Science.gov

Sample records for ryanodine receptor subtype

  1. Ryanodine receptors in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Rueda, Angélica

    2002-07-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of smooth muscle is endowed with two different types of Ca2+ release channels, i.e. inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In general, both release channels mobilize Ca2+ from the same internal store in smooth muscle. While the importance of IP3Rs in agonist-induced contraction is well established, the role of RyRs in excitation-contraction coupling of smooth muscle is not clear. The participation of smooth muscle RyRs in the amplification of Ca2+ transients induced by either opening of Ca2+-permeable channels or IP3-triggered Ca2+ release has been studied. The efficacy of both processes to activate RyRs by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is highly variable and not widely present in smooth muscle. Although RyRs in smooth muscle generate Ca2+ sparks that are similar to those observed in striated muscles, the contribution of these local Ca2+ events to depolarization-induced global rise in [Ca2+]i is rather limited. Recent data suggest that RyRs are involved in regulating the luminal [Ca2+] of SR and also in smooth muscle relaxation. This review summarizes studies that were carried out mainly in muscle strips or in freshly isolated myocytes, and that were aimed to determine the physiological role of RyRs in smooth muscle.

  2. Ryanodine receptors as leak channels.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Ávila, Guillermo; Rueda, Angélica

    2014-09-15

    Ryanodine receptors are Ca(2+) release channels of internal stores. This review focuses on those situations and conditions that transform RyRs from a finely regulated ion channel to an unregulated Ca(2+) leak channel and the pathological consequences of this alteration. In skeletal muscle, mutations in either CaV1.1 channel or RyR1 results in a leaky behavior of the latter. In heart cells, RyR2 functions normally as a Ca(2+) leak channel during diastole within certain limits, the enhancement of this activity leads to arrhythmogenic situations that are tackled with different pharmacological strategies. In smooth muscle, RyRs are involved more in reducing excitability than in stimulating contraction so the leak activity of RyRs in the form of Ca(2+) sparks, locally activates Ca(2+)-dependent potassium channels to reduce excitability. In neurons the enhanced activity of RyRs is associated with the development of different neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Huntington diseases. It appears then that the activity of RyRs as leak channels can have both physiological and pathological consequences depending on the cell type and the metabolic condition.

  3. [Ryanodine receptor, calcium leak and arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Rueda, Angélica; de Alba-Aguayo, David R; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2014-01-01

    The participation of the ionic Ca(2+) release channel/ryanodine receptor in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling is well known since the late '80s, when various seminal papers communicated its purification for the first time and its identity with the "foot" structures located at the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition to its main role as the Ca(2+) channel responsible for the transient Ca(2+) increase that activates the contractile machinery of the cardiomyocytes, the ryanodine receptor releases Ca(2+) during the relaxation phase of the cardiac cycle, giving rise to a diastolic Ca(2+) leak. In normal physiological conditions, diastolic Ca(2+) leak regulates the proper level of luminal Ca(2+), but in pathological conditions it participates in the generation of both, acquired and hereditary arrhythmias. Very recently, several groups have focused their efforts into the development of pharmacological tools to control the altered diastolic Ca(2+) leak via ryanodine receptors. In this review, we focus our interest on describing the participation of cardiac ryanodine receptor in the diastolic Ca(2+) leak under physiological or pathological conditions and also on the therapeutic approaches to control its undesired exacerbated activity during diastole.

  4. Evidence for ryanodine receptors in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Cunha, V M; Mendonça-Silva, D L; Noël, F

    1998-10-15

    The present study investigated the presence of ryanodine receptors in the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. [3H]Ryanodine specific binding sites were found in the four subcellular fractions of S. mansoni; however, more binding sites were recovered in the heterogeneous fraction P1 and the microsomal fraction P4, as was thapsigargin-sensitive (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPase activity, marking the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pumps. This binding had an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) in the nanomolar range, an apparent maximal number of receptors (Bmax) of about 80 fmol/mg of protein, and was modulated by ions (Ca2+, Mg2+) and some pharmacological tools such as caffeine. Ryanodine was able to accelerate the rate of 45Ca2+ release from actively loaded vesicles, and also to induce a transient contraction of the whole worm. We conclude that ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release channels are present in S. mansoni, with properties very similar to the ones present in higher animals.

  5. Detection of calcium release via ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed

    Eu, Jerry P; Meissner, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor ion channels (RyRs) release Ca(2+) from the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum in a variety of nonvertebrate and vertebrate species including flies, crustaceans, birds, fish, and amphibians. They are most abundant in skeletal and cardiac muscle, where in response to an action potential, the release of Ca(2+) ions from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through the RyRs into the cytoplasm leads to muscle contraction (i.e., excitation-contraction coupling). Here, we describe how to determine their cellular location using isoform-specific antibodies, their protein levels using an in vitro ((3)H)ryanodine-binding assay, and their cellular release of Ca(2+) using RyR-specific channel agonists and inhibitors.

  6. Catecholamime Interactions with the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipp, Robert Carl

    The cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ ion channel found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), an intracellular membranous Ca2+ storage system. It is well known that a destabilization of RyR2 can lead to a Ca2+ flux out of the SR, which results in an overload of intracellular Ca2+; this can also lead to arrhythmias and heart failure. The catecholamines play a large role in the regulation of RyR2; stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor on the cell membrane can lead to a hyperphosphorylation of RyR2, making it more leaky to Ca2+. We have previously shown that strong electron donors will inhibit RyR2. It is hypothesized that the catecholamines, sharing a similar structure with other proven inhibitors of RyR2, will also inhibit RyR2. Here we confirm this hypothesis and show for the first time that the catecholamines, isoproterenol and epinephrine, act as strong electron donors and inhibit RyR2 activity at the single channel level. This data suggests that the catecholamines can influence RyR2 activity at two levels. This offers promising insight into the potential development of a new class of drugs to treat heart failure and arrhythmia; ones that can both prevent the hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 by blocking the beta-adrenergic receptor, but can also directly inhibit the release of Ca2+ from RyR2.

  7. Structure of a mammalian ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Zalk, Ran; Clarke, Oliver B; des Georges, Amédée; Grassucci, Robert A; Reiken, Steven; Mancia, Filippo; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Frank, Joachim; Marks, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) mediate the rapid release of calcium (Ca(2+)) from intracellular stores into the cytosol, which is essential for numerous cellular functions including excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. Lack of sufficient structural detail has impeded understanding of RyR gating and regulation. Here we report the closed-state structure of the 2.3-megadalton complex of the rabbit skeletal muscle type 1 RyR (RyR1), solved by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy at an overall resolution of 4.8 Å. We fitted a polyalanine-level model to all 3,757 ordered residues in each protomer, defining the transmembrane pore in unprecedented detail and placing all cytosolic domains as tertiary folds. The cytosolic assembly is built on an extended α-solenoid scaffold connecting key regulatory domains to the pore. The RyR1 pore architecture places it in the six-transmembrane ion channel superfamily. A unique domain inserted between the second and third transmembrane helices interacts intimately with paired EF-hands originating from the α-solenoid scaffold, suggesting a mechanism for channel gating by Ca(2+).

  8. Insights into the gating mechanism of the ryanodine-modified human cardiac Ca2+-release channel (ryanodine receptor 2).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Thomas, N Lowri; Williams, Alan J

    2014-09-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are intracellular membrane channels playing key roles in many Ca(2+) signaling pathways and, as such, are emerging novel therapeutic and insecticidal targets. RyRs are so named because they bind the plant alkaloid ryanodine with high affinity and although it is established that ryanodine produces profound changes in all aspects of function, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying altered gating is minimal. We address this issue using detailed single-channel gating analysis, mathematical modeling, and energetic evaluation of state transitions establishing that, with ryanodine bound, the RyR pore adopts an extremely stable open conformation. We demonstrate that stability of this state is influenced by interaction of divalent cations with both activating and inhibitory cytosolic sites and, in the absence of activating Ca(2+), trans-membrane voltage. Comparison of the conformational stability of ryanodine- and Imperatoxin A-modified channels identifies significant differences in the mechanisms of action of these qualitatively similar ligands.

  9. Redox regulation of the ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Zissimopoulos, S; Lai, F A

    2006-11-01

    The RyR (ryanodine receptor)/calcium release channel contains a number of highly reactive thiol groups that endow it with redox sensitivity. In general, oxidizing conditions favour channel opening, while reducing conditions have the opposite effect. Thiol modification affects the channel sensitivity to its principal effectors, Ca2+, Mg2+ and ATP, and alters RyR protein interactions. Here, we give a brief account of the major findings and prevailing views in the field.

  10. Inhibitory ryanodine prevents ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca²⁺ release without affecting endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ content in primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Adasme, Tatiana; Paula-Lima, Andrea; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-02-27

    Ryanodine is a cell permeant plant alkaloid that binds selectively and with high affinity to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Sub-micromolar ryanodine concentrations activate RyR channels while micromolar concentrations are inhibitory. Several reports indicate that neuronal synaptic plasticity, learning and memory require RyR-mediated Ca(2+)-release, which is essential for muscle contraction. The use of micromolar (inhibitory) ryanodine represents a common strategy to suppress RyR activity in neuronal cells: however, micromolar ryanodine promotes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion in muscle cells. Information is lacking in this regard in neuronal cells; hence, we examined here if addition of inhibitory ryanodine elicited Ca(2+) release in primary hippocampal neurons, and if prolonged incubation of primary hippocampal cultures with inhibitory ryanodine affected neuronal ER calcium content. Our results indicate that inhibitory ryanodine does not cause Ca(2+) release from the ER in primary hippocampal neurons, even though ryanodine diffusion should produce initially low intracellular concentrations, within the RyR activation range. Moreover, neurons treated for 1 h with inhibitory ryanodine had comparable Ca(2+) levels as control neurons. These combined findings imply that prolonged incubation with inhibitory ryanodine, which effectively abolishes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release, preserves ER Ca(2+) levels and thus constitutes a sound strategy to suppress neuronal RyR function.

  11. Modulation of ryanodine receptor Ca2+ channels (Review).

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Terutaka

    2010-01-01

    Ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyRs) play a crucial role in the mobilization of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during the excitation-contraction coupling of muscle cells. In skeletal muscle, depolarization of transverse tubules activates the RyR, whereas in cardiac muscle, a Ca2+ influx through an L-type Ca2+ channel activates the RyR. The RyR is also activated by caffeine, a low concentration (<10 µM) of ryanodine or cyclic ADP-ribose. RyR activity is inhibited by Mg2+, ruthenium red, or higher concentrations (≥100 µM) of ryanodine. The activity of RyR channels is modulated by phosphorylation and by associated proteins, including calmodulin (CaM), calsequestrin (CSQ) and FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs). In muscle cells, apoCaM (Ca2+-free CaM) activates the RyR channel, and Ca2+ CaM (Ca2+-bound CaM) inhibits the channel. CSQ can bind approximately 40 moles of Ca2+/mole of CSQ in the SR lumen of muscle cells, and interacts functionally with RyR protein. When the RyR is stimulated, Ca2+ released from the lumen is dissociated from the CSQ- Ca2+ complex. A 12-kDa or 12.6-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP12 or FKBP12.6, respectively) is associated with RyR protein. When FKBP12 or FKBP12.6 is dissociated from the FKBP-RyR complex, the RyR is modulated (activated). Phosphorylation of the RyR by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II modulates the channel. PKA phosphorylation of the RyR on the skeletal and cardiac muscle SR dissociates FKBP12 or FKBP12.6 from the RyR complex. This review deals with the modulation mechanisms of RyR proteins by associated proteins and phosphorylation.

  12. Ryanodine Receptor Allosteric Coupling and the Dynamics of Calcium Sparks

    PubMed Central

    Groff, Jeffrey R.; Smith, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    Puffs and sparks are localized intracellular Ca2+ elevations that arise from the cooperative activity of Ca2+-regulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and ryanodine receptors clustered at Ca2+ release sites on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum or the sarcoplasmic reticulum. While the synchronous gating of Ca2+-regulated Ca2+ channels can be mediated entirely though the buffered diffusion of intracellular Ca2+, interprotein allosteric interactions also contribute to the dynamics of ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating and Ca2+ sparks. In this article, Markov chain models of Ca2+ release sites are used to investigate how the statistics of Ca2+ spark generation and termination are related to the coupling of RyRs via local [Ca2+] changes and allosteric interactions. Allosteric interactions are included in a manner that promotes the synchronous gating of channels by stabilizing neighboring closed-closed and/or open-open channel pairs. When the strength of Ca2+-mediated channel coupling is systematically varied (e.g., by changing the Ca2+ buffer concentration), simulations that include synchronizing allosteric interactions often exhibit more robust Ca2+ sparks; however, for some Ca2+ coupling strengths the sparks are less robust. We find no evidence that the distribution of spark durations can be used to distinguish between allosteric interactions that stabilize closed channel pairs, open channel pairs, or both in a balanced fashion. On the other hand, the changes in spark duration, interspark interval, and frequency observed when allosteric interactions that stabilize closed channel pairs are gradually removed from simulations are qualitatively different than the changes observed when open or both closed and open channel pairs are stabilized. Thus, our simulations clarify how changes in spark statistics due to pharmacological washout of the accessory proteins mediating allosteric coupling may indicate the type of synchronizing allosteric interactions exhibited

  13. Calsequestrin interacts directly with the cardiac ryanodine receptor luminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Handhle, Ahmed; Ormonde, Chloe E.; Thomas, N. Lowri; Bralesford, Catherine; Williams, Alan J.; Lai, F. Anthony

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac muscle contraction requires sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release mediated by the quaternary complex comprising the ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2), calsequestrin 2 (CSQ2), junctin (encoded by ASPH) and triadin. Here, we demonstrate that a direct interaction exists between RyR2 and CSQ2. Topologically, CSQ2 binding occurs at the first luminal loop of RyR2. Co-expression of RyR2 and CSQ2 in a human cell line devoid of the other quaternary complex proteins results in altered Ca2+-release dynamics compared to cells expressing RyR2 only. These findings provide a new perspective for understanding the SR luminal Ca2+ sensor and its involvement in cardiac physiology and disease. PMID:27609834

  14. Functional switching of GABAergic synapses by ryanodine receptor activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Miao-Kun; Nelson, Thomas J.; Alkon, Daniel L.

    2000-10-01

    The role of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) in modifiability of synapses made by the basket interneurons onto the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells was examined in rats. Associating single-cell RyR activation with postsynaptic depolarization increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations and reversed the basket interneuron-CA1 inhibitory postsynaptic potential into an excitatory postsynaptic potential. This synaptic transformation was accompanied by a shift of the reversal potential from that of chloride toward that of bicarbonate. This inhibitory postsynaptic potential-excitatory postsynaptic potential transformation was prevented by blocking RyR or carbonic anhydrase. Associated postsynaptic depolarization and RyR activation, therefore, changes GABAergic synapses from excitation filters to amplifier and, thereby, shapes information flow through the hippocampal network.

  15. Sphingosylphosphocholine modulates the ryanodine receptor/calcium-release channel of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Betto, R; Teresi, A; Turcato, F; Salviati, G; Sabbadini, R A; Krown, K; Glembotski, C C; Kindman, L A; Dettbarn, C; Pereon, Y; Yasui, K; Palade, P T

    1997-01-01

    Sphingosylphosphocholine (SPC) modulates Ca2+ release from isolated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes; 50 microM SPC induces the release of 70 80% of the accumulated calcium. SPC release calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor, since the release is inhibited by the ryanodine receptor channel antagonists ryanodine. Ruthenium Red and sphingosine. In intact cardiac myocytes, even in the absence of extracellular calcium. SPC causes a rise in diastolic Ca2+, which is greatly reduced when the sarcoplasmic reticulum is depleted of Ca2+ by prior thapsigargin treatment. SPC action on the ryanodine receptor is Ca(2+)-dependent. SPC shifts to the left the Ca(2+)-dependence of [3H]ryanodine binding, but only at high pCa values, suggesting that SPC might increase the sensitivity to calcium of the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanism. At high calcium concentrations (pCa 4.0 or lower), where [3H]ryanodine binding is maximally stimulated, no effect of SPC is observed. We conclude that SPC releases calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes by activating the ryanodine receptor and possibly another intracellular Ca(2+)-release channel, the sphingolipid Ca(2+)-release-mediating protein of endoplasmic reticulum (SCaMPER) [Mao, Kim, Almenoff, Rudner, Kearney and Kindman (1996) Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci. U.S.A 93, 1993-1996], which we have identified for the first time in cardiac tissue. PMID:9078280

  16. Cyclic ADP-ribose, the ryanodine receptor and Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Sitsapesan, R; McGarry, S J; Williams, A J

    1995-11-01

    In a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate tissues the ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ channel is the pathway for Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The mechanism for activation of the ryanodine receptor-channel complex appears to depend both on the ryanodine receptor isoform and the cell type. In addition, a complex combination of endogenous intracellular compounds regulates channel gating. In this article, Rebecca Sitsapesan, Stephen McGarry and Alan Williams review the mechanisms involved in cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR)-induced Ca2+ release and discuss the likelihood that cADPR-activated Ca2+ release is mediated by one of the recognized isoforms of the ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ channel complex.

  17. Different Involvement of Type 1, 2, and 3 Ryanodine Receptors in Memory Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Quattrone, Alessandro; Vivoli, Elisa; Norcini, Monica; Bartolini, Alessandro; Ghelardini, Carla

    2008-01-01

    The administration of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) agonist 4-Cmc (0.003-9 nmol per mouse intracerebroventricularly [i.c.v.]) ameliorated memory functions, whereas the RyR antagonist ryanodine (0.0001-1 nmol per mouse i.c.v.) induced amnesia in the mouse passive avoidance test. The role of the type 1, 2, and 3 RyR isoforms in memory processes was…

  18. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D.; Stewart, Alan J.; Pitt, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Zn2+ homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn2+ modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca2+ dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn2+ is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn2+ concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca2+. At concentrations of free Zn2+ >1 nm, Zn2+ is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca2+ is removed. Zn2+ is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca2+. Millimolar levels of free Zn2+ were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn2+ modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn2+ elicit Ca2+ release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca2+. This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn2+ in shaping Ca2+ dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  19. Leaky ryanodine receptors contribute to diaphragmatic weakness during mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Matecki, Stefan; Dridi, Haikel; Jung, Boris; Saint, Nathalie; Reiken, Steven R.; Scheuermann, Valérie; Mrozek, Ségolène; Umanskaya, Alisa; Petrof, Basil J.; Jaber, Samir; Marks, Andrew R.; Lacampagne, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction (VIDD) refers to the diaphragm muscle weakness that occurs following prolonged controlled mechanical ventilation (MV). The presence of VIDD impedes recovery from respiratory failure. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms accounting for VIDD are still not fully understood. Here, we show in human subjects and a mouse model of VIDD that MV is associated with rapid remodeling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR1) in the diaphragm. The RyR1 macromolecular complex was oxidized, S-nitrosylated, Ser-2844 phosphorylated, and depleted of the stabilizing subunit calstabin1, following MV. These posttranslational modifications of RyR1 were mediated by both oxidative stress mediated by MV and stimulation of adrenergic signaling resulting from the anesthesia. We demonstrate in the murine model that such abnormal resting SR Ca2+ leak resulted in reduced contractile function and muscle fiber atrophy for longer duration of MV. Treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists or with S107, a small molecule drug that stabilizes the RyR1–calstabin1 interaction, prevented VIDD. Diaphragmatic dysfunction is common in MV patients and is a major cause of failure to wean patients from ventilator support. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge of RyR1 alterations as a proximal mechanism underlying VIDD (i.e., loss of function, muscle atrophy) and identifies RyR1 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27457930

  20. Drosophila Ryanodine Receptors Mediate General Anesthesia by Halothane

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuying; Sandstrom, David J.; Smith, Harold E.; High, Brigit; Marsh, Jon W.; Nash, Howard A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although in vitro studies have identified numerous possible targets, the molecules that mediate the in vivo effects of volatile anesthetics remain largely unknown. The mammalian ryanodine receptor (Ryr) is a known halothane target, and we hypothesized that it has a central role in anesthesia. Methods Gene function of the Drosophila Ryr (dRyr) was manipulated in the whole body or in specific tissues using a collection of mutants and transgenes, and responses to halothane were measured with a reactive climbing assay. Cellular responses to halothane were studied using Ca2+ imaging and patch clamp electrophysiology. Results Halothane potency strongly correlates with dRyr gene copy number, and missense mutations in regions known to be functionally important in mammalian Ryrs gene cause dominant hypersensitivity. Tissue-specific manipulation of dRyr shows that expression in neurons and glia, but not muscle, mediates halothane sensitivity. In cultured cells, halothane-induced Ca2+ efflux is strictly dRyr-dependent, suggesting a close interaction between halothane and dRyr. Ca2+ imaging and electrophysiology of Drosophila central neurons reveal halothane-induced Ca2+ flux that is altered in dRyr mutants and correlates with strong hyperpolarization. Conclusions In Drosophila, neurally-expressed dRyr mediates a substantial proportion of halothane's anesthetic effects in vivo, is potently activated by halothane in vitro, and activates an inhibitory conductance. Our results provide support for Ryr as an important mediator of immobilization by volatile anesthetics. PMID:23254148

  1. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D; Stewart, Alan J; Pitt, Samantha J

    2015-07-10

    Aberrant Zn(2+) homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn(2+) modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca(2+) dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn(2+) is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn(2+) concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca(2+). At concentrations of free Zn(2+) >1 nm, Zn(2+) is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca(2+) is removed. Zn(2+) is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca(2+). Millimolar levels of free Zn(2+) were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn(2+) modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca(2+) waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn(2+) elicit Ca(2+) release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca(2+). This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn(2+) in shaping Ca(2+) dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating.

  2. Architecture and conformational switch mechanism of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Rouslan G; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction is initiated by the release of calcium (Ca(2+)) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum into the cytoplasm of myocytes through ryanodine receptors (RyRs). RyRs are homotetrameric channels with a molecular mass of more than 2.2 megadaltons that are regulated by several factors, including ions, small molecules and proteins. Numerous mutations in RyRs have been associated with human diseases. The molecular mechanism underlying the complex regulation of RyRs is poorly understood. Using electron cryomicroscopy, here we determine the architecture of rabbit RyR1 at a resolution of 6.1 Å. We show that the cytoplasmic moiety of RyR1 contains two large α-solenoid domains and several smaller domains, with folds suggestive of participation in protein-protein interactions. The transmembrane domain represents a chimaera of voltage-gated sodium and pH-activated ion channels. We identify the calcium-binding EF-hand domain and show that it functions as a conformational switch allosterically gating the channel.

  3. Ryanodine receptor-mediated arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Blayney, Lynda M.; Lai, F. Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The cardiac ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel (RyR2) is an essential sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) transmembrane protein that plays a central role in excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) in cardiomyocytes. Aberrant spontaneous, diastolic Ca2+ leak from the SR due to dysfunctional RyR2 contributes to the formation of delayed after-depolarisations, which are thought to underlie the fatal arrhythmia that occurs in both heart failure (HF) and in catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). CPVT is an inherited disorder associated with mutations in either the RyR2 or a SR luminal protein, calsequestrin. RyR2 shows normal function at rest in CPVT but the RyR2 dysfunction is unmasked by physical exercise or emotional stress, suggesting abnormal RyR2 activation as an underlying mechanism. Several potential mechanisms have been advanced to explain the dysfunctional RyR2 observed in HF and CPVT, including enhanced RyR2 phosphorylation status, altered RyR2 regulation at luminal/cytoplasmic sites and perturbed RyR2 intra/inter-molecular interactions. This review considers RyR2 dysfunction in the context of the structural and functional modulation of the channel, and potential therapeutic strategies to stabilise RyR2 function in cardiac pathology. PMID:19345240

  4. Ryanodine receptor-2 upregulation and nicotine-mediated plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ziviani, Elena; Lippi, Giordano; Bano, Daniele; Munarriz, Eliana; Guiducci, Stefania; Zoli, Michele; Young, Kenneth W; Nicotera, Pierluigi

    2011-01-05

    Nicotine, the major psychoactive component of cigarette smoke, modulates neuronal activity to produce Ca2+-dependent changes in gene transcription. However, the downstream targets that underlie the long-term effects of nicotine on neuronal function, and hence behaviour, remain to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that nicotine administration to mice upregulates levels of the type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2), a Ca2+-release channel present on the endoplasmic reticulum, in a number of brain areas associated with cognition and addiction, notably the cortex and ventral midbrain. Nicotine-mediated RyR2 upregulation was driven by CREB, and caused a long-lasting reinforcement of Ca2+ signalling via the process of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. RyR2 upregulation was itself required for long-term phosphorylation of CREB in a positive-feedback signalling loop. We further demonstrate that inhibition of RyR-activation in vivo abolishes sensitization to nicotine-induced habituated locomotion, a well-characterised model for onset of drug dependence. Our findings, therefore, indicate that gene-dependent reprogramming of Ca2+ signalling is involved in nicotine-induced behavioural changes.

  5. Functional Coupling of Ca2+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, James S. K.; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dihydropyridine receptors are functionally coupled to ryanodine receptors of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in triadic or diadic junctional complexes. In cardiac muscle direct physical or functional couplings have not been demonstrated. We have tested the hypothesis of functional coupling of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in rat cardiac myocytes by comparing the efficacies of Ca2+ in triggering Ca2+ release when the ion enters the cell via the Ca2+ channels or the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger. Ca2+ transported through the Ca2+ channels was 20-160 times more effective than Ca2+ influx via the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger in gating Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting privileged communication between Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors. In support of this hypothesis we found that Ca2+ channels were inactivated by Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, even though the myoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations were buffered with 10 mM EGTA. The data thus suggest privileged cross signaling between the dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors such that Ca2+ flux through either the Ca2+ channel or the ryanodine receptor alters the gating kinetics of the other channel.

  6. Cardiomyocyte ryanodine receptor degradation by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Pedrozo, Zully; Torrealba, Natalia; Fernández, Carolina; Gatica, Damian; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Sanchez, Gina; Gillette, Thomas G.; Hill, Joseph A.; Donoso, Paulina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Time for primary review: 15 days Aims Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a selective mechanism for the degradation of soluble cytosolic proteins bearing the sequence KFERQ. These proteins are targeted by chaperones and delivered to lysosomes where they are translocated into the lysosomal lumen and degraded via the lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP-2A). Mutations in LAMP2 that inhibit autophagy result in Danon disease characterized by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) plays a key role in cardiomyocyte excitation–contraction and its dysfunction can lead to cardiac failure. Whether RyR2 is degraded by CMA is unknown. Methods and results To induce CMA, cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with geldanamycin (GA) to promote protein degradation through this pathway. GA increased LAMP-2A levels together with its redistribution and colocalization with Hsc70 in the perinuclear region, changes indicative of CMA activation. The inhibition of lysosomes but not proteasomes prevented the loss of RyR2. The recovery of RyR2 content after incubation with GA by siRNA targeting LAMP-2A suggests that RyR2 is degraded via CMA. In silico analysis also revealed that the RyR2 sequence harbours six KFERQ motifs which are required for the recognition Hsc70 and its degradation via CMA. Our data suggest that presenilins are involved in RyR2 degradation by CMA. Conclusion These findings are consistent with a model in which oxidative damage of the RyR2 targets it for turnover by presenilins and CMA, which could lead to removal of damaged or leaky RyR2 channels. PMID:23404999

  7. Multiple Modes of Ryanodine Receptor 2 Inhibition by Flecainide

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, D.; Imtiaz, M. S.; van Helden, D. F.; Knollmann, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) causes sudden cardiac death due to mutations in cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2), calsequestrin, or calmodulin. Flecainide, a class I antiarrhythmic drug, inhibits Na+ and RyR2 channels and prevents CPVT. The purpose of this study is to identify inhibitory mechanisms of flecainide on RyR2. RyR2 were isolated from sheep heart, incorporated into lipid bilayers, and investigated by single-channel recording under various activating conditions, including the presence of cytoplasmic ATP (2 mM) and a range of cytoplasmic [Ca2+], [Mg2+], pH, and [caffeine]. Flecainide applied to either the cytoplasmic or luminal sides of the membrane inhibited RyR2 by two distinct modes: 1) a fast block consisting of brief substate and closed events with a mean duration of ∼1 ms, and 2) a slow block consisting of closed events with a mean duration of ∼1 second. Both inhibition modes were alleviated by increasing cytoplasmic pH from 7.4 to 9.5 but were unaffected by luminal pH. The slow block was potentiated in RyR2 channels that had relatively low open probability, whereas the fast block was unaffected by RyR2 activation. These results show that these two modes are independent mechanisms for RyR2 inhibition, both having a cytoplasmic site of action. The slow mode is a closed-channel block, whereas the fast mode blocks RyR2 in the open state. At diastolic cytoplasmic [Ca2+] (100 nM), flecainide possesses an additional inhibitory mechanism that reduces RyR2 burst duration. Hence, multiple modes of action underlie RyR2 inhibition by flecainide. PMID:25274603

  8. Structural determinants of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor gating.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Chakraborty, Asima; Xu, Le; Mei, Yingwu; Samsó, Montserrat; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    Ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) releases Ca(2+) from intracellular stores upon nerve impulse to trigger skeletal muscle contraction. Effector binding at the cytoplasmic domain tightly controls gating of the pore domain of RyR1 to release Ca(2+). However, the molecular mechanism that links effector binding to channel gating is unknown due to lack of structural data. Here, we used a combination of computational and electrophysiological methods and cryo-EM densities to generate structural models of the open and closed states of RyR1. Using our structural models, we identified an interface between the pore-lining helix (Tyr-4912-Glu-4948) and a linker helix (Val-4830-Val-4841) that lies parallel to the cytoplasmic membrane leaflet. To test the hypothesis that this interface controls RyR1 gating, we designed mutations in the linker helix to stabilize either the open (V4830W and T4840W) or closed (H4832W and G4834W) state and validated them using single channel experiments. To further confirm this interface, we designed mutations in the pore-lining helix to stabilize the closed state (Q4947N, Q4947T, and Q4947S), which we also validated using single channel experiments. The channel conductance and selectivity of the mutations that we designed in the linker and pore-lining helices were indistinguishable from those of WT RyR1, demonstrating our ability to modulate RyR1 gating without affecting ion permeation. Our integrated computational and experimental approach significantly advances the understanding of the structure and function of an unusually large ion channel.

  9. Mapping domains and mutations on the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor channel.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jean H; Zorzato, Francesco; Clarke, Nigel F; Treves, Susan

    2012-11-01

    The skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor isoform 1 (RyR1) is a calcium release channel involved in excitation-contraction coupling, the process whereby an action potential is translated to a cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signal that activates muscle contraction. Dominant and recessive mutations in RYR1 cause a range of muscle disorders, including malignant hyperthermia and several forms of congenital myopathies. Many aspects of disease pathogenesis in ryanodinopathies remain uncertain, particularly for those myopathies due to recessive mutations. A thorough understanding of the ryanodine receptor macromolecular complex and its interactions with proteins and small molecular modulators is an essential starting point from which to investigate disease mechanisms.

  10. Reversible block of the calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor by protamine, a heparin antidote.

    PubMed

    Koulen, P; Ehrlich, B E

    2000-07-01

    Channel activity of the calcium release channel from skeletal muscle, ryanodine receptor type 1, was measured in the presence and absence of protamine sulfate on the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Single-channel activity was measured after incorporating channels into planar lipid bilayers. Optimally and suboptimally calcium-activated calcium release channels were inactivated by the application of protamine to the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Recovery of channel activity was not observed while protamine was present. The addition of protamine bound to agarose beads did not change channel activity, implying that the mechanism of action involves an interaction with the ryanodine receptor rather than changes in the bulk calcium concentration of the medium. The block of channel activity by protamine could be reversed either by removal by perfusion with buffer or by the addition of heparin to the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Microinjection of protamine into differentiated C(2)C(12) mouse muscle cells prevented caffeine-induced intracellular calcium release. The results suggest that protamine acts on the ryanodine receptor in a similar but opposite manner from heparin and that protamine can be used as a potent, reversible inhibitor of ryanodine receptor activity.

  11. Phosphorylation of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor by exogenous and endogenous protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Hohenegger, M; Suko, J

    1993-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor is the main Ca(2+)-release structure in skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. In both tissues, phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor has been proposed to be involved in the regulation of Ca2+ release. In the present study, we have examined the ability of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor to serve as a substrate for phosphorylation by exogenously added catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PK-A), cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PK-G), or calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (PK-CaM). A large amount of phosphate incorporation was observed for PK-CaM (938 +/- 48 pmol of Pi/mg of purified channel protein), whereas the level of phosphorylation was considerably lower with PK-A or PK-G (345 +/- 139 and 96 +/- 6 pmol/mg respectively). In addition, endogenous PK-CaM activity co-migrates with the ryanodine receptor through several steps of purification, suggesting a strong association of the two proteins. This endogenous PK-CaM activity is abolished by a PK-CaM-specific synthetic peptide inhibitor. Endogenous cAMP- and cGMP-dependent phosphorylation was not observed in the purified ryanodine-receptor preparation. Taken together, these observations imply that PK-CaM is the physiologically relevant protein kinase, capable of phosphorylating the channel protein to a minimum stoichiometry of 2 mol of Pi per mol of tetramer. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8257417

  12. Nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate activates the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hohenegger, Martin; Suko, Josef; Gscheidlinger, Regina; Drobny, Helmut; Zidar, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    Calcium is a universal second messenger. The temporal and spatial information that is encoded in Ca(2+)-transients drives processes as diverse as neurotransmitter secretion, axonal outgrowth, immune responses and muscle contraction. Ca(2+)-release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores can be triggered by diffusible second messengers like Ins P (3), cyclic ADP-ribose or nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). A target has not yet been identified for the latter messenger. In the present study we show that nanomolar concentrations of NAADP trigger Ca(2+)-release from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. This was due to a direct action on the Ca(2+)-release channel/ryanodine receptor type-1, since in single channel recordings, NAADP increased the open probability of the purified channel protein. The effects of NAADP on Ca(2+)-release and open probability of the ryanodine receptor occurred over a similar concentration range (EC(50) approximately 30 nM) and were specific because (i) they were blocked by Ruthenium Red and ryanodine, (ii) the precursor of NAADP, NADP, was ineffective at equimolar concentrations, (iii) NAADP did not affect the conductance and reversal potential of the ryanodine receptor. Finally, we also detected an ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity in the sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction of skeletal muscle. This enzyme was not only capable of synthesizing cyclic GDP-ribose but also NAADP, with an activity of 0.25 nmol/mg/min. Thus, we conclude that NAADP is generated in the vicinity of type 1 ryanodine receptor and leads to activation of this ion channel. PMID:12102654

  13. Amino acid residues 4425-4621 localized on the three-dimensional structure of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Benacquista, B L; Sharma, M R; Samsó, M; Zorzato, F; Treves, S; Wagenknecht, T

    2000-01-01

    We have localized a region contained within the sequence of amino acid residues 4425-4621 on the three-dimensional structure of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR). Mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against a peptide comprising these residues have been complexed with ryanodine receptors and imaged in the frozen-hydrated state by cryoelectron microscopy. These images, along with images of antibody-free ryanodine receptor, were used to compute two-dimensional averaged images and three-dimensional reconstructions. Two-dimensional averages of immunocomplexes in which the ryanodine receptor was in the fourfold symmetrical orientation disclosed four symmetrical regions of density located on the edges of the receptor's cytoplasmic assembly that were absent from control averages of receptor without added antibody. Three-dimensional reconstructions revealed the antibody-binding sites to be on the so-called handle domains of the ryanodine receptor's cytoplasmic assembly, near their junction with the transmembrane assembly. This study is the first to demonstrate epitope mapping on the three-dimensional structure of the ryanodine receptor. PMID:10692321

  14. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin; Zhou, Zhansong; Ji, Guangju

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  15. Selenoprotein N is required for ryanodine receptor calcium release channel activity in human and zebrafish muscle.

    PubMed

    Jurynec, Michael J; Xia, Ruohong; Mackrill, John J; Gunther, Derrick; Crawford, Thomas; Flanigan, Kevin M; Abramson, Jonathan J; Howard, Michael T; Grunwald, David Jonah

    2008-08-26

    Mutations affecting the seemingly unrelated gene products, SepN1, a selenoprotein of unknown function, and RyR1, the major component of the ryanodine receptor intracellular calcium release channel, result in an overlapping spectrum of congenital myopathies. To identify the immediate developmental and molecular roles of SepN and RyR in vivo, loss-of-function effects were analyzed in the zebrafish embryo. These studies demonstrate the two proteins are required for the same cellular differentiation events and are needed for normal calcium fluxes in the embryo. SepN is physically associated with RyRs and functions as a modifier of the RyR channel. In the absence of SepN, ryanodine receptors from zebrafish embryos or human diseased muscle have altered biochemical properties and have lost their normal sensitivity to redox conditions, which likely accounts for why mutations affecting either factor lead to similar diseases.

  16. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx.

  17. The ryanodine receptor is expressed in human pancreatic acinar cells and contributes to acinar cell injury.

    PubMed

    Lewarchik, Christopher M; Orabi, Abrahim I; Jin, Shunqian; Wang, Dong; Muili, Kamaldeen A; Shah, Ahsan U; Eisses, John F; Malik, Adeel; Bottino, Rita; Jayaraman, Thottala; Husain, Sohail Z

    2014-09-01

    Physiological calcium (Ca(2+)) signals within the pancreatic acinar cell regulate enzyme secretion, whereas aberrant Ca(2+) signals are associated with acinar cell injury. We have previously identified the ryanodine receptor (RyR), a Ca(2+) release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum, as a modulator of these pathological signals. In the present study, we establish that the RyR is expressed in human acinar cells and mediates acinar cell injury. We obtained pancreatic tissue from cadaveric donors and identified isoforms of RyR1 and RyR2 by qPCR. Immunofluorescence staining of the pancreas showed that the RyR is localized to the basal region of the acinar cell. Furthermore, the presence of RyR was confirmed from isolated human acinar cells by tritiated ryanodine binding. To determine whether the RyR is functionally active, mouse or human acinar cells were loaded with the high-affinity Ca(2+) dye (Fluo-4 AM) and stimulated with taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLCS) (500 μM) or carbachol (1 mM). Ryanodine (100 μM) pretreatment reduced the magnitude of the Ca(2+) signal and the area under the curve. To determine the effect of RyR blockade on injury, human acinar cells were stimulated with pathological stimuli, the bile acid TLCS (500 μM) or the muscarinic agonist carbachol (1 mM) in the presence or absence of the RyR inhibitor ryanodine. Ryanodine (100 μM) caused an 81% and 47% reduction in acinar cell injury, respectively, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase leakage (P < 0.05). Taken together, these data establish that the RyR is expressed in human acinar cells and that it modulates acinar Ca(2+) signals and cell injury.

  18. Sexual Dimorphism in a Reciprocal Interaction of Ryanodine and IP3 Receptors in the Induction of Hyperalgesic Priming.

    PubMed

    Khomula, Eugen V; Ferrari, Luiz F; Araldi, Dionéia; Levine, Jon D

    2017-02-22

    Hyperalgesic priming, a model of pain chronification in the rat, is mediated by ryanodine receptor-dependent calcium release. Although ryanodine induces priming in both sexes, females are 5 orders of magnitude more sensitive, by an estrogen receptor α (EsRα)-dependent mechanism. An inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor inhibitor prevented the induction of priming by ryanodine. For IP3 induced priming, females were also more sensitive. IP3-induced priming was prevented by pretreatment with inhibitors of the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase and ryanodine receptor. Antisense to EsRα prevented the induction of priming by low-dose IP3 in females. The induction of priming by an EsRα agonist was ryanodine receptor-dependent and prevented by the IP3 antagonist. Thus, an EsRα-dependent bidirectional interaction between endoplasmic reticulum IP3 and ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium signaling is present in the induction of hyperalgesic priming, in females. In cultured male DRG neurons, IP3 (100 μm) potentiated depolarization-induced transients produced by extracellular application of high-potassium solution (20 mm, K20), in nociceptors incubated with β-estradiol. This potentiation of depolarization-induced calcium transients was blocked by the IP3 antagonist, and not observed in the absence of IP3 IP3 potentiation was also blocked by ryanodine receptor antagonist. The application of ryanodine (2 nm), instead of IP3, also potentiated K20-induced calcium transients in the presence of β-estradiol, in an IP3 receptor-dependent manner. Our results point to an EsRα-dependent, reciprocal interaction between IP3 and ryanodine receptors that contributes to sex differences in hyperalgesic priming.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The present study demonstrates a mechanism that plays a role in the marked sexual dimorphism observed in a model of the transition to chronic pain, hyperalgesic priming. This mechanism involves a reciprocal interaction between the endoplasmic

  19. Functional characterisation of the R2452W ryanodine receptor variant associated with malignant hyperthermia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Roesl, Cornelia; Sato, Keisaku; Schiemann, Anja; Pollock, Neil; Stowell, Kathryn M

    2014-09-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder that manifests in susceptible individuals exposed to volatile anaesthetics. Over 400 variants in the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) have been reported but relatively few have been definitively associated with susceptibility to MH. This is largely due to the technical challenges of demonstrating abnormal Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This study focuses on the R2452W variant and its functional characterisation with the aim of classifying this variant as MH causative. HEK293 cells were transiently transfected with full-length human wildtype or R2452W mutant RYR1 cDNA. In addition, B-lymphoblastoid cells from blood and myoblasts propagated from in vitro contracture tests were extracted from patients positive for the R2452W variant. All cell lines generated were loaded with the ratiometric dye Fura-2 AM, stimulated with the RYR1-specific agonist 4-chloro-m-cresol and Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum was monitored by fluorescence emission. All cells expressing the RYR1 R2452W variant show a significantly higher Ca(2+) release in response to the agonist, 4-chloro-m-cresol, compared to cells expressing RYR1 WT. These results indicate that the R2452W variant results in a hypersensitive ryanodine receptor 1 and suggest that the R2452W variant in the ryanodine receptor 1 is likely to be causative of MH.

  20. CCDI: a new ligand that modulates mammalian type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chengju; Shao, Chun Hong; Padanilam, Christina; Ezell, Edward; Singh, Jaipaul; Kutty, Shelby; Bidasee, Keshore R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are Ca2+-release channels on the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum that modulate a wide array of physiological functions. Three RyR isoforms are present in cells: RyR1, RyR2 and RyR3. To date, there are no reports on ligands that modulate RyR in an isoform-selective manner. Such ligands are not only valuable research tools, but could serve as intermediates for development of therapeutics. Experimental approach Pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid and 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide were allowed to react in carbon tetrachloride for 24 h at low temperatures and pressures. The chemical structures of the two products isolated were elucidated using NMR spectrometry, mass spectrometry and elemental analyses. [3H]-ryanodine binding, lipid bilayer and time-lapsed confocal imaging were used to determine their effects on RyR isoforms. Key results The major product, 2-cyclohexyl-3-cyclohexylimino-2, 3, dihydro–pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-1-one (CCDI) dose-dependently potentiated Ca2+-dependent binding of [3H]-ryanodine to RyR1, with no significant effects on [3H]-ryanodine binding to RyR2 or RyR3. CCDI also reversibly increased the open probability (Po) of RyR1 with minimal effects on RyR2 and RyR3. CCDI induced Ca2+ transients in C2C12 skeletal myotubes, but not in rat ventricular myocytes. This effect was blocked by pretreating cells with ryanodine. The minor product 2-cyclohexyl-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazole-1,3-dione had no effect on either [3H]-ryanodine binding or Po of RyR1, RyR2 and RyR3. Conclusions and implications A new ligand that preferentially modulates RyR1 was identified. In addition to being an important research tool, the pharmacophore of this small molecule could serve as a template for the synthesis of other isoform-selective modulators of RyRs. PMID:24819467

  1. Carbonylation induces heterogeneity in cardiac ryanodine receptor function in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chun Hong; Tian, Chengju; Ouyang, Shouqiang; Moore, Caronda J; Alomar, Fadhel; Nemet, Ina; D'Souza, Alicia; Nagai, Ryoji; Kutty, Shelby; Rozanski, George J; Ramanadham, Sasanka; Singh, Jaipaul; Bidasee, Keshore R

    2012-09-01

    Heart failure and arrhythmias occur at 3 to 5 times higher rates among individuals with diabetes mellitus, compared with age-matched, healthy individuals. Studies attribute these defects in part to alterations in the function of cardiac type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s), the principal Ca(2+)-release channels on the internal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). To date, mechanisms underlying RyR2 dysregulation in diabetes remain poorly defined. A rat model of type 1 diabetes, in combination with echocardiography, in vivo and ex vivo hemodynamic studies, confocal microscopy, Western blotting, mass spectrometry, site-directed mutagenesis, and [(3)H]ryanodine binding, lipid bilayer, and transfection assays, was used to determine whether post-translational modification by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) represented a contributing cause. After 8 weeks of diabetes, spontaneous Ca(2+) release in ventricular myocytes increased ~5-fold. Evoked Ca(2+) release from the SR was nonuniform (dyssynchronous). Total RyR2 protein levels remained unchanged, but the ability to bind the Ca(2+)-dependent ligand [(3)H]ryanodine was significantly reduced. Western blotting and mass spectrometry revealed RCS adducts on select basic residues. Mutation of residues to delineate the physiochemical impact of carbonylation yielded channels with enhanced or reduced cytoplasmic Ca(2+) responsiveness. The prototype RCS methylglyoxal increased and then decreased the RyR2 open probability. Methylglyoxal also increased spontaneous Ca(2+) release and induced Ca(2+) waves in healthy myocytes. Treatment of diabetic rats with RCS scavengers normalized spontaneous and evoked Ca(2+) release from the SR, reduced carbonylation of RyR2s, and increased binding of [(3)H]ryanodine to RyR2s. From these data, we conclude that post-translational modification by RCS contributes to the heterogeneity in RyR2 activity that is seen in experimental diabetes.

  2. Stressed out: the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor as a target of stress

    PubMed Central

    Bellinger, Andrew M.; Mongillo, Marco; Marks, Andrew R.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past century, understanding the mechanisms underlying muscle fatigue and weakness has been the focus of much investigation. However, the dominant theory in the field, that lactic acidosis causes muscle fatigue, is unlikely to tell the whole story. Recently, dysregulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release has been associated with impaired muscle function induced by a wide range of stressors, from dystrophy to heart failure to muscle fatigue. Here, we address current understandings of the altered regulation of SR Ca2+ release during chronic stress, focusing on the role of the SR Ca2+ release channel known as the type 1 ryanodine receptor. PMID:18246195

  3. Effect of gadolinium on the ryanodine receptor/sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sárközi, Sándor; Szegedi, Csaba; Lukács, Balázs; Ronjat, Michel; Jóna, István

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gadolinium ions on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR1) was studied using heavy SR (HSR) vesicles and RyR1 isolated from rabbit fast twitch muscle. In the [(3)H]ryanodine binding assay, 5 microM Gd(3+) increased the K(d) of the [(3)H]ryanodine binding of the vesicles from 33.8 nM to 45.6 nM while B(max), referring to the binding capacity, was not affected significantly. In the presence of 18 nM[(3)H]ryanodine and 100 microM free Ca(2+), Gd(3+) inhibited the binding of the radiolabeled ryanodine with an apparent K(d) value of 14.7 microM and a Hill coefficient of 3.17. In (45)Ca(2+) experiments the time constant of (45)Ca(2+) efflux from HSR vesicles increased from 90.9 (+/- 11.1) ms to 187.7 (+/- 24.9) ms in the presence of 20 microM gadolinium. In single channel experiments gadolinium inhibited the channel activity from both the cytoplasmic (cis) (IC(50) = 5.65 +/- 0.33 microM, n(Hill) = 4.71) and the luminal (trans) side (IC(50) = 5.47 +/- 0.24 microM, n(Hill) = 4.31). The degree of inhibition on the cis side didn't show calcium dependency in the 100 microM to 1 mM Ca(2+) concentration range which indicates no competition with calcium on its regulatory binding sites. When Gd(3+) was applied at the trans side, EGTA was present at the cis side to prevent the binding of Gd(+3) to the cytoplasmic calcium binding regulatory sites of the RyR1 if Gd(3+) accidentally passed through the channel. The inhibition of the channel did not show any voltage dependence, which would be the case if Gd(3+) exerted its effect after getting to the cis side. Our results suggest the presence of inhibitory binding sites for Gd(3+) on both sides of the RyR1 with similar Hill coefficients and IC(50) values.

  4. Disease mutations in the ryanodine receptor N-terminal region couple to a mobile intersubunit interface.

    PubMed

    Kimlicka, Lynn; Lau, Kelvin; Tung, Ching-Chieh; Van Petegem, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors are large channels that release Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Hundreds of RyR mutations can cause cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders, yet detailed mechanisms explaining their effects have been lacking. Here we compare pseudo-atomic models and propose that channel opening coincides with widening of a cytoplasmic vestibule formed by the N-terminal region, thus altering an interface targeted by 20 disease mutations. We solve crystal structures of several disease mutants that affect intrasubunit domain-domain interfaces. Mutations affecting intrasubunit ionic pairs alter relative domain orientations, and thus couple to surrounding interfaces. Buried disease mutations cause structural changes that also connect to the intersubunit contact area. These results suggest that the intersubunit contact region between N-terminal domains is a prime target for disease mutations, direct or indirect, and we present a model whereby ryanodine receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors are activated by altering domain arrangements in the N-terminal region.

  5. Heterogeneous function of ryanodine receptors, but not IP3 receptors, in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Erika B.

    2011-01-01

    The roles played by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in vascular smooth muscle in the microcirculation remain unclear. Therefore, the function of both RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and downstream arterioles were assessed using confocal imaging and pressure myography. Feed artery vascular smooth muscle displayed Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ waves, which were inhibited by the RyR antagonists ryanodine (10 μM) or tetracaine (100 μM). Despite the inhibition of sparks and waves, ryanodine or tetracaine increased global intracellular Ca2+ and constricted the arteries. The blockade of IP3Rs with xestospongin D (5 μM) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM) or the inhibition of phospholipase C using U-73122 (10 μM) also attenuated Ca2+ waves without affecting Ca2+ sparks. Importantly, the IP3Rs and phospholipase C antagonists decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and dilated the arteries. In contrast, cremaster arterioles displayed only Ca2+ waves: Ca2+ sparks were not observed, and neither ryanodine (10–50 μM) nor tetracaine (100 μM) affected either Ca2+ signals or arteriolar tone despite the presence of functional RyRs as assessed by responses to the RyR agonist caffeine (10 mM). As in feed arteries, arteriolar Ca2+ waves were attenuated by xestospongin D (5 μM), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM), and U-73122 (10 μM), accompanied by decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and vasodilation. These findings highlight the contrasting roles played by RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in feed arteries and demonstrate important differences in the function of RyRs between feed arteries and downstream arterioles. PMID:21357503

  6. Methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium block of amine currents through the ryanodine receptor reveals single pore architecture.

    PubMed

    Anyatonwu, Georgia I; Buck, Edmond D; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2003-11-14

    The homotetrameric structure of the ryanodine-sensitive intracellular calcium (Ca2+) release channel (ryanodine receptor (RyR)) suggests that the four RyR subunits either combine to form a single pore or that each RyR subunit is an independently conducting pathway. Previously we showed that methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium (MTSEA+) covalently modifies the RyR to reduce current amplitudes in a time-dependent and stepwise manner. To ascertain the number of functionally conducting pores in the RyR, two approaches were combined: modification of the receptor by MTSEA+ and the use of different sized current carriers. Previous reports (Tinker, A., and Williams, A. J. (1993) J. Gen. Physiol. 102, 1107-1129) have shown that the organic cations methylamine, dimethylamine, ethylamine, and trimethylamine are permeant through the RyR but with reduced current amplitude depending upon the diameter of the respective amine. Experiments using the thiol reagent MTSEA+ to modify the channel protein showed that the current amplitudes decrease in steps leading to complete block of the channel when cesium (Cs+) is the current carrier. MTSEA+ modification decreased the number of channel substates as the diameter of the current carrier increased. Comparison of the degree of inhibition of MTSEA+-modified currents allows for differentiation between the two models for channel architecture. These results demonstrate that the conduction pathway for the RyR is comprised of a single central pore.

  7. Ryanodine receptors, calcium signaling and regulation of vascular tone in the cerebral parenchymal microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Nelson, Mark T.; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral blood supply is delivered by a surface network of pial arteries and arterioles from which arise (parenchymal) arterioles that penetrate into the cortex and terminate in a rich capillary bed. The critical regulation of cerebral blood flow, locally and globally, requires precise vasomotor regulation of the intracerebral microvasculature. This vascular region is anatomically unique as illustrated by the presence of astrocytic processes that envelope almost the entire basolateral surface of parenchymal arterioles. There are, moreover, notable functional differences between pial arteries and parenchymal arterioles. For example, in pial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), local calcium release events (“calcium sparks”) through ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels in sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane activate large conductance, calcium-sensitive potassium (BK) channels to modulate vascular diameter. In contrast, VSMCs in parenchymal arterioles express functional RyR and BK channels, but under physiological conditions these channels do not oppose pressure-induced vasoconstriction. Here we summarize the roles of ryanodine receptors in the parenchymal microvasculature under physiologic and pathologic conditions, and discuss their importance in the control of cerebral blood flow. PMID:23216877

  8. Channel Gating Dependence on Pore Lining Helix Glycine Residues in Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Mowrey, David D; Mendez Giraldez, Raul; Wang, Ying; Pasek, Daniel A; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2015-07-10

    Type 1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) release Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to initiate skeletal muscle contraction. The role of RyR1-G4934 and -G4941 in the pore-lining helix in channel gating and ion permeation was probed by replacing them with amino acid residues of increasing side chain volume. RyR1-G4934A, -G4941A, and -G4941V mutant channels exhibited a caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release response in HEK293 cells and bound the RyR-specific ligand [(3)H]ryanodine. In single channel recordings, significant differences in the number of channel events and mean open and close times were observed between WT and RyR1-G4934A and -G4941A. RyR1-G4934A had reduced K(+) conductance and ion selectivity compared with WT. Mutations further increasing the side chain volume at these positions (G4934V and G4941I) resulted in reduced caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells, low [(3)H]ryanodine binding levels, and channels that were not regulated by Ca(2+) and did not conduct Ca(2+) in single channel measurements. Computational predictions of the thermodynamic impact of mutations on protein stability indicated that although the G4934A mutation was tolerated, the G4934V mutation decreased protein stability by introducing clashes with neighboring amino acid residues. In similar fashion, the G4941A mutation did not introduce clashes, whereas the G4941I mutation resulted in intersubunit clashes among the mutated isoleucines. Co-expression of RyR1-WT with RyR1-G4934V or -G4941I partially restored the WT phenotype, which suggested lessening of amino acid clashes in heterotetrameric channel complexes. The results indicate that both glycines are important for RyR1 channel function by providing flexibility and minimizing amino acid clashes.

  9. Structure–function relationships of peptides forming the calcin family of ryanodine receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Liang; Gurrola, Georgina B.; Zhang, Jing; Valdivia, Carmen R.; SanMartin, Mario; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Zhang, Liming; Possani, Lourival D.

    2016-01-01

    Calcins are a novel family of scorpion peptides that bind with high affinity to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and increase their activity by inducing subconductance states. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the structure–function relationships of the eight calcins known to date, based on their primary sequence, three-dimensional modeling, and functional effects on skeletal RyRs (RyR1). Primary sequence alignment and evolutionary analysis show high similarity among all calcins (≥78.8% identity). Other common characteristics include an inhibitor cysteine knot (ICK) motif stabilized by three pairs of disulfide bridges and a dipole moment (DM) formed by positively charged residues clustering on one side of the molecule and neutral and negatively charged residues segregating on the opposite side. [3H]Ryanodine binding assays, used as an index of the open probability of RyRs, reveal that all eight calcins activate RyR1 dose-dependently with Kd values spanning approximately three orders of magnitude and in the following rank order: opicalcin1 > opicalcin2 > vejocalcin > hemicalcin > imperacalcin > hadrucalcin > maurocalcin >> urocalcin. All calcins significantly augment the bell-shaped [Ca2+]-[3H]ryanodine binding curve with variable effects on the affinity constants for Ca2+ activation and inactivation. In single channel recordings, calcins induce the appearance of a subconductance state in RyR1 that has a unique fractional value (∼20% to ∼60% of the full conductance state) but bears no relationship to binding affinity, DM, or capacity to stimulate Ca2+ release. Except for urocalcin, all calcins at 100 nM concentration stimulate Ca2+ release and deplete Ca2+ load from skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum. The natural variation within the calcin family of peptides offers a diversified set of high-affinity ligands with the capacity to modulate RyRs with high dynamic range and potency. PMID:27114612

  10. Structure-function relationships of peptides forming the calcin family of ryanodine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Gurrola, Georgina B; Zhang, Jing; Valdivia, Carmen R; SanMartin, Mario; Zamudio, Fernando Z; Zhang, Liming; Possani, Lourival D; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2016-05-01

    Calcins are a novel family of scorpion peptides that bind with high affinity to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and increase their activity by inducing subconductance states. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the structure-function relationships of the eight calcins known to date, based on their primary sequence, three-dimensional modeling, and functional effects on skeletal RyRs (RyR1). Primary sequence alignment and evolutionary analysis show high similarity among all calcins (≥78.8% identity). Other common characteristics include an inhibitor cysteine knot (ICK) motif stabilized by three pairs of disulfide bridges and a dipole moment (DM) formed by positively charged residues clustering on one side of the molecule and neutral and negatively charged residues segregating on the opposite side. [(3)H]Ryanodine binding assays, used as an index of the open probability of RyRs, reveal that all eight calcins activate RyR1 dose-dependently with Kd values spanning approximately three orders of magnitude and in the following rank order: opicalcin1 > opicalcin2 > vejocalcin > hemicalcin > imperacalcin > hadrucalcin > maurocalcin > urocalcin. All calcins significantly augment the bell-shaped [Ca(2+)]-[(3)H]ryanodine binding curve with variable effects on the affinity constants for Ca(2+) activation and inactivation. In single channel recordings, calcins induce the appearance of a subconductance state in RyR1 that has a unique fractional value (∼20% to ∼60% of the full conductance state) but bears no relationship to binding affinity, DM, or capacity to stimulate Ca(2+) release. Except for urocalcin, all calcins at 100 nM concentration stimulate Ca(2+) release and deplete Ca(2+) load from skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum. The natural variation within the calcin family of peptides offers a diversified set of high-affinity ligands with the capacity to modulate RyRs with high dynamic range and potency.

  11. Characterization of ryanodine receptor type 1 single channel activity using "on-nucleus" patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Larry E; Groom, Linda A; Dirksen, Robert T; Yule, David I

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we provide the first description of the biophysical and pharmacological properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) expressed in a native membrane using the on-nucleus configuration of the patch clamp technique. A stable cell line expressing rabbit RyR1 was established (HEK-RyR1) using the FLP-in 293 cell system. In contrast to untransfected cells, RyR1 expression was readily demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry in HEK-RyR1 cells. In addition, the RyR1 agonists 4-CMC and caffeine activated Ca(2+) release that was inhibited by high concentrations of ryanodine. On nucleus patch clamp was performed in nuclei prepared from HEK-RyR1 cells. Raising the [Ca(2+)] in the patch pipette resulted in the appearance of a large conductance cation channel with well resolved kinetics and the absence of prominent subconductance states. Current versus voltage relationships were ohmic and revealed a chord conductance of ∼750pS or 450pS in symmetrical 250mM KCl or CsCl, respectively. The channel activity was markedly enhanced by caffeine and exposure to ryanodine resulted in the appearance of a subconductance state with a conductance ∼40% of the full channel opening with a Po near unity. In total, these properties are entirely consistent with RyR1 channel activity. Exposure of RyR1 channels to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPr), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) or dantrolene did not alter the single channel activity stimulated by Ca(2+), and thus, it is unlikely these molecules directly modulate RyR1 channel activity. In summary, we describe an experimental platform to monitor the single channel properties of RyR channels. We envision that this system will be influential in characterizing disease-associated RyR mutations and the molecular determinants of RyR channel modulation.

  12. Structural and functional characterization of ryanodine receptor-natrin toxin interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Qiong-Ling; Meng, Xing; Shu, Yuyan; Jiang, Tao; Wagenknecht, Terence; Yin, Chang-Cheng; Sui, Sen-Fang; Liu, Zheng

    2008-11-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are widely distributed, and notably occur in the mammalian reproductive tract and in the salivary glands of venomous reptiles. Most CRISPs can inhibit ion channels, such as the cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel, potassium channel, and calcium channel. Natrin is a CRISP that has been purified from snake venom. Its targets include the calcium-activated potassium channel, the voltage-gated potassium channel, and the calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR). Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that natrin binds specifically to type 1 RyR (RyR1) from skeletal muscle. Natrin was found to inhibit both the binding of ryanodine to RyR1, and the calcium-channel activity of RyR1. Cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle image reconstruction analysis revealed that natrin binds to the clamp domains of RyR1. Docking of the crystal structure of natrin into our cryo-electron microscopy density map of the RyR1 + natrin complex suggests that natrin inhibits RyR1 by stabilizing a domain-domain interaction, and that the cysteine-rich domain of natrin is crucial for binding. These findings help reveal how natrin toxin inhibits the RyR calcium release channel, and they allow us to posit a generalized mechanism that governs the interaction between CRISPs and ion channels.

  13. Direct association of the reticulon protein RTN1A with the ryanodine receptor 2 in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Levent; Meissner, Barbara; Riedl, Maria Christine; Muik, Martin; Schwarzer, Christoph; Ferraguti, Francesco; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Schweigreiter, Rüdiger; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Romanin, Christoph; Bandtlow, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    RTN1A is a reticulon protein with predominant localization in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It was previously shown that RTN1A is expressed in neurons of the mammalian central nervous system but functional information remains sparse. To elucidate the neuronal function of RTN1A, we chose to focus our investigation on identifying possible novel binding partners specifically interacting with the unique N-terminus of RTN1A. Using a nonbiased approach involving GST pull-downs and MS analysis, we identified the intracellular calcium release channel ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) as a direct binding partner of RTN1A. The RyR2 binding site was localized to a highly conserved 150-amino acid residue region. RTN1A displays high preference for RyR2 binding in vitro and in vivo and both proteins colocalize in hippocampal neurons and Purkinje cells. Moreover, we demonstrate the precise subcellular localization of RTN1A in Purkinje cells and show that RTN1A inhibits RyR channels in [3H]ryanodine binding studies on brain synaptosomes. In a functional assay, RTN1A significantly reduced RyR2-mediated Ca2 + oscillations. Thus, RTN1A and RyR2 might act as functional partners in the regulation of cytosolic Ca2 + dynamics the in neurons. PMID:23454728

  14. Dendritic differentiation of cerebellar Purkinje cells is promoted by ryanodine receptors expressed by Purkinje and granule cells.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Ryo; Sakata, Shin-ichi; Naito, Asami; Hirashima, Naohide; Tanaka, Masahiko

    2014-04-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells have the most elaborate dendritic trees among neurons in the brain. We examined the roles of ryanodine receptor (RyR), an intracellular Ca(2+) release channel, in the dendrite formation of Purkinje cells using cerebellar cell cultures. In the cerebellum, Purkinje cells express RyR1 and RyR2, whereas granule cells express RyR2. When ryanodine (10 µM), a blocker of RyR, was added to the culture medium, the elongation and branching of Purkinje cell dendrites were markedly inhibited. When we transferred small interfering RNA (siRNA) against RyR1 into Purkinje cells using single-cell electroporation, dendritic branching but not elongation of the electroporated Purkinje cells was inhibited. On the other hand, transfection of RyR2 siRNA into granule cells also inhibited dendritic branching of Purkinje cells. Furthermore, ryanodine reduced the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the culture medium. The ryanodine-induced inhibition of dendritic differentiation was partially rescued when BDNF was exogenously added to the culture medium in addition to ryanodine. Overall, these results suggest that RyRs expressed by both Purkinje and granule cells play important roles in promoting the dendritic differentiation of Purkinje cells and that RyR2 expressed by granule cells is involved in the secretion of BDNF from granule cells.

  15. Frontrunners of T cell activation: Initial, localized Ca2+ signals mediated by NAADP and the type 1 ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Insa M A; Diercks, Björn-Philipp; Gattkowski, Ellen; Czarniak, Frederik; Kempski, Jan; Werner, René; Schetelig, Daniel; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Schumacher, Valéa; von Osten, Manuel; Lodygin, Dimitri; Flügel, Alexander; Fliegert, Ralf; Guse, Andreas H

    2015-10-13

    The activation of T cells is the fundamental on switch for the adaptive immune system. Ca(2+) signaling is essential for T cell activation and starts as initial, short-lived, localized Ca(2+) signals. The second messenger nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) forms rapidly upon T cell activation and stimulates early Ca(2+) signaling. We developed a high-resolution imaging technique using multiple fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes to characterize these early signaling events and investigate the channels involved in NAADP-dependent Ca(2+) signals. In the first seconds of activation of either primary murine T cells or human Jurkat cells with beads coated with an antibody against CD3, we detected Ca(2+) signals with diameters close to the limit of detection and that were close to the activation site at the plasma membrane. In Jurkat cells in which the ryanodine receptor (RyR) was knocked down or in primary T cells from RyR1(-/-) mice, either these early Ca(2+) signals were not detected or the number of signals was markedly reduced. Local Ca(2+) signals observed within 20 ms upon microinjection of Jurkat cells with NAADP were also sensitive to RyR knockdown. In contrast, TRPM2 (transient receptor potential channel, subtype melastatin 2), a potential NAADP target channel, was not required for the formation of initial Ca(2+) signals in primary T cells. Thus, through our high-resolution imaging method, we characterized early Ca(2+) release events in T cells and obtained evidence for the involvement of RyR and NAADP in such signals.

  16. Is ryanodine receptor phosphorylation key to the fight or flight response and heart failure?

    PubMed

    Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    In situations of stress the heart beats faster and stronger. According to Marks and colleagues, this response is, to a large extent, the consequence of facilitated Ca²+ release from intracellular Ca²+ stores via ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2), thought to be due to catecholamine-induced increases in RyR2 phosphorylation at serine 2808 (S2808). If catecholamine stimulation is sustained (for example, as occurs in heart failure), RyR2 becomes hyperphosphorylated and "leaky," leading to arrhythmias and other pathology. This "leaky RyR2 hypothesis" is highly controversial. In this issue of the JCI, Marks and colleagues report on two new mouse lines with mutations in S2808 that provide strong evidence supporting their theory. Moreover, the experiments revealed an influence of redox modifications of RyR2 that may account for some discrepancies in the field.

  17. Novel targets for treating heart and muscle disease: stabilizing ryanodine receptors and preventing intracellular calcium leak.

    PubMed

    Lehnart, Stephan E

    2007-04-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) function as intracellular Ca(2+) release channels on the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes. In striated muscles, Ca(2+) release through RyRs controls muscle excitation-contraction coupling. RyR channel function is regulated by a cytoplasmic scaffold domain that forms a macromolecular signaling complex including calstabin (formerly known as FK506-binding protein), calmodulin, phosphodiesterase, kinase and phosphatase proteins. An increasing number of genetic and acquired diseases has been associated with intracellular Ca(2+) leak. In heart failure, for instance, the RyR complex becomes altered, resulting in chronic channel dysfunction and chronic sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) leak. Recently, the efficacy of novel Ca(2+) release channel-stabilizing drugs has been demonstrated in cardiac and skeletal muscle disease models.

  18. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release via ryanodine receptors regulates neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Chen, Yili; Ito, Akihiro; Murayama, Takashi; Oyamada, Hideto; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Sato, Osamu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Mori, Nozomu; Oguchi, Katsuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito; Iino, Masamitsu

    2012-01-18

    Mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores regulates a multitude of cellular functions, but the role of intracellular Ca(2+) release via the ryanodine receptor (RyR) in the brain remains incompletely understood. We found that nitric oxide (NO) directly activates RyRs, which induce Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores of central neurons, and thereby promote prolonged Ca(2+) signalling in the brain. Reversible S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) triggers this Ca(2+) release. NO-induced Ca(2+) release (NICR) is evoked by type 1 NO synthase-dependent NO production during neural firing, and is essential for cerebellar synaptic plasticity. NO production has also been implicated in pathological conditions including ischaemic brain injury, and our results suggest that NICR is involved in NO-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that NICR via RyR1 plays a regulatory role in the physiological and pathophysiological functions of the brain.

