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Sample records for saccharomyces uvarum pt

  1. Interaction between Hanseniaspora uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2015-08-03

    During wine fermentation, Saccharomyces clearly dominate over non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, and several factors could be related to this dominance. However, the main factor causing the reduction of cultivable non-Saccharomyces populations has not yet been fully established. In the present study, various single and mixed fermentations were performed to evaluate some of the factors likely responsible for the interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum. Alcoholic fermentation was performed in compartmented experimental set ups with ratios of 1:1 and 1:9 and the cultivable population of both species was followed. The cultivable H. uvarum population decreased sharply at late stages when S. cerevisiae was present in the other compartment, similarly to alcoholic fermentations in non-compartmented vessels. Thus, cell-to-cell contact did not seem to be the main cause for the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum. Other compounds related to fermentation performance (such as sugar and ethanol) and/or certain metabolites secreted by S. cerevisiae could be related to the sharp decrease in H. uvarum cultivability. When these factors were analyzed, it was confirmed that metabolites from S. cerevisiae induced lack of cultivability in H. uvarum, however ethanol and other possible compounds did not seem to induce this effect but played some role during the process. This study contributes to a new understanding of the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum populations during the late stages of wine fermentation.

  2. Evolutionary relationships between the former species Saccharomyces uvarum and the hybrids Saccharomyces bayanus and Saccharomyces pastorianus; reinstatement of Saccharomyces uvarum (Beijerinck) as a distinct species.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu-Vang; Gaillardin, Claude

    2005-02-01

    Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the GDH1 homologues from Saccharomyces bayanus strain CBS 380T and S. pastorianus strains showed that they share an almost identical sequence, SuGDH1*, which is a diverged form of the SuGDH1 from the type strain of the former species S. uvarum, considered as synonym of S. bayanus. SuGDH1* is close to but differs from SuGDH1 by the accumulation of a high number of neutral substitutions designated as Multiple Neutral Mutations Accumulation (MNMA). Further analysis carried out with three other markers, BAP2, HO and MET2 showed that they have also diverged from their S. uvarum counterparts by MNMA. S. bayanus CBS 380T is placed between S. uvarum and S. pastorianus sharing MET2, CDC91 sequences with the former and BAP2, GDH1, HO sequences with the latter. S. bayanus CBS 380T has been proposed to be a S. uvarum/S. cerevisiae hybrid and this proposal is confirmed by the presence in its genome a S. cerevisiae SUC4 gene. Strain S. bayanus CBS 380T, with a composite genome, is genetically isolated from strains of the former S. uvarum species, thus justifying the reinstatement of S. uvarum as a distinct species.

  3. Molecular and enological characterization of a natural Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae hybrid.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; González, Sara Susana; Combina, Mariana; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2015-07-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a main role in the winemaking process, although other species, like Saccharomyces uvarum or Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been associated with must fermentations. It has been reported in recent years, that yeast hybrids of different Saccharomyces species might be responsible for wine productions. Although S. cerevisiae×Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrids have been well studied, very little attention has been paid to S. cerevisiae×S. uvarum hybrids. In this work we characterized the genomic composition of S6U, a widely used commercial S. cerevisiae×S. uvarum yeast hybrid isolated in wine fermentations containing one copy of the genome of each parental species, which suggests a relatively recent hybridization event. We also studied its performance under diverse enological conditions. The results show enhanced performance under low temperature enological conditions, increased glycerol production, lower acetic acid production and increased production of interesting aroma compounds. We also examined the transcriptomic response of the S6U hybrid strain compared with the reference species under enological conditions. The results show that although the hybrid strain transcriptome is more similar to S. uvarum than to S. cerevisiae, it presents specifically regulated genes involved in stress response, lipids and amino acid metabolism. The enological performance and aroma profile of this S. cerevisiae×S. uvarum hybrid makes it a good candidate for participating in winemaking, especially at low temperatures.

  4. Saccharomyces eubayanus and Saccharomyces uvarum associated with the fermentation of Araucaria araucana seeds in Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M Eugenia; Pérez-Través, Laura; Sangorrín, Marcela P; Barrio, Eladio; Lopes, Christian A

    2014-09-01

    Mudai is a traditional fermented beverage, made from the seeds of the Araucaria araucana tree by Mapuche communities. The main goal of the present study was to identify and characterize the yeast microbiota responsible of Mudai fermentation as well as from A. araucana seeds and bark from different locations in Northern Patagonia. Only Hanseniaspora uvarum and a commercial bakery strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated from Mudai and all Saccharomyces isolates recovered from A. araucana seed and bark samples belonged to the cryotolerant species Saccharomyces eubayanus and Saccharomyces uvarum. These two species were already reported in Nothofagus trees from Patagonia; however, this is the first time that they were isolated from A. araucana, which extends their ecological distribution. The presence of these species in A. araucana seeds and bark samples, led us to postulate a potential role for them as the original yeasts responsible for the elaboration of Mudai before the introduction of commercial S. cerevisiae cultures. The molecular and genetic characterization of the S. uvarum and S. eubayanus isolates and their comparison with European S. uvarum strains and S. eubayanus hybrids (S. bayanus and S. pastorianus), allowed their ecology and evolution us to be examined.

  5. Mitochondrial inheritance and fermentative : oxidative balance in hybrids between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa; Antúnez, Oreto; Pérez-Ortín, Josè Enrique; Barrio, Eladio; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-07-01

    Breeding between Saccharomyces species is a useful tool for obtaining improved wine yeast strains, combining fermentative features of parental species. In this work, 25 artificial Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces uvarum hybrids were constructed by spore conjugation. A multi-locus PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis, targeting six nuclear gene markers and the ribosomal region including the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two internal transcribed spacers, showed that the hybrid genome is the result of two chromosome sets, one coming from S. cerevisiae and the other from S. uvarum. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) typing showed uniparental inheritance in all hybrids. Furthermore, sibling hybrids, obtained by repeated crosses between the same parental strains, showed the same mtDNA, suggesting that the mitochondrial transmission is not stochastic or species-specific, but dependent on the parental strains. Finally four hybrids, two of which with S. cerevisiae mtDNA and two with S. uvarum mtDNA, were subjected to transcriptome analysis. Our results showed that the hybrids bearing S. cerevisiae mtDNA exhibited less expression of genes involved in glycolysis/fermentation pathways and in hexose transport compared to hybrids with S. uvarum mtDNA. Respiration assay confirmed the increased respiratory activity of hybrids with the S. cerevisiae mtDNA genome. These findings suggest that mtDNA type and fermentative : respiratory performances are correlated in S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum hybrids and the mtDNA type is an important trait for constructing new improved hybrids for winemaking.

  6. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on saccharomyces uvarum metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Luciano, J.Z.; Hix, C.

    1987-04-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the effect of UV radiation on the metabolism of Saccharomcyes uvarum in wort used in beer production. Pure yeast cultures were exposed to a Westinghouse G8T5 germicidal lamp for 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes and added to fresh wort. The cultures were allowed to ferment for 96 hours at 130 C and fermentation products were assayed at 24 hour intervals and analyzed on a SCABA BEER ANALYZER. Metabolic parameters measured were balling, alcohol and cell count. Percent alcohol (V/V %) increased significantly at all exposures, but as the UV dosage increased, alcohol levels showed a significant decline with longer exposures. The assimilation of sugars or balling levels dropped at each exposure level among samples. The ability for the yeast to assimilate sugars decreased as UV exposure was increased although pitching rates fluctuated. (Pitching rates are the cell count readings at inoculation). None of the samples showed a logarithmic growth pattern, except for the controls which did not exhibit a lag phase. All other samples decreased cell counts as exposure levels increased, without peaks. Substrate availability was not a factor in the metabolism of Saccharomyces uvarum. Cell count levels at each exposure could have possibly affected the metabolic parameters because of excessive cell killing. Viabilities at the exposure levels studied show that the number of live cells available for nutrient uptake was lower at each level. However, the peak levels of the parameters measured were very close to the controls. Although the availability of cells was low, metabolic rates could have been altered by the UV light.

  7. Redox interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum in mixed culture under enological conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheraiti, Naoufel; Guezenec, Stéphane; Salmon, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Wine yeast starters that contain a mixture of different industrial yeasts with various properties may soon be introduced to the market. The mechanisms underlying the interactions between the different strains in the starter during alcoholic fermentation have never been investigated. We identified and investigated some of these interactions in a mixed culture containing two yeast strains grown under enological conditions. The inoculum contained the same amount (each) of a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a natural hybrid strain of S. cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum. We identified interactions that affected biomass, by-product formation, and fermentation kinetics, and compared the redox ratios of monocultures of each strain with that of the mixed culture. The redox status of the mixed culture differed from that of the two monocultures, showing that the interactions between the yeast strains involved the diffusion of metabolite(s) within the mixed culture. Since acetaldehyde is a potential effector of fermentation, we investigated the kinetics of acetaldehyde production by the different cultures. The S. cerevisiae-S. uvarum hybrid strain produced large amounts of acetaldehyde for which the S. cerevisiae strain acted as a receiving strain in the mixed culture. Since yeast response to acetaldehyde involves the same mechanisms that participate in the response to other forms of stress, the acetaldehyde exchange between the two strains could play an important role in inhibiting some yeast strains and allowing the growth of others. Such interactions could be of particular importance in understanding the ecology of the colonization of complex fermentation media by S. cerevisiae.

  8. Simultaneous Saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to ethanol using Penicillium funiculosum cellulose and free or immobilized Saccharomyces uvarum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpa V.; Sivaraman, H.; Rao, M.

    1983-06-01

    This communication discusses the compatibility of Penicillium funiculosum cellulase with Saccharomyces uvarum cells and the results on the combined hydrolysis and fermentation of cellulose to ethanol using a system of S. uvarum cells immobilized in an open pore gelatin matrix described earlier from the same laboratory. (Refs. 10).

  9. Saccharomyces uvarum is responsible for the traditional fermentation of apple chicha in Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Maria E; Pérez-Través, Laura; Sangorrín, Marcela P; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo; Lopes, Christian A

    2017-01-01

    Apple chicha is a fresh low alcoholic beverage elaborated by aboriginal communities of Andean Patagonia (Argentina and Chile). In the present work, we identified the yeast microbiota associated with this fermentation, and characterized genetically those belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. Both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum were found in the analyzed fermentations. Phylogenetic and population structure analyses based on genes sequence analysis were carried out for both S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum strains obtained in this study and a set of additional strains from diverse origins. The results demonstrate that S. cerevisiae strains from apple chicha belong to the big group of wine/European strains of this species, while S. uvarum strains were included in the Holartic population of this species. Additionally, some S. uvarum strains from chichas evidenced as an admixture of both pure Holartic and pure South American populations. Our results suggest that Holartic strains could have been introduced in South America together with the domestication of apple trees by Mapuche communities. This Holartic population suffered admixis with the naturally present South American population of this species, originating strains bearing genetic features from the two populations, detectable in both chichas and natural habitats.

  10. Exploration of genetic and phenotypic diversity within Saccharomyces uvarum for driving strain improvement in winemaking.

    PubMed

    Verspohl, Alexandra; Solieri, Lisa; Giudici, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    The selection and genetic improvement of wine yeast is an ongoing process, since yeast strains should match new technologies in winemaking to satisfy evolving consumer preferences. A large genetic background is the necessary starting point for any genetic improvement programme. For this reason, we collected and characterized a large number of strains belonging to Saccharomyces uvarum. In particular, 70 strains were isolated from cold-stored must samples: they were identified and compared to S. uvarum strains originating from different collections, regarding fermentation profile, spore viability and stress response. The results demonstrate a large biodiversity among the new isolates, with particular emphasis to fermentation performances, genotypes and high spore viability, making the isolates suitable for further genetic improvement programmes. Furthermore, few of them are competitive with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and per se, suitable for wine fermentation, due to their resistance to stress, short lag phase and fermentation by-products.

  11. A Gondwanan imprint on global diversity and domestication of wine and cider yeast Saccharomyces uvarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David James; Marullo, Philippe; Todd Hittinger, Chris; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2014-06-01

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum.

  12. A Gondwanan imprint on global diversity and domestication of wine and cider yeast Saccharomyces uvarum.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David James; Marullo, Philippe; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2014-06-02

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum.

  13. A Gondwanan Imprint on Global Diversity and Domestication of Wine and Cider Yeast Saccharomyces uvarum

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David; Marullo, Philippe; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum. PMID:24887054

  14. Physiological characterization of Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces eubayanus from Patagonia and their potential for cidermaking.

    PubMed

    González Flores, Melisa; Rodríguez, María Eugenia; Oteiza, Juan Martín; Barbagelata, Raúl Jorge; Lopes, Christian Ariel

    2017-03-01

    A diversity of yeast strains belonging to the cryotolerant fermentative species S. uvarum and S. eubayanus have been recovered from natural habitats and traditional fermentations in North Patagonia. The aim of this work was to evaluate the most relevant physiological features in a set of Patagonian strains belonging to S. uvarum and S. eubayanus, in order to analyze their potentiality to be used as starter cultures for cidermaking elaborated at low temperature. We evidenced that S. uvarum strains isolated from natural habitats (Araucaria araucana bark) showed similar physiological features to S. eubayanus strains obtained from the same habitat, and different from S. uvarum strains from fermentative environments (apple chichas). We also confirm the capacity of S. uvarum to produce high glycerol levels, low acetic acid and elevated production of the higher alcohol 2-phenylethanol and 2-phenylethyl acetate and demonstrated similar properties in S. eubayanus. Finally, we evidenced for the first time the antagonistic activity of S. eubayanus and selected three strains (two S. uvarum and one S. eubayanus) bearing the best combination of features to be used as a starter culture in cidermaking.

  15. Volatile flavour profile of reduced alcohol wines fermented with the non-conventional yeast species Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Saccharomyces uvarum.

    PubMed

    Varela, C; Sengler, F; Solomon, M; Curtin, C

    2016-10-15

    Production of quality wines with decreased alcohol concentration continues to be one of the major challenges facing wine producers. Therefore, there is considerable interest in the isolation or generation of wine yeasts less efficient at transforming grape sugars into ethanol. We recently demonstrated that Metschnikowia pulcherrima AWRI1149 and Saccharomyces uvarum AWRI2846 were both able to produce reduced alcohol wine when used in sequential inoculation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This effect is additive when both strains are co-inoculated in grape must. Here we describe the volatile flavour profile of Chardonnay and Shiraz wines produced with these two strains. Wines fermented with M. pulcherrima showed concentrations of ethyl acetate likely to affect negatively wine aroma. Wines fermented with S. uvarum and with a combination of M. pulcherrima and S. uvarum were characterised by increased concentrations of 2-phenyl ethanol and 2-phenylethyl acetate, both associated with positive sensory attributes.

  16. The Oenological Potential of Hanseniaspora uvarum in Simultaneous and Sequential Co-fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Industrial Wine Production

    PubMed Central

    Tristezza, Mariana; Tufariello, Maria; Capozzi, Vittorio; Spano, Giuseppe; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In oenology, the utilization of mixed starter cultures composed by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts is an approach of growing importance for winemakers in order to enhance sensory quality and complexity of the final product without compromising the general quality and safety of the oenological products. In fact, several non-Saccharomyces yeasts are already commercialized as oenological starter cultures to be used in combination with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while several others are the subject of various studies to evaluate their application. Our aim, in this study was to assess, for the first time, the oenological potential of H. uvarum in mixed cultures (co-inoculation) and sequential inoculation with S. cerevisiae for industrial wine production. Three previously characterized H. uvarum strains were separately used as multi-starter together with an autochthonous S. cerevisiae starter culture in lab-scale micro-vinification trials. On the basis of microbial development, fermentation kinetics and secondary compounds formation, the strain H. uvarum ITEM8795 was further selected and it was co- and sequentially inoculated, jointly with the S. cerevisiae starter, in a pilot scale wine production. The fermentation course and the quality of final product indicated that the co-inoculation was the better performing modality of inoculum. The above results were finally validated by performing an industrial scale vinification The mixed starter was able to successfully dominate the different stages of the fermentation process and the H. uvarum strain ITEM8795 contributed to increasing the wine organoleptic quality and to simultaneously reduce the volatile acidity. At the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first study regarding the utilization of a selected H. uvarum strain in multi-starter inoculation with S. cerevisiae for the industrial production of a wine. In addition, we demonstrated, at an industrial scale, the importance of non-Saccharomyces in

  17. Characterization of Saccharomyces uvarum (Beijerinck, 1898) and related hybrids: assessment of molecular markers that predict the parent and hybrid genomes and a proposal to name yeast hybrids.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu-Vang; Boekhout, Teun

    2017-03-03

    The use of the nuclear-DNA re-association technique has led taxonomists to consider Saccharomyces uvarum a synonym of S. bayanus. The latter, however, is not a species but a hybrid harbouring S. eubayanus (Seu) and S. uvarum (Su) sub-genomes with a minor DNA contribution from S. cerevisiae (Sc). To recognize genetically pure lines of S. uvarum and putative interspecies hybrids among so-called S. bayanus strains present in public culture collections, we propose the use of four markers that were defined from the S. bayanus CBS 380T composite genome, namely SeuNTS2 (rDNA), ScMAL31, MTY1 and SuMEL1. S. carlsbergensis CBS 1513 was found similar to S. bayanus except that it carries the SeuMEL1 allele. Different marker combinations revealed that among 33 strains examined only few strains were similar to CBS 380T, but many pure S. uvarum lines and putative Su/Seu-related hybrids occurred. Our results demonstrated that these hybrids were erroneously considered authentic S. bayanus and therefore the varietal state "Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum comb. nov. Naumov" is not valid. Our markers constitute a tool to get insights into the genomic makeup of Saccharomyces interspecies hybrids. We also make a proposal to name those hybrids that may also be applicable to other fungal hybrids.

  18. Differential attraction of drosophilids to banana baits inoculated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum within a Neotropical forest remnant

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Marcos R.D.; Uno, Fabiana; Chaves, Rafael D.; Tidon, Rosana; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Yeasts are a necessary requisite in the diet of most Drosophila species that, in turn, may vector their dispersal in natural environments. Differential attractiveness experiments and the isolation of yeasts consumed by Drosophila may be informative for characterizing this association. Hanseniaspora uvarum is among the most common yeast species isolated from Drosophila crops, with high attractiveness to drosophilids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used to collect flies, and it allows broad sampling of almost all local Drosophila species. Pronounced differences in the field concerning Drosophila attractivity to baits seeded with these yeast species have been previously reported. However, few explicit generalizations have been set. Since late fifties, no field experiments of Drosophila attractivity were carried out in the Neotropical region, which is facing shifts in abiotic and biotic factors. Our objective is to characterize preference behavior that mediates the interaction in the wild among Neotropical Drosophila species and yeasts associated with them. We want to set a broad generalization about drosophilids attracted to these yeasts. Here we present the results of a differential attractiveness experiment we carried out in a natural Atlantic Rainforest fragment to assess the preferences of Drosophila species groups to baits inoculated with H. uvarum and S. cerevisiae. Methods Both yeast species were cultured in GYMP broth and separately poured in autoclaved mashed banana that was left fermenting. In the field, we collected drosophilids over five arrays of three different baits: non-inoculated autoclaved banana and banana inoculated with each yeast. In the laboratory the drosophilids were sorted to five sets according to their external morphology and/or genitalia: tripunctata; guarani; willistoni; exotic; and the remaining flies pooled in others. Results and Conclusions Uninoculated banana baits attracted virtually no flies. We found

  19. Differences in Enzymatic Properties of the Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces uvarum Alcohol Acetyltransferases and Their Impact on Aroma-Active Compounds Production

    PubMed Central

    Stribny, Jiri; Querol, Amparo; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Higher alcohols and acetate esters belong to the most important yeast secondary metabolites that significantly contribute to the overall flavor and aroma profile of fermented products. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, esterification of higher alcohols is catalyzed mainly by the alcohol acetyltransferases encoded by genes ATF1 and ATF2. Previous investigation has shown other Saccharomyces species, e.g., S. kudriavzevii and S. uvarum, to vary in aroma-active higher alcohols and acetate esters formation when compared to S. cerevisiae. Here, we aimed to analyze the enzymes encoded by the ATF1 and ATF2 genes from S. kudriavzevii (SkATF1, SkATF2) and S. uvarum (SuATF1, SuATF2). The heterologous expression of the individual ATF1 and ATF2 genes in a host S. cerevisiae resulted in the enhanced production of several higher alcohols and acetate esters. Particularly, an increase of 2-phenylethyl acetate production by the strains that harbored ATF1 and ATF2 genes from S. kudriavzevii and S. uvarum was observed. When grown with individual amino acids as the nitrogen source, the strain that harbored SkATF1 showed particularly high 2-phenylethyl acetate production and the strains with introduced SkATF2 or SuATF2 revealed increased production of isobutyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, and 2-phenylethyl acetate compared to the reference strains with endogenous ATF genes. The alcohol acetyltransferase activities of the individual Atf1 and Atf2 enzymes measured in the cell extracts of the S. cerevisiae atf1 atf2 iah1 triple-null strain were detected for all the measured substrates. This indicated that S. kudriavzevii and S. uvarum Atf enzymes had broad range substrate specificity as S. cerevisiae Atf enzymes. Individual Atf1 enzymes exhibited markedly different kinetic properties since SkAtf1p showed c. twofold higher and SuAtf1p c. threefold higher Km for isoamyl alcohol than ScAtf1p. Together these results indicated that the differences found among the three Saccharomyces species during the

  20. Yeast population dynamics reveal a potential 'collaboration' between Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Saccharomyces uvarum for the production of reduced alcohol wines during Shiraz fermentation.

    PubMed

    Contreras, A; Curtin, C; Varela, C

    2015-02-01

    The wine sector is actively seeking strategies and technologies that facilitate the production of wines with lower alcohol content. One of the simplest approaches to achieve this aim would be the use of wine yeast strains which are less efficient at transforming grape sugars into ethanol; however, commercial wine yeasts have very similar ethanol yields. We recently demonstrated that Metschnikowia pulcherrima AWRI1149 was able to produce wine with reduced alcohol concentration when used in sequential inoculation with a wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, different inoculation regimes were explored to study the effect of yeast population dynamics and potential yeast interactions on the metabolism of M. pulcherrima AWRI1149 during fermentation of non-sterile Shiraz must. Of all inoculation regimes tested, only ferments inoculated with M. pulcherrima AWRI1149 showed reduced ethanol concentration. Population dynamics revealed the presence of several indigenous yeast species and one of these, Saccharomyces uvarum (AWRI 2846), was able to produce wine with reduced ethanol concentration in sterile conditions. Both strains however, were inhibited when a combination of three non-Saccharomyces strains, Hanseniaspora uvarum AWRI863, Pichia kluyveri AWRI1896 and Torulaspora delbrueckii AWRI2845 were inoculated into must, indicating that the microbial community composition might impact on the growth of M. pulcherrima AWRI1149 and S. uvarum AWRI 2846. Our results indicate that mixed cultures of M. pulcherrima AWRI1149 and S. uvarum AWRI2846 enable an additional reduction of wine ethanol concentration compared to the same must fermented with either strain alone. This work thus provides a foundation to develop inoculation regimes for the successful application of non-cerevisiae yeast to the production of wines with reduced alcohol.

  1. Monitoring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, and Starmerella bacillaris (synonym Candida zemplinina) populations during alcoholic fermentation by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Mas, Albert

    2014-11-17

    Various molecular approaches have been applied as culture-independent techniques to monitor wine fermentations over the last decade. Among them, those based on RNA detection have been widely used for yeast cell detection, assuming that RNA only exists in live cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting intracellular rRNA is considered a promising technique for the investigation of wine ecology. For the present study, we applied the FISH technique in combination with epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to directly quantify populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, and Starmerella bacillaris during alcoholic fermentations. A new specific probe that hybridizes with eight species of Hanseniaspora genus and a second probe specific for Starm. bacillaris were designed, and the conditions for their application to pure cultures, mixed cultures, and wine samples were optimized. Single and mixed fermentations were performed with natural, concentrated must at two different temperatures, 15 °C and 25 °C. The population dynamics revealed that the Sacch. cerevisiae population increased to 10(7)-10(8)cells/ml during all fermentations, whereas H. uvarum and Starm. bacillaris tended to increase in single fermentations but remained at levels similar to their inoculations at 10(6)cells/ml in mixed fermentations. Temperature mainly affected the fermentation duration (slower at the lower temperature) but did not affect the population sizes of the different species. The use of these probes in natural wine fermentations has been validated.

  2. Oral Intake of Carboxymethyl-Glucan (CM-G) from Yeast (Saccharomyces uvarum) Reduces Malondialdehyde Levels in Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Vilma Barbosa da Silva; de Melo, Adma Nadja Ferreira; de Souza, Neyrijane Targino; da Silva, Vânia Maria Barboza; Castro-Gomez, Raul H; Silva, Alexandre Sérgio; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Magnani, Marciane

    2015-08-14

    Carboxymethyl-glucan (CM-G) is a water-soluble derivative of β(1 → 3)(1 → 6) glucan, a well-known immunostimulant and antioxidant compound. In this experimental, randomized and placebo-controlled study, the effects of oral CM-G intake over a 60-day period on the peripheral blood, cholesterol, glycemic index and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of healthy men was assessed. The CM-G was obtained from spent brewer's yeast (S. uvarum) with DS 0.8 and molecular weight of 2.2 × 10(5) Da. Following CM-G administration, no changes were observed in red and white blood cell, hematocrit, hemoglobin and platelet counts, or in cholesterol and glycemic indices. After 30 days of CM-G administration, the MDA levels decreased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) in men receiving CM-G. The results showed for the first time that CM-G may act as an adjuvant in preventing oxidative damage in healthy humans.

  3. Hanseniaspora uvarum from Winemaking Environments Show Spatial and Temporal Genetic Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Albertin, Warren; Setati, Mathabatha E.; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Mostert, Talitha T.; Colonna-Ceccaldi, Benoit; Coulon, Joana; Girard, Patrick; Moine, Virginie; Pillet, Myriam; Salin, Franck; Bely, Marina; Divol, Benoit; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Hanseniaspora uvarum is one of the most abundant yeast species found on grapes and in grape must, at least before the onset of alcoholic fermentation (AF) which is usually performed by Saccharomyces species. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic and phenotypic variability within the H. uvarum species. One hundred and fifteen strains isolated from winemaking environments in different geographical origins were analyzed using 11 microsatellite markers and a subset of 47 strains were analyzed by AFLP. H. uvarum isolates clustered mainly on the basis of their geographical localization as revealed by microsatellites. In addition, a strong clustering based on year of isolation was evidenced, indicating that the genetic diversity of H. uvarum isolates was related to both spatial and temporal variations. Conversely, clustering analysis based on AFLP data provided a different picture with groups showing no particular characteristics, but provided higher strain discrimination. This result indicated that AFLP approaches are inadequate to establish the genetic relationship between individuals, but allowed good strain discrimination. At the phenotypic level, several extracellular enzymatic activities of enological relevance (pectinase, chitinase, protease, β-glucosidase) were measured but showed low diversity. The impact of environmental factors of enological interest (temperature, anaerobia, and copper addition) on growth was also assessed and showed poor variation. Altogether, this work provided both new analytical tool (microsatellites) and new insights into the genetic and phenotypic diversity of H. uvarum, a yeast species that has previously been identified as a potential candidate for co-inoculation in grape must, but whose intraspecific variability had never been fully assessed. PMID:26834719

  4. 2μ plasmid in Saccharomyces species and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Strope, Pooja K.; Kozmin, Stanislav G.; Skelly, Daniel A.; Magwene, Paul M.; Dietrich, Fred S.; McCusker, John H.

    2015-01-01

    We determined that extrachromosomal 2μ plasmid was present in 67 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-genome strains; in addition to variation in the size and copy number of 2μ, we identified three distinct classes of 2μ. We identified 2μ presence/absence and class associations with populations, clinical origin and nuclear genotypes. We also screened genome sequences of S. paradoxus, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. eubayanus, S. mikatae, S. arboricolus and S. bayanus strains for both integrated and extrachromosomal 2μ. Similar to S. cerevisiae, we found no integrated 2μ sequences in any S. paradoxus strains. However, we identified part of 2μ integrated into the genomes of some S. uvarum, S. kudriavzevii, S. mikatae and S. bayanus strains, which were distinct from each other and from all extrachromosomal 2μ. We identified extrachromosomal 2μ in one S. paradoxus, one S. eubayanus, two S. bayanus and 13 S. uvarum strains. The extrachromosomal 2μ in S. paradoxus, S. eubayanus and S. cerevisiae were distinct from each other. In contrast, the extrachromosomal 2μ in S. bayanus and S. uvarum strains were identical with each other and with one of the three classes of S. cerevisiae 2μ, consistent with interspecific transfer. PMID:26463005

  5. 2μ plasmid in Saccharomyces species and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Strope, Pooja K; Kozmin, Stanislav G; Skelly, Daniel A; Magwene, Paul M; Dietrich, Fred S; McCusker, John H

    2015-12-01

    We determined that extrachromosomal 2μ plasmid was present in 67 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-genome strains; in addition to variation in the size and copy number of 2μ, we identified three distinct classes of 2μ. We identified 2μ presence/absence and class associations with populations, clinical origin and nuclear genotypes. We also screened genome sequences of S. paradoxus, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. eubayanus, S. mikatae, S. arboricolus and S. bayanus strains for both integrated and extrachromosomal 2μ. Similar to S. cerevisiae, we found no integrated 2μ sequences in any S. paradoxus strains. However, we identified part of 2μ integrated into the genomes of some S. uvarum, S. kudriavzevii, S. mikatae and S. bayanus strains, which were distinct from each other and from all extrachromosomal 2μ. We identified extrachromosomal 2μ in one S. paradoxus, one S. eubayanus, two S. bayanus and 13 S. uvarum strains. The extrachromosomal 2μ in S. paradoxus, S. eubayanus and S. cerevisiae were distinct from each other. In contrast, the extrachromosomal 2μ in S. bayanus and S. uvarum strains were identical with each other and with one of the three classes of S. cerevisiae 2μ, consistent with interspecific transfer.

  6. Molecular Analysis of the Genes Involved in Aroma Synthesis in the Species S. cerevisiae, S. kudriavzevii and S. bayanus var. uvarum in Winemaking Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gamero, Amparo; Belloch, Carmela; Ibáñez, Clara; Querol, Amparo

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces genus is the main yeast involved in wine fermentations to play a crucial role in the production and release of aromatic compounds. Despite the several studies done into the genome-wide expression analysis using DNA microarray technology in wine S. cerevisiae strains, this is the first to investigate other species of the Saccharomyces genus. This research work investigates the expression of the genes involved in flavor compound production in three different Saccharomyces species (S. cerevisiae, S. bayanus var. uvarum and S. kudriavzevii) under low (12°C) and moderate fermentation temperatures (28°C). The global genes analysis showed that 30% of genes appeared to be differently expressed in the three cryophilic strains if compared to the reference strain (mesophilic S. cerevisiae), suggesting a very close cold adaptation response. Remarkable differences in the gene expression level were observed when comparing the three species, S. cerevisiae, S. bayanus var. uvarum and S. kudriavzevii, which will result in different aroma profiles. Knowledge of these differences in the transcriptome can be a tool to help modulate aroma to create wines with the desired aromatic traits. PMID:24854353

  7. Optimization of air-blast drying process for manufacturing Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeast as industrial wine starters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae-Byuk; Choi, Won-Seok; Jo, Hyun-Jung; Yeo, Soo-Hwan; Park, Heui-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Wine yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae D8) and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum S6 and Issatchenkia orientalis KMBL5774) were studied using air-blast drying instead of the conventional drying methods (such as freeze and spray drying). Skim milk-a widely used protective agent-was used and in all strains, the highest viabilities following air-blast drying were obtained using 10% skim milk. Four excipients (wheat flour, nuruk, artichoke powder, and lactomil) were evaluated as protective agents for yeast strains during air-blast drying. Our results showed that 7 g lactomil was the best excipient in terms of drying time, powder form, and the survival rate of the yeast in the final product. Finally, 7 types of sugars were investigated to improve the survival rate of air-blast dried yeast cells: 10% trehalose, 10% sucrose, and 10% glucose had the highest survival rate of 97.54, 92.59, and 79.49% for S. cerevisiae D8, H. uvarum S6, and I. orientalis KMBL5774, respectively. After 3 months of storage, S. cerevisiae D8 and H. uvarum S6 demonstrated good survival rates (making them suitable for use as starters), whereas the survival rate of I. orientalis KMBL5774 decreased considerably compared to the other strains. Air-blast dried S. cerevisiae D8 and H. uvarum S6 showed metabolic activities similar to those of non-dried yeast cells, regardless of the storage period. Air-blast dried I. orientalis KMBL5774 showed a noticeable decrease in its ability to decompose malic acid after 3 months of storage at 4 °C.

  8. Interspecies hybridization and recombination in Saccharomyces wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sipiczki, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    The ascomycetous yeasts traditionally referred to as the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex are a group of closely related species that are isolated by a postzygotic barrier. They can easily hybridize; and their allodiploid hybrids propagate by mitotic divisions as efficiently as the parental strains, but can barely divide by meiosis, and thus rarely produce viable spores (sterile interspecies hybrids). The postzygotic isolation is not effective in allotetraploids that are able to carry out meiosis and produce viable spores (fertile interspecies hybrids). By application of molecular identification methods, double (Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces uvarum and S. cerevisiae x Saccharomyces kudriavzevii) and triple (S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum x S. kudriavzevii) hybrids were recently identified in yeast populations of fermenting grape must and cider in geographically distinct regions. The genetic analysis of these isolates and laboratory-bred hybrids revealed great variability of hybrid genome structures and demonstrated that the alloploid genome of the zygote can undergo drastic changes during mitotic and meiotic divisions of the hybrid cells. This genome-stabilization process involves loss of chromosomes and genes and recombination between the partner genomes. This article briefly reviews the results of the analysis of interspecies hybrids, proposes a model for the mechanism of genome stabilization and highlights the potential of interspecies hybridization in winemaking.

  9. Hybridization within Saccharomyces Genus Results in Homoeostasis and Phenotypic Novelty in Winemaking Conditions.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Telma; Albertin, Warren; Dillmann, Christine; Bely, Marina; la Guerche, Stéphane; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie; Sicard, Delphine; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; de Vienne, Dominique; Marullo, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Despite its biotechnological interest, hybridization, which can result in hybrid vigor, has not commonly been studied or exploited in the yeast genus. From a diallel design including 55 intra- and interspecific hybrids between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum grown at two temperatures in enological conditions, we analyzed as many as 35 fermentation traits with original statistical and modeling tools. We first showed that, depending on the types of trait--kinetics parameters, life-history traits, enological parameters and aromas -, the sources of variation (strain, temperature and strain * temperature effects) differed in a large extent. Then we compared globally three groups of hybrids and their parents at two growth temperatures: intraspecific hybrids S. cerevisiae * S. cerevisiae, intraspecific hybrids S. uvarum * S. uvarum and interspecific hybrids S. cerevisiae * S. uvarum. We found that hybridization could generate multi-trait phenotypes with improved oenological performances and better homeostasis with respect to temperature. These results could explain why interspecific hybridization is so common in natural and domesticated yeast, and open the way to applications for wine-making.

  10. Hybridization within Saccharomyces Genus Results in Homoeostasis and Phenotypic Novelty in Winemaking Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dillmann, Christine; Bely, Marina; la Guerche, Stéphane; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie; Sicard, Delphine; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; de Vienne, Dominique; Marullo, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Despite its biotechnological interest, hybridization, which can result in hybrid vigor, has not commonly been studied or exploited in the yeast genus. From a diallel design including 55 intra- and interspecific hybrids between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum grown at two temperatures in enological conditions, we analyzed as many as 35 fermentation traits with original statistical and modeling tools. We first showed that, depending on the types of trait – kinetics parameters, life-history traits, enological parameters and aromas –, the sources of variation (strain, temperature and strain * temperature effects) differed in a large extent. Then we compared globally three groups of hybrids and their parents at two growth temperatures: intraspecific hybrids S. cerevisiae * S. cerevisiae, intraspecific hybrids S. uvarum * S. uvarum and interspecific hybrids S. cerevisiae * S. uvarum. We found that hybridization could generate multi-trait phenotypes with improved oenological performances and better homeostasis with respect to temperature. These results could explain why interspecific hybridization is so common in natural and domesticated yeast, and open the way to applications for wine-making. PMID:25946464

  11. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27148191

  12. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae.

  13. Efficient engineering of marker-free synthetic allotetraploids of Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Alexander, William G; Peris, David; Pfannenstiel, Brandon T; Opulente, Dana A; Kuang, Meihua; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-04-01

    Saccharomyces interspecies hybrids are critical biocatalysts in the fermented beverage industry, including in the production of lager beers, Belgian ales, ciders, and cold-fermented wines. Current methods for making synthetic interspecies hybrids are cumbersome and/or require genome modifications. We have developed a simple, robust, and efficient method for generating allotetraploid strains of prototrophic Saccharomyces without sporulation or nuclear genome manipulation. S. cerevisiae×S. eubayanus, S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii, and S. cerevisiae×S. uvarum designer hybrid strains were created as synthetic lager, Belgian, and cider strains, respectively. The ploidy and hybrid nature of the strains were confirmed using flow cytometry and PCR-RFLP analysis, respectively. This method provides an efficient means for producing novel synthetic hybrids for beverage and biofuel production, as well as for constructing tetraploids to be used for basic research in evolutionary genetics and genome stability.