  19. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  20. Calcineurin upregulates local Ca(2+) signaling through ryanodine receptor-1 in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Carlo P; Liu, Qing-Hua; Zheng, Yun-Min; Yadav, Vishal; Zhang, Zhen; Wu, Ling-Gang; Wang, Yong-Xiao

    2014-11-15

    Local Ca(2+) signals (Ca(2+) sparks) play an important role in multiple cellular functions in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Protein kinase Cϵ is known to downregulate ASMC Ca(2+) sparks and contraction; however, no complementary phosphatase has been shown to produce opposite effects. Here, we for the first time report that treatment with a specific calcineurin (CaN) autoinhibitory peptide (CAIP) to block CaN activity decreases, whereas application of nickel to activate CaN increases, Ca(2+) sparks in both the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Treatment with xestospogin-C to eliminate functional inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors does not prevent CAIP from inhibiting local Ca(2+) signaling. However, high ryanodine treatment almost completely blocks spark formation and prevents the nickel-mediated increase in sparks. Unlike CAIP, the protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor endothall has no effect. Local Ca(2+) signaling is lower in CaN catalytic subunit Aα gene knockout (CaN-Aα(-/-)) mouse ASMCs. The effects of CAIP and nickel are completely lost in CaN-Aα(-/-) ASMCs. Neither CAIP nor nickel produces an effect on Ca(2+) sparks in type 1 ryanodine receptor heterozygous knockout (RyR1(-/+)) mouse ASMCs. However, their effects are not altered in RyR2(-/+) or RyR3(-/-) mouse ASMCs. CaN inhibition decreases methacholine-induced contraction in isolated RyR1(+/+) but not RyR1(-/+) mouse tracheal rings. Supportively, muscarinic contractile responses are also reduced in CaN-Aα(-/+) mouse tracheal rings. Taken together, these results provide novel evidence that CaN regulates ASMC Ca(2+) sparks specifically through RyR1, which plays an important role in the control of Ca(2+) signaling and contraction in ASMCs.

  1. Mutational analysis of putative calcium binding motifs within the skeletal ryanodine receptor isoform, RyR1.

    PubMed

    Fessenden, James D; Feng, Wei; Pessah, Isaac N; Allen, P D

    2004-12-17

    The functional relevance of putative Ca(2+) binding motifs previously identified with Ca(2+) overlay binding analysis within the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor isoform (RyR1) was examined using mutational analysis. EF hands between amino acid positions 4081 and 4092 (EF1) and 4116 and 4127 (EF2) were scrambled singly or in combination within the full-length rabbit RyR1 cDNA. These cDNAs were expressed in 1B5 RyR-deficient myotubes and channel function assessed using Ca(2+)-imaging techniques, [(3)H]ryanodine binding measurements, and single channel experiments. In intact myotubes, these mutations did not affect functional responses to either depolarization or RyR agonists (caffeine, 4-chloro-m-cresol) compared with wtRyR1. However, in [(3)H]ryanodine binding measurements, both Ca(2+) activation and inhibition of the EF1 mutant was significantly altered compared with wtRyR1. No high affinity [(3)H]ryanodine binding was observed in membranes expressing the EF2 mutation, although in single channel measurements, the EF2-disrupted channel could be activated by micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations. In addition, micromolar levels of ryanodine placed these channels into the classical half-conductance state, thus indicating that occupancy of high affinity ryanodine binding sites is not required for ryanodine-induced subconductance states in RyR1. Disruption of three additional putative RyR1 calcium binding motifs located between amino acid positions 4254 and 4265 (EF3), 4407 and 4418 (EF4), or 4490 and 4502 (EF5) either singly or in combination (EF3-5) did not affect functional responses in 1B5 myotubes except that the EC(50) for caffeine activation for the EF3 construct was significantly increased compared with wtRyR1. However, in [(3)H]ryanodine binding experiments, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation and inactivation of mutated RyRs containing EF3, EF4, or EF5 was unaffected when compared with wtRyR1.

  2. Functional calcium release channel formed by the carboxyl-terminal portion of ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, M B; Zhao, J; Takeshima, H; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is one of the key proteins involved in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in skeletal muscle, where it functions as a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. RyR consists of a single polypeptide of approximately 560 kDa normally arranged in a homotetrameric structure, which contains a carboxyl (C)-terminal transmembrane domain and a large amino (N)-terminal cytoplasmic domain. To test whether the carboxyl-terminal portion of RyR is sufficient to form a Ca2+ release channel, we expressed the full-length (RyR-wt) and C-terminal (RyR-C, approximately 130 kDa) RyR proteins in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and measured their Ca2+ release channel functions in planar lipid bilayer membranes. The single-channel properties of RyR-wt were found to be similar to those of RyR from skeletal muscle SR. The RyR-C protein forms a cation-selective channel that shares some of the channel properties with RyR-wt, including activation by cytoplasmic Ca2+ and regulation by ryanodine. Unlike RyR-wt, which exhibits a linear current-voltage relationship and inactivates at millimolar Ca2+, the channels formed by RyR-C display significant inward rectification and fail to close at high cytoplasmic Ca2+. Our results show that the C-terminal portion of RyR contains structures sufficient to form a functional Ca2+ release channel, but the N-terminal portion of RyR also affects the ion-conduction and calcium-dependent regulation of the Ca2+ release channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9284301

  3. Dynamic regulation of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) channel activity by Homer 1.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Tu, Jiancheng; Pouliquin, Pierre; Cabrales, Elaine; Shen, Xiaohua; Dulhunty, Angela; Worley, Paul F; Allen, Paul D; Pessah, Isaac N

    2008-03-01

    Homer, a family of scaffolding proteins originally identified in neurons, is also expressed in skeletal muscle. Previous studies showed that splice variants of Homer 1 (H1) amplify the gain of the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) channel complex. Using [3H]ryanodine ([3H]Ry) to probe the conformational state of RyR1, the actions of long- and short-forms of H1 are examined singly and in combination. At < or =200 nM, H1 long-forms (H1b or H1c possessing coiled-coil (CC) domains) and short-forms (H1a or H1EVH1 lacking CC domains) enhance specific [3H]Ry binding to RyR1. However, at a concentration > 200 nM, either H1 form completely inhibited [3H]Ry binding. Importantly, the combinations of H1c+H1EVH1, or H1b+H1a acted in an additive manner to enhance or inhibit [3H]Ry-binding activity. H1a and H1c individually or in combination produced the same dynamic pattern in regulating purified RyR1 channels reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers. In combination, their net action on RyR1 channels depends on total concentrations of H1. These data provide a mechanism by which constitutively and transiently expressed H1 forms can tightly regulate RyR1 channel activity in response to changing levels of expression and degradation of H1 proteins.

  4. Antibody probe study of Ca2+ channel regulation by interdomain interaction within the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Parness, Jerome; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2004-01-01

    N-terminal and central domains of ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1), where many reported malignant hyperthermia (MH) mutations are localized, represent putative channel regulatory domains. Recent domain peptide (DP) probe studies led us to the hypothesis that these domains interact to stabilize the closed state of channel (zipping), while weakening of domain-domain interactions (unzipping) by mutation de-stabilizes the channel, making it leaky to Ca2+ or sensitive to the agonists of RyR1. As shown previously, DP1 (N-terminal domain peptide) and DP4 (central domain peptide) produced MH-like channel activation/sensitization effects, presumably by peptide binding to sites critical to stabilizing domain-domain interactions and resultant loss of conformational constraints. Here we report that polyclonal anti-DP1 and anti-DP4 antibodies also produce MH-like channel activation and sensitization effects as evidenced by about 4-fold enhancement of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR1 and by a significant left-shift of the concentration-dependence of activation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release by polylysine. Fluorescence quenching experiments demonstrate that the accessibility of a DP4-directed, conformationally sensitive fluorescence probe linked to the RyR1 N-terminal domain is increased in the presence of domain-specific antibodies, consistent with the view that these antibodies produce unzipping of interacting domains that are of hindered accessibility to the surrounding aqueous environment. Our results suggest that domain-specific antibody binding induces a conformational change resulting in channel activation, and are consistent with the hypothesis that interacting N-terminal and central domains are intimately involved in the regulation of RyR1 channel function. PMID:15027895

  5. Characterization of hadrucalcin, a peptide from Hadrurus gertschi scorpion venom with pharmacological activity on ryanodine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Elisabeth F; Capes, E Michelle; Diego-García, Elia; Zamudio, Fernando Z; Fuentes, Oscar; Possani, Lourival D; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Members of the calcin family, presently including imperatoxin A, maurocalcin, opicalcins and hemicalcin, are basic, 33-mer peptide activators of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), the calcium channels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that provide the majority of calcium for muscle contraction. Here we describe hadrucalcin, a novel member of this family. Experimental approach: Hadrucalcin was isolated from the venom of Hadrurus gertschi. Amino acid sequence and mass were determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry respectively. A cDNA library was constructed to generate clones for DNA sequence determination. Biological activity of native toxin was confirmed with [3H]ryanodine binding, by using SR vesicles from cardiac and skeletal muscle, and with single skeletal (RyR1) and cardiac (RyR2) channels reconstituted in lipid bilayers. Hadrucalcin was applied to intact ventricular myocytes to investigate effects on calcium transients. The secondary structure of hadrucalcin was computer-modelled by using atomic coordinates from maurocalcin, a structurally similar peptide. Key results: Hadrucalcin is distinguished from previously described congeners by two additional amino acids in its primary sequence and the lack of prominent amphipathicity. Hadrucalcin activated RyRs with high affinity (EC50= 37 nmol·L−1), induced a long-lasting subconductance state on RyR1 and RyR2, and rapidly (lag time ∼2 s) penetrated ventricular cardiomyocytes, eliciting discharge of internal calcium stores and spontaneous contractions. Conclusions and implications: Hadrucalcin is a cell-permeant, powerful activator of RyRs, which has translational potential for targeted delivery of drugs to RyR as novel therapeutic intervention in arrhythmogenic disease. PMID:19389159

  6. Phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor mediates the cardiac fight or flight response in mice.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jian; Kushnir, Alexander; Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Reiken, Steven; Li, Jingdong; Lehnart, Stephan E; Lindegger, Nicolas; Mongillo, Marco; Mohler, Peter J; Marks, Andrew R

    2010-12-01

    During the classic "fight-or-flight" stress response, sympathetic nervous system activation leads to catecholamine release, which increases heart rate and contractility, resulting in enhanced cardiac output. Catecholamines bind to β-adrenergic receptors, causing cAMP generation and activation of PKA, which phosphorylates multiple targets in cardiac muscle, including the cardiac ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel (RyR2) required for muscle contraction. PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 enhances channel activity by sensitizing the channel to cytosolic calcium (Ca²+). Here, we found that mice harboring RyR2 channels that cannot be PKA phosphorylated (referred to herein as RyR2-S2808A+/+ mice) exhibited blunted heart rate and cardiac contractile responses to catecholamines (isoproterenol). The isoproterenol-induced enhancement of ventricular myocyte Ca²+ transients and fractional shortening (contraction) and the spontaneous beating rate of sinoatrial nodal cells were all blunted in RyR2-S2808A+/+ mice. The blunted cardiac response to catecholamines in RyR2-S2808A+/+ mice resulted in impaired exercise capacity. RyR2-S2808A+/+ mice were protected against chronic catecholaminergic-induced cardiac dysfunction. These studies identify what we believe to be new roles for PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 in both the heart rate and contractile responses to acute catecholaminergic stimulation.

  7. Minding the Calcium Store: Ryanodine Receptor Activation as a Convergent Mechanism of PCB Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pessah, Isaac N.; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Lein, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic low level polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) exposures remain a significant public health concern since results from epidemiological studies indicate PCB burden is associated with immune system dysfunction, cardiovascular disease, and impairment of the developing nervous system. Of these various adverse health effects, developmental neurotoxicity has emerged as a particularly vulnerable endpoint in PCB toxicity. Arguably the most pervasive biological effects of PCBs could be mediated by their ability to alter the spatial and temporal fidelity of Ca2+ signals through one or more receptor mediated processes. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the structure and function of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in muscle and nerve cells and how PCBs and related non-coplanar structures alter these functions. The molecular and cellular mechanisms by which non-coplanar PCBs and related structures alter local and global Ca2+ signaling properties and the possible short and long-term consequences of these perturbations on neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration are reviewed. PMID:19931307

  8. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia.

  9. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  10. Disease Mutations in the Ryanodine Receptor Central Region: Crystal Structures of a Phosphorylation Hot Spot Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Lau, Kelvin; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-02-09

    Ryanodine Receptors (RyRs) are huge Ca{sup 2+} release channels in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and form targets for phosphorylation and disease mutations. We present crystal structures of a domain in three RyR isoforms, containing the Ser2843 (RyR1) and Ser2808/Ser2814 (RyR2) phosphorylation sites. The RyR1 domain is the target for 11 disease mutations. Several of these are clustered near the phosphorylation sites, suggesting that phosphorylation and disease mutations may affect the same interface. The L2867G mutation causes a drastic thermal destabilization and aggregation at room temperature. Crystal structures for other disease mutants show that they affect surface properties and intradomain salt bridges. In vitro phosphorylation experiments show that up to five residues in one long loop of RyR2 can be phosphorylated by PKA or CaMKII. Docking into cryo-electron microscopy maps suggests a putative location in the clamp region, implying that mutations and phosphorylation may affect the allosteric motions within this area.

  11. Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor (Ryr2)-mediated Calcium Signals Specifically Promote Glucose Oxidation via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bround, Michael J; Wambolt, Rich; Cen, Haoning; Asghari, Parisa; Albu, Razvan F; Han, Jun; McAfee, Donald; Pourrier, Marc; Scott, Nichollas E; Bohunek, Lubos; Kulpa, Jerzy E; Chen, S R Wayne; Fedida, David; Brownsey, Roger W; Borchers, Christoph H; Foster, Leonard J; Mayor, Thibault; Moore, Edwin D W; Allard, Michael F; Johnson, James D

    2016-11-04

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (Ryr2) Ca(2+) release channels and cellular metabolism are both disrupted in heart disease. Recently, we demonstrated that total loss of Ryr2 leads to cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction, arrhythmia, and reduced heart rate. Acute total Ryr2 ablation also impaired metabolism, but it was not clear whether this was a cause or consequence of heart failure. Previous in vitro studies revealed that Ca(2+) flux into the mitochondria helps pace oxidative metabolism, but there is limited in vivo evidence supporting this concept. Here, we studied heart-specific, inducible Ryr2 haploinsufficient (cRyr2Δ50) mice with a stable 50% reduction in Ryr2 protein. This manipulation decreased the amplitude and frequency of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals in isolated cardiomyocytes, without changes in cardiomyocyte contraction. Remarkably, in the context of well preserved contractile function in perfused hearts, we observed decreased glucose oxidation, but not fat oxidation, with increased glycolysis. cRyr2Δ50 hearts exhibited hyperphosphorylation and inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, the key Ca(2+)-sensitive gatekeeper to glucose oxidation. Metabolomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic analyses revealed additional functional networks associated with altered metabolism in this model. These results demonstrate that Ryr2 controls mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics and plays a specific, critical role in promoting glucose oxidation in cardiomyocytes. Our findings indicate that partial RYR2 loss is sufficient to cause metabolic abnormalities seen in heart disease.

  12. The deletion of exon 3 in the cardiac ryanodine receptor is rescued by β strand switching.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Paolo A; Kimlicka, Lynn; Tung, Ching-Chieh; Van Petegem, Filip

    2011-06-08

    Mutations in the cardiac Ryanodine Receptor (RYR2) are linked to triggered arrhythmias. Removal of exon 3 results in a severe form of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). This exon encodes secondary structure elements that are crucial for folding of the N-terminal domain (NTD), raising the question of why the deletion is neither lethal nor confers a loss of function. We determined the 2.3 Å crystal structure of the NTD lacking exon 3. The removal causes a structural rescue whereby a flexible loop inserts itself into the β trefoil domain and increases thermal stability. The exon 3 deletion is not tolerated in the corresponding RYR1 domain. The rescue shows a novel mechanism by which RYR2 channels can adjust their Ca²⁺ release properties through altering the structure of the NTD. Despite the rescue, the deletion affects interfaces with other RYR2 domains. We propose that relative movement of the NTD is allosterically coupled to the pore region.

  13. Single-Particle Cryo-EM of the Ryanodine Receptor Channel in an Aqueous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Mariah R.; Fan, Guizhen

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated Ca2+ release channels that are responsible for the increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration leading to muscle contraction. Our current understanding of RyR channel gating and regulation is greatly limited due to the lack of a high-resolution structure of the channel protein. The enormous size and unwieldy shape of Ca2+ release channels make X-ray or NMR methods difficult to apply for high-resolution structural analysis of the full-length functional channel. Single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is one of the only effective techniques for the study of such a large integral membrane protein and its molecular interactions. Despite recent developments in cryo-EM technologies and break-through single-particle cryo-EM studies of ion channels, cryospecimen preparation, particularly the presence of detergent in the buffer, remains the main impediment to obtaining atomic-resolution structures of ion channels and a multitude of other integral membrane protein complexes. In this review we will discuss properties of several detergents that have been successfully utilized in cryo-EM studies of ion channels and the emergence of the detergent alternative amphipol to stabilize ion channels for structure-function characterization. Future structural studies of challenging specimen like ion channels are likely to be facilitated by cryo-EM amenable detergents or alternative surfactants. PMID:26913144

  14. Single-particle cryo-EM of the ryanodine receptor channel in an aqueous environment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Mariah R.; Fan, Guizhen; Serysheva, Irina I.

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated Ca2+ release channels that are responsible for the increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration leading to muscle contraction. Our current understanding of RyR channel gating and regulation is greatly limited due to the lack of a high-resolution structure of the channel protein. The enormous size and unwieldy shape of Ca2+ release channels make X-ray or NMR methods difficult to apply for high-resolution structural analysis of the full-length functional channel. Single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is one of the only effective techniques for the study of such a large integral membrane protein and its molecular interactions. Despite recent developments in cryo-EM technologies and break-through single-particle cryo-EM studies of ion channels, cryospecimen preparation, particularly the presence of detergent in the buffer, remains the main impediment to obtaining atomic-resolution structures of ion channels and a multitude of other integral membrane protein complexes. In this review we will discuss properties of several detergents that have been successfully utilized in cryo-EM studies of ion channels and the emergence of the detergent alternative amphipol to stabilize ion channels for structure-function characterization. Future structural studies of challenging specimen like ion channels are likely to be facilitated by cryo-EM amenable detergents or alternative surfactants. PMID:25844145

  15. A cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome contig containing the complete ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Trask, B.; Bergmann, A.; De Jong, P. ); Phillips, M.S.; MacLennan, D.H. )

    1993-08-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene is responsible for some forms of malignant hyperthermia and has been localized to 19q13.1. Central core disease is a genetic myopathy that is genetically linked to RYR1. The authors have identified an overlapping set of cosmid and YAC clones that spans more than 800 kb and includes the RYR1 gene ([approximately]205 kb). Cosmids from this region were identified by screening three chromosome 19 cosmid libraries (11-fold coverage) with six subclones representing the entire RYR1 cDNA. Genomic sequences from positive cosmids were then used as probes to identify additional cosmids. A minimally overlapping set of 23 cosmids was assembled into two contigs on the basis of restriction fragment analysis and hybridization data. Three YAC clones were isolated by screening a human YAC library with selected cosmid inserts. Overlaps among these YACs and the cosmid contigs were determined by hybridizing YAC Alu-PCR products to cosmid DNAs. The YACs bridged the gap between the cosmid contigs and extended the contig on both sides. Fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments positioned the RYR1 contig between GPI, MAG, and D19S191 on the proximal side and D19S190, CYP2A, CYP2F, SNRPA, BCKDHA, and other markers on the distal side. The 800-kb contig of cloned reagents will facilitate the detailed characterization of the RYR1 gene and other loci that may be closely related to central core disease. 62 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Single Ryanodine Receptor Channel Basis of Caffeine's Action on Ca2+ Sparks

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Maura; Zima, Aleksey V.; Nani, Alma; Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L.; Copello, Julio A.; Ramos-Franco, Josefina; Blatter, Lothar A.; Fill, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine) is a widely used pharmacological agonist of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) Ca2+ release channel. It is also a well-known stimulant that can produce adverse side effects, including arrhythmias. Here, the action of caffeine on single RyR2 channels in bilayers and Ca2+ sparks in permeabilized ventricular cardiomyocytes is defined. Single RyR2 caffeine activation depended on the free Ca2+ level on both sides of the channel. Cytosolic Ca2+ enhanced RyR2 caffeine affinity, whereas luminal Ca2+ essentially scaled maximal caffeine activation. Caffeine activated single RyR2 channels in diastolic quasi-cell-like solutions (cytosolic MgATP, pCa 7) with an EC50 of 9.0 ± 0.4 mM. Low-dose caffeine (0.15 mM) increased Ca2+ spark frequency ∼75% and single RyR2 opening frequency ∼150%. This implies that not all spontaneous RyR2 openings during diastole are associated with Ca2+ sparks. Assuming that only the longest openings evoke sparks, our data suggest that a spark may result only when a spontaneous single RyR2 opening lasts >6 ms. PMID:21320437

  17. Structure of the rabbit ryanodine receptor RyR1 at near-atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen; Bai, Xiao-chen; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Li, Zhangqiang; Xie, Tian; Peng, Wei; Yin, Chang-cheng; Li, Xueming; Scheres, Sjors H W; Shi, Yigong; Yan, Nieng

    2015-01-01

    The ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are high-conductance intracellular Ca(2+) channels that play a pivotal role in the excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal and cardiac muscles. RyRs are the largest known ion channels, with a homotetrameric organization and approximately 5,000 residues in each protomer. Here we report the structure of the rabbit RyR1 in complex with its modulator FKBP12 at an overall resolution of 3.8 Å, determined by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. Three previously uncharacterized domains, named central, handle and helical domains, display the armadillo repeat fold. These domains, together with the amino-terminal domain, constitute a network of superhelical scaffold for binding and propagation of conformational changes. The channel domain exhibits the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily fold with distinct features. A negative-charge-enriched hairpin loop connecting S5 and the pore helix is positioned above the entrance to the selectivity-filter vestibule. The four elongated S6 segments form a right-handed helical bundle that closes the pore at the cytoplasmic border of the membrane. Allosteric regulation of the pore by the cytoplasmic domains is mediated through extensive interactions between the central domains and the channel domain. These structural features explain high ion conductance by RyRs and the long-range allosteric regulation of channel activities.

  18. Ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel PKA phosphorylation: a critical mediator of heart failure progression.

    PubMed

    Wehrens, Xander H T; Lehnart, Stephan E; Reiken, Steven; Vest, John A; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R

    2006-01-17

    Defective regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2)/calcium release channel, required for excitation-contraction coupling in the heart, has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. For example, diastolic calcium "leak" via RyR2 channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been identified as an important factor contributing to impaired contractility in heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death. In patients with heart failure, chronic activation of the "fight or flight" stress response leads to protein kinase A (PKA) hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 at Ser-2808. PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 Ser-2808 reduces the binding affinity of the channel-stabilizing subunit calstabin2, resulting in leaky RyR2 channels. We developed RyR2-S2808A mice to determine whether Ser-2808 is the functional PKA phosphorylation site on RyR2. Furthermore, mice in which the RyR2 channel cannot be PKA phosphorylated were relatively protected against the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Taken together, these data show that PKA phosphorylation of Ser-2808 on the RyR2 channel appears to be a critical mediator of progressive cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction.

  19. Gene profiling of embryonic skeletal muscle lacking type I ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release channel.

    PubMed

    Filipova, Dilyana; Walter, Anna M; Gaspar, John A; Brunn, Anna; Linde, Nina F; Ardestani, Mostafa A; Deckert, Martina; Hescheler, Jürgen; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Sachinidis, Agapios; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2016-02-01

    In mature skeletal muscle, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration rises dramatically upon membrane depolarization, constituting the link between excitation and contraction. This process requires Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1). However, RYR1's potential roles in muscle development remain obscure. We used an established RyR1- null mouse model, dyspedic, to investigate the effects of the absence of a functional RYR1 and, consequently, the lack of RyR1-mediated Ca(2+) signaling, during embryogenesis. Homozygous dyspedic mice die after birth and display small limbs and abnormal skeletal muscle organization. Skeletal muscles from front and hind limbs of dyspedic fetuses (day E18.5) were subjected to microarray analyses, revealing 318 differentially expressed genes. We observed altered expression of multiple transcription factors and members of key signaling pathways. Differential regulation was also observed for genes encoding contractile as well as muscle-specific structural proteins. Additional qRT-PCR analysis revealed altered mRNA levels of the canonical muscle regulatory factors Six1, Six4, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG and MRF4 in mutant muscle, which is in line with the severe developmental retardation seen in dyspedic muscle histology analyses. Taken together, these findings suggest an important non-contractile role of RyR1 or RYR1-mediated Ca(2+) signaling during muscle organ development.

  20. Green tea catechins are potent sensitizers of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1).

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Ward, Chris W; Padilla, Isela T; Cabrales, Elaine; Lopez, José R; Eltit, José M; Allen, Paul D; Pessah, Isaac N

    2010-08-15

    Catechins, polyphenols extracted from green tea leaves, have a broad range of biological activities although the specific molecular mechanisms responsible are not known. At the high experimental concentrations typically used polyphenols bind to membrane phospholipid and also are easily auto-oxidized to generate superoxide anion and semiquinones, and can adduct to protein thiols. We report that the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is a molecular target that responds to nanomolar (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG). Single channel analyses demonstrate EGCG (5-10nM) increases channel open probability (Po) twofold, by lengthening open dwell time. The degree of channel activation is concentration-dependent and is rapidly and fully reversible. Four related catechins, EGCG, ECG, EGC ((-)-epigallocatechin) and EC ((-)-epicatechin) showed a rank order of activity toward RyR1 (EGCG>ECG>EGC>EC). EGCG and ECG enhance the sensitivity of RyR1 to activation by < or =100microM cytoplasmic Ca(2+) without altering inhibitory potency by >100microM Ca(2+). EGCG as high as 10microM in the extracellular medium potentiated Ca(2+) transient amplitudes evoked by electrical stimuli applied to intact myotubes and adult FDB fibers, without eliciting spontaneous Ca(2+) release or slowing Ca(2+) transient recovery. The results identify RyR1 as a sensitive target for the major tea catechins EGCG and ECG, and this interaction is likely to contribute to their observed biological activities.

  1. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release: activation of type 1 ryanodine receptor by endogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1.

  2. Hypernitrosylated ryanodine receptor calcium release channels are leaky in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Reiken, Steven; Carlson, Christian; Mongillo, Marco; Liu, Xiaoping; Rothman, Lisa; Matecki, Stefan; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2009-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and early death resulting from dystrophin deficiency. Loss of dystrophin results in disruption of a large dystrophin glycoprotein complex, leading to pathological calcium (Ca2+)-dependent signals that damage muscle cells. We have identified a structural and functional defect in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel, in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy that contributes to altered Ca2+ homeostasis in dystrophic muscles. RyR1 isolated from mdx skeletal muscle showed an age-dependent increase in S-nitrosylation coincident with dystrophic changes in the muscle. RyR1 S-nitrosylation depleted the channel complex of FKBP12 (also known as calstabin-1, for calcium channel stabilizing binding protein), resulting in 'leaky' channels. Preventing calstabin-1 depletion from RyR1 with S107, a compound that binds the RyR1 channel and enhances the binding affinity of calstabin-1 to the nitrosylated channel, inhibited sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak, reduced biochemical and histological evidence of muscle damage, improved muscle function and increased exercise performance in mdx mice. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak via RyR1 due to S-nitrosylation of the channel and calstabin-1 depletion contributes to muscle weakness in muscular dystrophy, and that preventing the RyR1-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak may provide a new therapeutic approach.

  3. Expression and localization of ryanodine receptors in the frog semicircular canal.

    PubMed

    Perin, Paola; Botta, Laura; Tritto, Simona; Laforenza, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    Several experiments suggest an important role for store-released Ca²⁺ in hair cell organs: drugs targeting IP₃ and ryanodine (RyRs) receptors affect release from hair cells, and stores are thought to be involved in vesicle recycling at ribbon synapses. In this work we investigated the semicircular canal distribution of RyRs by immunofluorescence, using slice preparations of the sensory epithelium (to distinguish cell types) and flat mounts of the simpler nonsensory regions. RyRs were present in hair cells, mostly in supranuclear spots, but not in supporting cells; as regards nonsensory regions, they were also localized in dark cells and cells from the ductus. No labeling was found in nerve terminals, although nerve branches could be observed in proximity to hair cell RyR spots. The differential expression of RyR isoforms was studied by RT-PCR and immunoblotting, showing the presence of RyRα in both ampulla and canal arm and RyRβ in the ampulla only.

  4. DIDS modifies the conductance, gating, and inactivation mechanisms of the cardiac ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Adam Parker; Sitsapesan, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the covalent modifier of amino groups, 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) on the single-channel properties of purified sheep cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR) incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers were investigated. DIDS increased single-channel conductance and open probability (P(o)) and induced unique modifications to the voltage-dependence of gating. The effects of DIDS on conduction and gating were irreversible within the time scale of the experiments, and both effects were dependent on the permeant ion. DIDS induced a greater increase in conductance with Ca(2+) (20%) compared with K(+) (8%) as the permeant ion. After modification by DIDS, all channels could be rapidly inactivated in a voltage-dependent manner. The open probability of the DIDS-modified channel decreased with increasing positive or negative transmembrane potentials; however, inactivation was only observed at negative potentials. Our results demonstrate that inactivation of RyR channels is dependent on the ligand activating the channel, and this will have consequences for the control and termination of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release in cardiac cells. PMID:12023226

  5. Structure of the rabbit ryanodine receptor RyR1 at near-atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianping; Li, Zhangqiang; Xie, Tian; Peng, Wei; Yin, Changcheng; Li, Xueming; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Shi, Yigong; Yan, Nieng

    2014-01-01

    The ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are high-conductance intracellular Ca2+ channels that play a pivotal role in the excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal and cardiac muscles. RyRs are the largest known ion channels, with a homotetrameric organization and approximately 5000 residues in each protomer. Here we report the structure of the rabbit RyR1 in complex with its modulator FKBP12 at an overall resolution of 3.8 Å, determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. Three previously uncharacterized domains, named Central, Handle, and Helical domains, display the armadillo repeat fold. These domains, together with the amino-terminal domain, constitute a network of superhelical scaffold for binding and propagation of conformational changes. The channel domain exhibits the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily fold with distinct features. A negative charge-enriched hairpin loop connecting S5 and the pore helix is positioned above the entrance to the selectivity filter vestibule. The four elongated S6 segments form a right-handed helical bundle that closes the pore at the cytoplasmic border of the membrane. Allosteric regulation of the pore by the cytoplasmic domains is mediated through extensive interactions between the Central domains and the channel domain. These structural features explain high ion conductance by RyRs and the long-range allosteric regulation of channel activities. PMID:25517095

  6. Two regions of the ryanodine receptor calcium channel are involved in Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Angela C; Yamaguchi, Naohiro

    2014-03-04

    Skeletal (RyR1) and cardiac muscle (RyR2) isoforms of ryanodine receptor calcium channels are inhibited by millimollar Ca(2+), but the affinity of RyR2 for inhibitory Ca(2+) is ~10 times lower than that of RyR1. Previous studies demonstrated that the C-terminal quarter of RyR has critical domain(s) for Ca(2+) inactivation. To obtain further insights into the molecular basis of regulation of RyRs by Ca(2+), we constructed and expressed 18 RyR1-RyR2 chimeras in HEK293 cells and determined the Ca(2+) activation and inactivation affinities of these channels using the [(3)H]ryanodine binding assay. Replacing two distinct regions of RyR1 with corresponding RyR2 sequences reduced the affinity for Ca(2+) inactivation. The first region (RyR2 amino acids 4020-4250) contains two EF-hand Ca(2+) binding motifs (EF1, amino acids 4036-4047; EF2, amino acids 4071-4082), and the second region includes the putative second transmembrane segment (S2). A RyR1-backbone chimera containing only EF2 from RyR2 had a modest (not significant) change in Ca(2+) inactivation, whereas another chimera channel carrying only EF1 from RyR2 had a significantly reduced level of Ca(2+) inactivation. The results suggest that EF1 is a more critical determinant for RyR inactivation by Ca(2+). In addition, activities of the chimera carrying RyR2 EF-hands were suppressed at 10-100 μM Ca(2+), and the suppression was relieved by 1 mM Mg(2+). The same effects have been observed with wild-type RyR2. A mutant RyR1 carrying both regions replaced with RyR2 sequences (amino acids 4020-4250 and 4560-4618) showed a Ca(2+) inactivation affinity comparable to that of RyR2, indicating that these regions are sufficient to confer RyR2-type Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation on RyR1.

  7. Evidence for novel caffeine and Ca2+ binding sites on the lobster skeletal ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin Jun; Williams, Alan J; Sitsapesan, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    The effects of Ca2+, ATP and caffeine on the gating of lobster skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors (RyR) was investigated after reconstitution of the channels into planar phospholipid bilayers and by using [3H]-ryanodine binding studies. The single channel studies reveal that the EC50 (60 μM) for activation of the lobster skeletal RyR by Ca2+ as the sole ligand is higher than for any other isoform of RyR studied. Inactivation of the channel by Ca2+ (EC50=1 mM) occurs at concentrations slightly higher than those required to inactivate mammalian skeletal RyR (RyR1) but lower than those required to inactivate mammalian cardiac RyR (RyR2). Lifetime analysis demonstrates that cytosolic Ca2+, as the sole activating ligand, cannot fully open the lobster skeletal RyR (maximum Po approximately 0.2). The mechanism for the increase in open probability (Po) is an increase in both the frequency and the duration of the open events. ATP is a very effective activator of the lobster RyR and can almost fully open the channel in the presence of activating cytosolic [Ca2+]. In the presence of 700 μM Ca2+, 1 mM ATP increased Po to approximately 0.8. Caffeine, often used as a tool to identify the presence of RyR channels, is relatively ineffective and cannot increase Po above the level that can be attained with Ca2+ alone. The results reveal that caffeine increases Po by a different mechanism to that of cytosolic Ca2+ demonstrating that the mechanism for channel activation by caffeine is not ‘sensitization' to cytosolic Ca2+. By studying the mechanisms involved in the activation of the lobster RyR we have demonstrated that the channel responds in a unique manner to Ca2+ and to caffeine. The results strongly indicate that these ligand binding sites on the channel are different to those on mammalian isoforms of RyR. PMID:10193789

  8. Role of malignant hyperthermia domain in the regulation of Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor) of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zorzato, F; Menegazzi, P; Treves, S; Ronjat, M

    1996-09-13

    A fusion protein encompassing Gly341 of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor was used to raise monoclonal antibodies; epitope mapping demonstrates that monoclonal antibody 419 (mAb419) reacts with a sequence a few residues upstream from Gly341. The mAb419 was then used to probe ryanodine receptor (RYR) functions. Our results show that upon incubation of triads vesicles with mAb419 the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release rate at pCa 8 was increased. Equilibrium evaluation of [3H]ryanodine binding at different [Ca2+] indicates that mAb419 shifted the half-maximal [Ca2+] for stimulation of ryanodine binding to lower value (0.1 versus 1.2 microM). Such functional effects may be due to a direct action of the Ab on the Ca2+ binding domain of the RYR or to the perturbation by the Ab of the intramolecular interaction between the immunopositive region and regulatory domain of the RYR. The latter hypothesis was tested directly using the optical biosensor BIAcore (Pharmacia Biotech Inc.): we show that the immunopositive RYR polypeptide is able to interact with the native RYR complex. Ligand overlays with immunopositive digoxigenin-RYR fusion protein indicate that such an interaction might occur with a calmodulin binding domain (defined by residues 3010-3225) and with a polypeptide defined by residues 799-1172. In conclusion our results suggest that the stimulation by the mAb419 of the RYR channel activity is due to the perturbation of an intramolecular interaction between the immunopositive polypeptide and a Ca2+ regulatory site probably corresponding to a calmodulin binding domain.

  9. Structural and functional conservation of key domains in InsP[subscript 3] and ryanodine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Min-Duk; Velamakanni, Saroj; Ishiyama, Noboru; Stathopulos, Peter B.; Rossi, Ana M.; Khan, Samir A.; Dale, Philippa; Li, Congmin; Ames, James B.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Taylor, Colin W.

    2012-07-11

    Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP{sub 3}Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric intracellular Ca{sup 2+} channels. In each of these receptor families, the pore, which is formed by carboxy-terminal transmembrane domains, is regulated by signals that are detected by large cytosolic structures. InsP{sub 3}R gating is initiated by InsP{sub 3} binding to the InsP{sub 3}-binding core (IBC, residues 224-604 of InsP{sub 3}R1) and it requires the suppressor domain (SD, residues 1-223 of InsP{sub 3}R1). Here we present structures of the amino-terminal region (NT, residues 1-604) of rat InsP{sub 3}R1 with (3.6 {angstrom}) and without (3.0 {angstrom}) InsP{sub 3} bound. The arrangement of the three NT domains, SD, IBC-{beta} and IBC-{alpha}, identifies two discrete interfaces ({alpha} and {beta}) between the IBC and SD. Similar interfaces occur between equivalent domains (A, B and C) in RyR1 (ref. 9). The orientations of the three domains when docked into a tetrameric structure of InsP{sub 3}R and of the ABC domains docked into RyR are remarkably similar. The importance of the {alpha}-interface for activation of InsP{sub 3}R and RyR is confirmed by mutagenesis and, for RyR, by disease-causing mutations. Binding of InsP{sub 3} causes partial closure of the clam-like IBC, disrupting the {beta}-interface and pulling the SD towards the IBC. This reorients an exposed SD loop ('hotspot' (HS) loop) that is essential for InsP{sub 3}R activation. The loop is conserved in RyR and includes mutations that are associated with malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. The HS loop interacts with an adjacent NT, suggesting that activation re-arranges inter-subunit interactions. The A domain of RyR functionally replaced the SD in full-length InsP{sub 3}R, and an InsP{sub 3}R in which its C-terminal transmembrane region was replaced by that from RyR1 was gated by InsP{sub 3} and blocked by ryanodine. Activation mechanisms are conserved between InsP{sub 3}R and Ry

  10. Subconductance states in single-channel activity of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors after removal of FKBP12.

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, G P; Junankar, P R; Dulhunty, A F

    1997-01-01

    FKBP12 was removed from ryanodine receptors (RyRs) by incubation of rabbit skeletal muscle terminal cisternae membranes with rapamycin. The extent of FKBP12 removal was estimated by immunostaining Western blots of terminal cisternae proteins. Single FKBP12-depleted RyR channels, incorporated into planar lipid bilayers, were modulated by Ca2+, ATP, ryanodine, and ruthenium red in the cis chamber and opened frequently to the normal maximum conductance of approximately 230 pS and to substate levels of approximately 0.25, approximately 0.5, and approximately 0.75 of the maximum conductance. Substate activity was rarely seen in native RyRs. Ryanodine did not after the number of conductance levels in FKBP12-depleted channels, but, at a membrane potential of +40 mV, reduced both the maximum and the substate conductances by approximately 50%. FKBP12-stripped channels were activated by a 10-fold-lower [Ca2+] and inhibited by a 10-fold-higher [Ca2+], than RyRs from control-incubated and native terminal cisternae vesicles. The open probability (Po) of these FKBP12-deficient channels was greater than that of control channels at 0.1 microM and 1 mM cis Ca2+ but no different at 10 microM cis Ca2+, where channels showed maximal Ca2+ activation. The approximately 0.25 substate was less sensitive than the maximum conductance to inhibition by Ca2+ and was the dominant level in channels inhibited by 1 mM cis Ca2+. The results show that FKBP12 coordinates the gating of channel activity in control and ryanodine-modified RyRs. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8994600

  11. The role of ryanodine receptor type 3 in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Supnet, Charlene; Sun, Suya; Zhang, Hua; Good, Levi; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is reported to play an important role in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. The role of ER Ca(2+) release channels, the ryanodine receptors (RyanRs), has been extensivelys tudied in AD models and RyanR expression and activity are upregulated in the brains of various familial AD (FAD) models.The objective of this study was to utilize a genetic approach to evaluate the importance of RyanR type 3 (RyanR3) in the context of AD pathology.The expression of RyanR3 was also elevated in hippocampus of APPPS1 mice (Thy1-APPKM670/671NL, Thy1-PS1L166P).In young (≤ 3 mo) APPPS1 mice, the deletion of RyanR3 increased hippocampal neuronal network excitability and accelerated AD pathology, leading to mushroom spine loss and increased amyloid accumulation. In contrast, deletion of RyanR3 in older APPPS1 mice (≥ 6 mo) rescued network excitability and mushroom spine loss, reduced amyloid plaque load and reduced spontaneous seizure occurrence.Our data suggests a dual role for RyanR3 in AD pathology. In young AD neurons, RyanR3 protects AD neurons from synaptic and network dysfunction. In older AD neurons, increased RyanR3 activity contributes to pathology. These results imply that blockade of RyanR3 may be beneficial for those in the later stages of the disease, but RyanR activators may be beneficial when used prior to disease onset or in its initial stages. Caffeine is an activator of RyanRs and our results may help to explain a complex epidemiological connection between coffee consumption in mid-life and risk of AD development in old age.

  12. RNAi mediated knockdown of the ryanodine receptor gene decreases chlorantraniliprole susceptibility in Sogatella furcifera.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yao; Wan, Pin-Jun; Hu, Xing-Xing; Li, Guo-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The diamide insecticides activate ryanodine receptors (RyRs) to release and deplete intracellular calcium stores from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscles and the endoplasmic reticulum of many types of cells. They rapidly interrupt feeding of the target pest and eventually kill the pest due to starvation. However, information about the structure and function of insect RyRs is still limited. In this study, we isolated a 15,985bp full-length cDNA (named SfRyR) from Sogatella furcifera, a serious rice planthopper pest throughout Asia. SfRyR encodes a 5140-amino acid protein, which shares 78-97% sequence identities with other insect homologues, and less than 50% identities with Homo sapiens RyR1-3. All hallmarks of the RyR proteins are conserved in SfRyR. In the N-terminus, SfRyR has a MIR domain, two RIH domains, three SPRY domains, four copies of RyR repeated domain and a RIH-associated domain. In the C-terminus, SfRyR possesses two consensus calcium ion-binding EF-hand motifs, and six transmembrane helices. Temporal and spatial expression analysis showed that SfRyR was widely found in all development stages including egg, first through fifth instar nymphs, macropterous adult females and males. On day 2 fifth-instar nymphs, SfRyR was ubiquitously expressed in the head, thorax and abdomen. Dietary ingestion of dsSfRyR1 and dsSfRyR2 significantly reduced the mRNA level of SfRyR in the treated nymphs by 77.9% and 81.8% respectively, and greatly decreased chlorantraniliprole-induced mortality. Thus, our results suggested that SfRyR gene encoded a functional RyR that mediates chlorantraniliprole toxicity to S. furcifera.

  13. A new cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linwei; Mirza, Shamaruh; Richardson, Spencer J.; Gallant, Esther M.; Thekkedam, Chris; Pace, Suzy M.; Zorzato, Francesco; Liu, Dan; Beard, Nicole A.; Dulhunty, Angela F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Junctin, a non-catalytic splice variant encoded by the aspartate-β-hydroxylase (Asph) gene, is inserted into the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ store where it modifies Ca2+ signalling in the heart and skeletal muscle through its regulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels. Junctin is required for normal muscle function as its knockout leads to abnormal Ca2+ signalling, muscle dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmia. However, the nature of the molecular interaction between junctin and RyRs is largely unknown and was assumed to occur only in the SR lumen. We find that there is substantial binding of RyRs to full junctin, and the junctin luminal and, unexpectedly, cytoplasmic domains. Binding of these different junctin domains had distinct effects on RyR1 and RyR2 activity: full junctin in the luminal solution increased RyR channel activity by ∼threefold, the C-terminal luminal interaction inhibited RyR channel activity by ∼50%, and the N-terminal cytoplasmic binding produced an ∼fivefold increase in RyR activity. The cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and RyR is required for luminal binding to replicate the influence of full junctin on RyR1 and RyR2 activity. The C-terminal domain of junctin binds to residues including the S1–S2 linker of RyR1 and N-terminal domain of junctin binds between RyR1 residues 1078 and 2156. PMID:25609705

  14. Cardiac calcium signalling pathologies associated with defective calmodulin regulation of type 2 ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arnáiz-Cot, Juan José; Damon, Brooke James; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Cleemann, Lars; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Meissner, Gerhard; Morad, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a homotetramer of 560 kDa polypeptides regulated by calmodulin (CaM), which decreases its open probability at diastolic and systolic Ca2+ concentrations. Point mutations in the CaM-binding domain of RyR2 (W3587A/L3591D/F3603A, RyR2ADA) in mice result in severe cardiac hypertrophy, poor left ventricle contraction and death by postnatal day 16, suggesting that CaM inhibition of RyR2 is required for normal cardiac function. Here, we report on Ca2+ signalling properties of enzymatically isolated, Fluo-4 dialysed whole cell clamped cardiac myocytes from 10–15-day-old wild-type (WT) and homozygous Ryr2ADA/ADA mice. Spontaneously occurring Ca2+ spark frequency, measured at −80 mV, was 14-fold lower in mutant compared to WT myocytes. ICa, though significantly smaller in mutant myocytes, triggered Ca2+ transients that were of comparable size to those of WT myocytes, but with slower activation and decay kinetics. Caffeine-triggered Ca2+ transients were about three times larger in mutant myocytes, generating three- to four-fold bigger Na+-Ca2+ exchanger NCX currents (INCX). Mutant myocytes often exhibited Ca2+ transients of variable size and duration that were accompanied by similarly alternating and slowly activating INCX. The data suggest that RyR2ADA mutation produces significant reduction in ICa density and ICa-triggered Ca2+ release gain, longer but infrequently occurring Ca2+ sparks, larger sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ loads, and spontaneous Ca2+ releases accompanied by activation of large and potentially arrhythmogenic inward INCX. PMID:23836685

  15. Redox modification of ryanodine receptors contributes to sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Györke, Inna; Belevych, Andriy E; Terentyeva, Radmila; Sridhar, Arun; Nishijima, Yoshinori; de Blanco, Esperanza Carcache; Khanna, Savita; Sen, Chandan K; Cardounel, Arturo J; Carnes, Cynthia A; Györke, Sandor

    2008-12-05

    Abnormal cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) function is recognized as an important factor in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). However, the specific molecular causes underlying RyR2 defects in HF remain poorly understood. In the present study, we used a canine model of chronic HF to test the hypothesis that the HF-related alterations in RyR2 function are caused by posttranslational modification by reactive oxygen species generated in the failing heart. Experimental approaches included imaging of cytosolic ([Ca(2+)](c)) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) luminal Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]SR) in isolated intact and permeabilized ventricular myocytes and single RyR2 channel recording using the planar lipid bilayer technique. The ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione, as well as the level of free thiols on RyR2 decreased markedly in failing versus control hearts consistent with increased oxidative stress in HF. RyR2-mediated SR Ca(2+) leak was significantly enhanced in permeabilized myocytes, resulting in reduced [Ca(2+)](SR) in HF compared to control cells. Both SR Ca(2+) leak and [Ca(2+)](SR) were partially normalized by treating HF myocytes with reducing agents. Conversely, oxidizing agents accelerated SR Ca(2+) leak and decreased [Ca(2+)](SR) in cells from normal hearts. Moreover, exposure to antioxidants significantly improved intracellular Ca(2+)-handling parameters in intact HF myocytes. Single RyR2 channel activity was significantly higher in HF versus control because of increased sensitivity to activation by luminal Ca(2+) and was partially normalized by reducing agents through restoring luminal Ca(2+) sensitivity oxidation of control RyR2s enhanced their luminal Ca(2+) sensitivity, thus reproducing the HF phenotype. These findings suggest that redox modification contributes to abnormal function of RyR2s in HF, presenting a potential therapeutic target for treating HF.

  16. Ryanodine receptor 2 contributes to hemorrhagic shock-induced bi-phasic vascular reactivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rong; Ding, Xiao-li; Liu, Liang-ming

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) is a critical component of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RyR2 in abnormal vascular reactivity after hemorrhagic shock in rats. Methods: SD rats were hemorrhaged and maintained mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 40 mmHg for 30 min or 2 h, and then superior mesenteric arteries (SMA) rings were prepared to measure the vascular reactivity. In other experiments, SMA rings of normal rats and rat VSMCs were exposed to a hypoxic medium for 10 min or 3 h. SMA rings of normal rats and VSMCs were transfected with siRNA against RyR2. Intracellular Ca2+ release in VSMCs was assessed using Fura-2/AM. Results: The vascular reactivity of the SMA rings from hemorrhagic rats was significantly increased in the early stage (30 min), but decreased in the late stage (2 h) of hemorrhagic shock. Similar results were observed in the SMA rings exposed to hypoxia for 10 min or 3 h. The enhanced vascular reactivity of the SMA rings exposed to hypoxia for 10 min was partly attenuated by transfection with RyR2 siRNA, whereas the blunted vascular reactivity of the SMA rings exposed to hypoxia for 3 h was partly restored by transfection with RyR2 siRNA. Treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine (1 mmol/L) significantly increased Ca2+ release in VSMCs exposed to hypoxia for 10 min or 3 h, which was partially antagonized by transfection with RyR2 siRNA. Conclusion: RyR2-mediated Ca2+ release contributes to the development of bi-phasic vascular reactivity induced by hemorrhagic shock or hypoxia. PMID:25263335

  17. Ryanodine receptor gating controls generation of diastolic calcium waves in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Petrovič, Pavol; Valent, Ivan; Cocherová, Elena; Pavelková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The role of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating in the initiation and propagation of calcium waves was investigated using a mathematical model comprising a stochastic description of RyR gating and a deterministic description of calcium diffusion and sequestration. We used a one-dimensional array of equidistantly spaced RyR clusters, representing the confocal scanning line, to simulate the formation of calcium sparks. Our model provided an excellent description of the calcium dependence of the frequency of diastolic calcium sparks and of the increased tendency for the production of calcium waves after a decrease in cytosolic calcium buffering. We developed a hypothesis relating changes in the propensity to form calcium waves to changes of RyR gating and tested it by simulation. With a realistic RyR gating model, increased ability of RyR to be activated by Ca2+ strongly increased the propensity for generation of calcium waves at low (0.05–0.1-µM) calcium concentrations but only slightly at high (0.2–0.4-µM) calcium concentrations. Changes in RyR gating altered calcium wave formation by changing the calcium sensitivity of spontaneous calcium spark activation and/or the average number of open RyRs in spontaneous calcium sparks. Gating changes that did not affect RyR activation by Ca2+ had only a weak effect on the propensity to form calcium waves, even if they strongly increased calcium spark frequency. Calcium waves induced by modulating the properties of the RyR activation site could be suppressed by inhibiting the spontaneous opening of the RyR. These data can explain the increased tendency for production of calcium waves under conditions when RyR gating is altered in cardiac diseases. PMID:26009544

  18. A new cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Mirza, Shamaruh; Richardson, Spencer J; Gallant, Esther M; Thekkedam, Chris; Pace, Suzy M; Zorzato, Francesco; Liu, Dan; Beard, Nicole A; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2015-03-01

    Junctin, a non-catalytic splice variant encoded by the aspartate-β-hydroxylase (Asph) gene, is inserted into the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) store where it modifies Ca(2+) signalling in the heart and skeletal muscle through its regulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Junctin is required for normal muscle function as its knockout leads to abnormal Ca(2+) signalling, muscle dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmia. However, the nature of the molecular interaction between junctin and RyRs is largely unknown and was assumed to occur only in the SR lumen. We find that there is substantial binding of RyRs to full junctin, and the junctin luminal and, unexpectedly, cytoplasmic domains. Binding of these different junctin domains had distinct effects on RyR1 and RyR2 activity: full junctin in the luminal solution increased RyR channel activity by ∼threefold, the C-terminal luminal interaction inhibited RyR channel activity by ∼50%, and the N-terminal cytoplasmic binding produced an ∼fivefold increase in RyR activity. The cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and RyR is required for luminal binding to replicate the influence of full junctin on RyR1 and RyR2 activity. The C-terminal domain of junctin binds to residues including the S1-S2 linker of RyR1 and N-terminal domain of junctin binds between RyR1 residues 1078 and 2156.

  19. Investigations of the contribution of a putative glycine hinge to ryanodine receptor channel gating.

    PubMed

    Euden, Joanne; Mason, Sammy A; Viero, Cedric; Thomas, N Lowri; Williams, Alan J

    2013-06-07

    Ryanodine receptor channels (RyR) are key components of striated muscle excitation-contraction coupling, and alterations in their function underlie both inherited and acquired disease. A full understanding of the disease process will require a detailed knowledge of the mechanisms and structures involved in RyR function. Unfortunately, high-resolution structural data, such as exist for K(+)-selective channels, are not available for RyR. In the absence of these data, we have used modeling to identify similarities in the structural elements of K(+) channel pore-forming regions and postulated equivalent regions of RyR. This has identified a sequence of residues in the cytosolic cavity-lining transmembrane helix of RyR (G(4864)LIIDA(4869) in RyR2) analogous to the glycine hinge motif present in many K(+) channels. Gating in these K(+) channels can be disrupted by substitution of residues for the hinge glycine. We investigated the involvement of glycine 4864 in RyR2 gating by monitoring properties of recombinant human RyR2 channels in which this glycine is replaced by residues that alter gating in K(+) channels. Our data demonstrate that introducing alanine at position 4864 produces no significant change in RyR2 function. In contrast, function is altered when glycine 4864 is replaced by either valine or proline, the former preventing channel opening and the latter modifying both ion translocation and gating. Our studies reveal novel information on the structural basis of RyR gating, identifying both similarities with, and differences from, K(+) channels. Glycine 4864 is not absolutely required for channel gating, but some flexibility at this point in the cavity-lining transmembrane helix is necessary for normal RyR function.

  20. Calmodulin regulation and identification of calmodulin binding region of type-3 ryanodine receptor calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Xu, Le; Pasek, Daniel A; Evans, Kelly E; Chen, S R Wayne; Meissner, Gerhard

    2005-11-15

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of intracellular Ca(2+) channels that are regulated by calmodulin (CaM). At low Ca(2+) concentrations (<1 microM), CaM activates RyR1 and RyR3 and inhibits RyR2. At elevated Ca(2+) concentrations (>1 microM), CaM inhibits all three RyR isoforms. Here we report that the regulation of recombinant RyR3 by CaM is sensitive to redox regulation. RyR3 in the presence of reduced glutathione binds CaM with 10-15-fold higher affinity, at low and high Ca(2+) concentrations, compared to in the presence of oxidized glutathione. However, compared to RyR1 assayed at low Ca(2+) concentrations under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, CaM binds RyR3 with reduced affinity but activates RyR3 to a greater extent. Under reducing conditions, RyR1 and RyR3 activities are inhibited with a similar affinity at [Ca(2+)] > 1 microM. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that RyR3 contains a single conserved CaM binding site. Corresponding amino acid substitutions in the CaM binding site differentially affect CaM binding and CaM regulation of RyR3 and those of the two other isoforms. The results support the suggestion that other isoform dependent regions have a major role in the regulation of RyRs by CaM [Yamaguchi et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 36433-36439].

  1. Ryanodine receptor cluster fragmentation and redistribution in persistent atrial fibrillation enhance calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Macquaide, Niall; Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Sempels, Wouter; Lenaerts, Ilse; Holemans, Patricia; Hofkens, Johan; Jafri, M. Saleet; Willems, Rik; Sipido, Karin R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In atrial fibrillation (AF), abnormalities in Ca2+ release contribute to arrhythmia generation and contractile dysfunction. We explore whether ryanodine receptor (RyR) cluster ultrastructure is altered and is associated with functional abnormalities in AF. Methods and results Using high-resolution confocal microscopy (STED), we examined RyR cluster morphology in fixed atrial myocytes from sheep with persistent AF (N = 6) and control (Ctrl; N = 6) animals. RyR clusters on average contained 15 contiguous RyRs; this did not differ between AF and Ctrl. However, the distance between clusters was significantly reduced in AF (288 ± 12 vs. 376 ± 17 nm). When RyR clusters were grouped into Ca2+ release units (CRUs), i.e. clusters separated by <150 nm, CRUs in AF had more clusters (3.43 ± 0.10 vs. 2.95 ± 0.02 in Ctrl), which were more dispersed. Furthermore, in AF cells, more RyR clusters were found between Z lines. In parallel experiments, Ca2+ sparks were monitored in live permeabilized myocytes. In AF, myocytes had >50% higher spark frequency with increased spark time to peak (TTP) and duration, and a higher incidence of macrosparks. A computational model of the CRU was used to simulate the morphological alterations observed in AF cells. Increasing cluster fragmentation to the level observed in AF cells caused the observed changes, i.e. higher spark frequency, increased TTP and duration; RyR clusters dispersed between Z-lines increased the occurrence of macrosparks. Conclusion In persistent AF, ultrastructural reorganization of RyR clusters within CRUs is associated with overactive Ca2+ release, increasing the likelihood of propagating Ca2+ release. PMID:26490742

  2. Ryanodine Receptor Activation Induces Long-Term Plasticity of Spine Calcium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pannasch, Ulrike; Rückl, Martin; Rüdiger, Sten; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of signalling in dendritic spines is the synapse-specific transduction of short electrical signals into biochemical responses. Ca2+ is a major upstream effector in this transduction cascade, serving both as a depolarising electrical charge carrier at the membrane and an intracellular second messenger. Upon action potential firing, the majority of spines are subject to global back-propagating action potential (bAP) Ca2+ transients. These transients translate neuronal suprathreshold activation into intracellular biochemical events. Using a combination of electrophysiology, two-photon Ca2+ imaging, and modelling, we demonstrate that bAPs are electrochemically coupled to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores via ryanodine receptors (RyRs). We describe a new function mediated by spine RyRs: the activity-dependent long-term enhancement of the bAP-Ca2+ transient. Spines regulate bAP Ca2+ influx independent of each other, as bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is compartmentalized and independent of the dendritic Ca2+ transient. Furthermore, this functional state change depends exclusively on bAPs travelling antidromically into dendrites and spines. Induction, but not expression, of bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is a spine-specific function of the RyR. We demonstrate that RyRs can form specific Ca2+ signalling nanodomains within single spines. Functionally, RyR mediated Ca2+ release in these nanodomains induces a new form of Ca2+ transient plasticity that constitutes a spine specific storage mechanism of neuronal suprathreshold activity patterns. PMID:26098891

  3. In vitro Modeling of Ryanodine Receptor 2 Dysfunction Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Azra; Xu, Guoxing; Shao, Kaifeng; Papadopoulos, Symeon; Lehmann, Martin; Arnáiz-Cot, Juan J.; Rosa, Angelo O.; Nguemo, Filomain; Matzkies, Matthias; Dittmann, Sven; Stone, Susannah L.; Linke, Matthias; Zechner, Ulrich; Beyer, Vera; Hennies, Hans Christian; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Klauke, Baerbel; Parwani, Abdul S.; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Farr, Martin; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin; Milting, Hendrik; Hescheler, Juergen; Šaric, Tomo

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated from accessible adult cells of patients with genetic diseases open unprecedented opportunities for exploring the pathophysiology of human diseases in vitro. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia type 1 (CPVT1) is an inherited cardiac disorder that is caused by mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor type 2 gene (RYR2) and is characterized by stress-induced ventricular arrhythmia that can lead to sudden cardiac death in young individuals. The aim of this study was to generate iPS cells from a patient with CPVT1 and determine whether iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes carrying patient specific RYR2 mutation recapitulate the disease phenotype in vitro. Methods: iPS cells were derived from dermal fibroblasts of healthy donors and a patient with CPVT1 carrying the novel heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation p.F2483I in the RYR2. Functional properties of iPS cell derived-cardiomyocytes were analyzed by using whole-cell current and voltage clamp and calcium imaging techniques. Results: Patch-clamp recordings revealed arrhythmias and delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) after catecholaminergic stimulation of CPVT1-iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Calcium imaging studies showed that, compared to healthy cardiomyocytes, CPVT1-cardiomyocytes exhibit higher amplitudes and longer durations of spontaneous Ca2+ release events at basal state. In addition, in CPVT1-cardiomyocytes the Ca2+-induced Ca2+-release events continued after repolarization and were abolished by increasing the cytosolic cAMP levels with forskolin. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the suitability of iPS cells in modeling RYR2-related cardiac disorders in vitro and opens new opportunities for investigating the disease mechanism in vitro, developing new drugs, predicting their toxicity, and optimizing current treatment strategies. PMID:22178870

  4. Peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor can modulate cardiac ryanodine receptor channel activity and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Curtis, Suzanne M; Cengia, Louise; Sakowska, Magdalena; Casarotto, Marco G

    2004-01-01

    We show that peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop alter cardiac RyR (ryanodine receptor) channel activity in a cytoplasmic Ca2+-dependent manner. The peptides were AC (Thr-793-Ala-812 of the cardiac dihydropyridine receptor), AS (Thr-671-Leu-690 of the skeletal dihydropyridine receptor), and a modified AS peptide [AS(D-R18)], with an extended helical structure. The peptides added to the cytoplasmic side of channels in lipid bilayers at > or = 10 nM activated channels when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 100 nM, but either inhibited or did not affect channel activity when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 10 or 100 microM. Both activation and inhibition were independent of bilayer potential. Activation by AS, but not by AC or AS(D-R18), was reduced at peptide concentrations >1 mM in a voltage-dependent manner (at +40 mV). In control experiments, channels were not activated by the scrambled AS sequence (ASS) or skeletal II-III loop peptide (NB). Resting Ca2+ release from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum was not altered by peptide AC, but Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release was depressed. Resting and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release were enhanced by both the native and modified AS peptides. NMR revealed (i) that the structure of peptide AS(D-R18) is not influenced by [Ca2+] and (ii) that peptide AC adopts a helical structure, particularly in the region containing positively charged residues. This is the first report of specific functional interactions between dihydropyridine receptor A region peptides and cardiac RyR ion channels in lipid bilayers. PMID:14678014

  5. Characterization of RyR1-slow, a ryanodine receptor specific to slow-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morrissette, J; Xu, L; Nelson, A; Meissner, G; Block, B A

    2000-11-01

    Two distinct skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) are expressed in a fiber type-specific manner in fish skeletal muscle (11). In this study, we compare [(3)H]ryanodine binding and single channel activity of RyR1-slow from fish slow-twitch skeletal muscle with RyR1-fast and RyR3 isolated from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Scatchard plots indicate that RyR1-slow has a lower affinity for [(3)H]ryanodine when compared with RyR1-fast. In single channel recordings, RyR1-slow and RyR1-fast had similar slope conductances. However, the maximum open probability (P(o)) of RyR1-slow was threefold less than the maximum P(o) of RyR1-fast. Single channel studies also revealed the presence of two populations of RyRs in tuna fast-twitch muscle (RyR1-fast and RyR3). RyR3 had the highest P(o) of all the RyR channels and displayed less inhibition at millimolar Ca(2+). The addition of 5 mM Mg-ATP or 2.5 mM beta, gamma-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (AMP-PCP) to the channels increased the P(o) and [(3)H]ryanodine binding of both RyR1s but also caused a shift in the Ca(2+) dependency curve of RyR1-slow such that Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation was attenuated. [(3)H]ryanodine binding data also showed that Mg(2+)-dependent inhibition of RyR1-slow was reduced in the presence of AMP-PCP. These results indicate differences in the physiological properties of RyRs in fish slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle, which may contribute to differences in the way intracellular Ca(2+) is regulated in these muscle types.

  6. Arachidonic acid activates release of calcium ions from reticulum via ryanodine receptor channels in C2C12 skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Muslikhov, E R; Sukhanova, I F; Avdonin, P V

    2014-05-01

    Arachidonic acid causes an increase in free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in differentiated skeletal multinucleated myotubes C2C12 and does not induce calcium response in C2C12 myoblasts. The same reaction of myotubes to arachidonic acid is observed in Ca2+-free medium. This indicates that arachidonic acid induces release of calcium ions from intracellular stores. The blocker of ryanodine receptor channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum dantrolene (20 µM) inhibits this effect by 68.7 ± 6.3% (p < 0.001). The inhibitor of two-pore calcium channels of endolysosomal vesicles trans-NED19 (10 µM) decreases the response to arachidonic acid by 35.8 ± 5.4% (p < 0.05). The phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 (10 µM) has no effect. These data indicate the involvement of ryanodine receptor calcium channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum in [Ca2+]i elevation in skeletal myotubes caused by arachidonic acid and possible participation of two-pore calcium channels from endolysosomal vesicles in this process.

  7. Ryanodine receptor point mutations confer diamide insecticide resistance in tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    PubMed

    Roditakis, Emmanouil; Steinbach, Denise; Moritz, Gerald; Vasakis, Emmanouil; Stavrakaki, Marianna; Ilias, Aris; García-Vidal, Lidia; Martínez-Aguirre, María Del Rosario; Bielza, Pablo; Morou, Evangelia; Silva, Jefferson E; Silva, Wellington M; Siqueira, Ηerbert A A; Iqbal, Sofia; Troczka, Bartlomiej J; Williamson, Martin S; Bass, Chris; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia; Vontas, John; Nauen, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Insect ryanodine receptors (RyR) are the molecular target-site for the recently introduced diamide insecticides. Diamides are particularly active on Lepidoptera pests, including tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). High levels of diamide resistance were recently described in some European populations of T. absoluta, however, the mechanisms of resistance remained unknown. In this study the molecular basis of diamide resistance was investigated in a diamide resistant strain from Italy (IT-GELA-SD4), and additional resistant field populations collected in Greece, Spain and Brazil. The genetics of resistance was investigated by reciprocally crossing strain IT-GELA-SD4 with a susceptible strain and revealed an autosomal incompletely recessive mode of inheritance. To investigate the possible role of target-site mutations as known from diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella), we sequenced respective domains of the RyR gene of T. absoluta. Genotyping of individuals of IT-GELA-SD4 and field-collected strains showing different levels of diamide resistance revealed the presence of G4903E and I4746M RyR target-site mutations. These amino acid substitutions correspond to those recently described for diamide resistant diamondback moth, i.e. G4946E and I4790M. We also detected two novel mutations, G4903V and I4746T, in some of the resistant T. absoluta strains. Radioligand binding studies with thoracic membrane preparations of the IT-GELA-SD4 strain provided functional evidence that these mutations alter the affinity of the RyR to diamides. In combination with previous work on P. xylostella our study highlights the importance of position G4903 (G4946 in P. xylostella) of the insect RyR in defining sensitivity to diamides. The discovery of diamide resistance mutations in T. absoluta populations of diverse geographic origin has serious implications for the efficacy of diamides under applied conditions. The implementation of appropriate resistance

  8. Aldolase potentiates DIDS activation of the ryanodine receptor in rabbit skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Seo, In-Ra; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Eun Hui; Meissner, Gerhard; Kim, Do Han

    2006-01-01

    DIDS (4,4′-di-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate), an anion channel blocker, triggers Ca2+ release from skeletal muscle SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum). The present study characterized the effects of DIDS on rabbit skeletal single Ca2+-release channel/RyR1 (ryanodine receptor type 1) incorporated into a planar lipid bilayer. When junctional SR vesicles were used for channel incorporation (native RyR1), DIDS increased the mean Po (open probability) of RyR1 without affecting unitary conductance when Cs+ was used as the charge carrier. Lifetime analysis of single RyR1 activities showed that 10 μM DIDS induced reversible long-lived open events (Po=0.451±0.038) in the presence of 10 μM Ca2+, due mainly to a new third component for both open and closed time constants. However, when purified RyR1 was examined in the same condition, 10 μM DIDS became considerably less potent (Po=0.206±0.025), although the caffeine response was similar between native and purified RyR1. Hence we postulated that a DIDS-binding protein, essential for the DIDS sensitivity of RyR1, was lost during RyR1 purification. DIDS-affinity column chromatography of solubilized junctional SR, and MALDI–TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization–time-of-flight) MS analysis of the affinity-column-associated proteins, identified four major DIDS-binding proteins in the SR fraction. Among them, aldolase was the only protein that greatly potentiated DIDS sensitivity. The association between RyR1 and aldolase was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and aldolase-affinity batch-column chromatography. Taken together, we conclude that aldolase is physically associated with RyR1 and could confer a considerable potentiation of the DIDS effect on RyR1. PMID:16817780

  9. Expression of ryanodine receptor RyR3 produces Ca2+ sparks in dyspedic myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher W; Schneider, Martin F; Castillo, Daniel; Protasi, Feliciano; Wang, Yaming; Wayne Chen, S R; Allen, Paul D

    2000-01-01

    Discrete, localized elevations of myoplasmic [Ca2+], Ca2+‘sparks’, were readily detected using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 and laser scanning confocal microscopy in ‘dyspedic’ 1B5 myotubes, i.e. myotubes which do not express ryanodine receptors (RyRs), transduced with virions containing cDNA for RyR type 3 that were saponin permeabilized to allow dye entry. Ca2+ sparks were never observed in non-transduced RyR null myotubes.The spatial locations of sparks observed in permeabilized myotubes roughly corresponded to regions of RyR protein expression in the same myotube as detected after subsequent fixation and antibody staining.Permeabilized RyR3-transduced myotubes exhibited similar punctate peripheral RyR3 protein immunohistochemical patterns as myotubes fixed before permeabilization indicating that permeabilization did not affect the structural organization of the triad.Ca2+ sparks, recorded in line scan mode, in permeabilized myotubes expressing RyR3 exhibited mean amplitudes (change in fluorescence/mean fluorescence, ΔF/F: 1.20 ± 0.04) and temporal rise times (10-90 %; 6.31 ± 0.12 ms) similar to those of sparks recorded in permeabilized frog skeletal muscle fibres (0.98 ± 0.01; 6.11 ± 0.07, respectively) using the same confocal system. Spatial extent and temporal duration of the Ca2+ sparks were ≈40 % larger in the RyR3-expressing myotube cultures than in frog fibres.Ca2+ sparks recorded in line scan mode often occurred repetitively at the same spatial location in RyR3-expressing myotubes. Such repetitive events were highly reproducible in amplitude and spatio-temporal properties, as previously observed for repetitive mode sparks in frog skeletal muscle.Ca2+ sparks recorded in xy mode were frequently compressed in the y (slower scan) direction compared to the x direction. This asymmetry was reproduced assuming spatially symmetric events having the time course of Ca2+ sparks recorded in line scan (xt) mode.These expression studies

  10. Unbalanced upregulation of ryanodine receptor 2 plays a particular role in early development of daunorubicin cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kucerova, Dana; Doka, Gabriel; Kruzliak, Peter; Turcekova, Katarina; Kmecova, Jana; Brnoliakova, Zuzana; Kyselovic, Jan; Kirchhefer, Uwe; Müller, Frank U; Krenek, Peter; Boknik, Peter; Klimas, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Calcium release channel on the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes (ryanodine receptor type 2, RyR2) plays a critical role in the regulation of calcium and was identified as a crucial factor for development of chronic anthracycline cardiomyopathy. Its early stages are less well described although these determine the later development. Hence, we tested the effect of repeated, short-term anthracycline (daunorubicin) administration on cardiac performance, cardiomyocyte function and accompanied changes in calcium regulating proteins expression. Ten-twelve weeks old male Wistar rats were administered with 6 doses of daunorubicin (DAU, 3 mg/kg, i.p., every 48 h), controls (CON) received vehicle. Left ventricular function (left ventricular pressure, LVP; rate of pressure development, +dP/dt and decline, -dP/dt) was measured using left ventricular catheterization under tribromethanol anaesthesia (15 ml/kg b.w.). Cell shortening was measured in enzymatically isolated cardiomyocytes. The expressions of RyR2 and associated intracellular calcium regulating proteins, cytoskeletal proteins (alpha-actinin, alpha-tubul in) as well as oxidative stress regulating enzymes (gp91phox, MnSOD) were detected in ventricular tissue samples using immunoblotting. mRNA expressions of cardiac damage markers (Nppa and Nppb, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides; Myh6, Myh7 and Myh7b, myosin heavy chain alpha and beta) were detected using RT-PCR. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration was measured to estimate oxidative stress. DAU rats exhibited significantly depressed left ventricular features (LVP by 14%, +dP/dt by 36% and -dP/dt by 30%; for all P<0.05), in line with concomitant increase in Nppa and Nppb gene expressions (3.23- and 2.18-fold, for both P<0.05), and a 4.34-fold increase in Myh7 (P<0.05). Controversially, we observed increased cell shortening of isolated cardiac cells by 31% (p<0.05). DAU administration was associated with a twofold upregulation of RyR2 (P<0

  11. Hierarchical clustering of ryanodine receptors enables emergence of a calcium clock in sinoatrial node cells.

    PubMed

    Stern, Michael D; Maltseva, Larissa A; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J; Lakatta, Edward G; Maltsev, Victor A

    2014-05-01

    The sinoatrial node, whose cells (sinoatrial node cells [SANCs]) generate rhythmic action potentials, is the primary pacemaker of the heart. During diastole, calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) interacts with membrane currents to control the rate of the heartbeat. This "calcium clock" takes the form of stochastic, partially periodic, localized calcium release (LCR) events that propagate, wave-like, for limited distances. The detailed mechanisms controlling the calcium clock are not understood. We constructed a computational model of SANCs, including three-dimensional diffusion and buffering of calcium in the cytosol and SR; explicit, stochastic gating of individual RyRs and L-type calcium channels; and a full complement of voltage- and calcium-dependent membrane currents. We did not include an anatomical submembrane space or inactivation of RyRs, the two heuristic components that have been used in prior models but are not observed experimentally. When RyRs were distributed in discrete clusters separated by >1 µm, only isolated sparks were produced in this model and LCR events did not form. However, immunofluorescent staining of SANCs for RyR revealed the presence of bridging RyR groups between large clusters, forming an irregular network. Incorporation of this architecture into the model led to the generation of propagating LCR events. Partial periodicity emerged from the interaction of LCR events, as observed experimentally. This calcium clock becomes entrained with membrane currents to accelerate the beating rate, which therefore was controlled by the activity of the SERCA pump, RyR sensitivity, and L-type current amplitude, all of which are targets of β-adrenergic-mediated phosphorylation. Unexpectedly, simulations revealed the existence of a pathological mode at high RyR sensitivity to calcium, in which the calcium clock loses synchronization with the membrane, resulting in a paradoxical decrease in beating

  12. Coupled gating of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors is modulated by Ca2+, Mg2+, and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Maura; Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L.; Neumann, Jake T.; Escobar, Ariel L.; Fleischer, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Coupled gating (synchronous openings and closures) of groups of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors (RyR1), which mimics RyR1-mediated Ca2+ release underlying Ca2+ sparks, was first described by Marx et al. (Marx SO, Ondrias K, Marks AR. Science 281: 818–821, 1998). The nature of the RyR1-RyR1 interactions for coupled gating still needs to be characterized. Consequently, we defined planar lipid bilayer conditions where ∼25% of multichannel reconstitutions contain mixtures of coupled and independently gating RyR1. In ∼10% of the cases, all RyRs (2–10 channels; most frequently 3–4) gated in coupled fashion, allowing for quantification. Our results indicated that coupling required cytosolic solutions containing ATP/Mg2+ and high (50 mM) luminal Ca2+ (Calum) or Sr2+ solutions. Bursts of coupled activity (events) started and ended abruptly, with all channels activating/deactivating within ∼300 μs. Coupled RyR1 were heterogeneous, where highly active RyR1 (“drivers”) seemed open during the entire coupled event (Po = 1), while other RyR1s (“followers”) displayed abundant flickering and smaller amplitude. Drivers mean open time increased with cytosolic Ca2+ (Cacyt) or caffeine, whereas followers flicker frequency was Cacyt independent and more sensitive to inhibition by cytosolic Mg2+. Coupled events were insensitive to varying lumen-to-cytosol Ca2+ fluxes from ∼1 to 8 pA, which does not corroborate coupling of neighboring RyR1 by local Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. However, coupling requires specific Calum sites, as it was lost when Calum was replaced by luminal Ba2+ or Mg2+. In summary, coupled events reveal complex interactions among heterogeneous RyR1, differentially modulated by cytosolic ATP/Mg2+, Cacyt, and Calum, which under cell-like ionic conditions may parallel synchronous RyR1 gating during Ca2+ sparks. PMID:22785120

  13. Hierarchical clustering of ryanodine receptors enables emergence of a calcium clock in sinoatrial node cells

    PubMed Central

    Maltseva, Larissa A.; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Maltsev, Victor A.

    2014-01-01

    The sinoatrial node, whose cells (sinoatrial node cells [SANCs]) generate rhythmic action potentials, is the primary pacemaker of the heart. During diastole, calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) interacts with membrane currents to control the rate of the heartbeat. This “calcium clock” takes the form of stochastic, partially periodic, localized calcium release (LCR) events that propagate, wave-like, for limited distances. The detailed mechanisms controlling the calcium clock are not understood. We constructed a computational model of SANCs, including three-dimensional diffusion and buffering of calcium in the cytosol and SR; explicit, stochastic gating of individual RyRs and L-type calcium channels; and a full complement of voltage- and calcium-dependent membrane currents. We did not include an anatomical submembrane space or inactivation of RyRs, the two heuristic components that have been used in prior models but are not observed experimentally. When RyRs were distributed in discrete clusters separated by >1 µm, only isolated sparks were produced in this model and LCR events did not form. However, immunofluorescent staining of SANCs for RyR revealed the presence of bridging RyR groups between large clusters, forming an irregular network. Incorporation of this architecture into the model led to the generation of propagating LCR events. Partial periodicity emerged from the interaction of LCR events, as observed experimentally. This calcium clock becomes entrained with membrane currents to accelerate the beating rate, which therefore was controlled by the activity of the SERCA pump, RyR sensitivity, and L-type current amplitude, all of which are targets of β-adrenergic–mediated phosphorylation. Unexpectedly, simulations revealed the existence of a pathological mode at high RyR sensitivity to calcium, in which the calcium clock loses synchronization with the membrane, resulting in a paradoxical decrease in

  14. Ryanodine produces a low frequency stimulation-induced NMDA receptor-independent long-term potentiation in the rat dentate gyrus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Wu, J; Rowan, M J; Anwyl, R

    1996-01-01

    1. The induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) was investigated in the rat dentate gyrus in the presence of ryanodine, an agent which is known to selectively bind to the ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ channels which regulate Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores. 2. In control media, high frequency stimulation (HFS) induced LTP, and prolonged low frequency stimulation (LFS) induced long-term depression (LTD), of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and patch clamped excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). 3. In the presence of ryanodine, at a threshold concentration of about 1 microM, HFS-induced LTP was inhibited, whereas LFS (5 Hz, 900 pulses) now induced LTP. 4. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist D-2-amino-phosphonopentanoate (D-AP5), at both 50 and 200 microM, did not prevent the induction of LTP by 5 Hz LFS in the presence of ryanodine. This demonstrates the NMDAR independence of LTP induction in the presence of ryanodine. Furthermore, D AP5 reversed the block of HFS-induced LTP by ryanodine. 5. The induction of LTP by 5 Hz LFS in the presence of ryanodine was blocked by lowering extracellular Ca2+, or by rapidly buffering intracellular Ca2+ to very low levels with BAPTA. 6. The induction of LTP by 5 Hz LFS was inhibited by the L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, and also by Ni2+ a commonly used T type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blocker. 7. The 5 Hz LFS-induced LTP in the presence of ryanodine was inhibited by the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist (+)-alpha-methyl 4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). 8. The 5 Hz LFS-induced LTP in the presence of ryanodine was blocked by Ruthenium Red, an agent known to block RyR channel opening, and also by thapsigargin, an agent known to block-ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake into endoplasmic reticulum. 9. The results of the present studies emphasize the importance of intracellular Ca2+ stores in the induction of LTP. PMID:8887781

  15. A variably spliced region in the type 1 ryanodine receptor may participate in an inter-domain interaction.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takashi; Pace, Suzy M; Wei, Lan; Beard, Nicole A; Dirksen, Robert T; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine residues that are variably spliced in the juvenile and adult isoforms of the skeletal-muscle RyR1 (type 1 ryanodine receptor). The juvenile ASI(-) splice variant is less active than the adult ASI(+) variant and is overexpressed in patients with DM (myotonic dystrophy) [Kimura, Nakamori, Lueck, Pouliquin, Aoike, Fujimura, Dirksen, Takahashi, Dulhunty and Sakoda (2005) Hum. Mol. Genet. 14, 2189-2200]. In the present study, we explore the ASI region using synthetic peptides corresponding to rabbit RyR1 residues Thr3471-Gly3500 either containing [PASI(+)] or lacking [PASI(-)] the ASI residues. Both peptides increased [3H]ryanodine binding to rabbit RyR1s, increased Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reti-culum vesicles and increased single RyR1 channel activity. The peptide PASI(-) was more active in each case than PASI(+). [3H]Ryanodine binding to recombinant ASI(+)RyR1 or ASI(-)-RyR1 was enhanced more by PASI(-) than PASI(+), with the greatest increase seen when PASI(-) was added to ASI(-)RyR1. The activation of the RyR channels is consistent with the hypo-thesis that the peptides interrupt an inhibitory inter-domain inter-action and that PASI(-) is more effective at interrupting this interaction than PASI(+). We therefore suggest that the ASI(-) sequence interacts more tightly than the ASI(+) sequence with its binding partner, so that the ASI(-)RyR1 is more strongly inhibited (less active) than the ASI(+)RyR1. Thus the affinity of the binding partners in this inter-domain interaction may deter-mine the activities of the mature and juvenile isoforms of RyR1 and the stronger inhibition in the juvenile isoform may contribute to the myopathy in DM.

  16. Chloroform extract of hog barn dust modulates skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor calcium-release channel (RyR1).

    PubMed

    Tian, Chengju; Shao, Chun Hong; Fenster, Danielle S; Mixan, Mark; Romberger, Debra J; Toews, Myron L; Bidasee, Keshore R

    2010-09-01

    Skeletal muscle weakness is a reported ailment in individuals working in commercial hog confinement facilities. To date, specific mechanisms responsible for this symptom remain undefined. The purpose of this study was to assess whether hog barn dust (HBD) contains components that are capable of binding to and modulating the activity of type 1 ryanodine receptor Ca2+-release channel (RyR1), a key regulator of skeletal muscle function. HBD collected from confinement facilities in Nebraska were extracted with chloroform, filtered, and rotary evaporated to dryness. Residues were resuspended in hexane-chloroform (20:1) and precipitates, referred to as HBDorg, were air-dried and studied further. In competition assays, HBDorg dose-dependently displaced [3H]ryanodine from binding sites on RyR1 with an IC50 of 1.5±0.1 microg/ml (Ki=0.4±0.0 microg/ml). In single-channel assays using RyR1 reconstituted into a lipid bilayer, HBDorg exhibited three distinct dose-dependent effects: first it increased the open probability of RyR1 by increasing its gating frequency and dwell time in the open state, then it induced a state of reduced conductance (55% of maximum) that was more likely to occur and persist at positive holding potentials, and finally it irreversibly closed RyR1. In differentiated C2C12 myotubes, addition of HBD triggered a rise in intracellular Ca2+ that was blocked by pretreatment with ryanodine. Since persistent activation and/or closure of RyR1 results in skeletal muscle weakness, these new data suggest that HBD is responsible, at least in part, for the muscle ailment reported by hog confinement workers.

  17. Chloroform extract of hog barn dust modulates skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor calcium-release channel (RyR1)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chengju; Shao, Chun Hong; Fenster, Danielle S.; Mixan, Mark; Romberger, Debra J.; Toews, Myron L.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle weakness is a reported ailment in individuals working in commercial hog confinement facilities. To date, specific mechanisms responsible for this symptom remain undefined. The purpose of this study was to assess whether hog barn dust (HBD) contains components that are capable of binding to and modulating the activity of type 1 ryanodine receptor Ca2+-release channel (RyR1), a key regulator of skeletal muscle function. HBD collected from confinement facilities in Nebraska were extracted with chloroform, filtered, and rotary evaporated to dryness. Residues were resuspended in hexane-chloroform (20:1) and precipitates, referred to as HBDorg, were air-dried and studied further. In competition assays, HBDorg dose-dependently displaced [3H]ryanodine from binding sites on RyR1 with an IC50 of 1.5 ± 0.1 μg/ml (Ki = 0.4 ± 0.0 μg/ml). In single-channel assays using RyR1 reconstituted into a lipid bilayer, HBDorg exhibited three distinct dose-dependent effects: first it increased the open probability of RyR1 by increasing its gating frequency and dwell time in the open state, then it induced a state of reduced conductance (55% of maximum) that was more likely to occur and persist at positive holding potentials, and finally it irreversibly closed RyR1. In differentiated C2C12 myotubes, addition of HBD triggered a rise in intracellular Ca2+ that was blocked by pretreatment with ryanodine. Since persistent activation and/or closure of RyR1 results in skeletal muscle weakness, these new data suggest that HBD is responsible, at least in part, for the muscle ailment reported by hog confinement workers. PMID:20576841

  18. P2 receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed Central

    Kunapuli, S P; Daniel, J L

    1998-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides have been implicated in a number of physiological functions. Nucleotides act on cell-surface receptors known as P2 receptors, of which several subtypes have been cloned. Both ATP and ADP are stored in platelets and are released upon platelet activation. Furthermore, nucleotides are also released from damaged or broken cells. Thus during vascular injury nucleotides play an important role in haemostasis through activation of platelets, modulation of vascular tone, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes to the site of injury, and facilitation of adhesion of leucocytes to the endothelium. Nucleotides also moderate these functions by generating nitric oxide and prostaglandin I2 through activation of endothelial cells, and by activating different receptor subtypes on vascular smooth muscle cells. In the heart, P2 receptors regulate contractility through modulation of L-type Ca2+ channels, although the molecular mechanisms involved are still under investigation. Classical pharmacological studies have identified several P2 receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system. Molecular pharmacological studies have clarified the nature of some of these receptors, but have complicated the picture with others. In platelets, the classical P2T receptor has now been resolved into three P2 receptor subtypes: the P2Y1, P2X1 and P2TAC receptors (the last of these, which is coupled to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, is yet to be cloned). In peripheral blood leucocytes, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes, the effects of classical P2X, P2Y and P2U receptors have been found to be mediated by more than one P2 receptor subtype. However, the exact functions of these multiple receptor subtypes remain to be understood, as P2-receptor-selective agonists and antagonists are still under development. PMID:9841859

  19. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. )

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  20. The ryanodine receptor/calcium channel genes are widely and differentially expressed in murine brain and peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are intracellular calcium release channels that participate in controlling cytosolic calcium levels. At variance with the probably ubiquitous inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-operated calcium channels (1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors), RyRs have been mainly regarded as the calcium release channels controlling skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. Increasing evidence has recently suggested that RyRs may be more widely expressed, but this has never been extensively examined. Therefore, we cloned three cDNAs corresponding to murine RyR homologues to carry a comprehensive analysis of their expression in murine tissues. Here, we report that the three genes are expressed in almost all tissues analyzed, where tissue-specific patterns of expression were observed. In the uterus and vas deferens, expression of RyR3 was localized to the smooth muscle component of these organs. In the testis, expression of RyR1 and RyR3 was detected in germ cells. RyR mRNAs were also detected in in vitro-cultured cell lines. RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3 mRNA were detected in the cerebrum and in the cerebellum. In situ analysis revealed a cell type-specific pattern of expression in the different regions of the central nervous system. The differential expression of the three ryanodine receptor genes in the central nervous system was also confirmed using specific antibodies against the respective proteins. This widespread pattern of expression suggests that RyRs may participate in the regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis in a range of cells wider than previously recognized. PMID:7876312

  1. Myometrial angiotensin II receptor subtypes change during ovine pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, B E; Ipson, M A; Shaul, P W; Kamm, K E; Rosenfeld, C R

    1993-01-01

    Although regulation of angiotensin II receptor (AT) binding in vascular and uterine smooth muscle is similar in nonpregnant animals, studies suggest it may differ during pregnancy. We, therefore, examined binding characteristics of myometrial AT receptors in nulliparous (n = 7), pregnant (n = 24, 110-139 d of gestation), and postpartum (n = 21, 5 to > or = 130 d) sheep and compared this to vascular receptor binding. We also determined if changes in myometrial binding reflect alterations in receptor subtype. By using plasma membrane preparations from myometrium and medial layer of abdominal aorta, we determined receptor density and affinity employing radioligand binding; myometrial AT receptor subtypes were assessed by inhibiting [125I]-ANG II binding with subtype-specific antagonists. Compared to nulliparous ewes, myometrial AT receptor density fell approximately 90% during pregnancy (1,486 +/- 167 vs. 130 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein) and returned to nulliparous values > or = 4 wk postpartum; vascular binding was unchanged. Nulliparous myometrium expressed predominantly AT2 receptors (AT1/AT2 congruent to 15%/85%), whereas AT1 receptors predominated during pregnancy (AT1/AT2 congruent to 80%/20%). By 5 d postpartum AT1/AT2 congruent to 40%/60%, and > 4 wk postpartum AT2 receptors again predominated (AT1/AT2 congruent to 15%/85%). In studies of ANG II-induced force generation, myometrium from pregnant ewes (n = 10) demonstrated dose-dependent increases in force (P < 0.001), which were inhibited with an AT1 receptor antagonist. Postpartum myometrial responses were less at doses > or = 10(-9) M (P < 0.05) and unaffected by AT2 receptor antagonists. Vascular and myometrial AT receptor binding are differentially regulated during ovine pregnancy, the latter primarily reflecting decreases in AT2 receptor expression. This is the first description of reversible changes in AT receptor subtype in adult mammals. PMID:8227339

  2. Clinical Significance of Ryanodine Receptor 1 Gene (RYR1) Variants: Proceedings of the 2013 MHAUS Scientific Conference

    PubMed Central

    Riazi, Sheila; Kraeva, Natalia; Muldoon, Sheila M.; Dowling, James; Ho, Clara; Petre, Maria-Alexandra; Parness, Jerome; Dirksen, Robert T.; Rosenberg, Henry

    2014-01-01

    The Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States (MHAUS) and the Department of Anesthesia at the University of Toronto sponsored a Scientific Conference on November 1–2, 2013 in Toronto, Canada. The multidisciplinary group of experts, including clinicians, geneticists and physiologists involved in research related to malignant hyperthermia (MH), shared new insights into the pathophysiology of type-1 ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1)-linked diseases, as well as the relationship between MH and “awake MH” conditions, such as exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) and exertional heat illness (EHI). In addition, the molecular genetics of MH, and clinical issues related to the diagnosis and management of RYR1-linked disorders, were presented. The conference also honored Dr. David H. MacLennan for his contributions to our understanding of the genetics, pathogenesis and treatment of MH and other RYR1-related myopathies. This report represents a summary of the proceedings of this conference. PMID:25189431

  3. Three-dimensional structure of ryanodine receptor isoform three in two conformational states as visualized by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M R; Jeyakumar, L H; Fleischer, S; Wagenknecht, T

    2000-03-31

    Using cryo-electron microscopy and single particle image processing techniques, we present the first three-dimensional reconstructions of isoform 3 of the ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel (RyR3). Reconstructions were carried out on images obtained from a purified, detergent-solubilized receptor for two different buffer conditions, which were expected to favor open and closed functional states of the channel. As for the heart (RyR2) and skeletal muscle (RyR1) receptor isoforms, RyR3 is a homotetrameric complex comprising two main components, a multidomain cytoplasmic assembly and a smaller ( approximately 20% of the total mass) transmembrane region. Although the isoforms show structural similarities, consistent with the approximately 70% overall sequence identity of the isoforms, detailed comparisons of RyR3 with RyR1 showed one region of highly significant difference between them. This difference indicated additional mass present in RyR1, and it likely corresponds to a region of the RyR1 sequence (residues 1303-1406, known as diversity region 2) that is absent from RyR3. The reconstructions of RyR3 determined under "open" and "closed" conditions were similar to each other in overall architecture. A difference map computed between the two reconstructions reveals subtle changes in conformation at several widely dispersed locations in the receptor, the most prominent of which is a approximately 4 degrees rotation of the transmembrane region with respect to the cytoplasmic assembly.

  4. Function and expression of ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in smooth muscle cells of murine feed arteries and arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Erika B; Goodwin, Erica L; Segal, Steven S; Jackson, William F

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vasomotor control is differentially regulated between feed arteries and downstream arterioles from the cremaster muscle of C57BL/6 mice. In isolated pressurized arteries, confocal Ca2+ imaging of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) revealed Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ waves. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists (ryanodine and tetracaine) inhibited both sparks and waves but increased global Ca2+ and myogenic tone. In arterioles, SMCs exhibited only Ca2+ waves that were insensitive to ryanodine or tetracaine. Pharmacological interventions indicated that RyRs are functionally coupled to large-conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa) in SMCs of arteries, whereas BKCa appear functionally coupled to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in SMCs of arterioles. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) antagonists (xestospongin D or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) or a phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) attenuated Ca2+ waves, global Ca2+ and myogenic tone in arteries and arterioles but had no effect on arterial sparks. Real-time PCR of isolated SMCs revealed RyR2 as the most abundant isoform transcript; arteries expressed twice the RyR2 but only 65% the RyR3 of arterioles and neither vessel expressed RyR1. Immunofluorescent localisation of RyR protein indicated bright, clustered staining of arterial SMCs in contrast to diffuse staining in arteriolar SMCs. Expression of IP3R transcripts and protein immunofluorescence were similar in SMCs of both vessels with IP3R1>>IP3R2>IP3R3. Despite similar expression of IP3Rs and dependence of Ca2+ waves on IP3Rs, these data illustrate pronounced regional heterogeneity in function and expression of RyRs between SMCs of the same vascular resistance network. We conclude that vasomotor control is differentially regulated in feed arteries vs. downstream arterioles. PMID:22331418

  5. Roles of the NH2-terminal domains of cardiac ryanodine receptor in Ca2+ release activation and termination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingjie; Sun, Bo; Xiao, Zhichao; Wang, Ruiwu; Guo, Wenting; Zhang, Joe Z; Mi, Tao; Wang, Yundi; Jones, Peter P; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S R Wayne

    2015-03-20

    The NH2-terminal region (residues 1-543) of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of mutations associated with cardiac arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies. Functional studies have revealed that the NH2-terminal region is involved in the activation and termination of Ca(2+) release. The three-dimensional structure of the NH2-terminal region has recently been solved. It is composed of three domains (A, B, and C). However, the roles of these individual domains in Ca(2+) release activation and termination are largely unknown. To understand the functional significance of each of these NH2-terminal domains, we systematically deleted these domains and assessed their impact on caffeine- or Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release and store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) in HEK293 cells. We found that all deletion mutants were capable of forming caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive functional channels, indicating that the NH2-terminal region is not essential for channel gating. Ca(2+) release measurements revealed that deleting domain A markedly reduced the threshold for SOICR termination but had no effect on caffeine or Ca(2+) activation or the threshold for SOICR activation, whereas deleting domain B substantially enhanced caffeine and Ca(2+) activation and lowered the threshold for SOICR activation and termination. Conversely, deleting domain C suppressed caffeine activation, abolished Ca(2+) activation and SOICR, and diminished protein expression. These results suggest that domain A is involved in channel termination, domain B is involved in channel suppression, and domain C is critical for channel activation and expression. Our data shed new insights into the structure-function relationship of the NH2-terminal domains of RyR2 and the action of NH2-terminal disease mutations.

  6. Identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of retinoid X and retinoic acid receptors via quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Motonori; Shudo, Koichi; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Understanding and identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of a ligand is an important issue in the field of drug discovery. Using a combination of classical molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical calculations, this report assesses the receptor subtype selectivity for the human retinoid X receptor (hRXR) and retinoic acid receptor (hRAR) ligand-binding domains (LBDs) complexed with retinoid ligands. The calculated energies show good correlation with the experimentally reported binding affinities. The technique proposed here is a promising method as it reveals the origin of the receptor subtype selectivity of selective ligands.

  7. Pre-Slaughter Stress Affects Ryanodine Receptor Protein Gene Expression and the Water-Holding Capacity in Fillets of the Nile Tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Jorge A. F.; Gasparino, Eliane; Del Vesco, Ana P.; Goes, Marcio D.; Alexandre Filho, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Current study evaluated the effect of pre-slaughter stress on serum cortisol levels, pH, colorimetry, water-holding capacity (WHC) and gene expression of ryanodine receptors (RyR1 and RyR3) in the Nile tilapia. A 3x4 factorial scheme experiment was conducted comprising three densities (100, 200, 400 kg/m³) with four transportation times (60, 120, 180, and 240 minutes).Transportation times alone reduced cortisol levels up to 180 minutes, followed by increased WHC and mRNA expression, RyR1 and RyR3 (200 kg/m³ density). No effect of density x transportation time interacted on the evaluated parameters. Results provided the first evidence that pre-slaughter stress affected ryanodine gene expression receptors and, consequently, the water-holding capacity in tilapia fillets. PMID:26053858

  8. Mediation of Autophagic Cell Death by Type 3 Ryanodine Receptor (RyR3) in Adult Hippocampal Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Min; Jeong, Eun-Ji; Park, Hyunhee; An, Hyun-Kyu; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death (ACD). Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs—especially RyR3—were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished ACD of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology. PMID:27199668

  9. The foot structure from the type 1 ryanodine receptor is required for functional coupling to store-operated channels.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Alicia; Diaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Antaramian, Anaid; Vaca, Luis

    2005-07-01

    In the present study we have explored structural determinants of the functional interaction between skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We have illustrated a functional interaction between TRPC1 channels and RyR1 for the regulation of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) initiated after releasing calcium from a caffeine-sensitive intracellular calcium pool. RNA interference experiments directed to reduce the amount of TRPC1 protein indicate that RyR1 associates to at least two different types of store-operated channels (SOCs), one dependent and one independent of TRPC1. In contrast, bradykinin-induced SOCE is completely dependent on the presence of TRPC1 protein, as we have previously illustrated. Removing the foot structure from RyR1 results in normal caffeine-induced release of calcium from internal stores but abolishes the activation of SOCE, indicating that this structure is require for functional coupling to SOCs. The footless RyR1 protein shows a different cellular localization when compared with wild type RyR1. The later protein shows a higher percentage of colocalization with FM-464, a marker of plasma membrane. The implications of the foot structure for the functional and physical coupling to TRPC and SOCs is discussed.

  10. Stable expression and functional characterisation of the diamondback moth ryanodine receptor G4946E variant conferring resistance to diamide insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Troczka, Bartlomiej J.; Williams, Alan J.; Williamson, Martin S.; Field, Linda M.; Lüemmen, Peter; Davies, T.G. Emyr

    2015-01-01

    Diamides, such as flubendiamide and chlorantraniliprole, belong to a new chemical class of insecticides that act as conformation-sensitive activators of insect ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Both compounds are registered for use against lepidopteran species such as the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, a notorious global pest of cruciferous crops. Recently acquired resistance to diamide insecticides in this species is thought to be due to a target-site mutation conferring an amino acid substitution (G4946E), located within the trans-membrane domain of the RyR, though the exact role of this mutation has not yet been fully determined. To address this we have cloned a full-length cDNA encoding the P. xylostella RyR and established clonal Sf9 cell lines stably expressing either the wildtype RyR or the G4946E variant, in order to test the sensitivity to flubendiamide and chlorantraniliprole on the recombinant receptor. We report that the efficacy of both diamides was dramatically reduced in clonal Sf9 cells stably expressing the G4946E modified RyR, providing clear functional evidence that the G4946E RyR mutation impairs diamide insecticide binding. PMID:26424584

  11. Activation of single cardiac and skeletal ryanodine receptor channels by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Györke, S; Vélez, P; Suárez-Isla, B; Fill, M

    1994-01-01

    Single ryanodine-sensitive sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels isolated from rabbit skeletal and canine cardiac muscle were reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers. Single channel activity was measured in simple solutions (no ATP or Mg2+) with 250 mM symmetrical Cs+ as charge carrier. A laser flash was used to photolyze caged-Ca2+ (DM-nitrophen) in a small volume directly in front of the bilayer. The free [Ca2+] in this small volume and in the bulk solution was monitored with Ca2+ electrodes. This setup allowed fast, calibrated free [Ca2+] stimuli to be applied repetitively to single SR Ca2+ release channels. A standard photolytically induced free [Ca2+] step (pCa 7-->6) was applied to both the cardiac and skeletal release channels. The rate of channel activation was determined by fitting a single exponential to ensemble currents generated from at least 50 single channel sweeps. The time constants of activation were 1.43 +/- 0.65 ms (mean +/- SD; n = 5) and 1.28 +/- 0.61 ms (n = 5) for cardiac and skeletal channels, respectively. This study presents a method for defining the fast Ca2+ regulation kinetics of single SR Ca2+ release channels and shows that the activation rate of skeletal SR Ca2+ release channels is consistent with a role for CICR in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:8075325

  12. Electron-conformational transformations govern the temperature dependence of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Iaparov, B. I.; Ryvkin, A. M.; Solovyova, O. E.; Markhasin, V. S.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature influences many aspects of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, in particular, hypothermia increases the open probability ( P open) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-release channels (ryanodine-sensitive RyR channels) rising the SR Ca2+ load in mammalian myocytes. However, to the best of our knowledge, no theoretical models are available for that effect. Traditional Markov chain models do not provide a reasonable molecular mechanistic insight on the origin of the temperature effects. Here in the paper we address a simple physically clear electron-conformational model to describe the RyR gating and argue that a synergetic effect of external thermal fluctuation forces (Gaussian-Markovian noise) and internal friction via the temperature stimulation/suppression of the open-close RyR tunneling probability can be considered as a main contributor to temperature effects on the RyR gating. Results of the computer modeling allowed us to successfully reproduce all the temperature effects observed for an isolated RyR gating in vitro under reducing the temperature: increase in P open and mean open time without any significant effect on mean closed

  13. Functional and biochemical properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 channels from heterozygous R163C malignant hyperthermia-susceptible mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Barrientos, Genaro C; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Yang, Tianzhong; Padilla, Isela T; Truong, Kim; Allen, Paul D; Lopez, José R; Pessah, Isaac N

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) confer malignant hyperthermia susceptibility. How inherent impairments in Ca(2+) channel regulation affect skeletal muscle function in myotubes and adult fibers under basal (nontriggering) conditions are not understood. Myotubes, adult flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers, and sarcoplasmic reticulum skeletal membranes were isolated from heterozygous knockin R163C and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT myotubules, R163C myotubes have reduced Ca(2+) transient amplitudes in response to electrical field pulses; however, R163C FDB fibers do not differ in their responses to electrical stimuli, despite heightened cellular cytoplasmic resting Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](rest)) and sensitivity to halothane. Immunoblotting of membranes from each genotype shows similar expression of RyR1, FK506 binding protein 12 kDa, and Ca(2+)-ATPase, but RyR1 (2844)Ser phosphorylation in R163C muscle is 31% higher than that of WT muscle (p < 0.001). RyR1 channels reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers reveal ∼65% of R163C channels exhibit ≥2-fold greater open probability (P(o)) than WT, with prolonged mean open dwell times and shortened closed dwell times. [(3)H]Ryanodine (Ry) binding and single-channel analyses show that R163C-RyR1 has altered regulation compared with WT: 1) 3-fold higher sensitivity to Ca(2+) activation; 2) 2-fold greater [(3)H]Ry receptor occupancy; 3) comparatively higher channel activity, even in reducing glutathione buffer; 4) enhanced RyR1 activity both at 25 and 37°C; and 5) elevated cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)](rest). R163C channels are inherently more active than WT channels, a functional impairment that cannot be reversed by dephosphorylation with protein phosphatase. Dysregulated R163C channels produce a more overt phenotype in myotubes than in adult fibers in the absence of triggering agents, suggesting tighter negative regulation of R163C-RyR1 within the Ca(2+) release unit of adult fibers.

  14. Subtype Differences in Pre-Coupling of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, Jan; Janíčková, Helena; Randáková, Alena; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Based on the kinetics of interaction between a receptor and G-protein, a myriad of possibilities may result. Two extreme cases are represented by: 1/Collision coupling, where an agonist binds to the free receptor and then the agonist-receptor complex “collides” with the free G-protein. 2/Pre-coupling, where stable receptor/G-protein complexes exist in the absence of agonist. Pre-coupling plays an important role in the kinetics of signal transduction. Odd-numbered muscarinic acetylcholine receptors preferentially couple to Gq/11, while even-numbered receptors prefer coupling to Gi/o. We analyzed the coupling status of the various subtypes of muscarinic receptors with preferential and non-preferential G-proteins. The magnitude of receptor-G-protein coupling was determined by the proportion of receptors existing in the agonist high-affinity binding conformation. Antibodies directed against the C-terminus of the α-subunits of the individual G-proteins were used to interfere with receptor-G-protein coupling. Effects of mutations and expression level on receptor-G-protein coupling were also investigated. Tested agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. Antibodies directed against the C-terminus of the α-subunits of the preferential G-protein decreased the proportion of high-affinity sites, and mutations at the receptor-G-protein interface abolished agonist high-affinity binding. In contrast, mutations that prevent receptor activation had no effect. Expression level of preferential G-proteins had no effect on pre-coupling to non-preferential G-proteins. Our data show that all subtypes of muscarinic receptors pre-couple with their preferential classes of G-proteins, but only M1 and M3 receptors also pre-couple with non-preferential Gi/o G-proteins. Pre-coupling is not dependent on agonist efficacy nor on receptor activation. The ultimate mode of coupling is therefore dictated by a combination of the receptor subtype

  15. Multiple Estrogen Receptor Subtypes Influence Ingestive Behavior in Female Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Santollo, Jessica; Daniels, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular-related diseases. This is attributable, at least in part, to loss of the ovarian hormone estradiol, which inhibits food and fluid intake in humans and laboratory animal models. Although the hypophagic and anti-dipsogenic effects of estradiol have been well documented for decades, the precise mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. An obvious step toward addressing this open question is identifying which estrogen receptor subtypes are involved and what intracellular processes are involved. This question, however, is complicated not only by the variety of estrogen receptor subtypes that exist, but also because many subtypes have multiple locations of action (i.e. in the nucleus or in the plasma membrane). This review will highlight our current understanding of the roles specific estrogen receptor subtypes play in mediating estradiol’s anorexigenic and anti-dipsogenic effects along with highlighting the many open questions that remain. This review will also describe recent work being performed by our laboratory aimed at answering these open questions. PMID:26037634

  16. Multiple estrogen receptor subtypes influence ingestive behavior in female rodents.

    PubMed

    Santollo, Jessica; Daniels, Derek

    2015-12-01

    Postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular-related diseases. This is attributable, at least in part, to loss of the ovarian hormone estradiol, which inhibits food and fluid intake in humans and laboratory animal models. Although the hypophagic and anti-dipsogenic effects of estradiol have been well documented for decades, the precise mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. An obvious step toward addressing this open question is identifying which estrogen receptor subtypes are involved and what intracellular processes are involved. This question, however, is complicated not only by the variety of estrogen receptor subtypes that exist, but also because many subtypes have multiple locations of action (i.e. in the nucleus or in the plasma membrane). This review will highlight our current understanding of the roles that specific estrogen receptor subtypes play in mediating estradiol's anorexigenic and anti-dipsogenic effects along with highlighting the many open questions that remain. This review will also describe recent work being performed by our laboratory aimed at answering these open questions.

  17. Isolation of rat genomic clones encoding subtypes of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. Identification of a unique receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Lanier, S M; Downing, S; Duzic, E; Homcy, C J

    1991-06-05

    alpha 2-Adrenergic receptors (alpha 2-AR) exist as subtypes that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and differ in 1) their ligand recognition properties, 2) their extent of receptor protein glycosylation, and possible 3) their mechanism of signal transduction. Genomic or cDNA clones encoding three receptor subtypes have been characterized; however, both functional and radioligand binding studies in rodents suggest the existence of a fourth receptor subtype. To isolate the rat genes encoding receptor subtypes we screened a rat genomic library with an oligonucleotide probe encompassing the third membrane span of the human C-4 alpha 2-AR. Two intronless rat genes were isolated that encode distinct receptor subtypes (RG10, RG20). RG10 and RG20 encode proteins of 458 and 450 amino acids, respectively, that are 56% homologous and possess the structural features expected of this class of membrane-bound receptors. RG10 identifies a mRNA species of approximately 2500 nucleotides that is found primarily in brain, whereas RG20 identifies a larger mRNA species (approximately 4000 nucleotides) that is found in several tissues including brain, kidney, and salivary gland. RG10 is 88% homologous to the human C-4 alpha 2-AR and exhibits similar binding properties ( [3H]rauwolscine KD = 0.7 +/- 0.3 nM) as determined following transient expression of the receptor in COS-1 cells. RG20 exhibits ligand binding properties distinct from the three receptor subtypes identified by molecular cloning. Saturation binding studies indicate an affinity constant of 15 +/- 1.2 nM for the alpha 2-AR antagonist [3H]rauwolscine, a value 6-20 times higher than that observed for the three cloned receptor subtypes. In competition binding studies the potency order of competing ligands for RG20 is phentolamine greater than idazoxan greater than yohimbine greater than rauwolscine greater than prazosin. Of the three previously cloned alpha 2-AR, RG20 is most closely related to the human C-10 alpha 2-AR

  18. Novel mutations and mutation combinations of ryanodine receptor in a chlorantraniliprole resistant population of Plutella xylostella (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Liang, Pei; Zhou, Xuguo; Gao, Xiwu

    2014-01-01

    A previous study documented a glycine to glutamic acid mutation (G4946E) in ryanodine receptor (RyR) was highly correlated to diamide insecticide resistance in field populations of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae). In this study, a field population collected in Yunnan province, China, exhibited a 2128-fold resistance to chlorantraniliprole. Sequence comparison between resistant and susceptible P. xylostella revealed three novel mutations including a glutamic acid to valine substitution (E1338D), a glutamine to leucine substitution (Q4594L) and an isoleucine to methionine substitution (I4790M) in highly conserved regions of RyR. Frequency analysis of all four mutations in this field population showed that the three new mutations showed a high frequency of 100%, while the G4946E had a frequency of 20%. Furthermore, the florescent ligand binding assay revealed that the RyR containing multiple mutations displayed a significantly lower affinity to the chlorantraniliprole. The combined results suggested that the co-existence of different combinations of the four mutations was involved in the chlorantraniliprole resistance. An allele-specific PCR based method was developed for the diagnosis of the four mutations in the field populations of P. xylostella. PMID:25377064

  19. Ryanodine receptor genes of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis: Molecular cloning, alternative splicing and expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Y C; Sheng, C W; Casida, John E; Zhao, C Q; Han, Z J

    2017-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) of the calcium release channel is the main target of anthranilic and phthalic diamide insecticides which have high selective insecticidal activity relative to mammalian toxicity. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Chilo suppressalis RyR (CsRyR) was isolated and characterized. The CsRyR mRNA has an open reading frame (ORF) of 15,387bp nucleotides, which encodes 5128 amino acids with GenBank ID: KR088972. Comparison of protein sequences showed that CsRyR shared high identities with other insects of 77-96% and lower identity to mammals and nematodes with only 42-45%. One alternative splicing site (KENLG) unique to Lepidoptera was found and two exclusive exons of CsRyR (I /II) were revealed. Spatial and temporal expression of CsRyR mRNA was at the highest relative level in 3rd instar larvae and head (including brain and muscle), and at the lowest expression level in egg and fat body. The expression levels of whole body CsRyR mRNA were increased remarkably after injection of 4th instar larvae with chlorantraniliprole at 0.004 to 0.4μg/g. This structural and functional information on CsRyR provides the basis for further understanding the selective action of chlorantraniliprole and possibly other diamide insecticides.

  20. Cardiac ryanodine receptor: Selectivity for alkaline earth metal cations points to the EF-hand nature of luminal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Gaburjakova, Jana; Gaburjakova, Marta

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the regulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) by luminal Ca(2+) is mediated by luminal binding sites located on the RYR2 channel itself and/or its auxiliary protein, calsequestrin. The localization and structure of RYR2-resident binding sites are not known because of the lack of a high-resolution structure of RYR2 luminal regions. To obtain the first structural insight, we probed the RYR2 luminal face stripped of calsequestrin by alkaline earth metal divalents (M(2+): Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)). We show that the RYR2 response to caffeine at the single-channel level is significantly modified by the nature of luminal M(2+). Moreover, we performed competition experiments by varying the concentration of luminal M(2+) (Mg(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)) from 8 mM to 53 mM and investigated its ability to compete with 1mM luminal Ca(2+). We demonstrate that all tested M(2+) bind to exactly the same RYR2 luminal binding sites. Their affinities decrease in the order: Ca(2+)>Sr(2+)>Mg(2+)~Ba(2+), showing a strong correlation with the M(2+) affinity of the EF-hand motif. This indicates that the RYR2 luminal binding regions and the EF-hand motif likely share some structural similarities because the structure ties directly to the function.

  1. Caffeine-induced Release of Intracellular Ca2+ from Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Expressing Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Manjunatha B.; Zhao, Jiying; Zang, Weijin; Balke, C. William; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Wier, W. Gil; Ma, Jianjie

    1997-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR)/Ca2+ release channel is an essential component of excitation–contraction coupling in striated muscle cells. To study the function and regulation of the Ca2+ release channel, we tested the effect of caffeine on the full-length and carboxyl-terminal portion of skeletal muscle RyR expressed in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. Caffeine induced openings of the full length RyR channels in a concentration-dependent manner, but it had no effect on the carboxyl-terminal RyR channels. CHO cells expressing the carboxyl-terminal RyR proteins displayed spontaneous changes of intracellular [Ca2+]. Unlike the native RyR channels in muscle cells, which display localized Ca2+ release events (i.e., “Ca2+ sparks” in cardiac muscle and “local release events” in skeletal muscle), CHO cells expressing the full length RyR proteins did not exhibit detectable spontaneous or caffeine-induced local Ca2+ release events. Our data suggest that the binding site for caffeine is likely to reside within the amino-terminal portion of RyR, and the localized Ca2+ release events observed in muscle cells may involve gating of a group of Ca2+ release channels and/or interaction of RyR with muscle-specific proteins. PMID:9382901

  2. Modal gating transitions in cardiac ryanodine receptors during increases of Ca2+ concentration produced by photolysis of caged Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Zahradníková, A; Dura, M; Györke, S

    1999-08-01

    Channel adaptation is a basic property of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-release channels/ryanodine receptors (RyRs). It allows channel activity to decay during sustained increases in the concentration of activating Ca2+. Despite the potential physiological importance of this self-confining process, its molecular mechanism is not well understood. To define the mechanism of adaptation we studied the dynamics of cardiac Ca2+-release channel (RyR) gating using the planar lipid bilayer technique in combination with photolysis of caged Ca2+ (DM-nitrophen). Channels activated by rapid and sustained increases in Ca2+ concentration (from 0.1 to 0.5 micromol/l) displayed three distinct gating modes, manifested as current records with frequent and long openings (H-mode), with rare and short openings (L-mode), and with no openings (I-mode). H-mode channel activity occurred primarily at early times while L- and I-modes predominated at late times after the rapid Ca2+ concentration increase. The decrease in probability of H-mode, mirrored by an increase in the probability of the I-mode, proceeded with a time constant similar to that observed for spontaneous decay in channel activity (i.e., adaptation) in ensemble average records. These results indicate that RyR adaptation transpires by a shift of channel gating from a high open probability mode to low open probability and inactivated modes of the channel.

  3. Fluorescence probe study of Ca2+-dependent interactions of calmodulin with calmodulin-binding peptides of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Grabarek, Zenon; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2004-10-22

    We have used a highly environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (badan) to study the interaction between calmodulin (CaM) and a CaM-binding peptide of the ryanodine receptor (CaMBP) and its sub-fragments F1 and F4. Badan was attached to the Thr34Cys mutant of CaM (CaM-badan). Ca(2+) increase in a physiological range of Ca(2+) (0.1-2 microM) produced about 40 times increase in the badan fluorescence. Upon binding to CaMBP, the badan fluorescence of apo-CaM showed a small increase at a slow rate; whereas that of Ca-CaM showed a large decrease at a very fast rate. Upon binding of CaM to the badan-labeled CaMBP, the badan fluorescence showed a small and slow increase at low Ca(2+), and a large and fast increase at high Ca(2+). Thus, the badan probe attached to CaM Cys(34) can be used to monitor conformational changes occurring not only in CaM, but also those in the CaM-CaMBP interface. Based on our results we propose that both the interaction interface and the global conformation of the CaM-CaMBP complex are altered by calcium.

  4. Oxygen-coupled redox regulation of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel by NADPH oxidase 4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Hess, Douglas T; Nogueira, Leonardo; Yong, Sandro; Bowles, Dawn E; Eu, Jerry; Laurita, Kenneth R; Meissner, Gerhard; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2011-09-20

    Physiological sensing of O(2) tension (partial O(2) pressure, pO(2)) plays an important role in some mammalian cellular systems, but striated muscle generally is not considered to be among them. Here we describe a molecular mechanism in skeletal muscle that acutely couples changes in pO(2) to altered calcium release through the ryanodine receptor-Ca(2+)-release channel (RyR1). Reactive oxygen species are generated in proportion to pO(2) by NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the consequent oxidation of a small set of RyR1 cysteine thiols results in increased RyR1 activity and Ca(2+) release in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum and in cultured myofibers and enhanced contractility of intact muscle. Thus, Nox4 is an O(2) sensor in skeletal muscle, and O(2)-coupled hydrogen peroxide production by Nox4 governs the redox state of regulatory RyR1 thiols and thereby governs muscle performance. These findings reveal a molecular mechanism for O(2)-based signaling by an NADPH oxidase and demonstrate a physiological role for oxidative modification of RyR1.

  5. Antiarrhythmic potential of drugs targeting the cardiac ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channel: case study of dantrolene.

    PubMed

    Acsai, Karoly; Nagy, Norbert; Marton, Zoltan; Oravecz, Kinga; Varro, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Driven by the limitations of the traditional antiarrhythmic pharmacology, current antiarrhythmic research is trying to identify new avenues for the development of specific and safe antiarrhythmic drugs. One of the most promising approaches in this field is the amelioration of the abnormal events in cellular Ca(2+) handling originating from the dysfunction of ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release complex (RyR), which is an inevitable key factor in the pathology of myocardial dysfunction, remodeling and arrhythmogenesis. Accordingly, both in experimental and clinical situations, inhibition of abnormal activity of RyR, regardless of being the primary cause or a consequence during the pathogenesis appears to exert beneficial effect on disease outcome, including a marked antiarrhythmic defense. Considerable amount of our knowledge in this field originates from studies using dantrolene, a human drug with RyR stabilizing effect. Our review summarizes the cardiovascular pharmacology of dantrolene and the results of its use in experimental models of cardiac diseases, which emphasize a promising perspective for the possible antiarrhythmic application of RyR inhibition in the future.

  6. King-Denborough syndrome with and without mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene.

    PubMed

    Dowling, James J; Lillis, Suzanne; Amburgey, Kimberley; Zhou, Haiyan; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Buk, Stefan J A; Wraige, Elizabeth; Chow, Gabby; Abbs, Stephen; Leber, Steven; Lachlan, Katherine; Baralle, Diana; Taylor, Alexandra; Sewry, Caroline; Muntoni, Francesco; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    King-Denborough syndrome (KDS), first described in 1973, is a rare condition characterised by the triad of dysmorphic features, myopathy, and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS). Autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expressivity has been reported in several cases. Mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene have been implicated in a wide range of myopathies such as central core disease (CCD), the malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility trait and one isolated patient with KDS. Here we report clinical, pathologic and genetic features of four unrelated patients with KDS. Patients had a relatively uniform clinical presentation but muscle biopsy findings were highly variable. Heterozygous missense mutations in RYR1 were uncovered in three out of four families, of which one mutation was novel and two have previously been reported in MH. Further RyR1 protein expression studies performed in two families showed marked reduction of the RyR1 protein, indicating the presence of allelic RYR1 mutations not detectable on routine sequencing and potentially explaining marked intrafamilial variability. Our findings support the hypothesis that RYR1 mutations are associated with King-Denborough syndrome but that further genetic heterogeneity is likely.

  7. Is ryanodine receptor a calcium or magnesium channel? Roles of K+ and Mg2+ during Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Dirk; Chen, Haiyan; Fill, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is a poorly selective channel that mediates Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. How RyR's selectivity between the physiological cations K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) affects single-channel Ca(2+) current amplitude is examined using a recent model of RyR permeation. It is found that K(+) provides the vast majority of the countercurrent (through RyR itself) that is needed to prevent the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane potential from changing and stopping Ca(2+) release. Moreover, intra-pore competition between Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) defines single RyR Ca(2+) current amplitude. Since both [Mg(2+)] and [Ca(2+)](SR) can change during pathophysiological conditions, the RyR unitary Ca(2+) current amplitude during Ca(2+) release may change significantly due to this Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) competition. Compared to the classic action of Mg(2+) on RyR open probability, these Ca(2+) current amplitude changes have as large or larger effects on overall RyR Ca(2+) mobilization. A new aspect of RyR divalent versus monovalent selectivity is also identified where this kind of selectivity decreases as divalent concentration increases.

  8. Neuronal regeneration in C. elegans requires subcellular calcium release by ryanodine receptor channels and can be enhanced by optogenetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Shay, James; McLoed, Melissa; Roodhouse, Kevin; Chung, Samuel H; Clark, Christopher M; Pirri, Jennifer K; Alkema, Mark J; Gabel, Christopher V

    2014-11-26

    Regulated calcium signals play conserved instructive roles in neuronal repair, but how localized calcium stores are differentially mobilized, or might be directly manipulated, to stimulate regeneration within native contexts is poorly understood. We find here that localized calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum via ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels is critical in stimulating initial regeneration following traumatic cellular damage in vivo. Using laser axotomy of single neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that mutation of unc-68/RyR greatly impedes both outgrowth and guidance of the regenerating neuron. Performing extended in vivo calcium imaging, we measure subcellular calcium signals within the immediate vicinity of the regenerating axon end that are sustained for hours following axotomy and completely eliminated within unc-68/RyR mutants. Finally, using a novel optogenetic approach to periodically photo-stimulate the axotomized neuron, we can enhance its regeneration. The enhanced outgrowth depends on both amplitude and temporal pattern of excitation and can be blocked by disruption of UNC-68/RyR. This demonstrates the exciting potential of emerging optogenetic technology to beneficially manipulate cell physiology in the context of neuronal regeneration and indicates a link to the underlying cellular calcium signal. Taken as a whole, our findings define a specific localized calcium signal mediated by RyR channel activity that stimulates regenerative outgrowth, which may be dynamically manipulated for beneficial neurotherapeutic effects.

  9. A novel late-onset axial myopathy associated with mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene.

    PubMed

    Løseth, Sissel; Voermans, Nicol C; Torbergsen, Torberg; Lillis, Sue; Jonsrud, Christoffer; Lindal, Sigurd; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Lammens, Martin; Broman, Marcus; Dekomien, Gabriele; Maddison, Paul; Muntoni, Francesco; Sewry, Caroline; Radunovic, Aleksandar; de Visser, Marianne; Straub, Volker; van Engelen, Baziel; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene are a common cause of inherited neuromuscular disorders and have been associated with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from various congenital myopathies to the malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) trait without any associated weakness. RYR1-related myopathies are usually of early-childhood onset. Here we present 11 patients from 8 families with a late-onset axial myopathy associated with RYR1 variants. Patients presented between the third and seventh decade of life to neuromuscular centres in Norway, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom with predominant axial muscle involvement, comprising variable degrees of lumbar hyperlordosis, scapular winging and/or camptocormia. Marked myalgia was commonly associated. Serum creatine kinase levels were normal or moderately elevated. Muscle imaging showed consistent involvement of the lower paravertebral muscles and the posterior thigh. Muscle biopsy findings were often discrete, featuring variability in fibre size, increased internal nuclei and unevenness of oxidative enzyme staining, but only rarely overt cores. RYR1 sequencing revealed heterozygous missense variants, either previously associated with the MHS trait or localizing to known MHS mutational hotspots. These findings indicate that MHS-related RYR1 mutations may present later in life with prominent axial weakness but not always typical histopathological features. We propose a combined effect of RyR1 dysfunction, aging and particular vulnerability of axial muscle groups as a possible pathogenic mechanism. RYR1 is a candidate for cases with "idiopathic" camptocormia or bent spine syndrome (BSS).

  10. HIV-1 Tat Activates Neuronal Ryanodine Receptors with Rapid Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response and Mitochondrial Hyperpolarization

    PubMed Central

    Norman, John P.; Perry, Seth W.; Reynolds, Holly M.; Kiebala, Michelle; De Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Trejo, Margarita; Volsky, David J.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Masliah, Eliezer; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2008-01-01

    Neurologic disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is ultimately refractory to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) because of failure of complete virus eradication in the central nervous system (CNS), and disruption of normal neural signaling events by virally induced chronic neuroinflammation. We have previously reported that HIV-1 Tat can induce mitochondrial hyperpolarization in cortical neurons, thus compromising the ability of the neuron to buffer calcium and sustain energy production for normal synaptic communication. In this report, we demonstrate that Tat induces rapid loss of ER calcium mediated by the ryanodine receptor (RyR), followed by the unfolded protein response (UPR) and pathologic dilatation of the ER in cortical neurons in vitro. RyR antagonism attenuated both Tat-mediated mitochondrial hyperpolarization and UPR induction. Delivery of Tat to murine CNS in vivo also leads to long-lasting pathologic ER dilatation and mitochondrial morphologic abnormalities. Finally, we performed ultrastructural studies that demonstrated mitochondria with abnormal morphology and dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in brain tissue of patients with HIV-1 inflammation and neurodegeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that abnormal RyR signaling mediates the neuronal UPR with failure of mitochondrial energy metabolism, and is a critical locus for the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 in the CNS. PMID:19009018

  11. Genetic and Biochemical Approaches for In Vivo and In Vitro Assessment of Protein Oligomerization: The Ryanodine Receptor Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanczyk, Paulina J.; Lai, F. Anthony; Zissimopoulos, Spyros

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization is often a structural requirement for proteins to accomplish their specific cellular function. For instance, tetramerization of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) is necessary for the formation of a functional Ca2+ release channel pore. Here, we describe detailed protocols for the assessment of protein self-association, including yeast two-hybrid (Y2H), co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and chemical cross-linking assays. In the Y2H system, protein self-interaction is detected by β-galactosidase assay in yeast co-expressing GAL4 bait and target fusions of the test protein. Protein self-interaction is further assessed by co-IP using HA- and cMyc-tagged fusions of the test protein co-expressed in mammalian HEK293 cells. The precise stoichiometry of the protein homo-oligomer is examined by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE analysis following expression in HEK293 cells. Using these different but complementary techniques, we have consistently observed the self-association of the RyR N-terminal domain and demonstrated its intrinsic ability to form tetramers. These methods can be applied to protein-protein interaction and homo-oligomerization studies of other mammalian integral membrane proteins. PMID:27500320

  12. Crystal structures of ryanodine receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant

    PubMed Central

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Yuen, Siobhan M. Wong King; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q.; Cornea, Razvan L.; Fessenden, James D.; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca2+-dependent signalling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2–1.5 Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modelling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-binding protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding. PMID:26245150

  13. Ryanodine receptors blockade reduces Amyloid-beta load and memory impairments in Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Oulès, Bénédicte; Del Prete, Dolores; Greco, Barbara; Zhang, Xuexin; Lauritzen, Inger; Sevalle, Jean; Moreno, Sebastien; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia; Trebak, Mohamed; Checler, Frédéric; Benfenati, Fabio; Chami, Mounia

    2012-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), the perturbation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been linked to presenilins (PS), the catalytic core in γ-secretase complexes cleaving the amyloid precursor protein (APP) thereby generating amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we investigate whether APP contributes to ER Ca2+ homeostasis and whether ER Ca2+ could in turn influence Aβ production. We show that overexpression of wild-type human APP (APP695), or APP harboring the Swedish double mutation (APPswe) triggers increased Ryanodine receptors (RyR) expression and enhances RyR-mediated ER Ca2+ release in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and in APPswe-expressing (Tg2576) mice. Interestingly, dantrolene-induced lowering of RyR-mediated Ca2+ release leads to the reduction of both intracellular and extracellular Aβ load in neuroblastoma cells as well as in primary cultured neurons derived from Tg2576 mice. This Aβ reduction can be accounted for by decreased Thr-668-dependent APP phosphorylation and β- and γ-secretases activities. Importantly, dantrolene diminishes Aβ load, reduces Aβ-related histological lesions and slows down learning and memory deficits in Tg2576 mice. Overall, our data document a key role of RyR in Aβ production and learning and memory performances, and delineate RyR-mediated control of Ca2+ homeostasis as a physiological paradigm that could be targeted for innovative therapeutic approaches. PMID:22915123

  14. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S R Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1-547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2.

  15. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M. Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S. R. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1–547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2. PMID:26405799

  16. Structural basis of kainate subtype glutamate receptor desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Joel R.; Chittori, Sagar; Merk, Alan; Rao, Prashant; Han, Tae Hee; Serpe, Mihaela; Mayer, Mark L.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are ligand gated tetrameric ion channels that mediate synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They are instrumental in vertebrate cognition and their dysfunction underlies diverse diseases1,2. In both the resting and desensitized states of AMPA and kainate subtype glutamate receptors the ion channels are closed while the ligand binding domain, which is physically coupled to the channel, adopts dramatically different conformations3–6. Without an atomic model for the desensitized state, it is not possible to address a central question in receptor gating: how the resting and desensitized receptor states both display closed ion channels, even though they have major differences in quaternary structure of the ligand binding domain. By determining the cryo-EM structure of the kainate receptor GluK2 subtype in its desensitized state at 3.8 Å resolution, we show that desensitization is characterized by establishment of a ring-like structure in the ligand binding domain layer of the receptor. Formation of this “desensitization ring” is mediated by staggered helix contacts between adjacent subunits, which leads to a pseudo four-fold symmetric arrangement of the ligand binding domains, illustrating subtle changes in symmetry that are at the heart of the gating mechanism. Disruption of the desensitization ring is likely the key switch that enables restoration of the receptor to its resting state, thereby completing the gating cycle. PMID:27580033

  17. Glucose-Dependent Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic β-Cell Islets from Male Rats Requires Ca2+ Release via ROS-Stimulated Ryanodine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Paola; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Barrientos, Genaro; Valencia, Marco; Mears, David; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells requires an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). Glucose uptake into β-cells promotes Ca2+ influx and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In other cell types, Ca2+ and ROS jointly induce Ca2+ release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels. Therefore, we explored here if RyR-mediated Ca2+ release contributes to GSIS in β-cell islets isolated from male rats. Stimulatory glucose increased islet insulin secretion, and promoted ROS generation in islets and dissociated β-cells. Conventional PCR assays and immunostaining confirmed that β-cells express RyR2, the cardiac RyR isoform. Extended incubation of β-cell islets with inhibitory ryanodine suppressed GSIS; so did the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), which also decreased insulin secretion induced by glucose plus caffeine. Inhibitory ryanodine or NAC did not affect insulin secretion induced by glucose plus carbachol, which engages inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Incubation of islets with H2O2 in basal glucose increased insulin secretion 2-fold. Inhibitory ryanodine significantly decreased H2O2-stimulated insulin secretion and prevented the 4.5-fold increase of cytoplasmic [Ca2+] produced by incubation of dissociated β-cells with H2O2. Addition of stimulatory glucose or H2O2 (in basal glucose) to β-cells disaggregated from islets increased RyR2 S-glutathionylation to similar levels, measured by a proximity ligation assay; in contrast, NAC significantly reduced the RyR2 S-glutathionylation increase produced by stimulatory glucose. We propose that RyR2-mediated Ca2+ release, induced by the concomitant increases in [Ca2+] and ROS produced by stimulatory glucose, is an essential step in GSIS. PMID:26046640

  18. Interdomain Interactions within Ryanodine Receptors Regulate Ca2+ Spark Frequency in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shtifman, Alexander; Ward, Christopher W.; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Wang, Jianli; Olbinski, Beth; Valdivia, Hector H.; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Schneider, Martin F.

    2002-01-01

    DP4 is a 36-residue synthetic peptide that corresponds to the Leu2442-Pro2477 region of RyR1 that contains the reported malignant hyperthermia (MH) mutation site. It has been proposed that DP4 disrupts the normal interdomain interactions that stabilize the closed state of the Ca2+ release channel (Yamamoto, T., R. El-Hayek, and N. Ikemoto. 2000. J. Biol. Chem. 275:11618–11625). We have investigated the effects of DP4 on local SR Ca2+ release events (Ca2+ sparks) in saponin-permeabilized frog skeletal muscle fibers using laser scanning confocal microscopy (line-scan mode, 2 ms/line), as well as the effects of DP4 on frog SR vesicles and frog single RyR Ca2+ release channels reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers. DP4 caused a significant increase in Ca2+ spark frequency in muscle fibers. However, the mean values of the amplitude, rise time, spatial half width, and temporal half duration of the Ca2+ sparks, as well as the distribution of these parameters, remained essentially unchanged in the presence of DP4. Thus, DP4 increased the opening rate, but not the open time of the RyR Ca2+ release channel(s) generating the sparks. DP4 also increased [3H]ryanodine binding to SR vesicles isolated from frog and mammalian skeletal muscle, and increased the open probability of frog RyR Ca2+ release channels reconstituted in bilayers, without changing the amplitude of the current through those channels. However, unlike in Ca2+ spark experiments, DP4 produced a pronounced increase in the open time of channels in bilayers. The same peptide with an Arg17 to Cys17 replacement (DP4mut), which corresponds to the Arg2458-to-Cys2458 mutation in MH, did not produce a significant effect on RyR activation in muscle fibers, bilayers, or SR vesicles. Mg2+ dependence experiments conducted with permeabilized muscle fibers indicate that DP4 preferentially binds to partially Mg2+-free RyR(s), thus promoting channel opening and production of Ca2+ sparks. PMID:11773235

  19. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)Pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M/sub 1/ neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M/sub 1/, the cardiac M/sub 2/ and the glandular M/sub 3/.

  20. Pharmacophore development for antagonists at α1 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, J. B.; Coban, B.; Griffith, R.

    1996-12-01

    Many receptors, including α1 adrenergic receptors, have a range of subtypes. This offers possibilities for the development of highly selective antagonists with potentially fewer detrimental effects. Antagonists developed for α1A receptors, for example, would have potential in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. As part of the molecular design process, structural features necessary for the selective affinity for α1A and α1B adrenergic receptors have been investigated. The molecular modelling software (particularly the Apex module) of Molecular Simulations, Inc. was used to develop pharmacophore models for these two subtypes. Low-energy conformations of a set of known antagonists were used as input, together with a classification of the receptor affinity data. The biophores proposed by the program were evaluated and pharmacophores were proposed. The pharmacophore models were validated by testing the fit of known antagonists, not included in the training set. The critical structural feature for selectivity between the α1A and α1B adrenergic receptor sites is the distance between the basic nitrogen atom and the centre of an aromatic ring system. This will be exploited in the design and synthesis of structurally new selective antagonists for these sites.

  1. Muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity of novel heterocyclic QNB analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgold, J.; Cohen, V.I.; Paek, R.; Reba, R.C. )

    1991-01-01

    In an effort at synthesizing centrally-active subtype-selective antimuscarinic agents, the authors derivatized QNB (quinuclidinyl benzilate), a potent muscarinic antagonist, by replacing one of the phenyl groups with less lipophilic heterocyclic moieties. The displacement of ({sup 3}H)-N-methyl scopolamine binding by these novel compounds to membranes from cells expressing ml - m4 receptor subtypes was determined. Most of the novel 4-bromo-QNB analogues were potent and slightly selective for ml receptors. The 2-thienyl derivative was the most potent, exhibiting a 2-fold greater potency than BrQNB at ml receptors, and a 4-fold greater potency than BrQNB at ml receptors, and a 4-fold greater potency at m2 receptors. This compound was also considerably less lipophilic than BrQNB as determined from its retention time on C18 reverse phase HPLC. This compound may therefore be useful both for pharmacological studies and as a candidate for a radioiodinated SPECT imaging agent for ml muscarinic receptors in human brain.

  2. Levetiracetam Inhibits Both Ryanodine and IP3 Receptor Activated Calcium Induced Calcium Release in Hippocampal Neurons in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Nisha; Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide, and there is a pressing need to develop new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and understand their mechanisms of action. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel AED and despite its increasingly widespread clinical use, its mechanism of action is as yet undetermined. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) regulation by both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) has been implicated in epileptogenesis and the maintenance of epilepsy. To this end, we investigated the effect of LEV on RyR and IP3R activated calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in hippocampal neuronal cultures. RyR-mediated CICR was stimulated using the well-characterized RyR activator, caffeine. Caffeine (10mM) caused a significant increase in [Ca2+]i in hippocampal neurons. Treatment with LEV (33μM) prior to stimulation of RyR-mediated CICR by caffeine led to a 61% decrease in the caffeine induced peak height of [Ca2+]i when compared to the control. Bradykinin stimulates IP3R-activated CICR—to test the effect of LEV on IP3R-mediated CICR, bradykinin (1μM) was used to stimulate cells pre-treated with LEV (100μM). The data showed that LEV caused a 74% decrease in IP3R-mediated CICR compared to the control. In previous studies we have shown that altered Ca2+ homeostatic mechanisms play a role in seizure activity and the development of spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges (SREDs). Elevations in [Ca2+]i mediated by CICR systems have been associated with neurotoxicity, changes in neuronal plasticity, and the development of AE. Thus, the ability of LEV to modulate the two major CICR systems demonstrates an important molecular effect of this agent on a major second messenger system in neurons. PMID:18406528

  3. Characterization of the Molecular Architecture of Human Caveolin-3 and Interaction with the Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, Gareth; Collins, Richard F.; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-3 (cav-3), an integral membrane protein, is a building block of caveolae as well as a regulator of a number of physiological processes by facilitating the formation of multiprotein signaling complexes. We report that the expression of cav-3 in insect (Sf9) cells induces caveola formation, comparable in size with those observed in native tissue. We have also purified the recombinant cav-3 determining that it forms an oligomer of ∼220 kDa. We present the first three-dimensional structure for cav-3 (using transmission electron microscopy and single particle analysis methods) and show that nine cav-3 monomers assemble to form a complex that is toroidal in shape, ∼16.5 nm in diameter and ∼ 5.5 nm in height. Labeling experiments and reconstitution of the purified cav-3 into liposomes have allowed a proposal for the orientation of the protein with respect to the membrane. We have identified multiple caveolin-binding motifs within the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) sequence employing a bioinformatic analysis. We have then shown experimentally that there is a direct interaction between recombinant cav-3 nonamers and purified RyR1 homotetramers that would imply that at least one of the predicted cav-3-binding sites is exposed within the fully assembled RyR1 structure. The cav-3 three-dimensional model provides new insights as to how a cav-3 oligomer can bind multiple partners in close proximity to form signaling complexes. Furthermore, a direct interaction with RyR1 suggests a possible role for cav-3 as a modifier of muscle excitation-contraction coupling and/or for localization of the receptor to regions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. PMID:23071107

  4. Ca2+ release in muscle fibers expressing R4892W and G4896V type 1 ryanodine receptor disease mutants.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Romain; Legrand, Claude; Groom, Linda; Dirksen, Robert T; Jacquemond, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The large and rapidly increasing number of potentially pathological mutants in the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) prompts the need to characterize their effects on voltage-activated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release in skeletal muscle. Here we evaluated the function of the R4892W and G4896V RyR1 mutants, both associated with central core disease (CCD) in humans, in myotubes and in adult muscle fibers. For both mutants expressed in RyR1-null (dyspedic) myotubes, voltage-gated Ca(2+) release was absent following homotypic expression and only partially restored following heterotypic expression with wild-type (WT) RyR1. In muscle fibers from adult WT mice, both mutants were expressed in restricted regions of the fibers with a pattern consistent with triadic localization. Voltage-clamp-activated confocal Ca(2+) signals showed that fiber regions endowed with G4896V-RyR1s exhibited an ∼30% reduction in the peak rate of SR Ca(2+) release, with no significant change in SR Ca(2+) content. Immunostaining revealed no associated change in the expression of either α1S subunit (Cav1.1) of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) or type 1 sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA1), indicating that the reduced Ca(2+) release resulted from defective RyR1 function. Interestingly, in spite of robust localized junctional expression, the R4892W mutant did not affect SR Ca(2+) release in adult muscle fibers, consistent with a low functional penetrance of this particular CCD-associated mutant.