  14. Effects of pH, temperature and SO2 on the formation of pyranoanthocyanins during red wine fermentation with two species of Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Morata, A; Gómez-Cordovés, M C; Calderón, F; Suárez, J A

    2006-02-01

    The formation of vitisins A and B, p-coumaroyl and acetyl derivatives during the fermentation of red wine with two species of Saccharomyces was examined. One species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 7VA was selected for its high production of acetaldehyde and pyruvic acid (7VA). The other (control) species, Saccharomyces uvarum strain S6U is used commercially for wine production. The final vitisins A and B concentrations produced with S. cerevisiae were, respectively, twice and three times that produced with S. uvarum. Models for the formation and accumulation of these vitisins are proposed. This is the first report that the formation of a vinylphenolic derivative of anthocyanin, malvidin-3-O-glucoside-4-vinylguaiacol, can be favored by fermentation with certain yeasts, possibly those with cinnamoyl decarboxylase activity. The effect of SO2, pH and temperature on the formation of pyranoanthocyanins during fermentation with S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum was also analyzed using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)/Photodiode Array Detection. The identification of these compounds was confirmed using HPLC/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

  15. Sequential Fermentation with Selected Immobilized Non-Saccharomyces Yeast for Reduction of Ethanol Content in Wine

    PubMed Central

    Canonico, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Oro, Lucia; Ciani, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The average ethanol content of wine has increased over the last two decades. This increase was due to consumer preference, and also to climate change that resulted in increased grape maturity at harvest. In the present study, to reduce ethanol content in wine, a microbiological approach was investigated, using immobilized selected strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts namely Starmerella bombicola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora osmophila, and Hanseniaspora uvarum to start fermentation, followed by inoculation of free Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The immobilization procedures, determining high reaction rates, led a feasible sequential inoculation management avoiding possible contamination under actual winemaking. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells metabolized almost 50% of the sugar in 3 days, while S. cerevisiae inoculation completed all of fermentation. The S. bombicola and M. pulcherrima initial fermentations showed the best reductions in the final ethanol content (1.6 and 1.4% v/v, respectively). Resulting wines did not have any negative fermentation products with the exception of H. uvarum sequential fermentation that showed significant amount of ethyl acetate. On the other hand, there were increases in desirable compounds such as glycerol and succinic acid for S. bombicola, geraniol for M. pulcherrima and isoamyl acetate and isoamyl alcohol for H. osmophila sequential fermentations. The overall results indicated that a promising ethanol reduction could be obtained using sequential fermentation of immobilized selected non-Saccharomyces strains. In this way, a suitable timing of second inoculation and an enhancement of analytical profile of wine were obtained. PMID:27014203

  16. Sequential Fermentation with Selected Immobilized Non-Saccharomyces Yeast for Reduction of Ethanol Content in Wine.

    PubMed

    Canonico, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Oro, Lucia; Ciani, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The average ethanol content of wine has increased over the last two decades. This increase was due to consumer preference, and also to climate change that resulted in increased grape maturity at harvest. In the present study, to reduce ethanol content in wine, a microbiological approach was investigated, using immobilized selected strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts namely Starmerella bombicola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora osmophila, and Hanseniaspora uvarum to start fermentation, followed by inoculation of free Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The immobilization procedures, determining high reaction rates, led a feasible sequential inoculation management avoiding possible contamination under actual winemaking. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells metabolized almost 50% of the sugar in 3 days, while S. cerevisiae inoculation completed all of fermentation. The S. bombicola and M. pulcherrima initial fermentations showed the best reductions in the final ethanol content (1.6 and 1.4% v/v, respectively). Resulting wines did not have any negative fermentation products with the exception of H. uvarum sequential fermentation that showed significant amount of ethyl acetate. On the other hand, there were increases in desirable compounds such as glycerol and succinic acid for S. bombicola, geraniol for M. pulcherrima and isoamyl acetate and isoamyl alcohol for H. osmophila sequential fermentations. The overall results indicated that a promising ethanol reduction could be obtained using sequential fermentation of immobilized selected non-Saccharomyces strains. In this way, a suitable timing of second inoculation and an enhancement of analytical profile of wine were obtained.

  17. Effect of Temperature on the Prevalence of Saccharomyces Non cerevisiae Species against a S. cerevisiae Wine Strain in Wine Fermentation: Competition, Physiological Fitness, and Influence in Final Wine Composition

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-del-Real, Javier; Lairón-Peris, María; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for the fermentation of wine. Nevertheless, in the last years wineries are facing new challenges due to current market demands and climate change effects on the wine quality. New yeast starters formed by non-conventional Saccharomyces species (such as S. uvarum or S. kudriavzevii) or their hybrids (S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum and S. cerevisiae x S. kudriavzevii) can contribute to solve some of these challenges. They exhibit good fermentative capabilities at low temperatures, producing wines with lower alcohol and higher glycerol amounts. However, S. cerevisiae can competitively displace other yeast species from wine fermentations, therefore the use of these new starters requires an analysis of their behavior during competition with S. cerevisiae during wine fermentation. In the present study we analyzed the survival capacity of non-cerevisiae strains in competition with S. cerevisiae during fermentation of synthetic wine must at different temperatures. First, we developed a new method, based on QPCR, to quantify the proportion of different Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed cultures. This method was used to assess the effect of competition on the growth fitness. In addition, fermentation kinetics parameters and final wine compositions were also analyzed. We observed that some cryotolerant Saccharomyces yeasts, particularly S. uvarum, seriously compromised S. cerevisiae fitness during competences at lower temperatures, which explains why S. uvarum can replace S. cerevisiae during wine fermentations in European regions with oceanic and continental climates. From an enological point of view, mixed co-cultures between S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus or S. eubayanus, deteriorated fermentation parameters and the final product composition compared to single S. cerevisiae inoculation. However, in co-inoculated synthetic must in which S. kudriavzevii or S. uvarum coexisted with S. cerevisiae, there were fermentation

  18. Effect of Temperature on the Prevalence of Saccharomyces Non cerevisiae Species against a S. cerevisiae Wine Strain in Wine Fermentation: Competition, Physiological Fitness, and Influence in Final Wine Composition.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Del-Real, Javier; Lairón-Peris, María; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for the fermentation of wine. Nevertheless, in the last years wineries are facing new challenges due to current market demands and climate change effects on the wine quality. New yeast starters formed by non-conventional Saccharomyces species (such as S. uvarum or S. kudriavzevii) or their hybrids (S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum and S. cerevisiae x S. kudriavzevii) can contribute to solve some of these challenges. They exhibit good fermentative capabilities at low temperatures, producing wines with lower alcohol and higher glycerol amounts. However, S. cerevisiae can competitively displace other yeast species from wine fermentations, therefore the use of these new starters requires an analysis of their behavior during competition with S. cerevisiae during wine fermentation. In the present study we analyzed the survival capacity of non-cerevisiae strains in competition with S. cerevisiae during fermentation of synthetic wine must at different temperatures. First, we developed a new method, based on QPCR, to quantify the proportion of different Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed cultures. This method was used to assess the effect of competition on the growth fitness. In addition, fermentation kinetics parameters and final wine compositions were also analyzed. We observed that some cryotolerant Saccharomyces yeasts, particularly S. uvarum, seriously compromised S. cerevisiae fitness during competences at lower temperatures, which explains why S. uvarum can replace S. cerevisiae during wine fermentations in European regions with oceanic and continental climates. From an enological point of view, mixed co-cultures between S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus or S. eubayanus, deteriorated fermentation parameters and the final product composition compared to single S. cerevisiae inoculation. However, in co-inoculated synthetic must in which S. kudriavzevii or S. uvarum coexisted with S. cerevisiae, there were fermentation

  19. Saccharomyces boulardii

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some medications for fungal infection include fluconazole (Diflucan), terbinafine (Lamisil), itraconazole (Sporanox), and others.MinorBe watchful with ... a day. For diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile: 1 gram of Saccharomyces boulardii daily for 4 weeks ...

  20. Anaerobic organic acid metabolism of Candida zemplinina in comparison with Saccharomyces wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Ildikó; Nyitrai-Sárdy, Diána; Leskó, Annamária; Pomázi, Andrea; Kállay, Miklós

    2014-05-16

    Organic acid production under oxygen-limited conditions has been thoroughly studied in the Saccharomyces species, but practically never investigated in Candida zemplinina, which seems to be an acidogenic species under oxidative laboratory conditions. In this study, several strains of C. zemplinina were tested for organic acid metabolism, in comparison with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces uvarum and Candida stellata, under fermentative conditions. Only C. stellata produced significantly higher acidity in simple minimal media (SM) with low sugar content and two different nitrogen sources (ammonia or glutamic acid) at low level. However, the acid profile differed largely between the Saccharomyces and Candida species and showed inverse types of N-dependence in some cases. Succinic acid production was strongly enhanced on glutamic acid in Saccharomyces species, but not in Candida species. 2-oxoglutarate production was strongly supported on ammonium nitrogen in Candida species, but remained low in Saccharomyces. Candida species, C. stellata in particular, produced more pyruvic acid regardless of N-sources. From the results, we concluded that the anaerobic organic acid metabolisms of C. zemplinina and C. stellata are different from each other and also from that of the Saccharomyces species. In the formation of succinic acid, the oxidative pathway from glutamic acid seems to play little or no role in C. zemplinina. The reductive branch of the TCA cycle, however, produces acidic intermediates (malic, fumaric, and succinic acid) in a level comparable with the production of the Saccharomyces species. An unidentified organic acid, which was produced on glutamic acid only by the Candida species, needs further investigation.

  1. On the Complexity of the Saccharomyces bayanus Taxon: Hybridization and Potential Hybrid Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Través, Laura; Lopes, Christian A.; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio

    2014-01-01

    Although the genus Saccharomyces has been thoroughly studied, some species in the genus has not yet been accurately resolved; an example is S. bayanus, a taxon that includes genetically diverse lineages of pure and hybrid strains. This diversity makes the assignation and classification of strains belonging to this species unclear and controversial. They have been subdivided by some authors into two varieties (bayanus and uvarum), which have been raised to the species level by others. In this work, we evaluate the complexity of 46 different strains included in the S. bayanus taxon by means of PCR-RFLP analysis and by sequencing of 34 gene regions and one mitochondrial gene. Using the sequence data, and based on the S. bayanus var. bayanus reference strain NBRC 1948, a hypothetical pure S. bayanus was reconstructed for these genes that showed alleles with similarity values lower than 97% with the S. bayanus var. uvarum strain CBS 7001, and of 99–100% with the non S. cerevisiae portion in S. pastorianus Weihenstephan 34/70 and with the new species S. eubayanus. Among the S. bayanus strains under study, different levels of homozygosity, hybridization and introgression were found; however, no pure S. bayanus var. bayanus strain was identified. These S. bayanus hybrids can be classified into two types: homozygous (type I) and heterozygous hybrids (type II), indicating that they have been originated by different hybridization processes. Therefore, a putative evolutionary scenario involving two different hybridization events between a S. bayanus var. uvarum and unknown European S. eubayanus-like strains can be postulated to explain the genomic diversity observed in our S. bayanus var. bayanus strains. PMID:24705561

  2. On the complexity of the Saccharomyces bayanus taxon: hybridization and potential hybrid speciation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Través, Laura; Lopes, Christian A; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio

    2014-01-01

    Although the genus Saccharomyces has been thoroughly studied, some species in the genus has not yet been accurately resolved; an example is S. bayanus, a taxon that includes genetically diverse lineages of pure and hybrid strains. This diversity makes the assignation and classification of strains belonging to this species unclear and controversial. They have been subdivided by some authors into two varieties (bayanus and uvarum), which have been raised to the species level by others. In this work, we evaluate the complexity of 46 different strains included in the S. bayanus taxon by means of PCR-RFLP analysis and by sequencing of 34 gene regions and one mitochondrial gene. Using the sequence data, and based on the S. bayanus var. bayanus reference strain NBRC 1948, a hypothetical pure S. bayanus was reconstructed for these genes that showed alleles with similarity values lower than 97% with the S. bayanus var. uvarum strain CBS 7001, and of 99-100% with the non S. cerevisiae portion in S. pastorianus Weihenstephan 34/70 and with the new species S. eubayanus. Among the S. bayanus strains under study, different levels of homozygosity, hybridization and introgression were found; however, no pure S. bayanus var. bayanus strain was identified. These S. bayanus hybrids can be classified into two types: homozygous (type I) and heterozygous hybrids (type II), indicating that they have been originated by different hybridization processes. Therefore, a putative evolutionary scenario involving two different hybridization events between a S. bayanus var. uvarum and unknown European S. eubayanus-like strains can be postulated to explain the genomic diversity observed in our S. bayanus var. bayanus strains.

  3. Deciphering the Hybridisation History Leading to the Lager Lineage Based on the Mosaic Genomes of Saccharomyces bayanus Strains NBRC1948 and CBS380T

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huu-Vang; Legras, Jean-Luc; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Gaillardin, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomyces bayanus is a yeast species described as one of the two parents of the hybrid brewing yeast S. pastorianus. Strains CBS380T and NBRC1948 have been retained successively as pure-line representatives of S. bayanus. In the present study, sequence analyses confirmed and upgraded our previous finding: S. bayanus type strain CBS380T harbours a mosaic genome. The genome of strain NBRC1948 was also revealed to be mosaic. Both genomes were characterized by amplification and sequencing of different markers, including genes involved in maltotriose utilization or genes detected by array-CGH mapping. Sequence comparisons with public Saccharomyces spp. nucleotide sequences revealed that the CBS380T and NBRC1948 genomes are composed of: a predominant non-cerevisiae genetic background belonging to S. uvarum, a second unidentified species provisionally named S. lagerae, and several introgressed S. cerevisiae fragments. The largest cerevisiae-introgressed DNA common to both genomes totals 70kb in length and is distributed in three contigs, cA, cB and cC. These vary in terms of length and presence of MAL31 or MTY1 (maltotriose-transporter gene). In NBRC1948, two additional cerevisiae-contigs, cD and cE, totaling 12kb in length, as well as several smaller cerevisiae fragments were identified. All of these contigs were partially detected in the genomes of S. pastorianus lager strains CBS1503 (S. monacensis) and CBS1513 (S. carlsbergensis) explaining the noticeable common ability of S. bayanus and S. pastorianus to metabolize maltotriose. NBRC1948 was shown to be inter-fertile with S. uvarum CBS7001. The cross involving these two strains produced F1 segregants resembling the strains CBS380T or NRRLY-1551. This demonstrates that these S. bayanus strains were the offspring of a cross between S. uvarum and a strain similar to NBRC1948. Phylogenies established with selected cerevisiae and non-cerevisiae genes allowed us to decipher the complex hybridisation events linking S

  4. Alternative Glycerol Balance Strategies among Saccharomyces Species in Response to Winemaking Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Oliveira, Bruno M.; Zemančíková, Jana; Sychrová, Hana; Querol, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    Production and balance of glycerol is essential for the survival of yeast cells in certain stressful conditions as hyperosmotic or cold shock that occur during industrial processes as winemaking. These stress responses are well-known in S. cerevisiae, however, little is known in other phylogenetically close related Saccharomyces species associated with natural or fermentation environments such as S. uvarum, S. paradoxus or S. kudriavzevii. In this work we have investigated the expression of four genes (GPD1, GPD2, STL1, and FPS1) crucial in the glycerol pool balance in the four species with a biotechnological potential (S. cerevisiae; S. paradoxus; S. uvarum; and S. kudriavzevii), and the ability of strains to grow under osmotic and cold stresses. The results show different pattern and level of expression among the different species, especially for STL1. We also studied the function of Stl1 glycerol symporter in the survival to osmotic changes and cell growth capacity in winemaking environments. These experiments also revealed a different functionality of the glycerol transporters among the different species studied. All these data point to different strategies to handle glycerol accumulation in response to winemaking stresses as hyperosmotic or cold-hyperosmotic stress in the different species, with variable emphasis in the production, influx, or efflux of glycerol. PMID:27064588

  5. Persistence of Two Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts (Hanseniaspora and Starmerella) in the Cellar

    PubMed Central

    Grangeteau, Cédric; Gerhards, Daniel; von Wallbrunn, Christian; Alexandre, Hervé; Rousseaux, Sandrine; Guilloux-Benatier, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Different genera and/or species of yeasts present on grape berries, in musts and wines are widely described. Nevertheless, the community of non-Saccharomyces yeasts present in the cellar is still given little attention. Thus it is not known if the cellar is a real ecological niche for these yeasts or if it is merely a transient habitat for populations brought in by grape berries during the winemaking period. This study focused on three species of non-Saccharomyces yeasts commonly encountered during vinification: Starmerella bacillaris (synonymy with Candida zemplinina), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii and Hanseniaspora uvarum. More than 1200 isolates were identified at the strain level by FT-IR spectroscopy (207 different FTIR strain pattern). Only a small proportion of non-Saccharomyces yeasts present in musts came directly from grape berries for the three species studied. Some strains were found in the must in two consecutive years and some of them were also found in the cellar environment before the arrival of the harvest of second vintage. This study demonstrates for the first time the persistence of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains from year to year in the cellar. Sulfur dioxide can affect yeast populations in the must and therefore their persistence in the cellar environment. PMID:27014199

  6. Enological characterization of Spanish Saccharomyces kudriavzevii strains, one of the closest relatives to parental strains of winemaking and brewing Saccharomyces cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids.

    PubMed

    Peris, D; Pérez-Través, L; Belloch, C; Querol, A

    2016-02-01

    Wine fermentation and innovation have focused mostly on Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. However, recent studies have shown that other Saccharomyces species can also be involved in wine fermentation or are useful for wine bouquet, such as Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces paradoxus. Many interspecies hybrids have also been isolated from wine fermentation, such as S. cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrids. In this study, we explored the genetic diversity and fermentation performance of Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains, which we compared to other S. kudriavzevii strains. Fermentations of red and white grape musts were performed, and the phenotypic differences between Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains under different temperature conditions were examined. An ANOVA analysis suggested striking similarity between strains for glycerol and ethanol production, although a high diversity of aromatic profiles among fermentations was found. The sources of these phenotypic differences are not well understood and require further investigation. Although the Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains showed desirable properties, particularly must fermentations, the quality of their wines was no better than those produced with a commercial S. cerevisiae. We suggest hybridization or directed evolution as methods to improve and innovate wine.

  7. Tandem repeat-tRNA (TRtRNA) PCR method for the molecular typing of non-Saccharomyces subspecies.

    PubMed

    Barquet, Marianne; Martín, Valentina; Medina, Karina; Pérez, Gabriel; Carrau, Francisco; Gaggero, Carina

    2012-01-01

    There is a worldwide trend to understand the impact of non-Saccharomyces yeast species on the process of winemaking. Although the predominant species at the end of the fermentation is Saccharomyces cerevisiae, several non-Saccharomyces species present during the first days of the process can produce and/or release aromas that improve the bouquet and complexity of the final wine. Since no genomic sequences are available for the predominant non-Saccharomyces species selected from grapes or musts (Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora vineae, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Candida zemplinina), a reproducible PCR method was devised to discriminate strains at the subspecies level. The method combines different oligonucleotides based on tandem repeats with a second oligonucleotide based on a conserved tRNA region, specific for ascomycetes. Tandem repeats are randomly dispersed in all eukaryotic genomes and tRNA genes are conserved and present in several copies in different chromosomes. As an example, the method was applied to discriminate native M. pulcherrima strains but it could be extended to differentiate strains from other non-Saccharomyces species. The biodiversity of species and strains found in the grape ecosystem is a potential source of new enzymes, fungicides and/or novel sustainable methods for biological control of phytopathogens.

  8. Quantifying the individual effects of ethanol and temperature on the fitness advantage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Z; Arroyo-López, F N; Barrio, E; Querol, A; Guillamón, J M

    2011-09-01

    The presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in grape berries and fresh musts is usually very low. However, as fermentation progresses, the population levels of this species considerably increase. In this study, we use the concept of fitness advantage to measure how increasing ethanol concentrations (0-25%) and temperature values (4-46 °C) in wine fermentations affects competition between S. cerevisiae and several non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Candida zemplinina, Pichia fermentans and Kluyveromyces marxianus). We used a mathematical approach to model the hypothetical time needed for S. cerevisiae to impose itself on a mixed population of the non-Saccharomyces species described above. This approach also took into consideration the influence of environmental factors and the initial population levels of S. cerevisiae (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0%). Our results suggest that Saccharomyces niche construction via ethanol production does not provide a clear ecological advantage (at least not until the ethanol concentration exceeds 9%), whereas a temperature rise (above 15 °C) does give S. cerevisiae a considerable advantage. The initial frequency of S. cerevisiae considerably influences the time it needs to impose itself (until it reaches a final frequency of 99% in the mixed culture), the lowest time values being found at the highest initial frequency. In light of these results, the application of low temperatures in the wine industry could favor the growth and survival of non-Saccharomyces species for a longer period of time.

  9. Diversity of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in three red grape varieties cultured in the Serranía de Ronda (Spain) vine-growing region.

    PubMed

    Clavijo, Almudena; Calderón, Isabel L; Paneque, Patricia

    2010-10-15

    For the first time, an ecological survey of wine yeasts present in grapes growing in two vineyards located in the region of "Serranía de Ronda" (Málaga, southern Spain) has been carried out. During the 2006 and 2007 vintages, grapes from different varieties were aseptically collected and allowed to ferment spontaneously in the laboratory. From a total of 1586 colonies isolated from microvinifications, 1281 were identified according to ITS polymorphisms and their identity confirmed by sequencing of the D1/D2 region of 26S rDNA. Most of the isolates (84%) corresponded to thirteen different non-Saccharomyces species with Kluyveromyces thermotolerans, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Issatchenkia orientalis accounting for 42.7% of the total. Mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates revealed a low diversity since only eleven different profiles were found, nine of them corresponding to local strains and two to commercial ones that had been used in different campaigns and that very likely were disseminated from the winery to the adjacent vineyard. A different distribution of strains was found in the three grape varieties studied.

  10. Phenotypic characterisation of Saccharomyces spp. for tolerance to 1-butanol.

    PubMed

    Zaki, A M; Wimalasena, T T; Greetham, D

    2014-11-01

    Biofuels are expected to play a role in replacing crude oil as a liquid transportation fuel, and research into butanol has highlighted the importance of this alcohol as a fuel. Butanol has a higher energy density than ethanol, butanol-gasoline blends do not separate in the presence of water, and butanol is miscible with gasoline (Szulczyk, Int J Energy Environ 1(1):2876-2895, 40). Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a fermentative organism in the biofuel industry producing ethanol from glucose derived from starchy plant material; however, it typically cannot tolerate butanol concentrations greater than 2 % (Luong, Biotechnol Bioeng 29 (2):242-248, 27). 90 Saccharomyces spp. strains were screened for tolerance to 1-butanol via a phenotypic microarray assay and we observed significant variation in response with the most tolerant strains (S. cerevisiae DBVPG1788, S. cerevisiae DBVPG6044 and S. cerevisiae YPS128) exhibiting tolerance to 4 % 1-butanol compared with S. uvarum and S. castelli strains, which were sensitive to 3 % 1-butanol. Response to butanol was confirmed using traditional yeast methodologies such as growth; it was observed that fermentations in the presence of butanol, when using strains with a tolerant background, were significantly faster. Assessing for genetic rationale for tolerance, it was observed that 1-butanol-tolerant strains, when compared with 1-butanol-sensitive strains, had an up-regulation of RPN4, a transcription factor which regulates proteasome genes. Analysing for the importance of RPN4, we observed that a Δrpn4 strain displayed a reduced rate of fermentation in the presence of 1-butanol when compared with the BY4741 background strain. This data will aid the development of breeding programmes to produce better strains for future bio-butanol production.

  11. Diversity and evolution of non-Saccharomyces yeast populations during wine fermentation: effect of grape ripeness and cold maceration.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Núria; González, Angel; Mas, Albert; Guillamón, Jose M

    2006-01-01

    We have evaluated the effect of grape maturity and cold maceration prior to fermentation on the yeast ecology during wine fermentation. Non-Saccharomyces strains were selectively isolated and identified using two rapid PCR techniques, namely enterobacterial repetitve intergenic consensus-PCR and PCR-intron splice sites, in various wine fermentation conditions. These identifications were further complemented and confirmed by restriction fragment length poymorphism and sequencing analysis of the 5.8S-ITS and D1/D2 ribosomal regions, respectively. Eleven species belonging to five genera were identified. Candida stellata, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Hanseniaspora osmophila were the dominant species, representing almost 90% of the isolates. Minor strains presented different species of the genera Candida, Issatchenkia, Zygoascus and Zygosaccharomyces. Selective isolation made it possible to isolate some species that were hardly related to the wine-making process, such as Issatchenkia hanoiensis, a new species that has only been described recently.

  12. Fermentative capabilities and volatile compounds produced by Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Saccharomyces yeast strains in pure and mixed cultures during Agave tequilana juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Ivonne Wendolyne; Estarrón-Espinosa, Mirna; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María

    2015-09-01

    The fermentative and aromatic capabilities of Kloeckera africana/Hanseniaspora vineae K1, K. apiculata/H. uvarum K2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1 and S2 were studied in pure and mixed culture fermentations using Agave tequila juice as the culture medium. In pure and mixed cultures, Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains showed limited growth and sugar consumption, as well as low ethanol yield and productivity, compared to S. cerevisiae, which yielded more biomass, ethanol and viable cell concentrations. In pure and mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae presented a similar behaviour reaching high biomass production, completely consuming the sugar, leading to high ethanol production. Furthermore, the presence of S. cerevisiae strains in the mixed cultures promoted the production of higher alcohols, acetaldehyde and ethyl esters, whereas Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains stimulated the production of ethyl acetate and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate compounds.

  13. A New System for Comparative Functional Genomics of Saccharomyces Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Caudy, Amy A.; Guan, Yuanfang; Jia, Yue; Hansen, Christina; DeSevo, Chris; Hayes, Alicia P.; Agee, Joy; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R.; Arellano, Hugo; Barrett, Daniel; Bauerle, Cynthia; Bisaria, Namita; Bradley, Patrick H.; Breunig, J. Scott; Bush, Erin; Cappel, David; Capra, Emily; Chen, Walter; Clore, John; Combs, Peter A.; Doucette, Christopher; Demuren, Olukunle; Fellowes, Peter; Freeman, Sam; Frenkel, Evgeni; Gadala-Maria, Daniel; Gawande, Richa; Glass, David; Grossberg, Samuel; Gupta, Anita; Hammonds-Odie, Latanya; Hoisos, Aaron; Hsi, Jenny; Hsu, Yu-Han Huang; Inukai, Sachi; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Ke, Xiaobo; Kojima, Mina; Leachman, Samuel; Lieber, Danny; Liebowitz, Anna; Liu, Julia; Liu, Yufei; Martin, Trevor; Mena, Jose; Mendoza, Rosa; Myhrvold, Cameron; Millian, Christian; Pfau, Sarah; Raj, Sandeep; Rich, Matt; Rokicki, Joe; Rounds, William; Salazar, Michael; Salesi, Matthew; Sharma, Rajani; Silverman, Sanford; Singer, Cara; Sinha, Sandhya; Staller, Max; Stern, Philip; Tang, Hanlin; Weeks, Sharon; Weidmann, Maxwell; Wolf, Ashley; Young, Carmen; Yuan, Jie; Crutchfield, Christopher; McClean, Megan; Murphy, Coleen T.; Llinás, Manuel; Botstein, David; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Dunham, Maitreya J.

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing, particularly in fungi, has progressed at a tremendous rate. More difficult, however, is experimental testing of the inferences about gene function that can be drawn from comparative sequence analysis alone. We present a genome-wide functional characterization of a sequenced but experimentally understudied budding yeast, Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum (henceforth referred to as S. bayanus), allowing us to map changes over the 20 million years that separate this organism from S. cerevisiae. We first created a suite of genetic tools to facilitate work in S. bayanus. Next, we measured the gene-expression response of S. bayanus to a diverse set of perturbations optimized using a computational approach to cover a diverse array of functionally relevant biological responses. The resulting data set reveals that gene-expression patterns are largely conserved, but significant changes may exist in regulatory networks such as carbohydrate utilization and meiosis. In addition to regulatory changes, our approach identified gene functions that have diverged. The functions of genes in core pathways are highly conserved, but we observed many changes in which genes are involved in osmotic stress, peroxisome biogenesis, and autophagy. A surprising number of genes specific to S. bayanus respond to oxidative stress, suggesting the organism may have evolved under different selection pressures than S. cerevisiae. This work expands the scope of genome-scale evolutionary studies from sequence-based analysis to rapid experimental characterization and could be adopted for functional mapping in any lineage of interest. Furthermore, our detailed characterization of S. bayanus provides a valuable resource for comparative functional genomics studies in yeast. PMID:23852385

  14. A new system for comparative functional genomics of Saccharomyces yeasts.

    PubMed

    Caudy, Amy A; Guan, Yuanfang; Jia, Yue; Hansen, Christina; DeSevo, Chris; Hayes, Alicia P; Agee, Joy; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Arellano, Hugo; Barrett, Daniel; Bauerle, Cynthia; Bisaria, Namita; Bradley, Patrick H; Breunig, J Scott; Bush, Erin; Cappel, David; Capra, Emily; Chen, Walter; Clore, John; Combs, Peter A; Doucette, Christopher; Demuren, Olukunle; Fellowes, Peter; Freeman, Sam; Frenkel, Evgeni; Gadala-Maria, Daniel; Gawande, Richa; Glass, David; Grossberg, Samuel; Gupta, Anita; Hammonds-Odie, Latanya; Hoisos, Aaron; Hsi, Jenny; Hsu, Yu-Han Huang; Inukai, Sachi; Karczewski, Konrad J; Ke, Xiaobo; Kojima, Mina; Leachman, Samuel; Lieber, Danny; Liebowitz, Anna; Liu, Julia; Liu, Yufei; Martin, Trevor; Mena, Jose; Mendoza, Rosa; Myhrvold, Cameron; Millian, Christian; Pfau, Sarah; Raj, Sandeep; Rich, Matt; Rokicki, Joe; Rounds, William; Salazar, Michael; Salesi, Matthew; Sharma, Rajani; Silverman, Sanford; Singer, Cara; Sinha, Sandhya; Staller, Max; Stern, Philip; Tang, Hanlin; Weeks, Sharon; Weidmann, Maxwell; Wolf, Ashley; Young, Carmen; Yuan, Jie; Crutchfield, Christopher; McClean, Megan; Murphy, Coleen T; Llinás, Manuel; Botstein, David; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Dunham, Maitreya J

    2013-09-01

    Whole-genome sequencing, particularly in fungi, has progressed at a tremendous rate. More difficult, however, is experimental testing of the inferences about gene function that can be drawn from comparative sequence analysis alone. We present a genome-wide functional characterization of a sequenced but experimentally understudied budding yeast, Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum (henceforth referred to as S. bayanus), allowing us to map changes over the 20 million years that separate this organism from S. cerevisiae. We first created a suite of genetic tools to facilitate work in S. bayanus. Next, we measured the gene-expression response of S. bayanus to a diverse set of perturbations optimized using a computational approach to cover a diverse array of functionally relevant biological responses. The resulting data set reveals that gene-expression patterns are largely conserved, but significant changes may exist in regulatory networks such as carbohydrate utilization and meiosis. In addition to regulatory changes, our approach identified gene functions that have diverged. The functions of genes in core pathways are highly conserved, but we observed many changes in which genes are involved in osmotic stress, peroxisome biogenesis, and autophagy. A surprising number of genes specific to S. bayanus respond to oxidative stress, suggesting the organism may have evolved under different selection pressures than S. cerevisiae. This work expands the scope of genome-scale evolutionary studies from sequence-based analysis to rapid experimental characterization and could be adopted for functional mapping in any lineage of interest. Furthermore, our detailed characterization of S. bayanus provides a valuable resource for comparative functional genomics studies in yeast.

  15. Dynamic study of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc in Jingyang, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes during spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc planted in 1957 in Jingyang region of China was followed in this study. Using a combination of colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium, sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis, a total of 686 isolates were identified at the species level. The six species identified were S. cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Issatchenkia terricola, Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis) and Trichosporon coremiiforme. This is the first report of T. coremiiforme as an inhabitant of grape must. Three new colony morphologies on WLN medium and one new 5.8S-ITS-RFLP profile are described. Species of non-Saccharomyces, predominantly H. opuntiae, were found in early stages of fermentation. Subsequently, S. cerevisiae prevailed followed by large numbers of P. kudriavzevii that dominated at the end of fermentations. Six native genotypes of S. cerevisiae were determined by interdelta sequence analysis. Genotypes III and IV were predominant. As a first step in exploring untapped yeast resources of the region, this study is important for monitoring the yeast ecology in native fermentations and screening indigenous yeasts that will produce wines with regional characteristics.

  16. Aroma Profile of Montepulciano d'Abruzzo Wine Fermented by Single and Co-culture Starters of Autochthonous Saccharomyces and Non-saccharomyces Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Patrignani, Francesca; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Di Gianvito, Paola; Pizzoni, Daniel; Arfelli, Giuseppe; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Montepulciano d'Abruzzo is a native grape variety of Vitis vinifera L., grown in central Italy and used for production of high quality red wines. Limited studies have been carried out to improve its enological characteristics through the use of indigenous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The main objective of the present work was to test two indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae (SRS1, RT73), a strain of Starmerella bacillaris (STS12), one of Hanseniaspora uvarum (STS45) and a co-culture of S. cerevisiae (SRS1) and S. bacillaris (STS12), in an experimental cellar to evaluate their role in the sensory characteristic of Montepulciano d'Abruzzo wine. A S. cerevisiae commercial strain was used. Fermentations were conducted under routine Montepulciano d'Abruzzo wine production, in which the main variables were the yeast strains used for fermentation. Basic winemaking parameters, some key chemical analysis and aroma compounds were considered. S. cerevisiae strain dynamics during fermentation were determined by molecular methods. The musts inoculated with the co-culture were characterized by a faster fermentation start and a higher content of glycerol after 3 days of fermentation, as well as the musts added with strains S. bacillaris (STS12) and H. uvarum (STS45). At the end of fermentation the parameters studied were quite similar in all the wines. Total biogenic amines (BA) content of all the wines was low. Ethanolamine was the predominant BA, with a concentration ranging from 21 to 24 mg/l. Wines were characterized by esters and alcohols. In particular, 2-phenylethanol, 3-methylbut-1-yl methanoate, and ethyl ethanoate were the major aroma volatile compounds in all wines. Statistical analysis highlighted the different role played by aroma compounds in the differentiation of wines, even if it was impossible to select a single class of compounds as the most important for a specific yeast. The present study represents a further step toward the use of tailored

  17. Enhancing the Bioconversion of Winery and Olive Mill Waste Mixtures into Lignocellulolytic Enzymes and Animal Feed by Aspergillus uvarum Using a Packed-Bed Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Salgado, José Manuel; Abrunhosa, Luís; Venâncio, Armando; Domínguez, José Manuel; Belo, Isabel

    2015-10-28

    Wineries and olive oil industries are dominant agro-industrial activities in southern European regions. Olive pomace, exhausted grape marc, and vine shoot trimmings are lignocellulosic residues generated by these industries, which could be valued biotechnologically. In the present work these residues were used as substrate to produce cellulases and xylanases through solid-state fermentation using Aspergillus uvarum MUM 08.01. For that, two factorial designs (3(2)) were first planned to optimize substrate composition, temperature, and initial moisture level. Subsequently, the kinectics of cellulolytic enzyme production, fungal growth, and fermented solid were characterized. Finally, the process was performed in a packed-bed bioreactor. The results showed that cellulase activity improved with the optimization processes, reaching 33.56 U/g, and with the packed-bed bioreactor aeration of 0.2 L/min, reaching 38.51 U/g. The composition of fermented solids indicated their potential use for animal feed because cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and phenolic compounds were partially degraded 28.08, 10.78, 13.3, and 28.32%, respectively, crude protein was increased from 8.47 to 17.08%, and the mineral contents meet the requirements of main livestock.

  18. Effects of particulate materials and osmoprotectants on very-high-gravity ethanolic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K C; Hynes, S H; Ingledew, W M

    1994-01-01

    The effects of osmoprotectants (such as glycine betaine and proline) and particulate materials on the fermentation of very high concentrations of glucose by the brewing strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae (uvarum) NCYC 1324 were studied. The yeast growing at 20 degrees C consumed only 15 g of the sugar per 100 ml from a minimal medium which initially contained 35% (wt/vol) glucose. Supplementing the medium with a mixture of glycine betaine, glycine, and proline increased the amount of sugar fermented to 30.5 g/100 ml. With such supplementation, the viability of the yeast cells was maintained above 80% throughout the fermentation, while it dropped to less than 12% in the unsupplemented controls. Among single additives, glycine was more effective than proline or glycine betaine. On incubating the cultures for 10 days, the viability decreased to only 55% with glycine, while it dropped to 36 and 27%, respectively, with glycine betaine and proline. It is suggested that glycine and proline, known to be poor nitrogen sources for growth, may serve directly or indirectly as osmoprotectants. Nutrients such as tryptone, yeast extract, and a mixture of purine and pyrimidine bases increased the sugar uptake and ethanol production but did not allow the population to maintain the high level of cell viability. While only 43% of the sugar was fermented in unsupplemented medium, the presence of particulate materials such as wheat bran, wheat mash insolubles, alumina, and soy flour increased sugar utilization to 68, 75, 81, and 82%, respectively. PMID:8017934

  19. Major sulfonate transporter Soa1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and considerable substrate diversity in its fungal family

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Sylvester; Kankipati, Harish; De Graeve, Stijn; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Lindgreen, Stinus; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2017-01-01

    Sulfate is a well-established sulfur source for fungi; however, in soils sulfonates and sulfate esters, especially choline sulfate, are often much more prominent. Here we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae YIL166C(SOA1) encodes an inorganic sulfur (sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate) transporter that also catalyses sulfonate and choline sulfate uptake. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal SOA1 orthologues and expression of 20 members in the sul1Δ sul2Δ soa1Δ strain, which is deficient in inorganic and organic sulfur compound uptake, reveals that these transporters have diverse substrate preferences for sulfur compounds. We further show that SOA2, a S. cerevisiae SOA1 paralogue found in S. uvarum, S. eubayanus and S. arboricola is likely to be an evolutionary remnant of the uncharacterized open reading frames YOL163W and YOL162W. Our work highlights the importance of sulfonates and choline sulfate as sulfur sources in the natural environment of S. cerevisiae and other fungi by identifying fungal transporters for these compounds. PMID:28165463

  20. Effects of particulate materials and osmoprotectants on very-high-gravity ethanolic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K C; Hynes, S H; Ingledew, W M

    1994-05-01

    The effects of osmoprotectants (such as glycine betaine and proline) and particulate materials on the fermentation of very high concentrations of glucose by the brewing strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae (uvarum) NCYC 1324 were studied. The yeast growing at 20 degrees C consumed only 15 g of the sugar per 100 ml from a minimal medium which initially contained 35% (wt/vol) glucose. Supplementing the medium with a mixture of glycine betaine, glycine, and proline increased the amount of sugar fermented to 30.5 g/100 ml. With such supplementation, the viability of the yeast cells was maintained above 80% throughout the fermentation, while it dropped to less than 12% in the unsupplemented controls. Among single additives, glycine was more effective than proline or glycine betaine. On incubating the cultures for 10 days, the viability decreased to only 55% with glycine, while it dropped to 36 and 27%, respectively, with glycine betaine and proline. It is suggested that glycine and proline, known to be poor nitrogen sources for growth, may serve directly or indirectly as osmoprotectants. Nutrients such as tryptone, yeast extract, and a mixture of purine and pyrimidine bases increased the sugar uptake and ethanol production but did not allow the population to maintain the high level of cell viability. While only 43% of the sugar was fermented in unsupplemented medium, the presence of particulate materials such as wheat bran, wheat mash insolubles, alumina, and soy flour increased sugar utilization to 68, 75, 81, and 82%, respectively.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Shuttle vectors.

    PubMed

    Gnügge, Robert; Rudolf, Fabian

    2017-01-10

    Yeast shuttle vectors are indispensable tools in yeast research. They enable cloning of defined DNA sequences in Escherichia coli and their direct transfer into Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. There are three types of commonly used yeast shuttle vectors: centromeric plasmids, episomal plasmids and integrating plasmids. In this review, we discuss the different plasmid systems and their characteristic features. We focus on their segregational stability and copy number and indicate how to modify these properties. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Hooykaas, Paul J J; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Bundock, Paul; Soltani, Jalal; van Attikum, Haico; van Heusden, G Paul H

    2006-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic organisms. This species has enabled a detailed study of the (genetic) requirements for Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transformation. For instance research with this yeast has led to the recognition that the transforming DNA molecules integrate into the eukaryotic chromosomes either by homologous recombination, which is the preferred pathway in S. cerevisiae, or by nonhomologous end-joining. Based on the protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of S. cerevisiae methodology has been developed for the transformation of many other yeast and fungal species.