  5. Structure-activity relationship for noncoplanar polychlorinated biphenyl congeners toward the ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ channel complex type 1 (RyR1).

    PubMed

    Pessah, Isaac N; Hansen, Larry G; Albertson, Timothy E; Garner, C Edwin; Ta, Tram Anh; Do, Zung; Kim, Kyung Ho; Wong, Patty W

    2006-01-01

    Ryanodine receptor isoforms are expressed in both excitable and nonexcitable tissues where they form microsomal Ca2+ release channels broadly involved in shaping cellular signaling. In this report, we provide a detailed structure-activity relationship (SAR) for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and metabolites necessary for enhancing ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) activity using [3H]ryanodine ([3H]Ry) binding analysis. The 2,3,6-Cl PCB configuration is most important for optimal recognition by the RyR1 complex and/or critical for sensitizing its activation. Para substitution(s) diminishes the activity with para-chloro having a higher potency than the corresponding para-hydroxy derivative. The addition of a more bulky para-methyl-sulfonyl group eliminates the activity toward RyR1, supporting the importance of the para positions in binding RyR1. The requirement for an intact major T cell immunophilin FKBP12-RyR1 complex was observed with each of 12 active PCB congeners indicating a common mechanism requiring an immunophilin-regulated Ca2+ release channel. An excellent correlation between the relative potencies for doubling [3H]Ry binding and the corresponding initial rates of PCB-induced Ca2+ efflux indicates that [3H]Ry binding analysis provides a measure of dysregulation of microsomal Ca2+ transport. The SAR for activating RyR1 is consistent with those previously reported in several in vivo and in vitro studies, suggesting that a common mechanism may contribute to the toxicity of noncoplanar PCBs. A practical application of the receptor-based screen developed here with RyR1 is that it provides a quantitative SAR that may be useful in predicting biological activity and risk of mixtures containing noncoplanar PCB congeners that have low or a lack of aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity.

  6. Cell Type Specific Spatial and Functional Coupling Between Mammalian Brain Kv2.1 K+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mandikian, Danielle; Bocksteins, Elke; Parajuli, Laxmi Kumar; Bishop, Hannah I.; Cerda, Oscar; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Trimmer, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv2.1 voltage-gated K+ channel is widely expressed throughout mammalian brain where it contributes to dynamic activity-dependent regulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability. Here we show that somatic plasma membrane Kv2.1 clusters are juxtaposed to clusters of intracellular ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+-release channels in mouse brain neurons, most prominently in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum. Electron microscopy-immunogold labeling shows that in MSNs, plasma membrane Kv2.1 clusters are adjacent to subsurface cisternae, placing Kv2.1 in close proximity to sites of RyR-mediated Ca2+ release. Immunofluorescence labeling in transgenic mice expressing GFP in specific MSN populations reveals the most prominent juxtaposed Kv2.1-RyR clusters in indirect pathway MSNs. Kv2.1 in both direct and indirect pathway MSNs exhibits markedly lower levels of labeling with phosphospecific antibodies directed against the S453, S563, and S603 phosphorylation site compared to levels observed in neocortical neurons, although labeling for Kv2.1 phosphorylation at S563 was significantly lower in indirect pathway MSNs compared to those in the direct pathway. Finally, acute stimulation of RyRs in heterologous cells causes a rapid hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of activation of Kv2.1, typical of Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent Kv2.1 dephosphorylation. Together, these studies reveal that striatal MSNs are distinct in their expression of clustered Kv2.1 at plasma membrane sites juxtaposed to intracellular RyRs, as well as in Kv2.1 phosphorylation state. Differences in Kv2.1 expression and phosphorylation between MSNs in direct and indirect pathways provide a cell- and circuit-specific mechanism for coupling intracellular Ca2+ release to phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Kv2.1 to dynamically impact intrinsic excitability. PMID:24962901

  7. Identification of novel ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) protein interaction with calcium homeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Timothy; Sharma, Parveen; Ignatchenko, Alex; MacLennan, David H; Kislinger, Thomas; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2011-05-13

    The ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) is a homotetrameric Ca(2+) release channel located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle where it plays a role in the initiation of skeletal muscle contraction. A soluble, 6×-histidine affinity-tagged cytosolic fragment of RyR1 (amino acids 1-4243) was expressed in HEK-293 cells, and metal affinity chromatography under native conditions was used to purify the peptide together with interacting proteins. When analyzed by gel-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), 703 proteins were identified under all conditions. This group of proteins was filtered to identify putative RyR interacting proteins by removing those proteins found in only 1 RyR purification and proteins for which average spectral counts were enriched by less than 4-fold over control values. This resulted in 49 potential RyR1 interacting proteins, and 4 were selected for additional interaction studies: calcium homeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP), endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment 53-kDa protein (LMAN1), T-complex protein, and phosphorylase kinase. Western blotting showed that only CHERP co-purified with affinity-tagged RyR1 and was eluted with imidazole. Immunofluorescence showed that endogenous CHERP co-localizes with endogenous RyR1 in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat soleus muscle. A combination of overexpression of RyR1 in HEK-293 cells with siRNA-mediated suppression of CHERP showed that CHERP affects Ca(2+) release from the ER via RyR1. Thus, we propose that CHERP is an RyR1 interacting protein that may be involved in the regulation of excitation-contraction coupling.

  8. N-terminal and central segments of the type 1 ryanodine receptor mediate its interaction with FK506-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Girgenrath, Tanya; Mahalingam, Mohana; Svensson, Bengt; Nitu, Florentin R; Cornea, Razvan L; Fessenden, James D

    2013-05-31

    We used site-directed labeling of the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements to map RyR1 sequence elements forming the binding site of the 12-kDa binding protein for the immunosuppressant drug, FK506. This protein, FKBP12, promotes the RyR1 closed state, thereby inhibiting Ca(2+) leakage in resting muscle. Although FKBP12 function is well established, its binding determinants within the RyR1 protein sequence remain unresolved. To identify these sequence determinants using FRET, we created five single-Cys FKBP variants labeled with Alexa Fluor 488 (denoted D-FKBP) and then targeted these D-FKBPs to full-length RyR1 constructs containing decahistidine (His10) "tags" placed within N-terminal (amino acid residues 76-619) or central (residues 2157-2777) regions of RyR1. The FRET acceptor Cy3NTA bound specifically and saturably to these His tags, allowing distance analysis of FRET measured from each D-FKBP variant to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag. Results indicate that D-FKBP binds proximal to both N-terminal and central domains of RyR1, thus suggesting that the FKBP binding site is composed of determinants from both regions. These findings further imply that the RyR1 N-terminal and central domains are proximal to one another, a core premise of the domain-switch hypothesis of RyR function. We observed FRET from GFP fused at position 620 within the N-terminal domain to central domain His-tagged sites, thus further supporting this hypothesis. Taken together, these results support the conclusion that N-terminal and central domain elements are closely apposed near the FKBP binding site within the RyR1 three-dimensional structure.

  9. Regulation of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor/Ca2+-release channel RyR1 by S-palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Chaube, Ruchi; Hess, Douglas T; Wang, Ya-Juan; Plummer, Bradley; Sun, Qi-An; Laurita, Kennneth; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2014-03-21

    The ryanodine receptor/Ca(2+)-release channels (RyRs) of skeletal and cardiac muscle are essential for Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum that mediates excitation-contraction coupling. It has been shown that RyR activity is regulated by dynamic post-translational modifications of Cys residues, in particular S-nitrosylation and S-oxidation. Here we show that the predominant form of RyR in skeletal muscle, RyR1, is subject to Cys-directed modification by S-palmitoylation. S-Palmitoylation targets 18 Cys within the N-terminal, cytoplasmic region of RyR1, which are clustered in multiple functional domains including those implicated in the activity-governing protein-protein interactions of RyR1 with the L-type Ca(2+) channel CaV1.1, calmodulin, and the FK506-binding protein FKBP12, as well as in "hot spot" regions containing sites of mutations implicated in malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. Eight of these Cys have been identified previously as subject to physiological S-nitrosylation or S-oxidation. Diminishing S-palmitoylation directly suppresses RyR1 activity as well as stimulus-coupled Ca(2+) release through RyR1. These findings demonstrate functional regulation of RyR1 by a previously unreported post-translational modification and indicate the potential for extensive Cys-based signaling cross-talk. In addition, we identify the sarco/endoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-ATPase 1A and the α1S subunit of the L-type Ca(2+) channel CaV1.1 as S-palmitoylated proteins, indicating that S-palmitoylation may regulate all principal governors of Ca(2+) flux in skeletal muscle that mediates excitation-contraction coupling.

  10. Simulation of the effect of rogue ryanodine receptors on a calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Ye, Xuesong; Cheng, Heping

    2010-05-26

    Calcium homeostasis is considered to be one of the most important factors for the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle. However, under some pathological conditions, such as heart failure (HF), calcium homeostasis is disordered, and spontaneous waves may occur. In this study, we developed a mathematical model of formation and propagation of a calcium wave based upon a governing system of diffusion-reaction equations presented by Izu et al (2001 Biophys. J. 80 103-20) and integrated non-clustered or 'rogue' ryanodine receptors (rogue RyRs) into a two-dimensional (2D) model of ventricular myocytes isolated from failing hearts in which sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) pools are partially unloaded. The model was then used to simulate the effect of rogue RyRs on initiation and propagation of the calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with HF. Our simulation results show that rogue RyRs can amplify the diastolic SR Ca(2+) leak in the form of Ca(2+) quarks, increase the probability of occurrence of spontaneous Ca(2+) waves even with smaller SR Ca(2+) stores, accelerate Ca(2+) wave propagation, and hence lead to delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) and cardiac arrhythmia in the diseased heart. This investigation suggests that incorporating rogue RyRs in the Ca(2+) wave model under HF conditions provides a new view of Ca(2+) dynamics that could not be mimicked by adjusting traditional parameters involved in Ca(2+) release units and other ion channels, and contributes to understanding the underlying mechanism of HF.

  11. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

    PubMed

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Ruas, Jorge L; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca(2+) leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca(2+) release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca(2+)-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group.

  12. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise

    PubMed Central

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J.; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T.; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca2+ leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca2+ release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca2+-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group. PMID:26575622

  13. Simulation of the effect of rogue ryanodine receptors on a calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Ye, Xuesong; Cheng, Heping

    2010-06-01

    Calcium homeostasis is considered to be one of the most important factors for the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle. However, under some pathological conditions, such as heart failure (HF), calcium homeostasis is disordered, and spontaneous waves may occur. In this study, we developed a mathematical model of formation and propagation of a calcium wave based upon a governing system of diffusion-reaction equations presented by Izu et al (2001 Biophys. J. 80 103-20) and integrated non-clustered or 'rogue' ryanodine receptors (rogue RyRs) into a two-dimensional (2D) model of ventricular myocytes isolated from failing hearts in which sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pools are partially unloaded. The model was then used to simulate the effect of rogue RyRs on initiation and propagation of the calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with HF. Our simulation results show that rogue RyRs can amplify the diastolic SR Ca2+ leak in the form of Ca2+ quarks, increase the probability of occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ waves even with smaller SR Ca2+ stores, accelerate Ca2+ wave propagation, and hence lead to delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) and cardiac arrhythmia in the diseased heart. This investigation suggests that incorporating rogue RyRs in the Ca2+ wave model under HF conditions provides a new view of Ca2+ dynamics that could not be mimicked by adjusting traditional parameters involved in Ca2+ release units and other ion channels, and contributes to understanding the underlying mechanism of HF.

  14. Ryanodine receptor blockade reduces amyloid-β load and memory impairments in Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Oulès, Bénédicte; Del Prete, Dolores; Greco, Barbara; Zhang, Xuexin; Lauritzen, Inger; Sevalle, Jean; Moreno, Sebastien; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia; Trebak, Mohamed; Checler, Frédéric; Benfenati, Fabio; Chami, Mounia

    2012-08-22

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), the perturbation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca²⁺) homeostasis has been linked to presenilins, the catalytic core in γ-secretase complexes cleaving the amyloid precursor protein (APP), thereby generating amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we investigate whether APP contributes to ER Ca²⁺ homeostasis and whether ER Ca²⁺ could in turn influence Aβ production. We show that overexpression of wild-type human APP (APP(695)), or APP harboring the Swedish double mutation (APP(swe)) triggers increased ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression and enhances RyR-mediated ER Ca²⁺ release in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and in APP(swe)-expressing (Tg2576) mice. Interestingly, dantrolene-induced lowering of RyR-mediated Ca²⁺ release leads to the reduction of both intracellular and extracellular Aβ load in neuroblastoma cells as well as in primary cultured neurons derived from Tg2576 mice. This Aβ reduction can be accounted for by decreased Thr-668-dependent APP phosphorylation and β- and γ-secretases activities. Importantly, dantrolene diminishes Aβ load, reduces Aβ-related histological lesions, and slows down learning and memory deficits in Tg2576 mice. Overall, our data document a key role of RyR in Aβ production and learning and memory performances, and delineate RyR-mediated control of Ca²⁺ homeostasis as a physiological paradigm that could be targeted for innovative therapeutic approaches.

  15. Restraint effects on stress-related hormones and blood natural killer cell cytotoxicity in pigs with a mutated ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Ciepielewski, Z M; Stojek, W; Glac, W; Wrona, D

    2013-05-01

    A mutation in the ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) of the calcium release channel is responsible for increased stress susceptibility in pigs. In the present study, the relation of a mutation in RYR1 with the neuroendocrine (stress-related hormone) response and the immune defense represented by natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) during a 4-h restraint and recovery phase in 60 male pigs was investigated. Blood samples were collected from pigs previously divided into RYR1 genotypes (nn, Nn, NN), based on PCR amplification and restriction analyses. The blood samples collected during the restraint and recovery phases of the experiment were used to determine NKCC ((51)Cr-release assay), large granular lymphocyte number (hematologic method), and plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), GH, ACTH, and cortisol (COR) (by specific RIA). The greatest degree of NKCC response (P < 0.05) to restraint stress relative to controls was observed for the stress-susceptible homozygote group (nn). Measures of stress-related hormones were positively correlated with NKCC during the entire experimental period (P < 0.001 for all investigated hormones) in the nn group. Immunostimulatory effects in the early (0-60 min) phase of restraint were associated with increased hormone responses, especially PRL and GH. In the late (180-240 min) phase of stress and the recovery phase (480 min), a decrease in immune response was accompanied by an elevated COR response in all RYR1 genotypes. Moreover, divergent responses of both PRL (greatest in nn, P < 0.001) and GH (greatest in NN, P < 0.001) to the 4-h restraint were observed. Our results suggest that stress-susceptible RYR1-mutated homozygotes develop a greater level of immune defense, including cytotoxic activity of NK cells, and accompanied by more pronounced stress-induced changes in neuroendocrine response than stress-resistant heterozygous (Nn) and homozygous (NN) pigs.

  16. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; Martos, F; Bellido, I; Marquez, E; Garcia, A J; Pavia, J; Sanchez de la Cuesta, F

    1992-06-09

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle homogenates were characterized with [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) by ligand binding studies. [3H]NMS saturation experiments show the existence of a homogeneous population of non-interacting binding sites with similar affinity (KD values of 1.38 +/- 0.20 nM in human colon smooth muscle and 1.48 +/- 0.47 nM in rat colon smooth muscle) and with Hill slopes close to unity in both samples of tissue. However, a significant (P less than 0.01) increase in muscarinic receptor density (Bmax) is found in human colon (29.9 +/- 2.9 fmol/mg protein) compared with rat colon (17.2 +/- 1.5 fmol/mg protein). Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by non-labelled compounds shows the following order in human colon: atropine greater than AF-DX 116 greater than pirenzepine. Whereas in rat colon the rank order obtained is atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Atropine and pirenzepine bind to a homogeneous population of binding sites, although pirenzepine shows higher affinity to bind to the sites present in rat colon (Ki = 1.08 +/- 0.08 microM) than those in human colon (Ki = 1.74 +/- 0.02 microM) (P less than 0.05). Similarly, IC50 values obtained in AF-DX 116 competition experiments were significantly different (P less than 0.01) in human colon (IC50 = 1.69 +/- 0.37 microM) than in rat colon (IC50 = 3.78 +/- 0.75 microM). Unlike atropine and pirenzepine, the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by AF-DX 116 did not yield a simple mass-action binding curve (nH less than 1, P less than 0.01) suggesting the presence of more than one subtype of muscarinic receptor in both species. Computer analysis of these curves with a two binding site model suggests the presence of two populations of receptor. The apparent Ki1 value for the high affinity binding site is 0.49 +/- 0.07 microM for human colon smooth muscle and 0.33 +/- 0.05 microM for rat colon smooth muscle. The apparent Ki2 for the low affinity binding site is 8

  17. The EF-hand Ca2+ Binding Domain Is Not Required for Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenting; Sun, Bo; Xiao, Zhichao; Liu, Yingjie; Wang, Yundi; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Ruiwu; Chen, S R Wayne

    2016-01-29

    Activation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) by elevating cytosolic Ca(2+) is a central step in the process of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release, but the molecular basis of RyR2 activation by cytosolic Ca(2+) is poorly defined. It has been proposed recently that the putative Ca(2+) binding domain encompassing a pair of EF-hand motifs (EF1 and EF2) in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) functions as a Ca(2+) sensor that regulates the gating of RyR1. Although the role of the EF-hand domain in RyR1 function has been studied extensively, little is known about the functional significance of the corresponding EF-hand domain in RyR2. Here we investigate the effect of mutations in the EF-hand motifs on the Ca(2+) activation of RyR2. We found that mutations in the EF-hand motifs or deletion of the entire EF-hand domain did not affect the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of [(3)H]ryanodine binding or the cytosolic Ca(2+) activation of RyR2. On the other hand, deletion of the EF-hand domain markedly suppressed the luminal Ca(2+) activation of RyR2 and spontaneous Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells during store Ca(2+) overload or store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR). Furthermore, mutations in the EF2 motif, but not EF1 motif, of RyR2 raised the threshold for SOICR termination, whereas deletion of the EF-hand domain of RyR2 increased both the activation and termination thresholds for SOICR. These results indicate that, although the EF-hand domain is not required for RyR2 activation by cytosolic Ca(2+), it plays an important role in luminal Ca(2+) activation and SOICR.

  18. Involvement of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels, IP3 receptors, and ryanodine receptors in the generation of spontaneous rhythmic contractions of the cricket lateral oviduct.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Hirotake; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, the isolated cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) lateral oviduct exhibited spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRCs) with a frequency of 0.29±0.009 Hz (n=43) and an amplitude of 14.6±1.25 mg (n=29). SRCs completely disappeared following removal of extracellular Ca2+ using a solution containing 5mM EGTA. Application of the non-specific Ca2+ channel blockers Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+ also decreased both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs in dose-dependent manners, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through plasma membrane Ca2+ channels is essential for the generation of SRCs. Application of ryanodine (30 μM), which depletes intracellular Ca2+ by locking ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca2+ channels in an open state, gradually reduced the frequency and amplitude of SRCs. A RyR antagonist, tetracaine, reduced both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs, whereas a RyR activator, caffeine, increased the frequency of SRCs with a subsequent increase in basal tonus, indicating that RyRs are essential for generating SRCs. To further investigate the involvement of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in SRCs, we examined the effect of a PLC inhibitor, U73122, and an IP3R antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), on SRCs. Separately, U73122 (10 μM) and 2-APB (30-50 μM) both significantly reduced the amplitude of SRCs with little effect on their frequency, further indicating that the PLC/IP3R signaling pathway is fundamental to the modulation of the amplitude of SRCs. A hypotonic-induced increase in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs and a hypertonic-induced decrease in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs indicated that mechanical stretch of the lateral oviduct is involved in the generation of SRCs. The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-pump ATPase inhibitors thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid impaired or suppressed the relaxation phase of SRCs. Taken together, the present results indicate that Ca2+ influx through plasma membrane Ca2

  19. The Role of Parvalbumin, Sarcoplasmatic Reticulum Calcium Pump Rate, Rates of Cross-Bridge Dynamics, and Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Current on Peripheral Muscle Fatigue: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Verena

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of the excitation-contraction pathway, which has previously been validated for slow-twitch and fast-twitch skeletal muscles, is employed to investigate key biophysical processes leading to peripheral muscle fatigue. Special emphasis hereby is on investigating how the model's original parameter sets can be interpolated such that realistic behaviour with respect to contraction time and fatigue progression can be obtained for a continuous distribution of the model's parameters across the muscle units, as found for the functional properties of muscles. The parameters are divided into 5 groups describing (i) the sarcoplasmatic reticulum calcium pump rate, (ii) the cross-bridge dynamics rates, (iii) the ryanodine receptor calcium current, (iv) the rates of binding of magnesium and calcium ions to parvalbumin and corresponding dissociations, and (v) the remaining processes. The simulations reveal that the first two parameter groups are sensitive to contraction time but not fatigue, the third parameter group affects both considered properties, and the fourth parameter group is only sensitive to fatigue progression. Hence, within the scope of the underlying model, further experimental studies should investigate parvalbumin dynamics and the ryanodine receptor calcium current to enhance the understanding of peripheral muscle fatigue. PMID:27980606

  20. The Role of Parvalbumin, Sarcoplasmatic Reticulum Calcium Pump Rate, Rates of Cross-Bridge Dynamics, and Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Current on Peripheral Muscle Fatigue: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Röhrle, Oliver; Neumann, Verena; Heidlauf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of the excitation-contraction pathway, which has previously been validated for slow-twitch and fast-twitch skeletal muscles, is employed to investigate key biophysical processes leading to peripheral muscle fatigue. Special emphasis hereby is on investigating how the model's original parameter sets can be interpolated such that realistic behaviour with respect to contraction time and fatigue progression can be obtained for a continuous distribution of the model's parameters across the muscle units, as found for the functional properties of muscles. The parameters are divided into 5 groups describing (i) the sarcoplasmatic reticulum calcium pump rate, (ii) the cross-bridge dynamics rates, (iii) the ryanodine receptor calcium current, (iv) the rates of binding of magnesium and calcium ions to parvalbumin and corresponding dissociations, and (v) the remaining processes. The simulations reveal that the first two parameter groups are sensitive to contraction time but not fatigue, the third parameter group affects both considered properties, and the fourth parameter group is only sensitive to fatigue progression. Hence, within the scope of the underlying model, further experimental studies should investigate parvalbumin dynamics and the ryanodine receptor calcium current to enhance the understanding of peripheral muscle fatigue.

  1. Direct detection of calmodulin tuning by ryanodine receptor channel targets using a Ca2+-sensitive acrylodan-labeled calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Fruen, Bradley R; Balog, Edward M; Schafer, Janet; Nitu, Florentin R; Thomas, David D; Cornea, Razvan L

    2005-01-11

    Calmodulin (CaM) activates the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) at nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations but inhibits it at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, indicating that binding of Ca(2+) to CaM may provide a molecular switch for modulating RyR1 channel activity. To directly examine the Ca(2+) sensitivity of RyR1-complexed CaM, we used an environment-sensitive acrylodan adduct of CaM. The resulting (ACR)CaM probe displayed high-affinity binding to, and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of, RyR1 similar to that of unlabeled wild-type (WT) CaM. Upon addition of Ca(2+), (ACR)CaM exhibited a substantial (>50%) decrease in fluorescence (K(Ca) = 2.7 +/- 0.8 microM). A peptide derived from the RyR1 CaM binding domain (RyR1(3614)(-)(43)) caused an even more pronounced Ca(2+)-dependent fluorescence decrease, and a >or=10-fold leftward shift in its K(Ca) (0.2 +/- 0.1 microM). In the presence of intact RyR1 channels in SR vesicles, (ACR)CaM fluorescence spectra were distinct from those in the presence of RyR1(3614)(-)(43), although a Ca(2+)-dependent decrease in fluorescence was still observed. The K(Ca) for (ACR)CaM fluorescence in the presence of SR (0.8 +/- 0.4 microM) was greater than in the presence of RyR1(3614)(-)(43) but was consistent with functional determinations showing the conversion of (ACR)CaM from channel activator (apoCaM) to inhibitor (Ca(2+)CaM) at Ca(2+) concentrations between 0.3 and 1 microM. These results indicate that binding to RyR1 targets evokes significant changes in the CaM structure and Ca(2+) sensitivity (i.e., CaM tuning). However, changes resulting from binding of CaM to the full-length, tetrameric channels are clearly distinct from changes caused by the RyR1-derived peptide. We suggest that the Ca(2+) sensitivity of CaM when in complex with full-length channels may be tuned to respond to physiologically relevant changes in Ca(2+).

  2. Site-specific modification of calmodulin Ca²(+) affinity tunes the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor activation profile.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Zhou, Yubin; Zou, Jin; Chen, Yanyi; Patel, Priya; Yang, Jenny J; Balog, Edward M

    2010-11-15

    The skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor Ca²(+)-release channel (RyR1) is regulated by Ca²(+) and CaM (calmodulin). CaM shifts the biphasic Ca²(+)-dependence of RyR1 activation leftward, effectively increasing channel opening at low Ca²(+) and decreasing channel opening at high Ca²(+). The conversion of CaM from a RyR1 activator into an inhibitor is due to the binding of Ca²(+) to CaM; however, which of CaM's four Ca²(+)-binding sites serves as the switch for this conversion is unclear. We engineered a series of mutant CaMs designed to individually increase the Ca²(+) affinity of each of CaM's EF-hands by increasing the number of acidic residues in Ca²(+)-chelating positions. Domain-specific Ca²(+) affinities of each CaM variant were determined by equilibrium fluorescence titration. Mutations in sites I (T26D) or II (N60D) in CaM's N-terminal domain had little effect on CaM Ca²(+) affinity and regulation of RyR1. However, the site III mutation N97D increased the Ca²(+)-binding affinity of CaM's C-terminal domain and caused CaM to inhibit RyR1 at a lower Ca²(+) concentration than wild-type CaM. Conversely, the site IV mutation Q135D decreased the Ca²(+)-binding affinity of CaM's C-terminal domain and caused CaM to inhibit RyR1 at higher Ca²(+) concentrations. These results support the hypothesis that Ca²(+) binding to CaM's C-terminal acts as the switch converting CaM from a RyR1 activator into a channel inhibitor. These results indicate further that targeting CaM's Ca²(+) affinity may be a valid strategy to tune the activation profile of CaM-regulated ion channels.

  3. Ryanodine receptor sensitivity governs the stability and synchrony of local calcium release during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Andrew P; Jafri, M Saleet; Lederer, W J; Williams, George S B

    2016-03-01

    Calcium-induced calcium release is the principal mechanism that triggers the cell-wide [Ca(2+)]i transient that activates muscle contraction during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (ECC). Here, we characterize this process in mouse cardiac myocytes with a novel mathematical action potential (AP) model that incorporates realistic stochastic gating of voltage-dependent L-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channels (LCCs) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channels (the ryanodine receptors, RyR2s). Depolarization of the sarcolemma during an AP stochastically activates the LCCs elevating subspace [Ca(2+)] within each of the cell's 20,000 independent calcium release units (CRUs) to trigger local RyR2 opening and initiate Ca(2+) sparks, the fundamental unit of triggered Ca(2+) release. Synchronization of Ca(2+) sparks during systole depends on the nearly uniform cellular activation of LCCs and the likelihood of local LCC openings triggering local Ca(2+) sparks (ECC fidelity). The detailed design and true SR Ca(2+) pump/leak balance displayed by our model permits investigation of ECC fidelity and Ca(2+) spark fidelity, the balance between visible (Ca(2+) spark) and invisible (Ca(2+) quark/sub-spark) SR Ca(2+) release events. Excess SR Ca(2+) leak is examined as a disease mechanism in the context of "catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)", a Ca(2+)-dependent arrhythmia. We find that that RyR2s (and therefore Ca(2+) sparks) are relatively insensitive to LCC openings across a wide range of membrane potentials; and that key differences exist between Ca(2+) sparks evoked during quiescence, diastole, and systole. The enhanced RyR2 [Ca(2+)]i sensitivity during CPVT leads to increased Ca(2+) spark fidelity resulting in asynchronous systolic Ca(2+) spark activity. It also produces increased diastolic SR Ca(2+) leak with some prolonged Ca(2+) sparks that at times become "metastable" and fail to efficiently terminate. There is a huge margin of safety for

  4. Designing calcium release channel inhibitors with enhanced electron donor properties: stabilizing the closed state of ryanodine receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yanping; Yaeger, Daniel; Owen, Laura J; Escobedo, Jorge O; Wang, Jialu; Singer, Jeffrey D; Strongin, Robert M; Abramson, Jonathan J

    2012-01-01

    New drugs with enhanced electron donor properties that target the ryanodine receptor from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1) are shown to be potent inhibitors of single-channel activity. In this article, we synthesize derivatives of the channel activator 4-chloro-3-methyl phenol (4-CmC) and the 1,4-benzothiazepine channel inhibitor 4-[-3{1-(4-benzyl) piperidinyl}propionyl]-7-methoxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,4-benzothiazepine (K201, JTV519) with enhanced electron donor properties. Instead of activating channel activity (~100 μM), the 4-methoxy analog of 4-CmC [4-methoxy-3-methyl phenol (4-MmC)] inhibits channel activity at submicromolar concentrations (IC(50) = 0.34 ± 0.08 μM). Increasing the electron donor characteristics of K201 by synthesizing its dioxole congener results in an approximately 16 times more potent RyR1 inhibitor (IC(50) = 0.24 ± 0.05 μM) compared with K201 (IC(50) = 3.98 ± 0.79 μM). Inhibition is not caused by an increased closed time of the channel but seems to be caused by an open state block of RyR1. These alterations to chemical structure do not influence the ability of these drugs to affect Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase type 1. Moreover, the FKBP12 protein, which stabilizes RyR1 in a closed configuration, is shown to be a strong electron donor. It seems as if FKBP12, K201, its dioxole derivative, and 4-MmC inhibit RyR1 channel activity by virtue of their electron donor characteristics. These results embody strong evidence that designing new drugs to target RyR1 with enhanced electron donor characteristics results in more potent channel inhibitors. This is a novel approach to the design of new, more potent drugs with the aim of functionally modifying RyR1 single-channel activity.

  5. Role of Cys³⁶⁰² in the function and regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Mi, Tao; Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Tang, Yijun; Hiess, Florian; Xiao, Jianmin; Wang, Yundi; Zhang, Joe Z; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Ruiwu; Jones, Peter P; Chen, S R Wayne

    2015-04-01

    The cardiac Ca²⁺ release channel [ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2)] is modulated by thiol reactive agents, but the molecular basis of RyR2 modulation by thiol reagents is poorly understood. Cys³⁶³⁵ in the skeletal muscle RyR1 is one of the most hyper-reactive thiols and is important for the redox and calmodulin (CaM) regulation of the RyR1 channel. However, little is known about the role of the corresponding cysteine residue in RyR2 (Cys³⁶⁰²) in the function and regulation of the RyR2 channel. In the present study, we assessed the impact of mutating Cys³⁶⁰² (C³⁶⁰²A) on store overload-induced Ca²⁺ release (SOICR) and the regulation of RyR2 by thiol reagents and CaM. We found that the C³⁶⁰²A mutation suppressed SOICR by raising the activation threshold and delayed the termination of Ca²⁺ release by reducing the termination threshold. As a result, C³⁶⁰²A markedly increased the fractional Ca²⁺ release. Furthermore, the C³⁶⁰²A mutation diminished the inhibitory effect of N-ethylmaleimide on Ca²⁺ release, but it had no effect on the stimulatory action of 4,4'-dithiodipyridine (DTDP) on Ca²⁺ release. In addition, Cys³⁶⁰² mutations (C³⁶⁰²A or C³⁶⁰²R) did not abolish the effect of CaM on Ca²⁺-release termination. Therefore, RyR2-Cys³⁶⁰² is a major site mediating the action of thiol alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide, but not the action of the oxidant DTDP. Our data also indicate that residue Cys³⁶⁰² plays an important role in the activation and termination of Ca²⁺ release, but it is not essential for CaM regulation of RyR2.

  6. Camkii-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors Regulates Cell Death In Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Carlo, Mariano N.; Said, Matilde; Ling, Haiyun; Valverde, Carlos A.; De Giusti, Verónica; Sommese, Leandro; Palomeque, Julieta; Aiello, Alejandro E.; Skapura, Darlene G.; Rinaldi, Gustavo; Respress, Jonathan L.; Brown, Joan Heller; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Salas, Margarita A.; Mattiazzi, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+-Calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) activation is deleterious in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Moreover, inhibition of CaMKII-dependent phosphorylations at the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) prevents CaMKII-induced I/R damage. However, the downstream targets of CaMKII at the SR level, responsible for this detrimental effect, remain unclear. In the present study we aimed to dissect the role of the two main substrates of CaMKII at the SR level, phospholamban (PLN) and ryanodine receptors (RyR2), in CaMKII-dependent I/R injury. In mouse hearts subjected to global I/R (45/120 min), phosphorylation of the primary CaMKII sites, S2814 on cardiac RyR2 and of T17 on PLN, significantly increased at the onset of reperfusion whereas PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2 and PLN did not change. Similar results were obtained in vivo, in mice subjected to regional myocardial I/R (1/24 hrs). Knock-in mice with an inactivated serine 2814 phosphorylation site on RyR2 (S2814A), significantly improved post-ischemic mechanical recovery, reduced infarct size and decreased apoptosis. Conversely, knock-in mice, in which CaMKII site of RyR2 is constitutively activated (S2814D), significantly increased infarct size and exacerbated apoptosis. In S2814A and S2814D mice subjected to regional myocardial ischemia, infarct size was also decreased and increased respectively. Transgenic mice with double-mutant non-phosphorylatable PLN (S16A/T17A) in the PLN knockout background (PLNDM) also showed significantly increased post-ischemic cardiac damage. This effect cannot be attributed to PKA-dependent PLN phosphorylation and was not due to the enhanced L-type Ca2+ current, present in these mice. Our results reveal a major role for the phosphorylation of S2814 site on RyR2 in CaMKII-dependent I/R cardiac damage. In contrast, they showed that CaMKII-dependent increase in PLN phosphorylation during reperfusion opposes rather than contributes to I/R damage. PMID:24949568

  7. Phytoestrogens from Psoralea corylifolia reveal estrogen receptor-subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Xin, D; Wang, H; Yang, J; Su, Y-F; Fan, G-W; Wang, Y-F; Zhu, Y; Gao, X-M

    2010-02-01

    The seed of Psoralea corylifolia L. (PCL), a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, has been applied as a tonic or an aphrodisiac agent and commonly used as a remedy for bone fracture, osteomalacia and osteoporosis in China. In our study, the estrogen receptor subtype-selective activities of the extracts and compounds derived from PCL were analyzed using the HeLa cell assay. The different fractions including petroleum ether, CH(2)Cl(2) and EtOAc fractions of the EtOH extract of PCL showed significant activity in activating either ERalpha or ERbeta whereas the n-BuOH fraction showed no estrogenic activity. Further chromatographic purification of the active fractions yielded seven compounds including the two coumarins isopsoralen and psoralen, the four flavonoids isobavachalcone, bavachin, corylifol A and neobavaisoflavone, and the meroterpene phenol, bakuchiol. In reporter gene assay, the two coumarins (10(-8)-10(-5)M) acted as ERalpha-selective agonists while the other compounds (10(-9)-10(-6)M) activated both ERalpha and ERbeta. The estrogenic activities of all compounds could be completely suppressed by the pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suggesting that the compounds exert their activities through ER. Only psoralen and isopsoralen as ERalpha agonists promoted MCF-7 cell proliferation significantly. Although all the compounds have estrogenic activity, they may exert different biological effects. In conclusion, both ER subtype-selective and nonselective activities in compounds derived from PCL suggested that PCL could be a new source for selective estrogen-receptor modulators.

  8. Muscarinic M3 receptor subtype gene expression in the human heart.

    PubMed

    Hellgren, I; Mustafa, A; Riazi, M; Suliman, I; Sylvén, C; Adem, A

    2000-01-20

    The heart is an important target organ for cholinergic function. In this study, muscarinic receptor subtype(s) in the human heart were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our results demonstrated muscarinic receptor M2 and M3 subtype RNA in left/right atria/ventricles of donor hearts. Receptor autoradiography analysis using selective muscarinic ligands indicated an absence of M1 receptor subtype in the human heart. The level of muscarinic receptor binding in atria was two to three times greater than in ventricles. Our results suggest that muscarinic receptors in the human heart are of the M2 and M3 subtypes. This is the first report of M3 receptors in the human myocardium.

  9. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R; Heider, Dominik

    2016-04-29

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients.

  10. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C

    PubMed Central

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y.; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R.; Heider, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients. PMID:27126912

  11. Identification of two H3-histamine receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.E. Jr.; Zweig, A.; Shih, N.Y.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Clark, M.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The H3-histamine receptor provides feedback inhibition of histamine synthesis and release as well as inhibition of other neurotransmitter release. We have characterized this receptor by radioligand binding studies with the H3 agonist N alpha-(3H)methylhistamine ((3H)NAMHA). The results of (3H)NAMHA saturation binding and NAMHA inhibition of (3H)NAMHA binding were consistent with an apparently single class of receptors (KD = 0.37 nM, Bmax = 73 fmol/mg of protein) and competition assays with other agonists and the antagonists impromidine and dimaprit disclosed only a single class of sites. In contrast, inhibition of (3H)NAMHA binding by the specific high affinity H3 antagonist thioperamide revealed two classes of sites (KiA = 5 nM, BmaxA = 30 fmol/mg of protein; KiB = 68 nM, BmaxB = 48 fmol/mg of protein). Burimamide, another antagonist that, like thioperamide, contains a thiourea group, likewise discriminated between two classes of sites. In addition to differences between some antagonist potencies for the two receptors, there is a differential guanine nucleotide sensitivity of the two. The affinity of the H3A receptor for (3H) NAMHA was reduced less than 2-fold, whereas (3H)NAMHA binding to the H3B receptor was undetectable in the presence of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). The distinction between H3A and H3B receptor subtypes, the former a high affinity and the latter a low affinity thioperamide site, draws support from published in vitro data.

  12. Localization of nigrostriatal dopamine receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-forskolin was used to assess the effects of single and combined neurotoxin lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain on dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase (AC), respectively. Ibotenic acid (IA) lesions of the caudate-putamen (CPu) resulted in near total loss of both (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 and of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding in the ipsilateral CPu and substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu was only partially removed by this same lesion, and nigral (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding was virtually unchanged. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and IA lesions of the substantia nigra compacta (SNC) did not affect (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 or (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding, but largely removed (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the SNC. A 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway followed by an ipsilateral IA injection of the CPu failed to further reduce (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic DA receptors in the CPu are of both the D1 and D2 variety; however, a portion of D2 receptors in the CPu may be presynaptic on afferent nerve terminals to this structure. D1 receptors in the SNR are presynaptic on striatonigral terminals, whereas the D2 receptors of the SNC are autoreceptors on nigral DA neurons. The existence of presynaptic D2 receptors on nigrostriatal DA-ergic terminals could not be confirmed by this study. Co-localization of D1 receptors and AC occurs in both the CPu and SNR.

  13. The random-coil 'C' fragment of the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop can activate or inhibit native skeletal ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Haarmann, Claudia S; Green, Daniel; Casarotto, Marco G; Laver, Derek R; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2003-01-01

    The actions of peptide C, corresponding to (724)Glu-Pro(760) of the II-III loop of the skeletal dihydropyridine receptor, on ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels incorporated into lipid bilayers with the native sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane show that the peptide is a high-affinity activator of native skeletal RyRs at cytoplasmic concentrations of 100 nM-10 microM. In addition, we found that peptide C inhibits RyRs in a voltage-independent manner when added for longer times or at higher concentrations (up to 150 microM). Peptide C had a random-coil structure indicating that it briefly assumes a variety of structures, some of which might activate and others which might inhibit RyRs. The results suggest that RyR activation and inhibition by peptide C arise from independent stochastic processes. A rate constant of 7.5 x 10(5) s(-1).M(-1) was obtained for activation and a lower estimate for the rate constant for inhibition of 5.9 x 10(3) s(-1).M(-1). The combined actions of peptide C and peptide A (II-III loop sequence (671)Thr-Leu(690)) showed that peptide C prevented activation but not blockage of RyRs by peptide A. We suggest that the effects of peptide C indicate functional interactions between a part of the dihydropyridine receptor and the RyR. These interactions could reflect either dynamic changes that occur during excitation-contraction coupling or interactions between the proteins at rest. PMID:12620094

  14. Molecular and cellular analysis of human histamine receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Roland; Strasser, Andrea; Schneider, Erich H.; Neumann, Detlef; Dove, Stefan; Buschauer, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The human histamine receptors hH1R and hH2R constitute important drug targets, and hH3R and hH4R have substantial potential in this area. Considering the species-specificity of pharmacology of HxR orthologs, it is important to analyze hHxRs. Here,we summarize current knowledge of hHxRs endogenously expressed in human cells and hHxRs recombinantly expressed in mammalian and insect cells. We present the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems. We also discuss problems associated with the use of hHxR antibodies, an issue of general relevance for G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). There is much greater overlap in activity of ‘selective’ ligands for other hHxRs than the cognate receptor subtype than generally appreciated. Studies with native and recombinant systems support the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations, encompassing agonists and antagonists. It is emerging that for characterization of hHxR ligands, one cannot rely on a single test system and a single parameter. Rather, multiple systems and parameters have to be studied. Although such studies are time-consuming and expensive, ultimately, they will increase drug safety and efficacy. PMID:23254267

  15. Adrenergic receptor subtypes in the cerebral circulation of newborn piglets

    SciTech Connect

    Wagerle, L.C.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptor subtype mediating cerebral vasoconstriction during sympathetic nerve stimulation in the newborn piglet. The effect of ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antagonists prazosin and yohimbine on the cerebrovascular response to unilateral electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 15 V) of the superior cervical sympathetic trunk was studied in 25 newborn piglets. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with tracer microspheres. Sympathetic stimulation decreased blood flow to the ipsilateral cerebrum hippocampus, choroid plexus, and masseter muscle. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-Adrenergic receptor blockade with prazosin inhibited the sympathetic vasoconstriction in the cerebrum, hippocampus, and masseter muscle and abolished it in the choroid plexus. ..cap alpha../sub s/-Adrenergic receptor blockade with yohimbine had no effect. Following the higher dose of yohimbine, however, blood flow to all brain regions was increased by approximately two-fold, possibly due to enhanced cerebral metabolism. These data demonstrate that vascular ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors mediate vasoconstriction to neuroadrenergic stimulation in cerebral resistance vessels in the newborn piglet.

  16. Membrane depolarization increases ryanodine sensitivity to Ca2+ release to the cytosol in L6 skeletal muscle cells: Implications for excitation–contraction coupling

    PubMed Central

    Pitake, Saumitra

    2015-01-01

    The dihydropyridine receptor in the plasma membrane and the ryanodine receptor in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are known to physically interact in the process of excitation–contraction coupling. However, the mechanism for subsequent Ca2+ release through the ryanodine receptor is unknown. Our lab has previously presented evidence that the dihydropyridine receptor and ryanodine receptor combine as a channel for the entry of Ca2+ under resting conditions, known as store operated calcium entry. Here, we provide evidence that depolarization during excitation–contraction coupling causes the dihydropyridine receptor to disengage from the ryanodine receptor. The newly freed ryanodine receptor can then transport Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol. Experimentally, this should more greatly expose the ryanodine receptor to exogenous ryanodine. To examine this hypothesis, we titrated L6 skeletal muscle cells with ryanodine in resting and excited (depolarized) states. When L6 muscle cells were depolarized with high potassium or exposed to the dihydropyridine receptor agonist BAYK-8644, known to induce dihydropyridine receptor movement within the membrane, ryanodine sensitivity was enhanced. However, ryanodine sensitivity was unaffected when Ca2+ was elevated without depolarization by the ryanodine receptor agonist chloromethylcresol, or by increasing Ca2+ concentration in the media. Ca2+ entry currents (from the extracellular space) during excitation were strongly inhibited by ryanodine, but Ca2+ entry currents in the resting state were not. We conclude that excitation releases the ryanodine receptor from occlusion by the dihydropyridine receptor, enabling Ca2+ release from the ryanodine receptor to the cytosol. PMID:26643865

  17. Membrane depolarization increases ryanodine sensitivity to Ca2+ release to the cytosol in L6 skeletal muscle cells: Implications for excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Pitake, Saumitra; Ochs, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    The dihydropyridine receptor in the plasma membrane and the ryanodine receptor in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are known to physically interact in the process of excitation-contraction coupling. However, the mechanism for subsequent Ca(2+) release through the ryanodine receptor is unknown. Our lab has previously presented evidence that the dihydropyridine receptor and ryanodine receptor combine as a channel for the entry of Ca(2+) under resting conditions, known as store operated calcium entry. Here, we provide evidence that depolarization during excitation-contraction coupling causes the dihydropyridine receptor to disengage from the ryanodine receptor. The newly freed ryanodine receptor can then transport Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol. Experimentally, this should more greatly expose the ryanodine receptor to exogenous ryanodine. To examine this hypothesis, we titrated L6 skeletal muscle cells with ryanodine in resting and excited (depolarized) states. When L6 muscle cells were depolarized with high potassium or exposed to the dihydropyridine receptor agonist BAYK-8644, known to induce dihydropyridine receptor movement within the membrane, ryanodine sensitivity was enhanced. However, ryanodine sensitivity was unaffected when Ca(2+) was elevated without depolarization by the ryanodine receptor agonist chloromethylcresol, or by increasing Ca(2+) concentration in the media. Ca(2+) entry currents (from the extracellular space) during excitation were strongly inhibited by ryanodine, but Ca(2+) entry currents in the resting state were not. We conclude that excitation releases the ryanodine receptor from occlusion by the dihydropyridine receptor, enabling Ca(2+) release from the ryanodine receptor to the cytosol.

  18. FKBP12 modulation of the binding of the skeletal ryanodine receptor onto the II-III loop of the dihydropyridine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Fiona M; Robert, Mylène; Jona, Istvan; Szegedi, Csaba; Albrieux, Mireille; Geib, Sandrine; De Waard, Michel; Villaz, Michel; Ronjat, Michel

    2002-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, excitation-contraction coupling involves a functional interaction between the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR). The domain corresponding to Thr(671)-Leu(690) of the II-III loop of the skeletal DHPR alpha(1)-subunit is able to regulate RyR properties and calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, whereas the domain corresponding to Glu(724)-Pro(760) antagonizes this effect. Two peptides, covering these sequences (peptide A(Sk) and C(Sk), respectively) were immobilized on polystyrene beads. We demonstrate that peptide A(Sk) binds to the skeletal isoform of RyR (RyR1) whereas peptide C(Sk) does not. Using surface plasmon resonance detection, we show that 1) domain Thr(671)-Leu(690) is the only sequence of the II-III loop binding with RyR1 and 2) the interaction of peptide A(Sk) with RyR1 is not modulated by Ca(2+) (pCa 9-2) nor by Mg(2+) (up to 10 mM). In contrast, this interaction is strongly potentiated by the immunophilin FKBP12 (EC(50) = 10 nM) and inhibited by both rapamycin (IC(50) = 5 nM) and FK506. Peptide A(Sk) induces a 300% increase of the opening probability of the RyR1 incorporated in lipid bilayer. Removal of FKBP12 from RyR1 completely abolishes this effect of domain A(Sk) on RyR1 channel behavior. These results demonstrate a direct interaction of the RyR1 with the discrete domain of skeletal DHPR alpha(1)-subunit corresponding to Thr(671)-Leu(690) and show that the association of FKBP12 with RyR1 specifically modulates this interaction. PMID:11751303

  19. Growing vascular endothelial cells express somatostatin subtype 2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J C; Balster, D A; Gebhardt, B M; O'Dorisio, T M; O'Dorisio, M S; Espenan, G D; Drouant, G J; Woltering, E A

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that non-proliferating (quiescent) human vascular endothelial cells would not express somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst 2) and that this receptor would be expressed when the endothelial cells begin to grow. To test this hypothesis, placental veins were harvested from 6 human placentas and 2 mm vein disks were cultured in 0.3% fibrin gels. Morphometric analysis confirmed that 50–75% of cultured vein disks developed radial capillary growth within 15 days. Sst 2 gene expression was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of the RNA from veins before culture and from tissue-matched vein disks that exhibited an angiogenic response. The sst 2 gene was expressed in the proliferating angiogenic sprouts of human vascular endothelium. The presence of sst 2 receptors on proliferating angiogenic vessels was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining and in vivo scintigraphy. These results suggest that sst 2 may be a unique target for antiangiogenic therapy with sst 2 preferring somatostatin analogues conjugated to radioisotopes or cytotoxic agents. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461088

  20. Hypocretin (orexin) receptor subtypes differentially enhance acetylcholine release and activate g protein subtypes in rat pontine reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, René; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2006-04-01

    The hypothalamic peptides hypocretin-1 (orexin A) and -2 (orexin B) promote wakefulness by mechanisms that are not well understood. Defects in hypocretinergic neurotransmission underlie the human sleep disorder narcolepsy. Hypocretins alter cell excitability via two receptor subtypes, hypocretin receptor subtype 1 (hcrt-r1) and hypocretin receptor subtype 2 (hcrt-r2). This study aimed to identify G protein subtypes activated by hypocretin in rat pontine reticular nucleus oral part (PnO) and the hypocretin receptor subtype modulating acetylcholine (ACh) release in the PnO. G protein activation was quantified using in vitro [(35)S]guanylyl-5'-O-(gamma-thio)triphosphate autoradiography. ACh release was measured using in vivo microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography. Hypocretin-1-stimulated G protein activation was significantly decreased by pertussis toxin, demonstrating that some hypocretin receptors in rat PnO activate inhibitory G proteins. Hypocretin-1-stimulated ACh release was not blocked by pertussis toxin, supporting the conclusion that the hypocretin receptors modulating ACh release in rat PnO activate stimulatory G proteins. Hypocretin-1 and -2 each caused a concentration-dependent increase in ACh release with similar potencies, indicating that hcrt-r2 modulates ACh release in PnO. Hypocretin-1 caused a significantly greater increase in ACh release than hypocretin-2, suggesting a role for hcrt-r1 in the modulation of PnO ACh release. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that hypocretin receptors in rat PnO signal via inhibitory and stimulatory G proteins and that ACh release in rat PnO is modulated by hcrt-r2 and hcrt-r1. One mechanism by which hypocretin promotes arousal may be to increase ACh release in the pontine reticular formation.

  1. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal [beta]-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, Fernando J.; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J.; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2009-12-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+}. Ca{sup 2+} is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca{sup 2+} transient by activation of a class of Ca{sup 2+} release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca{sup 2+} transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR{sub NTD}) at 2.5 {angstrom}. The RyR{sub NTD} structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the 'arm' domain in IP3Rsup. The N-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP{sub 3}R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyRNTD, supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions.

  2. Calcium Occupancy of N-terminal Sites within Calmodulin Induces Inhibition of the Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates calcium release from intracellular stores in skeletal muscle through its association with the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel, where CaM association enhances channel opening at resting calcium levels and its closing at micromolar calcium levels associated with muscle contraction. A high-affinity CaM-binding sequence (RyRp) has been identified in RyR1, which corresponds to a 30-residue sequence (i.e., K3614 – N3643) located within the central portion of the primary sequence. However, it is currently unclear whether the identified CaM-binding sequence a) senses calcium over the physiological range of calcium-concentrations associated with RyR1 regulation or b) plays a structural role unrelated to the calcium-dependent modulation of RyR1 function. Therefore, we have measured the calcium-dependent activation of the individual domains of CaM in association with RyRp and their relationship to the CaM-dependent regulation of RyR1. These measurements utilize an engineered CaM, permitting the site-specific incorporation of N-(1-pyrene) maleimide at either T34C (PyN-CaM) or T110C (PyC-CaM) in the N- and C-domains, respectively. Consistent with prior measurements, we observe a high-affinity association between both apo- and calcium-activated CaM and RyRp. Upon association with RyRp, fluorescence changes in PyN-CaM or PyC-CaM permit the measurement of the calcium-activation of these individual domains. Fluorescence changes upon calcium-activation of PyC-CaM in association with RyRp are indicative of high-affinity calcium-dependent activation of the C-terminal domain of CaM bound to RyRp at resting calcium levels and the activation of the N-terminal domain at levels of calcium associated cellular activation. In comparison, occupancy of calcium-binding sites in the N-domain of CaM mirrors the calcium-dependence of RyR1 inhibition observed at activating calcium levels, where [Ca]1/2 = 4.3 0.4 μM, suggesting a direct regulation of Ry

  3. Calcium occupancy of N-terminal sites within calmodulin induces inhibition of the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-09-18

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates calcium release from intracellular stores in skeletal muscle through its association with the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel, where CaM association enhances channel opening at resting calcium levels and its closing at micromolar calcium levels associated with muscle contraction. A high-affinity CaM-binding sequence (RyRp) has been identified in RyR1, which corresponds to a 30-residue sequence (i.e., K3614-N3643) located within the central portion of the primary sequence. However, it is presently unclear whether the identified CaM-binding sequence in association with CaM (a) senses calcium over the physiological range of calcium concentrations associated with RyR1 regulation or alternatively, (b) plays a structural role unrelated to the calcium-dependent modulation of RyR1 function. Therefore, we have measured the calcium-dependent activation of the individual domains of CaM in association with RyRp and their relationship to the CaM-dependent regulation of RyR1. These measurements utilize an engineered CaM, permitting the site-specific incorporation of N-(1-pyrene)maleimide at either T34C (PyN-CaM) or T110C (PyC-CaM) in the N- and C-domains, respectively. Consistent with prior measurements, we observe a high-affinity association of both apo-CaM and calcium-activated CaM with RyRp. Upon association with RyRp, fluorescence changes in PyN-CaM or PyC-CaM permit the measurement of the calcium-dependent activation of these individual domains. Fluorescence changes upon calcium activation of PyC-CaM in association with RyRp are indicative of high-affinity calcium-dependent activation of the C-terminal domain of CaM at resting calcium levels; at calcium levels associated with muscle contraction, activation of the N-terminal domain occurs with concomitant increases in the fluorescence intensity of PyC-CaM that is associated with structural changes within the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1. Occupancy of calcium-binding sites in the N

  4. Malignant hyperthermia and the clinical significance of type-1 ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) variants: proceedings of the 2013 MHAUS Scientific Conference.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Sheila; Kraeva, Natalia; Muldoon, Sheila M; Dowling, James; Ho, Clara; Petre, Maria-Alexandra; Parness, Jerome; Dirksen, Robert T; Rosenberg, Henry

    2014-11-01

    The Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States and the Department of Anesthesia at the University of Toronto sponsored a Scientific Conference on November 1-2, 2013 in Toronto, ON, Canada. The multidisciplinary group of experts, including clinicians, geneticists, and physiologists involved in research related to malignant hyperthermia (MH), shared new insights into the pathophysiology of diseases linked to the type-1 ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) as well as the relationship between MH and "awake MH" conditions, such as exertional rhabdomyolysis and exertional heat illness. In addition, the molecular genetics of MH and clinical issues related to the diagnosis and management of disorders linked to RYR1 were presented. The conference also honoured Dr. David H. MacLennan for his contributions to our understanding of the genetics, pathogenesis, and treatment of MH and other RYR1-related myopathies. This report represents a summary of the proceedings of this conference.

  5. Characterization of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have characterized the muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung membranes using the selective muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ) and the classical muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate. High-affinity binding with pharmacologic specificity was demonstrated for both radioligands. The high affinity Kd for (/sup 3/H)PZ binding determined from saturation isotherms was 5.6 nM, and the Kd for (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding was 14.3 pM. Approximately 62% of the total muscarinic binding sites in human peripheral lung bind (/sup 3/H)PZ with high affinity. There was no significant effect of the guanine nucleotide, guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate, on the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinyclidinyl benzilate binding by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in peripheral lung membranes. If the muscarinic receptor with high affinity for PZ has an important role in bronchoconstriction, its characterization could result in the development of more selective bronchodilators.

  6. Adenosine receptors and diabetes: Focus on the A(2B) adenosine receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Over the last two decades, diabetes mellitus has become one of the most challenging health problems worldwide. Diabetes mellitus, classified as type I and II, is a pathology concerning blood glucose level in the body. The nucleoside adenosine has long been known to affect insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism, through activation of four G protein coupled adenosine receptors (ARs), named A1, A2A, A2B and A3. Currently, the novel promising subtype to develop new drugs for diabetes treatment is the A2BAR subtype. The use of selective agonists and antagonists for A2BAR subtype in various diabetic animal models allowed us to identify several effects of A2BAR signaling in cell metabolism. In particular, the focus of this review is to summarize the studies on purinergic signaling associated with diabetes through A2BARs modulation.

  7. Differential regulation of SK and BK channels by Ca2+ signals from Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in guinea-pig urinary bladder myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Gerald M; Nelson, Mark T

    2002-01-01

    Small-conductance (SK) and large-conductance (BK) Ca2+-activated K+ channels are key regulators of excitability in urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) of guinea-pig. The overall goal of this study was to define how SK and BK channels respond to Ca2+ signals from voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) in the surface membrane and from ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release channels or ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. To characterize the role of SK channels in UBSM, the effects of the SK channel blocker apamin on phasic contractions were examined. Apamin caused a dose-dependent increase in the amplitude of phasic contractions over a broad concentration range (10−10 to 10−6m). To determine the effects of Ca2+ signals from VDCCs and RyRs to SK and BK channels, whole cell membrane current was measured in isolated myocytes bathed in physiological solutions. Depolarization (-70 to +10 mV for 100 ms) of isolated myocytes caused an inward Ca2+ current (ICa), followed by an outward current. The outward current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by apamin (10−10 to 10−6m), and designated ISK. ISK had a mean amplitude of 53.8 ± 6.1 pA or ∼1.4 pA pF−1 at +10 mV. The amplitude of ISK correlated with the peak ICa. Blocking ICa abolished ISK. In contrast, ISK was insensitive to the RyR blocker ryanodine (10 μM). These data indicate that Ca2+ signals from VDCCs, but not from RyRs, activate SK channels. BK channel currents (IBK) were isolated from other currents by using the BK channel blockers tetraethylammonium ions (TEA+; 1 mm) or iberiotoxin (200 nm). Voltage steps evoked transient and steady-state IBK components. Transient BK currents have previously been shown to result from BK channel activation by local Ca2+ release through RyRs (‘Ca2+ sparks’). Transient BK currents were inhibited by ryanodine (10 μM), as expected, and had a mean amplitude of 152.6 pA at +10 mV. The mean number of transient BK currents during a

  8. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  9. Role of amino-terminal half of the S4-S5 linker in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) channel gating.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Oba, Toshiharu; Oyamada, Hideto; Oguchi, Katsuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Ogawa, Yasuo

    2011-10-14

    The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is a Ca(2+) release channel found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle and plays a pivotal role in excitation-contraction coupling. The RyR1 channel is activated by a conformational change of the dihydropyridine receptor upon depolarization of the transverse tubule, or by Ca(2+) itself, i.e. Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). The molecular events transmitting such signals to the ion gate of the channel are unknown. The S4-S5 linker, a cytosolic loop connecting the S4 and S5 transmembrane segments in six-transmembrane type channels, forms an α-helical structure and mediates signal transmission in a wide variety of channels. To address the role of the S4-S5 linker in RyR1 channel gating, we performed alanine substitution scan of N-terminal half of the putative S4-S5 linker (Thr(4825)-Ser(4829)) that exhibits high helix probability. The mutant RyR1 was expressed in HEK cells, and CICR activity was investigated by caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release, single-channel current recordings, and [(3)H]ryanodine binding. Four mutants (T4825A, I4826A, S4828A, and S4829A) had reduced CICR activity without changing Ca(2+) sensitivity, whereas the L4827A mutant formed a constitutive active channel. T4825I, a disease-associated mutation for malignant hyperthermia, exhibited enhanced CICR activity. An α-helical wheel representation of the N-terminal S4-S5 linker provides a rational explanation to the observed activities of the mutants. These results suggest that N-terminal half of the S4-S5 linker may form an α-helical structure and play an important role in RyR1 channel gating.

  10. Divergent Activity Profiles of Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Channels Carrying Malignant Hyperthermia and Central Core Disease Mutations in the Amino-Terminal Region.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Oyamada, Hideto; Suzuki, Junji; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Oguchi, Katsuji; Iino, Masamitsu; Sakurai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle and is mutated in several diseases, including malignant hyperthermia (MH) and central core disease (CCD). Most MH and CCD mutations cause accelerated Ca2+ release, resulting in abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle. However, how specific mutations affect the channel to produce different phenotypes is not well understood. In this study, we have investigated 11 mutations at 7 different positions in the amino (N)-terminal region of RyR1 (9 MH and 2 MH/CCD mutations) using a heterologous expression system in HEK293 cells. In live-cell Ca2+ imaging at room temperature (~25 °C), cells expressing mutant channels exhibited alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis, i.e., an enhanced sensitivity to caffeine, a depletion of Ca2+ in the ER and an increase in resting cytoplasmic Ca2+. RyR1 channel activity was quantitatively evaluated by [3H]ryanodine binding and three parameters (sensitivity to activating Ca2+, sensitivity to inactivating Ca2+ and attainable maximum activity, i.e., gain) were obtained by fitting analysis. The mutations increased the gain and the sensitivity to activating Ca2+ in a site-specific manner. The gain was consistently higher in both MH and MH/CCD mutations. Sensitivity to activating Ca2+ was markedly enhanced in MH/CCD mutations. The channel activity estimated from the three parameters provides a reasonable explanation to the pathological phenotype assessed by Ca2+ homeostasis. These properties were also observed at higher temperatures (~37 °C). Our data suggest that divergent activity profiles may cause varied disease phenotypes by specific mutations. This approach should be useful for diagnosis and treatment of diseases with mutations in RyR1.

  11. Role of Mg(2+) in Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release through ryanodine receptors of frog skeletal muscle: modulations by adenine nucleotides and caffeine.

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, T; Kurebayashi, N; Ogawa, Y

    2000-01-01

    Mg(2+) serves as a competitive antagonist against Ca(2+) in the high-affinity Ca(2+) activation site (A-site) and as an agonist of Ca(2+) in the low-affinity Ca(2+) inactivation site (I-site) of the ryanodine receptor (RyR), which mediates Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). This paper presents the quantitative determination of the affinities for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) of A- and I-sites of RyR in frog skeletal muscles by measuring [(3)H]ryanodine binding to purified alpha- and beta-RyRs and CICR activity in skinned fibers. There was only a minor difference in affinity at most between alpha- and beta-RyRs. The A-site favored Ca(2+) 20- to 30-fold over Mg(2+), whereas the I-site was nonselective between the two cations. The RyR in situ showed fivefold higher affinities for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) of both sites than the purified alpha- and beta-RyRs with unchanged cation selectivity. Adenine nucleotides, whose stimulating effect was found to be indistinguishable between free and complexed forms, did not alter the affinities for cations in either site, except for the increased maximum activity of RyR. Caffeine increased not only the affinity of the A-site for Ca(2+) alone, but also the maximum activity of RyR with otherwise minor changes. The results presented here suggest that the rate of CICR in frog skeletal muscles appears to be too low to explain the physiological Ca(2+) release, even though Mg(2+) inhibition disappears. PMID:10733962

  12. Sound Waves Induce Neural Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Ryanodine Receptor-Induced Calcium Release and Pyk2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yura; Park, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Jong Seob; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil; Jeon, Songhee

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown considerable promise as an adaptable cell source for use in tissue engineering and other therapeutic applications. The aims of this study were to develop methods to test the hypothesis that human MSCs could be differentiated using sound wave stimulation alone and to find the underlying mechanism. Human bone marrow (hBM)-MSCs were stimulated with sound waves (1 kHz, 81 dB) for 7 days and the expression of neural markers were analyzed. Sound waves induced neural differentiation of hBM-MSC at 1 kHz and 81 dB but not at 1 kHz and 100 dB. To determine the signaling pathways involved in the neural differentiation of hBM-MSCs by sound wave stimulation, we examined the Pyk2 and CREB phosphorylation. Sound wave induced an increase in the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and CREB at 45 min and 90 min, respectively, in hBM-MSCs. To find out the upstream activator of Pyk2, we examined the intracellular calcium source that was released by sound wave stimulation. When we used ryanodine as a ryanodine receptor antagonist, sound wave-induced calcium release was suppressed. Moreover, pre-treatment with a Pyk2 inhibitor, PF431396, prevented the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and suppressed sound wave-induced neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs. These results suggest that specific sound wave stimulation could be used as a neural differentiation inducer of hBM-MSCs.

  13. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; Rice, Kenner C.; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H.; McCurdy, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. PMID:27189970

  14. Classification of Dopamine Receptor Genes in Vertebrates: Nine Subtypes in Osteichthyes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kei; Fontaine, Romain; Pasqualini, Catherine; Vernier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission regulates various brain functions, and its regulatory roles are mediated by two families of G protein-coupled receptors: the D1 and D2 receptor families. In mammals, the D1 family comprises two receptor subtypes (D1 and D5), while the D2 family comprises three receptor subtypes (D2, D3 and D4). Phylogenetic analyses of dopamine receptor genes strongly suggest that the common ancestor of Osteichthyes (bony jawed vertebrates) possessed four subtypes in the D1 family and five subtypes in the D2 family. Mammals have secondarily lost almost half of the ancestral dopamine receptor genes, whereas nonmammalian species kept many of them. Although the mammalian situation is an exception among Osteichthyes, the current classification and characterization of dopamine receptors are based on mammalian features, which have led to confusion in the identification of dopamine receptor subtypes in nonmammalian species. Here we begin by reviewing the history of the discovery of dopamine receptors in vertebrates. The recent genome sequencing of coelacanth, gar and elephant shark led to the proposal of a refined scenario of evolution of dopamine receptor genes. We also discuss a current problem of nomenclature of dopamine receptors. Following the official nomenclature of mammalian dopamine receptors from D1 to D5, we propose to name newly identified receptor subtypes from D6 to D9 in order to facilitate the use of an identical name for orthologous genes among different species. To promote a nomenclature change which allows distinguishing the two dopamine receptor families, a nomenclature consortium is needed. This comparative perspective is crucial to correctly interpret data obtained in animal studies on dopamine-related brain disorders, and more fundamentally, to understand the characteristics of dopamine neurotransmission in vertebrates.

  15. Subtype-selective regulation of IP(3) receptors by thimerosal via cysteine residues within the IP(3)-binding core and suppressor domain.