  3. Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pan-genome reveals a pool of copy number variants distributed in diverse yeast strains from differing industrial environments

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Barbara; Richter, Chandra; Kvitek, Daniel J.; Pugh, Tom; Sherlock, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Although the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is arguably one of the most well-studied organisms on earth, the genome-wide variation within this species—i.e., its “pan-genome”—has been less explored. We created a multispecies microarray platform containing probes covering the genomes of several Saccharomyces species: S. cerevisiae, including regions not found in the standard laboratory S288c strain, as well as the mitochondrial and 2-μm circle genomes–plus S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. kluyveri, and S. castellii. We performed array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) on 83 different S. cerevisiae strains collected across a wide range of habitats; of these, 69 were commercial wine strains, while the remaining 14 were from a diverse set of other industrial and natural environments. We observed interspecific hybridization events, introgression events, and pervasive copy number variation (CNV) in all but a few of the strains. These CNVs were distributed throughout the strains such that they did not produce any clear phylogeny, suggesting extensive mating in both industrial and wild strains. To validate our results and to determine whether apparently similar introgressions and CNVs were identical by descent or recurrent, we also performed whole-genome sequencing on nine of these strains. These data may help pinpoint genomic regions involved in adaptation to different industrial milieus, as well as shed light on the course of domestication of S. cerevisiae. PMID:22369888

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldolase. The aldolase activity in various mutant alleles measured as fructose 1,6-bisphosphate cleavage is between 1 to 2% and as condensation of triose phosphates to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is 2 to 5% that of the wild-type. The mutants accumulate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate from glucose during glycolysis and dihydroxyacetone phosphate during gluconeogenesis. This suggests that the aldolase activity is absent in vivo. PMID:6384192

  5. PT and INR Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibrillation ) The presence of artificial heart valves Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) Antiphospholipid syndrome Occasionally, in heart attacks with certain risk factors The PT test may be used along with ...

  6. PT-symmetric strings

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo; Fernández, Francisco M.; Garcia, Javier; Gutierrez, German

    2014-04-15

    We study both analytically and numerically the spectrum of inhomogeneous strings with PT-symmetric density. We discuss an exactly solvable model of PT-symmetric string which is isospectral to the uniform string; for more general strings, we calculate exactly the sum rules Z(p)≡∑{sub n=1}{sup ∞}1/E{sub n}{sup p}, with p=1,2,… and find explicit expressions which can be used to obtain bounds on the lowest eigenvalue. A detailed numerical calculation is carried out for two non-solvable models depending on a parameter, obtaining precise estimates of the critical values where pair of real eigenvalues become complex. -- Highlights: •PT-symmetric Hamiltonians exhibit real eigenvalues when PT symmetry is unbroken. •We study PT-symmetric strings with complex density. •They exhibit regions of unbroken PT symmetry. •We calculate the critical parameters at the boundaries of those regions. •There are exact real sum rules for some particular complex densities.

  7. PT quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bender, Carl M; DeKieviet, Maarten; Klevansky, S P

    2013-04-28

    PT-symmetric quantum mechanics (PTQM) has become a hot area of research and investigation. Since its beginnings in 1998, there have been over 1000 published papers and more than 15 international conferences entirely devoted to this research topic. Originally, PTQM was studied at a highly mathematical level and the techniques of complex variables, asymptotics, differential equations and perturbation theory were used to understand the subtleties associated with the analytic continuation of eigenvalue problems. However, as experiments on PT-symmetric physical systems have been performed, a simple and beautiful physical picture has emerged, and a PT-symmetric system can be understood as one that has a balanced loss and gain. Furthermore, the PT phase transition can now be understood intuitively without resorting to sophisticated mathematics. Research on PTQM is following two different paths: at a fundamental level, physicists are attempting to understand the underlying mathematical structure of these theories with the long-range objective of applying the techniques of PTQM to understanding some of the outstanding problems in physics today, such as the nature of the Higgs particle, the properties of dark matter, the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, neutrino oscillations and the cosmological constant; at an applied level, new kinds of PT-synthetic materials are being developed, and the PT phase transition is being observed in many physical contexts, such as lasers, optical wave guides, microwave cavities, superconducting wires and electronic circuits. The purpose of this Theme Issue is to acquaint the reader with the latest developments in PTQM. The articles in this volume are written in the style of mini-reviews and address diverse areas of the emerging and exciting new area of PT-symmetric quantum mechanics.

  8. Pt redistribution during Ni(Pt) silicide formation

    SciTech Connect

    Demeulemeester, J.; Smeets, D.; Vantomme, A.; Van Bockstael, C.; Detavernier, C.; Comrie, C. M.; Barradas, N. P.; Vieira, A.

    2008-12-29

    We report on a real-time Rutherford backscattering spectrometry study of the erratic redistribution of Pt during Ni silicide formation in a solid phase reaction. The inhomogeneous Pt redistribution in Ni(Pt)Si films is a consequence of the low solubility of Pt in Ni{sub 2}Si compared to NiSi and the limited mobility of Pt in NiSi. Pt further acts as a diffusion barrier and resides in the Ni{sub 2}Si grain boundaries, significantly slowing down the Ni{sub 2}Si and NiSi growth kinetics. Moreover, the observed incorporation of a large amount of Pt in the NiSi seeds indicates that Pt plays a major role in selecting the crystallographic orientation of these seeds and thus in the texture of the resulting Ni{sub 1-x}Pt{sub x}Si film.

  9. Yeasts: What's in a name? A brief reconnaissance and sampling of literature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientific names (including authors) are provided for certain yeasts used by vintners and brewers: Saccharomyces cerevisiae Meyen ex E.C. Hansen, Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum (Beij.) G.I. Naumov (synonym Saccharomyces uvarum Beij.), Saccharomyces pastorianus Reess ex E.C. Hansen (synonym Saccha...

  10. PT-symmetric kinks

    SciTech Connect

    Souza Dutra, A. de; Santos, V. G. C. S. dos; Amaro de Faria, A. C. Jr.

    2007-06-15

    Some kinks for non-Hermitian quantum field theories in 1+1 dimensions are constructed. A class of models where the soliton energies are stable and real are found. Although these kinks are not Hermitian, they are symmetric under PT transformations.

  11. Selected non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts in controlled multistarter fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are metabolically active during spontaneous and inoculated must fermentations, and by producing a plethora of by-products, they can contribute to the definition of the wine aroma. Thus, use of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts as mixed starter cultures for inoculation of wine fermentations is of increasing interest for quality enhancement and improved complexity of wines. We initially characterized 34 non-Saccharomyces yeasts of the genera Candida, Lachancea (Kluyveromyces), Metschnikowia and Torulaspora, and evaluated their enological potential. This confirmed that non-Saccharomyces yeasts from wine-related environments represent a rich sink of unexplored biodiversity for the winemaking industry. From these, we selected four non-Saccharomyces yeasts to combine with starter cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed fermentation trials. The kinetics of growth and fermentation, and the analytical profiles of the wines produced indicate that these non-Saccharomyces strains can be used with S. cerevisiae starter cultures to increase polysaccharide, glycerol and volatile compound production, to reduce volatile acidity, and to increase or reduce the total acidity of the final wines, depending on yeast species and inoculum ratio used. The overall effects of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on fermentation and wine quality were strictly dependent on the Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio that mimicked the differences of fermentation conditions (natural or simultaneous inoculated fermentation).

  12. Characterization of azo dyes on Pt and Pt/polyaniline/dispersed Pt electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, J.; Fernández, J.; del Río, A. I.; Bonastre, J.; Cases, F.

    2012-06-01

    The electrochemical characterization of two organic dyes (amaranth and procion orange MX-2R) has been performed on Pt electrodes and Pt electrodes coated with polyaniline and dispersed Pt. Electrodes with different Pt loads have been synthesized and characterized obtaining that a load of 300 μg cm-2 was the optimum one. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to observe the distribution and morphology of the Pt nanoparticles. The electroactivity of the electrodes has also been characterized by means of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The chemical characterization of Pt dispersed Pani coated Pt electrodes (Pt-Pani-Pt) was performed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical characterization of the dyes has been performed by means of cyclic voltammetry. Voltammograms have shown that the presence of the dyes diminishes characteristic Pt oxidation and reduction peaks. However, redox processes due to the dyes, appeared in the voltammograms. The different species responsible of these redox processes were generated in the vicinity of the electrode and were not adsorbed on the electrode surface since after stirring, the different redox processes disappeared. Characterization with different scan rates showed that redox processes of both dyes were controlled by diffusion.

  13. The compressibility of nanocrystalline Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheykin, A. S.; Dmitriev, V. P.; Chagovets, S. V.; Kuriganova, A. B.; Smirnova, N. V.; Leontyev, I. N.

    2012-10-01

    High-pressure behavior of carbon supported Pt nanoparticles (Pt/C) with an average particle size of 10.6 nm was investigated by in situ high-pressure synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction up to 14 GPa at ambient temperature. Our results show that the compressibility of Pt/C nanoparticles decreases substantially as the particle size decreases. An interpretation based upon the available mechanisms of structural compliance in nanoscale vs bulk materials was proposed.

  14. Growth of Pt Clusters from Mixture Film of Pt-C and Dynamics of Pt Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Masayuki; Kumamoto, Akihito; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Kaito, Chihiro

    2007-06-01

    A complete mixture film of carbon and platinum produced by coevaporation in a vacuum was directly heated in a transmission electron microscope. It was found that the diffusion and crystal growth of Pt clusters in the mixture film take place at approximately 500 °C. Pt clusters with a size of 2-5 nm were connected with each other in a parallel orientation or twin-crystal configuration in the mixture film. The growth of onion-like carbon with a hole at the center also occurred. The grown Pt clusters with twin-crystal structures appeared on and in the carbon film. The diffusion of Pt atoms in carbon was discussed as the problem of elusion in fuel cells. Direct observation of the movement of Pt clusters on and in the carbon film was carried out. The movement difference of Pt clusters in and on carbon film has been directly presented.

  15. {PT}-symmetric optical superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    The spectral and localization properties of {PT}-symmetric optical superlattices, either infinitely extended or truncated at one side, are theoretically investigated, and the criteria that ensure a real energy spectrum are derived. The analysis is applied to the case of superlattices describing a complex ( {PT}-symmetric) extension of the Harper Hamiltonian in the rational case.

  16. Homogeneous Pt-bimetallic Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chao; Chi, Miaofang; More, Karren Leslie; Markovic, Nenad; Stamenkovic, Vojislav

    2011-01-01

    Alloying has shown enormous potential for tailoring the atomic and electronic structures, and improving the performance of catalytic materials. Systematic studies of alloy catalysts are, however, often compromised by inhomogeneous distribution of alloying components. Here we introduce a general approach for the synthesis of monodispersed and highly homogeneous Pt-bimetallic alloy nanocatalysts. Pt{sub 3}M (where M = Fe, Ni, or Co) nanoparticles were prepared by an organic solvothermal method and then supported on high surface area carbon. These catalysts attained a homogeneous distribution of elements, as demonstrated by atomic-scale elemental analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy. They also exhibited high catalytic activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), with improvement factors of 2-3 versus conventional Pt/carbon catalysts. The measured ORR catalytic activities for Pt{sub 3}M nanocatalysts validated the volcano curve established on extended surfaces, with Pt{sub 3}Co being the most active alloy.

  17. Nucleosome Positioning in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, An; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The DNA of eukaryotic cells is spooled around large histone protein complexes, forming nucleosomes that make up the basis for a high-order packaging structure called chromatin. Compared to naked DNA, nucleosomal DNA is less accessible to regulatory proteins and regulatory processes. The exact positions of nucleosomes therefore influence several cellular processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation, recombination, replication, and DNA repair. Here, we review recent technological advances enabling the genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positions in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discuss the various parameters that determine nucleosome positioning in vivo, including cis factors like AT content, variable tandem repeats, and poly(dA:dT) tracts that function as chromatin barriers and trans factors such as chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription factors, histone-modifying enzymes, and RNA polymerases. In the last section, we review the biological role of chromatin in gene transcription, the evolution of gene regulation, and epigenetic phenomena. PMID:21646431

  18. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  19. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge regarding Saccharomyces cerevisiae has accumulated over time, and today S. cerevisiae serves as a widley used biotechnological production organism as well as a eukaryotic model system. The high transformation efficiency, in addition to the availability of the complete yeast genome sequence, has facilitated genetic manipulation of this microorganism, and new approaches are constantly being taken to metabolicially engineer this organism in order to suit specific needs. In this paper, strategies and concepts for metabolic engineering are discussed and several examples based upon selected studies involving S. cerevisiae are reviewed. The many different studies of metabolic engineering using this organism illustrate all the categories of this multidisciplinary field: extension of substrate range, improvements of producitivity and yield, elimination of byproduct formation, improvement of process performance, improvements of cellular properties, and extension of product range including heterologous protein production. PMID:10704473

  20. Postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.A.; Boyce, J.; Cox, B.

    1981-04-01

    Postreplication events in logarithmically growing excision-defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined after low doses of ultraviolet light. Pulse-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid had interruptions, and when the cells were chased, the interruptions were no longer detected. Since the loss of interruptions was not associated with an exchange of pyrimidine dimers at a detection level of 10 to 20% of the induced dimers, it was concluded that postreplication repair in excision-defective mutants does not involve molecular recombination. Pyrimidine dimers were assayed by utilizing the ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in extracts of Micrococcus luteus and newly developed alkaline sucrose gradient techniques, which yielded chromosomal-size deoxyribonucleic acid after treatment of irradiated cells.

  1. Pyruvate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pronk, J T; Yde Steensma, H; Van Dijken, J P

    1996-12-01

    In yeasts, pyruvate is located at a major junction of assimilatory and dissimilatory reactions as well as at the branch-point between respiratory dissimilation of sugars and alcoholic fermentation. This review deals with the enzymology, physiological function and regulation of three key reactions occurring at the pyruvate branch-point in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: (i) the direct oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, catalysed by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, (ii) decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde, catalysed by pyruvate decarboxylase, and (iii) the anaplerotic carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, catalysed by pyruvate carboxylase. Special attention is devoted to physiological studies on S. cerevisiae strains in which structural genes encoding these key enzymes have been inactivated by gene disruption.

  2. Chromosome Duplication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Stephen P.; Labib, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The accurate and complete replication of genomic DNA is essential for all life. In eukaryotic cells, the assembly of the multi-enzyme replisomes that perform replication is divided into stages that occur at distinct phases of the cell cycle. Replicative DNA helicases are loaded around origins of DNA replication exclusively during G1 phase. The loaded helicases are then activated during S phase and associate with the replicative DNA polymerases and other accessory proteins. The function of the resulting replisomes is monitored by checkpoint proteins that protect arrested replisomes and inhibit new initiation when replication is inhibited. The replisome also coordinates nucleosome disassembly, assembly, and the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. Finally, when two replisomes converge they are disassembled. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have led the way in our understanding of these processes. Here, we review our increasingly molecular understanding of these events and their regulation. PMID:27384026

  3. Lifetime measurements in 180Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. M.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Li, C. B.; Gao, Z. C.; Li, G. S.; Chen, F. Q.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, S. P.; Zhong, J.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, H. W.; Luo, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Lifetimes of the yrast states in 180Pt have been measured from 4+ to 8+ using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. These states were populated by the reaction 156Gd(28Si,4 n )180Pt at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The differential decay curve method was applied to determine the lifetimes from experimental coincidence data. The B (E 2 ) values extracted from lifetimes increase with increasing spin, implying rotor behavior, but do not show the typical shape coexistence where the B (E 2 ) values present a rapid increase at very low spins. Calculations based on the triaxial projected shell model were performed for the yrast states in 180Pt and the results of both energies and E 2 transition probabilities reproduce the experimental data very well. The result also shows that a better description of the yrast band in 180Pt requires consideration of the γ degree of freedom.

  4. Integrable discrete PT symmetric model.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Musslimani, Ziad H

    2014-09-01

    An exactly solvable discrete PT invariant nonlinear Schrödinger-like model is introduced. It is an integrable Hamiltonian system that exhibits a nontrivial nonlinear PT symmetry. A discrete one-soliton solution is constructed using a left-right Riemann-Hilbert formulation. It is shown that this pure soliton exhibits unique features such as power oscillations and singularity formation. The proposed model can be viewed as a discretization of a recently obtained integrable nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  5. Key Residues and Phosphate Release Routes in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pho84 Transceptor

    PubMed Central

    Van der Veken, Jeroen; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Persson, Bengt L.

    2016-01-01

    Pho84, a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein, is the main high-affinity Pi transceptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although transport mechanisms have been suggested for other MFS members, the key residues and molecular events driving transport by Pi:H+ symporters are unclear. The current Pho84 transport model is based on the inward-facing occluded crystal structure of the Pho84 homologue PiPT in the fungus Piriformospora indica. However, this model is limited by the lack of experimental data on the regulatory residues for each stage of the transport cycle. In this study, an open, inward-facing conformation of Pho84 was used to study the release of Pi. A comparison of this conformation with the model for Pi release in PiPT revealed that Tyr179 in Pho84 (Tyr150 in PiPT) is not part of the Pi binding site. This difference may be due to a lack of detailed information on the Pi release step in PiPT. Molecular dynamics simulations of Pho84 in which a residue adjacent to Tyr179, Asp178, is protonated revealed a conformational change in Pho84 from an open, inward-facing state to an occluded state. Tyr179 then became part of the binding site as was observed in the PiPT crystal structure. The importance of Tyr179 in regulating Pi release was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and transport assays. Using trehalase activity measurements, we demonstrated that the release of Pi is a critical step for transceptor signaling. Our results add to previous studies on PiPT, creating a more complete picture of the proton-coupled Pi transport cycle of a transceptor. PMID:27875295

  6. Study on the preparation of Pt nanocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-fan; Ji, Zhen; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo-wen; Jia, Cheng-chang; Yang, Shan-wu

    2017-01-01

    Ag@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (Ag@Pt NPs) were prepared by a co-reduction method. Pt nanocapsules with diameters of less than 10 nm were obtained by an electrochemical method. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) scanning was used to cavitate the Ag@Pt NPs, and the morphology, structure, and cavitation conditions were studied. The results indicate that the effective cavitation conditions to obtain Pt nanoparticles from Ag@Pt NPs are a scanning voltage of 0 to 0.8 V and continuous CV scanning over 2 h. This cavitation method is also applicable for the syntheses of Ir, Ru, and Ru-Pt nanocapsules.

  7. Lead toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van der Heggen, Maarten; Martins, Sara; Flores, Gisela; Soares, Eduardo V

    2010-12-01

    The effect of Pb on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell structure and function was examined. Membrane integrity was assessed by the release of UV-absorbing compounds and by the intracellular K(+) efflux. No leakage of UV(260)-absorbing compounds or loss of K(+) were observed in Pb (until 1,000 μmol/l) treated cells up to 30 min; these results suggest that plasma membrane seems not to be the immediate and primary target of Pb toxicity. The effect of Pb on yeast metabolism was examined using the fluorescent probe FUN-1 and compared with the ability to reproduce, evaluated by colony-forming units counting. The exposition of yeast cells, during 60 min to 1,000 μmol/l Pb, induces a decrease in the ability to process FUN-1 although the cells retain its proliferation capacity. A more prolonged contact time (120 min) of yeast cells with Pb induces a marked (> 50%) loss of yeast cells metabolic activity and replication competence through a mechanism which most likely requires protein synthesis.

  8. [Thermoresistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts].

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhin, V A

    2011-01-01

    Under natural conditions, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reproduce, as a rule, on the surface of solid or liquid medium. Thus, life cycle of yeast populations is substantially influenced by diurnal changes in ambient temperature. The pattern in the response of unrestricted yeast S. cerevisiae culture to changes in the temperature of cultivation is revealed experimentally. Yeast population, in the absence of environmental constraints on the functioning of cell chemosmotic bioenergetic system, demonstrates the ability of thermoresistance when the temperature of cultivation switches from the range of 12-36 degrees C to 37.5-40 degrees C. During the transient period that is associated with the temperature switching and lasts from 1 to 4 turnover cycles, yeast reproduction rate remains 1.5-2 times higher than under stationary conditions. This is due to evolutionary acquired adaptive activity of cell chemosmotic system. After the adaptive resources exhausting, yeast thermoresistance fully recovers at the temperature range of 12-36 degrees C within one generation time under conditions of both restricted and unrestricted nourishment. Adaptive significance of such thermoresistance seems obvious enough--it allows maintaining high reproduction rate in yeast when ambient temperature is reaching a brief maximum shortly after noon.

  9. PET genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tzagoloff, A; Dieckmann, C L

    1990-01-01

    We describe a collection of nuclear respiratory-defective mutants (pet mutants) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of 215 complementation groups. This set of mutants probably represents a substantial fraction of the total genetic information of the nucleus required for the maintenance of functional mitochondria in S. cerevisiae. The biochemical lesions of mutants in approximately 50 complementation groups have been related to single enzymes or biosynthetic pathways, and the corresponding wild-type genes have been cloned and their structures have been determined. The genes defined by an additional 20 complementation groups were identified by allelism tests with mutants characterized in other laboratories. Mutants representative of the remaining complementation groups have been assigned to one of the following five phenotypic classes: (i) deficiency in cytochrome oxidase, (ii) deficiency in coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase, (iii) deficiency in mitochondrial ATPase, (iv) absence of mitochondrial protein synthesis, and (v) normal composition of respiratory-chain complexes and of oligomycin-sensitive ATPase. In addition to the genes identified through biochemical and genetic analyses of the pet mutants, we have cataloged PET genes not matched to complementation groups in the mutant collection and other genes whose products function in the mitochondria but are not necessary for respiration. Together, this information provides an up-to-date list of the known genes coding for mitochondrial constituents and for proteins whose expression is vital for the respiratory competence of S. cerevisiae. PMID:2215420

  10. PT3. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Mary, Ed.; Price, Jerry, Ed.

    This document contains 142 papers on PT3 (Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to use Technology) from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference. Topics covered include: a technology in urban education summit; student professional development; meeting NCATE (National Council of Teachers of English) standards;…

  11. Facile activation of dihydrogen by a phosphinito-bridged Pt(I)-Pt(I) complex.

    PubMed

    Mastrorilli, Piero; Latronico, Mario; Gallo, Vito; Polini, Flavia; Re, Nazzareno; Marrone, Alessandro; Gobetto, Roberto; Ellena, Silvano

    2010-04-07

    The phosphinito-bridged Pt(I) complex [(PHCy(2))Pt(mu-PCy(2)){kappa(2)P,O-mu-P(O)Cy(2)}Pt(PHCy(2))](Pt-Pt) (1) reversibly adds H(2) under ambient conditions, giving cis-[(H)(PHCy(2))Pt(1)(mu-PCy(2))(mu-H)Pt(2)(PHCy(2)){kappaP-P(O)Cy(2)}](Pt-Pt) (2). Complex 2 slowly isomerizes spontaneously into the corresponding more stable isomer trans-[(PHCy(2))(H)Pt(mu-PCy(2))(mu-H)Pt(PHCy(2)){kappaP-P(O)Cy(2)}](Pt-Pt) (3). DFT calculations indicate that the reaction of 1 with H(2) occurs through an initial heterolytic splitting of the H(2) molecule assisted by the phosphinito oxygen with breaking of the Pt-O bond and hydrogenation of the Pt and O atoms, leading to the formation of the intermediate [(PHCy(2))(H)Pt(mu-PCy(2))Pt(PHCy(2)){kappaP-P(OH)Cy(2)}](Pt-Pt) (D), where the two split hydrogen atoms interact within a six-membered Pt-H...H-O-P-Pt ring. Compound D is a labile intermediate which easily evolves into the final dihydride complex 2 through a facile (9-15 kcal mol(-1), depending on the solvent) hydrogen shift from the phosphinito oxygen to the Pt-Pt bond. Information obtained by addition of para-H(2) on 1 are in agreement with the presence of a heterolytic pathway in the 1 --> 2 transformation. NMR experiments and DFT calculations also gave evidence for the nonclassical dihydrogen complex [(PHCy(2))(eta(2)-H(2))Pt(mu-PCy(2))Pt(PHCy(2)){kappaP-P(O)Cy(2)}](Pt-Pt) (4), which is an intermediate in the dehydrogenation of 2 to 1 and is also involved in intramolecular and intermolecular exchange processes. Experimental and DFT studies showed that the isomerization 2 --> 3 occurs via an intramolecular mechanism essentially consisting of the opening of the Pt-Pt bond and of the hydrogen bridge followed by the rotation of the coordination plane of the Pt center with the terminal hydride ligand.

  12. Mechanisms of Ethanol Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet is also sensitive to higher ethanol concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Ethanol tolerance is associated with interplay of complex networks at the genome level. Although significant eff...

  13. Regulation of Mitotic Exit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Baro, Bàrbara; Queralt, Ethel; Monje-Casas, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) is an essential signaling pathway, closely related to the Hippo pathway in mammals, which promotes mitotic exit and initiates cytokinesis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the MEN components and their regulation.

  14. Tangential Ultrafiltration of Aqueous "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae" Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Carlos M.; Neves, Patricia S.; Da Silva, Francisco A.; Xavier, Ana M. R. B.; Eusebio, M. F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental work on ultrafiltration is presented to illustrate the practical and theoretical principles of this separation technique. The laboratory exercise comprises experiments with pure water and with aqueous "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (from commercial Baker's yeast) suspensions. With this work students detect the characteristic phenomena…

  15. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  16. A halotolerant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gaxiola, R; Corona, M; Zinker, S

    1996-01-01

    FRD, a nuclear and dominant spontaneous mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of growing in up to 2 M NaCl, was isolated. Compared with parental cells, the mutant cells have a lower intracellular Na+/K+ ratio, shorter generation times in the presence of 1 M NaCl, and alterations in gene expression. PMID:8631691

  17. Surface termination of CePt5/Pt (111 ): The key to chemical inertness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praetorius, C.; Zinner, M.; Held, G.; Fauth, K.

    2015-11-01

    The surface termination of CePt5/Pt (111 ) is determined experimentally by LEED-IV. In accordance with recent theoretical predictions, a dense Pt terminated surface is being found. Whereas the CePt5 volume lattice comprises Pt kagome layers, additional Pt atoms occupy the associated hole positions at the surface. This finding provides a natural explanation for the remarkable inertness of the CePt5 intermetallic. Implications of the structural relaxations determined by LEED-IV analysis are discussed with regard to observations by scanning tunneling microscopy and electron spectroscopies.

  18. Pt-Mg, Pt-Ca, and Pt-Zn Lantern Complexes and Metal-Only Donor-Acceptor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Baddour, Frederick G; Hyre, Ariel S; Guillet, Jesse L; Pascual, David; Lopez-de-Luzuriaga, José Maria; Alam, Todd M; Bacon, Jeffrey W; Doerrer, Linda H

    2017-01-03

    Pt-based heterobimetallic lantern complexes of the form [PtM(SOCR)4(L)] have been shown previously to form intermolecular metallophilic interactions and engage in antiferromagnetic coupling between lanterns having M atoms with open shell configurations. In order to understand better the influence of the carboxylate bridge and terminal ligand on the electronic structure, as well as the metal-metal interactions within each lantern unit, a series of diamagnetic lantern complexes, [PtMg(SAc)4(OH2)] (1), [PtMg(tba)4(OH2)] (2), [PtCa(tba)4(OH2)] (3), [PtZn(tba)4(OH2)] (4), and a mononuclear control (Ph4P)2[Pt(SAc)4] (5) have been synthesized. Crystallographic data show close Pt-M contacts enforced by the lantern structure in each dinuclear case. (195)Pt-NMR spectroscopy of 1-4, (Ph4P)2[Pt(SAc)4] (5), and several previously reported lanterns revealed a strong chemical shift dependence on the identity of the second metal (M), mild influence by the thiocarboxylate ligand (SOCR; R = CH3 (thioacetate, SAc), C6H5 (thiobenzoate, tba)), and modest influence from the terminal ligand (L). Fluorescence spectroscopy has provided evidence for a Pt···Zn metallophilic interaction in [PtZn(SAc)4(OH2)], and computational studies demonstrate significant dative character. In all of 1-4, the short Pt-M distances suggest that metal-only Lewis donor (Pt)-Lewis acceptor (M) interactions could be present. DFT and NBO calculations, however, show that only the Zn examples have appreciable covalent character, whereas the Mg and Ca complexes are much more ionic.

  19. Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces Competition during Microvinification under Different Sugar and Nitrogen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lleixà, Jessica; Manzano, Maria; Mas, Albert; Portillo, María del C.

    2016-01-01

    The inoculation of wines with autochthonous yeast allows obtaining complex wines with a peculiar microbial footprint characteristic from a wine region. Mixed inoculation of non-Saccharomyces yeasts and S. cerevisiae is of interest for the wine industry for technological and sensory reasons. However, the interactions between these yeasts are not well understood, especially those regarding the availability of nutrients. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of nitrogen and sugar concentration on the evolution of mixed yeast populations on controlled laboratory-scale fermentations monitored by density, plate culturing, PCR-DGGE and sugar and nitrogen consumption. Furthermore, the effect of the time of inoculation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae respect the initial co-inoculation of three non-Saccharomyces yeasts was evaluated over the evolution of fermentation. Our results have shown that S. cerevisiae inoculation during the first 48 h conferred a stabilizing effect over the fermentations with non-Saccharomyces strains tested and, generally, reduced yeast diversity at the end of the fermentation. On the other hand, nitrogen limitation increased the time of fermentation and also the proportion of non-Saccharomyces yeasts at mid and final fermentation. High sugar concentration resulted in different proportions of the inoculated yeast depending on the time of S. cerevisiae inoculation. This work emphasizes the importance of the concentration of nutrients on the evolution of mixed fermentations and points to the optimal conditions for a stable fermentation in which the inoculated yeasts survived until the end. PMID:27994585

  20. PT AND PT/NI "NEEDLE" ELETROCATALYSTS ON CARBON NANOTUBES WITH HIGH ACTIVITY FOR THE ORR

    SciTech Connect

    Colon-Mercado, H.

    2011-11-10

    Platinum and platinum/nickel alloy electrocatalysts supported on graphitized (gCNT) or nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (nCNT) are prepared and characterized. Pt deposition onto carbon nanotubes results in Pt 'needle' formations that are 3.5 nm in diameter and {approx}100 nm in length. Subsequent Ni deposition and heat treatment results in PtNi 'needles' with an increased diameter. All Pt and Pt/Ni materials were tested as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The Pt and Pt/Ni catalysts showed excellent performance for the ORR, with the heat treated PtNi/gCNT (1.06 mA/cm{sup 2}) and PtNi/nCNT (0.664 mA/cm{sup 2}) showing the highest activity.

  1. The Role of Pt Complex on the Synthesis of FePt by Polyol Process

    SciTech Connect

    Aizawa, S.; Tohji, K.; Jeyadevan, B.

    2008-02-25

    Target materials in this experiment were FePt alloy nanoparticles with face-centered tetragonal structure, narrow size distribution, and the size of 6-8 nm. This type of materials was expected to have high recording-density of 1 Tbit/inch{sup 2} with high magnetic anisotropy. In this study, a detailed investigation was carried out to understand the reduction characteristics of Pt complexes, and FePt alloy nanoparticles with diameters larger than 6 nm was try to synthesize. For the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles by using polyol process, three kinds of Pt complexes, namely, H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}, Pt(EDTA), and Pt(acac){sub 2} was used. The size of Pt metal nanoparticles was only few nm in the case of single Pt complex, while it was increased to 7-10 nm in the case of mixed Pt complex and adjusting the reaction temperature increasing ratio. FePt alloy nanoparticles with the diameter of 7-8 nm, distorted shape, and narrow size distribution were successfully synthesized. However, composition ratio of the particle was Fe{sub 12-21}Pt{sub 79-88}, nevertheless the ratio of a Fe:Pt in the original solution was 2:1.

  2. Genomic Insights into the Saccharomyces sensu stricto Complex

    PubMed Central

    Borneman, Anthony R.; Pretorius, Isak S.

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces sensu stricto group encompasses species ranging from the industrially ubiquitous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to those that are confined to geographically limited environmental niches. The wealth of genomic data that are now available for the Saccharomyces genus is providing unprecedented insights into the genomic processes that can drive speciation and evolution, both in the natural environment and in response to human-driven selective forces during the historical “domestication” of these yeasts for baking, brewing, and winemaking. PMID:25657346

  3. The Saccharomyces Genome Database Variant Viewer

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Travis K.; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Engel, Stacia R.; Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dalusag, Kyla S.; Demeter, Janos; Hellerstedt, Sage T.; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S.; Paskov, Kelley M.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. In recent years, we have moved toward increased representation of sequence variation and allelic differences within S. cerevisiae. The publication of numerous additional genomes has motivated the creation of new tools for their annotation and analysis. Here we present the Variant Viewer: a dynamic open-source web application for the visualization of genomic and proteomic differences. Multiple sequence alignments have been constructed across high quality genome sequences from 11 different S. cerevisiae strains and stored in the SGD. The alignments and summaries are encoded in JSON and used to create a two-tiered dynamic view of the budding yeast pan-genome, available at http://www.yeastgenome.org/variant-viewer. PMID:26578556

  4. Low Pt content direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst: nanophase PtRuNiZr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Whitacre, Jay F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for the preparation of a metallic material having catalytic activity that includes synthesizing a material composition comprising a metal content with a lower Pt content than a binary alloy containing Pt but that displays at least a comparable catalytic activity on a per mole Pt basis as the binary alloy containing Pt; and evaluating a representative sample of the material composition to ensure that the material composition displays a property of at least a comparable catalytic activity on a per mole Pt basis as a representative binary alloy containing Pt. Furthermore, metallic compositions are disclosed that possess substantial resistance to corrosive acids.

  5. Direct Determination of the Ionization Energies of PtC, PtO, and PtO2 with VUVRadiation

    SciTech Connect

    Citir, Murat; Metz, Ricardo B.; Belau, Leonid; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-07-21

    Photoionization efficiency curves were measured for gas-phase PtC, PtO, and PtO2 using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at the Advanced Light Source. The molecules were prepared by laser ablation of a platinum tube, followed by reaction with CH4 or N2O and supersonic expansion. These measurements providethe first directly measured ionization energy for PtC, IE(PtC) = 9.45 +- 0.05 eV. The direct measurement also gives greatly improved ionization energies for the platinum oxides, IE(PtO) = 10.0 +- 0.1 eV and IE(PtO2) = 11.35 +- 0.05 eV. The ionization energy connects the dissociation energies of the neutral and cation, leading to greatly improved 0 K bond dissociation energies for the neutrals: D0(Pt-C) = 5.95 +- 0.07 eV, D0(Pt-O)= 4.30 +- 0.12 eV, and D0(OPt-O) = 4.41 +- 0.13 eV, as well as enthalpies of formation for the gas-phase molecules Delta H0 f,0(PtC(g)) = 701 +- 7 kJ/mol, Delta H0f,0(PtO(g)) = 396 +- 12 kJ/mol, and Delta H0f,0(PtO2(g)) = 218 +- 11 kJ/mol. Much of the error in previous Knudsen cell measurements of platinum oxide bond dissociation energies is due to the use of thermodynamic second law extrapolations. Third law values calculated using statistical mechanical thermodynamic functions are in much better agreement with values obtained from ionization energies and ion energetics. These experiments demonstrate that laser ablation production with direct VUV ionization measurements is a versatile tool to measure ionization energies and bond dissociation energies for catalytically interesting species such as metal oxides and carbides.

  6. "Malonate uptake and metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae".

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei Ning; Tan, Kee Yang

    2013-09-01

    Malonyl-CoA plays an important role in the synthesis and elongation of fatty acids in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Malonyl-CoA is at a low concentration inside the cell and is produced mainly from acetyl-CoA through the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase. It would be beneficial to find an alternative source of malonyl-CoA to increase its intracellular concentration and overall synthesis of the fatty acids. MatB gene from the bacteria Rhizobium leguminosarium bv. trifolii encodes for a malonyl-CoA synthetase which catalyzes the formation of the malonyl-CoA directly from malonate and CoA. However, results from high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) proved that Saccharomyces cerevisiae itself does not contain enough cytoplasmic malonate within them and is unable to uptake exogenously supplied malonate in the form of malonic acid. A dicarboxylic acid plasma membrane transporter with the ability to uptake exogenous malonic acid was identified from another species of yeast known as Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the gene encoding this transporter is identified as the mae1 gene. From the experiments thus far, the mae1 gene had been successfully cloned and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression and functional ability of the encoded plasma membrane dicarboxylic acid transporter were also demonstrated and verified using specialized technologies such as RT-PCR, yeast immunofluorescence, HPLC, and LC-MS.

  7. High-performance core-shell PdPt@Pt/C catalysts via decorating PdPt alloy cores with Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-Ni; Liao, Shi-Jun; Liang, Zhen-Xing; Yang, Li-Jun; Wang, Rong-Fang

    A core-shell structured low-Pt catalyst, PdPt@Pt/C, with high performance towards both methanol anodic oxidation and oxygen cathodic reduction, as well as in a single hydrogen/air fuel cell, is prepared by a novel two-step colloidal approach. For the anodic oxidation of methanol, the catalyst shows three times higher activity than commercial Tanaka 50 wt% Pt/C catalyst; furthermore, the ratio of forward current I f to backward current I b is high up to 1.04, whereas for general platinum catalysts the ratio is only ca. 0.70, indicating that this PdPt@Pt/C catalyst has high activity towards methanol anodic oxidation and good tolerance to the intermediates of methanol oxidation. The catalyst is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The core-shell structure of the catalyst is revealed by XRD and TEM, and is also supported by underpotential deposition of hydrogen (UPDH). The high performance of the PdPt@Pt/C catalyst may make it a promising and competitive low-Pt catalyst for hydrogen fueled polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications.

  8. PT-symmetric slowing down of decoherence

    DOE PAGES

    Gardas, Bartlomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh Behari

    2016-10-27

    Here, we invesmore » tigate PT-symmetric quantum systems ultraweakly coupled to an environment. We find that such open systems evolve under PT-symmetric, purely dephasing and unital dynamics. The dynamical map describing the evolution is then determined explicitly using a quantum canonical transformation. Furthermore, we provide an explanation of why PT-symmetric dephasing-type interactions lead to a critical slowing down of decoherence. This effect is further exemplified with an experimentally relevant system, a PT-symmetric qubit easily realizable, e.g., in optical or microcavity experiments.« less

  9. PT-symmetric mode-locking.

    PubMed

    Longhi, S

    2016-10-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetry is one of the most important accomplishments in optics over the past decade. Here the concept of PT mode-locking (ML) of a laser is introduced, in which active phase-locking of cavity axial modes is realized by asymmetric mode coupling in a complex time crystal. PT ML shows a transition from single- to double-pulse emission as the PT symmetry breaking point is crossed. The transition can show a turbulent behavior, depending on a dimensionless modulation parameter that plays the same role as the Reynolds number in hydrodynamic flows.