    PubMed

    Khan, Samir A; Rossi, Ana M; Riley, Andrew M; Potter, Barry V L; Taylor, Colin W

    2013-04-15

    IP(3)R (IP(3) [inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate] receptors) and ryanodine receptors are the most widely expressed intracellular Ca(2+) channels and both are regulated by thiol reagents. In DT40 cells stably expressing single subtypes of mammalian IP(3)R, low concentrations of thimerosal (also known as thiomersal), which oxidizes thiols to form a thiomercurylethyl complex, increased the sensitivity of IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release via IP(3)R1 and IP(3)R2, but inhibited IP(3)R3. Activation of IP(3)R is initiated by IP(3) binding to the IBC (IP(3)-binding core; residues 224-604) and proceeds via re-arrangement of an interface between the IBC and SD (suppressor domain; residues 1-223). Thimerosal (100 μM) stimulated IP(3) binding to the isolated NT (N-terminal; residues 1-604) of IP(3)R1 and IP(3)R2, but not to that of IP(3)R3. Binding of a competitive antagonist (heparin) or partial agonist (dimeric-IP(3)) to NT1 was unaffected by thiomersal, suggesting that the effect of thimerosal is specifically related to IP(3)R activation. IP(3) binding to NT1 in which all cysteine residues were replaced by alanine was insensitive to thimerosal, so too were NT1 in which cysteine residues were replaced in either the SD or IBC. This demonstrates that thimerosal interacts directly with cysteine in both the SD and IBC. Chimaeric proteins in which the SD of the IP(3)R was replaced by the structurally related A domain of a ryanodine receptor were functional, but thimerosal inhibited both IP(3) binding to the chimaeric NT and IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release from the chimaeric IP(3)R. This is the first systematic analysis of the effects of a thiol reagent on each IP(3)R subtype. We conclude that thimerosal selectively sensitizes IP(3)R1 and IP(3)R2 to IP(3) by modifying cysteine residues within both the SD and IBC and thereby stabilizing an active conformation of the receptor.

  16. TARP subtypes differentially and dose-dependently control synaptic AMPA receptor gating.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Aaron D; Zhou, Wei; Karimzadegan, Siavash; Bredt, David S; Nicoll, Roger A

    2007-09-20

    A family of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) profoundly affects the trafficking and gating of AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Although TARP subtypes are differentially expressed throughout the CNS, it is unclear whether this imparts functional diversity to AMPARs in distinct neuronal populations. Here, we examine the effects of each TARP subtype on the kinetics of AMPAR gating in heterologous cells and in neurons. We report a striking heterogeneity in the effects of TARP subtypes on AMPAR deactivation and desensitization, which we demonstrate controls the time course of synaptic transmission. In addition, we find that some TARP subtypes dramatically slow AMPAR activation kinetics. Synaptic AMPAR kinetics also depend on TARP expression level, suggesting a variable TARP/AMPAR stoichiometry. Analysis of quantal synaptic transmission in a TARP gamma-4 knockout (KO) mouse corroborates our expression data and demonstrates that TARP subtype-specific gating of AMPARs contributes to the kinetics of native AMPARs at central synapses.

  17. Differential alterations in muscarinic receptor subtypes in Alzheimer's disease: implications for cholinergic-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Flynn, D D; Ferrari-DiLeo, G; Levey, A I; Mash, D C

    1995-01-01

    Molecular subtypes of muscarinic receptors (m1-m5) are novel targets for cholinergic replacement therapies in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, knowledge concerning the relative distribution, abundance and functional status of these receptors in human brain and AD is incomplete. Recent data from our laboratory have demonstrated a defect in the ability of the M1 receptor subtype to form a high affinity agonist-receptor-G protein complex in AD frontal cortex. This defect is manifested by decreased M1 receptor-stimulated GTPgammaS binding and GTPase activity and by a loss in receptor-stimulated phospholipase C activity. Normal levels of G proteins suggest that the aberrant receptor-G protein interaction may result from an altered form of the m1 receptor in AD. The combined use of radioligand binding and receptor-domain specific antibodies has permitted the re-examination of the status of muscarinic receptor subtypes in the human brain. In AD, normal levels of m1 receptor [3H]-pirenzepine binding contrasted with diminished m1 immunoreactivity, further suggesting that there is an altered form of the m1 receptor in the disease. Reduced m2 immunoreactivity was consistent with decreased numbers of m2 binding sites. Increased levels of m4 receptors were observed in both binding and immunoreactivity measurements. These findings suggest one possible explanation for the relative ineffectiveness of cholinergic replacement therapies used to date and suggest potential new directions for development of effective therapeutic strategies for AD.

  18. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  19. GABA A/Bz receptor subtypes as targets for selective drugs.

    PubMed

    Da Settimo, F; Taliani, S; Trincavelli, M L; Montali, M; Martini, C

    2007-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors are the major inhibitory neuronal receptors in the mammalian brain. Their activation by GABA opens the intrinsic ion channel, enabling chloride flux into the cell with subsequent hyperpolarization. Several GABA(A) receptor subunit isoforms have been cloned, the major isoform containing alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, and a regional heterogeneity associated with distinct physiological effects has been suggested. As a variety of allosteric ligands can modulate GABA-gated conductance changes through binding to distinct sites, the development of subtype-selective ligands may lead to the selective treatment of GABA system-associated pathology. In particular, the best characterized binding site is the benzodiazepine site (BzR), localized at the alpha/gamma subunit interface, in which the alpha subunit is the main determinant of BzR ligand action selectivity. The alpha1-containing BzR have been proposed to be responsible for the sedative action; the alpha2 and/or the alpha3 subtypes have been suggested to mediate the anxiolytic activity and the myorelaxation effects, and the alpha5 subtype has been associated with cognition processes. The discovery of alpha-selective subtype ligands may help in the specific treatment of anxiety, sleep disorders, convulsions and memory deficits with fewer side effects. Selectivity may be achieved by two approaches: selective affinity or selective efficacy. Selective affinity needs a compound to bind with a higher affinity to one receptor subtype compared with another, whereas subtype-selective efficacy relies on a compound binding to all subtypes, but having different efficacies at various subtypes. The status of BzR ligands, subdivided on the basis of their main chemical structural features, is reviewed in relation to structure-activity relationships which determine their affinity or efficacy selectivity for a certain BzR subtype.

  20. Angiotensin receptor subtype mediated physiologies and behaviors: New discoveries and clinical targets

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John W.; Yamamoto, Brent J.; Harding, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) mediates several classic physiologies including body water and electrolyte homeostasis, blood pressure, cyclicity of reproductive hormones and sexual behaviors, and the regulation of pituitary gland hormones. These functions appear to be mediated by the angiotensin II (AngII)/AT1 receptor subtype system. More recently, the angiotensin IV (AngIV)/AT4 receptor subtype system has been implicated in cognitive processing, cerebroprotection, local blood flow, stress, anxiety and depression. There is accumulating evidence to suggest an inhibitory influence by AngII acting at the AT1 subtype, and a facilitory role by AngIV acting at the AT4 subtype, on neuronal firing rate, long-term potentiation, associative and spatial learning, and memory. This review initially describes the biochemical pathways that permit synthesis and degradation of active angiotensin peptides and three receptor subtypes (AT1, AT2 and AT4) thus far characterized. There is vigorous debate concerning the identity of the most recently discovered receptor subtype, AT4. Descriptions of classic and novel physiologies and behaviors controlled by the RAS are presented. This review concludes with a consideration of the emerging therapeutic applications suggested by these newly discovered functions of the RAS. PMID:18160199

  1. Analysis of the entire ryanodine receptor type 1 and alpha 1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor (CACNA1S) coding regions for variants associated with malignant hyperthermia in Australian families.

    PubMed

    Gillies, R L; Bjorksten, A R; Du Sart, D; Hockey, B M

    2015-03-01

    Defects in the genes coding for the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) and alpha 1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor (CACNA1S) have been identified as causative for malignant hyperthermia (MH). Sixty-two MH susceptible individuals presenting to the same diagnostic centre had copy deoxyribonucleic acid, derived from muscle ribonucleic acid, sequenced to identify variants with the potential to be responsible for the MH phenotype in both RYR1 and CACNA1S. These genetic findings were combined with clinical episode details and in vitro contracture test results to improve our understanding of the Australian MH cohort. Twelve novel variants were identified in RYR1 and six in CACNA1S. Known RYR1 causative mutations were identified in six persons and novel variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S in a further 17 persons. Trends indicated higher mutation identification in those with more definitive clinical episodes and stronger in vitro contracture test responses.

  2. Multiple actions of φ-LITX-Lw1a on ryanodine receptors reveal a functional link between scorpion DDH and ICK toxins

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer J.; Vetter, Irina; Lewis, Richard J.; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Lam, Alexander; Gallant, Esther M.; Beard, Nicole A.; Alewood, Paul F.; Dulhunty, Angela F.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported the isolation of a scorpion toxin named U1-liotoxin-Lw1a (U1-LITX-Lw1a) that adopts an unusual 3D fold termed the disulfide-directed hairpin (DDH) motif, which is the proposed evolutionary structural precursor of the three-disulfide-containing inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) motif found widely in animals and plants. Here we reveal that U1-LITX-Lw1a targets and activates the mammalian ryanodine receptor intracellular calcium release channel (RyR) with high (fM) potency and provides a functional link between DDH and ICK scorpion toxins. Moreover, U1-LITX-Lw1a, now described as φ-liotoxin-Lw1a (φ-LITX-Lw1a), has a similar mode of action on RyRs as scorpion calcines, although with significantly greater potency, inducing full channel openings at lower (fM) toxin concentrations whereas at higher pM concentrations increasing the frequency and duration of channel openings to a submaximal state. In addition, we show that the C-terminal residue of φ-LITX-Lw1a is crucial for the increase in full receptor openings but not for the increase in receptor subconductance opening, thereby supporting the two-binding-site hypothesis of scorpion toxins on RyRs. φ-LITX-Lw1a has potential both as a pharmacological tool and as a lead molecule for the treatment of human diseases that involve RyRs, such as malignant hyperthermia and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23671114

  3. Detection of a novel mutation in the ryanodine receptor gene in an Irish malignant hyperthermia pedigree: correlation of the IVCT response with the affected and unaffected haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, K E; Giblin, L; Lynch, P J; Quane, K A; Lehane, M; Heffron, J J; McCarthy, T V

    1997-01-01

    Defects in the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene are associated with malignant hyperthermia (MH), an autosomal dominant disorder of skeletal muscle and one of the main causes of death resulting from anaesthesia. Susceptibility to MH (MHS) is determined by the level of tension generated in an in vitro muscle contracture test (IVCT) in response to caffeine and halothane. To date, mutation screening of the RYR1 gene in MH families has led to the identification of eight mutations. We describe here the identification of a novel mutation, Arg552Trp, in the RYR1 gene, which is clearly linked to the MHS phenotype in a large, well characterised Irish pedigree. Considering that the RYR1 protein functions as a tetramer, correlation of the IVCT with the affected and unaffected haplotypes was performed on the pedigree to investigate if the normal RYR1 allele in affected subjects contributes to the variation in the IVCT. The results show that the normal RYR1 allele is unlikely to play a role in IVCT variation. Images PMID:9138151

  4. Resistance to diamide insecticides in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is associated with a mutation in the membrane-spanning domain of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Troczka, Bartek; Zimmer, Christoph T; Elias, Jan; Schorn, Corinna; Bass, Chris; Davies, T G Emyr; Field, Linda M; Williamson, Martin S; Slater, Russell; Nauen, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    Diamide insecticides such as chlorantraniliprole and flubendiamide are a new class of insecticide that selectively target insect ryanodine receptors (RyR), a distinct class of homo-tetrameric calcium release channels which play a pivotal role in calcium homeostasis in numerous cell types. Resistance to these insecticides has recently been reported in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), a global lepidopteran pest of cruciferous crops. In the present study a region of the gene encoding the proposed diamide binding site of the RyR from P. xylostella collected from the Philippines and Thailand and found to be over 200-fold resistant to both chlorantraniliprole and flubendiamide compared to susceptible strains, were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Comparison of the sequence with those from several susceptible reference strains revealed non-synonymous mutations in each of the resistant strains that in both cases lead to a glycine to glutamic acid substitution (G4946E) in the protein. The independent evolution of the same amino acid substitution within a highly conserved region of the proposed diamide binding site in two geographically separated resistant strains of P. xylostella strongly suggests a causal association with diamide resistance. Furthermore we designed a pyrosequencing-based diagnostic assay for resistance monitoring purposes that can be used to detect the G4946E mutation in field-collected samples of diamondback moth. The implications of the reported findings for resistance management strategies are discussed.

  5. Imperatoxin A, a Cell-Penetrating Peptide from Scorpion Venom, as a Probe of Ca2+-Release Channels/Ryanodine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gurrola, Georgina B.; Capes, E. Michelle; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Possani, Lourival D.; Valdivia, Héctor H.

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion venoms are rich in ion channel-modifying peptides, which have proven to be invaluable probes of ion channel structure-function relationship. We previously isolated imperatoxin A (IpTxa), a 3.7 kDa peptide activator of Ca2+-release channels/ryanodine receptors (RyRs) [1,2,3] and founding member of the calcin family of scorpion peptides. IpTxa folds into a compact, mostly hydrophobic molecule with a cluster of positively-charged, basic residues polarized on one side of the molecule that possibly interacts with the phospholipids of cell membranes. To investigate whether IpTxa permeates external cellular membranes and targets RyRs in vivo, we perfused IpTxa on intact cardiomyocytes while recording field-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ transients. To further investigate the cell-penetrating capabilities of the toxin, we prepared thiolated, fluorescent derivatives of IpTxa. Biological activity and spectroscopic properties indicate that these derivatives retain high affinity for RyRs and are only 5- to 10-fold less active than native IpTxa. Our results demonstrate that IpTxa is capable of crossing cell membranes to alter the release of Ca2+ in vivo, and has the capacity to carry a large, membrane-impermeable cargo across the plasma membrane, a finding with exciting implications for novel drug delivery. PMID:20668646

  6. Localization of a novel ryanodine receptor gene (RYR3) to human chromosome 15q14-q15 by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrentino, V. Istituto Scientifico H. San Raffaele, Milan ); Giannini, G. ); Malzac, P.; Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-10-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are intracellular Ca[sup 2+] release channels responsible for the release of Ca[sup 2+] from intracellular stores following transduction of many different extracellular stimuli. The genes of the two RyRs, originally described in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal (RYR1) or cardiac (RYR2) muscles, have been cloned and mapped on chromosome 19q13.1 and chromosome 1, respectively, in humans. The RYR1 gene has been shown to be tightly linked to the locus for malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS). A single-point mutation in RYR1 has been identified as the possible cause of MHS in swine and of at least some forms of MHS in human. Another MHS locus has been mapped on human chromosome 17q11-q24. We have recently cloned a third RyR (RYR3) from mink, which appears to be widely expressed. A RyR with 94% homology to mink cDNA has also been isolated from rabbit brain.

  7. Multi-minicore disease and atypical periodic paralysis associated with novel mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haiyan; Lillis, Suzanne; Loy, Ryan E; Ghassemi, Farshid; Rose, Michael R; Norwood, Fiona; Mills, Kerry; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lane, Russell J M; Feng, Lucy; Matthews, Emma; Sewry, Caroline A; Abbs, Stephen; Buk, Stefan; Hanna, Michael; Treves, Susan; Dirksen, Robert T; Meissner, Gerhard; Muntoni, Francesco; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2010-03-01

    The skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor plays a crucial role in excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and is implicated in various congenital myopathies. The periodic paralyses are a heterogeneous, dominantly inherited group of conditions mainly associated with mutations in the SCN4A and the CACNA1S genes. The interaction between RyR1 and DHPR proteins underlies depolarization-induced Ca(2+) release during EC coupling in skeletal muscle. We report a 35-year-old woman presenting with signs and symptoms of a congenital myopathy at birth and repeated episodes of generalized, atypical normokalaemic paralysis in her late teens. Genetic studies of this patient revealed three heterozygous RYR1 substitutions (p.Arg2241X, p.Asp708Asn and p.Arg2939Lys) associated with marked reduction of the RyR1 protein and abnormal DHPR distribution. We conclude that RYR1 mutations may give rise to both myopathies and atypical periodic paralysis, and RYR1 mutations may underlie other unresolved cases of periodic paralysis with unusual features.

  8. Nitric Oxide-induced Activation of the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Is Critical for Epileptic Seizure-induced Neuronal Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yoshinori; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Okubo, Yohei; Nakaune, Takuya; Suzuki, Junji; Shibata, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Koyama, Ryuta; Murayama, Takashi; Ito, Akihiro; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Ikegaya, Yuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Saito, Nobuhito; Kakizawa, Sho; Iino, Masamitsu

    2016-09-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening emergency that can cause neurodegeneration with debilitating neurological disorders. However, the mechanism by which convulsive SE results in neurodegeneration is not fully understood. It has been shown that epileptic seizures produce markedly increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain, and that NO induces Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), which occurs through S-nitrosylation of the intracellular Ca(2+) release channel. Here, we show that through genetic silencing of NO-induced activation of the RyR1 intracellular Ca(2+) release channel, neurons were rescued from seizure-dependent cell death. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of RyR1, was protective against neurodegeneration caused by SE. These results demonstrate that NO-induced Ca(2+) release via RyR is involved in SE-induced neurodegeneration, and provide a rationale for the use of RyR1 inhibitors for the prevention of brain damage following SE.

  9. Comprehensive behavioral phenotyping of ryanodine receptor type 3 (RyR3) knockout mice: decreased social contact duration in two social interaction tests.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Naoki; Tanda, Koichi; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Takao, Keizo; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration is crucial for various neuronal functions such as synaptic transmission and plasticity, and gene expression. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of intracellular calcium release channels that mediate calcium-induced calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Among the three RyR isoforms, RyR3 is preferentially expressed in the brain especially in the hippocampus and striatum. To investigate the behavioral effects of RyR3 deficiency, we subjected RyR3 knockout (RyR3-/-) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. RyR3-/- mice exhibited significantly decreased social contact duration in two different social interaction tests, where two mice can freely move and make contacts with each other. They also exhibited hyperactivity and mildly impaired prepulse inhibition and latent inhibition while they did not show significant abnormalities in motor function and working and reference memory tests. These results indicate that RyR3 has an important role in locomotor activity and social behavior.

  10. Geographic spread, genetics and functional characteristics of ryanodine receptor based target-site resistance to diamide insecticides in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Denise; Gutbrod, Oliver; Lümmen, Peter; Matthiesen, Svend; Schorn, Corinna; Nauen, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Anthranilic diamides and flubendiamide belong to a new chemical class of insecticides acting as conformation sensitive activators of the insect ryanodine receptor (RyR). These compounds control a diverse range of different herbivorous insects including diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), a notorious global pest on cruciferous crops, which recently developed resistance due to target-site mutations located in the trans-membrane domain of the Plutella RyR. In the present study we further investigated the genetics and functional implications of a RyR G4946E target-site mutation we recently identified in a Philippine diamondback moth strain (Sudlon). Strain Sudlon is homozygous for the G4946E mutation and has been maintained under laboratory conditions without selection pressure for almost four years, and still exhibit stable resistance ratios of >2000-fold to all commercial diamides. Its F1 progeny resulting from reciprocal crosses with a susceptible strain (BCS-S) revealed no maternal effects and a diamide susceptible phenotype, suggesting an autosomally almost recessive mode of inheritance. Subsequent back-crosses indicate a near monogenic nature of the diamide resistance in strain Sudlon. Radioligand binding studies with Plutella thoracic microsomal membrane preparations provided direct evidence for the dramatic functional implications of the RyR G4946E mutation on both diamide specific binding and its concentration dependent modulation of [(3)H]ryanodine binding. Computational modelling based on a cryo-EM structure of rabbit RyR1 suggests that Plutella G4946E is located in trans-membrane helix S4 close to S4-S5 linker domain supposed to be involved in the modulation of the voltage sensor, and another recently described mutation, I4790M in helix S2 approx. 13 Å opposite of G4946E. Genotyping by pyrosequencing revealed the presence of the RyR G4946E mutation in larvae collected in 2013/14 in regions of ten different countries where

  11. Positive somatostatin receptor scintigraphy correlates with the presence of somatostatin receptor subtype 2.

    PubMed Central

    John, M; Meyerhof, W; Richter, D; Waser, B; Schaer, J C; Scherübl, H; Boese-Landgraf, J; Neuhaus, P; Ziske, C; Mölling, K; Riecken, E O; Reubi, J C; Wiedenmann, B

    1996-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is positive in approximately 75% of all patients with neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumours. This study aimed to identify specific somatostatin receptor (sstr) subtypes, which are responsible for the in vivo binding of the widely used somatostatin analogue, octreotide in human neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumours. Twelve patients underwent SRS with radiolabelled octreotide. After surgical resection, tumour tissues were analysed in vitro for somatostatin and octreotide binding sites by autoradiography. In addition, for the first time, sstr subtype mRNA expression was examined by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Tumour tissues from all SRS positive patients were positive by autoradiography. Semiquantitative RT-PCR revealed most prominently sstr2 expression in scintigraphically positive tumours. Two SRS negative tumours contained in vitro octreotide binding sites as well as high levels of sstr1 and sstr2 mRNAs. Positive SRS is mainly due to sstr2. sstr1, 3, 4, and probably 5 are less important for in vivo octreotide binding. False negative scintigraphic results seem to be influenced by factors independent of the expression of specific sstr. Images Figure 4 PMID:8566856

  12. Muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover in the rat corpus striatum: role of muscarinic receptor subtypes and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Monsma, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    The coupling between the M1 and M2 muscarinic receptor subtypes and phosphatidylinositol (Pl) hydrolysis has been examined in the corpus striatum and cerebral cortex of the rat brain. Receptor binding by the various muscarinic ligands was assessed using a preparation of intact brain cell aggregates, under similar conditions as the assay of Pl hydrolysis. In striatal cell aggregates, (/sup 3/H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)-QNB) bound to a single class of muscarinic sites with high affinity, inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-QNB binding by muscarinic receptor ligands which exhibit selectivity for subtypes of the muscarinic receptor revealed the presence of both the M1 and M2 subtypes in approximately equal numbers.

  13. Prognosis of metastatic breast cancer subtypes: the hormone receptor/HER2-positive subtype is associated with the most favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, Dorien J A; van Kampen, Roel J W; Voogd, Adri C; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; Smilde, Tineke J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Peters, Frank P J; van Riel, Johanna M G H; Peters, Natascha A J B; de Boer, Maaike; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to the situation in early breast cancer, little is known about the prognostic relevance of the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in metastatic breast cancer. The objectives of this study were to present survival estimates and to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtypes based on HR and HER2 status in a recent cohort of metastatic breast cancer patients, which is representative of current clinical practice. Patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2009 were included. Information regarding patient and tumor characteristics and treatment was collected. Patients were categorized in four subtypes based on the HR and HER2 status of the primary tumor: HR positive (+)/HER2 negative (-), HR+/HER2+, HR-/HER2+ and triple negative (TN). Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtype, adjusted for possible confounders. Median follow-up was 21.8 months for the 815 metastatic breast cancer patients included; 66 % of patients had the HR+/HER2- subtype, 8 % the HR-/HER2+ subtype, 15 % the TN subtype and 11 % the HR+/HER2+ subtype. The longest survival was observed for the HR+/HER2+ subtype (median 34.4 months), compared to 24.8 months for the HR+/HER2- subtype, 19.8 months for the HR-/HER2+ subtype and 8.8 months for the TN subtype (P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, subtype was an independent prognostic factor, as were initial site of metastases and metastatic-free interval. The HR+/HER2+ subtype was associated with the longest survival after diagnosis of distant metastases.

  14. Cloning of two adenosine receptor subtypes from mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, D L; Walker, L L; Heinemann, S

    1994-05-01

    Adenosine potentiates the stimulated release of mast cell mediators. Pharmacologic studies suggest the presence of two adenosine receptors, one positively coupled to adenylate cyclase and the other coupled to phospholipase C activation. To identify mast cell adenosine receptor subtypes, cDNAs for the A1 and A2a adenosine receptors were obtained by screening a mouse brain cDNA library with the use of PCR-derived probes. Mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell cDNA libraries were constructed and screened with the use of A1 and A2a cDNA probes, which revealed the presence of A2a, but not A1, receptor clones. A putative A2b receptor was identified by using low stringency mast cell library screening. Northern blotting of mast cell poly(A)+ RNA with the use of receptor subtype probes labeled single mRNA bands of 2.4 kb and 1.8 kb for the A2a and A2b receptors, respectively. In situ cells. An A2a receptor-specific agonist failed to enhance mast cell mediator release, which suggests that the secretory process is modulated through the A2b and/or another receptor subtype. By using RNase protection assays, we found that mast cells that had been cultured in the presence of N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine for 24 h exhibited a decrease in both A2a and A2b receptor RNA levels. Cells that had been cultured for 1 to 2 days in the presence of dexamethasone demonstrated increased amounts of A2a receptor mRNA, but no identifiable change in A2b receptor mRNA. Mast cells possess at least two adenosine receptor subtypes that may be differentially regulated.

  15. Caffeine-mediated inhibition of calcium release channel inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor subtype 3 blocks glioblastoma invasion and extends survival.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Soo; Han, Kyung-Seok; Ku, Bo Mi; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Hong, Jinpyo; Shin, Hye Young; Almonte, Antoine G; Woo, Dong Ho; Brat, Daniel J; Hwang, Eun Mi; Yoo, Seung Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung-Hye; Paek, Sun Ha; Roh, Eun Joo; Lee, Sung Joong; Park, Jae-Yong; Traynelis, Stephen F; Lee, C Justin

    2010-02-01

    Calcium signaling is important in many signaling processes in cancer cell proliferation and motility including in deadly glioblastomas of the brain that aggressively invade neighboring tissue. We hypothesized that disturbing Ca(2+) signaling pathways might decrease the invasive behavior of giloblastoma, extending survival. Evaluating a panel of small-molecule modulators of Ca(2+) signaling, we identified caffeine as an inhibitor of glioblastoma cell motility. Caffeine, which is known to activate ryanodine receptors, paradoxically inhibits Ca(2+) increase by inositol 1,4,5-trisphospate receptor subtype 3 (IP(3)R3), the expression of which is increased in glioblastoma cells. Consequently, by inhibiting IP(3)R3-mediated Ca(2+) release, caffeine inhibited migration of glioblastoma cells in various in vitro assays. Consistent with these effects, caffeine greatly increased mean survival in a mouse xenograft model of glioblastoma. These findings suggest IP(3)R3 as a novel therapeutic target and identify caffeine as a possible adjunct therapy to slow invasive growth of glioblastoma.

  16. Expression and function of ryanodine receptor related pathways in PCB tolerant Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from New Bedford Harbor, MA, USA.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Erika B; Stegeman, John J; Goldstone, Jared V; Nacci, Diane E; Champlin, Denise; Jayaraman, Saro; Connon, Richard E; Pessah, Isaac N

    2015-02-01

    Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) thrive in New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, highly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Resident killifish have evolved tolerance to dioxin-like (DL) PCBs, whose toxic effects through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well studied. In NBH, non-dioxin like PCBs (NDL PCBs), which lack activity toward the AhR, vastly exceed levels of DL congeners yet how killifish counter NDL toxic effects has not been explored. In mammals and fish, NDL PCBs are potent activators of ryanodine receptors (RyR), Ca(2+) release channels necessary for a vast array of physiological processes. In the current study we compared the expression and function of RyR related pathways in NBH killifish with killifish from the reference site at Scorton Creek (SC, MA). Relative to the SC fish, adults from NBH displayed increased levels of skeletal muscle RyR1 protein, and increased levels of FK506-binding protein 12 kDa (FKBP12) an accessory protein essential for NDL PCB-triggered changes in RyR channel function. In accordance with increased RyR1 levels, NBH killifish displayed increased maximal ligand binding, increased maximal response to Ca(2+) activation and increased maximal response to activation by the NDL PCB congener PCB 95. Compared to SC, NBH embryos and larvae had increased levels of mtor and ryr2 transcripts at multiple stages of development, and generations, while levels of serca2 were decreased at 9 days post-fertilization in the F1 and F2 generations. These findings suggest that there are compensatory and heritable changes in RyR mediated Ca(2+) signaling proteins or potential signaling partners in NBH killifish.

  17. Juxtaglomerular cell CaSR stimulation decreases renin release via activation of the PLC/IP(3) pathway and the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Capisano, M Cecilia; Reddy, Mahendranath; Mendez, Mariela; Garvin, Jeffrey L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2013-02-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-coupled protein expressed in renal juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. Its activation stimulates calcium-mediated decreases in cAMP content and inhibits renin release. The postreceptor pathway for the CaSR in JG cells is unknown. In parathyroids, CaSR acts through G(q) and/or G(i). Activation of G(q) stimulates phospholipase C (PLC), and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)), releasing calcium from intracellular stores. G(i) stimulation inhibits cAMP formation. In afferent arterioles, the ryanodine receptor (RyR) enhances release of stored calcium. We hypothesized JG cell CaSR activation inhibits renin via the PLC/IP(3) and also RyR activation, increasing intracellular calcium, suppressing cAMP formation, and inhibiting renin release. Renin release from primary cultures of isolated mouse JG cells (n = 10) was measured. The CaSR agonist cinacalcet decreased renin release 56 ± 7% of control (P < 0.001), while the PLC inhibitor U73122 reversed cinacalcet inhibition of renin (104 ± 11% of control). The IP(3) inhibitor 2-APB also reversed inhibition of renin from 56 ± 6 to 104 ± 11% of control (P < 0.001). JG cells were positively labeled for RyR, and blocking RyR reversed CaSR-mediated inhibition of renin from 61 ± 8 to 118 ± 22% of control (P < 0.01). Combining inhibition of IP(3) and RyR was not additive. G(i) inhibition with pertussis toxin plus cinacalcet did not reverse renin inhibition (65 ± 12 to 41 ± 8% of control, P < 0.001). We conclude stimulating JG cell CaSR activates G(q), initiating the PLC/IP(3) pathway, activating RyR, increasing intracellular calcium, and resulting in calcium-mediated renin inhibition.

  18. Expression and function of ryanodine receptor related pathways in PCB tolerant Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from New Bedford Harbor, MA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Erika B.; Stegeman, John J.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Nacci, Diane E.; Champlin, Denise; Jayaraman, Saro; Connon, Richard E.; Pessah, Isaac N.

    2015-01-01

    Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) thrive in New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, highly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Resident killifish have evolved tolerance to dioxin-like (DL) PCBs, whose toxic effects through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well studied. In NBH, non-dioxin like PCBs (NDL PCBs), which lack activity toward the AhR, vastly exceed levels of DL congeners yet how killifish counter NDL toxic effects has not been explored. In mammals and fish, NDL PCBs are potent activators of ryanodine receptors (RyR), Ca2+ release channels necessary for a vast array of physiological processes. In the current study we compared the expression and function of RyR related pathways in NBH killifish with killifish from the reference site at Scorton Creek (SC, MA). Relative to the SC fish, adults from NBH displayed increased levels of skeletal muscle RyR1 protein, and increased levels of FK506-binding protein 12 kDa (FKBP12), an accessory protein essential for NDL PCB-triggered changes in RyR channel function. In accordance with increased RyR1 levels, NBH killifish displayed increased maximal ligand binding, increased maximal response to Ca2+ activation and increased maximal response to activation by the NDL PCB congener PCB 95. Compared to SC, NBH embryos and larvae had increased levels of mtor and ryr2 transcripts at multiple stages of development, and generations, while levels of serca2 were decreased at 9 days post-fertilization in the F1 and F2 generations. These findings suggest that there are compensatory and heritable changes in RyR mediated Ca2+ signaling proteins or potential signaling partners in NBH killifish. PMID:25546006

  19. Overlap of dopaminergic, adrenergic, and serotoninergic receptors and complementarity of their subtypes in primate prefrontal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman-Rakic, P.S.; Lidow, M.S.; Gallager, D.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Quantitative in vitro autoradiography was used to determine and compare the areal and laminar distribution of the major dopaminergic, adrenergic, and serotonergic neurotransmitter receptors in 4 cytoarchitectonic regions of the prefrontal cortex in adult rhesus monkeys. The selective ligands, 3H-SCH-23390, 3H-raclopride, 3H-prazosin, and 3H-clonidine were used to label the D1 and D2 dopamine receptor subtypes and the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, respectively, while 125I-iodopindolol was used to detect beta-adrenergic receptors. The radioligands, 3H-5-hydroxytryptamine and 3H-ketanserin labeled, respectively, the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors. Densitometry was performed on all cortical layers and sublayers for each of the 7 ligands to allow quantitative as well as qualitative comparison among them in each cytoarchitectonic area. Although each monoamine receptor was distributed in a distinctive laminar-specific pattern that was remarkably similar from area to area, there was considerable overlap among the dopaminergic, adrenergic, and serotoninergic receptors, while subtypes of the same receptor class tended to have complementary laminar profiles and different concentrations. Thus, the D1 dopamine, the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic, and the 5-HT1 receptors were present in highest relative concentration in superficial layers I, II, and IIIa (the S group). In contrast, the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic subtypes and the 5-HT2 receptor had their highest concentrations in the intermediate layers, IIIb and IV (the I group), while the D2 receptor was distinguished by relatively high concentrations in the deep layer V compared to all other layers (the D class). Thus, clear laminar differences were observed in the D1 vs D2 dopaminergic, the alpha- vs beta-adrenergic, and the 5-HT1 vs 5-HT2 serotoninergic receptor subtypes in all 4 areas examined.

  20. Differential subcellular distribution of rat brain dopamine receptors and subtype-specific redistribution induced by cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Voulalas, Pamela J.; Schetz, John; Undieh, Ashiwel S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the subcellular distribution of dopamine D1, D2 and D5 receptor subtypes in rat frontal cortex, and examined whether psychostimulant-induced elevation of synaptic dopamine could alter the receptor distribution. Differential detergent solubilization and density gradient centrifugation were used to separate various subcellular fractions, followed by semi-quantitative determination of the relative abundance of specific receptor proteins in each fraction. D1 receptors were predominantly localized to detergent-resistant membranes, and a portion of these receptors also floated on sucrose gradients. These properties are characteristic of proteins found in lipid rafts and caveolae. D2 receptors exhibited variable distribution between cytoplasmic, detergent-soluble and detergent-resistant membrane fractions, yet were not present in buoyant membranes. Most D5 receptor immunoreactivity was distributed into the cytoplasmic fraction, failing to sediment at forces up to 300,000g, while the remainder was localized to detergent-soluble membranes in cortex. D5 receptors were undetectable in detergent-resistant fractions or raft-like subdomains. Following daily cocaine administration for seven days, a significant portion of D1 receptors translocated from detergent-resistant membranes to detergent-soluble membranes and the cytoplasmic fraction. The distributions of D5 and D2 receptor subtypes were not significantly altered by cocaine treatment. These data imply that D5 receptors are predominantly cytoplasmic, D2 receptors are diffusely distributed within the cell, whereas D1 receptors are mostly localized to lipid rafts within the rat frontal cortex. Dopamine receptor subtype localization is susceptible to modulation by pharmacological manipulations that elevate synaptic dopamine, however the functional implications of such drug-induced receptor warrant further investigation. PMID:21236347

  1. Pirenzepine binding to membrane-bound, solubilized and purified muscarinic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgold, J.

    1986-05-01

    Muscarinic receptors were purified to near-homogeneity from bovine cortex, an area rich in the putative M1 subtype, and from bovine pons/medulla, an area rich in the putative M2 subtype. In both cases, the receptors were solubilized in digitonin and purified over an affinity column. Both the cortical and pons/medulla preparations yielded receptor proteins of 70,000 daltons. Pirenzepine binding was deduced from its competition with /sup 3/H-N-methyl scopolamine. The binding of pirenzepine to membrane-bound receptors from cortex was best described by a two site model, with approximately half the sites having a Ki of 6.4 x 10/sup -9/ M and the remaining sites having a Ki of 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M. Membrane-bound receptors from pons/medulla bound pirenzepine according to a one-site model with a Ki of 1.1 x 10/sup -7/ M. After solubilization the two-site binding of cortical receptors became a one-site binding, Ki = 1.1 x 10/sup -7/M. This value was still five-fold lower than that of soluble receptors from pons/medulla. After purification however the affinity of pirenzepine for the pons/medulla receptor increased so that the two putative subtypes bound pirenzepine with approximately the same affinity. These findings suggest that the different pirenzepine binding characteristics used to define muscarinic receptor subtypes are not inherent in the receptor protein itself but may be due to coupling factors associated with the receptor.

  2. Binding and functional properties of hexocyclium and sila-hexocyclium derivatives to muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Tastenoy, M.; Feifel, R.; Mutschler, E.; Tacke, R.; Strohmann, C.; Rafeiner, K.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J. F.; Lambrecht, G.

    1994-01-01

    1. We have compared the binding properties of several hexocyclium and sila-hexocyclium derivatives to muscarinic M1 receptors (in rat brain, human neuroblastoma (NB-OK 1) cells and calf superior cervical ganglia), rat heart M2 receptors, rat pancreas M3 receptors and M4 receptors in rat striatum, with their functional antimuscarinic properties in rabbit vas deferens (M1/M4-like), guinea-pig atria (M2), and guinea-pig ileum (M3) muscarinic receptors. 2. Sila-substitution (C/Si exchange) of hexocyclium (-->sila-hexocyclium) and demethyl-hexocyclium (-->demethyl-sila-hexocyclium) did not significantly affect their affinities for muscarinic receptors. By contrast, sila-substitution of o-methoxy-hexocyclium increased its affinity 2 to 3 fold for all the muscarinic receptor subtypes studied. 3. The p-fluoro- and p-chloro-derivatives of sila-hexocyclium had lower affinities than the parent compound at the four receptor subtypes, in binding and pharmacological studies. 4. In binding studies, o-methoxy-sila-hexocyclium (M1 = M4 > or = M3 > or = M2) had a much lower affinity than sila-hexocyclium for the four receptor subtypes, and discriminated the receptor subtypes more poorly than sila-hexocyclium (M1 = M3 > M4 > M2). This is in marked contrast with the very clear selectivity of o-methoxy-sila-hexocyclium for the prejunctional M1/M4-like heteroreceptors in rabbit vas deferens. 5. The tertiary amines demethyl-hexocyclium, demethyl-sila-hexocyclium and demethyl-o-methoxy-sila-hexocyclium had 10 to 30 fold lower affinities than the corresponding quaternary ammonium derivatives. PMID:8075869

  3. Expression of purinergic P2X receptor subtypes 1, 2, 3 and 7 in equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Zamboulis, Danae E; Senior, Mark; Clegg, Peter D; Milner, Peter I

    2013-11-01

    Tissue sensitisation and chronic pain have been described in chronic-active laminitis in the horse, making treatment of such cases difficult. Purinergic P2X receptors are linked to chronic pain and inflammation. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of purinergic P2X receptor subtypes 1, 2, 3 and 7 in the hoof, palmar digital vessels and nerve, dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in horses with chronic-active laminitis (n=5) compared to non-laminitic horses (n=5). Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on tissue sections using antibodies against P2X receptor subtypes 1-3 and 7. In horses with laminitis, there was a reduction in the thickness of the tunica media layer of the palmar digital vein as a proportion of the whole vessel diameter (0.48±0.05) compared to the non-laminitic group (0.57±0.04; P=0.02). P2X receptor subtype 3 was expressed in the smooth muscle layer (tunica media) of the palmar digital artery of horses with laminitis, but was absent in horses without laminitis. There was strong expression of P2X receptor subtype 7 in the proliferating, partially keratinised, epidermal cells of the secondary epidermal lamellae in the hooves of horses with laminitis, but no immunopositivity in horses without laminitis.

  4. Recombinant Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Prevents Aberrant Ca2+ Leakage through the Ryanodine Receptor by Suppressing Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Induced by Isoproterenol in Failing Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Susa, Takehisa; Nanno, Takuma; Ishiguchi, Hironori; Myoren, Takeki; Nishimura, Shigehiko; Kato, Takayoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Oda, Tetsuro; Okuda, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Yano, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Catecholamines induce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus enhancing diastolic Ca2+ leakage through the ryanodine receptor during heart failure (HF). However, little is known regarding the effect of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on ROS generation and Ca2+ handling in failing cardiomyocytes. The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which an exogenous ANP exerts cardioprotective effects during HF. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from the left ventricles of a canine tachycardia-induced HF model and sham-operated vehicle controls. The degree of mitochondrial oxidized DNA was evaluated by double immunohistochemical (IHC) staining using an anti-VDAC antibody for the mitochondria and an anti-8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine antibody for oxidized DNA. The effect of ANP on ROS was investigated using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, diastolic Ca2+ sparks assessed by confocal microscopy using Fluo 4-AM, and the survival rate of myocytes after 48 h. The double IHC study revealed that isoproterenol (ISO) markedly increased oxidized DNA in the mitochondria in HF and that the ISO-induced DNA damage was markedly inhibited by the co-presence of ANP. ROS production and Ca2+ spark frequency (CaSF) were increased in HF compared to normal controls, and were further increased in the presence of ISO. Notably, ANP significantly suppressed both ISO-induced ROS and CaSF without changing sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in HF (p<0.01, respectively). The survival rate after 48 h in HF was significantly decreased in the presence of ISO compared with baseline (p<0.01), whereas it was significantly improved by the co-presence of ANP (p<0.01). Together, our results suggest that ANP strongly suppresses ISO-induced mitochondrial ROS generation, which might correct aberrant diastolic Ca2+ sparks, eventually contributing to the improvement of cardiomyocyte survival in HF. PMID:27657534

  5. Ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca2+ release underlies iron-induced mitochondrial fission and stimulates mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in primary hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    SanMartín, Carol D.; Paula-Lima, Andrea C.; García, Alejandra; Barattini, Pablo; Hartel, Steffen; Núñez, Marco T.; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that iron accumulation impairs brain function. We have reported previously that addition of sub-lethal concentrations of iron to primary hippocampal neurons produces Ca2+ signals and promotes cytoplasmic generation of reactive oxygen species. These Ca2+ signals, which emerge within seconds after iron addition, arise mostly from Ca2+ release through the redox-sensitive ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels present in the endoplasmic reticulum. We have reported also that addition of synaptotoxic amyloid-β oligomers to primary hippocampal neurons stimulates RyR-mediated Ca2+ release, generating long-lasting Ca2+ signals that activate Ca2+-sensitive cellular effectors and promote the disruption of the mitochondrial network. Here, we describe that 24 h incubation of primary hippocampal neurons with iron enhanced agonist-induced RyR-mediated Ca2+ release and promoted mitochondrial network fragmentation in 43% of neurons, a response significantly prevented by RyR inhibition and by the antioxidant agent N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Stimulation of RyR-mediated Ca2+ release by a RyR agonist promoted mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in control neurons and in iron-treated neurons that displayed non-fragmented mitochondria, but not in neurons with fragmented mitochondria. Yet, the global cytoplasmic Ca2+ increase induced by the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin prompted significant mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in neurons with fragmented mitochondria, indicating that fragmentation did not prevent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake but presumably decreased the functional coupling between RyR-mediated Ca2+ release and the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. Taken together, our results indicate that stimulation of redox-sensitive RyR-mediated Ca2+ release by iron causes significant neuronal mitochondrial fragmentation, which presumably contributes to the impairment of neuronal function produced by iron accumulation. PMID:24653672

  6. Conformation-dependent stability of junctophilin 1 (JP1) and ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) channel complex is mediated by their hyper-reactive thiols.

    PubMed

    Phimister, Andrew J; Lango, Jozsef; Lee, Eun Hui; Ernst-Russell, Michael A; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Ma, Jianjie; Allen, Paul D; Pessah, Isaac N

    2007-03-23

    Junctophilin 1 (JP1), a 72-kDa protein localized at the skeletal muscle triad, is essential for stabilizing the close apposition of T-tubule and sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes to form junctions. In this study we report that rapid and selective labeling of hyper-reactive thiols found in both JP1 and ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) with 7-diethylamino-3-(4'-maleimidylphenyl)-4-methylcoumarin, a fluorescent thiol-reactive probe, proceeded 12-fold faster under conditions that minimize RyR1 gating (e.g. 10 mM Mg2+) compared with conditions that promote high channel activity (e.g. 100 microM Ca2+, 10 mM caffeine, 5 mM ATP). The reactivity of these thiol groups was very sensitive to oxidation by naphthoquinone, H2O2, NO, or O2, all known modulators of the RyR1 channel complex. Using preparative SDS-PAGE, in-gel tryptic digestion, high pressure liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing, we identified 7-diethylamino-3-(4'-maleimidylphenyl)-4-methylcoumarin-thioether adducts on three cysteine residues of JP1 (101, 402, and 627); the remaining five cysteines of JP1 were unlabeled. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated a physical interaction between JP1 and RyR1 that, like thiol reactivity, was sensitive to RyR1 conformation and chemical status of the hyper-reactive cysteines of JP1 and RyR1. These findings support a model in which JP1 interacts with the RyR1 channel complex in a conformationally sensitive manner and may contribute integral redox-sensing properties through reactive sulfhydryl chemistry.

  7. Reduced aerobic capacity causes leaky ryanodine receptors that trigger arrhythmia in a rat strain artificially selected and bred for low aerobic running capacity

    PubMed Central

    Høydal, MA; Stølen, TO; Johnsen, AB; Alvez, M; Catalucci, D; Condorelli, G; Koch, LG; Britton, SL; Smith, GL; Wisløff, U

    2014-01-01

    Aim Rats selectively bred for inborn Low Capacity of Running (LCR) display a series of poor health indices where as rats selected for High Capacity of Running (HCR) display a healthy profile. We hypothesized that selection of low aerobic capacity over generations leads to a phenotype with increased diastolic Ca2+ leak that trigger arrhythmia. Methods We used rats selected for HCR (N=10) or LCR (N=10) to determine the effect of inborn aerobic capacity on Ca2+ leak and susceptibility of ventricular arrhythmia. We studied isolated FURA2/AM loaded cardiomyocytes to detect Ca2+-handling and function on an inverted epi-fluorescence microscope. To determine arrhythmogenicity we did a final experiment with electrical burst pacing in Langendorff perfused hearts. Results Ca2+-handling was impaired by reduced Ca2+ amplitude, prolonged time to 50% Ca2+ decay, and reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-content. Impaired Ca2+ removal was influenced by reduced SR Ca2+ ATP-ase 2a (SERCA2a) function and increased sodium/Ca2+-exchanger (NCX) in LCR rats. Diastolic Ca2 leak was 87% higher in LCR rats. The leak was reduced by CaMKII inhibition. Expression levels of phosphorylated theorine-286 CaMKII levels and increased RyR2 phosphorylation at the Serine-2814 site mechanistically support our findings of increased leak in LCR. LCR rats had significantly higher incidence of ventricular fibrillation. Conclusion Selection of inborn low aerobic capacity over generations leads to a phenotype with increased risk of ventricular fibrillation. Increased phosphorylation of CaMKII at serine-2814 at the cardiac ryanodine receptor appears as an important mechanism of impaired Ca2+ handling and diastolic Ca2+ leak that results in increased susceptibility to ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24444142

  8. PCB 136 Atropselectively Alters Morphometric and Functional Parameters of Neuronal Connectivity in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons via Ryanodine Receptor-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca2+-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (−)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (−)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca2+-sensitive dye demonstrates that (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations. Similarly, (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure. PMID:24385416

  9. PCB 136 atropselectively alters morphometric and functional parameters of neuronal connectivity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons via ryanodine receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D; Pessah, Isaac N; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J

    2014-04-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca²⁺-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (-)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (-)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca²⁺-sensitive dye demonstrates that (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ oscillations. Similarly, (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury Leads to Hyperoxidation and Nitrosylation of Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor-1 Associated with Upregulation of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase 4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Harlow, Lauren; Graham, Zachary A; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher

    2017-02-27

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in marked atrophy and dysfunction of skeletal muscle. There are currently no effective treatments for SCI-induced muscle atrophy or the dysfunction of the remaining muscle tissue. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-4 (Nox4) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and has been identified as an important O2 sensor in skeletal muscle. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are calcium (Ca(2+)) channels that are responsible for Ca(2+) release from SR. In skeletal muscle, type1 RyR (RyR1) is predominantly functional. RyR1 is regulated by multiple proteins, including calstabin1, which assures that they close appropriately once contraction has ceased. RyR1 function is also regulated by oxidation and redox-dependent cysteine nitrosylation. Excessive oxidation/nitrosylation of RyR1 is associated with dissociation of calstabin1 and reduced muscle force generation. However, whether Nox4 levels in skeletal muscle are elevated or whether RyR1 is oxidized or nitrosylated after SCI has not been determined. In this study, we examined Nox4 expression, oxidation/nitrolysation status, and association of calstabin1 with RyR1 in skeletal muscle derived from rats that were subjected to T4 complete transection (SCI), and observed elevated expression of Nox4 messenger RNA and protein in muscle after SCI associated with enhanced binding of Nox4 to RyR1, increased oxidation and nitrosylation of RyR1, and dissociation of calstabin1 from RyR1 in SCI rat muscle. Our data suggest that RyR1 dysfunction resulting from excessive oxidation/nitrosylation may contribute to reduced specific force after SCI and suggest that Nox4 may be the source of ROS responsible for increased oxidation and nitrosylation of RyR1.

  11. The I4895T Mutation in the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Induces Fiber-Type Specific Alterations in Skeletal Muscle that Mimic Premature Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Simona; Loy, Ryan E.; Dirksen, Robert T.; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The I4898T (IT) mutation in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is linked to a form of central core disease (CCD) in humans and results in a non leaky channel and excitation-contraction uncoupling. We characterized age- and fiber type-dependent alterations in muscle ultrastructure, as well as the magnitude and spatiotemporal properties of evoked Ca2+ release in heterozygous Ryr1I4895T/WT (IT/+) knock-in mice on a mixed genetic background. The results indicate a classical but mild CCD phenotype that includes muscle weakness and the presence of mitochondrial-deficient areas in type I fibers. Electrically-evoked Ca2+ release is significantly reduced in single FDB fibers from young and old IT/+ mice. Structural changes are strongly fiber type-specific, affecting type I and IIB/IIX fibers in very distinct ways, and sparing type IIA fibers. Ultrastructural alterations in our IT/+ mice are also present in wild type, but at a lower frequency and older ages, suggesting that the disease mutation on the mixed background promotes an acceleration of normal age-dependent changes. The observed functional and structural alterations and their similarity to age-associated changes are entirely consistent with the known properties of the mutated channel, which result in reduced calcium release as is also observed in normal aging muscle. In strong contrast to these observations, a subset of patients with the analogous human heterozygous mutation and IT/+ mice on an inbred 129S2/SvPasCrl background exhibit a more severe disease phenotype, which is not directly consistent with the mutated channel properties. PMID:20961389

  12. AB283. SPR-10 Down-regulation of ryanodine receptor gene expression in murine urinary bladder smooth muscle following partial bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Javed, Elham; Addya, Shankar; Fortina, Paolo; Zderic, Stephen; Wein, Alan; Chacko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) displays spontaneous action potentials and this potential is related to the phasic nature of spontaneous contractions in this tissue. The amplitude of a phasic contraction depends on the increase in Ca2+ entry caused by membrane depolarization. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in UBSM decreases the force production by decreasing the frequency of phasic contractions through interactions with large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) and small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels. Microarray and network analysis were employed to determine the changes in mRNA in 14-day obstructed murine bladders. We found that obstruction significantly down-regulated the RyRs in bladder smooth muscle (BSM). Methods Male C57Bl/6 mice were surgically obstructed and kept for 14 days. Sham-operated mice served as a control. Bladders were excised; urothelium scraped off with a scalpel, and the serosa was removed. BSM obtained from PBOO and sham control animals were used for microarray and western blotting Results Pathway-based analysis of these gene signatures showed significant number of under-expressed genes in obstructed bladder and they were mapped to proteins involved in calcium signaling. We focused our work on RyR protein expression in BSM. There was a four-fold reduction of RyR3 in BSM in 14-day obstructed groups as shown by microarray and immunoblotting compared to that of sham-operated animals. Conclusions These results confirm that the RyR gene expression is down-regulated in obstructed murine bladder smooth muscle. Funding Source(s) None

  13. Ca(2+)-activated ion currents triggered by ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release control firing of inhibitory neurons in the prepositus hypoglossi nucleus.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasuhiko; Yanagawa, Yuchio

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous miniature outward currents (SMOCs) are known to exist in smooth muscles and peripheral neurons, and evidence for the presence of SMOCs in central neurons has been accumulating. SMOCs in central neurons are induced through Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (K(Ca)) channels, which are activated through Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum via ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Previously, we found that some neurons in the prepositus hypoglossi nucleus (PHN) showed spontaneous outward currents (SOCs). In the present study, we used whole cell recordings in slice preparations of the rat brain stem to investigate the following: 1) the ionic mechanisms of SOCs, 2) the types of neurons exhibiting frequent SOCs, and 3) the effect of Ca(2+)-activated conductance on neuronal firing. Pharmacological analyses revealed that SOCs were induced via the activation of small-conductance-type K(Ca) (SK) channels and RyRs, indicating that SOCs correspond to SMOCs. An analysis of the voltage responses to current pulses of the fluorescence-expressing inhibitory neurons of transgenic rats revealed that inhibitory neurons frequently exhibited SOCs. Abolition of SOCs via blockade of SK channels enhanced the frequency of spontaneous firing of inhibitory PHN neurons. However, abolition of SOCs via blockade of RyRs reduced the firing frequency and hyperpolarized the membrane potential. Similar reductions in firing frequency and hyperpolarization were also observed when Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation (CAN) channels were blocked. These results suggest that, in inhibitory neurons in the PHN, Ca(2+) release via RyRs activates SK and CAN channels, and these channels regulate spontaneous firing in a complementary manner.

  14. Stabilization of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel-FKBP12 complex by the 1,4-benzothiazepine derivative S107.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Kramer, Henning F; Tomberlin, Ginger H; Townsend, Claire; Meissner, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) complex results in the rapid release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and muscle contraction. Dissociation of the small FK506 binding protein 12 subunit (FKBP12) increases RyR1 activity and impairs muscle function. The 1,4-benzothiazepine derivative JTV519, and the more specific derivative S107 (2,3,4,5,-tetrahydro-7-methoxy-4-methyl-1,4-benzothiazepine), are thought to improve skeletal muscle function by stabilizing the RyR1-FKBP12 complex. Here, we report a high degree of nonspecific and specific low affinity [(3)H]S107 binding to SR vesicles. SR vesicles enriched in RyR1 bound ∼48 [(3)H]S107 per RyR1 tetramer with EC(50) ∼52 µM and Hillslope ∼2. The effects of S107 and FKBP12 on RyR1 were examined under conditions that altered the redox state of RyR1. S107 increased FKBP12 binding to RyR1 in SR vesicles in the presence of reduced glutathione and the NO-donor NOC12, with no effect in the presence of oxidized glutathione. Addition of 0.15 µM FKBP12 to SR vesicles prevented FKBP12 dissociation; however, in the presence of oxidized glutathione and NOC12, FKBP12 dissociation was observed in skeletal muscle homogenates that contained 0.43 µM myoplasmic FKBP12 and was attenuated by S107. In single channel measurements with FKBP12-depleted RyR1s, in the absence and presence of NOC12, S107 augmented the FKBP12-mediated decrease in channel activity. The data suggest that S107 can reverse the harmful effects of redox active species on SR Ca(2+) release in skeletal muscle by binding to RyR1 low affinity sites.

  15. Overexpression of ryanodine receptor type 1 enhances mitochondrial fragmentation and Ca2+-induced ATP production in cardiac H9c2 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    O-Uchi, Jin; Jhun, Bong Sook; Hurst, Stephen; Bisetto, Sara; Gross, Polina; Chen, Ming; Kettlewell, Sarah; Park, Jongsun; Oyamada, Hideto; Smith, Godfrey L; Murayama, Takashi; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2013-12-01

    Ca(+) influx to mitochondria is an important trigger for both mitochondrial dynamics and ATP generation in various cell types, including cardiac cells. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx is mainly mediated by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). Growing evidence also indicates that mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx mechanisms are regulated not solely by MCU but also by multiple channels/transporters. We have previously reported that skeletal muscle-type ryanodine receptor (RyR) type 1 (RyR1), which expressed at the mitochondrial inner membrane, serves as an additional Ca(2+) uptake pathway in cardiomyocytes. However, it is still unclear which mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx mechanism is the dominant regulator of mitochondrial morphology/dynamics and energetics in cardiomyocytes. To investigate the role of mitochondrial RyR1 in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology/function in cardiac cells, RyR1 was transiently or stably overexpressed in cardiac H9c2 myoblasts. We found that overexpressed RyR1 was partially localized in mitochondria as observed using both immunoblots of mitochondrial fractionation and confocal microscopy, whereas RyR2, the main RyR isoform in the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum, did not show any expression at mitochondria. Interestingly, overexpression of RyR1 but not MCU or RyR2 resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation. These fragmented mitochondria showed bigger and sustained mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients compared with basal tubular mitochondria. In addition, RyR1-overexpressing cells had a higher mitochondrial ATP concentration under basal conditions and showed more ATP production in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation compared with nontransfected cells as observed by a matrix-targeted ATP biosensor. These results indicate that RyR1 possesses a mitochondrial targeting/retention signal and modulates mitochondrial morphology and Ca(2+)-induced ATP production in cardiac H9c2 myoblasts.

  16. Calcium-dependent energetics of calmodulin domain interactions with regulatory regions of the Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (RyR1).

    PubMed

    Newman, Rhonda A; Sorensen, Brenda R; Kilpatrick, Adina M; Shea, Madeline A

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) allosterically regulates the homo-tetrameric human Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (hRyR1): apo CaM activates the channel, while (Ca(2+))4-CaM inhibits it. CaM-binding RyR1 residues 1975-1999 and 3614-3643 were proposed to allow CaM to bridge adjacent RyR1 subunits. Fluorescence anisotropy titrations monitored the binding of CaM and its domains to peptides encompassing hRyR(11975-1999) or hRyR1(3614-3643). Both CaM and its C-domain associated in a calcium-independent manner with hRyR1(3614-3643) while N-domain required calcium and bound ~250-fold more weakly. Association with hRyR1(11975-1999) was weak. Both hRyR1 peptides increased the calcium-binding affinity of both CaM domains, while maintaining differences between them. These energetics support the CaM C-domain association with hRyR1(3614-3643) at low calcium, positioning CaM to respond to calcium efflux. However, the CaM N-domain affinity for hRyR(11975-1999) alone was insufficient to support CaM bridging adjacent RyR1 subunits. Other proteins or elements of the hRyR1 structure must contribute to the energetics of CaM-mediated regulation.

  17. Bidirectional coupling between ryanodine receptors and Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel machinery sustains store-operated Ca2+ entry in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Pratima; Dadsetan, Sepehr; Fomina, Alla F

    2012-10-26

    The expression and functional significance of ryanodine receptors (RyR) were investigated in resting and activated primary human T cells. RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3 transcripts were detected in human T cells. RyR1/2 transcript levels increased, whereas those of RyR3 decreased after T cell activation. RyR1/2 protein immunoreactivity was detected in activated but not in resting T cells. The RyR agonist caffeine evoked Ca(2+) release from the intracellular store in activated T cells but not in resting T cells, indicating that RyR are functionally up-regulated in activated T cells compared with resting T cells. In the presence of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) via plasmalemmal Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels, RyR blockers reduced the Ca(2+) leak from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the magnitude of SOCE, suggesting that a positive feedback relationship exists between RyR and CRAC channels. Overexpression of fluorescently tagged RyR2 and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), an ER Ca(2+) sensor gating CRAC channels, in HEK293 cells revealed that RyR are co-localized with STIM1 in the puncta formed after store depletion. These data indicate that in primary human T cells, the RyR are coupled to CRAC channel machinery such that SOCE activates RyR via a Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release mechanism, which in turn reduces the Ca(2+) concentration within the ER lumen in the vicinity of STIM1, thus facilitating SOCE by reducing store-dependent CRAC channel inactivation. Treatment with RyR blockers suppressed activated T cell expansion, demonstrating the functional importance of RyR in T cells.

  18. Contribution of impaired myofibril and ryanodine receptor function to prolonged low-frequency force depression after in situ stimulation in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daiki; Kanzaki, Keita; Kuratani, Mai; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Wada, Masanobu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether prolonged low-frequency force depression (PLFFD) that occurs in situ is the result of decreased myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity and/or reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release. Intact rat gastrocnemius muscles were electrically stimulated via the sciatic nerve until force was reduced to ~50% of the initial and dissected 30 min following the cessation of stimulation. Skinned fibre and whole muscle analyses were performed in the superficial region composed exclusively of type IIB fibres. Fatiguing stimulation significantly reduced the ratio of force at low frequency to that at high frequency to 65% in skinned fibres (1 vs. 50 Hz) and 73% in whole muscles (20 vs. 100 Hz). In order to evaluate changes in myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity and ryanodine receptor caffeine sensitivity, skinned fibres were activated in Ca(2+)- and caffeine-containing solutions, respectively. Skinned fibres from fatigued muscles displayed decreased caffeine sensitivity together with increased myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity. Treatment with 2,2'-dithiodipyridine and reduced glutathione induced a smaller increase in myofibrillar Ca(2+)sensitivity in fatigued than in rested fibres. In fatigued muscles, S-glutathionylation of troponin I was increased and submaximal SR Ca(2+) release, induced by 4-chloro-m-cresol, was decreased. These findings suggest that in the early stage of PLFFD that occurs in fast-twitch muscles of exercising animals and humans, S-glutathionylation of troponin I may attenuate PLFFD by increasing myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity and that under such a circumstance, PLFFD may be ascribable to failure of SR Ca(2+) release.

  19. The effects of ryanodine receptor (RYR1) mutation on natural killer cell cytotoxicity, plasma cytokines and stress hormones during acute intermittent exercise in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ciepielewski, Z M; Stojek, W; Borman, A; Myślińska, D; Pałczyńska, P; Kamyczek, M

    2016-04-01

    Stress susceptibility has been mapped to a single recessive gene, the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene or halothane (Hal) gene. Homozygous (Hal(nn)), mutated pigs are sensitive to halothane and susceptible to Porcine Stress Syndrome (PSS). Previous studies have shown that stress-susceptible RYR1 gene mutated homozygotes in response to restraint stress showed an increase in natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) accompanied by more pronounced stress-related hormone and anti-inflammatory cytokine changes. In order to determine the relationship of a RYR1 gene mutation with NKCC, plasma cytokines and stress-related hormones following a different stress model - exercise - 36 male pigs (representing different genotypes according to RYR1 gene mutation: NN, homozygous dominant; Nn, heterozygous; nn, homozygous recessive) were submitted to an intermittent treadmill walking. During the entire experiment the greatest level of NKCC and the greatest concentrations of interleukin (IL-) 6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon (IFN-)γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and stress-related hormones (adrenaline, prolactin, beta-endorphin) were observed in nn pigs, and the greatest concentration of IL-1 and growth hormone in NN pigs. Immunostimulatory effects of intermittent exercise on NKCC in nn pigs were concomitant with increases in IL-2, IL-12 and IFN-γ, the potent NKCC activators. Our findings suggest that stress-susceptible pigs RYR1 gene mutated pigs develop a greater level of NKCC and cytokine production in response to exercise stress. These results suggest that the heterogeneity of immunological and neuroendocrine response to exercise stress in pigs could be influenced by RYR1 gene mutation.

  20. Cockroach GABAB receptor subtypes: molecular characterization, pharmacological properties and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Blankenburg, S; Balfanz, S; Hayashi, Y; Shigenobu, S; Miura, T; Baumann, O; Baumann, A; Blenau, W

    2015-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the predominant inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Its effects are mediated by either ionotropic GABAA receptors or metabotropic GABAB receptors. GABAB receptors regulate, via Gi/o G-proteins, ion channels, and adenylyl cyclases. In humans, GABAB receptor subtypes are involved in the etiology of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. In arthropods, however, these members of the G-protein-coupled receptor family are only inadequately characterized. Interestingly, physiological data have revealed important functions of GABAB receptors in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. We have cloned cDNAs coding for putative GABAB receptor subtypes 1 and 2 of P. americana (PeaGB1 and PeaGB2). When both receptor proteins are co-expressed in mammalian cells, activation of the receptor heteromer with GABA leads to a dose-dependent decrease in cAMP production. The pharmacological profile differs from that of mammalian and Drosophila GABAB receptors. Western blot analyses with polyclonal antibodies have revealed the expression of PeaGB1 and PeaGB2 in the CNS of the American cockroach. In addition to the widespread distribution in the brain, PeaGB1 is expressed in salivary glands and male accessory glands. Notably, PeaGB1-like immunoreactivity has been detected in the GABAergic salivary neuron 2, suggesting that GABAB receptors act as autoreceptors in this neuron.

  1. Effects of absolute configuration of IQNP on muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, D.W.; Lambert, C.R.; Knapp, F.F.

    1994-05-01

    IQNP, a high affinity muscarinic ligand with high cerebral uptake and long retention, contains two chiral centers in addition to vinyl iodide sterochemistry. The various diastereomers, in which the 3-quinuclidinyl moiety has the R configuration, have been prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. These data show that muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity is dramatically affected by the configuration of the acetate center and vinyl iodide. In vitro studies show that E-(R,R)-IQNP is 100 times more selective for ml than m2 subtype as compared to E-(R,S), which was confirmed by in vivo results. In contrast, in vivo, Z-(R,R) has high uptake in m2 rich tissues (heart and cerebellum). In vitro studies are being performed on the Z isomers. Blocking studies with subtype-specific ligands confirm these data which illustrate the importance of molecular configuration on receptor subtype selectivity. These combined studies demonstrate that these isomers of IQNP are good candidates for future studies of receptor subtypes.

  2. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  3. Cloning of a novel G protein-coupled receptor, SLT, a subtype of the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Mori, M; Harada, M; Terao, Y; Sugo, T; Watanabe, T; Shimomura, Y; Abe, M; Shintani, Y; Onda, H; Nishimura, O; Fujino, M

    2001-05-25

    A DNA fragment encoding an amino acid sequence possessing common features to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily was found in the human genomic sequence, and from this information, the full-length cDNA of a novel GPCR, designated SLT, was cloned from the human hippocampus cDNA library. SLT showed the highest homology to the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor, SLC-1 (31.5% identity), and to a lesser extent, to the somatostatin (SST) receptor subtypes. MCH exhibited agonistic behavior when applied to the SLT-expressing CHO cells at subnanomolar doses whereas more than 200 known peptides, including SST and cortistatin, did not. These results indicated that MCH is the cognate ligand of the SLT receptor and that this newly cloned GPCR is the second subtype of the MCH receptor. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of the SLT gene expression in human tissues showed that the SLT receptor is expressed mainly in brain areas including the cerebral cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, and corpus callosum, as well as in a limited number of peripheral tissues. The distribution of the SLT nearly overlapped that of SLC-1, suggesting that some of the neural functions of MCH may be mediated by both of these receptor subtypes.

  4. LTD expression is independent of glutamate receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Granger, Adam J; Nicoll, Roger A

    2014-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) is a form of synaptic plasticity that plays a major role in the activity-dependent reshaping of synaptic transmission. LTD is expressed as a decrease in synaptic AMPA receptor number, though the exact mechanism remains controversial. Several lines of evidence have suggested necessary roles for both the GluA1 and GluA2 subunits, and specifically certain interactions with their cytoplasmic tails. However, it is unclear if either GluA1 or GluA2 are absolutely required for LTD. We tested this hypothesis using constitutive knock-outs and single-cell molecular replacement of AMPA receptor subunits in mouse hippocampus. We found that neither GluA1 or GluA2 are required for normal expression of LTD, and indeed a normal decrease in synaptic transmission was observed in cells in which all endogenous AMPA receptors have been replaced by kainate receptors. Thus, LTD does not require removal of specific AMPA receptor subunits, but likely involves a more general modification of the synapse and its ability to anchor a broad range of receptor proteins.

  5. A Molecular and Chemical Perspective in Defining Melatonin Receptor Subtype Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chan, King Hang; Wong, Yung Hou

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is primarily synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during darkness in a normal diurnal cycle. In addition to its intrinsic antioxidant property, the neurohormone has renowned regulatory roles in the control of circadian rhythm and exerts its physiological actions primarily by interacting with the G protein-coupled MT1 and MT2 transmembrane receptors. The two melatonin receptor subtypes display identical ligand binding characteristics and mediate a myriad of signaling pathways, including adenylyl cyclase inhibition, phospholipase C stimulation and the regulation of other effector molecules. Both MT1 and MT2 receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system as well as many peripheral tissues, but each receptor subtype can be linked to specific functional responses at the target tissue. Given the broad therapeutic implications of melatonin receptors in chronobiology, immunomodulation, endocrine regulation, reproductive functions and cancer development, drug discovery and development programs have been directed at identifying chemical molecules that bind to the two melatonin receptor subtypes. However, all of the melatoninergics in the market act on both subtypes of melatonin receptors without significant selectivity. To facilitate the design and development of novel therapeutic agents, it is necessary to understand the intrinsic differences between MT1 and MT2 that determine ligand binding, functional efficacy, and signaling specificity. This review summarizes our current knowledge in differentiating MT1 and MT2 receptors and their signaling capacities. The use of homology modeling in the mapping of the ligand-binding pocket will be described. Identification of conserved and distinct residues will be tremendously useful in the design of highly selective ligands. PMID:24018885

  6. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Honda, A; Sugimoto, Y; Namba, T; Watabe, A; Irie, A; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1993-04-15

    A functional cDNA clone encoding mouse EP2 subtype of prostaglandin (PG) E receptor was isolated from a mouse cDNA library by cross-hybridization with the mouse EP3 subtype PGE receptor cDNA. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 513 amino acid residues with putative seven-transmembrane domains. In contrast to EP3 receptor, this receptor possesses long third intracellular loop and carboxyl-terminal tail. [3H] PGE2 specifically bound to the membrane of mammalian COS cells transfected with the cDNA. The binding to the membrane was displaced with unlabeled PG in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost > or = PGF2 alpha > or = PGD2. The binding was also inhibited by misoprostol, an EP2 and EP3 agonist, but not by sulprostone, an EP1 and EP3 agonist, and SC-19220, an EP1 antagonist. PGE2 markedly increased cAMP level in COS cells transfected with the cDNA. These results suggest that this receptor is EP2 subtype. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the EP2 mRNA is widely expressed in various tissues, the abundant expression being observed in ileum, thymus, and mastocytoma P-815 cells.