  10. The effect of Pt content on NiPtAl coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, James A; Pint, Bruce A; Zhang, Ying; Wright, Ian G

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of Pt content on the coating composition and subsequent oxidation behavior of gamma/gamma-prime NiPtAl coatings. Gamma/gamma-prime diffusion coatings were fabricated by vacuum annealing electroplated Pt on single-crystal and directionally-solidified superalloy substrates. Specimens with 7 and 12 m thickness Pt were annealed at 1100 or 1175oC. Coating compositions were characterized to evaluate distribution of Pt and Al as a function of annealing temperature and Pt thickness. Selected coatings fabricated from 7 and 12 m Pt were evaluated in cyclic oxidation at 1100 and 1150oC. Coatings with higher Pt contents showed improvements in spallation resistance at both 1100 and 1150oC, particularly on superalloys with higher Hf and S contents.

  11. The ecology and evolution of non-domesticated Saccharomyces species

    PubMed Central

    Boynton, Primrose J; Greig, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Yeast researchers need model systems for ecology and evolution, but the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is not ideal because its evolution has been affected by domestication. Instead, ecologists and evolutionary biologists are focusing on close relatives of S. cerevisiae, the seven species in the genus Saccharomyces. The best-studied Saccharomyces yeast, after S. cerevisiae, is S. paradoxus, an oak tree resident throughout the northern hemisphere. In addition, several more members of the genus Saccharomyces have recently been discovered. Some Saccharomyces species are only found in nature, while others include both wild and domesticated strains. Comparisons between domesticated and wild yeasts have pinpointed hybridization, introgression and high phenotypic diversity as signatures of domestication. But studies of wild Saccharomyces natural history, biogeography and ecology are only beginning. Much remains to be understood about wild yeasts' ecological interactions and life cycles in nature. We encourage researchers to continue to investigate Saccharomyces yeasts in nature, both to place S. cerevisiae biology into its ecological context and to develop the genus Saccharomyces as a model clade for ecology and evolution. © 2014 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25242436

  12. AN ANIMAL MODEL OF PLATINUM (PT) HYPERSENSITIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to Pt salts has been associated with occupational asthma. Pt, the most active component and widely used metal in catalytic converters, is released in automobile exhaust and is a proposed diesel fuel additive. Thus, with the potential for widespread environmental distrib...

  13. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Pt Nanopeanuts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemei; Xia, Zengzilu; Huang, Yingzhou; Jia, Yunpeng; Sun, Xiaonan; Li, Yu; Li, Xueming; Wu, Rui; Liu, Anping; Qi, Xueqiang; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the novel shape of Pt nanoparticles is one of the most useful ways to improve the electrocatalytic performance of Pt in fuel cells. In this work, the Pt nanopeanuts consisting of two nanospheres grown together have been fabricated through a two-step polyol method. The high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrum collected at adjacent part point out the Pt nanopeanut is apparently different from the two physical attached nanospheres. To understand the growth mechanism of this nanopeanut, the final products in different synthesis situations are studied. The results indicate the interesting morphology of Pt nanopeanuts mainly benefit from the chemical reagent (FeCl3) while the size and homogeneity are greatly affected by the temperature. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic activity of the Pt nanopeanuts has also been demonstrated here. Our two-step synthesis of Pt nanopeanuts not only enlarges the group of Pt nanoparticles, but also provides a beneficial strategy for the synthesis of novel metal nanoparticles. PMID:27528078

  14. Nonlinear waves in PT -symmetric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konotop, Vladimir V.; Yang, Jianke; Zezyulin, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent progress on nonlinear properties of parity-time (PT )-symmetric systems is comprehensively reviewed in this article. PT symmetry started out in non-Hermitian quantum mechanics, where complex potentials obeying PT symmetry could exhibit all-real spectra. This concept later spread out to optics, Bose-Einstein condensates, electronic circuits, and many other physical fields, where a judicious balancing of gain and loss constitutes a PT -symmetric system. The natural inclusion of nonlinearity into these PT systems then gave rise to a wide array of new phenomena which have no counterparts in traditional dissipative systems. Examples include the existence of continuous families of nonlinear modes and integrals of motion, stabilization of nonlinear modes above PT -symmetry phase transition, symmetry breaking of nonlinear modes, distinctive soliton dynamics, and many others. In this article, nonlinear PT -symmetric systems arising from various physical disciplines are presented, nonlinear properties of these systems are thoroughly elucidated, and relevant experimental results are described. In addition, emerging applications of PT symmetry are pointed out.

  15. Metrology with PT-Symmetric Cavities: Enhanced Sensitivity near the PT-Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Peng; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Jing, Hui; Lü, Xin-You; Li, Chun-Wen; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco; Liu, Yu-Xi

    2016-09-09

    We propose and analyze a new approach based on parity-time (PT) symmetric microcavities with balanced gain and loss to enhance the performance of cavity-assisted metrology. We identify the conditions under which PT-symmetric microcavities allow us to improve sensitivity beyond what is achievable in loss-only systems. We discuss the application of PT-symmetric microcavities to the detection of mechanical motion, and show that the sensitivity is significantly enhanced near the transition point from unbroken- to broken-PT regimes. Our results open a new direction for PT-symmetric physical systems and it may find use in ultrahigh precision metrology and sensing.

  16. Optical second harmonic generation from Pt nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, N.; Aratake, K.; Okushio, R.; Iwai, T.; Sugawara, A.; Sano, H.; Mizutani, G.

    2007-09-01

    We have measured optical second harmonic intensity from arrays of Pt nanowires of 20 nm and 9 nm average widths, as a function of the incident and output light polarizations, the azimuthal angle, and the excitation photon energy. The nanowires were fabricated through shadow deposition on self-organized NaCl(1 1 0) faceted templates. The anisotropy of the SH intensity from the Pt nanowires was found to be stronger than that from the Au nanowires reported previously. The effective nonlinear susceptibility element χ222(2), with the suffix 2 indicating the direction [1 1¯ 0], was observed for Pt nanowires, although it was not observed for Au nanowires. This difference is suggested to be due to the weaker suppression of the incident fundamental fields by the depolarization field in the Pt nanowires and the larger anisotropy in the nonlinearity of Pt nanowires due to the thinner widths.

  17. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Mohseni, Soudabeh; Mardani Jouneghani, Rasoul; Pourhossein, Meraj; Iravani, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (NPs) by biotransformations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and analysis of the sizes and shapes of the NPs produced. Dried and freshly cultured S. cerevisiae were used as the biocatalyst. Dried yeast synthesized few NPs, but freshly cultured yeast produced a large amount of them. Silver NPs were spherical, 2-20 nm in diameter, and the NPs with the size of 5.4 nm were the most frequent ones. NPs were seen inside the cells, within the cell membrane, attached to the cell membrane during the exocytosis, and outside of the cells.

  18. Fatty Acid Synthetase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harold P.; Volkmann, Carol M.; Chao, Fu-Chuan

    1967-01-01

    A light particle fraction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, obtained from the crude ribosomal material, and containing the fatty acid synthetase, consisted primarily of 27S and 47S components. This fraction has a protein-ribonucleic acid ratio of about 13. Electron micrographs showed particles ranging in diameter between 100 and 300 A in this material. By use of density gradient analysis, the fatty acid synthetase was found in the 47S component. This component contained particles which were predominantly 300 A in diameter and which were considerably flatter than ribosomes, and it consisted almost entirely of protein. Images PMID:6025308

  19. Components of microtubular structures in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Pillus, L; Solomon, F

    1986-01-01

    Most studies of cytoskeletal organelles have concentrated on molecular analyses of abundant and biochemically accessible structures. In many of the classical cases, however, the nature of the system chosen has precluded a concurrent genetic analysis. The mitotic spindle of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one example of an organelle that can be studied by both classical and molecular genetics. We show here that this microtubule structure also can be examined biochemically. The spindle can be isolated by selective extractions of yeast cells by using adaptations of methods successfully applied to animal cells. In this way, microtubule-associated proteins of the yeast spindle are identified. Images PMID:3517870

  20. Replicative and chronological aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Longo, Valter D; Shadel, Gerald S; Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian

    2012-07-03

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has directly or indirectly contributed to the identification of arguably more mammalian genes that affect aging than any other model organism. Aging in yeast is assayed primarily by measurement of replicative or chronological life span. Here, we review the genes and mechanisms implicated in these two aging model systems and key remaining issues that need to be addressed for their optimization. Because of its well-characterized genome that is remarkably amenable to genetic manipulation and high-throughput screening procedures, S. cerevisiae will continue to serve as a leading model organism for studying pathways relevant to human aging and disease.

  1. Electrochemical study of the Pt and Pt-Ni upon multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Norani Muti; Mumtaz, Asad; Ansari, Muhammad Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz

    2016-11-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells have attracted great interest in the recent development of portable devices. New routes are being developed for synthesizing the catalysts used in the methanol oxidation. In this work, the electrochemical behavior of the Pt and Pt-Ni upon multiwalled carbon nanotubes, synthesized via a new modified route, has been studied. The results showed that Pt-Ni 10% has the comparable current density to the Pt 20%-loading which is nearly 3 times greater than 10% Pt loading. The transfer of the polarization curve of Pt-Ni 10% towards lower polarization region following the catalyst with 20% Pt loading indicates the higher activity of the nano-electro-catalysts in the alkaline media. Also the long term efficiency and activity of the Pt-Ni with 10% loading is nearly reaching the 20% Pt-loading which is almost 10 folds greater than the 10% Pt loading. The study revealed that Ni in Pt-based nanoalloy impart not only an enhanced activity but also better durability of catalyst in direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  2. Reduction of Pt2+ species in model Pt-CeO2 fuel cell catalysts upon reaction with methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitzel, Armin; Johánek, Viktor; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Nataliya; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Matolín, Vladimír; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    The stability of atomically dispersed Pt2+ species on the surface of nanostructured CeO2 films during the reaction with methanol has been investigated by means of synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant photoemission spectroscopy. The isolated Pt2+ species were prepared at low Pt concentration in Pt-CeO2 film. Additionally, Pt2+ species coexisting with metallic Pt particles were prepared at high Pt concentration. We found that adsorption of methanol yields similar decomposition products regardless of Pt concentration in Pt-CeO2 films. A small number of oxygen vacancies formed during the methanol decomposition can be replenished in the Pt-CeO2 film with low Pt concentration by diffusion of oxygen from the bulk. In the presence of supported Pt particles, a higher number of oxygen vacancies leads to a partial reduction of the Pt2+ species. The isolated Pt2+ species are reduced under rather strongly reducing conditions only, i.e. during annealing under continuous exposure to methanol. Reduction of isolated Pt2+ species results in the formation of ultra-small Pt particles containing around 25 atoms per particle or less. Such ultra-small Pt particles demonstrate excellent stability against sintering during annealing of Pt-CeO2 film with low Pt concentration under reducing conditions.

  3. Thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains representing potentials for bioethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke by consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Yuan, Bo; Sun, Juan; Wang, Shi-An; Li, Fu-Li

    2012-09-01

    Thermotolerant inulin-utilizing yeast strains are desirable for ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). To obtain such strains, 21 naturally occurring yeast strains isolated by using an enrichment method and 65 previously isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were investigated in inulin utilization, extracellular inulinase activity, and ethanol fermentation from inulin and Jerusalem artichoke tuber flour at 40 °C. The strains Kluyveromyces marxianus PT-1 (CGMCC AS2.4515) and S. cerevisiae JZ1C (CGMCC AS2.3878) presented the highest extracellular inulinase activity and ethanol yield in this study. The highest ethanol concentration in Jerusalem artichoke tuber flour fermentation (200 g L(-1)) at 40 °C achieved by K. marxianus PT-1 and S. cerevisiae JZ1C was 73.6 and 65.2 g L(-1), which corresponded to the theoretical ethanol yield of 90.0 and 79.7 %, respectively. In the range of 30 to 40 °C, temperature did not have a significant effect on ethanol production for both strains. This study displayed the distinctive superiority of K. marxianus PT-1 and S. cerevisiae JZ1C in the thermotolerance and utilization of inulin-type oligosaccharides reserved in Jerusalem artichoke tubers. It is proposed that both K. marxianus and S. cerevisiae have considerable potential in ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by a high temperature CBP.

  4. Metabolic Engineering of Probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Kong, In Iok; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Jayakody, Lahiru N.; Kim, Heejin; Xia, Peng-Fei; Kwak, Suryang; Sung, Bong Hyun; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Walukiewicz, Hanna E.; Rao, Christopher V.

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic yeast that has been used for promoting gut health as well as preventing diarrheal diseases. This yeast not only exhibits beneficial phenotypes for gut health but also can stay longer in the gut than Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, S. boulardii is an attractive host for metabolic engineering to produce biomolecules of interest in the gut. However, the lack of auxotrophic strains with defined genetic backgrounds has hampered the use of this strain for metabolic engineering. Here, we report the development of well-defined auxotrophic mutants (leu2, ura3, his3, and trp1) through clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9-based genome editing. The resulting auxotrophic mutants can be used as a host for introducing various genetic perturbations, such as overexpression or deletion of a target gene, using existing genetic tools for S. cerevisiae. We demonstrated the overexpression of a heterologous gene (lacZ), the correct localization of a target protein (red fluorescent protein) into mitochondria by using a protein localization signal, and the introduction of a heterologous metabolic pathway (xylose-assimilating pathway) in the genome of S. boulardii. We further demonstrated that human lysozyme, which is beneficial for human gut health, could be secreted by S. boulardii. Our results suggest that more sophisticated genetic perturbations to improve S. boulardii can be performed without using a drug resistance marker, which is a prerequisite for in vivo applications using engineered S. boulardii. PMID:26850302

  5. Fermentation studies using Saccharomyces diastaticus yeast strains

    SciTech Connect

    Erratt, J.A.; Stewart, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The yeast species, Saccharomyces diastaticus, has the ability to ferment starch and dextrin, because of the extracellular enzyme, glucoamylase, which hydrolyzes the starch/dextrin to glucose. A number of nonallelic genes--DEX 1, DEX 2, and dextrinase B which is allelic to STA 3--have been isolated, which impart to the yeast the ability to ferment dextrin. Various diploid yeast strains were constructed, each being either heterozygous or homozygous for the individual dextrinase genes. Using 12 (sup 0) plato hopped wort (30% corn adjunct) under agitated conditions, the fermentation rates of the various diploid yeast strains were monitored. A gene-dosage effect was exhibited by yeast strains containing DEX 1 or DEX 2, however, not with yeast strains containing dextrinase B (STA 3). The fermentation and growth rates and extents were determined under static conditions at 14.4 C and 21 C. With all yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes, both fermentation and growth were increased at the higher incubation temperature. Using 30-liter fermentors, beer was produced with the various yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes and the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the products were determined. The concentration of glucose in the beer was found to increase during a 3-mo storage period at 21 C, indicating that the glucoamylase from Saccharomyces diastaticus is not inactivated by pasteurization. (Refs. 36).

  6. Monoterpene alcohols release and bioconversion by Saccharomyces species and hybrids.

    PubMed

    Gamero, A; Manzanares, P; Querol, A; Belloch, C

    2011-01-31

    Terpene profile of Muscat wines fermented by Saccharomyces species and hybrid yeasts was investigated. The amount of geraniol decreased in most wines with respect to the initial must except for Saccharomyces bayanus wines. On the other hand, alpha-terpineol amount was higher in wines fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and hybrid yeasts. The amount of linalool was similar in all wines and comparable to the amount in the initial must. Lower levels of beta-D-glucosidase activity were found in the hybrid yeasts with respect to S. cerevisiae. Moreover, no relationship between beta-D-glucosidase activity and terpenes profile in Muscat wines fermented with Saccharomyces species and hybrids was found. Growth of yeasts on minimum medium supplemented with geraniol showed bioconversion of geraniol into linalool and alpha-terpineol. Percentages of geraniol uptake and bioconversion were different between Saccharomyces species and hybrids. Strains within S. bayanus, Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and hybrids showed higher geraniol uptake than S. cerevisiae, whereas the percentage of produced linalool and alpha-terpineol was higher in S. cerevisiae and hybrid yeasts than in S. bayanus and S. kudriavzevii. The relationship between geraniol uptake and adaptation of Saccharomyces species to grow at low temperature is discussed.

  7. Axisymmetric photonic structures with PT-symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Waqas W.; Herrero, Ramon; Botey, Muriel; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    PT-symmetric structures in photonic crystals, combining refractive index and gain-loss modulations is becoming a research field with increasing interest due to the light directionality induced by these particular potentials. Here, we consider PT-symmetric potentials with axial symmetry to direct light to the crystal central point obtaining a localization effect. The axial and PT-symmetric potential intrinsically generates an exceptional central point in the photonic crystal by the merge of both symmetries. This particular point in the crystal lattice causes field amplitude gradients with exponential slopes around the crystal center. The field localization strongly depends on the phase of the central point and on the complex amplitude of the PT-potential. The presented work analyzes in a first stage 1D linear PT-axisymmetric crystals and the role of the central point phase that determines the defect character, i.e. refractive index defect, gain-loss defect or a combination of both. The interplay of the directional light effect induced by the PT-symmetry and the light localization around the central point through the axial symmetry enhances localization and allows higher field concentration for certain phases. The linearity of the studied crystals introduces an exponential growth of the field that mainly depends on the complex amplitude of the potential. The work is completed by the analysis of 2D PT-axisymmetric potentials showing different spatial slopes and growth rates caused by symmetry reasons.

  8. Biaxially strained PtPb/Pt core/shell nanoplate boosts oxygen reduction catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Lingzheng; Zhang, Nan; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Li, Jing; Yao, Jianlin; Wu, Tao; Lu, Gang; Ma, Jing-Yuan; Su, Dong; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2016-12-16

    Compressive surface strains have been necessary to boost oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in core/shell M/Pt catalysts (where M can be Ni, Co, Fe). We report a class of PtPb/Pt core/shell nanoplate catalysts that exhibit large biaxial tensile strains. The stable Pt (110) facets of the nanoplates have high ORR specific and mass activities that reach 7.8 milliampere per centimeter square and 4.3 ampere per milligram of platinum at 0.9 volts versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), respectively. Density functional theory calculations revealed that the edge-­Pt and top (bottom)-Pt (110) facets undergo large tensile strains that help optimize the Pt-­O bond strength. The intermetallic core and uniform 4 layers of Pt shell of the PtPb/Pt nanoplates appear to underlie the high endurance of these catalysts, which can undergo 50,000 voltage cycles with negligible activity decay and no apparent structure and composition changes.

  9. Biaxially strained PtPb/Pt core/shell nanoplate boosts oxygen reduction catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Bu, Lingzheng; Zhang, Nan; Guo, Shaojun; ...

    2016-12-16

    Compressive surface strains have been necessary to boost oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in core/shell M/Pt catalysts (where M can be Ni, Co, Fe). We report a class of PtPb/Pt core/shell nanoplate catalysts that exhibit large biaxial tensile strains. The stable Pt (110) facets of the nanoplates have high ORR specific and mass activities that reach 7.8 milliampere per centimeter square and 4.3 ampere per milligram of platinum at 0.9 volts versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), respectively. Density functional theory calculations revealed that the edge-­Pt and top (bottom)-Pt (110) facets undergo large tensile strains that help optimize the Pt-­Omore » bond strength. The intermetallic core and uniform 4 layers of Pt shell of the PtPb/Pt nanoplates appear to underlie the high endurance of these catalysts, which can undergo 50,000 voltage cycles with negligible activity decay and no apparent structure and composition changes.« less

  10. Regenerating Pt-3d-Pt model electrocatalysts through oxidation-reduction cycles monitored at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menning, Carl A.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    The interchange between the Pt-Ni-Pt and Ni-Pt-Pt bimetallic configurations in O 2 and H 2 is confirmed experimentally at atmospheric pressure using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The subsurface Pt-3d-Pt structure, a desirable configuration as cathode electrocatalysts for PEM fuel cells, is found to be preferred in the reducing environment of H 2 whereas the surface 3d-Pt-Pt configuration is preferred in O 2. This process has been found to be reversible, providing useful insights into the maintenance and regeneration of the desirable subsurface structure.

  11. Inferring ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts by progressive inactivation.

    PubMed

    Pina, Cristina; Couto, José António; António, José; Hogg, Tim

    2004-10-01

    The kinetics of cell inactivation in the presence of ethanol at 20, 22.5% and 25% (v/v), was measured by progressive sampling and viable counting, and used as an inference of the ethanol resistance status of five non-Saccharomyces strains and one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The capacity of standard inocula of the same strains to establish growth at increasing initial ethanol concentrations was employed as a comparison. The effect of various different pre-culture conditions on the ethanol resistance of the 6 strains was analysed by the cell inactivation method and by the cell growth method. Exposing cells to 25% (v/v) ethanol for 4 min enabled the differentiation of the yeasts in terms of their resistance to ethanol. The results suggest that the two methods are generally concordant and that the cell inactivation method can, thus, be used to infer ethanol resistance of yeast strains.

  12. Effects of Fusariotoxin T-2 on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis

    PubMed Central

    Schappert, Keith T.; Khachatourians, George G.

    1983-01-01

    A Fusarium metabolite, T-2 toxin, inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The growth inhibitory concentrations of T-2 toxin were 40 and 100 μg/ml, respectively, for exponentially growing cultures of the two yeasts. S. carlsbergensis was more sensitive to the toxin and exhibited a biphasic dose-response curve. Addition of the toxin at 10 μg/ml of S. carlsbergensis culture resulted in a retardation of growth as measured turbidimetrically, after only 30 to 40 min. This action was reversible upon washing the cells free of the toxin. The sensitivity of the yeasts to the toxin was dependent upon the types and concentrations of carbohydrates used in the growth media. The sensitivity of the cells to the toxin decreased in glucose-repressed cultures. These results suggest that T-2 toxin interferes with mitochondrial functions of these yeasts. Images PMID:16346249

  13. Gains and Losses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    PubMed

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Wang, Chuen-Yi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-07-27

    Gene expression evolution occurs through changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. Interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) constitute one of the most important points where these two regulatory components intersect. In this study, we investigated the evolution of TFBSs in the promoter regions of different Saccharomyces strains and species. We divided the promoter of a gene into the proximal region and the distal region, which are defined, respectively, as the 200-bp region upstream of the transcription starting site and as the 200-bp region upstream of the proximal region. We found that the predicted TFBSs in the proximal promoter regions tend to be evolutionarily more conserved than those in the distal promoter regions. Additionally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the fermentation of alcoholic drinks have experienced more TFBS losses than gains compared with strains from other environments (wild strains, laboratory strains, and clinical strains). We also showed that differences in TFBSs correlate with the cis component of gene expression evolution between species (comparing S. cerevisiae and its sister species Saccharomyces paradoxus) and within species (comparing two closely related S. cerevisiae strains).

  14. Colloidally prepared Pt nanowires versus impregnated Pt nanoparticles: comparison of adsorption and reaction properties.

    PubMed

    Haghofer, Andreas; Sonström, Patrick; Fenske, Daniela; Föttinger, Karin; Schwarz, Sabine; Bernardi, Johannes; Al-Shamery, Katharina; Bäumer, Marcus; Rupprechter, Günther

    2010-11-02

    Ligand-capped Pt nanowires, prepared by colloidal synthesis and deposited on a high surface area γ-Al(2)O(3) support, were subjected to surface characterization by electron microscopy and FTIR spectroscopy using CO as a probe molecule. The structural, adsorption, and catalytic reaction properties of the colloidal Pt nanowires were compared to those of conventional, impregnated Pt nanoparticles on the same Al(2)O(3) support. In situ FTIR spectroscopy indicated ligand effects on the CO resonance frequency, irreversible CO-induced surface roughening upon CO adsorption, and a higher resistance of colloidal catalysts toward oxidation (both in oxygen and during CO oxidation), suggesting that the organic ligands might protect the Pt surface. Elevated temperature induced a transformation of Pt nanowires to faceted Pt nanoparticles. The colloidal catalyst was active for hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE), but no ligand effect on selectivity was obtained.

  15. Active Pt3Ni (111) Surface of Pt3Ni Icosahedron for Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianbing; Xiao, Meiling; Li, Kui; Liu, Changpeng; Zhao, Xiao; Xing, Wei

    2016-11-09

    Highly active, durable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts are extremely important for fuel cell applications. Herein, we provide an efficient way to synthesis of activity Pt3M icosahedra by the one-pot hydrothermal method in the presence of glucosamine which can well adjust the reduction rate of Pt(4+) and efficiently control the morphology of final catalysts. Compared to Pt/C, the Pt3Ni icosahedra show 32-fold and 12-fold enhancement in specific and mass activity, respectively. Furthermore, robust durability was also observed in the accelerated durability test. Thus, this Pt3Ni icosahedron is found among the best Pt-based ORR catalysts, moreover, the findings also demonstrate how to mimic active extended surfaces in nanoscale.

  16. Dependence of Curie temperature on Pt layer thickness in Co/Pt system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Obinata, A.; Hibino, Y.; Hirohata, A.; Kuerbanjiang, B.; Lazarov, V. K.; Chiba, D.

    2015-03-01

    The Pt thickness dependence of the Curie temperature of perpendicularly magnetized ultra-thin (Pt/)Co/Pt films has been investigated by magnetization measurements. The Curie temperature and the saturation magnetic moment increase with the Co layer thickness and even with the Pt layer thickness. The Curie temperature is found to have linear dependence on the total magnetic moment of the system and the coefficients of the linear fits are almost identical, regardless of whether the thicknesses of the ferromagnetic Co layer or the Pt layer are varied. The Curie temperature also increases with the magnetic anisotropy, but no systematic dependence is observed. These results suggest that the magnetic moment induced in the Pt layer by the ferromagnetic proximity effect plays a significant role in determining the Curie temperatures of such two-dimensional ferromagnetic systems.

  17. Epitaxial oxide bilayer on Pt(001) nanofacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, D.; Komanicky, V.; Iddir, H.; Pierce, M. S.; Menzel, A.; Chang, K-C.; Barbour, A.; Zapol, P.; You, H.

    2012-01-01

    We observed an epitaxial, air-stable, partially registered (2 x 1) oxide bilayer on Pt (001) nanofacets [V. Komanicky, A. Menzel, K.-C. Chang, and H. You, J. Phys. Chem. 109, 23543 (2005)]. The bilayer is made of two half Pt layers; the top layer has four oxygen bonds and the second layer two. The positions and oxidation states of the Pt atoms are determined by analyzing crystal truncation rods and resonance scattering data. The positions of oxygen atoms are determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Partial registry on the nanofacets and the absence of such registry on the extended Pt (001) surface prepared similarly are explained in DFT calculations by strain relief that can be accommodated only by nanoscale facets.

  18. Heavy Lift & Propulsion Technology (HL&PT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cris Guidi delivers a presentation from the Heavy Lift & Propulsion Technology (HL&PT) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of ...

  19. Epitaxial oxide bilayer on Pt (001) nanofacets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Daniel; Komanicky, Vladimir; Iddir, Hakim; Pierce, Michael S.; Menzel, Andreas; Chang, Kee-Chul; Barbour, Andi; Zapol, Peter; You, Hoydoo

    2012-01-01

    We observed an epitaxial, air-stable, partially registered (2 × 1) oxide bilayer on Pt (001) nanofacets [V. Komanicky, A. Menzel, K.-C. Chang, and H. You, J. Phys. Chem. 109, 23543 (2005)]. The bilayer is made of two half Pt layers; the top layer has four oxygen bonds and the second layer two. The positions and oxidation states of the Pt atoms are determined by analyzing crystal truncation rods and resonance scattering data. The positions of oxygen atoms are determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Partial registry on the nanofacets and the absence of such registry on the extended Pt (001) surface prepared similarly are explained in DFT calculations by strain relief that can be accommodated only by nanoscale facets.

  20. Superior long-term activity for a Pt-Re alloy compared to Pt in methanol oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Audrey S.; Xie, Kangmin; Monnier, John R.; Chen, Donna A.

    2017-03-01

    Pt-Re bimetallic catalysts have shown enhanced activity compared to pure Pt for reactions involving oxidation, but the origins of this improved activity are not fully understood. Methanol oxidation on a Pt-Re alloy surface and pure Pt foil was studied in a microreactor coupled to an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. For reaction at 60 °C, the Pt-Re alloy surface exhibits superior long-term activity over a 24 h reaction period compared to pure Pt. The initial activity of Pt is 10-15% higher than on Pt-Re; however, the Pt surface gradually loses activity after 10 h online, whereas the activity of Pt-Re does not diminish. Post-reaction XPS shows that more carbon accumulates on the Pt than on Pt-Re, and the improved long-term activity is attributed to a greater ability of Pt-Re to oxidize the carbonaceous intermediates that eventually poison active sites. Both Pt and Pt-Re surfaces have almost no activity for methanol oxidation until a minimum coverage of oxygen is achieved from O2 dissociation. A comparison with methanol oxidation studies on Pt and Pt-Re in a pressure regime that is 150 times lower than in this work demonstrates that more carbon and less oxygen accumulate on the surfaces during reaction at the lower pressures.

  1. Facile synthesis of Pt-Pd alloy nanocages and Pt nanorings by templating with Pd nanoplates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xue; Luo, Ming; Huang, Hongwen; ...

    2016-09-06

    We report a facile method for the synthesis of Pt-Pd nanocages and Pt nanorings by conformally coating Pd nanoplates with Pt-based shells using polyol- and water-based protocols, respectively, followed by selective removal of the Pd cores. For the polyol-based system, Pd nanoplates were conformally coated with Pt-Pd alloy shells due to the use of a high reaction temperature of 200 °C and a slow injection rate for the Pt precursor. In comparison, Pt shells were formed on Pd nanoplates (with a larger thickness on the side face than on the top/bottom face) in the water-based system due to the usemore » of a low reaction temperature of 80 °C and the presence of twin boundaries on the side face. As such, the Pd@Pt nanoplates prepared using the polyol- and water-based protocols evolved into Pt-Pd nanocages and Pt nanorings, respectively, when the Pd templates in the cores were selectively removed by wet etching. As a result, the wall thickness of the nanocages and the ridge thickness of the nanorings could be reduced down to 1.1 nm and 1.8 nm, respectively, without breaking the hollow structures.« less

  2. Dependence of Magnetic Properties of Co/Pt Multilayers on Deposition Temperature of Pt Buffer Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Shigeru; Nishimura, Tomotaka; Kobayashi, Tadashi; Masuda, Morio

    1993-04-01

    A 15-nm-thick Pt buffer layer was deposited on a glass slide at temperature Ts(Ptbuf) ranging from 30 to 300°C by e-gun evaporation. Following the cooling in vacuum to ambient temperature, Co and Pt layers have been alternately deposited on it. Very large perpendicular anisotropy and coercivity have been obtained at Ts(Ptbuf) higher than 200°C. The (111) preferred orientation of the Co/Pt multilayer as well as the Pt buffer layer became more pronounced with elevating Ts(Ptbuf), to which the enhancement of perpendicular anisotropy with elevating Ts(Ptbuf) might be ascribable.

  3. Facile synthesis of Pt-Pd alloy nanocages and Pt nanorings by templating with Pd nanoplates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue; Luo, Ming; Huang, Hongwen; Chi, Miaofang; Howe, Jane; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Xia, Younan

    2016-09-06

    We report a facile method for the synthesis of Pt-Pd nanocages and Pt nanorings by conformally coating Pd nanoplates with Pt-based shells using polyol- and water-based protocols, respectively, followed by selective removal of the Pd cores. For the polyol-based system, Pd nanoplates were conformally coated with Pt-Pd alloy shells due to the use of a high reaction temperature of 200 °C and a slow injection rate for the Pt precursor. In comparison, Pt shells were formed on Pd nanoplates (with a larger thickness on the side face than on the top/bottom face) in the water-based system due to the use of a low reaction temperature of 80 °C and the presence of twin boundaries on the side face. As such, the Pd@Pt nanoplates prepared using the polyol- and water-based protocols evolved into Pt-Pd nanocages and Pt nanorings, respectively, when the Pd templates in the cores were selectively removed by wet etching. As a result, the wall thickness of the nanocages and the ridge thickness of the nanorings could be reduced down to 1.1 nm and 1.8 nm, respectively, without breaking the hollow structures.

  4. Cell Wall Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Guillaume; Bussey, Howard

    2006-01-01

    An extracellular matrix composed of a layered meshwork of β-glucans, chitin, and mannoproteins encapsulates cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organelle determines cellular morphology and plays a critical role in maintaining cell integrity during cell growth and division, under stress conditions, upon cell fusion in mating, and in the durable ascospore cell wall. Here we assess recent progress in understanding the molecular biology and biochemistry of cell wall synthesis and its remodeling in S. cerevisiae. We then review the regulatory dynamics of cell wall assembly, an area where functional genomics offers new insights into the integration of cell wall growth and morphogenesis with a polarized secretory system that is under cell cycle and cell type program controls. PMID:16760306

  5. Progress in metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-09-01

    The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic engineering, evolutionary engineering, and global transcription machinery engineering, in yeast strain improvement. It also summarizes existing tools for fine-tuning and regulating enzyme activities and thus metabolic pathways. Recent examples of yeast metabolic engineering for food, beverage, and industrial biotechnology (bioethanol and bulk and fine chemicals) follow. S. cerevisiae currently enjoys increasing popularity as a production organism in industrial ("white") biotechnology due to its inherent tolerance of low pH values and high ethanol and inhibitor concentrations and its ability to grow anaerobically. Attention is paid to utilizing lignocellulosic biomass as a potential substrate.

  6. Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other fungi

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Shigeyuki; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2010-01-01

    Transformation (i.e., genetic modification of a cell by the incorporation of exogenous DNA) is indispensable for manipulating fungi. Here, we review the transformation methods for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida albicans, Pichia pastoris and Aspergillus species and discuss some common modifications to improve transformation efficiency. We also present a model of the mechanism underlying S. cerevisiae transformation, based on recent reports and the mechanism of transfection in mammalian systems. This model predicts that DNA attaches to the cell wall and enters the cell via endocytotic membrane invagination, although how DNA reaches the nucleus is unknown. Polyethylene glycol is indispensable for successful transformation of intact cells and the attachment of DNA and also possibly acts on the membrane to increase the transformation efficiency. Both lithium acetate and heat shock, which enhance the transformation efficiency of intact cells but not that of spheroplasts, probably help DNA to pass through the cell wall. PMID:21468206

  7. Glycerol production of various strains of saccharomyces

    SciTech Connect

    Radler, F.; Schuetz, H.

    1982-01-01

    The quantity of glycerol as principal by-product of the alcoholic fermentation depends to a large extent on the yeast strain. Different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to form amounts of glycerol varying between 4.2 to 10.4 g/L. The formation of glycerol is regarded as a result of the competition between alcohol dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that compete for the reduced coenzyme NADH/sub 2/. High and low glycerol forming yeast strains showed large differences in the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and only small variation in the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase. The total amount of glycerol formed was also influenced by amino acids. In thiamine deficient media a decrease in glycerol formation was observed. Experiments indicate a correlation between the formation of acetaldehyde and glycerol and the production of cell mass that may be of practical interest. (Refs. 12).

  8. Social wasps are a Saccharomyces mating nest.

    PubMed

    Stefanini, Irene; Dapporto, Leonardo; Berná, Luisa; Polsinelli, Mario; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2016-02-23

    The reproductive ecology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is still largely unknown. Recent evidence of interspecific hybridization, high levels of strain heterozygosity, and prion transmission suggest that outbreeding occurs frequently in yeasts. Nevertheless, the place where yeasts mate and recombine in the wild has not been identified. We found that the intestine of social wasps hosts highly outbred S. cerevisiae strains as well as a rare S. cerevisiae×S. paradoxus hybrid. We show that the intestine of Polistes dominula social wasps favors the mating of S. cerevisiae strains among themselves and with S. paradoxus cells by providing a succession of environmental conditions prompting cell sporulation and spores germination. In addition, we prove that heterospecific mating is the only option for European S. paradoxus strains to survive in the gut. Taken together, these findings unveil the best hidden secret of yeast ecology, introducing the insect gut as an environmental alcove in which crosses occur, maintaining and generating the diversity of the ascomycetes.

  9. Social wasps are a Saccharomyces mating nest

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Irene; Dapporto, Leonardo; Berná, Luisa; Polsinelli, Mario; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive ecology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is still largely unknown. Recent evidence of interspecific hybridization, high levels of strain heterozygosity, and prion transmission suggest that outbreeding occurs frequently in yeasts. Nevertheless, the place where yeasts mate and recombine in the wild has not been identified. We found that the intestine of social wasps hosts highly outbred S. cerevisiae strains as well as a rare S. cerevisiae×S. paradoxus hybrid. We show that the intestine of Polistes dominula social wasps favors the mating of S. cerevisiae strains among themselves and with S. paradoxus cells by providing a succession of environmental conditions prompting cell sporulation and spores germination. In addition, we prove that heterospecific mating is the only option for European S. paradoxus strains to survive in the gut. Taken together, these findings unveil the best hidden secret of yeast ecology, introducing the insect gut as an environmental alcove in which crosses occur, maintaining and generating the diversity of the ascomycetes. PMID:26787874

  10. Viruses and prions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wickner, Reed B; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Esteban, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a key experimental organism for the study of infectious diseases, including dsRNA viruses, ssRNA viruses, and prions. Studies of the mechanisms of virus and prion replication, virus structure, and structure of the amyloid filaments that are the basis of yeast prions have been at the forefront of such studies in these classes of infectious entities. Yeast has been particularly useful in defining the interactions of the infectious elements with cellular components: chromosomally encoded proteins necessary for blocking the propagation of the viruses and prions, and proteins involved in the expression of viral components. Here, we emphasize the L-A dsRNA virus and its killer-toxin-encoding satellites, the 20S and 23S ssRNA naked viruses, and the several infectious proteins (prions) of yeast.

  11. Synchronization of the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A number of model organisms have provided the basis for our understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. These model organisms are generally much easier to manipulate than mammalian cells and as such provide amenable tools for extensive genetic and biochemical analysis. One of the most common model organisms used to study the cell cycle is the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model provides the ability to synchronise cells efficiently at different stages of the cell cycle, which in turn opens up the possibility for extensive and detailed study of mechanisms regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, we describe methods in which budding yeast cells are arrested at a particular phase of the cell cycle and then released from the block, permitting the study of molecular mechanisms that drive the progression through the cell cycle.

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in ecological context.

    PubMed

    Jouhten, Paula; Ponomarova, Olga; Gonzalez, Ramon; Patil, Kiran R

    2016-11-01

    The architecture and regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network are among the best studied owing to its widespread use in both basic research and industry. Yet, several recent studies have revealed notable limitations in explaining genotype-metabolic phenotype relations in this yeast, especially when concerning multiple genetic/environmental perturbations. Apparently unexpected genotype-phenotype relations may originate in the evolutionarily shaped cellular operating principles being hidden in common laboratory conditions. Predecessors of laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, the wild and the domesticated yeasts, have been evolutionarily shaped by highly variable environments, very distinct from laboratory conditions, and most interestingly by social life within microbial communities. Here we present a brief review of the genotypic and phenotypic peculiarities of S. cerevisiae in the context of its social lifestyle beyond laboratory environments. Accounting for this ecological context and the origin of the laboratory strains in experimental design and data analysis would be essential in improving the understanding of genotype-environment-phenotype relationships.

  13. Integral Membrane Protein Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Stroud, Robert M; Hays, Franklin A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic integral membrane proteins are challenging targets for crystallography or functional characterization in a purified state. Since expression is often a limiting factor when studying this difficult class of biological macromolecules, the intent of this chapter is to focus on the expression of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (IMPs) using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae is a prime candidate for the expression of eukaryotic IMPs because it offers the convenience of using episomal expression plasmids, selection of positive transformants, posttranslational modifications, and it can properly fold and target IMPs. Here we present a generalized protocol and insights based on our collective knowledge as an aid to overcoming the challenges faced when expressing eukaryotic IMPs in S. cerevisiae.

  14. CO2 hydrogenation on Pt, Pt/SiO2 and Pt/TiO2: Importance of synergy between Pt and oxide support

    DOE PAGES

    Kattel, Shyam; Yan, Binhang; Chen, Jingguang G.; ...

    2016-01-27

    In this paper we combined density functional theory (DFT), kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations and experimental measurements to gain insight into the mechanisms of CO2 conversion by hydrogen on the Pt nanoparticle (NP). The results show that in spite of the presence of active, low-coordinated sites, Pt NP alone is not able to catalyze the reaction due to the weak CO2 binding on the catalyst. Once CO2 is stabilized, the hydrogenation of CO2 to CO via the reverse-water–gas shift (RWGS) reaction is promoted; in contrast, the enhancement for further *CO hydrogenation to CH4 is less significant and no CH3OH ismore » observed. The selectivity to CO is mainly determined by CO binding energy and the energetics of *CO hydrogenation to *HCO, while that for CH4 and CH3OH is determined by the competition between hydrogenation and C–O bond scission reactions of the *H2COH species. Using SiO2 and TiO2 as the support, Pt NP is able to promote the overall CO2 conversion, while the impact on the selectivity is rather small. The theoretically predicted trend in activity and selectivity is in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, the enhanced activity of Pt/oxide over Pt is originated from the sites at the Pt–oxide interface, where the synergy between Pt and oxide plays an important role.« less

  15. PT -symmetric model of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Ghatak, Ananya; Gianfreda, Mariagiovanna

    2017-01-01

    The study of PT -symmetric physical systems began in 1998 as a complex generalization of conventional quantum mechanics, but beginning in 2007 experiments began to be published in which the predicted PT phase transition was clearly observed in classical rather than in quantum-mechanical systems. This paper examines the classical PT phase transition in dynamical-system models that are moderately accurate representations of antigen-antibody systems. A surprising conclusion that can be drawn from these models is that it might be possible treat a serious disease in which the antigen concentration grows out of bounds (and the host dies) by injecting a small dose of a second (different) antigen. In this case a PT -symmetric analysis shows there are two possible favorable outcomes. In the unbroken-PT -symmetric phase the disease becomes chronic and is no longer lethal, while in the appropriate broken-PT -symmetric phase the concentration of lethal antigen goes to zero and the disease is completely cured.

  16. Nanoparticulate CoPt Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barekatain, Yasaman; Hadjipanayis, George; Magnetics bLab Team

    Equiatomic FePt and CoPt alloys are very attractive for application in high density recording media because of the high magnetocrystalline anisotropy K of their fct(L10) structure with values exceeding 2MJ/m3.The aim of this study is to fabricate a nanoparticulate CoPt film consisting of CoPt nanoparticles embedded in a matrix. To obtain this we have used co-sputtering of CoPt with different materials M = BN,C, Cu and SiO2. Our first experiments were done on CoPt films with thickness of 200 nm. The as-sputtered films had the fcc structure and a coercivity of 150 Oe. Annealing at 700 oC for 30 min led to an increase in coercivity to 4 kOe. Optimization studies are under way to find the optimum sputtering conditions to obtain a fully ordered tetragonal structure with the highest value of coercivity which can then be used in the nanoparticulate composites. Work supported by DOE BES- FG02-04ERU4612 DOE DE-FG02-04ERU4612.

  17. Modeling of PEM fuel cell Pt/C catalyst degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wu; Fuller, Thomas F.

    Pt/C catalyst degradation remains as one of the primary limitations for practical applications of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Pt catalyst degradation mechanisms with the typically observed Pt nanoparticle growth behaviors have not been completely understood and predicted. In this work, a physics-based Pt/C catalyst degradation model is proposed with a simplified bi-modal particle size distribution. The following catalyst degradation processes were considered: (1) dissolution of Pt and subsequent electrochemical deposition on Pt nanoparticles in cathode; (2) diffusion of Pt ions in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA); and (3) Pt ion chemical reduction in membrane by hydrogen permeating through the membrane from the negative electrode. Catalyst coarsening with Pt nanoparticle growth was clearly demonstrated by Pt mass exchange between small and large particles through Pt dissolution and Pt ion deposition. However, the model is not adequate to predict well the catalyst degradation rates including Pt nanoparticle growth, catalyst surface area loss and cathode Pt mass loss. Additional catalyst degradation processes such as new Pt cluster formation on carbon support and neighboring Pt clusters coarsening was proposed for further simulative investigation.

  18. The Mitochondrial Genome Impacts Respiration but Not Fermentation in Interspecific Saccharomyces Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Rigoulet, Michel; Salin, Benedicte; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; de Vienne, Dominique; Sicard, Delphine; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has high rate of nucleotide substitution leading to different mitochondrial haplotypes called mitotypes. However, the impact of mitochondrial genetic variant on phenotypic variation has been poorly considered in microorganisms because mtDNA encodes very few genes compared to nuclear DNA, and also because mitochondrial inheritance is not uniparental. Here we propose original material to unravel mitotype impact on phenotype: we produced interspecific hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum species, using fully homozygous diploid parental strains. For two different interspecific crosses involving different parental strains, we recovered 10 independent hybrids per cross, and allowed mtDNA fixation after around 80 generations. We developed PCR-based markers for the rapid discrimination of S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum mitochondrial DNA. For both crosses, we were able to isolate fully isogenic hybrids at the nuclear level, yet possessing either S. cerevisiae mtDNA (Sc-mtDNA) or S. uvarum mtDNA (Su-mtDNA). Under fermentative conditions, the mitotype has no phenotypic impact on fermentation kinetics and products, which was expected since mtDNA are not necessary for fermentative metabolism. Alternatively, under respiratory conditions, hybrids with Sc-mtDNA have higher population growth performance, associated with higher respiratory rate. Indeed, far from the hypothesis that mtDNA variation is neutral, our work shows that mitochondrial polymorphism can have a strong impact on fitness components and hence on the evolutionary fate of the yeast populations. We hypothesize that under fermentative conditions, hybrids may fix stochastically one or the other mt-DNA, while respiratory environments may increase the probability to fix Sc-mtDNA. PMID:24086452

  19. Copper dusting effects on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Pt/Co/Pt tri-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parakkat, Vineeth Mohanan; Ganesh, K. R.; Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of Cu dusting on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of sputter grown Pt/Co/Pt stack in which the Cu layer is in proximity with that of Co is investigated in this work. We used magneto optic Kerr effect microscopy measurements to study the variation in the reversal mechanisms in films with Co thicknesses below 0.8nm by systematically varying their perpendicular magnetic anisotropy using controlled Cu dusting. Cu dusting was done separately above and below the cobalt layer in order to understand the role of bottom and top Pt layers in magnetization reversal mechanisms of sputtered Pt/Co/Pt stack. The introduction of even 0.3nm thick Cu layer below the cobalt layer drastically affected the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as evident from the nucleation behavior. On the contrary, even a 4nm thick top Cu layer had little effect on the reversal mechanism. These observations along with magnetization data was used to estimate the role of top and bottom Pt in the origin of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as well as magnetization switching mechanism in Pt/Co/Pt thin films. Also, with an increase in the bottom Cu dusting from 0.2 to 0.4nm there was an increase in the number of nucleation sites resulting in the transformation of domain wall patterns from a smooth interface type to a finger like one and finally to maze type.

  20. Multi-enzyme production by pure and mixed cultures of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Maturano, Y Paola; Rodríguez Assaf, Leticia A; Toro, M Eugenia; Nally, M Cristina; Vallejo, Martha; Castellanos de Figueroa, Lucía I; Combina, Mariana; Vazquez, Fabio

    2012-04-02

    Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts release enzymes that are able to transform neutral compounds of grape berries into active aromatic compounds, a process that enhances the sensory attributes of wines. So far, there exists only little information about enzymatic activity in mixed cultures of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces during grape must fermentations. The aim of the present work was to determine the ability of yeasts to produce extracellular enzymes of enological relevance (β-glucosidases, pectinases, proteases, amylases or xylanases) in pure and mixed Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces cultures during fermentation. Pure and mixed cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BSc562, Hanseniaspora vinae BHv438 and Torulaspora delbrueckii BTd259 were assayed: 1% S. cerevisiae/99% H. vinae, 10% S. cerevisiae/90% H. vinae, 1% S. cerevisiae/99% T. delbrueckii and 10% S. cerevisiae/90% T. delbrueckii. Microvinifications were carried out with fresh must without pressing from Vitis vinifera L. c.v. Pedro Jiménez, an autochthonous variety from Argentina. Non-Saccharomyces species survived during 15-18days (BTd259) or until the end of the fermentation (BHv438) and influenced enzymatic profiles of mixed cultures. The results suggest that high concentrations of sugars did not affect enzymatic activity. β-Glucosidase and pectinase activities seemed to be adversely affected by an increase in ethanol: activity diminished with increasing fermentation time. Throughout the fermentation, Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces isolates assayed produced a broad range of enzymes of enological interest that catalyze hydrolysis of polymers present in grape juice. Vinifications carried out by a pure or mixed culture of BTd259 (99% of T. delbrueckii) showed the highest production of all enzymes assayed except for β-glucosidase. In mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae outgrew H. vinae, and T. delbrueckii was only detected until halfway the fermentation process. Nevertheless, their secreted

  1. Surface chemistry of aromatic reactants on Pt- and Mo-modified Pt catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Allison M.; Mark, Lesli; Rasmussen, Mathew J.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Medlin, J. Will

    2016-11-01

    Supported catalysts containing an oxophilic metal such as Mo and a noble metal such as Pt have shown promising activity and selectivity for deoxygenation of biomass-derived compounds. Here, we report that PtMo catalysts also promote hydrogenolysis of the model compound benzyl alcohol, while decarbonylation is most prevalent over unmodified Pt. A combination of single crystal surface science studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and vapor phase upgrading experiments using supported catalysts was carried out to better understand the mechanism by which Mo promotes deoxygenation. Molybdenum was deposited in submonolayer quantities on a Pt(111) surface and reduced at high temperature. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments using benzyl alcohol as a reactant showed greatly enhanced yields of the deoxygenation product toluene at moderate Mo coverages. To understand how the interaction of the aromatic group with the surface influenced this reactivity, we investigated the adsorption of toluene as a probe molecule. We found that the addition of Mo to Pt(111) resulted in a significant decrease in toluene decomposition. DFT calculations indicated that this decrease was consistent with decreased aromatic adsorption strengths that accompany incorporation of Mo into the Pt subsurface. The weaker aromatic-surface interaction on Pt/Mo surfaces led to a tilted adsorption geometry for benzyl alcohol, which presumably promotes hydrogenolysis to produce toluene instead of decarbonylation to produce benzene and CO. Alumina-supported Pt and PtMo catalysts were also tested for benzyl alcohol deoxygenation. PtMo catalysts had a higher rate of toluene production and lower rates of benzene and benzaldehyde production. Additionally, when benzaldehyde was used as the reactant to measure decarbonylation activity the mass-normalized rate of benzene production was 2.5 times higher on Pt than PtMo. Altogether, the results of TPD, DFT, and supported catalyst

  2. Surface chemistry of aromatic reactants on Pt- and Mo-modified Pt catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Robinson, Allison M.; Mark, Lesli; Rasmussen, Mathew J.; ...

    2016-11-01

    Supported catalysts containing an oxophilic metal such as Mo and a noble metal such as Pt have shown promising activity and selectivity for deoxygenation of biomass-derived compounds. Here, we report that PtMo catalysts also promote hydrogenolysis of the model compound benzyl alcohol, while decarbonylation is most prevalent over unmodified Pt. A combination of single crystal surface science studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and vapor phase upgrading experiments using supported catalysts was carried out to better understand the mechanism by which Mo promotes deoxygenation. Molybdenum was deposited in submonolayer quantities on a Pt(111) surface and reduced at high temperature. Temperature-programmedmore » desorption (TPD) experiments using benzyl alcohol as a reactant showed greatly enhanced yields of the deoxygenation product toluene at moderate Mo coverages. To understand how the interaction of the aromatic group with the surface influenced this reactivity, we investigated the adsorption of toluene as a probe molecule. We found that the addition of Mo to Pt(111) resulted in a significant decrease in toluene decomposition. DFT calculations indicated that this decrease was consistent with decreased aromatic adsorption strengths that accompany incorporation of Mo into the Pt subsurface. The weaker aromatic-surface interaction on Pt/Mo surfaces led to a tilted adsorption geometry for benzyl alcohol, which presumably promotes hydrogenolysis to produce toluene instead of decarbonylation to produce benzene and CO. Alumina-supported Pt and PtMo catalysts were also tested for benzyl alcohol deoxygenation. PtMo catalysts had a higher rate of toluene production and lower rates of benzene and benzaldehyde production. Additionally, when benzaldehyde was used as the reactant to measure decarbonylation activity the mass-normalized rate of benzene production was 2.5 times higher on Pt than PtMo. Altogether, the results of TPD, DFT, and supported catalyst

  3. Efficient oxygen reduction catalysis by subnanometer Pt alloy nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kezhu; Zhao, Dandan; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    The common knowledge is that Pt and Pt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) less than 2 nm are not desirable for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, whether the same trend is expected in Pt-based nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates remains questionable because there is no scalable approach to make such Pt nanostructures. We report a general approach for preparing subnanometer Pt alloy NWs with a diameter of only 4 to 5 atomic layer thickness, ranging from monometallic Pt NWs to bimetallic PtNi and PtCo NWs and to trimetallic PtNiCo NWs. In a sharp contrast to Pt alloy NPs, the subnanometer Pt alloy NWs demonstrate exceptional mass and specific activities of 4.20 A/mg and 5.11 mA/cm2 at 0.9 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), respectively, 32.3 and 26.9 times higher than those of the commercial Pt/C. Density functional theory simulations reveal that the enhanced ORR activities are attributed to the catalytically active sites on high-density (111) facets in the subnanometer Pt alloy NWs. They are also very stable under the ORR condition with negligible activity decay over the course of 30,000 cycles. Our work presents a new approach to maximize Pt catalytic efficiency with atomic level utilization for efficient heterogeneous catalysis and beyond. PMID:28275723

  4. Efficient oxygen reduction catalysis by subnanometer Pt alloy nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kezhu; Zhao, Dandan; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2017-02-01

    The common knowledge is that Pt and Pt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) less than 2 nm are not desirable for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, whether the same trend is expected in Pt-based nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates remains questionable because there is no scalable approach to make such Pt nanostructures. We report a general approach for preparing subnanometer Pt alloy NWs with a diameter of only 4 to 5 atomic layer thickness, ranging from monometallic Pt NWs to bimetallic PtNi and PtCo NWs and to trimetallic PtNiCo NWs. In a sharp contrast to Pt alloy NPs, the subnanometer Pt alloy NWs demonstrate exceptional mass and specific activities of 4.20 A/mg and 5.11 mA/cm(2) at 0.9 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), respectively, 32.3 and 26.9 times higher than those of the commercial Pt/C. Density functional theory simulations reveal that the enhanced ORR activities are attributed to the catalytically active sites on high-density (111) facets in the subnanometer Pt alloy NWs. They are also very stable under the ORR condition with negligible activity decay over the course of 30,000 cycles. Our work presents a new approach to maximize Pt catalytic efficiency with atomic level utilization for efficient heterogeneous catalysis and beyond.

  5. Electrodeposition and electrocatalytic activity of Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticles and thin films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guojin

    Pt and Pt-based alloy catalysts were synthesized by electrodeposition on HOPG. The nucleation and growth, morphology, composition and crystal structure, and electrocatalytic activity (towards relevant reactions in the frame of PEMFCs and DMFCs) of these model electrodes were systematically investigated. The presence of chlorides inhibits the Pt reduction processes. There is a transition from progressive to instantaneous nucleation with increasing overpotential for the deposition from 1 mM H2PtCl6 electrolytes. The possibility of instantaneous nucleation at large overpotential by using electrolytes with large chloride concentration is advantageous for the growth of small, well dispersed nanoparticles. The electrochemical data were confirmed by AFM and SEM imaging studies. Relatively narrow size distributed nanoparticles can be obtained from the current system. While MOR activity decreases with decreasing particle size, the HER and HOR activity of deposited Pt particles increases with decreasing deposition period. The ORR activity first increases then decreases with increasing deposition time. Interactions between Pt and Ru, or Ni or Co are observed and they form solid solution as verified by XRD. Underpotential deposition occurs for Pt-Ni or Pt-Co co-electrodeposition. Pt-Ru deposition can be described as progressive nucleation at low overpotential and instantaneous nucleation at high overpotentials. Through direct morphological observations, the Pt-Ni or Pt-Co nucleation can be approximately described as progressive. Pt-Ru deposits are superior to Pt towards MOR. The optimum Ru content is about 50 at.%. Pt-Ni and Pt-Co deposits are more active than Pt for ORR. The optimum content is about 30 at.% Ni or 50 at.% Co. Dealloying of Pt-Ru and Pt-Ni or Pt-Co electrodeposit is observed after electrochemical characterization. The extent of dealloying increases with the content of the alloying element.

  6. Detecting broken \\mathbf{\\mathsf{PT}} -symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigert, Stefan

    2006-08-01

    A fundamental problem in the theory of \\mathbf{\\mathsf{PT}} -invariant quantum systems is to determine whether a given system 'respects' this symmetry or not. If not, the system usually develops non-real eigenvalues. It is shown in this contribution how to algorithmically detect the existence of complex eigenvalues for a given PT-symmetric matrix. The procedure uses classical results from stability theory which qualitatively locate the zeros of real polynomials in the complex plane. The interest and value of the present approach lies in the fact that it avoids diagonalization of the Hamiltonian at hand.

  7. Impact of oxygenation on the performance of three non-Saccharomyces yeasts in co-fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Kirti; Bauer, Florian F; Setati, Mathabatha E

    2017-03-01

    The sequential or co-inoculation of grape must with non-Saccharomyces yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains has recently become a common practice in winemaking. The procedure intends to enhance unique aroma and flavor profiles of wine. The extent of the impact of non-Saccharomyces strains depends on their ability to produce biomass and to remain metabolically active for a sufficiently long period. However, mixed-culture wine fermentations tend to become rapidly dominated by S. cerevisiae, reducing or eliminating the non-Saccharomyces yeast contribution. For an efficient application of these yeasts, it is therefore essential to understand the environmental factors that modulate the population dynamics of such ecosystems. Several environmental parameters have been shown to influence population dynamics, but their specific effect remains largely uncharacterized. In this study, the population dynamics in co-fermentations of S. cerevisiae and three non-Saccharomyces yeast species: Torulaspora delbrueckii, Lachancea thermotolerans, and Metschnikowia pulcherrima, was investigated as a function of oxygen availability. In all cases, oxygen availability strongly influenced population dynamics, but clear species-dependent differences were observed. Our data show that L. thermotolerans required the least oxygen, followed by T. delbrueckii and M. pulcherrima. Distinct species-specific chemical volatile profiles correlated in all cases with increased persistence of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, in particular increases in some higher alcohols and medium chain fatty acids. The results highlight the role of oxygen in regulating the succession of yeasts during wine fermentations and suggests that more stringent aeration strategies would be necessary to support the persistence of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in real must fermentations.

  8. Three-dimensional Structure of Saccharomyces Invertase

    PubMed Central

    Sainz-Polo, M. Angela; Ramírez-Escudero, Mercedes; Lafraya, Alvaro; González, Beatriz; Marín-Navarro, Julia; Polaina, Julio; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Invertase is an enzyme that is widely distributed among plants and microorganisms and that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the disaccharide sucrose into glucose and fructose. Despite the important physiological role of Saccharomyces invertase (SInv) and the historical relevance of this enzyme as a model in early biochemical studies, its structure had not yet been solved. We report here the crystal structure of recombinant SInv at 3.3 Å resolution showing that the enzyme folds into the catalytic β-propeller and β-sandwich domains characteristic of GH32 enzymes. However, SInv displays an unusual quaternary structure. Monomers associate in two different kinds of dimers, which are in turn assembled into an octamer, best described as a tetramer of dimers. Dimerization plays a determinant role in substrate specificity because this assembly sets steric constraints that limit the access to the active site of oligosaccharides of more than four units. Comparative analysis of GH32 enzymes showed that formation of the SInv octamer occurs through a β-sheet extension that seems unique to this enzyme. Interaction between dimers is determined by a short amino acid sequence at the beginning of the β-sandwich domain. Our results highlight the role of the non-catalytic domain in fine-tuning substrate specificity and thus supplement our knowledge of the activity of this important family of enzymes. In turn, this gives a deeper insight into the structural features that rule modularity and protein-carbohydrate recognition. PMID:23430743

  9. Cold Osmotic Shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Patching, J. W.; Rose, A. H.

    1971-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 366 is susceptible to cold osmotic shock. Exponentially growing cells from batch cultures grown in defined medium at 30 C, after being suspended in 0.8 m mannitol containing 10 mm ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid and then resuspended in ice-cold 0.5 mm MgCl2, accumulated the nonmetabolizable solutes d-glucosamine-hydrochloride and 2-aminoisobutyrate at slower rates than unshocked cells; shocked cells retained their viability. Storage of unshocked batch-grown cells in buffer at 10 C led to an increase in ability to accumulate glucosamine, and further experiments were confined to cells grown in a chemostat under conditions of glucose limitation, thereby obviating the need for storing cells before use. A study was made of the effect of the different stages in the cold osmotic shock procedure, including the osmotic stress, the chelating agent, and the cold Mg2+-containing diluent, on viability and solute-accumulating ability. Growth of shocked cells in defined medium resembled that of unshocked cells; however, in malt extract-yeast extract-glucose-peptone medium, the shocked cells had a longer lag phase of growth and initially grew at a slower rate. Cold osmotic shock caused the release of low-molecular-weight compounds and about 6 to 8% of the cell protein. Neither the cell envelope enzymes, invertase, acid phosphatase and l-leucine-β-naphthylamidase, nor the cytoplasmic enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, were released when yeast cells were subjected to cold osmotic shock. PMID:5001201

  10. Limited proteolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L; Encinas, M V; Jabalquinto, A M; Cardemil, E

    1993-08-01

    Incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with trypsin under native conditions cases a time-dependent loss of activity and the production of protein fragments. Cleavage sites determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses identified protease-sensitive peptide bonds between amino acid residues at positions 9-10 and 76-77. Additional fragmentation sites were also detected in a region approximately 70-80 amino acids before the carboxyl end of the protein. These results suggest that the enzyme is formed by a central compact domain comprising more than two thirds of the whole protein structure. From proteolysis experiments carried out in the presence of substrates, it could be inferred that CO2 binding specifically protects position 76-77 from trypsin action. Intrinsic fluorescence measurements demonstrated that CO2 binding induces a protein conformational change, and a dissociation constant for the enzyme CO2 complex of 8.2 +/- 0.6 mM was determined.

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in ecological context

    PubMed Central

    Jouhten, Paula; Ponomarova, Olga; Gonzalez, Ramon; Patil, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network are among the best studied owing to its widespread use in both basic research and industry. Yet, several recent studies have revealed notable limitations in explaining genotype–metabolic phenotype relations in this yeast, especially when concerning multiple genetic/environmental perturbations. Apparently unexpected genotype–phenotype relations may originate in the evolutionarily shaped cellular operating principles being hidden in common laboratory conditions. Predecessors of laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, the wild and the domesticated yeasts, have been evolutionarily shaped by highly variable environments, very distinct from laboratory conditions, and most interestingly by social life within microbial communities. Here we present a brief review of the genotypic and phenotypic peculiarities of S. cerevisiae in the context of its social lifestyle beyond laboratory environments. Accounting for this ecological context and the origin of the laboratory strains in experimental design and data analysis would be essential in improving the understanding of genotype–environment–phenotype relationships. PMID:27634775

  12. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J J

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes.

  13. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic engineering, evolutionary engineering, and global transcription machinery engineering, in yeast strain improvement. It also summarizes existing tools for fine-tuning and regulating enzyme activities and thus metabolic pathways. Recent examples of yeast metabolic engineering for food, beverage, and industrial biotechnology (bioethanol and bulk and fine chemicals) follow. S. cerevisiae currently enjoys increasing popularity as a production organism in industrial (“white”) biotechnology due to its inherent tolerance of low pH values and high ethanol and inhibitor concentrations and its ability to grow anaerobically. Attention is paid to utilizing lignocellulosic biomass as a potential substrate. PMID:18772282

  14. Stationary phase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Washburne, M; Braun, E; Johnston, G C; Singer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Growth and proliferation of microorganisms such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled in part by the availability of nutrients. When proliferating yeast cells exhaust available nutrients, they enter a stationary phase characterized by cell cycle arrest and specific physiological, biochemical, and morphological changes. These changes include thickening of the cell wall, accumulation of reserve carbohydrates, and acquisition of thermotolerance. Recent characterization of mutant cells that are conditionally defective only for the resumption of proliferation from stationary phase provides evidence that stationary phase is a unique developmental state. Strains with mutations affecting entry into and survival during stationary phase have also been isolated, and the mutations have been shown to affect at least seven different cellular processes: (i) signal transduction, (ii) protein synthesis, (iii) protein N-terminal acetylation, (iv) protein turnover, (v) protein secretion, (vi) membrane biosynthesis, and (vii) cell polarity. The exact nature of the relationship between these processes and survival during stationary phase remains to be elucidated. We propose that cell cycle arrest coordinated with the ability to remain viable in the absence of additional nutrients provides a good operational definition of starvation-induced stationary phase. PMID:8393130

  15. A biochemically structured model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lei, F; Rotbøll, M; Jørgensen, S B

    2001-07-12

    A biochemically structured model for the aerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose and ethanol is presented. The model focuses on the pyruvate and acetaldehyde branch points where overflow metabolism occurs when the growth changes from oxidative to oxido-reductive. The model is designed to describe the onset of aerobic alcoholic fermentation during steady-state as well as under dynamical conditions, by triggering an increase in the glycolytic flux using a key signalling component which is assumed to be closely related to acetaldehyde. An investigation of the modelled process dynamics in a continuous cultivation revealed multiple steady states in a region of dilution rates around the transition between oxidative and oxido-reductive growth. A bifurcation analysis using the two external variables, the dilution rate, D, and the inlet concentration of glucose, S(f), as parameters, showed that a fold bifurcation occurs close to the critical dilution rate resulting in multiple steady-states. The region of dilution rates within which multiple steady states may occur depends strongly on the substrate feed concentration. Consequently a single steady state may prevail at low feed concentrations, whereas multiple steady states may occur over a relatively wide range of dilution rates at higher feed concentrations.

  16. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  17. Cell wall construction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klis, Frans M; Boorsma, Andre; De Groot, Piet W J

    2006-02-01

    In this review, we discuss new insights in cell wall architecture and cell wall construction in the ascomycetous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transcriptional profiling studies combined with biochemical work have provided ample evidence that the cell wall is a highly adaptable organelle. In particular, the protein population that is anchored to the stress-bearing polysaccharides of the cell wall, and forms the interface with the outside world, is highly diverse. This diversity is believed to play an important role in adaptation of the cell to environmental conditions, in growth mode and in survival. Cell wall construction is tightly controlled and strictly coordinated with progression of the cell cycle. This is reflected in the usage of specific cell wall proteins during consecutive phases of the cell cycle and in the recent discovery of a cell wall integrity checkpoint. When the cell is challenged with stress conditions that affect the cell wall, a specific transcriptional response is observed that includes the general stress response, the cell wall integrity pathway and the calcineurin pathway. This salvage mechanism includes increased expression of putative cell wall assemblases and some potential cross-linking cell wall proteins, and crucial changes in cell wall architecture. We discuss some more enzymes involved in cell wall construction and also potential inhibitors of these enzymes. Finally, we use both biochemical and genomic data to infer that the architectural principles used by S. cerevisiae to build its cell wall are also used by many other ascomycetous yeasts and also by some mycelial ascomycetous fungi.

  18. Functional profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome.

    PubMed

    Giaever, Guri; Chu, Angela M; Ni, Li; Connelly, Carla; Riles, Linda; Véronneau, Steeve; Dow, Sally; Lucau-Danila, Ankuta; Anderson, Keith; André, Bruno; Arkin, Adam P; Astromoff, Anna; El-Bakkoury, Mohamed; Bangham, Rhonda; Benito, Rocio; Brachat, Sophie; Campanaro, Stefano; Curtiss, Matt; Davis, Karen; Deutschbauer, Adam; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Flaherty, Patrick; Foury, Francoise; Garfinkel, David J; Gerstein, Mark; Gotte, Deanna; Güldener, Ulrich; Hegemann, Johannes H; Hempel, Svenja; Herman, Zelek; Jaramillo, Daniel F; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L; Kötter, Peter; LaBonte, Darlene; Lamb, David C; Lan, Ning; Liang, Hong; Liao, Hong; Liu, Lucy; Luo, Chuanyun; Lussier, Marc; Mao, Rong; Menard, Patrice; Ooi, Siew Loon; Revuelta, Jose L; Roberts, Christopher J; Rose, Matthias; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Scherens, Bart; Schimmack, Greg; Shafer, Brenda; Shoemaker, Daniel D; Sookhai-Mahadeo, Sharon; Storms, Reginald K; Strathern, Jeffrey N; Valle, Giorgio; Voet, Marleen; Volckaert, Guido; Wang, Ching-yun; Ward, Teresa R; Wilhelmy, Julie; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Yang, Yonghong; Yen, Grace; Youngman, Elaine; Yu, Kexin; Bussey, Howard; Boeke, Jef D; Snyder, Michael; Philippsen, Peter; Davis, Ronald W; Johnston, Mark

    2002-07-25

    Determining the effect of gene deletion is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function. Conventional genetic screens exhibit biases, and genes contributing to a phenotype are often missed. We systematically constructed a nearly complete collection of gene-deletion mutants (96% of annotated open reading frames, or ORFs) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA sequences dubbed 'molecular bar codes' uniquely identify each strain, enabling their growth to be analysed in parallel and the fitness contribution of each gene to be quantitatively assessed by hybridization to high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We show that previously known and new genes are necessary for optimal growth under six well-studied conditions: high salt, sorbitol, galactose, pH 8, minimal medium and nystatin treatment. Less than 7% of genes that exhibit a significant increase in messenger RNA expression are also required for optimal growth in four of the tested conditions. Our results validate the yeast gene-deletion collection as a valuable resource for functional genomics.

  19. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek; Schölz, Christian; Wagner, Sebastian A; Magnes, Christoph; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on acetyl-CoA generation in distinct subcellular compartments. Mitochondrial acetylation levels correlated with acetyl-CoA concentration in vivo and acetyl-CoA acetylated lysine residues nonenzymatically in vitro. We developed a method to estimate acetylation stoichiometry and found that the vast majority of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylation had a very low stoichiometry. However, mitochondrial acetylation occurred at a significantly higher basal level than cytoplasmic acetylation, consistent with the distinct acetylation dynamics and higher acetyl-CoA concentration in mitochondria. High stoichiometry acetylation occurred mostly on histones, proteins present in histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase complexes, and on transcription factors. These data show that a majority of acetylation occurs at very low levels in exponentially growing yeast and is uniformly affected by exposure to acetyl-CoA.

  20. Regulation of Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Waechter, Charles J.; Lester, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence is presented which indicates that the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine by the methylation pathway in growing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is repressed by the presence of choline in the growth medium. This result, obtained previously for glucose-grown cells, was also observed for lactate-grown cells, of which half of the phosphatidylcholine is mitochondrial. A respiration-deficient mutant of the parent wild-type strain has been studied, and its inability to form functional mitochondria cannot be due to an impaired methylation pathway, as it has been shown to incorporate 14C-CH3-methionine into all of the methylated glycerophosphatides. The incorporation rate is depressed by the inclusion of 1 mm choline in the growth medium, suggesting a regulatory effect similar to that demonstrated for the wild-type strain. The effects of choline on the glycerophospholipid composition of lactate and glucose-grown cells is presented. The repressive effects of the two related bases, mono- and dimethylethanolamine, were examined, and reduced levels of 14C-CH3-methionine incorporation were found for cells grown in the presence of these bases. The effect of choline on the methylation rates is reversible and glucosegrown cells regain the nonrepressed level of methylation activity in 60 to 80 min after removal of choline from the growth medium. Images PMID:5547992

  1. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  2. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance study of the electrodeposition of Co, Pt and Pt-Co alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, A. J.; Chaparro, A. M.; Daza, L.

    The electrochemical deposition of Co, Pt and Pt-Co alloy are studied with the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) on a gold substrate. Co is deposited from acidic sulphate bath containing boric acid. Different processes are identified in this bath. Electrodeposition of Co on Au substrate is observed at potentials above redox potential, underpotential deposition, most probably due to formation of a Co-Au alloy. At more cathodic potentials, below -0.5 V, metallic Co is formed. The film is completely dissolved at positive potentials during the anodic scan, probably mediated by Co(OH) 2. The electrodeposition of platinum from acidic PtCl 6 2- bath occurs below the thermodynamic potential (0.74 V) with almost 100% efficiency. At potentials negative from 0.0 V the efficiency decreases due to parallel water reduction. The codeposition of Co and Pt is also studied in acidic bath. Here, the decrease of pH due to water reduction on Pt deposits gives rise to precipitation of Co(OH) 2, together with the deposition of metallic Pt and Co. The films contain as major component the Pt 3Co alloy.

  3. Tailoring Curie temperature and magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parakkat, Vineeth Mohanan; Ganesh, K. R.; Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2016-05-01

    The dependence of perpendicular magnetization and Curie temperature (Tc) of Pt/Co/Pt thin films on the thicknesses of Pt seed (Pts) and presence of Ta buffer layer has been investigated in this work. Pt and Co thicknesses were varied between 2 to 8 nm and 0.35 to 1.31 nm (across the spin reorientation transition thickness) respectively and the Tc was measured using SQUID magnetometer. We have observed a systematic dependence of Tc on the thickness of Pts. For 8nm thickness of Pts the Co layer of 0.35nm showed ferromagnetism with perpendicular anisotropy at room temperature. As the thickness of the Pts was decreased to 2nm, the Tc went down below 250K. XRD data indicated polycrystalline growth of Pts on SiO2. On the contrary Ta buffer layer promoted the growth of Pt(111). As a consequence Ta(5nm)/Pt(3nm)/Co(0.35nm)/Pt(2nm) had much higher Tc (above 300K) with perpendicular anisotropy when compared to the same stack without the Ta layer. Thus we could tune the ferromagnetic Tc and anisotropy by varying the Pts thickness and also by introducing Ta buffer layer. We attribute these observations to the micro-structural evolution of Pts layer which hosts the Co layer.

  4. Pt +-mediated activation of methane: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Christoph; Wesendrup, Ralf; Schwarz, Helmut

    1995-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study on the Pt +-mediated activation of methane is presented. Dehydrogenation of CH 4 by thermalized Pt + cations (Pt + + CH 4 ← PtCH 2+ + H 2) proceeds along a doublet ground state potential energy surface and is found to be reversible under the conditions of Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The recently reported oxidation of the cationic platinum carbene PtCH 2+ by O 2 produces electronically excited Pt + cations, which are detected in the 4F9/2 state by means of charge-transfer bracketing experiments.

  5. Intracellular Signal Triggered by Cholera Toxin in Saccharomyces boulardii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Rogelio L.; Castro, Ieso M.; Bambirra, Eduardo A.; Amaral, Sheila C.; Fietto, Luciano G.; Tropia, Maria José M.; Neves, Maria José; Dos Santos, Raquel G.; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Nicoli, Jacques R.

    1998-01-01

    As is the case for Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303 protects Fisher rats against cholera toxin (CT). The addition of glucose or dinitrophenol to cells of S. boulardii grown on a nonfermentable carbon source activated trehalase in a manner similar to that observed for S. cerevisiae. The addition of CT to the same cells also resulted in trehalase activation. Experiments performed separately on the A and B subunits of CT showed that both are necessary for activation. Similarly, the addition of CT but not of its separate subunits led to a cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal in both S. boulardii and S. cerevisiae. These data suggest that trehalase stimulation by CT probably occurred through the cAMP-mediated protein phosphorylation cascade. The requirement of CT subunit B for both the cAMP signal and trehalase activation indicates the presence of a specific receptor on the yeasts able to bind to the toxin, a situation similar to that observed for mammalian cells. This hypothesis was reinforced by experiments with 125I-labeled CT showing specific binding of the toxin to yeast cells. The adhesion of CT to a receptor on the yeast surface through the B subunit and internalization of the A subunit (necessary for the cAMP signal and trehalase activation) could be one more mechanism explaining protection against the toxin observed for rats treated with yeasts. PMID:9464394

  6. Intracellular signal triggered by cholera toxin in Saccharomyces boulardii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brandão, R L; Castro, I M; Bambirra, E A; Amaral, S C; Fietto, L G; Tropia, M J; Neves, M J; Dos Santos, R G; Gomes, N C; Nicoli, J R

    1998-02-01

    As is the case for Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303 protects Fisher rats against cholera toxin (CT). The addition of glucose or dinitrophenol to cells of S. boulardii grown on a nonfermentable carbon source activated trehalase in a manner similar to that observed for S.cerevisiae. The addition of CT to the same cells also resulted in trehalase activation. Experiments performed separately on the A and B subunits of CT showed that both are necessary for activation. Similarly, the addition of CT but not of its separate subunits led to a cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal in both S. boulardii and S. cerevisiae. These data suggest that trehalase stimulation by CT probably occurred through the cAMP-mediated protein phosphorylation cascade. The requirement of CT subunit B for both the cAMP signal and trehalase activation indicates the presence of a specific receptor on the yeasts able to bind to the toxin, a situation similar to that observed for mammalian cells. This hypothesis was reinforced by experiments with 125I-labeled CT showing specific binding of the toxin to yeast cells. The adhesion of CT to a receptor on the yeast surface through the B subunit and internalization of the A subunit (necessary for the cAMP signal and trehalase activation) could be one more mechanism explaining protection against the toxin observed for rats treated with yeasts.

  7. Exploring the northern limit of the distribution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus in North America.

    PubMed

    Charron, Guillaume; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Bertin, Chloé; Dubé, Alexandre K; Landry, Christian R

    2014-03-01

    We examined the northern limit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus in northeast America. We collected 876 natural samples at 29 sites and applied enrichment methods for the isolation of mesophilic yeasts. We uncovered a large diversity of yeasts, in some cases, associated with specific substrates. Sequencing of the ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 loci allowed to assign 226 yeast strains at the species level, including 41 S. paradoxus strains. Our intensive sampling suggests that if present, S. cerevisiae is rare at these northern latitudes. Our sampling efforts spread across several months of the year revealed that successful sampling increases throughout the summer and diminishes significantly at the beginning of the fall. The data obtained on the ecological context of yeasts corroborate what was previously reported on Pichiaceae, Saccharomycodaceae, Debaryomycetaceae and Phaffomycetaceae yeast families. We identified 24 yeast isolates that could not be assigned to any known species and that may be of taxonomic, medical, or biotechnological importance. Our study reports new data on the taxonomic diversity of yeasts and new resources for studying the evolution and ecology of S. paradoxus.