  7. GABA(A) receptor subtype-selectivity of novel bicuculline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Foppa, Verena; Thiery, Hanna; Hermange, Philippe; Janody, Simon; Berger, Michael L; Dodd, Robert H; Sieghart, Werner

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system and are targets of clinically important drugs modulating GABA induced ion flux by interacting with distinct allosteric binding sites. ROD 185 is a previously investigated structural analogue of the GABA site antagonist bicuculline, and a positive allosteric modulator acting via the benzodiazepine binding site. Here, we investigated 13 newly synthesized structural analogues of ROD 185 for their interaction with rat GABA(A) receptors. Using [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding assays, we identified four compounds exhibiting a higher affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site than ROD 185. Two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology at recombinant GABA(A) receptors indicated that most of these compounds positively modulated GABA-induced currents at these receptors. Additionally, these experiments revealed that this compound class not only interacts with the benzodiazepine binding site at αβγ receptors but also with a novel, so far unidentified binding site present in αβ receptors. Compounds with a high affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site stimulated GABA-induced currents stronger at αβγ than at αβ receptors and preferred α3β3γ2 receptors. Compounds showing equal or smaller effects at αβγ compared to αβ receptors differentially interacted with various αβ or αβγ receptor subtypes. Surprisingly, five of these compounds interacting with αβ receptors showed a strong stimulation at α6β3γ2 receptors. The absence of any direct effects at GABA(A) receptors, as well as their potential selectivity for receptor subtypes not being addressed by benzodiazepines, make this compound class to a starting point for the development of drugs with a possible clinical importance.

  8. Muscarinic and dopaminergic receptor subtypes on striatal cholinergic interneurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, V.L.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K. )

    1990-12-01

    Unilateral stereotaxic injection of small amounts of the cholinotoxin, AF64A, caused minimal nonselective tissue damage and resulted in a significant loss of the presynaptic cholinergic markers (3H)hemicholinium-3 (45% reduction) and choline acetyltransferase (27% reduction). No significant change from control was observed in tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase activity; presynaptic neuronal markers for dopamine- and serotonin-containing neurons, respectively. The AF64A lesion resulted in a significant reduction of dopamine D2 receptors as evidenced by a decrease in (3H)sulpiride binding (42% reduction) and decrease of muscarinic non-M1 receptors as shown by a reduction in (3H)QNB binding in the presence of 100 nM pirenzepine (36% reduction). Saturation studies revealed that the change in (3H)sulpiride and (3H)QNB binding was due to a change in Bmax not Kd. Intrastriatal injection of AF64A failed to alter dopamine D1 or muscarinic M1 receptors labeled with (3H)SCH23390 and (3H)pirenzepine, respectively. In addition, no change in (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase was observed. These results demonstrate that a subpopulation of muscarinic receptors (non-M1) are presynaptic on cholinergic interneurons (hence, autoreceptors), and a subpopulation of dopamine D2 receptors are postsynaptic on cholinergic interneurons. Furthermore, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase are not localized to striatal cholinergic interneurons.

  9. Oxygen-coupled redox regulation of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor/Ca2+ release channel (RyR1): sites and nature of oxidative modification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Wang, Benlian; Miyagi, Masaru; Hess, Douglas T; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2013-08-09

    In mammalian skeletal muscle, Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through the ryanodine receptor/Ca(2+)-release channel RyR1 can be enhanced by S-oxidation or S-nitrosylation of separate Cys residues, which are allosterically linked. S-Oxidation of RyR1 is coupled to muscle oxygen tension (pO2) through O2-dependent production of hydrogen peroxide by SR-resident NADPH oxidase 4. In isolated SR (SR vesicles), an average of six to eight Cys thiols/RyR1 monomer are reversibly oxidized at high (21% O2) versus low pO2 (1% O2), but their identity among the 100 Cys residues/RyR1 monomer is unknown. Here we use isotope-coded affinity tag labeling and mass spectrometry (yielding 93% coverage of RyR1 Cys residues) to identify 13 Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled S-oxidation in SR vesicles. Eight additional Cys residues are oxidized at high versus low pO2 only when NADPH levels are supplemented to enhance NADPH oxidase 4 activity. pO2-sensitive Cys residues were largely non-overlapping with those identified previously as hyperreactive by administration of exogenous reagents (three of 21) or as S-nitrosylated. Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled oxidation are distributed widely within the cytoplasmic domain of RyR1 in multiple functional domains implicated in RyR1 activity-regulating interactions with the L-type Ca(2+) channel (dihydropyridine receptor) and FK506-binding protein 12 as well as in "hot spot" regions containing sites of mutation implicated in malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. pO2-coupled disulfide formation was identified, whereas neither S-glutathionylated nor sulfenamide-modified Cys residues were observed. Thus, physiological redox regulation of RyR1 by endogenously generated hydrogen peroxide is exerted through dynamic disulfide formation involving multiple Cys residues.

  10. Racial Variations in Prostate Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Androgen Receptor Signaling Reflect Anatomic Tumor Location

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Farzana A.; Sundi, Debasish; Tosoian, Jeffrey J.; Choeurng, Voleak; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Ross, Ashley E.; Klein, Eric; Den, Robert; Dicker, Adam; Erho, Nicholas; Davicioni, Elai; Lotan, Tamara L.; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) subtypes based on ETS gene expression have been described. Recent studies suggest there are racial differences in tumor location, with PCa located anteriorly more often among African-American (AA) compared to Caucasian-American (CA) men. In this retrospective analysis of a multi-institutional cohort treated by radical prostatectomy (179 CA, 121 AA), we evaluated associations among molecular subtype, race, anatomic tumor location, and androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Subtype (m-ERG+, m-ETS+, m-SPINK1+, or triple-negative) was determined using distribution-based outlier analysis. AR signaling was investigated using gene expression profiling of canonical AR targets. m-ERG+ was more common in CA than AA men (47% vs 22%, p < 0.001). AA men were more likely to be m-SPINK1+ (13% vs 7%; p = 0.069) and triple-negative (50% vs 37%; p = 0.043). Racial differences in molecular subtypes did not persist when tumors were analyzed by location, suggesting a biologically important relationship between tumor location and subtype. Accordingly, anterior tumor location was associated with higher Decipher scores and lower global AR signaling. Patient summary This study demonstrates associations among patient race, prostate cancer molecular subtypes, and tumor location. Location-specific differences in androgen regulation may further underlie these relationships. PMID:26443432

  11. Binding characteristics of the muscarinic receptor subtype in rabbit pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    van Zwam, A.J.; Willems, P.H.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J.F.; de Pont, J.J.; van Ginneken, C.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The muscarinic receptor in the rabbit pancreas was characterized with the use of the labeled ligand ({sup 3}H)-(-)-quinuclidinyl-benzylate (({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB). Specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB to pancreatic acini was found to be reversible and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 68 pmol/l and a receptor density (RT) of 170 fmol/mg protein. Agonist binding behaviour was investigated by displacement of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB binding by eight agonists like arecoline, arecadine-propargylester (APE) and carbachol, yielding only low affinity binding sites. The inhibition of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB binding by the selective antagonists pirenzepine, hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD) and (11-(2-(diethyl-amino)-methyl-1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyr ido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepin-6-one (AF-DX 116) confirmed the M3 nature of the rabbit pancreatic receptor.

  12. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in neuronal and non-neuronal cholinergic function.

    PubMed

    Eglen, R M

    2006-07-01

    1 Muscarinic M1-M5 receptors mediate the metabotropic actions of acetylcholine in the nervous system. A growing body of data indicate they also mediate autocrine functions of the molecule. The availability of novel and selective muscarinic agonists and antagonists, as well as in vivo gene disruption techniques, has clarified the roles of muscarinic receptors in mediating both functions of acetylcholine. 2 Selective M1 agonists or mixed M1 agonists/M2 antagonists may provide an approach to the treatment of cognitive disorders, while M3 antagonism, or mixed M2/M3 antagonists, are approved for the treatment of contractility disorders including overactive bladder and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Preclinical data suggest that selective agonism of the M4 receptor will provide novel anti-nociceptive agents, while therapeutics-based upon agonism or antagonism of the muscarinic M5 receptor have yet to be reported. 3 The autocrine functions of muscarinic receptors broadly fall into two areas - control of cell growth or proliferation and mediation of the release of chemical mediators from epithelial cells, ultimately causing muscle relaxation. The former particularly are involved in embryological development, oncogenesis, keratinocyte function and immune responsiveness. The latter regulate contractility of smooth muscle in the vasculature, airways and urinary bladder. 4 Most attention has focused on muscarinic M1 or M3 receptors which mediate lymphocyte immunoresponsiveness, cell migration and release of smooth muscle relaxant factors. Muscarinic M4 receptors are implicated in the regulation of keratinocyte adhesion and M2 receptors in stem cell proliferation and development. Little data are available concerning the M5 receptor, partly due to the difficulties in defining the subtype pharmacologically. 5 The autocrine functions of acetylcholine, like those in the nervous system, involve activation of several muscarinic receptor subtypes. Consequently, the role of

  13. The role of serotonin receptor subtypes in treating depression: a review of animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Gregory V.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are effective in treating depression. Given the existence of different families and subtypes of 5-HT receptors, multiple 5-HT receptors may be involved in the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of SSRIs. Objective Behavioral pharmacology studies investigating the role of 5-HT receptor subtypes in producing or blocking the effects of SSRIs were reviewed. Results Few animal behavior tests were available to support the original development of SSRIs. Since their development, a number of behavioral tests and models of depression have been developed that are sensitive to the effects of SSRIs, as well as to other types of antidepressant treatments. The rationale for the development and use of these tests is reviewed. Behavioral effects similar to those of SSRIs (antidepressant-like) have been produced by agonists at 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, and 5-HT6 receptors. Also, antagonists at 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT3, 5- HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors have been reported to produce antidepressant-like responses. Although it seems paradoxical that both agonists and antagonists at particular 5-HT receptors can produce antidepressant-like effects, they probably involve diverse neurochemical mechanisms. The behavioral effects of SSRIs and other antidepressants may also be augmented when 5-HT receptor agonists or antagonists are given in combination. Conclusions The involvement of 5-HT receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs is complex and involves the orchestration of stimulation and blockade at different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Individual 5-HT receptors provide opportunities for the development of a newer generation of antidepressants that may be more beneficial and effective than SSRIs. PMID:21107537

  14. Evaluation of 1,2,5-thiadiazoles as modulators of M₁/M₅ muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditya; Rao, P S S; Messer, William S

    2014-03-15

    Studies have demonstrated the presence of allosteric binding sites on each of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes. Since most drugs targeting muscarinic receptors bind to the highly conserved orthosteric binding site, they fail to achieve appreciable subtype selectivity. Targeting non-conserved allosteric sites may provide a new way of enhancing selectivity for individual subtypes of muscarinic receptor. Tetra(ethyleneglycol)(3-methoxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)[3-(1-methyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyrid-3-yl)-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl] ether, CDD-0304 (10), was found to be a M₁/₂/₄ selective muscarinic agonist and might prove useful in treating the symptoms associated with schizophrenia (J. Med. Chem.2003, 46, 4273). It was hypothesized that the observed subtype selectivity demonstrated by 10 may be due to its ability to function as a bitopic ligand (J. Med. Chem.2006, 49, 7518). To further investigate this possibility, a novel series of compounds was synthesized using a 1,2,5-thiadiazole moiety along with varying lengths of a polyethylene glycol linker and terminal groups, for evaluation as potential allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors. Preliminary biological studies were performed using carbachol to stimulate M₁ and M₅ receptors. No significant agonist activity was observed at either M₁ or M₅ receptors for any of the compounds. Compound 18, 2-(4-methoxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-yloxy)-N,N-dimethylethanamine fumarate (CDD-0361F) was found to block the effects of carbachol at M5 muscarinic receptors.

  15. Alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor subtypes: non-identical triplets with different dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Hague, Chris; Chen, Zhongjian; Uberti, Michelle; Minneman, Kenneth P

    2003-12-12

    Alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors are one of the three subfamilies of G protein coupled receptors activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine to control important functions in many target organs. Three human subtypes (alpha(1A), alpha(1B), alpha(1D)) are derived from separate genes and are highly homologous in their transmembrane domains but not in their amino or carboxyl termini. Recent advances in our understanding of these "non-identical triplets" include development of knockout mice lacking single or multiple subtypes, new insights into subcellular localization and trafficking, identification of allosteric modulators, and increasing evidence for an important role in brain function. Although all three subtypes activate the same G(q/11) signaling pathway, they also appear to interact with different protein binding partners. Recent evidence suggests they may also form dimers, and may initiate independent signals through pathways yet to be clearly elucidated. Thus, this subfamily represents a common phenomenon of a group of similar but non-identical receptor subtypes activated by the same neurotransmitter, whose individual functional roles remain to be clearly established.

  16. The structure of the third intracellular loop of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Susumu; Oka, Yoshiaki; Haga, Kazuko; Kojima, Shuichi; Tateishi, Yukihiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Haga, Tatsuya

    2006-01-09

    We have examined whether the long third intracellular loop (i3) of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype has a rigid structure. Circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of M2i3 expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli indicated that M2i3 consists mostly of random coil. In addition, the differential CD spectrum between the M2 and M2deltai3 receptors, the latter of which lacks most of i3 except N- and C-terminal ends, gave no indication of secondary structure. These results suggest that the central part of i3 of the M2 receptor has a flexible structure.

  17. Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility arising from altered resting coupling between the skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel and the type 1 ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Eltit, Jose Miguel; Bannister, Roger A.; Moua, Ong; Altamirano, Francisco; Hopkins, Philip M.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Molinski, Tadeusz F.; López, Jose R.; Beam, Kurt G.; Allen, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility is a dominantly inherited disorder in which volatile anesthetics trigger aberrant Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle and a potentially fatal rise in perioperative body temperature. Mutations causing MH susceptibility have been identified in two proteins critical for excitation–contraction (EC) coupling, the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and CaV1.1, the principal subunit of the L-type Ca2+ channel. All of the mutations that have been characterized previously augment EC coupling and/or increase the rate of L-type Ca2+ entry. The CaV1.1 mutation R174W associated with MH susceptibility occurs at the innermost basic residue of the IS4 voltage-sensing helix, a residue conserved among all CaV channels [Carpenter D, et al. (2009) BMC Med Genet 10:104–115.]. To define the functional consequences of this mutation, we expressed it in dysgenic (CaV1.1 null) myotubes. Unlike previously described MH-linked mutations in CaV1.1, R174W ablated the L-type current and had no effect on EC coupling. Nonetheless, R174W increased sensitivity of Ca2+ release to caffeine (used for MH diagnostic in vitro testing) and to volatile anesthetics. Moreover, in CaV1.1 R174W-expressing myotubes, resting myoplasmic Ca2+ levels were elevated, and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores were partially depleted, compared with myotubes expressing wild-type CaV1.1. Our results indicate that CaV1.1 functions not only to activate RyR1 during EC coupling, but also to suppress resting RyR1-mediated Ca2+ leak from the SR, and that perturbation of CaV1.1 negative regulation of RyR1 leak identifies a unique mechanism that can sensitize muscle cells to MH triggers. PMID:22547813

  18. Molecular Characteristics, mRNA Expression, and Alternative Splicing of a Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shi, Wen-Zhi; Yang, Wen-Jia; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a distinct class of ligand-gated channels controlling the release of calcium from intracellular stores. The emergence of diamide insecticides, which selectively target insect RyRs, has promoted the study of insect RyRs. In the present study, the full-length RyR cDNA (BdRyR) was cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), a serious pest of fruits and vegetables throughout East Asia and the Pacific Rim. The cDNA of BdRyR contains a 15,420-bp open reading frame encoding 5,140 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 582.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.38. BdRyR shows a high level of amino acid sequence identity (78 to 97%) to other insect RyR isoforms. All common structural features of the RyRs are present in the BdRyR, including a well-conserved C-terminal domain containing consensus calcium-binding EF-hands and six transmembrane domains, and a large N-terminal domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that BdRyR was expressed at the lowest and highest levels in egg and adult, respectively, and that the BdRyR expression levels in the third instar larva, pupa and adult were 166.99-, 157.56- and 808.56-fold higher, respectively, than that in the egg. Among different adult body parts, the highest expression level was observed in the thorax compared with the head and abdomen. In addition, four alternative splice sites were identified in the BdRyR gene, with the first, ASI, being located in the central part of the predicted second spore lysis A/RyR domain. Diagnostic PCR analyses revealed that alternative splice variants were generated not only in a tissue-specific manner but also in a developmentally regulated manner. These results lay the foundation for further understanding the structural and functional properties of BdRyR, and the molecular mechanisms for target site resistance in B. dorsalis. PMID:24740254

  19. The Arrhythmogenic Calmodulin p.Phe142Leu Mutation Impairs C-domain Ca2+ Binding but Not Calmodulin-dependent Inhibition of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingjie; Larsen, Kamilla Taunsig; Nani, Alma; Tian, Xixi; Holt, Christian; Wang, Ruiwu; Fill, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A number of point mutations in the intracellular Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) are arrhythmogenic, yet their underlying mechanisms are not clear. These mutations generally decrease Ca2+ binding to CaM and impair inhibition of CaM-regulated Ca2+ channels like the cardiac Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR2), and it appears that attenuated CaM Ca2+ binding correlates with impaired CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Here, we investigated the RyR2 inhibitory action of the CaM p.Phe142Leu mutation (F142L; numbered including the start-Met), which markedly reduces CaM Ca2+ binding. Surprisingly, CaM-F142L had little to no aberrant effect on RyR2-mediated store overload-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells compared with CaM-WT. Furthermore, CaM-F142L enhanced CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition at the single channel level compared with CaM-WT. This is in stark contrast to the actions of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations N54I, D96V, N98S, and D130G, which all diminish CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Thermodynamic analysis showed that apoCaM-F142L converts an endothermal interaction between CaM and the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of RyR2 into an exothermal one. Moreover, NMR spectra revealed that the CaM-F142L-CaMBD interaction is structurally different from that of CaM-WT at low Ca2+. These data indicate a distinct interaction between CaM-F142L and the RyR2 CaMBD, which may explain the stronger CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition by CaM-F142L, despite its reduced Ca2+ binding. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of CaM-dependent regulation of RyR2 as well as the mechanistic effects of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations. The unique properties of the CaM-F142L mutation may provide novel clues on how to suppress excessive RyR2 Ca2+ release by manipulating the CaM-RyR2 interaction. PMID:27927985

  20. Modulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle expressing ryanodine receptor impaired in regulation by calmodulin and S100A1.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Prosser, Benjamin L; Ghassemi, Farshid; Xu, Le; Pasek, Daniel A; Eu, Jerry P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Cannon, Brian R; Wilder, Paul T; Lovering, Richard M; Weber, David; Melzer, Werner; Schneider, Martin F; Meissner, Gerhard

    2011-05-01

    In vitro, calmodulin (CaM) and S100A1 activate the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel (RyR1) at submicromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, whereas at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, CaM inhibits RyR1. One amino acid substitution (RyR1-L3625D) has previously been demonstrated to impair CaM binding and regulation of RyR1. Here we show that the RyR1-L3625D substitution also abolishes S100A1 binding. To determine the physiological relevance of these findings, mutant mice were generated with the RyR1-L3625D substitution in exon 74, which encodes the CaM and S100A1 binding domain of RyR1. Homozygous mutant mice (Ryr1(D/D)) were viable and appeared normal. However, single RyR1 channel recordings from Ryr1(D/D) mice exhibited impaired activation by CaM and S100A1 and impaired CaCaM inhibition. Isolated flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers from Ryr1(D/D) mice had depressed Ca(2+) transients when stimulated by a single action potential. However, during repetitive stimulation, the mutant fibers demonstrated greater relative summation of the Ca(2+) transients. Consistently, in vivo stimulation of tibialis anterior muscles in Ryr1(D/D) mice demonstrated reduced twitch force in response to a single action potential, but greater summation of force during high-frequency stimulation. During repetitive stimulation, Ryr1(D/D) fibers exhibited slowed inactivation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release flux, consistent with increased summation of the Ca(2+) transient and contractile force. Peak Ca(2+) release flux was suppressed at all voltages in voltage-clamped Ryr1(D/D) fibers. The results suggest that the RyR1-L3625D mutation removes both an early activating effect of S100A1 and CaM and delayed suppressing effect of CaCaM on RyR1 Ca(2+) release, providing new insights into CaM and S100A1 regulation of skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling.

  1. Redox modification of ryanodine receptors by mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species contributes to aberrant Ca2+ handling in ageing rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leroy L; Li, Weiyan; Lu, Yichun; Centracchio, Jason; Terentyeva, Radmila; Koren, Gideon; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2013-12-01

    Ageing is associated with a blunted response to sympathetic stimulation and an increased risk of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Aberrant calcium (Ca(2+)) handling is an important contributor to the electrical and contractile dysfunction associated with ageing. Yet, the specific molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal Ca(2+) handling in ageing heart remain poorly understood. In this study, we used ventricular myocytes isolated from young (5-9 months) and old (4-6 years) rabbit hearts to test the hypothesis that changes in Ca(2+) homeostasis are caused by post-translational modification of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) by mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in the ageing heart. Changes in parameters of Ca(2+) handling were determined by measuring cytosolic and intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) dynamics in intact and permeabilized ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy. We also measured age-related changes in ROS production and mitochondria membrane potential using a ROS-sensitive dye and a mitochondrial voltage-sensitive fluorescent indicator, respectively. In permeablized myocytes, ageing did not change SERCA activity and spark frequency but decreased spark amplitude and SR Ca(2+) load suggesting increased RyR activity. Treatment with the antioxidant dithiothreitol reduced RyR-mediated SR Ca(2+) leak in permeabilized myocytes from old rabbit hearts to the level comparable to young. Moreover, myocytes from old rabbits had more depolarized mitochondria membrane potential and increased rate of ROS production. Under β-adrenergic stimulation, Ca(2+) transient amplitude, SR Ca(2+) load, and latency of pro-arrhythmic spontaneous Ca(2+) waves (SCWs) were decreased while RyR-mediated SR Ca(2+) leak was increased in cardiomyocytes from old rabbits. Additionally, with β-adrenergic stimulation, scavenging of mitochondrial ROS in myocytes from old rabbit hearts restored redox status of RyRs, which reduced SR Ca(2+) leak, ablated most

  2. Rank-based genome-wide analysis reveals the association of Ryanodine receptor-2 gene variants with childhood asthma among human populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The standard approach to determine unique or shared genetic factors across populations is to identify risk alleles in one population and investigate replication in others. However, since populations differ in DNA sequence information, allele frequencies, effect sizes, and linkage disequilibrium patterns, SNP association using a uniform stringent threshold on p values may not be reproducible across populations. Here, we developed rank-based methods to investigate shared or population-specific loci and pathways for childhood asthma across individuals of diverse ancestry. We performed genome-wide association studies on 859,790 SNPs genotyped in 527 affected offspring trios of European, African, and Hispanic ancestry using publically available asthma database in the Genotypes and Phenotypes database. Results Rank-based analyses showed that there are shared genetic factors for asthma across populations, more at the gene and pathway levels than at the SNP level. Although the top 1,000 SNPs were not shared, 11 genes (RYR2, PDE4D, CSMD1, CDH13, ROBO2, RBFOX1, PTPRD, NPAS3, PDE1C, SEMA5A, and CTNNA2) mapped by these SNPs were shared across populations. Ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2, a statin response-related gene) showed the strongest association in European (p value = 2.55 × 10−7) and was replicated in African (2.57 × 10−4) and Hispanic (1.18 × 10−3) Americans. Imputation analyses based on the 1000 Genomes Project uncovered additional RYR2 variants associated with asthma. Network and functional ontology analyses revealed that RYR2 is an integral part of dermatological or allergic disorder biological networks, specifically in the functional classes involving inflammatory, eosinophilic, and respiratory diseases. Conclusion Our rank-based genome-wide analysis revealed for the first time an association of RYR2 variants with asthma and replicated previously discovered PDE4D asthma gene across human populations. The replication of top

  3. Interactions of antagonists with subtypes of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Huma; Tovey, Stephen C; Molinski, Tedeusz F; Taylor, Colin W

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) are intracellular Ca2+ channels. Interactions of the commonly used antagonists of IP3Rs with IP3R subtypes are poorly understood. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH IP3-evoked Ca2+ release from permeabilized DT40 cells stably expressing single subtypes of mammalian IP3R was measured using a luminal Ca2+ indicator. The effects of commonly used antagonists on IP3-evoked Ca2+ release and 3H-IP3 binding were characterized. KEY RESULTS Functional analyses showed that heparin was a competitive antagonist of all IP3R subtypes with different affinities for each (IP3R3 > IP3R1 ≥ IP3R2). This sequence did not match the affinities for heparin binding to the isolated N-terminal from each IP3R subtype. 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and high concentrations of caffeine selectively inhibited IP3R1 without affecting IP3 binding. Neither Xestospongin C nor Xestospongin D effectively inhibited IP3-evoked Ca2+ release via any IP3R subtype. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Heparin competes with IP3, but its access to the IP3-binding core is substantially hindered by additional IP3R residues. These interactions may contribute to its modest selectivity for IP3R3. Practicable concentrations of caffeine and 2-APB inhibit only IP3R1. Xestospongins do not appear to be effective antagonists of IP3Rs. PMID:24628114

  4. Selective anxiolytics: are the actions related to partial "agonist" activity or a preferential affinity for benzodiazepine receptor subtypes?

    PubMed

    Gee, K W; Yamamura, H I

    1983-01-01

    Both pharmacological and biochemical evidence support the existence of BZ receptor subtypes. Determination of the molecular basis of BZ receptor heterogeneity requires additional research. The physiological significance of BZ receptor subtypes is not currently understood. One hypothesis presented to explain the unique pharmacological effects of CL 218872 suggests that CL 218872 has preferential affinity for a BZ receptor subtype (i.e., type I sites) that mediates the anxiolytic effects of the clinically active BZs. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed to account for these observations and is based upon the possibility that CL 218872 may act as a partial agonist at the BZ receptor. The partial agonist theory is supported by behavioral evidence and the relatively small differences in affinity of the BZ receptor subtypes discriminated by CL 218872 at physiological temperatures. In addition, in vivo binding studies suggest that occupancy of type II BZ receptor subtypes (i.e., those with low affinity for CL 218872) is necessary for CL 218872 to produce minimal anticonflict activity (4). Unlike certain other neurotransmitter systems, it is difficult to correlate the heterogeneous binding properties of BZ receptor ligands with their agonist/antagonist potential at BZ receptor. For example, CL 218872 discriminates BZ receptor subtypes and acts as an agonist at the BZ receptor. Beta-carbolines such as PCC also discriminate receptor subtypes, yet they act as antagonists at the BZ receptor. Compounding the complexity, neither the nature nor the existence of an endogenous ligand is known. So, the designation of agonist or antagonist effects is made on a purely functional basis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. FLASH interacts with p160 coactivator subtypes and differentially suppresses transcriptional activity of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P

    2004-12-01

    We previously reported that tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor- and Fas-associated FLASH interacts with one of the p160 nuclear receptor coactivators, glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein (GRIP) 1, at its nuclear receptor-binding (NRB) domain, and that inhibits the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by interfering with association of GR and GRIP1. Here, we further examined the specificity of FLASH suppressive effect and the physical/functional interactions between this protein and two other p160 family subtypes. The suppressive effect of FLASH on GR transactivation was observed in several cell lines and on the chromatin-integrated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. FLASH strongly interacted with the NRB domain of the thyroid hormone receptor activator molecule (TRAM) 1, a member of the steroid hormone receptor coactivator (SRC) 3/nuclear receptor coactivator (N-CoA) 3 subtypes, as well as with SRC2/N-CoA2 p160 coactivator GRIP1, while its interaction with SRC1a, one of the SRC1/N-CoA1 proteins, was faint in yeast two-hybrid assays. Accordingly, FLASH strongly suppressed TRAM1- and GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR-stimulated transactivation of the MMTV promoter in HCT116 cells, while it did not affect SRC1a-induced potentiation of transcription. Furthermore, FLASH suppressed androgen- and progesterone receptor-induced transcriptional activity, but did not influence estrogen receptor-induced transactivation, possibly due to their preferential use of p160 coactivators in HCT116 and HeLa cells. Thus, FLASH differentially suppresses steroid hormone receptor-induced transcriptional activity by interfering with their association with SRC2/N-CoA2 and SRC3/N-CoA3 but not with SRC1/N-CoA1.

  6. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in cilia-driven transport and airway epithelial development

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Maike K.; Haberberger, Rainer V.; Hartmann, Petra; Faulhammer, Petra; Lips, Katrin S.; Krain, Benjamin; Wess, Jürgen; Kummer, Wolfgang; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells drives the removal of mucus and particles from the airways. Mucociliary transport and possibly airway epithelial development are governed by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but the precise roles of the subtypes involved are unknown. This issue was addressed by determining cilia-driven particle transport, ciliary beat frequency, and the composition and ultrastructural morphology of the tracheal epithelium in M1–M5 muscarinic receptor gene-deficient mice. Knockout of M3 muscarinic receptors prevented an increase in particle transport speed and ciliary beat frequency in response to muscarine. Furthermore, the ATP response after application of muscarine was blunted. Pretreatment with atropine before application of muscarine restored the response to ATP. Additional knockout of the M2 receptor in these mice partially restored the muscarine effect most likely through the M1 receptor and normalized the ATP response. M1, M4, and M5 receptor deficient mice exhibited normal responses to muscarine. None of the investigated mutant mouse strains had any impairment of epithelial cellular structure or composition. In conclusion, M3 receptors stimulate whereas M2 receptors inhibit cilia-driven particle transport. The M1 receptor increases cilia-driven particle transport if the M3 and M2 receptor are missing. None of the receptors is necessary for epithelial development. PMID:19213795

  7. Pharmacologic study of muscarinic receptor subtypes and arteriolar dilations: a comparison of conducted and local responses.

    PubMed

    Rivers, R J

    1999-03-01

    Arteriolar relaxation caused by the application of muscarinic agonists is mediated by multiple factors. One factor causes dilation only at the point of drug microapplication (local response), and a second factor causes responses remote (500 microm away) from the site of application (conducted response). This study was performed to determine if different muscarinic subtypes mediate the two responses. Arterioles of anesthetized hamster cheek pouch were studied with videomicroscopy. Muscarinic antagonists methscopolamine, scopolamine, pirenzepine, 4-DAMP (4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide), and AFDX-116 [(11-2[[2-[(diethylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl]-5, 11-dihydro-6H-pyrido [2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one)] were cumulatively applied, and the K(B) for each antagonist was determined for the local and conducted responses caused by methacholine microapplication (10(-4) M, 5 s). The pK(B) (local, conducted) were not significantly different for the two responses when using scopolamine (10.5, 10.4). When the antagonist AFDX-116 (5.6, 6.3), selective for muscarinic receptor (m2) subtype was applied, the K(B) was greater for the conducted response. The pK(B) was greater, however, for the local response when the m1 subtype-selective pirenzepine (7.7, 6.9) or m3 subtype-selective 4-DAMP (10.1, 9.8) was applied. Thus the antagonist pK(B) ratio for on the local and conducted responses depends on the subtype selectivity of the antagonist. These data strongly suggest that different receptors are involved in the two responses.

  8. Pharmacological identification of cholinergic receptor subtypes on Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Cole A; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; English, Connor; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster heart is a popular model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. Progress has been made in understanding the role of endogenous compounds in regulating cardiac function in this model. It is well characterized that common neurotransmitters act on many peripheral and non-neuronal tissues as they flow through the hemolymph of insects. Many of these neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), have been shown to act directly on the D. melanogaster larval heart. ACh is a primary neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates and at the neuromuscular junctions on skeletal and cardiac tissue. In insects, ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of sensory neurons and is also prominent in the CNS. A full understanding regarding the regulation of the Drosophila cardiac physiology by the cholinergic system remains poorly understood. Here we use semi-intact D. melanogaster larvae to study the pharmacological profile of cholinergic receptor subtypes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), in modulating heart rate (HR). Cholinergic receptor agonists, nicotine and muscarine both increase HR, while nAChR agonist clothianidin exhibits no significant effect when exposed to an open preparation at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In addition, both nAChR and mAChR antagonists increase HR as well but also display capabilities of blocking agonist actions. These results provide evidence that both of these receptor subtypes display functional significance in regulating the larval heart's pacemaker activity.

  9. Coexpression of striatal dopamine receptor subtypes and excitatory amino acid subunits.

    PubMed

    Ariano, M A; Larson, E R; Noblett, K L; Sibley, D R; Levine, M S

    1997-08-01

    The striatal cellular coexpression patterns for the D(1A) and D2 dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and the ionotropic excitatory amino acid (EAA) subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-R1) and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) (GluR1 and GluR2/3) receptor subunits were examined morphologically. Their coincidence was assessed by visualization of mRNA transcripts, localization of encoded receptor proteins, and binding analysis using concurrently paired methods of fluorescence detection. The findings indicated that 1) mRNA transcripts for both receptor systems were detected in the medium-sized neuron population, and the distribution of receptor message closely reflected protein and binding patterns, with the exception of the GluR1 subunit; 2) both DA receptor mRNA transcripts were coexpressed with each ionotropic EAA receptor subunit examined and with each other, and NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits also showed coincident expression; 3) D(1A) DA receptor protein was detected in neurons which coexpressed EAA subunit proteins; and 4) GluR2/3 and NMDA-R1 subunit proteins were coexpressed in medium-sized neurons which also demonstrated D2 DA receptor binding sites. These findings suggest morphological receptor "promiscuity" since the coexpression patterns between DA and EAA receptors were found in all permutations. The results provide a spatial framework for physiological findings describing functional interactions between the two DA receptor types and between specific DA and EAA receptors in the striatum.

  10. Electrophysiology-Based Assays to Detect Subtype-Selective Modulation of Human Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Glenn E.; Fedorov, Nikolai B.; Kuryshev, Yuri A.; Liu, Zhiqi; Orr, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-31) gave the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the responsibility for regulating tobacco products. Nicotine is the primary addictive component of tobacco and its effects can be modulated by additional ingredients in manufactured products. Nicotine acts by mimicking the neurotransmitter acetylcholine on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which function as ion channels in cholinergic modulation of neurotransmission. Subtypes within the family of neuronal nAChRs are defined by their α- and β-subunit composition. The subtype-selective profiles of tobacco constituents are largely unknown, but could be essential for understanding the physiological effects of tobacco products. In this report, we report the development and validation of electrophysiology-based high-throughput screens (e-HTS) for human nicotinic subtypes, α3β4, α3β4α5, α4β2, and α7 stably expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. Assessment of agonist sensitivity and acute desensitization gave results comparable to those obtained by conventional manual patch clamp electrophysiology assays. The potency of reference antagonists for inhibition of the receptor channels and selectivity of positive allosteric modulators also were very similar between e-HTS and conventional manual patch voltage clamp data. Further validation was obtained in pilot screening of a library of FDA-approved drugs that identified α7 subtype-selective positive allosteric modulation by novel compounds. These assays provide new tools for profiling of nicotinic receptor selectivity. PMID:27505073

  11. Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes is caused by their sequestration/internalization.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-10-01

    Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (hm2 receptors) stably expressed in chinese hamster ovary cells was measured as decreases in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity in membrane preparations after pre-treatment of cells with carbamylcholine. The extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was found to decrease to 64% following pretreatment of cells with 10 microM carbamylcholine for 30 min, and under the same conditions 51-59% of hm2 receptors were sequestered/internalized as assessed by decreases in the [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity on the cell surface. A similar reduction in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was observed by pretreatment of cells with 5 nM propylbenzylylcholine mustard, which irreversibly bound to and inactivated 58% of the hm2 receptors. When the cells were pretreated with 10 microM carbamylcholine in the presence of 0.32 M sucrose, which is known to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis, no sequestration/internalization of hm2 receptors was observed, and the extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity did not change. These results indicate that desensitization of hm2 receptors may be caused by reduction of receptor number on the cell surface through sequestration/internalization rather than by loss of the function of receptors.

  12. Pressure-selective modulation of NMDA receptor subtypes may reflect 3D structural differences.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; Kuttner, Yosef Y; Levy, Shiri; Mor, Merav; Hollmann, Michael; Grossman, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    Professional deep-water divers exposed to high pressure (HP) above 1.1 MPa suffer from High Pressure Neurological Syndrome (HPNS), which is associated with CNS hyperexcitability. We have previously reported that HP augments N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) synaptic responses, increases neuronal excitability, and potentially causes irreversible neuronal damage. We now report that HP (10.1 MPa) differentially affects eight specific NMDAR subtypes. GluN1(1a or 1b) was co-expressed with one of the four GluN2(A-D) subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. HP increased ionic currents (measured by two electrode voltage clamps) of one subtype, reduced the current in four others, and did not affect the current in the remaining three. 3D theoretical modeling was aimed at revealing specific receptor domains involved with HP selectivity. In light of the information on the CNS spatial distribution of the different NMDAR subtypes, we conclude that the NMDAR's diverse responses to HP may lead to selective HP effects on different brain regions. These discoveries call for further and more specific investigation of deleterious HP effects and suggest the need for a re-evaluation of deep-diving safety guidelines.

  13. α6β2*-subtype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are more sensitive than α4β2*-subtype receptors to regulation by chronic nicotine administration

    PubMed Central

    Marks, MJ; Grady, SR; Salminen, O; Paley, MA; Wageman, CR; McIntosh, JM; Whiteaker, P

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) of the α6β2* subtype (where * indicates the possible presence of additional subunits) are prominently expressed on dopaminergic neurons. Because of this, their role in tobacco use and nicotine dependence has received much attention. Previous studies have demonstrated that α6β2*-nAChR are downregulated following chronic nicotine exposure (unlike other subtypes that have been investigated – most prominently α4β2* nAChR). This study examines, for the first time, effects across a comprehensive chronic nicotine dose range. Chronic nicotine dose-responses and quantitative ligand-binding autoradiography were used to define nicotine sensitivity of changes in α4β2*-nAChR and α6β2*-nAChR expression. α6β2*-nAChR downregulation by chronic nicotine exposure in dopaminergic and optic-tract nuclei was ≈three-fold more sensitive than upregulation of α4β2*-nAChR. In contrast, nAChR-mediated [3H]-dopamine release from dopamine-terminal region synaptosomal preparations changed only in response to chronic treatment with high nicotine doses, while dopaminergic parameters (transporter expression and activity, dopamine receptor expression) were largely unchanged. Functional measures in olfactory tubercle preparations were made for the first time; both nAChR expression levels and nAChR-mediated functional measures changed differently between striatum and olfactory tubercles. These results show that functional changes measured using synaptosomal [3H]-DA release are primarily due to changes in nAChR, rather than in dopaminergic, function. PMID:24661093

  14. Inhibition of RNA synthesis by bradykinin involves both the B1 and B2 receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yau, L; Pinsk, M; Zahradka, P

    1996-04-01

    The efficacy of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in the treatment of heart disease is due in part to the accumulation of bradykinin (BK). Since BK can exert its effect by influencing cell proliferation, we chose to study the effect of BK on the growth of A10 vascular smooth muscle cells. Ligand binding studies to determine which BK receptor subtypes are present on A10 cells showed that both B1 and B2 receptors were present in approximately equal numbers. Examination of RNA synthesis demonstrated that BK inhibits uridine incorporation in a dose-dependent manner. This decrease in RNA synthesis was blocked by both B1 and B2 receptor antagonists, as well as by addition of indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. The latter result suggested that prostaglandins mediate the biological actions of BK. Consequently, we examined the direct effect of two prostaglandins, PGE2 and PGI2 (prostacyclin), on A10 cells. PGE2 caused a decrease in RNA synthesis, thus mimicking the effect of BK, while PGI2 did not. Therefore, the inhibition of RNA synthesis in A10 vascular smooth muscle cells by BK requires both B1 and B2 receptor subtypes and this action of BK is apparently mediated by de novo synthesis of prostaglandins.

  15. Role of catecholamines and serotonin receptor subtypes in nefopam-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Girard, Philippe; Coppé, Marie-Claude; Verniers, Danielle; Pansart, Yannick; Gillardin, Jean-Marie

    2006-09-01

    The non-opiate analgesic nefopam has been shown to inhibit monoamines uptake, but little is known about receptor subtypes effectively involved in its analgesic effect. In vitro binding assays yielded the following measures of affinity (IC(50)): serotonergic 5-HT(2C) (1.4 microM), 5-HT(2A) (5.1 microM), 5-HT(3) (22.3 microM), 5-HT(1B) (41.7 microM), 5-HT(1A) (64.9 microM), adrenergic alpha(1) (15.0 microM) and dopaminergic D(1) (100 microM). Subcutaneous nefopam administration dose-dependently inhibited pain in acetic acid-induced writhing (1-30 mg kg(-1)) and formalin (1-10 mg kg(-1)) tests in the mouse. Pretreatments with adrenergic alpha(1) (prazosin) and alpha(2) (yohimbine), and serotonergic 5-HT(1B) (GR127935) receptor antagonists significantly increased the nefopam ED(50) in the writhing test. The serotonergic 5-HT(2C) (RS102221) and the dopaminergic D(2) (sulpiride) receptor antagonists inhibited nefopam antinociception in the formalin test. However, in both tests, nefopam analgesic activity was not modified by the following receptor antagonists: dopaminergic D(1) (SCH23390), serotonergic 5-HT(1A) (NAN-190, WAY100635), 5-HT(2A) (R96544, ketanserin), 5-HT(3) (tropisetron), and 5-HT(4) (SDZ205557). In conclusion, nefopam analgesic activity could be modulated by the adrenergic alpha(1) and alpha(2) receptors, the dopaminergic D(2) receptors, and the serotonergic 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(2C) receptor subtypes.

  16. The diversity of GABAA receptors. Pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of GABAA channel subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hevers, W; Lüddens, H

    1998-08-01

    The amino acid gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) prevails in the CNS as an inhibitory neurotransmitter that mediates most of its effects through fast GABA-gated Cl(-)-channels (GABAAR). Molecular biology uncovered the complex subunit architecture of this receptor channel, in which a pentameric assembly derived from five of at least 17 mammalian subunits, grouped in the six classes alpha, beta, gamma, delta, sigma and epsilon, permits a vast number of putative receptor isoforms. The subunit composition of a particular receptor determines the specific effects of allosterical modulators of the GABAARs like benzodiazepines (BZs), barbiturates, steroids, some convulsants, polyvalent cations, and ethanol. To understand the physiology and diversity of GABAARs, the native isoforms have to be identified by their localization in the brain and by their pharmacology. In heterologous expression systems, channels require the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits in order to mimic the full repertoire of native receptor responses to drugs, with the BZ pharmacology being determined by the particular alpha and gamma subunit variants. Little is known about the functional properties of the beta, delta, and epsilon subunit classes and only a few receptor subtype-specific substances like loreclezole and furosemide are known that enable the identification of defined receptor subtypes. We will summarize the pharmacology of putative receptor isoforms and emphasize the characteristics of functional channels. Knowledge of the complex pharmacology of GABAARs might eventually enable site-directed drug design to further our understanding of GABA-related disorders and of the complex interaction of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms in neuronal processing.

  17. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) indicates that association with the type I ryanodine receptor (RyR1) causes reorientation of multiple cytoplasmic domains of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) α(1S) subunit.

    PubMed

    Polster, Alexander; Ohrtman, Joshua D; Beam, Kurt G; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2012-11-30

    The skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) in the t-tubular membrane serves as the Ca(2+) channel and voltage sensor for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, triggering Ca(2+) release via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The two proteins appear to be physically linked, and both the α(1S) and β(1a) subunits of the DHPR are essential for EC coupling. Within α(1S), cytoplasmic domains of importance include the I-II loop (to which β(1a) binds), the II-III and III-IV loops, and the C terminus. However, the spatial relationship of these domains to one another has not been established. Here, we have taken the approach of measuring FRET between fluorescent proteins inserted into pairs of α(1S) cytoplasmic domains. Expression of these constructs in dyspedic (RyR1 null) and dysgenic (α(1S) null) myotubes was used to test for function and targeting to plasma membrane/SR junctions and to test whether the presence of RyR1 caused altered FRET. We found that in the absence of RyR1, measureable FRET occurred between the N terminus and C terminus (residue 1636), and between the II-III loop (residue 626) and both the N and C termini; the I-II loop (residue 406) showed weak FRET with the II-III loop but not with the N terminus. Association with RyR1 caused II-III loop FRET to decrease with the C terminus and increase with the N terminus and caused I-II loop FRET to increase with both the II-III loop and N terminus. Overall, RyR1 appears to cause a substantial reorientation of the cytoplasmic α(1S) domains consistent with their becoming more closely packed.

  18. Common genetic variation in adiponectin, leptin, and leptin receptor and association with breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Nyante, Sarah J; Gammon, Marilie D; Kaufman, Jay S; Bensen, Jeannette T; Lin, Dan Yu; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Hu, Yijuan; He, Qianchuan; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C

    2011-09-01

    Adipocytokines are produced by visceral fat, and levels may be associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in adipocytokine genes adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), and the leptin receptor (LEPR) were associated with basal-like or luminal A breast cancer subtypes. 104 candidate and tag SNPs were genotyped in 1776 of 2022 controls and 1972 (200 basal-like, 679 luminal A) of 2311 cases from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case-control study of whites and African Americans. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry. Genotype odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Haplotype ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using Hapstat. Interactions with waist-hip ratio were evaluated using a multiplicative interaction term. Ancestry was estimated from 144 ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and included in models to control for population stratification. Candidate SNPs LEPR K109R (rs1137100) and LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) were positively associated with luminal A breast cancer, whereas ADIPOQ +45 T/G (rs2241766), ADIPOQ +276 G/T (rs1501299), and LEPR K656N (rs8129183) were not associated with either subtype. Few patterns were observed among tag SNPs, with the exception of 3 LEPR SNPs (rs17412175, rs9436746, and rs9436748) that were in moderate LD and inversely associated with basal-like breast cancer. However, no SNP associations were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Haplotypes in LEP and LEPR were associated with both basal-like and luminal A subtypes. There was no evidence of interaction with waist-hip ratio. Data suggest associations between LEPR candidate SNPs and luminal A breast cancer in the CBCS and LEPR intron 2 tag SNPs and basal-like breast cancer. Replication in additional studies where breast cancer subtypes have been defined is necessary to confirm these

  19. Common genetic variation in adiponectin, leptin, and leptin receptor and association with breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Nyante, Sarah J.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Lin, Dan Yu; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Hu, Yijuan; He, Qianchuan; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Adipocytokines are produced by visceral fat, and levels may be associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in adipocytokine genes adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), and the leptin receptor (LEPR) were associated with basal-like or luminal A breast cancer subtypes. 104 candidate and tag SNPs were genotyped in 1776 of 2022 controls and 1972 (200 basal-like, 679 luminal A) of 2311 cases from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case–control study of whites and African Americans. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry. Genotype odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Haplotype ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using Hapstat. Interactions with waist-hip ratio were evaluated using a multiplicative interaction term. Ancestry was estimated from 144 ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and included in models to control for population stratification. Candidate SNPs LEPR K109R (rs1137100) and LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) were positively associated with luminal A breast cancer, whereas ADIPOQ +45 T/G (rs2241766), ADIPOQ +276 G/T (rs1501299), and LEPR K656N (rs8129183) were not associated with either subtype. Few patterns were observed among tag SNPs, with the exception of 3 LEPR SNPs (rs17412175, rs9436746, and rs9436748) that were in moderate LD and inversely associated with basal-like breast cancer. However, no SNP associations were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Haplotypes in LEP and LEPR were associated with both basal-like and luminal A subtypes. There was no evidence of interaction with waist-hip ratio. Data suggest associations between LEPR candidate SNPs and luminal A breast cancer in the CBCS and LEPR intron 2 tag SNPs and basal-like breast cancer. Replication in additional studies where breast cancer subtypes have been defined is necessary to confirm these

  20. The SOL-2/Neto auxiliary protein modulates the function of AMPA-subtype ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Mellem, Jerry E; Jensen, Michael; Brockie, Penelope J; Walker, Craig S; Hoerndli, Frédéric J; Hauth, Linda; Madsen, David M; Maricq, Andres V

    2012-09-06

    The neurotransmitter glutamate mediates excitatory synaptic transmission by gating ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). AMPA receptors (AMPARs), a subtype of iGluR, are strongly implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. We previously discovered two classes of AMPAR auxiliary proteins in C. elegans that modify receptor kinetics and thus change synaptic transmission. Here, we have identified another auxiliary protein, SOL-2, a CUB-domain protein that associates with both the related auxiliary subunit SOL-1 and with the GLR-1 AMPAR. In sol-2 mutants, behaviors dependent on glutamatergic transmission are disrupted, GLR-1-mediated currents are diminished, and GLR-1 desensitization and pharmacology are modified. Remarkably, a secreted variant of SOL-1 delivered in trans can rescue sol-1 mutants, and this rescue depends on in cis expression of SOL-2. Finally, we demonstrate that SOL-1 and SOL-2 have an ongoing role in the adult nervous system to control AMPAR-mediated currents.

  1. PET imaging of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Shan, Hong; Conti, Peter; Li, Zibo

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) belong to a family of G-protein coupled receptors involved in the modulation of fast excitatory transmission. In particular, the subtype-5 receptor (mGluR5) was found to be an attractive target for the treatment and diagnosis of variety of psychiatric and neurological disease including anxiety, depression, epilepsy, drug addiction, and Parkinson's disease. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive imaging technique that holds great potential for the diagnosis of a brain disorder. In the study published in the American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, a 18F labelled PET probe was developed targeting mGluR5. This paper represents the efforts and challenges on the design and development of novel PET tracers for mGluR5 imaging. PMID:23133800

  2. Growth regulation of primary human keratinocytes by prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP3 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Konger, R L; Malaviya, R; Pentland, A P

    1998-02-04

    We examined the contribution of specific EP receptors in regulating cell growth. By RT-PCR and northern hybridization, adult human keratinocytes express mRNA for three PGE2 receptor subtypes associated with cAMP signaling (EP2, EP3, and small amounts of EP4). In actively growing, non-confluent primary keratinocyte cultures, the EP2 and EP4 selective agonists, 11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1, caused complete reversal of indomethacin-induced growth inhibition. The EP3/EP2 agonist (misoprostol), and the EP1/EP2 agonist (17-phenyl trinor PGE2), showed less activity. Similar results were obtained with agonist-induced cAMP formation. The ability of exogenous dibutyryl cAMP to completely reverse indomethacin-induced growth inhibition support the conclusion that growth stimulation occurs via an EP2 and/or EP4 receptor-adenylyl cyclase coupled response. In contrast, activation of EP3 receptors by sulprostone, which is virtually devoid of agonist activity at EP2 or EP4 receptors, inhibited bromodeoxyuridine uptake in indomethacin-treated cells up to 30%. Although human EP3 receptor variants have been shown in other cell types to markedly inhibit cAMP formation via a pertussis toxin sensitive mechanisms, EP3 receptor activation and presumably growth inhibition was independent of adenylyl cyclase, suggesting activation of other signaling pathways.

  3. Alterations of muscarinic receptor subtypes in pathways relating to memory: Effects of lesions and transplants

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, V.L.

    1989-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors have been classified pharmacologically into two distinct populations designated muscarinic type-one (M-1) and mscarinic type-two (M-2). The semiquantitative technique of receptor autoradiography was used to examine the anatomical and cellular distribution, and densities of M-1 and M-2 receptors in the rate brain. Muscarinic receptors were labeled with the classical antagonist ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). Differentiation of the muscarinic subtypes was accomplished by competition studies of ({sup 3}H)QNB against the relatively selective M-1 antagonist pirenzepine (PZ), and the relatively selective M-2 antagonist, AFDX-116. In addition, M-1 and M-2 receptors were directly labeled with ({sup 3}H)PZ and ({sup 3}H)AFDX-116, respectively. Cholinergic pathways from the large cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) to the cortex and from the medial septum (MS) to the hippocampus were examined by lesioning with the selective cholinergic neurotoxin, AF64A. Bilateral cerebral cortical infarction was performed in order to analyze potential changes in muscarinic receptor populations in subcortical structures that are sensitive to cortical infarction. Finally, the response of muscarinic receptors to fetal septodiagonal band transplants in the deafferentated hippocampus was examined.

  4. Pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating vasoconstriction of human umbilical vein

    PubMed Central

    Pujol Lereis, Virginia Andrea; Hita, Francisco Javier; Gobbi, Mauro Darío; Verdi, Marcela Gomez; Rodriguez, María Cecilia; Rothlin, Rodolfo Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The present study attempted to pharmacologically characterize the muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating contraction of human umbilical vein (HUV). HUV rings were mounted in organ baths and concentration–response curves were constructed for acetylcholine (ACh) (pEC50: 6.16±0.04; maximum response 80.00±1.98% of the responses induced by serotonin 10 μM). The absence of endothelium did not modify the contractile responses of ACh in this tissue. The role of cholinesterases was evaluated: neither neostigmine (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) nor iso-OMPA (butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) modified ACh responses. When both enzymes were simultaneously inhibited, a significantly but little potentiation was observed (control: pEC50 6.33±0.03; double inhibition: pEC50 6.57±0.05). Atropine, nonselective muscarinic receptors antagonist, inhibited ACh-induced contraction (pKB 9.67). The muscarinic receptors antagonists pirenzepine (M1), methoctramine (M2) and pFHHSiD (M3) also antagonized responses to ACh. The affinity values estimated for these antagonists against responses evoked by ACh were 7.58, 6.78 and 7.94, respectively. On the other hand, PD 102807 (M4 selective muscarinic receptors antagonist) was ineffective against ACh-induced contraction. In presence of a blocking concentration of pirenzepine, pFHHSiFD produced an additional antagonism activity on ACh-induced responses. The M1 muscarinic receptors agonist McN-A-343 produced similar maximum but less potent responses than ACh in HUV. The calculated pA2 for pirenzepine against McN-A-343 induced responses was 8.54. In conclusion, the data obtained in this study demonstrate the role of M1 muscarinic receptor subtypes and suggest the involvement of M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in ACh-induced vasoconstriction in HUV rings. In addition, the vasomotor activity evoked by ACh does not seem to be modulated by endothelial factors, and their enzymatic degradation appears to have little functional relevance in this

  5. Guanylpirenzepine distinguishes between neuronal ml and m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Monferini, E.; Cereda, E.; Ladinsky, H.; Donetti, A.; Giraldo, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Guanylpirenzepine, a polar, non-quaternary analog of pirenzepine, exhibited a novel binding behavior in rat brain regions: in competition binding experiments against (3H)pirenzepine labeling the M1 receptor in membranes from cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum, the compound, differently from pirenzepine, displayed heterogeneous binding curves. Computer assisted analysis of these curves, evidenced the existence of two populations of binding sites: a large proportion (84-89%) of high affinity receptors (KH = 64-92 nM) and a remainder with very low affinity (KL = 19-28 microM). Like pirenzepine, guanylpirenzepine showed low affinity for the glandular M3 and the cardiac M2 receptors when (3H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors in membranes from these two tissues; affinity values for guanylpirenzepine were 1336 and 5790 nM respectively, vs 323 and 683 nM for pirenzepine. We conclude that guanylpirenzepine is able to discriminate between m1 and m4 receptor subtypes and may represent a new tool for deeper studies on muscarinic receptors classification.

  6. Cloning, functional expression, and characterization of the human prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Bastien, L; Sawyer, N; Grygorczyk, R; Metters, K M; Adam, M

    1994-04-22

    A cDNA clone encoding the human prostaglandin (PG) E2 receptor EP2 subtype has been isolated from a human lung cDNA library. The 1.9-kilobase pair cDNA, hEP2, encodes for a 488-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 53,115 and has the seven putative transmembrane domains characteristic of G protein-coupled receptors. The specific binding of [3H]PGE2 to COS cell membranes transfected with the hEP2 cDNA was of high affinity with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 1 nM and the rank order of potency for prostaglandins in competition for [3H]PGE2 specific binding was PGE1 = PGE2 > iloprost > PGF2 alpha > PGD2. In competition studies using more selective prostanoid-receptor agonist and antagonists, the [3H]PGE2 specific binding was competed by MB28767, an EP3 agonist, but not by the EP1-preferring antagonists AH6809 and SC19220, or by the EP2 agonist butaprost. Electrophysiological studies of Xenopus oocytes co-injected with hEP2 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (cAMP-activated Cl- channel) cDNAs detected PGE2-specific inward Cl- currents, demonstrating that the hEP2 cDNA encoded a functional receptor which produced an increase in cAMP levels. Thus, we have cloned the human EP2 receptor subtype which is functionally coupled to increase in cAMP. Northern blot analysis showed that hEP2 is expressed as a 3.8-kilobase mRNA in a number of human tissues with the highest expression levels present in the small intestine.

  7. A Molecular Determinant of Subtype-Specific Desensitization in Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alsaloum, Matthew; Kazi, Rashek; Gan, Quan; Amin, Johansen

    2016-01-01

    AMPA and NMDA receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels that mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission throughout the nervous system. In the continual presence of glutamate, AMPA and NMDA receptors containing the GluN2A or GluN2B subunit enter into a nonconducting, desensitized state that can impact synaptic responses and glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. The process of desensitization is dramatically different between subtypes, but the basis for these differences is unknown. We generated an extensive sequence alignment of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) from diverse animal phyla and identified a highly conserved motif, which we termed the “hydrophobic box,” located at the extracellular interface of transmembrane helices. A single position in the hydrophobic box differed between mammalian AMPA and NMDA receptors. Surprisingly, we find that an NMDAR-to-AMPAR exchange mutation at this position in the rat GluN2A or GluN2B subunit had a dramatic and highly specific effect on NMDAR desensitization, making it AMPAR-like. In contrast, a reverse exchange mutation in AMPARs had minimal effects on desensitization. These experiments highlight differences in desensitization between iGluR subtypes and the highly specific contribution of the GluN2 subunit to this process. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Rapid communication between cells in the nervous system depends on ion channels that are directly activated by neurotransmitter molecules. Here, we studied ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), which are ion channels activated by the neurotransmitter glutamate. By comparing the sequences of a vast number of iGluR proteins from diverse animal species, assisted by available structural information, we identified a highly conserved motif. We showed that a single amino acid difference in this motif between mammalian iGluR subtypes has dramatic effects on receptor function. These results have implications in both the evolution of synaptic function, as well as the role of i

  8. GABAA receptor subtypes in the mouse brain: Regional mapping and diazepam receptor occupancy by in vivo [(18)F]flumazenil PET.

    PubMed

    Müller Herde, Adrienne; Benke, Dietmar; Ralvenius, William T; Mu, Linjing; Schibli, Roger; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Krämer, Stefanie D

    2017-04-15

    Classical benzodiazepines, which are widely used as sedatives, anxiolytics and anticonvulsants, exert their therapeutic effects through interactions with heteropentameric GABAA receptors composed of two α, two β and one γ2 subunit. Their high affinity binding site is located at the interface between the γ2 and the adjacent α subunit. The α-subunit gene family consists of six members and receptors can be homomeric or mixed with respect to the α-subunits. Previous work has suggested that benzodiazepine binding site ligands with selectivity for individual GABAA receptor subtypes, as defined by the benzodiazepine-binding α subunit, may have fewer side effects and may even be effective in diseases, such as schizophrenia, autism or chronic pain, that do not respond well to classical benzodiazepines. The distributions of the individual α subunits across the CNS have been extensively characterized. However, as GABAA receptors may contain two different α subunits, the distribution of the subunits does not necessarily reflect the distribution of receptor subtypes with respect to benzodiazepine pharmacology. In the present study, we have used in vivo [(18)F]flumazenil PET and in vitro [(3)H]flumazenil autoradiography in combination with GABAA receptor point-mutated mice to characterize the distribution of the two most prevalent GABAA receptor subtypes (α1 and α2) throughout the mouse brain. The results were in agreement with published in vitro data. High levels of α2-containing receptors were found in brain regions of the neuronal network of anxiety. The α1/α2 subunit combinations were predictable from the individual subunit levels. In additional experiments, we explored in vivo [(18)F]flumazenil PET to determine the degree of receptor occupancy at GABAA receptor subtypes following oral administration of diazepam. The dose to occupy 50% of sensitive receptors, independent of the receptor subtype(s), was 1-2mg/kg, in agreement with published data from ex vivo

  9. Somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 and 4 affect seizure susceptibility and hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission in mice.

    PubMed

    Moneta, D; Richichi, C; Aliprandi, M; Dournaud, P; Dutar, P; Billard, J M; Carlo, A S; Viollet, C; Hannon, J P; Fehlmann, D; Nunn, C; Hoyer, D; Epelbaum, J; Vezzani, A

    2002-09-01

    We have investigated the role of somatostatin receptor subtypes sst2 and sst4 in limbic seizures and glutamate-mediated neurotransmission in mouse hippocampus. As compared to wild-type littermates, homozygous mice lacking sst2 receptors showed a 52% reduction in EEG ictal activity induced by intrahippocampal injection of 30 ng kainic acid (P < 0.05). The number of behavioural tonic-clonic seizures was reduced by 50% (P < 0.01) and the time to onset of seizures was doubled on average (P < 0.05). Seizure-associated neurodegeneration was found in the injected hippocampus (CA1, CA3 and hilar interneurons) and sporadically in the ipsilateral latero-dorsal thalamus. This occurred to a similar extent in wild-type and sst2 knock-out mice. Intrahippocampal injection of three selective sst2 receptor agonists in wild-type mice (Octreotide, BIM 23120 and L-779976, 1.5-6.0 nmol) did not affect kainate seizures while the same compounds significantly reduced seizures in rats. L-803087 (5 nmol), a selective sst4 receptor agonist, doubled seizure activity in wild-type mice on average. Interestingly, this effect was blocked by 3 nmol octreotide. It was determined, in both radioligand binding and cAMP accumulation, that octreotide had no direct agonist or antagonist action at mouse sst4 receptors expressed in CCl39 cells, up to micromolar concentrations. In hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, octreotide (2 micro m) did not modify AMPA-mediated synaptic responses while facilitation occurred with L-803087 (2 micro m). Similarly to what was observed in seizures, the effect of L-803087 was reduced by octreotide. In hippocampal slices from sst2 knock-out mice, both octreotide and L-803087 were ineffective on synaptic responses. Our findings show that, unlike in rats, sst2 receptors in mice do not mediate anticonvulsant effects. Moreover, stimulation of sst4 receptors in the hippocampus of wild-type mice induced excitatory effects which appeared to depend on the presence of sst2

  10. Selective blockade of the endothelin subtype A receptor decreases early atherosclerosis in hamsters fed cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Kowala, M. C.; Rose, P. M.; Stein, P. D.; Goller, N.; Recce, R.; Beyer, S.; Valentine, M.; Barton, D.; Durham, S. K.

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that endothelin and its receptors may be involved in atherogenesis. To test this hypothesis, cholesterol-fed hamsters were treated with a selective endothelin subtype A (ETA) receptor antagonist BMS-182874. Characterization of hamster atherosclerotic plaques indicated that they contained a fibrous cap of smooth muscle cells, large macrophage-foam cells, and epitopes of oxidized low density lipoprotein. Messenger RNA for both ETA and ETB receptors was detected in aortic endothelial cells, in medial smooth muscle cells, and in macrophage-foam cells and smooth muscle cells of the fibro-fatty plaques. BMS-182874 inhibited the endothelin-1-induced pressor response whereas the depressor effect was unaltered, suggesting that vascular ETA receptors were selectively blocked in vivo. In hyperlipidemic hamsters, BMS-182874 decreased the area of the fatty streak by reducing the number and size of macrophage-foam cells. The results indicated that ETA receptors and thus endothelin promoted the early inflammatory phase of atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7717449

  11. Positron-labeled dopamine agonists for probing the high affinity states of dopamine subtype 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dah-Ren; Narendran, Raj; Laruelle, Marc

    2005-01-01

    It is well documented that guanidine nucleotide-coupled dopamine subtype 2 receptors (D2) are configured in high and low affinity states for the dopamine agonist in vitro. However, it is still unclear whether these functional states exist in vivo. We hypothesized that positron-labeled D2 agonist and Positron Emission Tomography can be used to probe these functional states noninvasively. Recently, we demonstrated in nonhuman primates that N-[11C]propyl-norapomorphine (NPA), a full D2 agonist, is a suitable tracer for imaging the high affinity states of D2 receptors in vivo. We also developed kinetic modeling method to derive receptor parameters, such as binding potential (BP) and specific uptake ratios (V3''). When coupled with a dopamine releasing drug, amphetamine, NPA was found to be more sensitive than antagonist tracers, such as [11C]raclopride (RAC), to endogenous dopamine concentration changes (by about 42%). This finding suggests that NPA is a superior tracer for reporting endogenous DA concentration. In addition, the difference of the BP or V3'' of NPA and RAC under control and amphetamine challenge conditions could be used to estimate the functional states of D2 receptors in vivo. On the basis of our findings and the assumptions that NPA binds only to the high affinity states and RAC binds equally to both affinity states, we proposed that about 70% of the D2 receptors are configured in the high affinity states in vivo.

  12. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Subtypes Differentially Regulate Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wamhoff, Brian R.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Macdonald, Timothy L.; Owens, Gary K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in acute vascular injury and smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation is not completely resolved. Methods and Results S1P receptor antagonists were used to test the hypothesis that specific S1P receptor subtypes differentially regulate SMC phenotypic modulation. In response to acute balloon injury of the rat carotid artery, S1P1/S1P3 receptor mRNA levels were transiently increased at 48 hours whereas S1P2 receptor expression was decreased. S1P2 expression was reinduced and increased at 7 to 10 days postinjury. Daily intraperitoneal injection of the S1P1/S1P3 antagonist VPC44116 decreased neointimal hyperplasia by ≈50%. In vitro, pharmacological inhibition of S1P1/S1P3 receptors with VPC25239 attenuated S1P-induced proliferation of rat aortic SMCs. Conversely, inhibition of S1P2 with JTE013 potentiated S1P-induced proliferation. Inhibition of S1P1/S1P3 resulted in S1P-induced activation of the SMC differentiation marker genes SMα-actin and SMMHC, whereas inhibition of S1P2 attenuated this response. S1P2-dependent activation of SMα-actin and SMMHC was shown to be mediated by L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and subsequent RhoA/Rho kinase– dependent SRF enrichment of CArG box promoter regions. Conclusion Results provide evidence that S1P1/S1P3 receptors promote, whereas S1P2 receptors antagonize, SMC proliferation and phenotypic modulation in vitro in response to S1P, or in vivo after vascular injury. PMID:18535287

  13. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptor subtypes and their role in representational memory

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to examine the distribution of muscarinic receptors in rat brain slices. Agonist and selective antagonist binding were examined by measuring the ability for unlabeled ligands to inhibit (/sup 3/H)-1-QNB labeling of muscarinic receptors. The distribution of high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M/sub 1/ subtype) was distinct from the distribution of high affinity carbamylcholine sites, which corresponded to the M/sub 2/ subtype. In a separate assay, the binding profile for pirenzepine was shown to differ from the profile for scopolamine, a classical muscarinic antagonist. Muscarinic antagonists, when injected into the Hippocampus, impaired performance of a representational memory task. Pirenzepine, the M/sub 1/ selective antagonist, produced representational memory deficits. Scopolamine, a less selective muscarinic antagonist, caused increases in running times in some animals which prevented a definitive interpretation of the nature of the impairment. Pirenzepine displayed a higher affinity for the hippocampus and was more effective in producing a selective impairment of representational memory than scopolamine. The data indicated that cholinergic activity in the hippocampus was necessary for representation memory function.