  8. Growth of non-Saccharomyces yeasts affects nutrient availability for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2012-07-02

    Yeast produces numerous secondary metabolites during fermentation that impact final wine quality. Although it is widely recognized that growth of diverse non-Saccharomyces (NS) yeast can positively affect flavor complexity during Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine fermentation, the inability to control spontaneous or co-fermentation processes by NS yeast has restricted their use in winemaking. We selected two NS yeasts from our Uruguayan native collection to study NS-S. cerevisiae interactions during wine fermentation. The selected strains of Hanseniaspora vineae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima had different yeast assimilable nitrogen consumption profiles and had different effects on S. cerevisiae fermentation and growth kinetics. Studies in which we varied inoculum size and using either simultaneous or sequential inoculation of NS yeast and S. cerevisiae suggested that competition for nutrients had a significant effect on fermentation kinetics. Sluggish fermentations were more pronounced when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24h after the initial stage of fermentation with a NS strain compared to co-inoculation. Monitoring strain populations using differential WL nutrient agar medium and fermentation kinetics of mixed cultures allowed for a better understanding of strain interactions and nutrient addition effects. Limitation of nutrient availability for S. cerevisiae was shown to result in stuck fermentations as well as to reduce sensory desirability of the resulting wine. Addition of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and a vitamin mix to a defined medium allowed for a comparison of nutrient competition between strains. Addition of DAP and the vitamin mix was most effective in preventing stuck fermentations.

  9. Pt-Ni and Pt-Co Catalyst Synthesis Route for Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firdosy, Samad A.; Ravi, Vilupanur A.; Valdez, Thomas I.; Kisor, Adam; Narayan, Sri R.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) at the cathode are the rate-limiting step in fuel cell performance. The ORR is 100 times slower than the corresponding hydrogen oxidation at the anode. Speeding up the reaction at the cathode will improve fuel cell efficiency. The cathode material is generally Pt powder painted onto a substrate (e.g., graphite paper). Recent efforts in the fuel cell area have focused on replacing Pt with Pt-X alloys (where X = Co, Ni, Zr, etc.) in order to (a) reduce cost, and (b) increase ORR rates. One of these strategies is to increase ORR rates by reducing the powder size, which would result in an increase in the surface area, thereby facilitating faster reaction rates. In this work, a process has been developed that creates Pt-Ni or Pt-Co alloys that are finely divided (on the nano scale) and provide equivalent performance at lower Pt loadings. Lower Pt loadings will translate to lower cost. Precursor salts of the metals are dissolved in water and mixed. Next, the salt mixtures are dried on a hot plate. Finally, the dried salt mixture is heattreated in a furnace under flowing reducing gas. The catalyst powder is then used to fabricate a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for electrochemical performance testing. The Pt- Co catalyst-based MEA showed comparable performance to an MEA fabri cated using a standard Pt black fuel cell catalyst. The main objective of this program has been to increase the overall efficiencies of fuel cell systems to support power for manned lunar bases. This work may also have an impact on terrestrial programs, possibly to support the effort to develop a carbon-free energy source. This catalyst can be used to fabricate high-efficiency fuel cell units that can be used in space as regenerative fuel cell systems, and terrestrially as primary fuel cells. Terrestrially, this technology will become increasingly important when transition to a hydrogen economy occurs.

  10. Disentangling interface and bulk contributions to the anisotropic magnetoresistance in Pt/Co/Pt sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobs, André; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report on interfacial contributions to the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in Co layers sandwiched between Pt. Utilizing the Fuchs-Sondheimer formalism interface contributions can be separated from bulklike AMR. We demonstrate that for all-metal systems interfacial AMR is also present when varying the magnetization within the film plane. This interfacial in-plane AMR is two times smaller than the contribution that arises when the magnetization is varied within the plane perpendicular to the current direction. This finding is in contrast to the spin Hall MR found for ferromagnetic insulator/Pt bilayers revealing the existence of different MR effects at the interfaces of Pt with conducting and insulating ferromagnets.

  11. Oxygen dissociation at close-packed Pt terraces, Pt steps, and Ag-covered Pt steps studied with density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šljivančanin, Ž.; Hammer, B.

    2002-08-01

    Using density functional theory we have characterized O 2 dissociation on flat and stepped Pt(1 1 1) surfaces. The reactivity of the steps is significantly higher than that of the flat terraces. Inclusion of Ag monoatomic chains along the Pt steps modifies the reactivity of the Pt steps towards that of the flat Pt terraces. Our investigations reveal the reaction energetics and the geometries for the molecular precursor states (MPS), transition states (TS) and final states of the dissociating oxygen. Both the MPS and TS geometries on stepped Pt involve oxygen species at the top of the step with no oxygen atoms diffusing onto the lower terrace. We further find that the Ag chains mainly modify the adsorption and reaction bond strengths while they leave the MPS and TS geometries essentially unchanged. The high reactivity of the Pt steps is explained in terms of the coordinative unsaturation of the Pt step atoms which cause a highlying valence 5d-electron system.

  12. Efficient Pt catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, J.; Gaubert, G.; Tilquin, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) requires an important decrease in their production cost. Cost reduction for the electrodes principally concerns the decrease in the amount of Pt catalyst necessary for the functioning of the PEFC without affecting cell performance. The first PEFCs used in the Gemini Space Program had a loading of 4-10 mg pt/cm{sup 2}. The cost of the electrodes was drastically reduced when pure colloidal Pt was replaced by Pt supported on carbon (Pt/C) with a Pt content of 0.4 Mg/cm{sup 2}. Since the occurrence of that breakthrough, many studies have been aimed at further lowering the Pt loading. Today, the lowest loadings reported for oxygen reduction are of the order of 0.05 mg pt/cm{sup 2}. The carbon support of commercial catalysts is Vulcan XC-72 from Cabot, a carbon black with a specific area of 254 m{sup 2}/g. Graphites with specific areas ranging from 20 to 305 m{sup 2}/g are now available from Lonza. The first aim of the present study was to determine the catalytic properties for 02 reduction of Pt supported on these high specific area graphites. The second aim was to use Pt inclusion synthesis on these high area graphites, and to measure the catalytic performances of these materials. Lastly, this same Pt-inclusion synthesis was extended even for use with Vulcan and Black Pearls as substrates (two carbon blacks from Cabot). All these catalysts have been labelled Pt-included materials to distinguish them from the Pt-supported ones. It will be shown that the reduced Pt content Pt-included materials obtained with high specific area substrates a are excellent catalysts for oxygen reduction, especially at high currents. Therefore, Pt inclusion synthesis appears to be a new method to decrease the cathodic Pt loading.

  13. Preparation of onion-like Pt-terminated Pt-Cu bimetallic nano-sized electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Taeho; Kim, Ok-Hee; Sung, Yung-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Ho-Nyun; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kwon, Oh Joong

    2016-06-01

    Onion-like Pt-terminated Pt-Cu bimetallic nano-sized electrocatalysts (Pt/Cu/Pt/C) were synthesized by using an electroless deposition method. The synthesized Pt/Cu/Pt/C consisted of a Pt-enriched shell, a sandwiched Pt-Cu alloy layer, and a Pt core. The Pt/Cu/Pt/C showed higher electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction in half-cell test than that of commercial Pt/C due to an electronic structure change in the Pt-enriched shell, resulting from the sandwiched Pt-Cu alloy layer underneath. The stability of the Pt/Cu/Pt/C was examined by using both half-cell and single-cell degradation tests. In both tests, the Pt/Cu/Pt/C exhibited stronger resistance to catalyst degradation than that of the commercial Pt/C. It is notable that cell performance with the Pt/Cu/Pt/C was fully recovered by N2 purging after single-cell degradation testing, indicating there was no permanent damage to the electrocatalyst during the test. It is suggested that thermodynamically-stable structure of the Pt/Cu/Pt/C contributed to the improved stability.

  14. PT-symmetric quantum electrodynamics and unitarity.

    PubMed

    Milton, Kimball A; Abalo, E K; Parashar, Prachi; Pourtolami, Nima; Wagner, J

    2013-04-28

    More than 15 years ago, a new approach to quantum mechanics was suggested, in which Hermiticity of the Hamiltonian was to be replaced by invariance under a discrete symmetry, the product of parity and time-reversal symmetry, PT. It was shown that, if PT is unbroken, energies were, in fact, positive, and unitarity was satisfied. Since quantum mechanics is quantum field theory in one dimension--time--it was natural to extend this idea to higher-dimensional field theory, and in fact an apparently viable version of PT-invariant quantum electrodynamics (QED) was proposed. However, it has proved difficult to establish that the unitarity of the scattering matrix, for example, the Källén spectral representation for the photon propagator, can be maintained in this theory. This has led to questions of whether, in fact, even quantum mechanical systems are consistent with probability conservation when Green's functions are examined, since the latter have to possess physical requirements of analyticity. The status of PT QED will be reviewed in this paper, as well as the general issue of unitarity.

  15. PT3 Papers. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Melissa, Ed.; Thompson, Mary, Ed.; Adams, Angelle, Ed.; Beyer, Evelyn, Ed.; Cheriyan, Saru, Ed.; Starke, Leslie, Ed.

    This document contains the papers on the PT3 (Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to use Technology) program from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference. Topics covered include: modeling instruction with modern information and communications technology; transforming computer coursework for preservice teachers;…

  16. Adsorption of hydrogen on Pt(111) and Pt(100) surfaces and its role in the HOR.

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D.; Tripkovic, D.; van der Vliet, D.; Stamenkovic, V.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen adsorption isotherms, evaluated by combination of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, are reported on Pt(1 1 1) and Pt(1 0 0) surfaces in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4}. We found that at E > 0.05 V Pt(1 1 1) and Pt(1 0 0) are only partially covered by the adsorbed hydrogen (H{sub ad}). On both surfaces, a full monolayer of the adsorbed hydrogen is completed at -0.1 V, i.e. the adsorption of atomic hydrogen is observed in the hydrogen evolution potential region. We also found, that the activity of the hydrogen oxidation reaction is mirrored by the shape of the hydrogen adsorption isotherms, implying that H{sub ad} is in fact a spectator in the HOR.

  17. Surface structure and chemistry of Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) near surface alloy model catalyst in CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shibi; Nguyen, Luan; Cheng, Fang; Liu, Lacheng; Yu, Ying; Tao, Franklin (Feng)

    2014-11-01

    Near surface alloy (NSA) model catalyst Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) was prepared on Pt(1 1 1) through a controlled vapor deposition of Cu atoms. Different coordination environments of Pt atoms of the topmost Pt layer with the underneath Cu atoms in the subsurface result in different local electronic structures of surface Pt atoms. Surface structure and chemistry of the NAS model catalyst in Torr pressure of CO were studied with high pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS). In Torr pressure of CO, the topmost Pt layer of Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) is restructured to thin nanoclusters with size of about 1 nm. Photoemission feature of O 1s of CO on Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) suggests CO adsorbed on both edge and surface of these formed nanoclusters. This surface is active for CO oxidation. Atomic layers of carbon are formed on Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) at 573 K in 2 Torr of CO.

  18. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  19. Kinetics of phosphomevalonate kinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Garcia, David E; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-01-01

    The mevalonate-based isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway is responsible for producing cholesterol in humans and is used commercially to produce drugs, chemicals, and fuels. Heterologous expression of this pathway in Escherichia coli has enabled high-level production of the antimalarial drug artemisinin and the proposed biofuel bisabolane. Understanding the kinetics of the enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway is critical to optimize the pathway for high flux. We have characterized the kinetic parameters of phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK, EC 2.7.4.2) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a previously unstudied enzyme. An E. coli codon-optimized version of the S. cerevisiae gene was cloned into pET-52b+, then the C-terminal 6X His-tagged protein was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) and purified on a Ni²⁺ column. The KM of the ATP binding site was determined to be 98.3 µM at 30°C, the optimal growth temperature for S. cerevisiae, and 74.3 µM at 37°C, the optimal growth temperature for E. coli. The K(M) of the mevalonate-5-phosphate binding site was determined to be 885 µM at 30°C and 880 µM at 37°C. The V(max) was determined to be 4.51 µmol/min/mg enzyme at 30°C and 5.33 µmol/min/mg enzyme at 37°C. PMK is Mg²⁺ dependent, with maximal activity achieved at concentrations of 10 mM or greater. Maximum activity was observed at pH = 7.2. PMK was not found to be substrate inhibited, nor feedback inhibited by FPP at concentrations up to 10 µM FPP.

  20. Combinatorial Cis-regulation in Saccharomyces Species.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Aaron T; Stormo, Gary D

    2016-01-15

    Transcriptional control of gene expression requires interactions between the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) controlling gene promoters. We developed a sensitive computational method to identify CRE combinations with conserved spacing that does not require genome alignments. When applied to seven sensu stricto and sensu lato Saccharomyces species, 80% of the predicted interactions displayed some evidence of combinatorial transcriptional behavior in several existing datasets including: (1) chromatin immunoprecipitation data for colocalization of transcription factors, (2) gene expression data for coexpression of predicted regulatory targets, and (3) gene ontology databases for common pathway membership of predicted regulatory targets. We tested several predicted CRE interactions with chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a wild-type strain and strains in which a predicted cofactor was deleted. Our experiments confirmed that transcription factor (TF) occupancy at the promoters of the CRE combination target genes depends on the predicted cofactor while occupancy of other promoters is independent of the predicted cofactor. Our method has the additional advantage of identifying regulatory differences between species. By analyzing the S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes, we identified differences in combinatorial cis-regulation between the species and showed that the predicted changes in gene regulation explain several of the species-specific differences seen in gene expression datasets. In some instances, the same CRE combinations appear to regulate genes involved in distinct biological processes in the two different species. The results of this research demonstrate that (1) combinatorial cis-regulation can be inferred by multi-genome analysis and (2) combinatorial cis-regulation can explain differences in gene expression between species.

  1. Combinatorial Cis-regulation in Saccharomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Aaron T.; Stormo, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional control of gene expression requires interactions between the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) controlling gene promoters. We developed a sensitive computational method to identify CRE combinations with conserved spacing that does not require genome alignments. When applied to seven sensu stricto and sensu lato Saccharomyces species, 80% of the predicted interactions displayed some evidence of combinatorial transcriptional behavior in several existing datasets including: (1) chromatin immunoprecipitation data for colocalization of transcription factors, (2) gene expression data for coexpression of predicted regulatory targets, and (3) gene ontology databases for common pathway membership of predicted regulatory targets. We tested several predicted CRE interactions with chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a wild-type strain and strains in which a predicted cofactor was deleted. Our experiments confirmed that transcription factor (TF) occupancy at the promoters of the CRE combination target genes depends on the predicted cofactor while occupancy of other promoters is independent of the predicted cofactor. Our method has the additional advantage of identifying regulatory differences between species. By analyzing the S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes, we identified differences in combinatorial cis-regulation between the species and showed that the predicted changes in gene regulation explain several of the species-specific differences seen in gene expression datasets. In some instances, the same CRE combinations appear to regulate genes involved in distinct biological processes in the two different species. The results of this research demonstrate that (1) combinatorial cis-regulation can be inferred by multi-genome analysis and (2) combinatorial cis-regulation can explain differences in gene expression between species. PMID:26772747

  2. Irreversible modification of magnetic properties of Pt/Co/Pt ultrathin films by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kisielewski, J.; Dobrogowski, W.; Kurant, Z.; Stupakiewicz, A.; Tekielak, M.; Maziewski, A.; Kirilyuk, A.; Kimel, A.; Rasing, Th.; Baczewski, L. T.; Wawro, A.

    2014-02-07

    Annealing ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films with single femtosecond laser pulses leads to irreversible spin-reorientation transitions and an amplification of the magneto-optical Kerr rotation. The effect was studied as a function of the Co thickness and the pulse fluence, revealing two-dimensional diagrams of magnetic properties. While increasing the fluence, the creation of two branches of the out-of-plane magnetization state was found.

  3. Hydrogen-induced ferromagnetism in two-dimensional Pt dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, P.; Enders, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Skomski, R.

    2016-09-01

    Electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of Pt dichalcogenide monolayers are investigated using first-principle calculations. We find that hydrogenation lifts the spin degeneracy in narrow antibonding Pt 5 d subband electrons and transforms the nonmagnetic semiconductors Pt X2(X =S ,Se ,Te ) into ferromagnetic metals, Pt X2 -1H; neither strain nor thin-film edges are necessary to support the transition. The trend towards ferromagnetism is most pronounced for X =S , decreasing with increasing atomic weight of the chalcogens.

  4. Structural and magnetic properties of the ordered FePt{sub 3}, FePt and Fe{sub 3}Pt nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Yuhong; Zhang, Xiaolong; Wang, Yaxin; Zhang, Yongjun; Liu, Huilian; Zhai, Hongju; Liu, Yanqing; Yang, Jinghai; Yan, Yongsheng

    2014-01-15

    The Fe{sub x}Pt{sub 100−x} nanoparticles (NPs) with different nominal atomic rations (30≤x≤80) were synthesized at 700 °C by the sol–gel method. The structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the samples were investigated. When the Fe content in the Fe–Pt alloy NPs was 30 at%, FePt{sub 3} NPs were successfully synthesized. With the increase in Fe content up to 50 at%, it was found that the superlattice reflections (0 0 1) and (1 1 0) appeared, which indicated the formation of the L1{sub 0}-FePt phase. Meanwhile, the FePt{sub 3} fraction was reduced. When the Fe content increased to 60 at%, single-phase L1{sub 0}-FePt NPs were synthesized. The coercivity (Hc), saturation magnetization (Ms) and chemical order parameter S for Fe{sub 60}Pt{sub 40} NPs were as high as 10,200 Oe, 17.567 emu/g and 0.928, respectively. With the further increase of the Fe content to 80 at%, only Fe{sub 3}Pt phase existed and the Hc of the Fe{sub 3}Pt NPs decreased drastically to 360 Oe. - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 3}Pt, FePt and FePt{sub 3} nanoparticles was obtained by sol–gel method. The effect of iron and platinum content on structural and magnetic properties of the FePt nanoparticles was investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • L1{sub 2}-FePt{sub 3}, L1{sub 0}-FePt and L1{sub 2}-Fe{sub 3}Pt NPs were synthesized by sol–gel method. • The chemical order parameter S affects the magnetic properties of the Fe–Pt alloy. • Structural and magnetic properties of the Fe–Pt alloy NPs were studied. • The synthetic route in this study will open up the possibilities of practical use.

  5. Modification of Pt/Co/Pt film properties by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avchaciov, K. A.; Ren, W.; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K.; Sveklo, I.; Maziewski, A.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the structural modifications of a Pt/Co/Pt trilayer epitaxial film under Ga+ 30-keV ion irradiation by means of classical molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The semiclassical tight-binding second-moment approximation potential was adjusted to reproduce the enthalpies of formation, the lattice constants, and the order-disorder transition temperatures for Co-Pt alloys. We found that during irradiation, the sandwich-type Pt(fcc)/Co(hcp)/Pt(fcc) film structure underwent a transition to the new solid solution α -Co /Pt (fcc ) phase. Our analysis of the short-range order indicates the formation, within a nanosecond time scale, of a homogeneous chemically disordered solution. The longer time-scale simulations employing a Monte Carlo algorithm demonstrated that the transition from the disordered phase to the ordered L 10 and L 12 phases was also possible but not significant for the changes in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) observed experimentally. The strain analysis showed that the Co layer was under tensile strain in the lateral direction at the fluences of 1.5 ×1014-3.5 ×1014ionscm -2 ; this range of fluences corresponds to the appearance of PMA. This strain was induced in the initially relaxed hcp Co layer due to its partial transformation to the fcc phase and to the influence of atomic layers with larger lattice constants at upper/lower interfaces.

  6. HREM study of structure of supported Pt catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ming-Hui; Smith, David J.; Kalakkad, Dinesh; Datye, Abhaya K.

    1993-03-01

    The surface structure and morphology of Pt catalysts supported on various oxides were studied by HREM profile imaging. An unstable Ti oxide overlayer and a stable crystalline monolayer on TiO2 supported Pt particles were observed after HTR at 923K. The overlayers could explain the SMSI in Pt/TiO2.

  7. Alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes through the structure evolution in Cu-Pt nanoparticles with a core-shell construction.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Liu, Hui; Cui, Penglei; Peng, Zhijian; Zhang, Suojiang; Yang, Jun

    2014-09-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles with hollow interiors and customizable shell compositions have immense potential for catalysis. Herein, we present an unique structure transformation phenomenon for the fabrication of alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes with polyhedral morphology. This strategy starts with the preparation of polyhedral Cu-Pt nanoparticles with a core-shell construction upon the anisotropic growth of Pt on multiply twinned Cu seed particles, which are subsequently transformed into alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes due to the Kirkendall effect between the Cu core and Pt shell. The as-prepared alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes possess the rhombic dodecahedral morphology of their core-shell parents after the structural evolution. In particular, the resulting alloy Cu₃Pt nanoframes are more effective for oxygen reduction reaction but ineffective for methanol oxidation reaction in comparison with their original Cu-Pt core-shell precursors.

  8. PT restoration via increased loss and gain in the PT-symmetric Aubry-André model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Charles H.; Scott, Derek D.; Joglekar, Yogesh N.

    2014-03-01

    In systems with "balanced loss and gain," the PT symmetry is broken by increasing the non-Hermiticity or the loss-gain strength. We show that finite lattices with oscillatory, PT-symmetric potentials exhibit unexpected PT-symmetry breaking and restoration. We obtain the PT phase diagram as a function of potential periodicity, which also controls the location complex eigenvalues in the lattice spectrum. We show that the sum of PT potentials with nearby periodicities leads to PT-symmetry restoration, where the system goes from a PT-broken state to a PT-symmetric state as the average loss-gain strength is increased. We discuss the implications of this transition for the propagation of a light in an array of coupled waveguides.

  9. Reactivity of atomically dispersed Pt(2+) species towards H2: model Pt-CeO2 fuel cell catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lykhach, Yaroslava; Figueroba, Alberto; Camellone, Matteo Farnesi; Neitzel, Armin; Skála, Tomáš; Negreiros, Fabio R; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Tsud, Nataliya; Prince, Kevin C; Fabris, Stefano; Neyman, Konstantin M; Matolín, Vladimír; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-03-21

    The reactivity of atomically dispersed Pt(2+) species on the surface of nanostructured CeO2 films and the mechanism of H2 activation on these sites have been investigated by means of synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant photoemission spectroscopy in combination with density functional calculations. Isolated Pt(2+) sites are found to be inactive towards H2 dissociation due to high activation energy required for H-H bond scission. Trace amounts of metallic Pt are necessary to initiate H2 dissociation on Pt-CeO2 films. H2 dissociation triggers the reduction of Ce(4+) cations which, in turn, is coupled with the reduction of Pt(2+) species. The mechanism of Pt(2+) reduction involves reverse oxygen spillover and formation of oxygen vacancies on Pt-CeO2 films. Our calculations suggest the existence of a threshold concentration of oxygen vacancies associated with the onset of Pt(2+) reduction.

  10. PtMo Alloy and MoOx@Pt Core-Shell Nanoparticles as Highly CO-Tolerant Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Hu, J; Wang, Q; Gaskell, K; Frenkel, A; Jackson, G; Eichhorm, B

    2009-01-01

    PtMo alloy and MoOx Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were successfully synthesized by a chemical coreduction and sequential chemical reduction method, respectively. Both the carbon-supported alloy and core-shell NPs show substantially higher CO tolerance, compared to the commercialized E-TEK PtRu alloy and Pt catalyst. These novel nanocatalysts can be potentially used as highly CO-tolerant anode electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  11. Structural Evolution of Solid Pt Nanoparticles to a Hollow PtFe Alloy with a Pt-Skin Surface via Space-Confined Pyrolysis and the Nanoscale Kirkendall Effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingmei; Chen, Siguo; Shi, Feng; Chen, Ke; Nie, Yao; Wang, Yao; Wu, Rui; Li, Jia; Zhang, Yun; Ding, Wei; Li, Yang; Li, Li; Wei, Zidong

    2016-12-01

    A space-confined interfacial conversion approach is developed to directly transform 3 nm solid Pt nanoparticles into a 5 nm hollow PtFe alloy featuring a Pt-skin surface. The approach presented for the structural evolution from solid Pt NPs to hollow PtFe alloy with controlled size, structure, and composition can be applied to other multimetallic electrocatalysts.

  12. One-Step Synthesis of Pt/Graphene Composites from Pt Acid Dissolved Ethanol via Microwave Plasma Spray Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun Hee; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Sun Kyung; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Park, Su-Ryeon; Lee, Chong Min; Jang, Hee Dong

    2016-01-01

    Pt nanoparticles-laden graphene (Pt/GR) composites were synthesized in the gas phase from a mixture of ethanol and Pt precursor by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. The morphology of Pt/GR composites has the shape of wrinkled sheets of paper, while Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) that are less than 2.6 nm in the mean diameter are uniformly well deposited on the surface of GR sheets stacked in only three layers. The Pt/GR composite prepared with 20 wt% of Pt had the highest specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of up to 402 m2 g−1 and 77 m2 g−1 (Pt), respectively. In addition, the composite showed superior electrocatalytic activity compared with commercial Pt-carbon black. The excellent electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the high specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of the Pt/GR composite directly produced by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. Thus, it is clearly expected that the Pt/GR composite is a promising material for DMFC catalysts. PMID:27622908

  13. Granular nanostructures and magnetic characteristics of FePt-TiO{sub 2}/FePt-C stacked granular films

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Takuya Moriya, Tomohiro; Hatayama, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Nobuaki; Okamoto, Satoshi; Kitakami, Osamu; Shimatsu, Takehito

    2014-05-07

    To realize a granular film composed of L1{sub 0}-FePt grains with high uniaxial magnetic anisotropy energy, K{sub u}, and segregants for heat-assisted magnetic recording, the FePt-TiO{sub 2}/FePt-C stacked film was investigated. The FePt-TiO{sub 2}/FePt-C stacked film has well-isolated granular structure with average grain size of 6.7 nm because the FePt-TiO{sub 2} film follows the FePt-C template film in microstructural growth. However, the K{sub u} value is quite low for total thickness of 9 nm: 5 × 10{sup 6} erg/cm{sup 3}. Exploration of the thickness dependence of L1{sub 0}-FePt(001) peaks in XRD spectra and cross-sectional TEM images suggest that degradation of the L1{sub 0} ordering appears near the middle of the FePt-TiO{sub 2} layer. The EDX-STEM mapping reveals that Ti atoms exist within the FePt grains in addition to the grain boundary. This indicates the possibility that TiO{sub 2} tends to be incorporated into the FePt grains and that it prevents L1{sub 0}-ordering of the FePt grains along the normal-to-plane direction.

  14. Surface enrichment of Pt in Ga2O3 films grown on liquid Pt/Ga alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabau, Mathias; Krick Calderón, Sandra; Rietzler, Florian; Niedermaier, Inga; Taccardi, Nicola; Wasserscheid, Peter; Maier, Florian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Papp, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The formation of surface Ga2O3 films on liquid samples of Ga, and Pt-Ga alloys with 0.7 and 1.8 at.% Pt was examined using near-ambient pressure (NAP) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thickness, composition and growth of the oxide films were deduced as a function of temperature and Pt content of the alloys, in ultra-high vacuum and at oxygen pressures of 3 × 10- 7, 3 × 10- 3 and 1 mbar. We examined oxide layers up to a thickness of 37 Å. Different growth modes were found for oxidation at low and high pressures. The formed Ga2O3 oxide films showed an increased Pt content, while the pristine GaPt alloy showed a surface depletion of Pt at the examined temperatures. Upon growth of Ga2O3 on Pt/Ga alloys a linear increase of Pt content was observed, due to the incorporation of 3.6 at.% Pt in the Ga2O3. The Pt content in Ga2O3, at the examined temperatures and bulk Pt concentrations is found to be independent of pressure, temperature and the nominal Pt content of the metallic alloy.

  15. One-Step Synthesis of Pt/Graphene Composites from Pt Acid Dissolved Ethanol via Microwave Plasma Spray Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eun Hee; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Sun Kyung; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Park, Su-Ryeon; Lee, Chong Min; Jang, Hee Dong

    2016-09-13

    Pt nanoparticles-laden graphene (Pt/GR) composites were synthesized in the gas phase from a mixture of ethanol and Pt precursor by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. The morphology of Pt/GR composites has the shape of wrinkled sheets of paper, while Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) that are less than 2.6 nm in the mean diameter are uniformly well deposited on the surface of GR sheets stacked in only three layers. The Pt/GR composite prepared with 20 wt% of Pt had the highest specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of up to 402 m(2) g(-1) and 77 m(2) g(-1) (Pt), respectively. In addition, the composite showed superior electrocatalytic activity compared with commercial Pt-carbon black. The excellent electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the high specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of the Pt/GR composite directly produced by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. Thus, it is clearly expected that the Pt/GR composite is a promising material for DMFC catalysts.

  16. One-Step Synthesis of Pt/Graphene Composites from Pt Acid Dissolved Ethanol via Microwave Plasma Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Eun Hee; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Sun Kyung; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Park, Su-Ryeon; Lee, Chong Min; Jang, Hee Dong

    2016-09-01

    Pt nanoparticles-laden graphene (Pt/GR) composites were synthesized in the gas phase from a mixture of ethanol and Pt precursor by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. The morphology of Pt/GR composites has the shape of wrinkled sheets of paper, while Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) that are less than 2.6 nm in the mean diameter are uniformly well deposited on the surface of GR sheets stacked in only three layers. The Pt/GR composite prepared with 20 wt% of Pt had the highest specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of up to 402 m2 g‑1 and 77 m2 g‑1 (Pt), respectively. In addition, the composite showed superior electrocatalytic activity compared with commercial Pt-carbon black. The excellent electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the high specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of the Pt/GR composite directly produced by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. Thus, it is clearly expected that the Pt/GR composite is a promising material for DMFC catalysts.

  17. Pt skin on Pd-Co-Zn/C ternary nanoparticles with enhanced Pt efficiency toward ORR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Weiping; Zhu, Jing; Han, Lili; Liu, Sufen; Wang, Jie; Wu, Zexing; Lei, Wen; Xuan, Cuijuan; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Deli

    2016-08-01

    Exploring highly active, stable and relatively low-cost nanomaterials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of vital importance for the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Herein, a highly active, durable, carbon supported, and monolayer Pt coated Pd-Co-Zn nanoparticle is synthesized via a simple impregnation-reduction method, followed by spontaneous displacement of Pt. By tuning the atomic ratios, we obtain the composition-activity volcano curve for the Pd-Co-Zn nanoparticles and determined that Pd : Co : Zn = 8 : 1 : 1 is the optimal composition. Compared with pure Pd/C, the Pd8CoZn/C nanoparticles show a substantial enhancement in both the catalytic activity and the durability toward the ORR. Moreover, the durability and activity are further enhanced by forming a Pt skin on Pd8CoZn/C nanocatalysts. Interestingly, after 10 000 potential cycles in N2-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 solution, Pd8CoZn@Pt/C shows improved mass activity (2.62 A mg-1Pt) and specific activity (4.76 A m-2total), which are about 1.4 and 4.4 times higher than the initial values, and 37.4 and 5.5 times higher than those of Pt/C catalysts, respectively. After accelerated stability testing in O2-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 solution for 30 000 potential cycles, the half-wave potential negatively shifts about 6 mV. The results show that the Pt skin plays an important role in enhancing the activity as well as preventing degradation.Exploring highly active, stable and relatively low-cost nanomaterials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of vital importance for the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Herein, a highly active, durable, carbon supported, and monolayer Pt coated Pd-Co-Zn nanoparticle is synthesized via a simple impregnation-reduction method, followed by spontaneous displacement of Pt. By tuning the atomic ratios, we obtain the composition-activity volcano curve for the Pd-Co-Zn nanoparticles and determined that Pd : Co : Zn = 8

  18. Molecular mechanisms of ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet sensitive to ethanol at higher concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Although significant efforts have been made to study ethanol-stress response in past decades, molecular mecha...

  19. Improving biomass sugar utilization by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient utilization of all available sugars in lignocellulosic biomass, which is more abundant than available commodity crops and starch, represents one of the most difficult technological challenges for the production of bioethanol. The well-studied yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has played a...

  20. Thermal resistance of Saccharomyces yeast ascospores in beers.

    PubMed

    Milani, Elham A; Gardner, Richard C; Silva, Filipa V M

    2015-08-03

    The industrial production of beer ends with a process of thermal pasteurization. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces pastorianus are yeasts used to produce top and bottom fermenting beers, respectively. In this research, first the sporulation rate of 12 Saccharomyces strains was studied. Then, the thermal resistance of ascospores of three S. cerevisiae strains (DSMZ 1848, DSMZ 70487, Ethanol Red(®)) and one strain of S. pastorianus (ATCC 9080) was determined in 4% (v/v) ethanol lager beer. D60 °C-values of 11.2, 7.5, 4.6, and 6.0 min and z-values of 11.7, 14.3, 12.4, and 12.7 °C were determined for DSMZ 1848, DSMZ 70487, ATCC 9080, and Ethanol Red(®), respectively. Lastly, experiments with 0 and 7% (v/v) beers were carried out to investigate the effect of ethanol content on the thermal resistance of S. cerevisiae (DSMZ 1848). D55 °C-values of 34.2 and 15.3 min were obtained for 0 and 7% beers, respectively, indicating lower thermal resistance in the more alcoholic beer. These results demonstrate similar spore thermal resistance for different Saccharomyces strains and will assist in the design of appropriate thermal pasteurization conditions for preserving beers with different alcohol contents.

  1. Social wasps promote social behavior in Saccharomyces spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This commentary provides background and an evaluation of a paper to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in which social wasps were found to harbor significant populations of two species of the yeast genus Saccharomyces. Apparently, the yeasts were acquired during feed...

  2. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a…

  3. Salmonella enteritidis PT6: another egg-associated salmonellosis?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M. R.; Lane, W.; Ribeiro, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 6 (PT6) increased dramatically in the United Kingdom during 1997. The sharp rise suggests that PT6 contamination has spread rapidly throughout a basic food commodity; however, the source and food vehicle remain unknown. We present evidence from three outbreaks suggesting a possible link between PT6 and eggs. Poor documentation of the egg supply network continues to pose problems for public health investigators. Thorough investigation of all future PT6 outbreaks and case-control studies of sporadic infections are needed to confirm the etiology of PT6 infection. PMID:9866747

  4. Pt skin on Pd–Co–Zn/C ternary nanoparticles with enhanced Pt efficiency toward ORR

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Weiping; Zhu, Jing; Han, Lili; ...

    2016-07-15

    Exploring highly active, stable and relatively low-cost nanomaterials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of vital importance for the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). A highly active, durable, carbon supported, and monolayer Pt coated Pd–Co–Zn nanoparticle is synthesized via a simple impregnation–reduction method, followed by spontaneous displacement of Pt. By tuning the atomic ratios, we obtain the composition–activity volcano curve for the Pd–Co–Zn nanoparticles and determined that Pd : Co : Zn = 8 : 1 : 1 is the optimal composition. Compared with pure Pd/C, the Pd8CoZn/C nanoparticles show a substantial enhancement in both themore » catalytic activity and the durability toward the ORR. Moreover, the durability and activity are further enhanced by forming a Pt skin on Pd8CoZn/C nanocatalysts. Interestingly, after 10 000 potential cycles in N2-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 solution, Pd8CoZn@Pt/C shows improved mass activity (2.62 A mg-1Pt) and specific activity (4.76 A m-2total), which are about 1.4 and 4.4 times higher than the initial values, and 37.4 and 5.5 times higher than those of Pt/C catalysts, respectively. After accelerated stability testing in O2-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 solution for 30 000 potential cycles, the half-wave potential negatively shifts about 6 mV. Our results show that the Pt skin plays an important role in enhancing the activity as well as preventing degradation.« less

  5. Pt skin on Pd-Co-Zn/C ternary nanoparticles with enhanced Pt efficiency toward ORR.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weiping; Zhu, Jing; Han, Lili; Liu, Sufen; Wang, Jie; Wu, Zexing; Lei, Wen; Xuan, Cuijuan; Xin, Huolin L; Wang, Deli

    2016-08-21

    Exploring highly active, stable and relatively low-cost nanomaterials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of vital importance for the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Herein, a highly active, durable, carbon supported, and monolayer Pt coated Pd-Co-Zn nanoparticle is synthesized via a simple impregnation-reduction method, followed by spontaneous displacement of Pt. By tuning the atomic ratios, we obtain the composition-activity volcano curve for the Pd-Co-Zn nanoparticles and determined that Pd : Co : Zn = 8 : 1 : 1 is the optimal composition. Compared with pure Pd/C, the Pd8CoZn/C nanoparticles show a substantial enhancement in both the catalytic activity and the durability toward the ORR. Moreover, the durability and activity are further enhanced by forming a Pt skin on Pd8CoZn/C nanocatalysts. Interestingly, after 10 000 potential cycles in N2-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 solution, Pd8CoZn@Pt/C shows improved mass activity (2.62 A mg(-1)Pt) and specific activity (4.76 A m(-2)total), which are about 1.4 and 4.4 times higher than the initial values, and 37.4 and 5.5 times higher than those of Pt/C catalysts, respectively. After accelerated stability testing in O2-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 solution for 30 000 potential cycles, the half-wave potential negatively shifts about 6 mV. The results show that the Pt skin plays an important role in enhancing the activity as well as preventing degradation.

  6. Pt skin on Pd–Co–Zn/C ternary nanoparticles with enhanced Pt efficiency toward ORR

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Weiping; Zhu, Jing; Han, Lili; Liu, Sufen; Wang, Jie; Wu, Zexing; Lei, Wen; Xuan, Cuijuan; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Deli

    2016-07-15

    Exploring highly active, stable and relatively low-cost nanomaterials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of vital importance for the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). A highly active, durable, carbon supported, and monolayer Pt coated Pd–Co–Zn nanoparticle is synthesized via a simple impregnation–reduction method, followed by spontaneous displacement of Pt. By tuning the atomic ratios, we obtain the composition–activity volcano curve for the Pd–Co–Zn nanoparticles and determined that Pd : Co : Zn = 8 : 1 : 1 is the optimal composition. Compared with pure Pd/C, the Pd8CoZn/C nanoparticles show a substantial enhancement in both the catalytic activity and the durability toward the ORR. Moreover, the durability and activity are further enhanced by forming a Pt skin on Pd8CoZn/C nanocatalysts. Interestingly, after 10 000 potential cycles in N2-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 solution, Pd8CoZn@Pt/C shows improved mass activity (2.62 A mg-1Pt) and specific activity (4.76 A m-2total), which are about 1.4 and 4.4 times higher than the initial values, and 37.4 and 5.5 times higher than those of Pt/C catalysts, respectively. After accelerated stability testing in O2-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 solution for 30 000 potential cycles, the half-wave potential negatively shifts about 6 mV. Our results show that the Pt skin plays an important role in enhancing the activity as well as preventing degradation.

  7. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  8. Integrability of PT-symmetric dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickton, J.; Susanto, H.

    2013-12-01

    The coupled discrete linear and Kerr nonlinear Schrödinger equations with gain and loss describing transport on dimers with parity-time (PT)-symmetric potentials are considered. The model is relevant among others to experiments in optical couplers and proposals on Bose-Einstein condensates in PT-symmetric double-well potentials. It is known that the models are integrable. Here, the integrability is exploited further to construct the phase portraits of the system. A pendulum equation with a linear potential and a constant force for the phase difference between the fields is obtained, which explains the presence of unbounded solutions above a critical threshold parameter. The behavior of all solutions of the system, including changes in the topological structure of the phase plane, is then discussed.

  9. Transforming AdaPT to Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsack, Stephen J.; Holzbach-Valero, A. A.; Waldrop, Raymond S.; Volz, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes how the main features of the proposed Ada language extensions intended to support distribution, and offered as possible solutions for Ada9X can be implemented by transformation into standard Ada83. We start by summarizing the features proposed in a paper (Gargaro et al, 1990) which constitutes the definition of the extensions. For convenience we have called the language in its modified form AdaPT which might be interpreted as Ada with partitions. These features were carefully chosen to provide support for the construction of executable modules for execution in nodes of a network of loosely coupled computers, but flexibly configurable for different network architectures and for recovery following failure, or adapting to mode changes. The intention in their design was to provide extensions which would not impact adversely on the normal use of Ada, and would fit well in style and feel with the existing standard. We begin by summarizing the features introduced in AdaPT.

  10. Direct determination of the ionization energies of PtC, PtO, and PtO2 with VUV radiation.

    PubMed

    Citir, Murat; Metz, Ricardo B; Belau, Leonid; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-10-02

    Photoionization efficiency curves were measured for gas-phase PtC, PtO, and PtO2 using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at the Advanced Light Source. The molecules were prepared by laser ablation of a platinum tube, followed by reaction with CH4 or N2O and supersonic expansion. These measurements provide the first directly measured ionization energy for PtC, IE(PtC) = 9.45 +/- 0.05 eV. The direct measurement also gives greatly improved ionization energies for the platinum oxides, IE(PtO) = 10.0 +/- 0.1 eV and IE(PtO2) = 11.35 +/- 0.05 eV. The ionization energy connects the dissociation energies of the neutral and cation, leading to greatly improved 0 K bond dissociation energies for the neutrals: D0(Pt-C) = 5.95 +/- 0.07 eV, D0(Pt-O) = 4.30 +/- 0.12 eV, and D0(OPt-O) = 4.41 +/- 0.13 eV, as well as enthalpies of formation for the gas-phase molecules DeltaH(0)(f,0)(PtC(g)) = 701 +/- 7 kJ/mol, DeltaH(0)(f,0)(PtO(g)) = 396 +/- 12 kJ/mol, and DeltaH(0)(f,0)(PtO2(g)) = 218 +/- 11 kJ/mol. Much of the error in previous Knudsen cell measurements of platinum oxide bond dissociation energies is due to the use of thermodynamic second law extrapolations. Third law values calculated using statistical mechanical thermodynamic functions are in much better agreement with values obtained from ionization energies and ion energetics. These experiments demonstrate that laser ablation production with direct VUV ionization measurements is a versatile tool to measure ionization energies and bond dissociation energies for catalytically interesting species such as metal oxides and carbides.

  11. PT symmetric Aubry-Andre model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuce, C.

    2014-06-01

    PT symmetric Aubry-Andre model describes an array of N coupled optical waveguides with position-dependent gain and loss. We show that the reality of the spectrum depends sensitively on the degree of quasi-periodicity for small number of lattice sites. We obtain the Hofstadter butterfly spectrum and discuss the existence of the phase transition from extended to localized states. We show that rapidly changing periodical gain/loss materials almost conserve the total intensity.

  12. Solitons in PT-symmetric nonlinear lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, Fatkhulla Kh.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Zezyulin, Dmitry A.; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.

    2011-04-15

    The existence of localized modes supported by the PT-symmetric nonlinear lattices is reported. The system considered reveals unusual properties: unlike other typical dissipative systems, it possesses families (branches) of solutions, which can be parametrized by the propagation constant; relatively narrow localized modes appear to be stable, even when the conservative nonlinear lattice potential is absent; and finally, the system supports stable multipole solutions.

  13. Scattering from a PT symmetric standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuce, C.

    2012-09-01

    We study the Kapitza-Dirac diffraction of a free beam particle in the presence of a PT symmetric standing wave. We discuss that the momentum and total probability are not conserved in the non-Hermitian scattering process. We show that the average momentum gain/loss does not vanish over a period even if the non-Hermitian optical potential changes periodically in time. We give the resonance conditions at which large momentum transfer is produced.

  14. Chemically synthesized FePt nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Victor; Abel, Frank; Hu, Xiaocao; Crespo, Patricia; Hadjipanayis, George

    2014-03-01

    FePt nanoparticles (NPs) are being widely investigated due to their high potential applications in magnetic recording media and biomedicine. These NPs are expected to be ideal candidates due to their excellent magnetic properties, such as high K and high Ms together with a high chemical stability. In this work, the FePt NPs have been synthesized by chemical routes according to the method reported by M. Chen et al.[2] At high temperature, surfactants together with iron pentacarbonyl are added to the solution and thermally decomposed. By controlling the injection temperature and the heating rate, we have been able to obtain homogeneous spherical clusters with an average size of 38 +/- 10 nm formed by 5 nm-FePt NPs. These clusters are found to be superparamagnetic above Tb of 55 K whereas at 5 K exhibit a coercive field of 1.2 kOe. Furthermore, these NPs seem to be highly stable in water after replacing the surfactants by TMAOH. These clusters appear to be good candidates for MRI and hyperthermia applications. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0302544.

  15. XAS and XMCD studies of magnetic properties modifications of Pt/Co/Au and Pt/Co/Pt trilayers induced by Ga⁺ ions irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mazalski, Piotr; Sveklo, Iosif; Kurant, Zbigniew; Ollefs, Katharina; Rogalev, Andrei; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Fassbender, Juergen; Baczewski, Lech Tomasz; Wawro, Andrzej; Maziewski, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic and magneto-optical properties of Pt/Co/Au and Pt/Co/Pt trilayers subjected to 30 keV Ga(+) ion irradiation are compared. In two-dimensional maps of these properties as a function of cobalt thickness and ion fluence, two branches with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) for Pt/Co/Pt trilayers are well distinguished. The replacement of the Pt capping layer with Au results in the two branches still being visible but the in-plane anisotropy for the low-fluence branch is suppressed whereas the high-fluence branch displays PMA. The X-ray absorption spectra and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra are discussed and compared with non-irradiated reference samples. The changes of their shapes and peak amplitude, particularly for the high-fluence branch, are related to the modifications of the local environment of Co(Pt) atoms and the etching effects induced by ion irradiation. Additionally, in irradiated trilayers the XMCD measurements at the Pt L2,3-edge reveal an increase of the magnetic moment induced in Pt atoms.

  16. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F−, Cl−, Br−). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs. PMID:27184228

  17. Exponentially Fragile PT Symmetry in Lattices with Localized Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bendix, Oliver; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Kottos, Tsampikos; Shapiro, Boris

    2009-07-17

    We study the effect of localized modes in lattices of size N with parity-time (PT) symmetry. Such modes are arranged in pairs of quasidegenerate levels with splitting deltaapproxexp{sup -N/x}i where xi is their localization length. The level 'evolution' with respect to the PT breaking parameter gamma shows a cascade of bifurcations during which a pair of real levels becomes complex. The spontaneous PT symmetry breaking occurs at gamma{sub PT}approxmin(delta), thus resulting in an exponentially narrow exact PT phase. As N/xi decreases, it becomes more robust with gamma{sub PT}approx1/N{sup 2} and the distribution P(gamma{sub PT}) changes from log-normal to semi-Gaussian. Our theory can be tested in the frame of optical lattices.

  18. Highly durable graphene nanoplatelets supported Pt nanocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Chong M.; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-06-01

    We report graphene nanoplatelets (GNP), which exhibit the advantages of both single-layer graphene and highly graphitic carbon, as a durable alternative support material for Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction in fuel cells. Pt nanoparticles are deposited on poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)(PDDA)-coated GNP, and characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, and electrochemical tests. Pt/GNP exhibits greatly enhanced electrochemical durability (2-3 times that of Pt/CNT and commercial Etek Pt/C). These are attributed to the intrinsic high graphitization degree of GNP and the enhanced Pt-carbon interaction in Pt/GNP. If considering that GNP can be easily mass produced from graphite, GNP is a promising, low-cost, and durable electrocatalyst support for oxygen reduction in fuel cells.

  19. Pt skin on AuCu intermetallic substrate: a strategy to maximize Pt utilization for fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gongwei; Huang, Bing; Xiao, Li; Ren, Zhandong; Chen, Hao; Wang, Deli; Abruña, Héctor D; Lu, Juntao; Zhuang, Lin

    2014-07-09

    The dependence on Pt catalysts has been a major issue of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Strategies to maximize the Pt utilization in catalysts include two main approaches: to put Pt atoms only at the catalyst surface and to further enhance the surface-specific catalytic activity (SA) of Pt. Thus far there has been no practical design that combines these two features into one single catalyst. Here we report a combined computational and experimental study on the design and implementation of Pt-skin catalysts with significantly improved SA toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Through screening, using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, a Pt-skin structure on AuCu(111) substrate, consisting of 1.5 monolayers of Pt, is found to have an appropriately weakened oxygen affinity, in comparison to that on Pt(111), which would be ideal for ORR catalysis. Such a structure is then realized by substituting the Cu atoms in three surface layers of AuCu intermetallic nanoparticles (AuCu iNPs) with Pt. The resulting Pt-skinned catalyst (denoted as Pt(S)AuCu iNPs) has been characterized in depth using synchrotron XRD, XPS, HRTEM, and HAADF-STEM/EDX, such that the Pt-skin structure is unambiguously identified. The thickness of the Pt skin was determined to be less than two atomic layers. Finally the catalytic activity of Pt(S)AuCu iNPs toward the ORR was measured via rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry through which it was established that the SA was more than 2 times that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. Taking into account the ultralow Pt loading in Pt(S)AuCu iNPs, the mass-specific catalytic activity (MA) was determined to be 0.56 A/mg(Pt)@0.9 V, a value that is well beyond the DOE 2017 target for ORR catalysts (0.44 A/mg(Pt)@0.9 V). These findings provide a strategic design and a realizable approach to high-performance and Pt-efficient catalysts for fuel cells.

  20. Effect of nitrogen upon structural and magnetic properties of FePt in FePt/AlN multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Tenghua Zhang, Cong; Sannomiya, Takumi; Muraishi, Shinji; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji

    2014-09-01

    This paper investigates the effect of the addition of nitrogen in FePt layers for ultrathin FePt/AlN multilayer structures. X-ray diffraction results reveal that a compressive stress relaxation occurs after annealing owing to the release of interstitial nitrogen atoms in the FePt layers. The introduction of nitrogen also induces a large in-plane compressive strain during grain growth not seen in FePt deposited without nitrogen. This strain is considered to decrease the driving force for (111) grain growth and FePt ordering.

  1. The role of the cationic Pt sites in the adsorption properties of water and ethanol on the Pt4/Pt(111) and Pt4/CeO2(111) substrates: A density functional theory investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seminovski, Yohanna; Tereshchuk, Polina; Kiejna, Adam; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    2016-09-01

    Finite site platinum particles, Ptn, supported on reduced or unreduced cerium oxide surfaces, i.e., CeO2-x(111) ( 0 < x < /1 2 ), have been employed and studied as catalysts for a wide range of applications, which includes hydrogen production using the ethanol steam reforming processes. Our atomic-level understanding of the interaction of Pt with CeO2-x has been improved in the last years; however, the identification of the active sites on the Ptn/CeO2-x(111) substrates is still far from complete. In this work, we applied density functional theory based calculations with the addition of the on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) for the investigation of the active sites and the role of the Pt oxidation state on the adsorption properties of water and ethanol (probe molecules) on four selected substrates, namely, Pt(111), Pt4/Pt(111), CeO2(111), and Pt4/CeO2(111). Our results show that water and ethanol preferentially bind in the cationic sites of the base of the tetrahedron Pt4 cluster instead of the anionic lower-coordinated Pt atoms located on the cluster-top or in the surface Ce (cationic) and O (anionic) sites. The presence of the Pt4 cluster contributes to increase the adsorption energy of both molecules on Pt(111) and CeO2(111) surfaces; however, its magnitude increases less for the case of Pt4/CeO2(111). Thus, the cationic Pt sites play a crucial role in the adsorption properties of water and ethanol. Both water and ethanol bind to on-top sites via the O atom and adopt parallel and perpendicular configurations on the Pt(111) and CeO2(111) substrates, respectively, while their orientation is changed once the Pt4 cluster is involved, favoring H binding with the surface sites.

  2. The role of the cationic Pt sites in the adsorption properties of water and ethanol on the Pt4/Pt(111) and Pt4/CeO2(111) substrates: A density functional theory investigation.

    PubMed

    Seminovski, Yohanna; Tereshchuk, Polina; Kiejna, Adam; Da Silva, Juarez L F

    2016-09-28

    Finite site platinum particles, Ptn, supported on reduced or unreduced cerium oxide surfaces, i.e., CeO2-x(111) (0Pt with CeO2-x has been improved in the last years; however, the identification of the active sites on the Ptn/CeO2-x(111) substrates is still far from complete. In this work, we applied density functional theory based calculations with the addition of the on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) for the investigation of the active sites and the role of the Pt oxidation state on the adsorption properties of water and ethanol (probe molecules) on four selected substrates, namely, Pt(111), Pt4/Pt(111), CeO2(111), and Pt4/CeO2(111). Our results show that water and ethanol preferentially bind in the cationic sites of the base of the tetrahedron Pt4 cluster instead of the anionic lower-coordinated Pt atoms located on the cluster-top or in the surface Ce (cationic) and O (anionic) sites. The presence of the Pt4 cluster contributes to increase the adsorption energy of both molecules on Pt(111) and CeO2(111) surfaces; however, its magnitude increases less for the case of Pt4/CeO2(111). Thus, the cationic Pt sites play a crucial role in the adsorption properties of water and ethanol. Both water and ethanol bind to on-top sites via the O atom and adopt parallel and perpendicular configurations on the Pt(111) and CeO2(111) substrates, respectively, while their orientation is changed once the Pt4 cluster is involved, favoring H binding with the surface sites.

  3. Pd surface and Pt subsurface segregation in Pt1-c Pd c nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Clercq, A.; Giorgio, S.; Mottet, C.

    2016-02-01

    The structure and chemical arrangement of Pt1-c Pd c nanoalloys with the icosahedral and face centered cubic symmetry are studied using Monte Carlo simulations with a tight binding interatomic potential fitted to density-functional theory calculations. Pd surface segregation from the lowest to the highest coordinated sites is predicted by the theory together with a Pt enrichment at the subsurface, whatever the structure and the size of the nanoparticles, and which subsists when increasing the temperature. The onion-shell chemical configuration is found for both symmetries and is initiated from the Pd surface segregation. It is amplified in the icosahedral symmetry and small sizes but when considering larger sizes, the oscillating segregation profile occurs near the surface on about three to four shells whatever the structure. Pd segregation results from the significant lower cohesive energy of Pd as compared to Pt and the weak ordering tendency leads to the Pt subsurface segregation. The very weak size mismatch does not prevent the bigger atoms (Pt) from occupying subsurface sites which are in compression whereas the smaller ones (Pd) occupy the central site of the icosahedra where the compression is an order of magnitude higher.

  4. Introducing a New Breed of Wine Yeast: Interspecific Hybridisation between a Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae

    PubMed Central

    Bellon, Jennifer R.; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L.; Dunn, Barbara L.; Chambers, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade), has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment. PMID:23614011

  5. Introducing a new breed of wine yeast: interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Jennifer R; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L; Dunn, Barbara L; Chambers, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade), has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment.

  6. First principles calculations of the effect of Pt on NiAl surfaceenergy and the site preference of Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Rong; Hou, Peggy Y.

    2007-03-08

    Pt-modified NiAl is widely used as a coating material in industry. In this study, the surface energies of NiAl with and without Pt are investigated using first-principles calculations. The presence of Pt in NiAl takes the surface electronic states to higher energies, resulting in an increased surface energy, which explains some of the beneficial effects of Pt on the oxidation resistance of NiAl. The electronic structure of NiAl-Pt alloys is also analyzed in terms of the site preference of Pt in NiAl. Results show that Pt bonds strongly to Al, giving its site preference on the Ni site.

  7. Highly durable Pt/graphene oxide and Pt/C hybrid catalyst for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ju Hae; Park, Hyang Jin; Kim, Junbom; Hur, Seung Hyun

    2014-02-01

    We report a highly durable hybrid catalyst composed of Pt/graphene oxide (GO) and Pt/C catalyst for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The accelerated durability tests in half-cell and full cell systems shows that the addition of small amount of Pt/GO catalyst significantly enhances the durability of commercial Pt/C catalyst without sacrificing initial electrochemical active surface area (ECSA). The XRD and TEM analysis reveal that the GO not only exhibits the high resistance to Pt agglomeration but also prevents the Pt agglomeration in Pt/C catalyst by providing the anchoring sites of eluted metal ions. We believe that this simple and effective approach can open a new way to fabricate highly durable electrocatalyst for the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles.

  8. Engineering of the anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction energies in Pt-Co and Pt-Co-Cu heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotter, Sarah; Beach, Geoffrey

    It has previously been shown that perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is increased in Pt-Co-Pt structures by placing a Cu spacer between the top, diffuse Co-Pt interface. However, including a spacer layer increases interfacial asymmetry in the system: a prerequisite for a strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) which governs helical spin structures such as skyrmions and chiral domain walls. We show that the increased asymmetry significantly enhances DMI strength in Pt-Co-Cu-Pt heterostructures as compared to corresponding Pt-Co-Pt systems. We further show that one can control the characteristic length scales governing domain width by engineering the magnetostatic, anisotropy, and DMI energies in heavy-metal/ferromagnet heterostructures. These structures may provide insight into engineering the size of skyrmions in spintronic devices.

  9. Pt/Co/oxide and oxide/Co/Pt electrodes for perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, L. E.; Rodmacq, B.; Auffret, S.; Dieny, B.

    2009-01-01

    This letter presents a study of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in oxide/Co/Pt structures, which could constitute the upper magnetic electrode of magnetic tunnel junctions. The growth of cobalt layers on SiO2 substrates shows that all 0.6 nm thick Co films are superparamagnetic, whereas perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is obtained for 1.5 nm films after annealing. Co layers grown on various Al and Mg oxides prepared by sputtering also exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy after annealing. Combined with inverse Pt/Co(CoFeB)/oxide stackings, these structures allow preparing tunnel junctions with thicker magnetic electrodes and much better thermal stability than those based on standard Pt/Co multilayers.

  10. Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-06-30

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and Zygosaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol.

  11. Magnetic field and temperature control over Pt/Co/Ir/Co/Pt multistate magnetic logic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgunov, R.; Hamadeh, A.; Fachec, T.; Lvovaa, G.; Koplak, O.; Talantsev, A.; Mangin, S.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic configurations in Pt/Co/Ir/Co/Pt synthetic ferrimagnet bilayer of strong perpendicular anisotropy have been systematically studied. Magnetization versus field hysteresis loops have been measured for different temperatures ranging from 5 to 300 K. The applied field - temperature (H-T) magnetization switching diagram has been constructed by extracting the different switching fields as a function of temperature. This switching diagram can be well explained by considering the competition between energy barrier of layer's magnetization reversal, interlayer exchange coupling, and Zeeman energy.

  12. The homoepitaxial growth of Pt on Pt(111) studied with STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, Michael; Michely, Thomas; Comsa, George

    The homoepitaxial growth of Pt on Pt(111) has been investigated by STM and the results have been compared to recent thermal He scattering (TEAS) data obtained on the same system. Additional information on the growth modes is obtained and the real space aspect of the growing surface, which results in TEAS and RHEED oscillations is evidenced. The three different growth modes, including the reentrant layer-by-layer growth at low temperatures, are confirmed. The limited diffusion along the adatom island edges, which causes their fractal aspect with dendritic structures, appears to play a significant role in the appearance of the low temperature layer-by-layer growth.

  13. The mechanism of charge density wave in Pt-based layered superconductors: SrPt2As2 and LaPt2Si2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooran; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B. I.

    2015-01-01

    The intriguing coexistence of the charge density wave (CDW) and superconductivity in SrPt2As2 and LaPt2Si2 has been investigated based on the ab initio density functional theory band structure and phonon calculations. We have found that the CDW instabilities for both cases arise from the q-dependent electron-phonon coupling with quasi-nesting feature of the Fermi surface. The band structure obtained by the band-unfolding technique reveals the sizable q-dependent electron-phonon coupling responsible for the CDW instability. The local split distortions of Pt atoms in the [As-Pt-As] layers play an essential role in driving the five-fold supercell CDW instability as well as the phonon softening instability in SrPt2As2. By contrast, the CDW and phonon softening instabilities in LaPt2Si2 occur without split distortions of Pt atoms. The phonon calculations suggest that the CDW and the superconductivity coexist in [X-Pt-X] layers (X = As or Si) for both cases. PMID:26449877

  14. Pt-content-controlled synthesis of Pd nanohollows/Pt nanorods core/shell composites with enhanced electrocatalytic activities for the methanol oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Shiqin; Fu, Chenglin; Chen, Yongxiang; Yu, Xiang; Lai, Xuandi; Ye, Cui; Hu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Pd nanohollows/Pt nanorods (PdNHs/PtNRs) core/shell composites have been synthesized by a multistep crystalline growth method, in which Pt NRs grow on the exterior surface of hollow Pd nanospheres in order. Moreover, the size and quantity of the Pt NRs in the PdNHs/PtNRs can be easily tailored and thus ameliorate Pt utilization efficiency through varying H2PtCl6 concentrations. By comparing with Pt NPs and commercial Pt/C (JM), the PdNHs/PtNRs prepared using 2.50 mL 0.02 M H2PtCl6 have larger surface area, better anti-CO poisoning ability and more excellent catalytic performance. Moreover, the catalytic properties of the PdNHs/PtNRs can be well tunable by modifying the Pt contents. Our studies indicate that the PdNHs/PtNRs prepared using 2.50 mL 0.02 M H2PtCl6, in which Pd NHs are nearly completely covered with Pt NRs, have the largest surface area, best antitoxic ability and most excellent catalytic performance, indicative of high Pt utilization efficiency of the PdNHs/PtNRs relative to Pt/C (JM), Pt NPs and other PdNHs/PtNRs prepared using other H2PtCl6 concentrations. Therefore, the strategy to the size and content control of the PdNHs/PtNRs nanocomposites can facilitate optimized design of Pt-based catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

  15. Nanoporous PtAg and PtCu alloys with hollow ligaments for enhanced electrocatalysis and glucose biosensing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Caixia; Liu, Yunqing; Su, Fa; Liu, Aihua; Qiu, Huajun

    2011-09-15

    Nanoporous silver (NPS) and copper (NPC) obtained by dealloying AgAl and CuAl alloys, respectively, were used as both three-dimensional templates and reducing agents for the fabrication of nanoporous PtAg (NPS-Pt) and PtCu (NPC-Pt) alloys with hollow ligaments by a simple galvanic replacement reaction with H(2)PtCl(6). Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction characterizations demonstrate that NPS and NPC with similar ligament sizes (30-50 nm) have different effects on the formed hollow nanostructures. For NPS-Pt, the shell of the hollow ligament is seamless. However, the shell of NPC-Pt is comprised of small pores and alloy nanoparticles with a size of ∼3 nm. The as-prepared NPS-Pt and NPC-Pt exhibit remarkably improved electrocatalytic activities towards the oxidation of ethanol and H(2)O(2) compared with state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst, and can be used for sensitive electrochemical sensing applications. The hierarchical nanoporous structure also provides a good microenvironment for enzymes. After immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx), the enzyme modified nanoporous electrode can sensitively detect glucose in a wide linear range (0.6-20 mM).

  16. Exchange interaction in L10-ordered FePt and CoPt from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. B.; Altounian, Z.

    2011-04-01

    The exchange interactions have been studied from a first-principles density functional calculation in FePt and CoPt with the tetragonal L10-type structure. For FePt, the effective exchange parameters of Fe at the sites 1a and 1c, JFe1a and JFe1c, have the same negative value (-1.40 mRy) while that between Fe (1a) and Fe (1c), JFe1a -1c, have a large positive value (8.29 mRy) and JFe-Pt also has a positive value (1.20 mRy). Similarly, for CoPt, the exchange parameters are JCo1a = JCo1c = -0.86 mRy, JCo1a -1c = 8.47 mRy and JCo-Pt = 1.30 mRy. The estimated mean fields TC are about 802 K and 870 K for FePt and CoPt, respectively, in good agreement with the experiments. TC shows peak value at c/a = 1 in FePt and CoPt, respectively, resulting from the interplay between negative and positive exchange interactions.

  17. Multiquanta breather model for PtCl

    SciTech Connect

    Voulgarakis, N. K.; Kalosakas, G.; Bishop, A. R.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2001-07-01

    We study the many-quanta problem of an intramolecular vibrational excitation interacting with optical phonons, that may represent the nonlinearity from intrinsic electron-lattice interactions. In the adiabatic limit we calculate numerically the ground-state energy and the corresponding wave functions for N vibrational quanta. In the one-dimensional case we find strong redshifts in the overtone spectra and an increasing spatial localization as the number of quanta increases. Through model parameter fitting we achieve very good quantitative agreement with experimental resonant Raman scattering measurements in the quasi-one-dimensional charge transfer solid PtCl. Accurate analytical expressions for the redshifts are also obtained.

  18. Surface diffusion of xenon on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, D. Laurence; George, Steven M.

    1993-06-01

    The surface diffusion of xenon on the Pt(111) surface was investigated using laser induced thermal desorption (LITD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. The surface diffusion coefficient at 80 K decreased dramatically from D=8×10-7 cm2/s at θ=0.05θs to approximately D=2×10-8 cm2/s at θ=θs, where θs denotes the saturation coverage at 85 K, corresponding to a commensurate monolayer coverage of 5.0×1014 xenon atoms/cm2. This coverage dependence was consistent with attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms and the existence of two-dimensional condensed phases of xenon on Pt(111). The kinetic parameters for surface diffusion at θ=θs were Edif=1.3±0.1 kcal/mol and D0=1.1×10-4±0.2 cm2/s. The magnitude of Edif at θ=θs represented the combined effect of the intrinsic corrugation of the adsorbate-surface potential and attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms. LITD experiments at θ=0.25 θs revealed diffusion kinetic parameters of Edif=1.2±0.2 kcal/mol and D0=3.4×10-4±0.5 cm2/s. The constant Edif at low and high coverage was attributed to the ``breakaway'' of xenon atoms from the edges of condensed phase xenon islands. The coverage dependence of the surface diffusion coefficient for Xe/Pt(111) was explained by a multiple site diffusion mechanism, where collisions with xenon islands limit diffusional motion. Thermal desorption kinetics for xenon on Pt(111) were determined using TPD experiments. Using the variation of heating rates method, the desorption parameters were Edes=6.6±0.2 kcal/mol and νdes=1.3×1013±0.4 s-1, in good agreement with previous studies. The xenon TPD peak shifted to higher temperature versus initial coverage at a fixed heating rate, providing further evidence for attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms.

  19. Diffusion and solid state reactions in Fe/Ag/Pt and FePt/Ag thin-film systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katona, G. L.; Safonova, N. Y.; Ganss, F.; Mitin, D.; Vladymyrskyi, I. A.; Sidorenko, S. I.; Makogon, Iu N.; Beddies, G.; Albrecht, M.; Beke, D. L.

    2015-05-01

    Depth profiles of tri-layered Fe(15 nm)/Ag(10 nm)/Pt(15 nm)/SiO2(100 nm)/Si(1 0 0) and bi-layered Fe50Pt50(15 nm)/Ag(7.5 nm)/SiO2(100 nm)/Si(1 0 0) thin films after different heat treatments were investigated by secondary neutral mass spectrometry. Isotherm annealing of the tri-layered samples was carried out between 245 and 390 °C up to several hours, while isochrone thermal annealing was performed between 600 and 900 °C for 30 s. Composition profiles, obtained after isotherm heat treatment, show that initially there was a strong intermixing between Ag and Pt, resulting most likely in the formation of an AgxPt1-x reaction layer. Furthermore, the intermixing process was much faster in the Ag layer accompanied by the segregation of Ag to the substrate/Pt interface. Later on the Pt, which diffused through the Ag layer, started to penetrate into the Fe grain boundaries. This process led to the formation of the FePt reaction product. At the same time as the Pt diffused into the Fe layer, reducing the amount of Pt in the AgxPt1-x layer, the Ag appeared to ‘move’ towards the substrate. Finally, an almost fully homogeneous FePt alloy layer formed with some FePt present in the grain boundaries of the remaining Ag. This behavior was compared to both types of samples subjected to isochrone thermal annealing. High temperature treatments resulted in similar results and eventually in the formation of a homogeneous L10 ordered FePt alloy with randomly distributed Ag in the grain boundaries and at the free surface.

  20. Adhesion to the yeast cell surface as a mechanism for trapping pathogenic bacteria by Saccharomyces probiotics.

    PubMed

    Tiago, F C P; Martins, F S; Souza, E L S; Pimenta, P F P; Araujo, H R C; Castro, I M; Brandão, R L; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2012-09-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of probiotics as an adjuvant for the prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal pathology. The great advantage of therapy with probiotics is that they have few side effects such as selection of resistant bacteria or disturbance of the intestinal microbiota, which occur when antibiotics are used. Adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the surface of probiotics instead of onto intestinal receptors could explain part of the probiotic effect. Thus, this study evaluated the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the cell wall of Saccharomyces boulardii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains UFMG 905, W303 and BY4741. To understand the mechanism of adhesion of pathogens to yeast, cell-wall mutants of the parental strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 were used because of the difficulty of mutating polyploid yeast, as is the case for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces boulardii. The tests of adhesion showed that, among 11 enteropathogenic bacteria tested, only Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Typhi adhered to the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741. The presence of mannose, and to some extent bile salts, inhibited this adhesion, which was not dependent on yeast viability. Among 44 cell-wall mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, five lost the ability to fix the bacteria. Electron microscopy showed that the phenomenon of yeast-bacteria adhesion occurred both in vitro and in vivo (in the digestive tract of dixenic mice). In conclusion, some pathogenic bacteria were captured on the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, thus preventing their adhesion to specific receptors on the intestinal epithelium and their subsequent invasion of the host.

  1. Genome annotation of a Saccharomyces sp. lager brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    De León-Medina, Patricia Marcela; Elizondo-González, Ramiro; Damas-Buenrostro, Luis Cástulo; Geertman, Jan-Maarten; Van den Broek, Marcel; Galán-Wong, Luis Jesús; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Pereyra-Alférez, Benito

    2016-09-01

    The genome of lager brewer's yeast is a hybrid, with Saccharomyces eubayanus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as sub-genomes. Due to their specific use in the beer industry, relatively little information is available. The genome of brewing yeast was sequenced and annotated in this study. We obtained a genome size of 22.7 Mbp that consisted of 133 scaffolds, with 65 scaffolds larger than 10 kbp. With respect to the annotation, 9939 genes were obtained, and when they were submitted to a local alignment, we found that 53.93% of these genes corresponded to S. cerevisiae, while another 42.86% originated from S. eubayanus. Our results confirm that our strain is a hybrid of at least two different genomes.

  2. Bioethanol production from sweet potato using Saccharomyces diastaticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Suryani, Irma; Pradia Paundradewa, J.

    2015-12-01

    Sweet potato contains about 16 to 40% dry matter and about 70-90% of the dry matter is a carbohydrate made up of starch, sugar, cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin so suitable for used as raw material for bioethanol. In this study focused on the manufacture of bioethanol with changes in temperature and concentration variations of yeast with sweet potato raw materials used yeast Saccharomyces diastaticus. Operating variables used are at a temperature of 30°C; 31,475°C; 35°C; 38,525°C; and 40°C with a yeast concentration of 25.9%; 30%; 40%; 50% and 54.1%. The experimental results obtained, the optimum conditions of ethanol fermentation with yeast Saccharomyces diastaticus on 36,67 °C temperature and yeast concentration of 43,43 % v / v.

  3. The Reference Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Then and Now

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Stacia R.; Dietrich, Fred S.; Fisk, Dianna G.; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dwight, Selina S.; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S.; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D.; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Miyasato, Stuart R.; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called “S288C 2010,” was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science. PMID:24374639

  4. The reference genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: then and now.

    PubMed

    Engel, Stacia R; Dietrich, Fred S; Fisk, Dianna G; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C; Dwight, Selina S; Hitz, Benjamin C; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J Michael

    2014-03-20

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called "S288C 2010," was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science.

  5. Opposite effects of Cu and Pt atoms on graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2017-02-01

    Metal atoms at graphene edges are important because they can modify the structure and properties of graphene; however, there are very few reports on their direct observation. We performed electron microscopy to investigate the stability and dynamics of Cu and Pt atoms at graphene edges. We found that Cu atoms mended graphene edges, while Pt atoms etched them, and these transformations were promoted by electron irradiation. Cu and Pt atoms formed different atomic configurations at graphene edges.

  6. A global topology map of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun; Melén, Karin; Österberg, Marie; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is, arguably, the best understood eukaryotic model organism, yet comparatively little is known about its membrane proteome. Here, we report the cloning and expression of 617 S. cerevisiae membrane proteins as fusions to a C-terminal topology reporter and present experimentally constrained topology models for 546 proteins. By homology, the experimental topology information can be extended to 15,000 membrane proteins from 38 fully sequenced eukaryotic genomes. membrane proteins | membrane proteomics | yeast

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae vaginitis: microbiology and in vitro antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Echeverría-Irigoyen, María Julia; Eraso, Elena; Cano, Josep; Gomáriz, María; Guarro, Josep; Quindós, Guillermo

    2011-09-01

    Genitourinary infections by Saccharomyces cerevisiae are rare. Here, we describe eight S. cerevisiae vulvovaginitis episodes where molecular (Affirm VPIII) and conventional microbiological methods (culture and carbohydrate assimilation) have proven to be inadequate for diagnostic purposes. DNA sequencing allowed the correct identification of the pathogen. All isolates were susceptible to most antifungal agents, with two of them also found to be susceptible-dose-dependent to itraconazole.

  8. Efficient Extraction of Thioreodoxin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Ethanol▿

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiharu; Nomura, Wataru; Takeuchi, Yoko; Ohdate, Takumi; Tamasu, Shogo; Kitaoka, Atsushi; Kiyokawa, Yoshifumi; Masutani, Hiroshi; Murata, Kazuo; Wakai, Yoshinori; Izawa, Shingo; Yodoi, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Thioredoxin, an antioxidant protein, is a promising molecule for development of functional foods because it protects the gastric mucosa and reduces the allergenicity of allergens. To establish a method for obtaining an ample amount of yeast thioredoxin, we found here that thioredoxin is released from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by treatment with 20% ethanol. We also found that Japanese sake contains a considerable amount of thioredoxin. PMID:17209065

  9. Defect-induced loading of Pt nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Yong Jin; Ra, Eun Ju; Kim, Ki Kang; An, Kay Hyeok; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Jae Young; Park, Chan Ho; Doo, Seok Kwang; Park, Min Ho; Yang, Cheol Woong

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes-supported Pt nanoparticles were loaded using a microwave oven on the defective carbon nanotubes generated by an additional oxidant during acid treatment. The authors' Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that defects created during oxidation and microwave treatment acted as nucleation seeds for Pt adsorption. The generated Pt nanoparticles had the size distributions of 2-3nm and were uniformly distributed on the defects of carbon nanotubes. The authors' density functional calculations showed that the adsorption of Pt atom on the vacancy of nanotube was significantly stronger by s-p hybridization with carbon atoms near the defect site.

  10. Thermochemistry of Pt-fullerene complexes: semiempirical study.

    PubMed

    Voityuk, Alexander A

    2009-10-29

    Modified Neglect of Differential Overlap (MNDO) and MNDO/d based semiempirical methods are widely employed to explore structure and thermochemistry of molecular systems. In this work, the AM1/d method has been parametrized for systems containing platinum. The proposed scheme delivers excellent performance for binding energies of Pt complexes with ethylene and large pi conjugated hydrocarbons. The estimated bond energies accurately reproduce the results of MP4(SDQ) calculations and show significant improvement over DFT (B3LYP and M05) data. We apply the AM1/d scheme to explore the structure and thermochemistry of several Pt compounds with C(60) and C(70). The calculated binding energies of bare Pt atoms and [Pt(PH(3))(2)] units to the fullerenes are 75 and 45 kcal/mol, respectively. We find that coordination of a single metal center to C(60) activates the fullerene cage making subsequent coordination of Pt more favorable. The bond energy [C(60)-PtC(60)] is calculated to be 65 kcal/mol. The estimated reaction enthalpies are useful for exploring the stability of Pt(x)C(60) polymer systems and their interaction with phosphines. AM1/d predicts a very low barrier to rotation of the coordinated fullerenes in [Pt(C(60))(2)]. The AM1/d scheme is computationally very efficient and can be employed to obtain fast quantitative estimates for binding energies and structural parameters of Pt complexes with large pi conjugated systems like fullerenes and carbon nanotubes.

  11. Predictions of the Pt(8)Ti phase in unexpected systems.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard H; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hart, Gus L W

    2010-05-19

    The binary A(8)B phase (prototype Pt(8)Ti) has been experimentally observed in 11 systems. A high-throughput search over all the binary transition intermetallics, however, reveals 59 occurrences of the A(8)B phase: Au(8)Zn(dagger), Cd(8)Sc(dagger), Cu(8)Ni(dagger), Cu(8)Zn(dagger), Hg(8)La, Ir(8)Os(dagger), Ir(8)Re, Ir(8)Ru(dagger), Ir(8)Tc, Ir(8)W(dagger), Nb(8)Os(dagger), Nb(8)Rh(dagger), Nb(8)Ru(dagger), Nb(8)Ta(dagger), Ni(8)Fe, Ni(8)Mo(dagger)*, Ni(8)Nb(dagger)*, Ni(8)Ta*, Ni(8)V*, Ni(8)W, Pd(8)Al(dagger), Pd(8)Fe, Pd(8)Hf, Pd(8)Mn, Pd(8)Mo*, Pd(8)Nb, Pd(8)Sc, Pd(8)Ta, Pd(8)Ti, Pd(8)V*, Pd(8)W*, Pd(8)Zn, Pd(8)Zr, Pt(8)Al(dagger), Pt(8)Cr*, Pt(8)Hf, Pt(8)Mn, Pt(8)Mo, Pt(8)Nb, Pt(8)Rh(dagger), Pt(8)Sc, Pt(8)Ta, Pt(8)Ti*, Pt(8)V*, Pt(8)W, Pt(8)Zr*, Rh(8)Mo, Rh(8)W, Ta(8)Pd, Ta(8)Pt, Ta(8)Rh, V(8)Cr(dagger), V(8)Fe(dagger), V(8)Ir(dagger), V(8)Ni(dagger), V(8)Pd, V(8)Pt, V(8)Rh, and V(8)Ru(dagger) ((dagger) = metastable, * = experimentally observed). This is surprising for the wealth of new occurrences that are predicted, especially in well-characterized systems (e.g., Cu-Zn). By verifying all experimental results while offering additional predictions, our study serves as a striking demonstration of the power of the high-throughput approach. The practicality of the method is demonstrated in the Rh-W system. A cluster-expansion-based Monte Carlo model reveals a relatively high order-disorder transition temperature.