  14. Reduced Serotonin Receptor Subtypes in a Limbic and a Neocortical Region in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Oblak, Adrian; Gibbs, Terrell T.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a behaviorally defined, neurological disorder with symptom onset before the age of three. Abnormalities in social-emotional behaviors are a core deficit in autism and are characterized by impaired reciprocal social interaction, lack of facial expressions, and the inability to recognize familiar faces. The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and fusiform gyrus (FG) are two regions within an extensive limbic-cortical network that contribute to social-emotional behaviors. Evidence indicates that changes in brains of individuals with autism begin prenatally. Serotonin (5HT) is one of the earliest expressed neurotransmitters, and plays an important role in synaptogenesis, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal migration. Abnormalities in 5HT systems have been implicated in several psychiatric disorders including autism, as evidenced by immunology, imaging, genetics, pharmacotherapy, and neuropathology. Although information is known regarding peripheral 5HT in autism, there is emerging evidence that 5HT systems in the CNS, including various 5HT receptor subtypes and transporters, are affected in autism. The present study demonstrated significant reductions in 5HT1A receptor binding density in superficial and deep layers of the PCC and FG, and in the density of 5HT2A receptors in superficial layers of the PCC and FG. Significant reduction in the density of serotonin transporters (5-HTT) was also found in the deep layers of the FG, but normal levels were demonstrated in both layers of the PCC and superficial layers of the FG. These studies provide potential substrates for decreased 5-HT modulation/innervation in the autism brain, and implicate two 5-HT receptor subtypes as potential neuromarkers for novel or existing pharmacotherapies. PMID:23894004

  15. The nicotinic receptor in the rat pineal gland is an alpha3beta4 subtype.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Susan C; Vicini, Stefano; Xiao, Yingxian; Dávila-García, Martha I; Yasuda, Robert P; Wolfe, Barry B; Kellar, Kenneth J

    2004-10-01

    The rat pineal gland contains a high density of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We characterized the pharmacology of the binding sites and function of these receptors, measured the nAChR subunit mRNA, and used subunit-specific antibodies to establish the receptor subtype as defined by subunit composition. In ligand binding studies, [3H]epibatidine ([3H]EB) binds with an affinity of approximately 100 pM to nAChRs in the pineal gland, and the density of these sites is approximately 5 times that in rat cerebral cortex. The affinities of nicotinic drugs for binding sites in the pineal gland are similar to those at alpha3beta4 nAChRs heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In functional studies, the potencies and efficacies of nicotinic drugs to activate or block whole-cell currents in dissociated pinealocytes match closely their potencies and efficacies to activate or block 86Rb+ efflux in the cells expressing heterologous alpha3beta4 nAChRs. Measurements of mRNA indicated the presence of transcripts for alpha3, beta2, and beta4 nAChR subunits but not those for alpha2, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, alpha7, or beta3 subunits. Immunoprecipitation with subunit-specific antibodies showed that virtually all [3H]EB-labeled nAChRs contained alpha3 and beta4 subunits associated in one complex. The beta2 subunit was not associated with this complex. Taken together, these results indicate that virtually all of the nAChRs in the rat pineal gland are the alpha3beta4 nAChR subtype and that the pineal gland can therefore serve as an excellent and convenient model in which to study the pharmacology and function of these receptors in a native tissue.

  16. High agonist-independent activity is a distinguishing feature of the dopamine D1B receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Tiberi, M; Caron, M G

    1994-11-11

    Dopamine D1A and D1B receptor subtypes belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. Both receptors are coupled to the activation of adenylyl cyclase and exhibit distinct brain distribution. To identify functional differences, binding and stimulation of adenylyl cyclase were assessed in 293 cells expressing transiently either dopamine D1A or D1B receptors. Membranes expressing D1B receptors displayed higher affinities for agonists than those expressing D1A receptors, whereas antagonist affinities were lower at the D1B than at the D1A receptor. Basal activity of adenylyl cyclase in whole 293 cells expressing various levels of D1B receptors was significantly higher than the basal activity measured in cells expressing D1A receptors. Maximal activation of adenylyl cyclase resulting from stimulation of the D1B receptor was less than that obtained following agonist activation of the D1A receptor. In cells expressing D1B receptors, agonists displayed an increased potency for stimulating adenylyl cyclase in comparison with the potencies determined for the D1A receptor. On the other hand, certain antagonists displayed "negative efficacy" at both receptor subtypes but had a more profound inhibition on the agonist-independent signaling activity of the D1B receptor. The properties described here are reminiscent of those of constitutively active G protein-coupled receptors obtained by site-directed mutations. Thus, the D1B receptor may represent a naturally occurring receptor subtype with properties akin to those of constitutively active G protein-coupled receptors. The different anatomical distribution and biochemical properties of these D1 receptors strengthen the functional distinctions between the two subtypes and could account for the basis of heterogeneity within a given class of neurotransmitter or hormone receptors. In addition, if these properties are recapitulated in cells expressing the D1B receptors, they may underlie important role in the regulation of

  17. Identification of the central imidazoline receptor subtype involved in modulation of halothane-epinephrine arrhythmias in rats.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Kiyokazu; Hayashi, Yukio; Itoh, Isao; Iwasaki, Mitsuo; Takada, Koji; Kamibayashi, Takahiko; Yamatodani, Atsushi; Mashimo, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    We previously reported that imidazoline receptors in the central nervous system are involved in modulation of halothane-epinephrine arrhythmias. These receptors have been subclassified as I1 and I2 subtypes, but it is not known which receptor subtype is involved in halothane-epinephrine-induced arrhythmias. We designed the present study to clarify the involvement of central imidazoline receptor subtype in the modulation of halothane-epinephrine-induced arrhythmias. Rats were anesthetized with halothane and monitored continuously for systemic arterial blood pressure and premature ventricular contractions. The arrhythmogenic dose of epinephrine was defined as the smallest dose that produces three or more premature ventricular contractions within a 15-s period. Intracisternal moxonidine dose-dependently inhibited the epinephrine-induced arrhythmias during halothane anesthesia. Intracisternal efaroxan, a selective I1 antagonist with little affinity for I2 subtype, but not rauwolscine, an alpha2 antagonist without affinity for imidazoline receptors, blocked the antiarrhythmic effect of moxonidine. Intracisternal BU 224 and 2-BFI, selective I2 ligands, also inhibited the epinephrine-induced arrhythmias dose-dependently; however, these effects were abolished by efaroxan. We conclude that central I1, but not I2, receptors play an important role in inhibition of halothane-epinephrine arrhythmia.

  18. Distribution of muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat brain as determined in binding studies with AF-DX 116 and pirenzepine

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo, E.; Hammer, R.; Ladinsky, H.

    1987-03-02

    In vitro competition binding experiments with the selective muscarinic antagonists AF-DX 116 and pirenzepine (PZ) vs /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine as radioligand revealed a characteristic distribution of muscarinic receptor subtypes in different regions of rat brain. Based on nonlinear least squares analysis, the binding data were compatible with the presence of three different subtypes: the M/sub 1/ receptor (high affinity for PZ), the cardiac M/sub 2/ receptor (high affinity for AF-DX 116) and the glandular M/sub 2/ receptor (low affinity for PZ and AF-DX 116). The highest proportion of M/sub 1/ receptors was found in the hippocampus, while the cerebellum and the hypothalamus were the regions with the largest fraction of the cardiac M/sub 2/ and glandular M/sub 2/ receptors, respectively. In certain brain areas, depending on the relative proportions of the subtypes, flat binding curves were seen for AF-DX 116 and PZ. Based on these data, an approximate distribution pattern of the subtypes in the various brain regions is presented. 19 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  19. Cinical Significance of Androgen Receptor, CK-5/6, KI-67 and Molecular Subtypes in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kayahan, Münire; İdiz, Ufuk Oğuz; Gucin, Zuhal; Erözgen, Fazilet; Memmi, Naim; Müslümanoğlu, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the relationship between molecular subtypes of breast cancer with expressions of androgen receptor, cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6)and Ki-67. Materials and Methods Expressions of androgen receptor, CK-5/6 and Ki-67 were determined by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded sections obtained from 86 invasive breast cancer cases of stages I/IIa/IIb in 4 molecular subtypes. Patients treated for recurrent disease and locally advanced disease were excluded. Results Forty one luminal A cases, ie. positive estrogen receptor(ER) and/or progesteron receptor (PR) with negative epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2), 14 luminal B, ie. positive ER and/or PR and positive HER2, 14 HER2-enriched (HER2+), ie. negative ER and PR with positive HER2, and 17 triple negative (negative ER and PR and HER2) invasive breast cancers were included. Mean follow-up was 17.46±11.70 mo. Androgen receptor-negativity and CK5/6-positivity were significantly more common in HER2+ and triple negative groups. Ki-67 and histological grade were higher in HER2+ group, significantly. Two deaths were triple negative (P=0.04). Androgen receptor-negativity, CK5/6 and Ki-67 status did not affect survival or systemic metastases, significantly. All groups had local recurrences. Local recurrence was significantly associated with androgen receptor-negativity in luminal A and high Ki-67 value in HER2+ groups. Systemic metastases were significantly more common in triple negative and HER2+ groups. Conclusion Molecular subtypes of breast cancer are prognostic and predictive. Androgen receptor is expressed more commonly in luminal subtypes with better prognosis and androgen receptor negativity is associated with development of local recurrence in luminal A cancers.

  20. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  1. CoMFA and docking study of novel estrogen receptor subtype selective ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolohan, Peter; Reichert, David E.

    2003-05-01

    We present the results from a Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and docking study of a diverse set of 36 estrogen receptor ligands whose relative binding affinities (RBA) with respect to 17β-Estradiol were available in both isoforms of the nuclear estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ). Initial CoMFA models exhibited a correlation between the experimental relative binding affinities and the molecular steric and electrostatic fields; ERα: r2=0.79, q2=0.44 ERβ: r2=0.93, q2=0.63. Addition of the solvation energy of the isolated ligand improved the predictive nature of the ERβ model initially; r2=0.96, q2=0.70 but upon rescrambling of the data-set and reselecting the training set at random, inclusion of the ligand solvation energy was found to have little effect on the predictive nature of the CoMFA models. The ligands were then docked inside the ligand binding domain (LBD) of both ERα and ERβ utilizing the docking program Gold, after-which the program CScore was used to rank the resulting poses. Inclusion of both the Gold and CScore scoring parameters failed to improve the predictive ability of the original CoMFA models. The subtype selectivity expressed as RBA(ERα/ERβ) of the test sets was predicted using the most predictive CoMFA models, as illustrated by the cross-validated r2. In each case the most selective ligands were ranked correctly illustrating the utility of this method as a prescreening tool in the development of novel estrogen receptor subtype selective ligands.

  2. Endothelin receptor subtypes and their functional relevance in human small coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Lisa N; Davenport, Anthony P

    1998-01-01

    The potent constrictor peptide endothelin (ET) has been implicated in various cardiovascular disorders including myocardial infarction and atherosclerosis. We have investigated the nature of ET receptor subtypes present on human small coronary arteries.Small coronary arteries were mounted in a wire-myograph for in vitro pharmacology. To investigate the ET receptor subtypes present in different segments of the coronary vascular tree, arteries were grouped according to internal diameter. Responses in arteries with small internal diameters (mean 316.7±7.9 μm; Group B) were compared to those in larger arteries (mean 586.2±23.1 μm; Group A).ET-1 consistently and potently contracted arteries from Group A and B, with EC50 values of 1.7 (0.9–3.2) nM (n=15) and 2.3 (1.4–4.2) nM (n=14), respectively. No correlation was observed between ET-1 potency and internal diameter. The response to ET-1 was potently antagonized by the selective ETA receptor antagonist PD156707 in both Group A and Group B, yielding pA2 values of 8.60±0.12 (n=4–6) and 8.38±0.17 (n=4–6), respectively. Slopes from Schild regression were not significantly different from unity.In contrast to ET-1, individual responses to ET-3 were variable. While all arteries from Group A responded to ET-3 (EC50∼69 (23–210) nM) (n=12), no response was obtained in 5 of the 14 tested in Group B. Of those responding, many failed to reach a maximum at concentrations up to 1 μM. ET-1 was more potent than ET-3 in all arteries tested. A biphasic ET-3 response was observed in 8 arteries suggesting that a small ETB population was also present in some patients. The selective ETB receptor agonist sarafotoxin S6c had little or no effect up to 10 nM (n=4–6).Responses to ET-1 and ET-3 were unaffected by removal of the endothelium in arteries from both groups suggesting a lack of functional, relaxant ETB receptors on endothelial cells (n=5).Using autoradiography, specific high density binding of the non

  3. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  4. Identification of vagal sensory receptors in the rat lung: are there subtypes of slowly adapting receptors?

    PubMed Central

    Bergren, D R; Peterson, D F

    1993-01-01

    1. We studied the characteristics of pulmonary sensory receptors whose afferent fibres are in the left vagus nerve of opened-chest rats. The activity of these receptors was recorded during mechanical ventilation approximating eupnoea, as well as during deflation, stepwise inflations and constant-pressure inflations of the lungs. Data were also collected from closed-chest rats and analysed separately. 2. Ninety-four per cent of receptors were located in the ipsilateral lung or airways with the remainder in the contralateral lung. 3. Not only were slowly adapting receptors (SARs) the most abundant pulmonary receptors but 21% of them were either exclusively or predominantly active during the deflationary phase of the ventilatory cycle. Deflationary units were found in opened- and closed-chest rats. The average conduction velocity for all fibres innervating SARs averaged 29.7 m s-1. 4. We found rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) to be extremely rare in the rat. Their activity was sparse and irregular. The conduction velocities of fibres innervating RARs averaged 12.3 m s-1. 5. Far more abundant than RARs in the remaining population of pulmonary fibres were C fibres. They were observed to have an average conduction velocity of 2.1 m s-1, base-level activity which was irregular and a high pressure threshold of activation and were stimulated by intravenous capsaicin injection. 6. Notable differences exist between pulmonary receptors in rats and those reported in other species. The variations include the abundant existence of intrapulmonary SARs with exclusively deflationary modulation and the rarity of RARs. We also encountered C fibres which have not previously been described systematically in the rat. PMID:8229824

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of the canine prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Hibbs, T A; Lu, B; Smock, S L; Vestergaard, P; Pan, L C; Owen, T A

    1999-05-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) binds to four G-protein coupled cell surface receptors (EP1-EP4) and has been implicated as a local mediator of bone anabolism via a cyclic AMP mediated pathway following activation of the EP2 and/or EP4 receptor subtype. A canine kidney cDNA library was screened using a human EP2 probe, and a clone with an open reading frame of 1083 bp, potentially encoding a protein of 361 amino acids, was characterized. This open reading frame has 89% identity to the human EP2 cDNA at the nucleotide level and 87% identity at the predicted protein level. Scatchard analysis of a CHO cell line stably transfected with canine EP2 yielded a dissociation constant of 22 nM for PGE2. Competition binding studies, using 3H-PGE2 as ligand, demonstrated specific displacement by PGE2, Prostaglandin E1, Prostaglandin A3, and butaprost (an EP2 selective ligand), but not by ligands with selectivity for the related DP, FP, IP, or TP receptors. Specific ligand binding also resulted in increased levels of cAMP in EP2 transfected cells with no evidence of short-term, ligand-induced desensitization. Northern blot analysis revealed two transcripts of 3300 and 2400 bp in canine lung, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction showed expression in all tissues examined. Southern blot analysis suggests the presence of a single-copy gene for EP2 in the dog.

  6. The mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype: cloning, expression, and northern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, M; Nishigaki, N; Sugimoto, Y; Morimoto, K; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1995-09-25

    A functional cDNA clone for the mouse prostaglandin (PG) E receptor EP2 subtype was isolated from a mouse cDNA library. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 362 amino acid residues with seven putative transmembrane domains. [3H]PGE2 bound specifically to the membrane of Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned receptor. This binding was displaced by unlabeled prostanoids in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost, a stable PGI2 agonist > PGF2 alpha > PGD2. Binding was also inhibited by butaprost (an EP2 agonist) and to a lesser extent by M&B 28767 (an EP3 agonist), but not by sulprostone (an EP1 and EP3 agonist) or SC-19220 (an EP1 antagonist). PGE2 and butaprost increased the cAMP level in the Chinese hamster ovary cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Northern blot analysis revealed that EP2 mRNA is expressed most abundantly in the uterus, followed by the spleen, lung, thymus, ileum, liver, and stomach.

  7. Rabies virus selectively alters 5-HT1 receptor subtypes in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, P E; Fillion, M P; Ermine, A; Tsiang, H; Fillion, G

    1993-04-15

    Rabies virus infection in man induces a series of clinical symptoms, some suggesting involvement of the central serotonergic system. The results of the present study show that, 5 days after rabies virus infection in rat, the total reversible high-affinity binding of [3H]5-HT in the hippocampus is not affected, suggesting that 5-HT1A binding is not altered. 5-HT1B sites identified by [125I]cyanopindolol binding are not affected in the cortex 3 and 5 days after the infection. Accordingly, the cellular inhibitory effect of trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP) on the [3H]acetylcholine-evoked release, presumably related to 5-HT1B receptor activity, is not modified 3 days after infection. In contrast, [3H]5-HT binding determined in the presence of drugs masking 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1C receptors, is markedly (50%) reduced 3 days after the viral infection. These results suggest that 5-HT1D-like receptor subtypes may be affected specifically and at an early stage after rabies viral infection.

  8. Molecular cloning and expression of rat prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Sando, T; Usui, T; Tanaka, I; Mori, K; Sasaki, Y; Fukuda, Y; Namba, T; Sugimoto, Y; Ichikawa, A; Narumiya, S

    1994-05-16

    A cDNA clone encoding the rat prostaglandin (PG) E receptor EP2 subtype was cloned from a rat lung cDNA library. It encodes 488 amino acid residues with putative seven-transmembrane domains. Specific binding of [3H]PGE2 was found in COS-7 cells transfected with the cDNA and was displaced with unlabeled prostaglandins in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost > or = PGF2 alpha > or = PGD2. The binding was also inhibited by misoprostol, an EP2 and EP3 agonist, but not by sulprostone, an EP1 and EP3 agonist. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the EP2 mRNA is widely expressed in various tissues, the significant expression being observed in the thymus, lung, spleen, heart stomach, and pancreas.

  9. Wound repair and proliferation of bronchial epithelial cells enhanced by bombesin receptor subtype 3 activation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu-Rong; Qi, Ming-Ming; Qin, Xiao-Qun; Xiang, Yang; Li, Xiang; Wang, Yue; Qu, Fei; Liu, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Song

    2006-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of bombesin receptor subtype 3 (BRS-3) in airway wound repair. The results showed that: (1) There was few expression of BRS-3 mRNA in the control group. In contrast, the expression of BRS-3 mRNA was gradually increased in the early 2 days, and peaked on the fourth day, and then decreased in the ozone-stressed AHR animal. BRS-3 mRNA was distributed in the ciliated columnar epithelium, monolayer columnar epithelium cells, scattered mesenchymal cells and Type II alveolar cells; (2) The wound repair and proliferation of bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were accelerated in a concentration-dependent manner by BRS-3 activation with P3513, which could be inhibited by PKA inhibitor H89. The study demostrated that activation of BRS-3 may play an important role in wound repair of AHR.

  10. FAS Death Receptor: A Breast Cancer Subtype-Specific Radiation Response Biomarker and Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Janet K.; Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Lee, Chen-Ting; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Wei; Geradts, Joseph; Fels, Diane R.; Hoang, Peter; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; Groth, Jeff; Kung, Hsiu-Ni; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Chi, Jen-Tsan A.

    2015-01-01

    Although a standardized approach to radiotherapy has been used to treat breast cancer, regardless of subtype (e.g., luminal, basal), recent clinical data suggest that radiation response may vary significantly among subtypes. We hypothesized that this clinical variability may be due, in part, to differences in cellular radiation response. In this study, we utilized RNA samples for microarray analysis from two sources: 1. Paired pre- and postirradiation breast tumor tissue from 32 early-stage breast cancer patients treated in our unique preoperative radiation Phase I trial; and 2. Sixteen biologically diverse breast tumor cell lines exposed to 0 and 5 Gy irradiation. The transcriptome response to radiation exposure was derived by comparing gene expression in samples before and after irradiation. Genes with the highest coefficient of variation were selected for further evaluation and validated at the RNA and protein level. Gene editing and agonistic antibody treatment were performed to assess the impact of gene modulation on radiation response. Gene expression in our cohort of luminal breast cancer patients was distinctly different before and after irradiation. Further, two distinct patterns of gene expression were observed in our biologically diverse group of breast cancer cell lines pre- versus postirradiation. Cell lines that showed significant change after irradiation were largely luminal subtype, while gene expression in the basal and HER2+ cell lines was minimally impacted. The 100 genes with the most significant response to radiation in patients were identified and analyzed for differential patterns of expression in the radiation-responsive versus nonresponsive cell lines. Fourteen genes were identified as significant, including FAS, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family known to play a critical role in programed cell death. Modulation of FAS in breast cancer cell lines altered radiation response phenotype and enhanced radiation sensitivity in

  11. Optical studies of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the guinea-pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Obaid, A L; Nelson, M E; Lindstrom, J; Salzberg, B M

    2005-08-01

    Nicotinic transmission in the enteric nervous system (ENS) is extensive, but the role of individual nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes in the functional connectivity of its plexuses has been elusive. Using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against neuronal alpha3-, alpha4-, alpha3/alpha5-, beta2-, beta4- and alpha7-subunits, combined with radioimmunoassays and immunocytochemistry, we demonstrate that guinea-pig enteric ganglia contain all of these nAChR-subunits with the exception of alpha4, and so, differ from mammalian brain. This information alone, however, is insufficient to establish the functional role of the identified nAChR-subtypes within the enteric networks and, ultimately, their specific contributions to gastrointestinal physiology. We have used voltage-sensitive dyes and a high-speed CCD camera, in conjunction with specific antagonists to various nAChRs, to elucidate some of the distinct contributions of the individual subtypes to the behaviour of enteric networks. In the guinea-pig, the submucous plexus has the extraordinary advantage that it is virtually two-dimensional, permitting optical recording, with single cell resolution, of the electrical activity of all of its neurones. In this plexus, the block of alpha3beta2-, alpha3beta4- and/or alpha7-nAChRs always results in a decrease in the magnitude of the synaptic response. However, the magnitude of the fast excitatory post-synaptic potentials (epsps) evoked by electrical stimulation of a neighbouring ganglion varies from cell to cell, reflecting the differential expression of subunits already observed using mAbs, as well as the strengths of the activated synaptic inputs. At the same time, we observe that submucous neurones have a substantial mecamylamine (Mec)-insensitive (non-nicotinic) component to their fast epsps, which may point to the presence of purinergic or serotonergic fast epsps in this system. In the myenteric plexus, on the other hand, the antagonist-induced changes in the

  12. CaMKII phosphorylation of the GABAA receptor: receptor subtype- and synapse-specific modulation

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Catriona M; He, Qionger; Smart, Trevor G

    2009-01-01

    As a major inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA plays a vital role in the brain by controlling the extent of neuronal excitation. This widespread role is reflected by the ubiquitous distribution of GABAA receptors throughout the central nervous system. To regulate the level of neuronal inhibition requires some endogenous control over the release of GABA and/or its postsynaptic response. In this context, Ca2+ ions are often used as primary or secondary messengers frequently resulting in the activation of protein kinases and phosphatases. One such kinase, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), can target the GABAA receptor to cause its phosphorylation. Evidence is now emerging, which is reviewed here, that GABAA receptors are indeed substrates for CaMKII and that this covalent modification alters the expression of cell surface receptors and their function. This type of regulation can also feature at inhibitory synapses leading to long-term inhibitory synaptic plasticity. Most recently, CaMKII has now been proposed to differentially phosphorylate particular isoforms of GABAA receptors in a synapse-specific context. PMID:19332484

  13. Differentiation of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human cortex and pons - Implications for anti-motion sickness therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Bruce G.; Peroutka, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    Radioligand binding studies were used to analyze muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human cortex and pons. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors were labeled by H-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (H-3-QNB). Scopolamine was equipotent in both brain regions and did not discriminate subtypes of H-3-QNB binding. By contrast, the M1 selective antagonist pirenzepine was approximately 33-fold more potent in human cortex than pons. Carbachol, a putative M2 selective agonist, was more than 100-fold more potent in human pons than cortex. These results demonstrate that the human pons contains a relatively large proportion of carbachol-sensitive muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Drugs targeted to this subpopulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors may prove to be effective anti-motion sickness agents with less side effects than scopolamine.

  14. Pharmacology of GABAC receptors: responses to agonists and antagonists distinguish A- and B-subtypes of homomeric rho receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Khalili, Parham; Ripps, Harris; Qian, Haohua

    2005-03-07

    GABA(C) receptors, expressed predominantly in vertebrate retina, are thought to be formed mainly by GABA rho subunits. Five GABA rho subunits have been cloned from white perch retina, four of which form functional homooligomeric receptors when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These rho subtypes, classified as rho1A, rho1B, rho2A and rho2B receptors based on amino acid sequence alignment, exhibit distinct temporal and pharmacological properties. To examine further the pharmacological properties associated with the various rho receptor subtypes, we investigated the effects of a selective GABA(C) receptor antagonist, TPMPA, on the GABA-mediated activity of receptors formed in Xenopus oocytes by the four GABA rho subunits. In addition, we recorded the activation profiles of beta-alanine, taurine, and glycine, three amino acids that modulate neuronal activity in various parts of the CNS and are purported to be rho receptor agonists. TPMPA effectively inhibited GABA-elicited responses on A-type receptors, whereas B-type receptors exhibited a relatively low sensitivity to the drug. A-type and B-type receptors also displayed distinctly different reactions to agonists. Both taurine and glycine-activated the B-type receptors, whereas these agents had no detectable effect on A-type receptors. Similarly, beta-alanine evoked large responses from B-type receptors, but was far less effective on A-type receptors. These results indicate that, in addition to the characteristic response properties identified previously, there is a pattern of pharmacological reactions that further distinguishes the A- and B-subtypes of GABA rho receptor.

  15. Pharmacological evidence for a novel cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor subtype in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; Norel, Xavier; Bäck, Magnus; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Brink, Charles

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the cysteinyl-leukotriene receptors (CysLT receptors) in isolated human pulmonary arteries, ring preparations were contracted with leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) in either the absence or presence of the selective CysLT1 receptor antagonists, ICI 198615, MK 571 or the dual CysLT1/CysLT2 receptor antagonist, BAY u9773. Since the contractions induced by the cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs) in intact preparations failed to attain a plateau response over the concentration range studied, the endothelium was removed and the tissue treated continuously with indomethacin (Rubbed+INDO). In these latter preparations, the pEC50 for LTC4 and LTD4 were not significantly different (7.61±0.07, n=20 and 7.96±0.09, n=22, respectively). However, the LTC4 and LTD4 contractions were markedly potentiated when compared with data from intact tissues. Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) did not contract human isolated pulmonary arterial preparations. In addition, treatment of preparations with LTE4 (1 μM; 30 min) did not modify either the LTC4 or LTD4 contractions. Treatment of preparations with the S-conjugated glutathione (S-hexyl-GSH; 100 μM, 30 min), an inhibitor of the metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4, did not modify LTC4 contractions. The pEC50 values for LTC4 were significantly reduced by treatment of the preparations with either ICI 198615, MK 571 or BAY u9773 and the pKB values were: 7.20, 7.02 and 6.26, respectively. In contrast, these antagonists did not modify the LTD4 pEC50 values. These findings suggest the presence of two CysLT receptors on human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle. A CysLT1 receptor with a low affinity for CysLT1 antagonists and a novel CysLT receptor subtype, both responsible for vasoconstriction. Activation of this latter receptor by LTC4 and LTD4 induced a contractile response which was resistant to the selective CysLT1 antagonists (ICI 198615 and MK 571) as well as the non-selective (CysLT1/CysLT2) antagonist, BAY u9773. PMID

  16. Silencing of the constitutive activity of the dopamine D1B receptor. Reciprocal mutations between D1 receptor subtypes delineate residues underlying activation properties.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, S; Jarvie, K R; Severynse, D M; Caron, M G; Tiberi, M

    1996-11-08

    Recently, we have shown that the dopamine D1B/D5 receptor displays binding and coupling properties that are reminiscent of those of the constitutively activated G protein-coupled receptors when compared with the related D1A/D1 receptor subtype (Tiberi, M., and Caron, M. G. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 27925-27931). The carboxyl-terminal region of the third cytoplasmic loop of several G protein-coupled receptors has been demonstrated to be important for the regulation of the equilibrium between inactive and active receptor conformations. In this cytoplasmic region, the primary structure of dopamine D1A and D1B receptors differs by only two residues: Phe264/Arg266 are present in D1A receptor compared with Ile288/Lys290 in the D1B receptor. To investigate whether these structural differences could account for the distinct binding and coupling properties of these dopamine receptor subtypes, we swapped the variant residues located in the carboxyl-terminal region by site-directed mutagenesis. The exchange of the D1A receptor residue Phe264 by the D1B receptor counterpart isoleucine led to a D1A receptor mutant exhibiting D1B-like constitutive properties. In contrast, substitution of D1B receptor Ile288 by the D1A receptor counterpart phenylalanine resulted in a loss of constitutive activation of the D1B receptor with binding and coupling properties similar to the D1A receptor. The Arg/Lys substitution had no effect on the function of either receptor. These results demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal region, and in particular residue Ile288, is a major determinant of the constitutive activity of the dopamine D1B receptor. Moreover, these results establish that not only can agonist-independent activity of a receptor be induced, but when given the appropriate mutation, it can be reversed or silenced.

  17. Interaction of psychoactive tryptamines with biogenic amine transporters and serotonin receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Blough, Bruce E.; Landavazo, Antonio; Decker, Ann M.; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H.; Rothman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Synthetic hallucinogenic tryptamines, especially those originally described by Alexander Shulgin, continue to be abused in the United States. The range of subjective experiences produced by different tryptamines suggests that multiple neurochemical mechanisms are involved in their actions, in addition to the established role of agonist activity at serotonin-2A (5-HT2A) receptors. Objectives This study evaluated the interaction of a series of synthetic tryptamines with biogenic amine neurotransmitter transporters and with serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes implicated in psychedelic effects. Methods Neurotransmitter transporter activity was determined in rat brain synaptosomes. Receptor activity was determined using calcium mobilization and DiscoveRx PathHunter® assays in HEK293, Gα16-CHO, and CHOk1 cells transfected with human receptors. Results Twenty-one tryptamines were analyzed in transporter uptake and release assays, and 5-HT2A, serotonin 1A (5-HT1A), and 5-HT2A β-arrestin functional assays. Eight of the compounds were found to have 5-HT-releasing activity. Thirteen compounds were found to be 5-HT uptake inhibitors or were inactive. All tryptamines were 5-HT2A agonists with a range of potencies and efficacies, but only a few compounds were 5-HT1A agonists. Most tryptamines recruited β-arrestin through 5-HT2A activation. Conclusions All psychoactive tryptamines are 5-HT2A agonists, but 5-HT transporter (SERT) activity may contribute significantly to the pharmacology of certain compounds. The in vitro transporter data confirm structure-activity trends for releasers and uptake inhibitors whereby releasers tend to be structurally smaller compounds. Interestingly, two tertiary amines were found to be selective substrates at SERT, which dispels the notion that 5-HT-releasing activity is limited only to primary or secondary amines. PMID:24800892

  18. Glucocorticoid-induced fetal programming alters the functional complement of angiotensin receptor subtypes within the kidney.

    PubMed

    Gwathmey, TanYa M; Shaltout, Hossam A; Rose, James C; Diz, Debra I; Chappell, Mark C

    2011-03-01

    We examined the impact of fetal programming on the functional responses of renal angiotensin receptors. Fetal sheep were exposed in utero to betamethasone (BMX; 0.17 mg/kg) or control (CON) at 80 to 81 days gestation with full-term delivery. Renal nuclear and plasma membrane fractions were isolated from sheep age 1.0 to 1.5 years for receptor binding and fluorescence detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or nitric oxide (NO). Mean arterial blood pressure and blood pressure variability were significantly higher in the BMX-exposed adult offspring versus CON sheep. The proportion of nuclear AT(1) receptors sensitive to losartan was 2-fold higher (67 ± 6% vs 27 ± 9%; P<0.01) in BMX compared with CON. In contrast, the proportion of AT(2) sites was only one third that of controls (BMX, 25 ± 11% vs CON, 78 ± 4%; P<0.01), with a similar reduction in sites sensitive to the Ang-(1-7) antagonist D-Ala7-Ang-(1-7) with BMX exposure. Functional studies revealed that Ang II stimulated ROS to a greater extent in BMX than in CON sheep (16 ± 3% vs 6 ± 4%; P<0.05); however, NO production to Ang II was attenuated in BMX (26 ± 7% vs 82 ± 14%; P<0.05). BMX exposure was also associated with a reduction in the Ang-(1-7) NO response (75 ± 8% vs 131 ± 26%; P<0.05). We conclude that altered expression of angiotensin receptor subtypes may be one mechanism whereby functional changes in NO- and ROS-dependent signaling pathways may favor the sustained increase in blood pressure evident in fetal programming.

  19. Identification of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 as a receptor activated by OxPAPC.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongsong; Mouillesseaux, Kevin P; Montoya, Dennis; Cruz, Daniel; Gharavi, Navid; Dun, Martin; Koroniak, Lukasz; Berliner, Judith A

    2006-03-17

    Oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (OxPAPC), which has been shown to accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions and other sites of chronic inflammation, activates endothelial cells (EC) to bind monocytes by activation of endothelial beta1 integrin and subsequent deposition of fibronectin on the apical surface. Our previous studies suggest this function of OxPAPC is mediated via a Gs protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). PEIPC (1-palmitoyl-2-epoxyisoprostane E2-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine) is the most active lipid in OxPAPC that activates this pathway. We screened a number of candidate GPCRs for their interaction with OxPAPC and PEIPC, using a reporter gene assay; we identified prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 and prostaglandin D2 receptor DP as responsive to OxPAPC. We focused on EP2, which is expressed in ECs, monocytes, and macrophages. OxPAPC component PEIPC, but not POVPC, activated EP2 with an EC50 of 108.6 nmol/L. OxPAPC and PEIPC were also able to compete with PGE2 for binding to EP2 in a ligand-binding assay. The EP2 specific agonist butaprost was shown to mimic the effect of OxPAPC on the activation of beta1 integrin and the stimulation of monocyte binding to endothelial cells. Butaprost also mimicked the effect of OxPAPC on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 in monocyte-derived cells. EP2 antagonist AH6809 blocked the activation of EP2 by OxPAPC in HEK293 cells and blocked the interleukin-10 response to PEIPC in monocytic THP-1 cells. These results suggest that EP2 functions as a receptor for OxPAPC and PEIPC, either as the phospholipid ester or the released fatty acid, in both endothelial cells and macrophages.

  20. Comparison of the Binding and Functional Properties of Two Structurally Different D2 Dopamine Receptor Subtype Selective Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported on the synthesis of substituted phenyl-4-hydroxy-1-piperidyl indole analogues with nanomolar affinity at D2 dopamine receptors, ranging from 10- to 100-fold selective for D2 compared to the D3 dopamine receptor subtype. More recently, we evaluated a panel of aripiprazole analogues, identifying several analogues that also exhibit D2 vs D3 dopamine receptor binding selectivity. These studies further characterize the intrinsic efficacy of the compound with the greatest binding selectivity from each chemical class, 1-((5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl)-4-(4-(methylthio)phenyl)piperidin-4-ol (SV 293) and 7-(4-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butoxy)-3,4-dihydroquinolin-2(1H)-one (SV-III-130s), using an adenylyl cyclase inhibition assay, a G-protein-coupled inward-rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel activation assay, and a cell based phospho-MAPK (pERK1/2) assay. SV 293 was found to be a neutral antagonist at D2 dopamine receptors using all three assays. SV-III-130s is a partial agonist using an adenylyl cyclase inhibition assay but an antagonist in the GIRK and phospho ERK1/2 assays. To define the molecular basis for the binding selectivity, the affinity of these two compounds was evaluated using (a) wild type human D2 and D3 receptors and (b) a panel of chimeric D2/D3 dopamine receptors. Computer-assisted modeling techniques were used to dock these compounds to the human D2 and D3 dopamine receptor subtypes. It is hoped that these studies on D2 receptor selective ligands will be useful in the future design of (a) receptor selective ligands used to define the function of D2-like receptor subtypes, (b) novel pharmacotherapeutic agents, and/or (c) in vitro and in vivo imaging agents. PMID:23259040

  1. Intracellular calcium homeostasis in human primary muscle cells from malignant hyperthermia-susceptible and normal individuals. Effect Of overexpression of recombinant wild-type and Arg163Cys mutated ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Censier, K; Urwyler, A; Zorzato, F; Treves, S

    1998-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a hypermetabolic disease triggered by volatile anesthetics and succinylcholine in genetically predisposed individuals. Nine point mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR) gene have so far been identified and shown to correlate with the MH-susceptible phenotype, yet direct evidence linking abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis to mutations in the RYR1 cDNA has been obtained for few mutations. In this report, we show for the first time that cultured human skeletal muscle cells derived from MH-susceptible individuals exhibit a half-maximal halothane concentration causing an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration which is twofold lower than that of cells derived from MH-negative individuals. We also present evidence demonstrating that overexpression of wild-type RYR1 in cells obtained from MH-susceptible individuals does not restore the MH-negative phenotype, as far as Ca2+ transients elicited by halothane are concerned; on the other hand, overexpression of a mutated RYR1 Arg163Cys Ca2+ channel in muscle cells obtained from MH-negative individuals conveys hypersensitivity to halothane. Finally, our results show that the resting Ca2+ concentration of cultured skeletal muscle cells from MH-negative and MH-susceptible individuals is not significantly different. PMID:9502764

  2. Ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) possessing malignant hyperthermia mutation R615C exhibits heightened sensitivity to dysregulation by non-coplanar 2,2',3,5',6-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 95).

    PubMed

    Ta, Tram Anh; Pessah, Isaac N

    2007-07-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility is conferred by inheriting one of >60 missense mutations within the highly regulated microsomal Ca(2+) channel known as ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). Although MH susceptible patients lack overt clinical signs, a potentially lethal MH syndrome can be triggered by exposure to halogenated alkane anesthetics. This study compares how non-coplanar 2,2',3,5',6-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 95), a congener identified in environmental and human samples, alters the binding properties of [(3)H]ryanodine to RyR1 in vitro. Junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was isolated from skeletal muscle dissected from wild type pigs ((Wt)RyR1) and pigs homozygous for MH mutation R615C ((MH)RyR1), a mutation also found in humans. Although the level of (Wt)RyR1 and (MH)RyR1 expression is the same, (MH)RyR1 shows heightened sensitivity to activation and altered regulation by physiological cations. We report here that (MH)RyR1 shows more pronounced activation by Ca(2+), and is less sensitive to channel inhibition by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), compared to (Wt)RyR1. In a buffer containing 100nM free Ca(2+), conditions typically found in resting cells, PCB 95 (50-1000nM) enhances the activity of (MH)RyR1 whereas it has no detectable effect on (Wt)RyR1. PCB 95 (2microM) decreases channel inhibition by Mg(2+) to a greater extent in (MH)RyR1 (IC(50) increased nine-fold) compared to (Wt)RyR1 (IC(50) increased by 2.5-fold). PCB95 reduces inhibition by Ca(2+) two-fold more with (MH)RyR1 than (Wt)RyR1. Our data suggest that non-coplanar PCBs are more potent and efficacious toward (MH)RyR1 than (Wt)RyR1, and have more profound effects on its cation regulation. Considering the important roles of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in regulating Ca(2+) signals involving RyR channels, these data provide the first mechanistic evidence that a genetic mutation known to confer susceptibility to pharmacological agents also enhances sensitivity to an environmental contaminant.

  3. Systemic and renal effects of an ETA receptor subtype-specific antagonist in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Schmetterer, Leopold; Dallinger, Susanne; Bobr, Barbara; Selenko, Nicole; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Wolzt, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Endothelins (ETs) might play a pathophysiological role in a variety of vascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of BQ-123, a specific ETA receptor antagonist on systemic and renal haemodynamics in healthy subjects. This was done at baseline and during infusion of exogenous ET-1.The study was performed in a balanced, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind 4 way cross-over design in 10 healthy male subjects. Subjects received co-infusions of ET-1 (2.5 ng kg−1 min−1 for 120 min) or placebo and BQ-123 (15 μg min−1 for 60 min and subsequently 60 μg min−1 for 60 min) or placebo. Renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed by the para-aminohippurate (PAH) and the inulin plasma clearance method, respectively.BQ-123 alone had no renal or systemic haemodynamic effect. ET-1 significantly reduced RPF (−24%, P<0.001) and GFR (−12%, P=0.034). These effects were abolished by co-infusion of either dose of BQ-123 (RPF: P=0.0012; GFR: P=0.020).BQ-123 reversed the renal haemodynamic effects induced by exogenous ET-1 in vivo. This indicates that vasoconstriction in the kidney provoked by ET-1 is predominantly mediated by the ETA receptor subtype. PMID:9692778

  4. Characterization of U-97775 as a GABAA receptor ligand of dual functionality in cloned rat GABAA receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Im, H. K.; Im, W. B.; Pregenzer, J. F.; Carter, D. B.; Jacobsen, E. J.; Hamilton, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. U-97775 (tert-butyl 7-chloro-4,5-dihydro-5-[(1-(3,4,5-trimethyl)piperazino)carbonyl]- imidazo[1,5-a])quinoxaline-3-carboxylate) is a novel GABAA receptor ligand of dual functionality and was characterized for its interactions with cloned rat GABAA receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney cells. 2. The drug produced a bell-shaped dose-response profile in the alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor subtype as monitored with GABA-induced Cl- currents in the whole cell patch-clamp technique. At low concentrations (< 0.5 microM), U-97775 enhanced the currents with a maximal increase of 120% as normalized to 5 microM GABA response (control). An agonist interaction of U-97775 with the benzodiazepine site is suggested, because Ro 15-1788 (an antagonist at the benzodiazepine site) abolished the current increase and [3H]-flunitrazepam binding was inhibited by U-97775 with a Ki of 1.2 nM. 3. The enhancement of GABA currents progressively disappeared as the U-97775 concentration was raised above 1 microM, and the current amplitude was reduced to 40% below the control at 10 microM U-97775. The current inhibition by U-97775 (10 microM) was not affected by Ro 15-1788. It appears that U-97775 interacts with a second site on GABA receptors, distinct from the benzodiazepine site, to reverse its agonistic activity on the benzodiazepine site and also to inhibit GABA currents. 4. U-97775 at low concentrations reduced and at high concentrations enhanced [35S]-TBPS binding. Ro 15-1788 selectively blocked the effect of U-97775 at low concentrations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7647975

  5. Muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in regulation of colonic motility in mice: functional studies using muscarinic receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takaji; Nakajima, Miwa; Teraoka, Hiroki; Unno, Toshihiro; Komori, Sei-ichi; Yamada, Masahisa; Kitazawa, Takio

    2011-11-16

    Although muscarinic M(2) and M(3) receptors are known to be important for regulation of gastric and small intestinal motility, muscarinic receptor subtypes regulating colonic function remain to be investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize muscarinic receptors involved in regulation of colonic contractility. M(2) and/or M(3) receptor knockout (KO) and wild-type mice were used in in vivo (defecation, colonic propulsion) and in vitro (contraction) experiments. Amount of feces was significantly decreased in M(3)R-KO and M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice but not in M(2)R-KO mice. Ranking of colonic propulsion was wild-type=M(2)R-KO>M(3)R-KO>M(2)/M(3)R-KO. In vitro, the amplitude of migrating motor complexes in M(2)R-KO, M(3)R-KO and M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice was significantly lower than that in wild-type mice. Carbachol caused concentration-dependent contraction of the proximal colon and distal colon from wild-type mice. In M(2)R-KO mice, the concentration-contraction curves shifted to the right and downward. In contrast, carbachol caused non-sustained contraction and relaxation in M(3)R-KO mice depending on its concentration. Carbachol did not cause contraction but instead caused relaxation of colonic strips from M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice. 4-[[[(3-chlorophenyl)amino]carbonyl]oxy]-N,N,N-trimethyl-2-butyn-1-aminium chloride (McN-A-343) caused a non-sustained contraction of colonic strips from wild-type mice, and this contraction was changed to a sustained contraction by tetrodotoxin, pirenzepine and L-nitroarginine methylester (L-NAME). In the colon of M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice, McN-A-343 caused only relaxation, which was decreased by tetrodotoxin, pirenzepine and L-NAME. In conclusion, M(1), M(2) and M(3) receptors regulate colonic motility of the mouse. M(2) and M(3) receptors mediate cholinergic contraction, but M(1) receptors on inhibitory nitrergic nerves counteract muscarinic contraction.

  6. Contribution of valine 7' of TMD2 to gating of neuronal alpha3 receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Navedo, Manuel F; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2006-12-01

    The second transmembrane domain (TMD2) of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels forms the channel pore. The functional role of the amino acid residues contributing to the channel pore in neuronal nicotinic alpha3 receptors is not well understood. We characterized the contribution of TMD2 position V7' to channel gating in neuronal nicotinic alpha3 receptors. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute position alpha3 (V7') with four different amino acids (A, F, S, or Y) and coexpressed each mutant subunit with wild-type (WT) beta2 or beta4 subunits in Xenopus oocytes. Whole-cell voltage clamp experiments show that substitution for an alanine, serine, or phenylalanine decreased by 2.3-6.2-fold the ACh-EC(50) for alpha3beta2 and alpha3beta4 receptor subtypes. Interestingly, mutation V7'Y did not produce a significant change in ACh-EC(50) when coexpressed with the beta2 subunit but showed a significant approximately two-fold increase with beta4. Similar responses were obtained with nicotine as the agonist. The antagonist sensitivity of the mutant channels was assessed by using dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE) and methyllycaconitine (MLA). The apparent potency of DHbetaE as an antagonist increased by approximately 3.7- and 11-fold for the alpha3beta2 V7'S and V7'F mutants, respectively, whereas no evident changes in antagonist potency were observed for the V7'A and V7'Y mutants. The V7'S and V7'F mutations increase MLA antagonist potency for the alpha3beta4 receptor by approximately 6.2- and approximately 9.3-fold, respectively. The V7'A mutation selectively increases the MLA antagonist potency for the alpha3beta4 receptor by approximately 18.7-fold. These results indicate that position V7' contributes to channel gating kinetics and pharmacology of the neuronal nicotinic alpha3 receptors.

  7. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in dorsal root ganglion neurons include the α6β4* subtype.

    PubMed

    Hone, Arik J; Meyer, Erin L; McIntyre, Melissa; McIntosh, J Michael

    2012-02-01

    The α6-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have recently been implicated in diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including Parkinson's disease and substance abuse. In contrast, little is known about the role of α6* nAChRs in the peripheral nervous system (where the asterisk denotes the possible presence of additional subunits). Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons are known to express nAChRs with a pharmacology consistent with an α7, α3β4*, and α4β2* composition. Here we present evidence that DRG neurons also express α6* nAChRs. We used RT-PCR to show the presence of α6 subunit transcripts and patch-clamp electrophysiology together with subtype-selective α-conotoxins to pharmacologically characterize the nAChRs in rat DRG neurons. α-Conotoxin BuIA (500 nM) blocked acetylcholine-gated currents (I(ACh)) by 90.3 ± 3.0%; the recovery from blockade was very slow, indicating a predominance of α(x)β4* nAChRs. Perfusion with either 300 nM BuIA[T5A;P6O] or 200 nM MII[E11A], α-conotoxins that target the α6β4* subtype, blocked I(ACh) by 49.3 ± 5 and 46.7 ± 8%, respectively. In these neurons, I(ACh) was relatively insensitive to 200 nM ArIB[V11L;V16D] (9.4±2.0% blockade) or 500 nM PnIA (23.0±4% blockade), α-conotoxins that target α7 and α3β2*/α6β2* nAChRs, respectively. We conclude that α6β4* nAChRs are among the subtypes expressed by DRG, and to our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of α6β4* in neurons outside the CNS.

  8. Quantitative and functional expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes in human prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Jaquet, P; Ouafik, L; Saveanu, A; Gunz, G; Fina, F; Dufour, H; Culler, M D; Moreau, J P; Enjalbert, A

    1999-09-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that somatostatin analogs preferential for the SSTR5 subtype suppress PRL release from prolactinoma cell cultures by 30-40%. These data supported the idea of somatostatin receptor subtype-specific control of PRL secretion in such tumors. The present study examines the quantitative profile of SSTRs messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in 10 PRL-secreting tumors and correlates the expression with the ability of native somatostatins (SS14 and SS28), SSTR2 preferential analogs (octreotide and BIM-23197), and the SSTR5 preferential analog BIM-23268 to suppress PRL secretion. RT-PCR quantitative analysis showed a large predominance of SSTR5 mRNA [5648 +/- 1918 pg/pg glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)] vs. SSTR2 mRNA (148 +/- 83 pg/pg GAPDH). The SSTR1 transcript was also highly expressed in prolactinomas (1296 +/- 669 pg/pg GAPDH). SSTR5 mRNA expression correlated with PRL inhibition induced by both SRIF14 and SRIF28. Among the different analogs tested, only BIM-23268 produced inhibition of PRL release similar to that achieved with the native peptides. Its EC50 for PRL suppression was 0.28 +/- 0.10 nmol/L. No additive effects on PRL suppression were achieved by cotreatment of the tumor cells with SSTR2 and SSTR5 preferential analogs. In the same tumor cell cultures, quinagolide, a potent dopamine agonist, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of PRL with an EC50 at least 10 times lower than that of BIM-23268. Coincubation of quinagolide and BIM-23268, particularly in tumor cells resistant to dopamine agonist treatment, did not produce additive effects on PRL suppression. In conclusion, prolactinomas have a specific pattern of SSTR subtype mRNA expression (SSTR5 and SSTR1). SSTR5 expression is correlated to PRL regulation. These inhibitory effects are superimposable, at a higher concentration, to those of the dopamine agonists, but are not additive, particularly in the adenomas resistant to dopaminergic suppression of PRL release.

  9. Angiotensin II receptor subtypes are coupled with distinct signal-transduction mechanisms in neurons and astrocytes from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Wei Tang; Zelezna, B.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-09-01

    Both neurons and astrocytes contain specific receptors for angiotensin II (AII). The authors used selective ligands for the AT{sub 1} and AT{sub 2} types of AII receptors to investigate the expression of functional receptor subtypes in astrocyte cultures and neuron cultures from 1-day-old (neonatal) rat brain. In astrocyte cultures, competition of {sup 125}I-labeled AII ({sup 125}I-AII) specific binding with AT{sub 1} (DuP753) or AT{sub 2} {l brace}PD123177, CGP42112A, (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII{r brace} selective receptor ligands revealed a potency series of AII > DuP753 > > > CGP42112A > (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII > PD123177. These results suggest a predominance of the AT{sub 1} receptor subtype in neonatal astrocytes. {sup 125}I-AII specific binding to neonate neuronal cultures was reduced 73-84% by 1 {mu} MPD123177, and the residual {sup 125}I-AII specific binding was eliminated by DuP753. The results suggest that astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat brains contain predominantly AT{sub 1} receptors that are coupled to a stimulation of inositophospholipid hydrolysis. In contrast, neuron cultures from neonatal rat brain contain mostly AT{sub 2} receptors that are coupled to a reduction in basal cGMP levels, but a smaller population of AT{sub 1} receptors is also present in these neurons.

  10. M1 and m2 muscarinic receptor subtypes regulate antidepressant-like effects of the rapidly acting antidepressant scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J M; Overshiner, C; Li, X; Catlow, J T; Wishart, G N; Schober, D A; Heinz, B A; Nikolayev, A; Tolstikov, V V; Anderson, W H; Higgs, R E; Kuo, M-S; Felder, C C

    2014-11-01

    Scopolamine produces rapid and significant symptom improvement in patients with depression, and most notably in patients who do not respond to current antidepressant treatments. Scopolamine is a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, and it is not known which one or more of the five receptor subtypes in the muscarinic family are mediating these therapeutic effects. We used the mouse forced-swim test, an antidepressant detecting assay, in wild-type and transgenic mice in which each muscarinic receptor subtype had been genetically deleted to define the relevant receptor subtypes. Only the M1 and M2 knockout (KO) mice had a blunted response to scopolamine in the forced-swim assay. In contrast, the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine were not significantly altered by gene deletion of any of the five muscarinic receptors. The muscarinic antagonists biperiden, pirenzepine, and VU0255035 (N-[3-oxo-3-[4-(4-pyridinyl)-1-piper azinyl]propyl]-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4-sulfonamide) with selectivity for M1 over M2 receptors also demonstrated activity in the forced-swim test, which was attenuated in M1 but not M2 receptor KO mice. An antagonist with selectivity of M2 over M1 receptors (SCH226206 [(2-amino-3-methyl-phenyl)-[4-[4-[[4-(3 chlorophenyl)sulfonylphenyl]methyl]-1-piperidyl]-1-piperidyl]methanone]) was also active in the forced-swim assay, and the effects were deleted in M2 (-/-) mice. Brain exposure and locomotor activity in the KO mice demonstrated that these behavioral effects of scopolamine are pharmacodynamic in nature. These data establish muscarinic M1 and M2 receptors as sufficient to generate behavioral effects consistent with an antidepressant phenotype and therefore as potential targets in the antidepressant effects of scopolamine.

  11. Identification of muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in catecholamine secretion in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells by genetic deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Miyata, Hironori; Matsui, Minoru; Inoue, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Activation of muscarinic receptors results in catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells in many mammals, and muscarinic receptors partly mediate synaptic transmission from the splanchnic nerve, at least in guinea pigs. To elucidate the physiological functions of muscarinic receptors in chromaffin cells, it is necessary to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in excitation. Experimental Approach To identify muscarinic receptors, pharmacological tools and strains of mice where one or several muscarinic receptor subtypes were genetically deleted were used. Cellular responses to muscarinic stimulation in isolated chromaffin cells were studied with the patch clamp technique and amperometry. Key Results Muscarinic M1, M4 and M5 receptors were immunologically detected in mouse chromaffin cells, and these receptors disappeared after the appropriate gene deletion. Mouse cells secreted catecholamines in response to muscarinic agonists, angiotensin II and a decrease in external pH. Genetic deletion of M1, but not M3, M4 or M5, receptors in mice abolished secretion in response to muscarine, but not to other stimuli. The muscarine-induced secretion was suppressed by MT7, a snake peptide toxin specific for M1 receptors. Similarly, muscarine failed to induce an inward current in the presence of MT7 in mouse and rat chromaffin cells. The binding affinity of VU0255035 for the inhibition of muscarine-induced currents agreed with that for the M1 receptor. Conclusions and Implications Based upon the effects of genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors and MT7, it is concluded that the M1 receptor alone is responsible for muscarine-induced catecholamine secretion. PMID:25393049

  12. Receptor Subtype-Dependent Galanin Actions on GABAergic Neurotransmission and Ethanol Responses in the Central Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Bajo, Michal; Madamba, Samuel G.; Lu, Xiaoying; Sharkey, Lisa M.; Bartfai, Tamas; Siggins, George Robert

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin and its three receptor subtypes (GalR1–3) are expressed in the central amygdala (CeA), a brain region involved in stress- and anxiety-related behaviors, as well as alcohol dependence. Galanin also has been suggested to play a role in alcohol intake and alcohol dependence. We examined the effects of galanin in CeA slices from wild type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice deficient of GalR2 and both GalR1 and GalR2 receptors. Galanin had dual effects on GABAergic transmission, decreasing the amplitudes of pharmacologically-isolated GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in over half of CeA neurons but augmenting IPSPs in the others. The increase in IPSP size was absent after superfusion of the GalR3 antagonist SNAP 37889, whereas the IPSP depression was absent in CeA neurons of GalR1 × GalR2 double KO and GalR2 KO mice. Paired-pulse facilitation studies showed weak or infrequent effects of galanin on GABA release. Thus, galanin may act postsynaptically through GalR3 to augment GABAergic transmission in some CeA neurons, whereas GalR2 receptors likely are involved in the depression of IPSPs. Co-superfusion of ethanol, which augments IPSPs presynaptically, together with galanin caused summated effects of ethanol and galanin in those CeA neurons showing galanin-augmented IPSPs, suggesting the two agents act via different mechanisms in this population. However, in neurons showing IPSP-diminishing galanin effects, galanin blunted the ethanol effects, suggesting a preemptive effect of galanin. These findings may increase understanding of the complex cellular mechanisms that underlie the anxiety-related behavioral effects of galanin and ethanol in CeA. PMID:21955024

  13. Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 2 Regulation of Scavenger Receptor CD36 Modulates Microglial Aβ42 Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianwu; Melief, Erica; Postupna, Nadia; Montine, Kathleen S.; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies underline the potential relevance of microglial innate immune activation in Alzheimer disease. Primary mouse microglia that lack prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 (EP2) show decreased innate immune-mediated neurotoxicity and increased amyloid β (Aβ) peptide phagocytosis, features that were replicated in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that scavenger receptor CD36 is an effector of EP2-regulated Aβ phagocytosis. CD36 expression was 143-fold greater in mouse primary microglia than in primary astrocytes. Three different means of suppressing EP2 signaling increased and an agonist of EP2 decreased CD36 expression in primary wild-type microglia. Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3, TLR4, and TLR7, but not TLR2 or TLR9, reduced primary microglial CD36 transcription and cell surface CD36 protein and reduced Aβ42 phagocytosis as well. At each step, the effects of innate immune activation on CD36 were reversed by at least 50% by an EP2 antagonist, and this partial rescue of microglia Aβ42 phagocytosis was largely mediated by CD36 activity. Finally, we showed in hippocampus of wild-type mice that innate immune activation suppressed CD36 expression by an EP2-dependent mechanism. Taken together with results of others that found brain clearance of Aβ peptides and behavioral improvements mediated by CD36 in mice, regulation of CD36-mediated Aβ phagocytosis by suppression of EP2 signaling may provide a new approach to suppressing some aspects of Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. PMID:25452117

  14. An α-helical C-terminal tail segment of the skeletal L-type Ca2+ channel β1a subunit activates ryanodine receptor type 1 via a hydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Karunasekara, Yamuna; Rebbeck, Robyn T; Weaver, Llara M; Board, Philip G; Dulhunty, Angela F; Casarotto, Marco G

    2012-12-01

    Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in skeletal muscle depends on protein interactions between the transverse tubule dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) voltage sensor and intracellular ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel. We present novel data showing that the C-terminal 35 residues of the β(1a) subunit adopt a nascent α-helix in which 3 hydrophobic residues align to form a hydrophobic surface that binds to RyR1 isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle. Mutation of the hydrophobic residues (L496, L500, W503) in peptide β(1a)V490-M524, corresponding to the C-terminal 35 residues of β(1a), reduced peptide binding to RyR1 to 15.2 ± 7.1% and prevented the 2.9 ± 0.2-fold activation of RyR1 by 10 nM wild-type peptide. An upstream hydrophobic heptad repeat implicated in β(1a) binding to RyR1 does not contribute to RyR1 activation. Wild-type β(1a)A474-A508 peptide (10 nM), containing heptad repeat and hydrophobic surface residues, increased RyR1 activity by 2.3 ± 0.2- and 2.2 ± 0.3-fold after mutation of the heptad repeat residues. We conclude that specific hydrophobic surface residues in the 35 residue β(1a) C-terminus bind to RyR1 and increase channel activity in lipid bilayers and thus may support skeletal EC coupling.

  15. An evolutionary comparison of leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors reveals a novel LGR subtype.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Van Loy, Tom; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2012-03-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors or LGRs are receptors with important functions in development and reproduction. Belonging to this evolutionarily conserved group of receptors are the well-studied glycoprotein hormone receptors and relaxin receptors in mammals, as well as the bursicon receptor, which triggers cuticle hardening and tanning in freshly enclosed insects. In this study, the numerous LGR sequences in different animal phyla are analyzed and compared. Based on these data a phylogenetic tree was generated. This information sheds new light on structural and evolutionary aspects regarding this receptor group. Apart from vertebrates and insects, LGRs are also present in early chordates (Urochordata, Cephalochordata and Hyperoartia) and other arthropods (Arachnida and Branchiopoda) as well as in Mollusca, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Nematoda, and even in ancient animal life forms, such as Cnidaria and Placozoa. Three distinct types of LGR exist, distinguishable by their number of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), their type-specific hinge region and the presence or absence of an LDLa motif. Type C LGRs containing only one LDLa (C1 subtype) appear to be present in nearly all animal phyla. We here describe a second subtype, C2, containing multiple LDLa motifs, which was discovered in echinoderms, mollusks and in one insect species (Pediculus humanis corporis). In addition, eight putative LGRs can be predicted from the genome data of the placozoan species Trichoplax adhaerens. They may represent an ancient form of the LGRs, however, more genomic data will be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  16. Analgesia and unwanted benzodiazepine effects in point-mutated mice expressing only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Ralvenius, William T; Benke, Dietmar; Acuña, Mario A; Rudolph, Uwe; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich

    2015-04-13

    Agonists at the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABAA receptors (BDZs) enhance synaptic inhibition through four subtypes (α1, α2, α3 and α5) of GABAA receptors (GABAAR). When applied to the spinal cord, they alleviate pathological pain; however, insufficient efficacy after systemic administration and undesired effects preclude their use in routine pain therapy. Previous work suggested that subtype-selective drugs might allow separating desired antihyperalgesia from unwanted effects, but the lack of selective agents has hitherto prevented systematic analyses. Here we use four lines of triple GABAAR point-mutated mice, which express only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAAR subtype at a time, to show that targeting only α2GABAARs achieves strong antihyperalgesia and reduced side effects (that is, no sedation, motor impairment and tolerance development). Additional pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses in these mice explain why clinically relevant antihyperalgesia cannot be achieved with nonselective BDZs. These findings should foster the development of innovative subtype-selective BDZs for novel indications such as chronic pain.

  17. Calcium/calmodulin‐dependent kinase II and nitric oxide synthase 1‐dependent modulation of ryanodine receptors during β‐adrenergic stimulation is restricted to the dyadic cleft

    PubMed Central

    Dries, Eef; Santiago, Demetrio J.; Johnson, Daniel M.; Gilbert, Guillaume; Holemans, Patricia; Korte, Sanne M.; Roderick, H. Llewelyn

    2016-01-01

    Key points The dyadic cleft, where coupled ryanodine receptors (RyRs) reside, is thought to serve as a microdomain for local signalling, as supported by distinct modulation of coupled RyRs dependent on Ca2+/calmodulin‐dependent kinase II (CaMKII) activation during high‐frequency stimulation.Sympathetic stimulation through β‐adrenergic receptors activates an integrated signalling cascade, enhancing Ca2+ cycling and is at least partially mediated through CaMKII.Here we report that CaMKII activation during β‐adrenergic signalling is restricted to the dyadic cleft, where it enhances activity of coupled RyRs thereby contributing to the increase in diastolic events. Nitric oxide synthase 1 equally participates in the local modulation of coupled RyRs.In contrast, the increase in the Ca2+ content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and related increase in the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient are primarily protein kinase A‐dependent.The present data extend the concept of microdomain signalling in the dyadic cleft and give perspectives for selective modulation of RyR subpopulations and diastolic events. Abstract In cardiac myocytes, β‐adrenergic stimulation enhances Ca2+ cycling through an integrated signalling cascade modulating L‐type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs), phospholamban and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Ca2+/calmodulin‐dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are proposed as prime mediators for increasing RyR open probability. We investigate whether this pathway is confined to the high Ca2+ microdomain of the dyadic cleft and thus to coupled RyRs. Pig ventricular myocytes are studied under whole‐cell voltage‐clamp and confocal line‐scan imaging with Fluo‐4 as a [Ca2+]i indicator. Following conditioning depolarizing pulses, spontaneous RyR activity is recorded as Ca2+ sparks, which are assigned to coupled and non‐coupled RyR clusters. Isoproterenol (ISO) (10 nm) increases Ca2+ spark frequency in both populations of RyRs. However

  18. Metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors modulate fear-conditioning induced enhancement of prepulse inhibition in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dan; Huang, Juan; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2007-02-01

    Non-startling acoustic events presented shortly before an intense startling sound can inhibit the acoustic startle reflex. This phenomenon is called prepulse inhibition (PPI), and is widely used as a model of sensorimotor gating. The present study investigated whether PPI can be modulated by fear conditioning, whose acquisition can be blocked by the specific antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5 (mGluR5), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP). The results show that a gap embedded in otherwise continuous noise sounds, which were delivered by two spatially separated loudspeakers, could inhibit the startle reflex induced by an intense sound that was presented 50 ms after the gap. The inhibitory effect depended on the duration of the gap, and was enhanced by fear conditioning that was introduced by temporally pairing the gap with footshock. Intraperitoneal injection of MPEP (0.5 or 5mg/kg) 30 min before fear conditioning blocked the enhancing effect of fear conditioning on PPI, but did not affect either the baseline startle magnitude or PPI if no fear conditioning was introduced. These results indicate that PPI is enhanced when the prepulse signifies an aversive event after fear conditioning. Also, mGlu5Rs play a role in preserving the fear-conditioning-induced enhancement of PPI.

  19. Regulation of body temperature and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis by bombesin receptor subtype-3.

    PubMed

    Lateef, Dalya M; Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo; Xiao, Cuiying; Reitman, Marc L

    2014-03-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) regulates energy homeostasis, with Brs3 knockout (Brs3(-/y)) mice being hypometabolic, hypothermic, and hyperphagic and developing obesity. We now report that the reduced body temperature is more readily detected if body temperature is analyzed as a function of physical activity level and light/dark phase. Physical activity level correlated best with body temperature 4 min later. The Brs3(-/y) metabolic phenotype is not due to intrinsically impaired brown adipose tissue function or in the communication of sympathetic signals from the brain to brown adipose tissue, since Brs3(-/y) mice have intact thermogenic responses to stress, acute cold exposure, and β3-adrenergic activation, and Brs3(-/y) mice prefer a cooler environment. Treatment with the BRS-3 agonist MK-5046 increased brown adipose tissue temperature and body temperature in wild-type but not Brs3(-/y) mice. Intrahypothalamic infusion of MK-5046 increased body temperature. These data indicate that the BRS-3 regulation of body temperature is via a central mechanism, upstream of sympathetic efferents. The reduced body temperature in Brs3(-/y) mice is due to altered regulation of energy homeostasis affecting higher center regulation of body temperature, rather than an intrinsic defect in brown adipose tissue.

  20. Predictive In Silico Studies of Human 5-hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtype 2B (5-HT2B) and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Terry-Elinor; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors are neuromodulator neurotransmitter receptors which when activated generate a signal transduction pathway within cells resulting in cell-cell communication. 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2B (5-HT2B) is a subtype of the seven members of 5-hydroxytrytamine (5-HT) family of receptors which is the largest member of the super family of 7-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Not only do 5-HT receptors play physiological roles in the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal and endocrine function and the central nervous, but they also play a role in behavioral functions. In particular 5-HT2B receptor is wide spread with regards to its distribution throughout bodily tissues and is expressed at high levels in the lungs, peripheral tissues, liver, kidney and prostate just to name a few. Hence 5-HT2B participates in multiple biological functions including CNS regulation, regulation of gastrointestinal motality, cardiovascular regulation and 5-HT transport system regulation. While 5-HT2B is a viable drug target and has therapeutic indications for treating obesity, psychotherapy, Parkinson’s disease etc. there is a growing concern regarding adverse drug reactions, specifically valvulopathy associated with 5-HT2B agonists. Due to the sequence homology experienced by 5-HT2 subtypes there is also a concern regarding the off target effects of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C agonists. The concept of subtype selectivity is of paramount importance and can be tackled with the aid of in silico studies, specifically cheminformatics, to develop models to predict valvulopathy associated toxicity of drug candidates prior to clinical trials. This review has highlighted three in silico approaches thus far that have been successful in either predicting 5-HT2B toxicity of molecules or identifying important interactions between 5-HT2B and drug molecules that bring about valvulopathy related toxicities. PMID:23675941

  1. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC mediates antipsychotic-like effects via the M4 subtype.

    PubMed

    Watt, Marla L; Rorick-Kehn, Linda; Shaw, David B; Knitowski, Karen M; Quets, Anne T; Chesterfield, Amy K; McKinzie, David L; Felder, Christian C

    2013-12-01

    The generation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtype-selective compounds has been challenging, requiring use of nonpharmacological approaches, such as genetically engineered animals, to deepen our understanding of the potential that members of the muscarinic receptor subtype family hold as therapeutic drug targets. The muscarinic receptor agonist 'BuTAC' was previously shown to exhibit efficacy in animal models of psychosis, although the particular receptor subtype(s) responsible for such activity was unclear. Here, we evaluate the in vitro functional agonist and antagonist activity of BuTAC using an assay that provides a direct measure of G protein activation. In addition, we employ the conditioned avoidance response paradigm, an in vivo model predictive of antipsychotic activity, and mouse genetic deletion models to investigate which presynaptic mAChR subtype mediates the antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC. Our results show that, in vitro, BuTAC acts as a full agonist at the M2AChR and a partial agonist at the M1 and M4 receptors, with full antagonist activity at M3- and M5AChRs. In the mouse conditioned avoidance response (CAR) assay, BuTAC exhibits an atypical antipsychotic-like profile by selectively decreasing avoidance responses at doses that do not induce escape failures. CAR results using M2(-/-), M4(-/-), and M2/M4 (M2/M4(-/-)) mice found that the effects of BuTAC were near completely lost in M2/M4(-/-) double-knockout mice and potency of BuTAC was right-shifted in M4(-/-) as compared with wild-type and M2(-/-) mice. The M2/M4(-/-) mice showed no altered sensitivity to the antipsychotic effects of either haloperidol or clozapine, suggesting that these compounds mediate their actions in CAR via a non-mAChR-mediated mechanism. These data support a role for the M4AChR subtype in mediating the antipsychotic-like activity of BuTAC and implicate M4AChR agonism as a potential novel therapeutic mechanism for ameliorating symptoms associated with

  2. Role of specific muscarinic receptor subtypes in cholinergic parasympathomimetic responses, in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and pilocarpine-induced seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Bymaster, Frank P; Carter, Petra A; Yamada, Masahisa; Gomeza, Jesus; Wess, Jürgen; Hamilton, Susan E; Nathanson, Neil M; McKinzie, David L; Felder, Christian C

    2003-04-01

    Muscarinic agonist-induced parasympathomimetic effects, in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis and seizures were evaluated in wild-type and muscarinic M1-M5 receptor knockout mice. The muscarinic agonist oxotremorine induced marked hypothermia in all the knockout mice, but the hypothermia was reduced in M2 and to a lesser extent in M3 knockout mice. Oxotremorine-induced tremor was abolished only in the M2 knockout mice. Muscarinic agonist-induced salivation was reduced to the greatest extent in M3 knockout mice, to a lesser degree in M1 and M4 knockout mice, and was not altered in M2 and M5 knockout mice. Pupil diameter under basal conditions was increased only in the M3 knockout mice. Pilocarpine-induced increases in in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis were completely absent in hippocampus and cortex of M1 knockout mice, but in vivo phosphoinositide hydrolysis was unaltered in the M2-M5 knockout mice. A high dose of pilocarpine (300 mg/kg) caused seizures and lethality in wild-type and M2-M5 knockout mice, but produced neither effect in the M1 knockout mice. These data demonstrate a major role for M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in mediating parasympathomimetic effects. Muscarinic M1 receptors activate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in cortex and hippocampus of mice, consistent with the role of M1 receptors in cognition. Muscarinic M1 receptors appear to be the only muscarinic receptor subtype mediating seizures.

  3. Serotonin receptor subtypes required for ventilatory long-term facilitation and its enhancement after chronic intermittent hypoxia in awake rats.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michelle; Zhang, Yi; White, David P; Ling, Liming

    2004-02-01

    Respiratory long-term facilitation (LTF), a serotonin-dependent, persistent augmentation of respiratory activity after episodic hypoxia, is enhanced by pretreatment of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH; 5 min 11-12% O2-5 min air, 12 h/night for 7 nights). The present study examined the effects of methysergide (serotonin 5-HT1,2,5,6,7 receptor antagonist), ketanserin (5-HT2 antagonist), or clozapine (5-HT2,6,7 antagonist) on both ventilatory LTF and the CIH effect on ventilatory LTF in conscious male adult rats to determine which specific receptor subtype(s) is involved. In untreated rats (i.e., animals not exposed to CIH), LTF, induced by five episodes of 5-min poikilocapnic hypoxia (10% O2) separated by 5-min normoxic intervals, was measured twice by plethysmography. Thus the measurement was conducted 1-2 days before (as control) and approximately 1 h after systemic injection of methysergide (1 mg/kg ip), ketanserin (1 mg/kg), or clozapine (1.5 mg/kg). Resting ventilation, metabolic rate, and hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were unchanged, but LTF ( approximately 18% above baseline) was eliminated by each drug. In CIH-treated rats, LTF was also measured twice, before and approximately 8 h after CIH. Vehicle, methysergide, ketanserin, or clozapine was injected approximately 1 h before the second measurement. Neither resting ventilation nor metabolic rate was changed after CIH and/or any drug. HVR was unchanged after methysergide and ketanserin but reduced in four of seven clozapine rats. The CIH-enhanced LTF ( approximately 28%) was abolished by methysergide and clozapine but only attenuated by ketanserin (to approximately 10%). Collectively, these data suggest that ventilatory LTF requires 5-HT2 receptors and that the CIH effect on LTF requires non-5-HT2 serotonin receptors, probably 5-HT6 and/or 5-HT7 subtype(s).

  4. Butyrate modulates the expression of. beta. -adrenergic receptor subtype in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Poksay, K.S.; Nakada, M.T.; Crooke, S.T.; Stadel, J.M.

    1986-03-05

    In mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex) affects a switch in ..beta..-adrenergic receptor (..beta..AR) subtype expression from ..beta../sub 1/AR to ..beta../sub 2/AR and increases total ..beta..AR number. They now demonstrate a similar effect by sodium butyrate (B) and find that the combined effect of these two gene-activating agents is greater than additive suggesting different mechanisms of action on the ..beta..AR. ..beta..AR are assayed in membranes prepared from 3T3-L1 cells using the radiolabeled ..beta..AR-specific antagonist (/sup 125/I)-cyanopindolol. ..beta..AR subtype is determined by competition binding of the ..beta../sub 2/AR-selective antagonist ICI 118.551 for the radioligand. B (2-10mM) causes a dose-dependent increase in total ..beta..AR number (up to 2-fold over control) and the proportion of ..beta../sub 2/AR. B (5mM) causes a time-dependent increase in total ..beta..AR number (2-fold) and the proportion of ..beta../sub 2/AR up to 24 hr. Dex maximally increases total ..beta..AR number (2-fold) when treated for 48 hr at concentrations greater than or equal to 100nM. B (2 or 5mM) together with dex (250nM) have a greater than additive effect on total ..beta..AR number at 24 hr (1.7-fold) and at 48 hr (1.4-2.4-fold, using 5 or 10mM B and dex greater than or equal to 10nM). The proportion of ..beta../sub 2/AR is also greater when both compounds are added together. In comparison with proprionate and valerate, B increases total ..beta..AR number and the proportion of ..beta../sub 2/AR to a greater extent and at lower concentrations. To determine a functional correlate to these findings, cells were pre-treated for 48 hr with B and/or dex, intracellular ATP labeled with /sup 3/H-adenine, followed by treatment with forskolin (10..mu..M) and ..beta..AR agonists. B caused a dramatic increase in /sup 3/H-cAMP produced compared to control and dex treatments and a greater than additive effect was again achieved when B and dex were

  5. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs.

    PubMed

    Pediani, John D; Ward, Richard J; Godin, Antoine G; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-06-17

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm(-2) human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior.

  6. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs*

    PubMed Central

    Pediani, John D.; Ward, Richard J.; Godin, Antoine G.; Marsango, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm−2 human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  7. Receptor mimicry by antibody F045–092 facilitates universal binding to the H3 subtype of influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Peter S.; Ohshima, Nobuko; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Yu, Wenli; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-04-10

    Influenza viruses present a significant health challenge each year, as in the H3N2 epidemic of 2012–2013. Here we describe an antibody, F045–092, that possesses broadly neutralizing activity against the entire H3 subtype and accommodates the natural variation and additional glycosylation in all strains tested from 1963 to 2011. Crystal structures of F045–092 in complex with HAs from 1975 and 2011 H3N2 viruses reveal the structural basis for its neutralization breadth through insertion of its 23-residue HCDR3 into the receptor-binding site that involves striking receptor mimicry. F045–092 extends its recognition to divergent subtypes, including H1, H2 and H13, using the enhanced avidity of its IgG to overcome lower-affinity Fab binding, as observed with other antibodies that target the receptor-binding site. This unprecedented level of antibody cross-reactivity against the H3 subtype can potentially inform on development of a pan-H3 vaccine or small-molecule therapeutics.

  8. Muscle weakness in Ryr1I4895T/WT knock-in mice as a result of reduced ryanodine receptor Ca2+ ion permeation and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Ryan E.; Orynbayev, Murat; Xu, Le; Andronache, Zoita; Apostol, Simona; Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.; Meissner, Gerhard; Melzer, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The type 1 isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) is the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that is activated during skeletal muscle excitation–contraction (EC) coupling. Mutations in the RYR1 gene cause several rare inherited skeletal muscle disorders, including malignant hyperthermia and central core disease (CCD). The human RYR1I4898T mutation is one of the most common CCD mutations. To elucidate the mechanism by which RYR1 function is altered by this mutation, we characterized in vivo muscle strength, EC coupling, SR Ca2+ content, and RYR1 Ca2+ release channel function using adult heterozygous Ryr1I4895T/+ knock-in mice (IT/+). Compared with age-matched wild-type (WT) mice, IT/+ mice exhibited significantly reduced upper body and grip strength. In spite of normal total SR Ca2+ content, both electrically evoked and 4-chloro-m-cresol–induced Ca2+ release were significantly reduced and slowed in single intact flexor digitorum brevis fibers isolated from 4–6-mo-old IT/+ mice. The sensitivity of the SR Ca2+ release mechanism to activation was not enhanced in fibers of IT/+ mice. Single-channel measurements of purified recombinant channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers revealed that Ca2+ permeation was abolished for homotetrameric IT channels and significantly reduced for heterotetrameric WT:IT channels. Collectively, these findings indicate that in vivo muscle weakness observed in IT/+ knock-in mice arises from a reduction in the magnitude and rate of RYR1 Ca2+ release during EC coupling that results from the mutation producing a dominant-negative suppression of RYR1 channel Ca2+ ion permeation. PMID:21149547

  9. Dystrophin Threshold Level Necessary for Normalization of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase, Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, and Ryanodine Receptor-Calcium Release Channel Type 1 Nitrosylation in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy Dystrophinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gentil, Christel; Le Guiner, Caroline; Falcone, Sestina; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Benkhelifa-Ziyyat, Sofia; Guigand, Lydie; Montus, Marie; Servais, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Piétri-Rouxel, France

    2016-09-01

    At present, the clinically most advanced strategy to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the exon-skipping strategy. Whereas antisense oligonucleotide-based clinical trials are underway for DMD, it is essential to determine the dystrophin restoration threshold needed to ensure improvement of muscle physiology at the molecular level. A preclinical trial has been conducted in golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs treated in a forelimb by locoregional delivery of rAAV8-U7snRNA to promote exon skipping on the canine dystrophin messenger. Here, we exploited rAAV8-U7snRNA-transduced GRMD muscle samples, well characterized for their percentage of dystrophin-positive fibers, with the aim of defining the threshold of dystrophin rescue necessary for normalization of the status of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mu (nNOSμ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel type 1 (RyR1), crucial actors for efficient contractile function. Results showed that restoration of dystrophin in 40% of muscle fibers is needed to decrease abnormal cytosolic nNOSμ expression and to reduce overexpression of iNOS, these two parameters leading to a reduction in the NO level in the muscle fibers. Furthermore, the same percentage of dystrophin-positive fibers of 40% was associated with the normalization of RyR1 nitrosylation status and with stabilization of the RyR1-calstabin1 complex that is required to facilitate coupled gating. We concluded that a minimal threshold of 40% of dystrophin-positive fibers is necessary for the reinstatement of central proteins needed for proper muscle contractile function, and thus identified a rate of dystrophin expression significantly improving, at the molecular level, the dystrophic muscle physiology.

  10. Muscle weakness in Ryr1I4895T/WT knock-in mice as a result of reduced ryanodine receptor Ca2+ ion permeation and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Loy, Ryan E; Orynbayev, Murat; Xu, Le; Andronache, Zoita; Apostol, Simona; Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H; Meissner, Gerhard; Melzer, Werner; Dirksen, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    The type 1 isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) is the Ca(2+) release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that is activated during skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. Mutations in the RYR1 gene cause several rare inherited skeletal muscle disorders, including malignant hyperthermia and central core disease (CCD). The human RYR1(I4898T) mutation is one of the most common CCD mutations. To elucidate the mechanism by which RYR1 function is altered by this mutation, we characterized in vivo muscle strength, EC coupling, SR Ca(2+) content, and RYR1 Ca(2+) release channel function using adult heterozygous Ryr1(I4895T/+) knock-in mice (IT/+). Compared with age-matched wild-type (WT) mice, IT/+ mice exhibited significantly reduced upper body and grip strength. In spite of normal total SR Ca(2+) content, both electrically evoked and 4-chloro-m-cresol-induced Ca(2+) release were significantly reduced and slowed in single intact flexor digitorum brevis fibers isolated from 4-6-mo-old IT/+ mice. The sensitivity of the SR Ca(2+) release mechanism to activation was not enhanced in fibers of IT/+ mice. Single-channel measurements of purified recombinant channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers revealed that Ca(2+) permeation was abolished for homotetrameric IT channels and significantly reduced for heterotetrameric WT:IT channels. Collectively, these findings indicate that in vivo muscle weakness observed in IT/+ knock-in mice arises from a reduction in the magnitude and rate of RYR1 Ca(2+) release during EC coupling that results from the mutation producing a dominant-negative suppression of RYR1 channel Ca(2+) ion permeation.

  11. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, M.A.; Fraser, C.M. )

    1990-12-14

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of (3H)-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. (3H)-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties.

  12. Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Subtype 5 in Addiction: a Therapeutic Window

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abundant evidence at the anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular levels implicates metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) in addiction. Consistently, the effects of a wide range of doses of different mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) have been tested in various animal models of addiction. Here, these studies were subjected to a systematic review to find out if mGluR5 NAMs have a therapeutic potential that can be translated to the clinic. Methods: Literature on consumption/self-administration and reinstatement of drug seeking as outcomes of interest published up to April 2015 was retrieved via PubMed. The review focused on the effects of systemic (i.p., i.v., s.c.) administration of the mGluR5 NAMs 3-((2-Methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl)pyridine (MTEP) and 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) on paradigms with cocaine, ethanol, nicotine, and food in rats. Results: MTEP and MPEP were found to reduce self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine at doses ≥1mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg, respectively. Dose-response relationship resembled a sigmoidal curve, with low doses not reaching statistical significance and high doses reliably inhibiting self-administration of drugs of abuse. Importantly, self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine, but not food, was reduced by MTEP and MPEP in the dose range of 1 to 2mg/kg and 2.5 to 3.2mg/kg, respectively. This dose range corresponds to approximately 50% to 80% mGluR5 occupancy. Interestingly, the limited data found in mice and monkeys showed a similar therapeutic window. Conclusion: Altogether, this review suggests a therapeutic window for mGluR5 NAMs that can be translated to the treatment of substance-related and addictive disorders. PMID:26802568

  13. Blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 relieves maladaptive chronic stress consequences.

    PubMed

    Peterlik, Daniel; Stangl, Christina; Bauer, Amelie; Bludau, Anna; Keller, Jana; Grabski, Dominik; Killian, Tobias; Schmidt, Dominic; Zajicek, Franziska; Jaeschke, Georg; Lindemann, Lothar; Reber, Stefan O; Flor, Peter J; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Etiology and pharmacotherapy of stress-related psychiatric conditions and somatoform disorders are areas of high unmet medical need. Stressors holding chronic plus psychosocial components thereby bear the highest health risk. Although the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) is well studied in the context of acute stress-induced behaviors and physiology, virtually nothing is known about its potential involvement in chronic psychosocial stress. Using the mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator CTEP (2-chloro-4-[2-[2,5-dimethyl-1-[4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]imidazol-4yl]ethynyl]pyridine), a close analogue of the clinically active drug basimglurant - but optimized for rodent studies, as well as mGlu5-deficient mice in combination with a mouse model of male subordination (termed CSC, chronic subordinate colony housing), we demonstrate that mGlu5 mediates multiple physiological, immunological, and behavioral consequences of chronic psychosocial stressor exposure. For instance, CTEP dose-dependently relieved hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunctions, colonic inflammation as well as the CSC-induced increase in innate anxiety; genetic ablation of mGlu5 in mice largely reproduced the stress-protective effects of CTEP and additionally ameliorated CSC-induced physiological anxiety. Interestingly, CSC also induced an upregulation of mGlu5 in the hippocampus, a stress-regulating brain area. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that mGlu5 is an important mediator for a wide range of chronic psychosocial stress-induced alterations and a potentially valuable drug target for the treatment of chronic stress-related pathologies in man.

  14. Receptor subtype-dependent positive and negative modulation of GABA(A) receptor function by niflumic acid, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Sinkkonen, Saku T; Mansikkamäki, Salla; Möykkynen, Tommi; Lüddens, Hartmut; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Korpi, Esa R

    2003-09-01

    In addition to blocking cyclooxygenases, members of the fenamate group of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been proposed to affect brain GABAA receptors. Using quantitative autoradiography with GABAA receptor-associated ionophore ligand [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) on rat brain sections, one of the fenamates, niflumate, at micromolar concentration was found to potentiate GABA actions in most brain areas, whereas being in the cerebellar granule cell layer an efficient antagonist similar to furosemide. With recombinant GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we found that niflumate potentiated 3 microM GABA responses up to 160% and shifted the GABA concentration-response curve to the left in alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, the predominant GABAA receptor subtype in the brain. This effect needed the gamma2 subunit, because on alpha1beta2 receptors, niflumate exhibited solely an antagonistic effect at high concentrations. The potentiation was not abolished by the specific benzodiazepine site antagonist flumazenil. Niflumate acted as a potent antagonist of alpha6beta2 receptors (with or without gamma2 subunit) and of alphaXbeta2gamma2 receptors containing a chimeric alpha1 to alpha6 subunit, which suggests that niflumate antagonism is dependent on the same transmembrane domain 1- and 2-including fragment of the alpha6 subunit as furosemide antagonism. This antagonism was noncompetitive because the maximal GABA response, but not the potency, was reduced by niflumate. These data show receptor subtype-dependent positive and negative modulatory actions of niflumate on GABAA receptors at clinically relevant concentrations, and they suggest the existence of a novel positive modulatory site on alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors that is dependent on the gamma2 subunit but not associated with the benzodiazepine binding site.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated cell proliferation through a prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Koide, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2004-09-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 inhibits hepatic stellate cell (HSC) mitogenesis. PGE-specific receptors are divided into four subtypes that are coupled either to Ca2+ mobilization (EP1 and EP3) or to the stimulation of adenyl cyclase (EP2 and EP4). The aims of the current study were to identify PGE receptor subtypes in cultured rat HSC and to examine which PGE receptor subtype(s) mediates the inhibitory effect of PGE2 on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated proliferation. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to detect PGE receptor subtype mRNA expression. Cell proliferation was determined by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation, and intracellular cyclic AMP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cultured rat HSC expressed mRNAs for all four subtypes of PGE receptor. PGE2- and EP2-selective agonist produced dose-dependent inhibitory effects on PDGF-stimulated proliferation. Neither EP1-, EP3-, nor EP4-selective agonists showed any inhibitory effect. An adenylate cyclase inhibitor strongly blunted the inhibition of DNA synthesis elicited by PGE2 and the EP2 agonist. The EP2 agonist generated higher and more prolonged increases in intracellular cyclic AMP than the EP4 agonist. Activation of the PGE EP2 receptor has an antiproliferative effect in HSC that may be mediated by cyclic AMP-related signal transduction pathways.

  16. Activation of classical estrogen receptor subtypes reduces tight junction disruption of brain endothelial cells under ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin A; Yoon, Joo Chun; Kim, Minsuk; Park, Eun-Mi

    2016-03-01

    Ischemic stroke, which induces oxidative stress in the brain, disrupts tight junctions (TJs) between brain endothelial cells, resulting in blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and brain edema. Estrogen reduces oxidative stress and protects brain endothelial cells from ischemic insult. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effects of estrogen on TJ disruption and to examine the roles of classical estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ERα- and ERβ, in estrogen effects in brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3) exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) injury. Estrogen pretreatment prevented OGD/R-induced decreases in cell viability and TJ protein levels. ERα- and ERβ-specific agonists also reduced TJ disruption. Knockdown of ERα or ERβ expression partially inhibited the effects of estrogen, but completely reversed the effects of corresponding ER subtype-specific agonists on the outcomes of OGD/R. During the early reperfusion period, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α/vascular endothelial growth factor was associated with decreased expression of occludin and claudin-5, respectively, and these changes in TJ protein levels were differentially regulated by ER subtype-specific agonists. Our results suggest that ERα and ERβ activation reduce TJ disruption via inhibition of signaling molecules after ischemic injury and that targeting each ER subtype can be a useful strategy for protecting the BBB from ischemic stroke in postmenopausal women.

  17. Structure-based prediction of subtype-selectivity of Histamine H3 receptor selective antagonists in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Fristrup, Peter; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Histamine receptors (HRs) are excellent drug targets for the treatment of diseases such as schizophrenia, psychosis, depression, migraine, allergies, asthma ulcers, and hypertension. Among them, the human H3 Histamine receptor (hH3HR) antagonists have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, and obesity.1 However, many of these drug candidates cause undesired side effects through the cross-reactivity with other histamine receptor subtypes. In order to develop improved selectivity and activity for such treatments it would be useful to have the three dimensional structures for all four HRs. We report here the predicted structures of four HR subtypes (H1, H2, H3, and H4) using the GEnSeMBLE (GPCR Ensemble of Structures in Membrane BiLayer Environment) Monte Carlo protocol.2 sampling ~ 35 million combinations of helix packings to predict the 10 most stable packings for each of the four subtypes. Then we used these best 10 protein structures with the DarwinDock Monte Carlo protocol to sample ~ 50,000*20 poses to predict the optimum ligand-protein structures for various agonists and antagonists. We find that E2065.46 contributes most in binding H3 selective agonists (5, 6, 7) in agreement with experimental mutation studies. We also find that conserved E5.46/ S5.43 in both of hH3HR and hH4HR are involved in H3/ H4 subtype selectivity. In addition, we find that M3786.55 in hH3HR provides additional hydrophobic interactions different from hH4HR (the corresponding amino acid of T3236.55 in hH4HR) to provide additional subtype bias. From these studies we developed a pharmacophore model based on our predictions for known hH3HR selective antagonists in clinical study [ABT-239 1, GSK-189,254 2, PF-3654746 3, and BF2.649 (Tiprolisant) 4] that suggests critical selectivity directing elements are: the basic proton interacting with D1143.32, the spacer, the aromatic

  18. Effects of lead exposure on hippocampal metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 and 7 in developmental rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Yan, Huai C; Yang, Bo; Tong, Lu S; Zou, Yu X; Tian, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Background A complete explanation of the mechanisms by which Pb2+ exerts toxic effects on developmental central nervous system remains unknown. Glutamate is critical to the developing brain through various subtypes of ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors have been considered as a principal target in lead-induced neurotoxicity. The relationship between mGluR3/mGluR7 and synaptic plasticity had been verified by many recent studies. The present study aimed to examine the role of mGluR3/mGluR7 in lead-induced neurotoxicity. Methods Twenty-four adult and female rats were randomly selected and placed on control or 0.2% lead acetate during gestation and lactation. Blood lead and hippocampal lead levels of pups were analyzed at weaning to evaluate the actual lead content at the end of the exposure. Impairments of short -term memory and long-term memory of pups were assessed by tests using Morris water maze and by detection of hippocampal ultrastructural alterations on electron microscopy. The impact of lead exposure on mGluR3 and mGluR7 mRNA expression in hippocampal tissue of pups were investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and its potential role in lead neurotoxicity were discussed. Results Lead levels of blood and hippocampi in the lead-exposed rats were significantly higher than those in the controls (P < 0.001). In tests using Morris Water Maze, the overall decrease in goal latency and swimming distance was taken to indicate that controls had shorter latencies and distance than lead-exposed rats (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001 by repeated-measures analysis of variance). On transmission electron microscopy neuronal ultrastructural alterations were observed and the results of real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that exposure to 0.2% lead acetate did not substantially change gene expression of mGluR3 and mGluR7 mRNA compared with controls. Conclusion Exposure to lead before and after

  19. Sequestration of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor hm1-hm5 subtypes: effect of G protein-coupled receptor kinases GRK2, GRK4, GRK5 and GRK6.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, H; Okuno, E; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-03-01

    Sequestration of porcine muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) expressed in COS-7 cells is facilitated by coexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2). We examined the effect of coexpression of GRK2, GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 on sequestration of human m1-m5 receptors expressed in COS-7 cells, which was assessed as loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity from the cell surface. Sequestration of m4 receptors as well as m2 receptors was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 and attenuated by coexpression of the dominant negative form of GRK2 (DN-GRK2). Sequestration of m3 and m5 receptors also was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 but not affected by coexpression of DN-GRK2. On the other hand, proportions of sequestered m1 receptors were not significantly different with coexpression of GRK2 and DN-GRK2. GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 did not facilitate sequestration of m1-m5 receptors in COS-7 cells, except that the sequestration of m2 receptors tended to be facilitated by coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6. However, coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5, but not GRK6, in BHK-21 cells facilitated sequestration of m2, but not m3, receptors. These results indicate that the effect of GRK2 to facilitate receptor sequestration is not restricted to m2 receptors but is generalized to other muscarinic receptors except m1 receptors and that other kinases, including GRK4 delta, GRK5 and endogenous kinase(s) in COS-7 cells, also contribute to sequestration of m2 and m4 receptors.

  20. Angiotensin II binding sites in the rat fetus: characterization of receptor subtypes and interaction with guanyl nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Feuillan, P P; Millan, M A; Aguilera, G

    1993-03-19

    Angiotensin II (AII) receptor subtypes were studied in the 18-day gestation fetal rat, using two non-peptide AII antagonists: (2-n-butyl-4-chloro-5-hydroxymethyl-1-(2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl) biphenyl-4-yl)methyl)imidazol (DuP 753; type 1 (AT1) specific), and 1-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)methyl-5-diphenacetyl -4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (PD 123177; type 2 (AT2) specific). Autoradiography using 125I(-)[Sar1,Ile8]AII showed that 10 microM PD 123177 decreased binding to near-nonspecific levels in skin, skeletal muscle and adrenal medulla, whereas 10 microM DuP 753 blocked binding in the liver and lung. Studies in skin and liver membranes confirmed the autoradiographic data: AT1 receptors were predominant in the liver (95%), and AT2 in the skin (97%). There was no cross-reactivity between receptor subtype and the heterologous antagonist up to a concentration of 10 microM. In both skin and liver, 2 mM dithiothreitol enhanced the binding of AT2 receptors by increasing receptor affinity, but inhibited binding of AT1 by decreasing the receptor number. In the absence of antagonists, guanyl nucleotides, added at equilibrium, caused marked dissociation of 125I-AII binding in liver membranes, but had minimal effect in skin. However, dissociation occurred in the skin when AT2 sites were blocked with 10 microM PD 123177, and in liver, dissociation was not observed when AT1 sites were blocked with DuP 753. Hence, in contrast to classical AII target tissues, which contain predominantly AT1, most of the sites in fetal skin and skeletal muscle are AT2. The demonstration that the effects of guanyl nucleotides are selective for receptor subtype suggests that the AT1 receptor, but not the AT2, is coupled to cell function via guanyl nucleotide binding proteins. The functional importance of the AT2 receptors and their role in fetal physiology is under current investigation.

  1. Versatility or promiscuity: the estrogen receptors, control of ligand selectivity and an update on subtype selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hui Wen; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2014-08-26

    The estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of versatile receptors. They regulate an enormity of processes starting in early life and continuing through sexual reproduction, development, and end of life. This review provides a background and structural perspective for the ERs as part of the nuclear receptor superfamily and discusses the ER versatility and promiscuity. The wide repertoire of ER actions is mediated mostly through ligand-activated transcription factors and many DNA response elements in most tissues and organs. Their versatility, however, comes with the drawback of promiscuous interactions with structurally diverse exogenous chemicals with potential for a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Even when interacting with endogenous hormones, ER actions can have adverse effects in disease progression. Finally, how nature controls ER specificity and how the subtle differences in receptor subtypes are exploited in pharmaceutical design to achieve binding specificity and subtype selectivity for desired biological response are discussed. The intent of this review is to complement the large body of literature with emphasis on most recent developments in selective ER ligands.

  2. Analysis of central opioid receptor subtype antagonism of hypotonic and hypertonic saline intake in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, R J; Glass, M J; Koch, J E

    1995-01-01

    Intake of either hypotonic or hypertonic saline solutions is modulated in part by the endogenous opioid system. Morphine and selective mu and delta opioid agonists increase saline intake, while general opioid antagonists reduce saline intake in rats. The present study evaluated whether intracerebroventricular administration of general (naltrexone) and selective mu (beta-funaltrexamine, 5-20 micrograms), mu, (naloxonazine, 50 micrograms), kappa (nor-binaltorphamine, 5-20 micrograms), delta (naltrindole, 20 micrograms), or delta 1 (DALCE, 40 micrograms) opioid receptor subtype antagonists altered water intake and either hypotonic (0.6%) or hypertonic (1.7%) saline intake in water-deprived (24 h) rats over a 3-h time course in a two-bottle choice test. Whereas peripheral naltrexone (0.5-2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced water intake and hypertonic saline intake, central naltrexone (1-50 micrograms) significantly reduced water intake and hypotonic saline intake. Water intake was significantly reduced following mu and kappa receptor antagonism, but not following mu 1, delta, or delta 1 receptor antagonism. In contrast, neither hypotonic nor hypertonic saline intake was significantly altered by any selective antagonist. These data are discussed in terms of opioid receptor subtype control over saline intake relative to the animal's hydrational state and the roles of palatability and/or salt appetite.

  3. Cartography of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptor Subtypes in Prefrontal Cortex and Its Projections.

    PubMed

    Mengod, Guadalupe; Palacios, José M; Cortés, Roser

    2015-07-15

    Since the development of chemical neuroanatomical tools in the 1960s, a tremendous wealth of information has been generated on the anatomical components of the serotonergic system, at the microscopic level in the brain including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC receives a widespread distribution of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) terminals from the median and dorsal raphe nuclei. 5-HT receptors were first visualized using radioligand autoradiography in the late 1980s and early 1990s and showed, in contrast to 5-HT innervation, a differential distribution of binding sites associated with different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Due to the cloning of the different 5-HT receptor subtype genes in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was possible, using in situ hybridization histochemistry, to localize cells expressing mRNA for these receptors. Double in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry allowed for the chemical characterization of the phenotype of cells expressing 5-HT receptors. Tract tracing technology allowed a detailed cartography of the neuronal connections of PFC and other brain areas. Based on these data, maps have been constructed that reflect our current understanding of the different circuits where 5-HT receptors can modulate the electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral functions of the PFC. We will review current knowledge regarding the cellular localization of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in mammalian PFC and their possible functions in the neuronal circuits of the PFC. We will discuss data generated in our laboratory as well as in others, focusing on localization in the pyramidal and GABAergic neuronal cell populations in different mammalian species using molecular neuroanatomy and on the connections with other brain regions.

  4. Age-dependent effects on social interaction of NMDA GluN2A receptor subtype-selective antagonism.

    PubMed

    Green, Torrian L; Burket, Jessica A; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2016-07-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission is implicated in the regulation of normal sociability in mice. The heterotetrameric NMDA receptor is composed of two obligatory GluN1 and either two "modulatory" GluN2A or GluN2B receptor subunits. GluN2A and GluN2B-containing receptors differ in terms of their developmental expression, distribution between synaptic and extrasynaptic locations, and channel kinetic properties, among other differences. Because age-dependent differences in disruptive effects of GluN2A and GluN2B subtype-selective antagonists on sociability and locomotor activity have been reported in rats, the current investigation explored age-dependent effects of PEAQX, a GluN2A subtype-selective antagonist, on sociability, stereotypic behaviors emerging during social interaction, and spatial working memory in 4- and 8-week old male Swiss Webster mice. The data implicate an age-dependent contribution of GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors to the regulation of normal social interaction in mice. Specifically, at a dose of PEAQX devoid of any effect on locomotor activity and mouse rotarod performance, the social interaction of 8-week old mice was disrupted without any effect on the social salience of a stimulus mouse. Moreover, PEAQX attenuated stereotypic behavior emerging during social interaction in 4- and 8-week old mice. However, PEAQX had no effect on spontaneous alternations, a measure of spatial working memory, suggesting that neural circuits mediating sociability and spatial working memory may be discrete and dissociable from each other. Also, the data suggest that the regulation of stereotypic behaviors and sociability may occur independently of each other. Because expression of GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors occurs at a later developmental stage, they may be more involved in mediating the pathogenesis of ASDs in patients with histories of "regression" after a period of normal development than GluN2B receptors.

  5. Sphingosine 1-phosphate protects primary human keratinocytes from apoptosis via nitric oxide formation through the receptor subtype S1P₃.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Elisabeth I; Potteck, Henrik; Schüppel, Melanie; Manggau, Marianti; Wahydin, Elly; Kleuser, Burkhard

    2012-12-01

    Although the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been identified to induce cell growth arrest of human keratinocytes, the sphingolipid effectively protects these epidermal cells from apoptosis. The molecular mechanism of the anti-apoptotic action induced by S1P is less characterized. Apart from S1P, endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO•) has been recognized as a potent modulator of apoptosis in keratinocytes. Therefore, it was of great interest to elucidate whether S1P protects human keratinocytes via a NO•-dependent signalling pathway. Indeed, S1P induced an activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human keratinocytes leading to an enhanced formation of NO•. Most interestingly, the cell protective effect of S1P was almost completely abolished in the presence of the eNOS inhibitor L-NAME as well as in eNOS-deficient keratinocytes indicating that the sphingolipid metabolite S1P protects human keratinocytes from apoptosis via eNOS activation and subsequent production of protective amounts of NO•. It is well established that most of the known actions of S1P are mediated by a family of five specific G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, the involvement of S1P-receptor subtypes in S1P-mediated eNOS activation has been examined. Indeed, this study clearly shows that the S1P(3) is the exclusive receptor subtype in human keratinocytes which mediates eNOS activation and NO• formation in response to S1P. In congruence, when the S1P(3) receptor subtype is abrogated, S1P almost completely lost its ability to protect human keratinocytes from apoptosis.

  6. Dissociation of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptor subtypes in the retrieval of cocaine-associated memory.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Michael K; Otis, James M; Mueller, Devin

    2016-01-01

    Drug seeking is maintained by encounters with drug-associated cues, and disrupting retrieval of these drug-cue associations would reduce the risk of relapse. Retrieval of cocaine-associated memories is dependent on β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) activation, and blockade of these receptors induces a persistent retrieval deficit. Whether retrieval of cocaine-associated memory is mediated by a specific β-AR subtype, however, remains unclear. Using a cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, we examined whether retrieval of a cocaine CPP memory is mediated collectively by β1- and β2-ARs, or by one of these β-AR subtypes alone. We show that co-blockade of β1- and β2-ARs abolished CPP expression on that and subsequent drug-free CPP tests, resulting in a long-lasting retrieval deficit that prevented subsequent cocaine-induced reinstatement. To dissociate the necessity of either β1- or β2-ARs alone, we administered subtype-specific antagonists prior to retrieval. Administration of a β1-AR antagonist before the initial CPP trial dose-dependently reduced expression of a CPP on that and subsequent drug-free trials as compared to vehicle administration. In contrast, administration of a β2-AR antagonist had no effect on initial CPP expression, although the highest dose reduced subsequent CPP expression. Importantly, either β1- or β2-AR blockade prior to an initial retrieval trial prevented subsequent cocaine-induced reinstatement. Our findings indicate that the β1-AR subtype mediates retrieval of a cocaine CPP, and that acutely blocking either β1- or β2-ARs can prevent subsequent cocaine-induced reinstatement. Thus, β-AR antagonists, particularly β1-ARs antagonists, could serve as adjuncts for addiction therapies to prevent retrieval of drug-associated memories and provide protection against relapse.

  7. Subtype-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists enhance the responsiveness to citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Christensen, Jeppe K; Olsen, Gunnar M; Peters, Dan; Mirza, Naheed R; Redrobe, John P

    2011-10-01

    Nicotine increases serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal activity and facilitates serotonin and noradrenaline release. Accordingly, nicotine enhances antidepressant-like actions of reuptake inhibitors selective for serotonin or noradrenaline in the mouse forced swim test and the mouse tail suspension test. Both high-affinity α4β2 and low-affinity α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are implicated in nicotine-mediated release of serotonin and noradrenaline. The present study therefore investigated whether selective agonism of α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors would affect the mouse forced swim test activity of two antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, namely the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. Subthreshold and threshold doses of citalopram (3 and 10 mg/kg) or reboxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg) were tested alone and in combination with the novel α4β2-selective partial nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, NS3956 (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) or the α7-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, PNU-282987 (10 and 30 mg/kg). Alone, NS3956 and PNU-282987 were devoid of activity in the mouse forced swim test, but both 1.0 mg/kg NS3956 and 30 mg/kg PNU-282987 enhanced the effect of citalopram and also reboxetine. The data suggest that the activity of citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test can be enhanced by agonists at either α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting that both nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes may be involved in the nicotine-enhanced action of antidepressants.

  8. Effects of the xenoestrogen bisphenol A in diencephalic regions of the teleost fish Coris julis occur preferentially via distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Alo', Raffaella; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Madeo, Maria; Giusi, Giuseppina; Carelli, Antonio; Canonaco, Marcello

    2005-04-15

    The xenoestrogen bisphenol A, a contaminant used in the manufacturing of polymers for many consumer products, has been shown to mimic estrogenic actions. This xenoestrogen regulates secretion and expression of pituitary lactotrophs plus morphological and structural features of estrogen target tissues in rodents. Recently, ecological hazards produced by bisphenol A have drawn interests towards the effects of this environmental chemical on neurobiological functions of aquatic vertebrates of which little is known. In this study, the effects of bisphenol A on the distribution of the biologically more active somatostatin receptor subtypes in diencephalic regions of the teleost fish Coris julis were assessed using nonpeptide agonists (L-779, 976 and L-817, 818) that are highly selective for subtype(2) and subtype(5), respectively. Bisphenol A proved to be responsible for highly significant increased binding levels of subtype(2) in hypothalamic areas, while markedly decreased levels of subtype(5) were found in these diencephalic areas, as well as in the medial preglomerular nucleus. The extensive distribution of somatostatin receptor subtype(2) and subtype(5) in the teleost diencephalic areas suggests that, like in mammals, this receptor system may not only be involved in enhanced hypophysiotropic neurohormonal functions but might also promote neuroplasticity events.

  9. Hyperspectral multiplex single-particle tracking of different receptor subtypes labeled with quantum dots in live neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, Simon; Sylvestre, Jean-Philippe; Marcet, Stephane; Mangiarini, Francesca; Bourgoin, Brice; Verhaegen, Marc; Blais-Ouellette, Sébastien; De Koninck, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy of existing therapies and the discovery of innovative treatments for central nervous system (CNS) diseases have been limited by the lack of appropriate methods to investigate complex molecular processes at the synaptic level. To improve our capability to investigate complex mechanisms of synaptic signaling and remodeling, we designed a fluorescence hyperspectral imaging platform to simultaneously track different subtypes of individual neurotransmitter receptors trafficking in and out of synapses. This imaging platform allows simultaneous image acquisition of at least five fluorescent markers in living neurons with a high-spatial resolution. We used quantum dots emitting at different wavelengths and functionalized to specifically bind to single receptors on the membrane of living neurons. The hyperspectral imaging platform enabled the simultaneous optical tracking of five different synaptic proteins, including subtypes of glutamate receptors (mGluR and AMPAR) and postsynaptic signaling proteins. It also permitted the quantification of their mobility after treatments with various pharmacological agents. This technique provides an efficient method to monitor several synaptic proteins at the same time, which could accelerate the screening of effective compounds for treatment of CNS disorders.

  10. Pharmacological characterization of (4R)-alkyl glutamate analogues at the ionotropic glutamate receptors--focus on subtypes iGlu(5-7).

    PubMed

    Bunch, Lennart; Gefflaut, Thierry; Alaux, Sebastien; Sagot, Emanuelle; Nielsen, Birgitte; Pickering, Darryl S

    2009-05-01

    The kainic acid (kainate, KA) receptors belong to the class of ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors in the central nervous system. Five subtypes have been identified, which have been termed KA(1,2) and iGlu(5-7). In the search for subtype selective ligands, alpha-amino-5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ATPA), (4R)-methyl Glu (1a), and E-4-neopentylidene Glu (2f) have all previously been reported as selective agonists for the iGlu(5) receptor subtype. In this paper, we present the pharmacological evaluation of a five-compound series of (4R)-alkyl Glu analogs (1b-e,g) which may be envisaged as conformationally released designs of ATPA and 4-alkylidenes 2a-h. Most notable is the pharmacological profile for (4R)-isopentyl Glu (1g) which shows a 10-fold increase in binding affinity for the iGlu(5) receptor subtype (K(i)=20.5 nM) in comparison with its E-4-alkylidene structural isomer 2g. Furthermore, 1g displays high selectivity over other KA receptor subtypes (KA(1,2) and iGlu(6,7)), AMPA-, and NMDA receptors (2050 and >5000 fold, respectively).

  11. Receptor Binding Profiles of Avian Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Subtypes on Human Cells as a Predictor of Pandemic Potential ▿ ‖

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Holly; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe; Ren, Junyuan; Loureiro, Silvia; Pickles, Raymond J.; Barclay, Wendy S.; Jones, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    The host adaptation of influenza virus is partly dependent on the sialic acid (SA) isoform bound by the viral hemagglutinin (HA). Avian influenza viruses preferentially bind the α-2,3 SA and human influenza viruses the α-2,6 isoform. Each isoform is predominantly associated with different surface epithelial cell types of the human upper airway. Using recombinant HAs and human tracheal airway epithelial cells in vitro and ex vivo, we show that many avian HA subtypes do not adhere to this canonical view of SA specificity. The propensity of avian viruses to adapt to human receptors may thus be more widespread than previously supposed. PMID:21106732

  12. mRNA expression profile of serotonin receptor subtypes and distribution of serotonergic terminations in marmoset brain

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Rammohan; Watakabe, Akiya; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    To better understand serotonin function in the primate brain, we examined the mRNA expression patterns of all the 13 members of the serotonin receptor (5HTR) family, by in situ hybridization (ISH) and the distribution of serotonergic terminations by serotonin transporter (SERT) protein immunohistochemical analysis. Ten of the 13 5HTRs showed significant mRNA expressions in the marmoset brain. Our study shows several new features of the organization of serotonergic systems in the marmoset brain. (1) The thalamus expressed only a limited number of receptor subtypes compared with the cortex, hippocampus, and other subcortical regions. (2) In the cortex, there are layer-selective and area-selective mRNA expressions of 5HTRs. (3) Highly localized mRNA expressions of 5HT1F and 5HT3A were observed. (4) There was a conspicuous overlap of the mRNA expressions of receptor subtypes known to have somatodendritic localization of receptor proteins with dense serotonergic terminations in the visual cortex, the central lateral (CL) nucleus of the thalamus, the presubiculum, and the medial mammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus. This suggests a high correlation between serotonin availability and receptor expression at these locations. (5) The 5HTRs show differences in mRNA expression pattern between the marmoset and mouse cortices whereas the patterns of both the species were much similar in the hippocampus. We discuss the possible roles of 5HTRs in the marmoset brain revealed by the analysis of their overall mRNA expression patterns. PMID:24904298

  13. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis. PMID:11207665

  14. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

  15. Muscarinic Receptor Subtypes Differentially Control Synaptic Input and Excitability of Cerebellum-Projecting Medial Vestibular Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei have a vital function in balance maintenance, gaze stabilization, and posture. Although muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed and involved in regulating vestibular function, it is unclear how individual mAChR subtypes regulate vestibular neuronal activity. In this study, we determined which specific subtypes of mAChRs control synaptic input and excitability of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons that project to the cerebellum. Cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons were labeled by a fluorescent retrograde tracer and then identified in rat brainstem slices. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that M2 and M3 were the possible major mAChR subtypes expressed in the MVN. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly reduced the amplitude of glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by stimulation of vestibular primary afferents, and this effect was abolished by the M2-preferring antagonist AF-DX 116. However, oxotremorine-M had no effect on GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents of labeled MVN neurons. Furthermore, oxotremorine-M significantly increased the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons, and this effect was blocked by the M3-preferring antagonist J104129 in most neurons tested. In addition, AF-DX 116 reduced the onset latency and prolonged the excitatory effect of oxotremorine-M on the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons. Our findings suggest that M3 is the predominant postsynaptic mAChR involved in muscarinic excitation of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. Presynaptic M2 mAChR regulates excitatory glutamatergic input from vestibular primary afferents, which in turn influences the excitability of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. This new information has important therapeutic implications for treating vestibular disorders with mAChR subtype-selective agents. PMID:26823384

  16. Muscarinic receptor subtypes differentially control synaptic input and excitability of cerebellum-projecting medial vestibular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei have a vital function in balance maintenance, gaze stabilization, and posture. Although muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed and involved in regulating vestibular function, it remains unclear how individual mAChR subtypes regulate vestibular neuronal activity. In this study, we determined which specific subtypes of mAChRs control synaptic input and excitability of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons that project to the cerebellum. Cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons were labeled by a fluorescent retrograde tracer and then identified in rat brainstem slices. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that M2 and M3 were the possible major mAChR subtypes expressed in the MVN. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly reduced the amplitude of glutamatergic excitatory post-synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of vestibular primary afferents, and this effect was abolished by the M2-preferring antagonist AF-DX 116. However, oxotremorine-M had no effect on GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents of labeled MVN neurons. Furthermore, oxotremorine-M significantly increased the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons, and this effect was blocked by the M3-preferring antagonist J104129 in most neurons tested. In addition, AF-DX 116 reduced the onset latency and prolonged the excitatory effect of oxotremorine-M on the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons. Our findings suggest that M3 is the predominant post-synaptic mAChR involved in muscarinic excitation of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. Pre-synaptic M2 mAChR regulates excitatory glutamatergic input from vestibular primary afferents, which in turn influences the excitability of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. This new information has important therapeutic implications for treating vestibular disorders with mAChR subtype-selective agents. Medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons projecting to the cerebellum are involved in balance control. We

  17. Use of an α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit concatamer to characterize ganglionic receptor subtypes with specific subunit composition reveals species-specific pharmacologic properties.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Clare; Papke, Roger L

    2012-09-01

    Drug development for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) is challenged by subtype diversity arising from variations in subunit composition. On-target activity for neuronal heteromeric receptors is typically associated with CNS receptors that contain α4 and other subunits, while off-target activity could be associated with ganglionic-type receptors containing α3β4 binding sites and other subunits, including β4, β2, α5, or α3 as a structural subunit in the pentamer. Additional interest in α3 β4 α5-containing receptors arises from genome-wide association studies linking these genes, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in α5 in particular, to lung cancer and heavy smoking. While α3 and β4 readily form receptors in expression system such as the Xenopus oocyte, since α5 is not required for function, simple co-expression approaches may under-represent α5-containing receptors. We used a concatamer of human α3 and β4 subunits to form ligand-binding domains, and show that we can force the insertions of alternative structural subunits into the functional pentamers. These α3β4 variants differ in sensitivity to ACh, nicotine, varenicline, and cytisine. Our data indicated lower efficacy for varenicline and cytisine than expected for β4-containing receptors, based on previous studies of rodent receptors. We confirm that these therapeutically important α4 receptor partial agonists may present different autonomic-based side-effect profiles in humans than will be seen in rodent models, with varenicline being more potent for human than rat receptors and cytisine less potent. Our initial characterizations failed to find functional effects of the α5 SNP. However, our data validate this approach for further investigations.

  18. Food intake, tumor growth, and weight loss in EP2 receptor subtype knockout mice bearing PGE2-producing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Wang, Wenhua; Nilsberth, Camilla; Andersson, Marianne; Lönnroth, Christina; Smedh, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in anorexia/cachexia development in MCG 101 tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we investigate the role of PGE receptor subtype EP2 in the development of anorexia after MCG 101 implantation in wild-type (EP2+/+) or EP2-receptor knockout (EP2−/−) mice. Our results showed that host absence of EP2 receptors attenuated tumor growth and development of anorexia in tumor-bearing EP2 knockout mice compared to tumor-bearing wild-type animals. Microarray profiling of the hypothalamus revealed a relative twofold change in expression of around 35 genes including mRNA transcripts coding for Phospholipase A2 and Prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds) in EP2 receptor knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. Prostaglandin D2 synthase levels were increased significantly in EP2 receptor knockouts, suggesting that improved food intake may depend on altered balance of prostaglandin production in hypothalamus since PGE2 and PGD2 display opposing effects in feeding control. PMID:26197930

  19. Crystal structure of arrestin-3 reveals the basis of the difference in receptor binding between two non-visual subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xuanzhi; Gimenez, Luis E.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2011-01-01

    Arrestins are multi-functional proteins that regulate signaling and trafficking of the majority of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as sub-cellular localization and activity of many other signaling proteins. Here we report the first crystal structure of arrestin-3, solved at 3.0Å. Arrestin-3 is an elongated two-domain molecule with the overall fold and key inter-domain interactions that hold free protein in the basal conformation similar to the other subtypes. Arrestin-3 is the least selective member of the family, binding wide variety of GPCRs with high affinity and demonstrating lower preference for active phosphorylated forms of the receptors. In contrast to the other three arrestins, part of the receptor-binding surface in the arrestin-3 C-domain does not form a contiguous β-sheet, consistent with increased flexibility. By swapping the corresponding elements between arrestin-2 and -3 we show that the presence of this loose structure correlates with reduced arrestin selectivity for activated receptor, consistent with a conformational change in this β-sheet upon receptor binding. PMID:21215759

  20. Involvement of serotonin receptor subtypes in the antidepressant-like effect of TRIM in the rat forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ulak, Güner; Mutlu, Oguz; Tanyeri, Pelin; Komsuoglu, F Ipek; Akar, Füruzan Yildiz; Erden, B Faruk

    2010-05-01

    Depression is a common illness with severe morbidity and mortality. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors are shown to elicit antidepressant-like effect in various animals models. It is widely known that serotonin plays an important role in the antidepressant-like effect of drugs. The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2) receptor subtypes in the antidepressant-like effect of TRIM, a nNOS inhibitor, in the rat forced swimming test (FST). TRIM displays an antidepressant-like activity in FST which is blocked by pretreatment with the NOS substrate l-arginine. Depletion of endogenous serotonin using para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA; 3x150mg/kg, i.p.) partially attenuated TRIM (50mg/kg)-induced reductions in immobility time in FST. Pretreatment with methiothepin (0.1mg/kg, i.p, a non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist), cyproheptadine (3mg/kg i.p, a 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist) or ketanserin (5mg/kg i.p, a 5HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist) prevented the effect of TRIM (50mg/kg) in the FST. WAY 100635 (0.1mg/kg i.p, a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist) and GR 127935 (3mg/kg i.p, a selective 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor antagonist) slightly reversed the immobility-reducing effect of TRIM in the FST, but this failed to reach a statistically significant level. The results of this study demonstrate that antidepressant-like effect of TRIM in the FST seems to be mediated, at least in part, by an interaction with 5-HT(2) receptors while non-significant effects were obtained with 5-HT(1) receptors.

  1. [Subtypes of muscarinic receptors--aspects of their physiologic significance for controlling heart rate in the human].

    PubMed

    Pitschner, H F; Schulte, B; Neuzner, J; Wellstein, A; Palm, D; Schlepper, M

    1994-01-01

    The cDNAs for five different muscarinic cholinoceptors have been cloned. The biochemical and physiological relevance of the m1, m2 and m3 receptors is understood in many aspects. The pharmacological defined M1, M2 and M3 related to antagonists binding studies closely correspond with those cloned. We compared effects of atropine and of the subtype selective M-cholinoceptor antagonists pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in humans. Dose- or time-response curves have been established for heart rate. Plasma samples were drawn in parallel with the effect measurements and analysed for drug concentrations. Subtype-selective radioceptor assays of the samples served to estimate the respective receptor occupancy in vivo. After low dosis of pirenzepine (M1-selective blockade) a negative chronotropic effect on heart rate could be observed. After high doses of pirenzepine or atropine (M-unselective blockade) the wellknown tachycardia appeared in parallel with occupancy of both the M2 and M3 subtypes. AF-DX 116 induced a tachycardia without a decrease of salivary flow in agreement with its selectivity profile (M2 > M1 > M3). Gastric emptying was only slightly inhibited by AF-DX 116 but nearly completely by a very high dose of pirenzepine blocking M1-, M2- and M3-cholinoceptors. The negative chronotropic effect on heart rate of a low dose of pirenzepine (M1 selective) was multi-folded by pretreatment with isoprenaline but disappeared during bicycle exercise. The implications of the functional M cholinoceptor heterogeneity in humans revealed by antagonists are discussed according to its possible importance for the control of autonomous nerve system.

  2. Pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidines as adenosine receptor antagonists: Effect of the N-5 bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bolcato, Chiara; Cusan, Claudia; Pastorin, Giorgia; Cacciari, Barbara; Klotz, Karl Norbert; Morizzo, Erika

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, many efforts have been made to search for potent and selective human A3 adenosine antagonists. In particular, one of the most promising human A3 adenosine receptor antagonists is represented by the pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine family. This class of compounds has been strongly investigated from the point of view of structure-activity relationships. In particular, it has been observed that fundamental requisites for having both potency and selectivity at the human A3 adenosine receptors are the presence of a small substituent at the N8 position and an unsubstitued phenyl carbamoyl moiety at the N5 position. In this study, we report the role of the N5-bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes. The observed structure-activity relationships of this class of antagonists are also exhaustively rationalized using the recently published ligand-based homology modeling approach. PMID:18368532

  3. Cloning, structural characterization, and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human prostaglandin E(2) receptor EP2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Smock, S L; Pan, L C; Castleberry, T A; Lu, B; Mather, R J; Owen, T A

    1999-09-17

    Northern blot analysis of human placental RNA using a probe to the 5' end of the human prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) EP2 receptor subtype coding region revealed the existence of a high abundance, low molecular weight transcript. To investigate the origin of this transcript, and its possible relationship to the human EP2 mRNA, we have cloned and characterized the gene encoding the human PGE(2) EP2 receptor subtype, identified transcriptional initiation and termination sites in two tissues (spleen and thymus), and determined its chromosomal localization. The human EP2 gene consists of two exons separated by a large intron, utilizes a common initiation site in both spleen and thymus at 1113 bp upstream of the translation initiation site, and has 3' transcript termini at 1140 bp and 1149 bp downstream of the translation stop site in spleen and thymus respectively. Southern and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated the human EP2 gene to be a single copy gene located in band 22 of the long arm of chromosome 14 (14q22). Though our initial interest in this gene was to investigate potential differential splicing of the human EP2 gene in placenta, this work demonstrates that the atypical transcript observed in placenta probably arises from a distinct, yet related, gene. Knowledge of the sequence, structure, and transcription events associated with the human EP2 gene will enable a broader understanding of its regulation and potential role in normal physiology and disease.

  4. Genetic analysis of HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form 02_AG, B and C subtype-specific envelope sequences from Northern India and their predicted co-receptor usage

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 epidemic in India is largely driven by subtype C but other subtypes or recombinants have also been reported from several states of India. This is mainly due to the co-circulation of other genetic subtypes that potentially can recombine to generate recombinant/mosaic genomes. In this study, we report detail genetic characterization of HIV-1 envelope sequences from North India (Delhi and neighboring regions). Six of 13 were related to subtype C, one B and the rest six showed relatedness with CRF02_AG strain. The subtype C possessed the highly conserved GPGQ motif but subtype B possessed the GPGR motif in the V3 loop as observed earlier. While most of the sequences suggested CCR5 co-receptor usage, one subtype C sample clearly indicated CXCR4 usage. A successful mother to child transmission was established in two pairs. Thus, co-circulation of multiple subtypes (B and C) and the recombinant CRF02_AG strains in North India suggests a rapidly evolving scenario of HIV-1 epidemic in this region with impact on vaccine formulation. Since this is the first report of CRF02_AG envelope from India, it will be important to monitor the spread of this strain and its impact on HIV-1 transmission in India. PMID:19954551

  5. Characterization of the neuropeptide Y system in the frog Silurana tropicalis (Pipidae): three peptides and six receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Sundström, G; Xu, B; Larsson, T A; Heldin, J; Bergqvist, C A; Fredriksson, R; Conlon, J M; Lundell, I; Denver, R J; Larhammar, D

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y and its related peptides PYY and PP (pancreatic polypeptide) are involved in feeding behavior, regulation of the pituitary and the gastrointestinal tract, and numerous other functions. The peptides act on a family of G-protein coupled receptors with 4-7 members in jawed vertebrates. We describe here the NPY system of the Western clawed frog Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis. Three peptides, NPY, PYY and PP, were identified together with six receptors, namely subtypes Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5, Y7 and Y8. Thus, this frog has all but one of the ancestral seven gnathostome NPY-family receptors, in contrast to mammals which have lost 2-3 of the receptors. Expression levels of mRNA for the peptide and receptor genes were analyzed in a panel of 19 frog tissues using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR. The peptide mRNAs had broad distribution with highest expression in skin, blood and small intestine. NPY mRNA was present in the three brain regions investigated, but PYY and PP mRNAs were not detectable in any of these. All receptor mRNAs had similar expression profiles with high expression in skin, blood, muscle and heart. Three of the receptors, Y5, Y7 and Y8, could be functionally expressed in HEK-293 cells and characterized with binding studies using the three frog peptides. PYY had the highest affinity for all three receptors (K(i) 0.042-0.34 nM). Also NPY and PP bound to the Y8 receptor with high affinity (0.14 and 0.50 nM). The low affinity of NPY for the Y5 receptor (100-fold lower than PYY) differs from mammals and chicken. This may suggest a less important role of NPY on Y5 in appetite stimulation in the frog compared with amniotes. In conclusion, our characterization of the NPY system in S. tropicalis with its six receptors demonstrates not only greater complexity than in mammals but also some interesting differences in ligand-receptor preferences.

  6. New ligands with affinity for the alpha4beta2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Synthesis, receptor binding, and 3D-QSAR modeling.

    PubMed

    Audouze, Karine; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard; Olsen, Gunnar M; Ahring, Philip; Jørgensen, Tino Dyhring; Peters, Dan; Liljefors, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    A new series of piperazines, diazepanes, diazocanes, diazabicyclononanes, and diazabicyclodecanes with affinity for the alpha4beta2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors were synthesized on the basis of results from a previous computational study. A predictive 3D-QSAR model was developed using the GRID/GOLPE approach (R2 = 0.94, Q2 = 0.83, SDEP = 0.34). The SAR was interpreted in terms of contour maps of the PLS coefficients and in terms of a homology model of the alpha4beta2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The results reveal that hydrogen bonding from both hydrogens on the protonated amine and from the pyridine nitrogen to a water molecule as well as van der Waals interactions between the substituent bearing the protonated amine and the receptor is of importance for ligand affinity. The combination of 3D-QSAR and homology modeling proved successful for the interpretation of structure-affinity relationships as well as the validation of the individual modeling approaches.

  7. Low nanomolar GABA effects at extrasynaptic α4β1/β3δ GABA(A) receptor subtypes indicate a different binding mode for GABA at these receptors.

    PubMed

    Karim, Nasiara; Wellendorph, Petrine; Absalom, Nathan; Bang, Line Haunstrup; Jensen, Marianne Lerbech; Hansen, Maja Michelle; Lee, Ho Joon; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R; Chebib, Mary

    2012-08-15

    Ionotropic GABA(A) receptors are a highly heterogenous population of receptors assembled from a combination of multiple subunits. The aims of this study were to characterize the potency of GABA at human recombinant δ-containing extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique, and to investigate, using site-directed mutagenesis, the molecular determinants for GABA potency at α4β3δ GABA(A) receptors. α4/δ-Containing GABA(A) receptors displayed high sensitivity to GABA, with mid-nanomolar concentrations activating α4β1δ (EC₅₀=24 nM) and α4β3δ (EC₅₀=12 nM) receptors. In the majority of oocytes expressing α4β3δ subtypes, GABA produced a biphasic concentration-response curve, and activated the receptor with low and high concentrations (EC₅₀(1)=16 nM; EC₅₀(2)=1.2 μM). At α4β2δ, GABA had low micromolar activity (EC₅₀=1 μM). An analysis of 10 N-terminal singly mutated α4β3δ receptors shows that GABA interacts with amino acids different to those reported for α1β2γ2 GABA(A) receptors. Residues Y205 and R207 of the β3-subunit significantly affected GABA potency, while the residue F71 of the α4- and the residue Y97 of the β3-subunit did not significantly affect GABA potency. Mutating the residue R218 of the δ-subunit, equivalent to the GABA binding residue R207 of the β2-subunit, reduced the potency of GABA by 670-fold, suggesting a novel GABA binding site at the δ-subunit interface. Taken together, GABA may have different binding modes for extrasynaptic δ-containing GABA(A) receptors compared to their synaptic counterparts.

  8. Co-Expression of Two Subtypes of Melatonin Receptor on Rat M1-Type Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wen-Long; Chen, Wei-Yi; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei; Weng, Shi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are involved in circadian and other non-image forming visual responses. An open question is whether the activity of these neurons may also be under the regulation mediated by the neurohormone melatonin. In the present work, by double-staining immunohistochemical technique, we studied the expression of MT1 and MT2, two known subtypes of mammalian melatonin receptors, in rat ipRGCs. A single subset of retinal ganglion cells labeled by the specific antibody against melanopsin exhibited the morphology typical of M1-type ipRGCs. Immunoreactivity for both MT1 and MT2 receptors was clearly seen in the cytoplasm of all labeled ipRGCs, indicating that these two receptors were co-expressed in each of these neurons. Furthermore, labeling for both the receptors were found in neonatal M1 cells as early as the day of birth. It is therefore highly plausible that retinal melatonin may directly modulate the activity of ipRGCs, thus regulating non-image forming visual functions. PMID:25714375

  9. The atypical 5-HT2 receptor mediating tachycardia in pithed rats: pharmacological correlation with the 5-HT2A receptor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Centurión, David; Ortiz, Mario I; Saxena, Pramod R; Villalón, Carlos M

    2002-01-01

    In pithed rats, 5-HT mediates tachycardia both directly (by 5-HT2 receptors) and indirectly (by a tyramine-like effect). The receptor mediating tachycardia directly has been classified as an ‘atypical' 5-HT2 receptor since it was ‘weakly' blocked by ketanserin. Moreover, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI), a 5-HT2 agonist, failed to mimic 5-HT-induced tachycardia. Since 5-HT2 receptors consist of 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C subtypes, this study investigated if these subtypes mediate the above response. In pithed rats, intraperitoneally (i.p.) pre-treated with reserpine (5 mg kg−1), intravenous (i.v.) administration of 5-HT, 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeO-T), 1-(3-chlorophenyl) piperazine (mCPP) and 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) (10, 30, 100 and 300 μg kg−1 each), produced dose-dependent tachycardic responses. Interestingly, DOI (10 – 1000 μg kg−1, i.v.) induced only slight, dose-unrelated, tachycardic responses, whilst the 5-HT2C agonist, Ro 60-0175 (10 – 1000 μg kg−1, i.v.), produced a slight tachycardia only at 300 and 1000 μg kg−1. In contrast, sumatriptan and 1-(m-trifluoromethylphenyl)- piperazine (TFMPP) were inactive. The rank order of potency was: 5-HT⩾5-MeO-T> mCPP⩾5-CT⩾DOI>Ro 60-0175. The tachycardic responses to 5-HT, which remained unaffected after i.v. saline (0.3 and 1 ml kg−1) or propranolol (3 mg kg−1), were selectively blocked by the 5-HT2A antagonists ketanserin (30 and 100 μg kg−1) or spiperone (10 and 30 μg kg−1) as well as by the non-selective 5-HT2 antagonists, ritanserin (10 and 30 μg kg−1) or mesulergine (100 μg kg−1). Remarkably, these responses were unaffected by the antagonists rauwolscine (5-HT2B), SB204741 (5-HT2B/2C) or Ro 04-6790 (5-ht6) (300 and 1000 μg kg−1 each). These results suggest that the ‘atypical' 5-HT2 receptors mediating tachycardia in reserpinized pithed rats are pharmacologically similar to the 5-HT2A

  10. Primary cultures of corticostriatal cells from newborn rats: a model to study muscarinic receptor subtypes regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Eva, C; Bovolin, P; Balzac, F; Botta, C; Gamalero, S R; Vaccarino, F M

    1990-01-01

    In the present work we characterized both the presynaptic and postsynaptic components of cholinergic transmission in a primary culture of corticostriatal neurons prepared from newborn rat brain. This culture preparation contains a small population of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactive neurons, corresponding to approximately 3% of the total cell number, and synthesizes increasing amounts of acetylcholine (ACh) from the third day in vitro (DIV), which reaches a plateau around the 10 day of culture. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChR), measured by the binding of the muscarinic antagonist [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB), are detectable from the fifth DIV and increase linearly during the time of culture. At the twelfth DIV, the density of mAChRs (approximately 600 fmol/mg protein) is comparable to the density of mAChR in adult rat cortex. These receptors are coupled to second messenger systems, since muscarinic agonists inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and stimulate phosphoinositide breakdown with efficacies and potencies similar to those found in adult rat cortex. Moreover, by using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique, we were able to demonstrate the presence of the m1, m3, and m4 mAChR subtype mRNAs in this neuronal culture at 12 DIV. Our data suggest that corticostriatal neuronal cultures develop in vitro ACh-synthesizing neurons and functionally active cholinergic receptors. This therefore makes them ideally suited to study the development and properties of brain mAChR subtypes.

  11. Heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex demonstrated by the selective antagonist AF-DX 116

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Seaver, N.A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the majority of muscarinic receptors in rabbit peripheral lung homogenates bind pirenzepine with high affinity (putative M1 subtype). In experiments of AF-DX 116 inhibiting (TH)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (TH)pirenzepine, the authors found similar inhibitory constants for AF-DX 116 binding in rat heart and rabbit peripheral lung that were 4-fold smaller (i.e. of higher affinity) than the inhibitory constant for rat cerebral cortex. This results demonstrates heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex. 20 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  12. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Subtype 3: A Novel Therapeutic Target of K-Ras Mutant Driven Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0346 TITLE: Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Subtype 3: A Novel Therapeutic Target of K-Ras Mutant Driven Non-Small... Mutant Driven Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0346 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Lee...14. ABSTRACT: This award aims to characterize the functional role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor subtype 3 (S1PR3) in oncogenic K-Ras mutant

  13. Dynamics of signaling between Ca(2+) sparks and Ca(2+)- activated K(+) channels studied with a novel image-based method for direct intracellular measurement of ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) current.

    PubMed

    ZhuGe, R; Fogarty, K E; Tuft, R A; Lifshitz, L M; Sayar, K; Walsh, J V

    2000-12-01

    Ca(2+) sparks are highly localized cytosolic Ca(2+) transients caused by a release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via ryanodine receptors (RyRs); they are the elementary events underlying global changes in Ca(2+) in skeletal and cardiac muscle. In smooth muscle and some neurons, Ca(2+) sparks activate large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK channels) in the spark microdomain, causing spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) that regulate membrane potential and, hence, voltage-gated channels. Using the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator fluo-3 and a high speed widefield digital imaging system, it was possible to capture the total increase in fluorescence (i.e., the signal mass) during a spark in smooth muscle cells, which is the first time such a direct approach has been used in any system. The signal mass is proportional to the total quantity of Ca(2+) released into the cytosol, and its rate of rise is proportional to the Ca(2+) current flowing through the RyRs during a spark (I(Ca(spark))). Thus, Ca(2+) currents through RyRs can be monitored inside the cell under physiological conditions. Since the magnitude of I(Ca(spark)) in different sparks varies more than fivefold, Ca(2+) sparks appear to be caused by the concerted opening of a number of RyRs. Sparks with the same underlying Ca(2+) current cause STOCs, whose amplitudes vary more than threefold, a finding that is best explained by variability in coupling ratio (i.e., the ratio of RyRs to BK channels in the spark microdomain). The time course of STOC decay is approximated by a single exponential that is independent of the magnitude of signal mass and has a time constant close to the value of the mean open time of the BK channels, suggesting that STOC decay reflects BK channel kinetics, rather than the time course of [Ca(2+)] decline at the membrane. Computer simulations were carried out to determine the spatiotemporal distribution of the Ca(2+) concentration resulting from the measured

  14. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Luis E; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2014-07-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor.

  15. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Luis E.; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor. PMID:24686081

  16. Ligand Independent and Subtype-Selective Actions of Thyroid Hormone Receptors in Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cvoro, Aleksandra; Bajic, Aleksandar; Zhang, Aijun; Simon, Marisa; Golic, Igor; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Korac, Aleksandra; Webb, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptors (TRs α and β) are homologous ligand-dependent transcription factors (TFs). While the TRs display distinct actions in development, metabolic regulation and other processes, comparisons of TRα and TRβ dependent gene regulation mostly reveal similar mechanisms of action and few TR subtype specific genes. Here, we show that TRα predominates in multipotent human adipose derived stem cells (hADSC) whereas TRβ is expressed at lower levels and is upregulated during hADSC differentiation. The TRs display several unusual properties in parental hADSC. First, TRs display predominantly cytoplas