  12. Jarzynski equality in PT-symmetric quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2015-04-13

    We show that the quantum Jarzynski equality generalizes to PT -symmetric quantum mechanics with unbroken PT -symmetry. In the regime of broken PT -symmetry the Jarzynski equality does not hold as also the CPT -norm is not preserved during the dynamics. These findings are illustrated for an experimentally relevant system – two coupled optical waveguides. It turns out that for these systems the phase transition between the regimes of unbroken and broken PT -symmetry is thermodynamically inhibited as the irreversible work diverges at the critical point.

  13. Jarzynski Equality in PT-Symmetric Quantum Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2015-04-17

    We show that the quantum Jarzynski equality generalizes to PT-symmetric quantum mechanics with unbroken PT symmetry. In the regime of broken PT symmetry, the Jarzynski equality does not hold as also the CPT norm is not preserved during the dynamics. These findings are illustrated for an experimentally relevant system-two coupled optical waveguides. It turns out that for these systems the phase transition between the regimes of unbroken and broken PT symmetry is thermodynamically inhibited as the irreversible work diverges at the critical point.

  14. Higgs bosons at high pT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Tobias; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-01-01

    We present a calculation of H +j at next-to-leading order including the effect of a finite top mass. Where possible we include the complete dependence on mt . This includes the leading order amplitude, the infrared poles of the two-loop amplitude and the real radiation amplitude. The remaining finite piece of the virtual correction is considered in an asymptotic expansion in mt , which is accurate to mt-4 . By successively including more mt-exact pieces, the dependence on the asymptotic series diminishes and we find convergent behavior for pT ,H>mt for the first time. Our results justify rescaling by the mt-exact leading-order (LO) cross section to model top-mass effects in effective field theory results up to pT of 250 to 300 GeV. We show that the error made by using the LO rescaling becomes comparable to the next-to-next-to-leading-order scale uncertainty for such large energies. We implement our results into the Monte Carlo code mcfm.

  15. [Investigation of coagulation time: PT and APTT].

    PubMed

    Ramakers, Christian; van der Heul, Cees; van Wijk, Eduard M

    2012-01-01

    The first case report describes an extremely prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) in a patient with no history of increased bleeding tendency. Heparin use was excluded. The APTT mixing study combined with the medical history suggests a deficiency in one of the non-essential coagulation factors. This was confirmed by factor XII activity of <1%. The second case report describes a prolonged APTT in a patient with no history of increased bleeding tendency. The negative bleeding tendency in combination with a failure of the mixing study to correct the coagulation assay results suggests a factor inhibitor, most probably lupus anticoagulant. Indeed, the lupus anticoagulant was positive and the anti-cardiolipin antibody titre was also positive. Aberrations in the process of haemostasis can be efficiently screened using a platelet count, an APTT, a PT and a thorough physical examination combined with a thorough medical history taking. Common causes of prolonged PT and/or APTT are the use of oral anticoagulants or heparin, vitamin K deficiency and liver disease. Other causes include coagulation factor deficiencies, coagulation factor inhibitors and diffuse intravascular coagulation.

  16. Surface reconstruction of Pt(001) quantitatively revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, R.; Meinel, K.; Krahn, O.; Widdra, W.

    2016-11-01

    The complex hexagonal reconstructions of the (001) surfaces of platinum and gold have been under debate for decades. Here, the structural details of the Pt(001) reconstruction have been quantitatively reinvestigated by combining the high resolving power of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). In addition, LEED simulations based on a Moiré approach have been applied. Annealing temperatures around 850 °C yield a superstructure that approaches a commensurable c (26.6 ×118 ) substrate registry. It evolves from a Moiré-like buckling of a compressed hexagonal top layer (hex) where atomic rows of the hex run parallel to atomic rows of the square substrate. Annealing at 920 °C stimulates a continuous rotation of the hex where all angles between ±0.7° are simultaneously realized. At temperatures around 1080 °C, the nonrotated hex coexists with a hex that is rotated by about 0.75°. Annealing at temperatures around 1120 °C yield a locking of the hex in fixed rotation angles of 0.77°, 0.88°, and 0.94°. At temperatures around 1170 °C, the Pt(001)-hex-R 0.94° prevails as the energetically most favored form of the rotated hex.

  17. Malo-ethanolic fermentation in Saccharomyces and Schizosaccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Volschenk, H; van Vuuren, H J J; Viljoen-Bloom, M

    2003-09-01

    Yeast species are divided into the K(+) or K(-) groups, based on their ability or inability to metabolise tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates as sole carbon or energy source. The K(-) group of yeasts includes strains of Saccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, which is capable of utilising TCA cycle intermediates only in the presence of glucose or other assimilable carbon sources. Although grouped together, these yeasts have significant differences in their abilities to degrade malic acid. Typically, strains of Saccharomyces are regarded as inefficient metabolisers of extracellular malic acid, whereas strains of Sch. pombe and Z. bailii can effectively degrade high concentrations of malic acid. The ability of a yeast strain to degrade extracellular malic acid is dependent on both the efficient transport of the dicarboxylic acid and the efficacy of the intracellular malic enzyme. The malic enzyme converts malic acid into pyruvic acid, which is further metabolised to ethanol and carbon dioxide under fermentative conditions via the so-called malo-ethanolic (ME) pathway. This review focuses on the enzymes involved in the ME pathway in Sch. pombe and Saccharomyces species, with specific emphasis on the malate transporter and the intracellular malic enzyme.

  18. Sequence diversity, reproductive isolation and species concepts in Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Liti, Gianni; Barton, David B H; Louis, Edward J

    2006-10-01

    Using the biological species definition, yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces sensu stricto comprise six species and one natural hybrid. Previous work has shown that reproductive isolation between the species is due primarily to sequence divergence acted upon by the mismatch repair system and not due to major gene differences or chromosomal rearrangements. Sequence divergence through mismatch repair has also been shown to cause partial reproductive isolation among populations within a species. We have surveyed sequence variation in populations of Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeasts and measured meiotic sterility in hybrids. This allows us to determine the divergence necessary to produce the reproductive isolation seen among species. Rather than a sharp transition from fertility to sterility, which may have been expected, we find a smooth monotonic relationship between diversity and reproductive isolation, even as far as the well-accepted designations of S. paradoxus and S. cerevisiae as distinct species. Furthermore, we show that one species of Saccharomyces--S. cariocanus--differs from a population of S. paradoxus by four translocations, but not by sequence. There is molecular evidence of recent introgression from S. cerevisiae into the European population of S. paradoxus, supporting the idea that in nature the boundary between these species is fuzzy.

  19. Genomics and Biochemistry of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast Strains.

    PubMed

    Eldarov, M A; Kishkovskaia, S A; Tanaschuk, T N; Mardanov, A V

    2016-12-01

    Saccharomyces yeasts have been used for millennia for the production of beer, wine, bread, and other fermented products. Long-term "unconscious" selection and domestication led to the selection of hundreds of strains with desired production traits having significant phenotypic and genetic differences from their wild ancestors. This review summarizes the results of recent research in deciphering the genomes of wine Saccharomyces strains, the use of comparative genomics methods to study the mechanisms of yeast genome evolution under conditions of artificial selection, and the use of genomic and postgenomic approaches to identify the molecular nature of the important characteristics of commercial wine strains of Saccharomyces. Succinctly, data concerning metagenomics of microbial communities of grapes and wine and the dynamics of yeast and bacterial flora in the course of winemaking is provided. A separate section is devoted to an overview of the physiological, genetic, and biochemical features of sherry yeast strains used to produce biologically aged wines. The goal of the review is to convince the reader of the efficacy of new genomic and postgenomic technologies as tools for developing strategies for targeted selection and creation of new strains using "classical" and modern techniques for improving winemaking technology.

  20. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films: dependence on Pt thickness and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiufeng; Dai, Zhiwen; Huang, Lin; Lu, Guangduo; Liu, Min; Piao, Hongguang; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Yu, Seong-cho; Pan, Liqing

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the temperature and the Pt layer thickness dependence of the magnetoresistances (MRs) in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films. Based on the field dependent measurements, it can be seen that the spin-current-induced spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) plays the dominant role in the MRs in the Co2FeSi/Pt bilayers in the whole temperature range. Meanwhile, a quite small part of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) existed in the MRs. It proved to be originated from magnetic proximity effect (MPE) by measuring the Pt thickness and temperature dependence of the AMR. Moreover, the Co2FeSi layer thickness has much weaker effect on the SMR and AMR compared to the Pt layer thickness. These results indicate that the Co2FeSi/Pt interface is beneficial to be used in the spin-current-induced physical phenomena.

  1. Controlled synthesis of FePt-Au hybrid nanoparticles triggered by reaction atmosphere and FePt seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinghan; Wu, Jiajia; Liu, Fei; Xing, Ruijun; Zhang, Chenzhen; Yang, Ce; Yin, Han; Hou, Yanglong

    2013-10-07

    We report an effective and facile method for synthesis of FePt-Au hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs). The typical secondary growth of Au proceeded in the presence of FePt seeds in organic solvents under a specific atmosphere. Interestingly, the type of atmosphere (Ar or Ar-H₂) and the size of selected FePt seeds were two major parameters determining the final morphology of FePt-Au HNPs. Enhancement of catalytic activity and stability of FePt-Au HNPs in methanol oxidation were achieved owing to interactions between Au and FePt. The optical properties of the resulting products can be steadily tuned which sheds light on their potential application in optical devices and bioimaging. The novel synthetic strategy offers an important tool towards multifunctional nanomaterials with designed architectures.

  2. Resolving Sulfur Oxidation and Removal from Pt and Pt3Co Electrocatalysts Using in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaker, D.; Gatewood, D; Korovina, A; Garsany, Y; Swider-Lyons, K

    2010-01-01

    Adsorbed sulfur is a poison to the Pt catalysts used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, but it can be removed by potential cycling. This process is studied for S{sub x}-poisoned nanoscale Pt- and Pt{sub 3}Co- on Vulcan carbon (Pt/VC and Pt{sub 3}Co/VC) in perchloric acid electrolyte using the {Delta}{mu} adsorbate isolation technique for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The {Delta}{mu} technique is modified to better distinguish the {Delta}{mu} signatures for H, O, and Sx on Pt. The resulting {Delta}{mu} analysis suggests that SO{sub 2} on nanoscale Pt is oxidized to bisulfate or sulfate species in two regions, near 1.05 V on the cluster edges of the Pt nanoparticle, and at higher potentials from the Pt(111) faces where oxygen is less strongly bound. The bisulfate or sulfate species desorb from the Pt surface at high potentials due to O(OH) adsorption/replacement and at low potentials due to loss of the Coulomb attraction between the bisulfate anion and the Pt. A similar oxidation process occurs for S{sub x}-poisoned Pt{sub 3}Co/VC, but at lower potentials because a ligand effect coming from Co shifts the oxidization potential of adsorbed SO{sub 2} to lower potentials while pushing OH adsorption to higher potentials. The spectroscopic results give insights into cyclic voltammetry data and are consistent with electrochemical cycling procedures for removing the sulfur.

  3. Monitoring volatile compounds production throughout fermentation by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces strains using headspace sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Morales, M L; Fierro-Risco, J; Callejón, R M; Paneque, P

    2017-02-01

    Currently, there is a growing interest in the use of non-Saccharomyces yeast to enhance the aromatic quality of wine, with pure or mixed cultures, as well as sequential inoculation. Volatile components of wines were closely related to their sensory quality. Hence, to study the evolution of volatile compounds during fermentation was of great interest. For this, sampling methods that did not alter the volume of fermentation media were the most suitable. This work reports the usefulness of headspace sorptive extraction as non-invasive method to monitor the changes in volatile compounds during fermentation. This method allowed monitoring of 141 compounds throughout the process of fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lachancea thermotolerans strains. Both strains showed a similar ability to ferment a must with high sugar content. The S. cerevisiae strain produced higher amount of volatile compounds especially esters that constitutes fruity aroma than L. thermotorelans.

  4. Correlation between ethanol stress and cellular fatty acid composition of alcohol producing non-Saccharomyces in comparison with Saccharomyces cerevisiae by multivariate techniques.

    PubMed

    Archana, K M; Ravi, R; Anu-Appaiah, K A

    2015-10-01

    Wine production is a complex process both from biochemical and microbiological point of view in which yeast plays a central role. The use of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non- Saccharomyces yeasts as mixed starter cultures for wine fermentations is of increasing interest to enhance the quality of wine.The most common stress, yeast cells encounter during wine fermentation is the increase in ethanol concentration.To enhance ethanol tolerance, alteration in the cellular lipid composition is one of its defence mechanism. Ethanol tolerance and cellular fatty acid composition of alcohol producing non Saccharomyces forms were compared with enological strains of Sacccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae used for the study, tolerated 15 % of ethanol and the non Saccharomyces strains such as, Issatchenkia occidentalis and Issatchenkia orientalis tolerated 10 % of ethanol. On exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ethanol stress, the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids increased with concomitant decrease in saturated fatty acids. Decrease in monounsaturated fatty acids, exhibited by non-Saccharomyces yeasts when exposed to ethanol stress, could be one of the reasons for their inability to withstand more than 10 % of alcohol. Multivariate techniques of data analysis - principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were employed in order to establish differentiation criteria as function of yeast strains, alcohol stress and their fatty acid profile. Based on the data, Chemometrics, such as principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis, can be successfully applied to fatty acid data to categorize the yeast.

  5. Exclusion of Saccharomyces kudriavzevii from a wine model system mediated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-López, F Noé; Pérez-Través, Laura; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the competition and potential hybrid generation between the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii in a wine-model environment. Our main goal was to understand why S. kudriavzevii has not been found in wine fermentations whilst their hybrids are present. Auxotrophic mutants (Ura(-) and Lys(-)) were used to favour the selection of hybrids and to specifically differentiate the two species in mixed fermentations carried out at different temperatures (17 °C, 24 °C and 31 °C). Both yeasts showed a reduction in their maximum specific growth rates in mixed fermentations, indicating a clear antagonistic effect between the two microorganisms. Temperature played an important role in this competition. In this way, S. kudriavzevii was less affected at 17 °C, but S. cerevisiae was clearly the best competitor at 31 °C, preventing the growth of S. kudriavzevii. Population levels of S. kudriavzevii always significantly decreased in the presence of S. cerevisiae. Ethanol was measured throughout the fermentations and in all cases S. kudriavzevii growth was arrested when ethanol levels were < 5 g/l, indicating that this compound did not influence the competitive exclusion of S. kudriavzevii. Killer factors were also discarded due to the K(-) R(-) phenotype of both strains. Finally, no prototrophic interspecific hybrids were isolated in small-scale fermentations at any temperature assayed. Our results show that the lack of competitiveness exhibited by S. kudriavzevii, especially at high temperatures, explains the absence of this species in wine fermentations, suggesting that natural S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids most likely originated in wild environments rather than in industrial fermentations.

  6. Quantitative comparison of transient growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces kluyveri, and Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Christoph; Von Stockar, Urs

    2003-03-30

    A multitude of metabolic regulations occur in yeast, particularly under dynamic process conditions, such as under sudden glucose excess. However, quantification of regulations and classification of yeast strains under these conditions have yet to be elucidated, which requires high-frequency and consistent quantification of the metabolic response. The present study aimed at quantifying the dynamic regulation of the central metabolism of strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. kluyveri, and Kluyveromyces lactis upon sudden glucose excess, accomplished by a shift-up in dilution rate inside of the oxidative region using a small metabolic flux model. It was found that, under transient growth conditions, S. kluyveri behaved like K. lactis, while classification using steady-state conditions would position S. kluyveri close to S. cerevisiae. For transient conditions and based on the observation whether excess glucose is initially used for catabolism (energy) or anabolism (carbon), we propose to classify strains into energy-driven, such as S. cerevisiae, and carbon-driven, such as S. kluyveri and K. lactis, strains. Furthermore, it was found that the delayed onset of fermentative catabolism in carbon-driven strains is a consequence of low catabolic flux and the initial shunt of glucose in non-nitrogen-containing biomass constituents. The MFA model suggests that energy limitation forced the cell to ultimately increase catabolic flux, while the capacity of oxidative catabolism is not sufficient to process this flux oxidatively. The combination of transient experiments and its exploitation with reconciled intrinsic rates using a small metabolic model could corroborate earlier findings of metabolic regulations, such as tight glucose control in carbon-driven strains and transient changes in biomass composition, as well as explore new regulations, such as assimilation of ethanol before glucose. The benefit from using small metabolic flux models is the richness of information and the

  7. Pt and Pt-Ru/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid as Electrocatalysts for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Cui, Xiaoli; Wang, Jun; Yen, Clive; Wai, Chien M.

    2006-06-01

    In recent years, the use of supercritical fluids (SCFs) for the synthesis and processing of nanomaterials has proven to be a rapid, direct, and clean approach to develop nanomaterials and nanocomposites. The application of supercritical fluid technology can result in products (and processes) that are cleaner, less expensive, and of higher quality than those that are produced using conventional technologies and solvents. In this work, carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported Pt and Pt-Ru nanoparticles catalysts have been synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The experimental results demonstrate that Pt, Pt-Ru/CNT nanocomposites synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide are effective electrocatalysts for low-temperature fuel cells.

  8. Effect of the state of distribution of supported Pt nanoparticles on effective Pt utilization in polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Makoto; Park, Young-Chul; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Yano, Hiroshi; Tryk, Donald A; Kamino, Takeo; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2013-07-21

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cells, it is essential to minimize Pt loading, particularly at the cathode, without serious loss of performance. From this point of view, we will report an advanced concept for the design of high performance catalysts and membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs): first, the evaluation of Pt particle distributions on both the interior and exterior walls of various types of carbon black (CB) particles used as supports with respect to the "effective surface (ES)"; second, control of both size and location of Pt particles by means of a new preparation method (nanocapsule method); and finally, a new evaluation method for the properties of MEAs based on the Pt utilization (UPt), mass activity (MA), and effectiveness of Pt (EfPt), based on the ES concept. The amounts of Pt catalyst particles located in the CB nanopores were directly evaluated using the transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and corresponding three-dimensional images. By use of the nanocapsule method and optimization of the ionomer, increased MA and EfPt values for the MEA were achieved. The improvement in the cathode performance can be attributed to the sharp particle-size distribution for Pt and the highly uniform dispersion on the exterior surface of graphitized carbon black (GCB) supports.

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in grape varieties of the São Francisco Valley

    PubMed Central

    de Ponzzes-Gomes, Camila M.P.B.S.; de Mélo, Dângelly L.F.M.; Santana, Caroline A.; Pereira, Giuliano E.; Mendonça, Michelle O.C.; Gomes, Fátima C.O.; Oliveira, Evelyn S.; Barbosa, Antonio M.; Trindade, Rita C.; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this work was to characterise indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the naturally fermented juice of grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo used in the São Francisco River Valley, northeastern Brazil. In this study, 155 S. cerevisiae and 60 non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated and identified using physiological tests and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Among the non-Saccharomyces species, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most common species, followed by Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Kloeckera apis, P. manshurica, C. orthopsilosis and C. zemplinina. The population counts of these yeasts ranged among 1.0 to 19 × 105 cfu/mL. A total of 155 isolates of S. cerevisiae were compared by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, and five molecular mitochondrial DNA restriction profiles were detected. Indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes of the São Francisco Valley can be further tested as potential starters for wine production. PMID:25242923

  10. Pt/ZnO nanowire Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Y.W.; Tien, L.C.; Norton, D.P.; Pearton, S.J.; Kang, B.S.; Ren, F.; LaRoche, J.R.

    2004-10-11

    Pt Schottky diodes were formed on single ZnO nanowires grown by site-selective molecular-beam epitaxy and then transferred to SiO{sub 2}-coated Si substrates. The diodes exhibit excellent ideality factors of 1.1 at 25 deg. C and very low (1.5x10{sup -10} A, equivalent to 2.35 A cm{sup -2}, at -10 V) reverse currents. The nanowire diodes show a strong photoresponse, with the current-voltage characteristics becoming ohmic under ultraviolet illumination (366 nm light). The on-off current ratio of the diodes at 0.15/-5 V was {approx}6. These results show the ability to manipulate the electron transport in nanoscale ZnO devices.

  11. Status of Genesis Mo-Pt Foils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Allton, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.; Butterworth, A. L.; Caffee, M. W.; Clark, B.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Komura, K.; Westphal, A. J.; Welten, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    A total of 8,000 sq cm of Mo-coated Pt foils were exposed to solar wind for 884 days by the Genesis mission. Solar wind ions were captured in the surface of the Mo. Our objective is the measurement of long-lived radionuclides, such as Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36, and Mn-53, and short-lived radionuclides, such as Na-22 and Mn-54, in the captured sample of solar wind. The expected flux of these nuclides in the solar wind is 100 atom/sq cm yr or less. The hard landing of the SRC (Sample Return Capsule) at UTTR (Utah Test and Training Range) has resulted in contaminated and crumpled foils. Here we present a status report and revised plan for processing the foils.

  12. Radiolytic preparation of nanosized Pt particles in sodium zeolite A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Kapoor, S.; Kulshreshtha, S. K.

    2002-04-01

    Nanosized platinum metal particles in zeolite NaA have been prepared by four different methods, namely, (I) γ-radiolysis of zeolite A sample exchanged with [Pt(NH 3) 4] 2+, (II) γ-radiolysis of precursor gel containing Pt 2+ ions followed by hydrothermal crystallisation to form zeolite A, (III) hydrogen reduction of Pt 2+ ions containing precursor gel followed by hydrothermal crystallisation and (IV) impregnation of zeolite A with H 2PtCl 6 solution followed by reduction at 200 °C in hydrogen flow. The size of Pt metal particles has been evaluated from X-ray line broadening and TEM and is found to be in the range of 5-15 nm for samples II, III and IV. Based on catalytic activity of these samples for hydrogenation of ethylene and cyclohexene, it is inferred that for sample I, Pt metal particles are confined to the pores of zeolite A. Unlike this, the Pt metal particles are randomly distributed in the zeolite matrix for samples II and III. For sample IV, the Pt metal particles are present over the surface of zeolite A.

  13. Thermochemistry of Pt-Fullerene Complexes: Semiempirical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2009-07-01

    Modified Neglect of Differential Overlap (MNDO) and MNDO/d based semiempirical methods are widely employed to explore structure and thermochemistry of molecular systems. In this work, the AM1/d method has been parametrized for systems containing platinum. The proposed scheme delivers excellent performance for binding energies of Pt complexes with ethylene and large π conjugated hydrocarbons. The estimated bond energies accurately reproduce the results of MP4(SDQ) calculations and show significant improvement over DFT (B3LYP and M05) data. We apply the AM1/d scheme to explore the structure and thermochemistry of several Pt compounds with C60 and C70. The calculated binding energies of bare Pt atoms and [Pt(PH3)2] units to the fullerenes are 75 and 45 kcal/mol, respectively. We find that coordination of a single metal center to C60 activates the fullerene cage making subsequent coordination of Pt more favorable. The bond energy [C60-PtC60] is calculated to be 65 kcal/mol. The estimated reaction enthalpies are useful for exploring the stability of PtxC60 polymer systems and their interaction with phosphines. AM1/d predicts a very low barrier to rotation of the coordinated fullerenes in [Pt(C60)2]. The AM1/d scheme is computationally very efficient and can be employed to obtain fast quantitative estimates for binding energies and structural parameters of Pt complexes with large π conjugated systems like fullerenes and carbon nanotubes.

  14. Controlled Synthesis and Assembly of FePt Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-20

    Monodisperse 4 nm FePt magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by superhydride reduction of FeCl{sub 2} and Pt(acac){sub 2} at high temperature, and thin assemblies of FePt nanoparticles with controlled thickness were formed through polymer mediated self-assembly. Adding superhydride (LiBEt{sub 3}H) to the organic solution of FeCl{sub 2} and Pt(acac){sub 2} in the presence of oleic acid, oleylamine and 1,2-hexadecanediol at 200 C, followed by refluxing at 263 C led to monodisperse 4 nm FePt nanoparticles. The initial molar ratio of the metal precursors was retained during the synthesis; and the final FePt composition of the particles was readily tuned. Alternatively absorbing a layer of polyethylenimine (PEI) and the FePt nanoparticles onto a solid substrate resulted in nanoparticle assemblies with tunable thickness. Chemical analysis of the assemblies revealed that more iron oxide was present in the thinner assemblies annealed at lower temperature or for shorter time. Thermal annealing induced the internal particle structure change from chemically disordered fee to chemically ordered fct and transformed the thin assembly from superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic. This controlled synthesis and assembly can be used to fabricate FePt nanoparticle-based functional devices for future nanomagnetic applications.

  15. Modifying exchange-spring behavior of CoPt/NiFe bilayer by inserting a Pt or Ru spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Jen-Hwa Tsai, C. L.; Lee, C.-M.; Saravanan, P.

    2015-05-07

    We herein explore the possibility of obtaining tunable tilted magnetic anisotropy in ordered-CoPt (5 nm)/NiFe(t{sub NiFe}) bilayers through modifying their exchange spring behavior by inserting Pt and Ru-spacers. The tuning process of tilt angle magnetization of NiFe-layer was systematically investigated by varying the Pt or Ru thickness (t{sub Pt} or t{sub Ru}) from 0 to 8 nm at different thicknesses of NiFe (t{sub NiFe} = 1.5, 4.0, and 6.0 nm). Polar magneto-optic Kerr effect (p-MOKE) studies reveal that the bilayers grown in absence of spacers exhibit almost a rectangular hysteresis loop. With the insertion of Pt-spacer, the loop becomes more and more tilted as t{sub Pt} increases; whereas, in the case of Ru-spacer, the nature of the loops is not simply changing in one direction. The estimated SQR{sub ⊥} (= θ{sub r}/θ{sub s}) values from the p-MOKE loops are found to monotonically decrease with increasing t{sub Pt} when t{sub Pt} ≦ 4 nm. In contrast, in the case of Ru-spacer, an oscillatory behavior for the SQR{sub ⊥} values is apparent when t{sub Ru} ≦ 4 nm. As a result, an oscillatory tilted angle of NiFe spin configuration was obtained in the case of Ru-spacer; while a decoupling effect was prominent for the Pt-spacer. The results of present study reveal that the insertion of Pt and Ru-spacers as an appropriate means for realizing tunable tilted magnetic anisotropy in the CoPt/NiFe exchange springs.

  16. Fine grains ceramics of PIN-PT, PIN-PMN-PT and PMN-PT systems: drift of the dielectric constant under high electric field.

    PubMed

    Pham-Thi, M; Augier, C; Dammak, H; Gaucher, P

    2006-12-22

    Lead-based ferroelectric ceramics with (1-x)Pb(B1 B2)O3-xPbTiO3 formula have emerged as a group of promising materials for various applications like ultrasonic sonars or medical imaging transducers. (1-x)PMN-xPT, (1-x)PIN-xPT and ternary solutions xPIN-yPMN-zPT ceramics are synthesised using the solid state reaction method. Our objective is to achieve higher structural transition temperatures than those of PMN-PT ceramics with as good dielectric, piezoelectric and electromechanical properties. Ceramics capacitance and loss tangent are measured when the ac field of measurement increases up to E=500 V/mm. Behaviours of these materials under ac field are related to their coercive field and Curie temperature.

  17. Ferroelectric Properties of Pt/Pb5Ge3O11/Pt and Pt/Pb5Ge3O11/HfO2/Si Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Shuichiro; Aizawa, Koji; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    The ferroelectric properties of metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) capacitors with a Pt/Pb5Ge3O11(PGO)/Pt structure and metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) diodes with a Pt/PGO/HfO2/Si structure were investigated. C-axis-oriented PGO thin films were formed on both Pt/SiO2/Si and HfO2 (6 nm)/Si structures by a sol-gel method. Typical values of remanent polarization (2Pr), coercive field (2Ec), and dielectric constant in the MFM capacitors were 5.7 μC/cm2, 63 kV/cm, and 50, respectively, and the remanent polarization gradually increased with the switching pulses for up to 1 × 1010 cycles. It was also found that the memory window in the MFIS diodes with a 340-nm-thick PGO film was as large as 1.3 V.

  18. Spin-orbit torque in Pt/CoNiCo/Pt symmetric devices

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meiyin; Cai, Kaiming; Ju, Hailang; Edmonds, Kevin William; Yang, Guang; Liu, Shuai; Li, Baohe; Zhang, Bao; Sheng, Yu; Wang, Shouguo; Ji, Yang; Wang, Kaiyou

    2016-01-01

    Current induced magnetization switching by spin-orbit torques offers an energy-efficient means of writing information in heavy metal/ferromagnet (FM) multilayer systems. The relative contributions of field-like torques and damping-like torques to the magnetization switching induced by the electrical current are still under debate. Here, we describe a device based on a symmetric Pt/FM/Pt structure, in which we demonstrate a strong damping-like torque from the spin Hall effect and unmeasurable field-like torque from Rashba effect. The spin-orbit effective fields due to the spin Hall effect were investigated quantitatively and were found to be consistent with the switching effective fields after accounting for the switching current reduction due to thermal fluctuations from the current pulse. A non-linear dependence of deterministic switching of average Mz on the in-plane magnetic field was revealed, which could be explained and understood by micromagnetic simulation. PMID:26856379

  19. Spin-orbit torque in Pt/CoNiCo/Pt symmetric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meiyin; Cai, Kaiming; Ju, Hailang; Edmonds, Kevin William; Yang, Guang; Liu, Shuai; Li, Baohe; Zhang, Bao; Sheng, Yu; Wang, Shouguo; Ji, Yang; Wang, Kaiyou

    2016-02-01

    Current induced magnetization switching by spin-orbit torques offers an energy-efficient means of writing information in heavy metal/ferromagnet (FM) multilayer systems. The relative contributions of field-like torques and damping-like torques to the magnetization switching induced by the electrical current are still under debate. Here, we describe a device based on a symmetric Pt/FM/Pt structure, in which we demonstrate a strong damping-like torque from the spin Hall effect and unmeasurable field-like torque from Rashba effect. The spin-orbit effective fields due to the spin Hall effect were investigated quantitatively and were found to be consistent with the switching effective fields after accounting for the switching current reduction due to thermal fluctuations from the current pulse. A non-linear dependence of deterministic switching of average Mz on the in-plane magnetic field was revealed, which could be explained and understood by micromagnetic simulation.

  20. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Schlitz, Richard; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2015-03-30

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance G{sub i} plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in G{sub i} between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures.

  1. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  5. Magnetic CoPt (60-70 wt%Pt) microstructures fabricated by the electrochemical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, M.; Gómez, E.; Vallés, E.

    2012-05-01

    CoPt microstructures, in the form of both discontinuous layers and patterned arrays, of 60-70 wt% Pt and nanometric thickness have been grown by electrodeposition through a resist mask prepared directly onto a glass/ITO substrate. This substrate was selected because its conductive ITO layer permits the electrodeposition process but does not show magnetic response. The lack of magnetic response of the substrate enables the magnetic properties of the microstructures deposited over it to be measured directly. Test microstructures of the different aspect ratio were successfully prepared, which confirms the suitability of the used bath; a good definition of both has been attained in spite of the significant hydrogen co-evolution. The deposition conditions have been adjusted to obtain a highly distorted hcp crystalline structure. Differences in the magnetic behaviour of the microstructures were observed depending on the orientations of the magnetic field applied. This work demonstrates the capability of the electrodeposition method to grow well-defined nanometric thick microstructures of hcp magnetic CoPt alloy with modulable magnetic properties as a function of the orientation of the applied magnetic field, microstructures which could be directly incorporated in magnetic microelectromechanical systems.

  6. Effect of interfacial intermixing on the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in Pt/Co/Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Adam W. J.; Shepley, Philippa M.; Marrows, Christopher H.; Moore, Thomas A.

    2017-02-01

    We study the effect of sputter-deposition conditions, namely, substrate temperature and chamber base pressure, upon the interface quality of epitaxial Pt/Co/Pt thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Here we define interface quality to be the inverse of the sum in quadrature of roughness and intermixing. We find that samples with the top Co/Pt layers grown at 250 ∘C exhibit a local maximum in roughness intermixing and that the interface quality is better for lower or higher deposition temperatures, up to 400 ∘C,above which the interface quality degrades. Imaging the expansion of magnetic domains in an in-plane field using wide-field Kerr microscopy, we determine the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in films in the deposition temperature range 100 ∘C to 300 ∘C . We find that the net DMI increases as the difference between top and bottom Co interface quality increases. Furthermore, for sufficiently low base pressures, the net DMI increases linearly with the deposition temperature, indicating that fine-tuning of the DMI may be achieved via the deposition conditions.

  7. Shape-selective enantioselective hydrogenation on Pt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Erik; Vargas, Angelo; Mallat, Tamas; Baiker, Alfons

    2009-09-02

    The structure sensitivity of enantioselective hydrogenations on chirally modified metals was investigated using Pt nanoparticles of different shapes. All three samples had an average particle size of 10 nm, but the fraction of dominantly cubic, cubooctahedral, and octahedral particles varied with decreasing {100} and increasing {111} faces in the same order. In the absence of chiral modifier the hydrogenation of ethyl pyruvate was independent of the shape of the Pt nanoparticles; variation of the specific reaction rates did not exceed the experimental error on all self-prepared catalysts and on a commercial Pt/Al(2)O(3) used as reference. Addition of cinchonidine or quinine induced a significant rate enhancement by a factor of 4-15, and the rate was always higher with quinine. Also, 72-92% ees were achieved, and the reaction was shape selective: both the rate and the ee increased with increasing Pt{111}/Pt{100} ratio. A similar correlation in the hydrogenation of ketopantolactone confirmed that decarbonylation or aldol-type side reactions of ethyl pyruvate were not the reason for structure sensitivity. A combined catalytic and theoretical study revealed that the probable origin of the particle shape dependency of enantioselective hydrogenation is the adsorption behavior of the cinchona alkaloid. DFT studies of cinchonidine interacting with Pt(100) and Pt(111) terraces indicated a remarkably stronger interaction on the former crystallographic face by ca. 155 kJ/mol. The higher adsorption strength on Pt(100) was corroborated experimentally by the faster hydrogenation of the homoaromatic ring of the alkaloid, which fragment interacts the strongest with Pt during its adsorption. Thus, an ideal catalyst for the hydrogenation of activated ketones contains dominantly Pt{111} terraces, which crystallographic face is more active and affords higher enantioselectivity, combined with the higher stability of the modifier.

  8. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Induced Magnetic Structures of Pt Layers in the Fe/Pt Multilayers Investigated by Resonant X-ray Magnetic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mihee; Takechi, Ryota; Hosoito, Nobuyoshi

    2017-02-01

    Depth distribution of the magnetization induced in the paramagnetic Pt layers of Fe/Pt multilayers was investigated by resonant X-ray magnetic scattering (RXMS) near the Pt L3 absorption edge. Two samples with different perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) were chosen for RXMS measurements. The magnetic depth profile of the Pt layer was determined in the magnetic saturation state of the Fe magnetization with the sample of weak PMA. The magnetization process of the Pt layer was investigated with the sample of moderate PMA. It is found that the Pt atoms near the interface region have a perpendicular component of the induced magnetization even in the saturation state of the Fe magnetization, suggesting that the PMA of Fe/Pt multilayers originates from the Pt atoms near the interface region. Concerning the magnetization process, the induced Pt magnetization is not proportional to the Fe magnetization. This implies a complicated magnetizing mechanism of the Pt layer by the Fe magnetization.

  9. Twofold PT symmetry in nonlinearly damped dynamical systems and tailoring PT regions with position-dependent loss-gain profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthiga, S.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the remarkable role of position-dependent damping in determining the parametric regions of symmetry breaking in nonlinear PT -symmetric systems. We illustrate the nature of PT -symmetry preservation and breaking with reference to a remarkable integrable scalar nonlinear system. In the two-dimensional cases of such position-dependent damped systems, we unveil the existence of a class of twofold-PT -symmetric systems which have twofold PT symmetries. We analyze the dynamics of these systems and show how symmetry breaking occurs, that is, whether the symmetry breaking of the two PT symmetries occurs in pair or occurs one by one. The addition of linear damping in these nonlinearly damped systems induces competition between the two types of damping. This competition results in a PT phase transition in which the PT symmetry is broken for lower loss or gain strength and is restored by increasing the loss or gain strength. We also show that by properly designing the form of the position-dependent damping, we can tailor the PT -symmetric regions of the system.

  10. Low Pt-content ternary PdCuPt nanodendrites: an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Song, Junhua; Zhang, Peina; Engelhard, Mark H.; Xia, Haibing; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic nanostructures are capturing increasing attentions in electrocatalysis owing to their unique structural features and low density. Herein, we report for the first time bromide ions mediated synthesis of low-Pt-content PdCuPt ternary nanodendrites via galvanic replacement reaction between Pt precursor and PdCu template in aqueous solution. The experimental results show that the ternary PdCuPt nanodendrites present enhanced electrocatalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction in acid solution compared with commercial Pt/C as well as some state-of-the-art catalysts. In details, the mass activity of the PdCuPt catalyst with optimized composition is 1.73 A/mgPt at 0.85 V vs RHE, which is 14 times higher than that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover, the long-term stability test demonstrates its better durability in acid solution. After 5k cycles, there is still 70% electrochemical surface area maintained. This method provides an efficient way to synthesize trimetallic alloys with controllable composition and specific structure for oxygen reduction reaction.

  11. Impact of buffer layer and Pt thickness on the interface structure and magnetic properties in (Co/Pt) multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersweiler, M.; Dumesnil, K.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of Pt thickness on the interface structure (roughness / intermixing) and magnetic properties has been investigated for (Co / Pt) multilayers sputtered on a Pt or a thin oxide (MgO or AlO x ) buffer layer. When Pt thickness increases from 1.2 nm-2.2 nm, we observe that the effective anisotropy increases with the Pt thickness, simultaneously with the decrease of roughness, i.e. the occurrence of sharper interfaces. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is still achieved on the oxide buffer layers, but with a lower effective anisotropy correlated to more perturbed interfaces. The detailed analysis of the saturation magnetization shows that: (i) M s is significantly enhanced in the case of rough/intermixed interfaces, which is attributed to and discussed in the framework of Pt induced polarization, (ii) the change in volume dipolar anisotropy is the main factor responsible for the reduction of K eff for systems grown on oxides. Beyond the major role of volume dipolar contribution that reduces PMA, a supplemental positive contribution promoting PMA can be invoked for rough interfaces and large M s (deposit on oxide). This contribution is consistent with a dipolar surface anisotropy term and increases for rough interfaces, in contrast to the Néel surface anisotropy. These opposite variations may interestingly lead to an enhanced anisotropy in (Co / Pt) stackings grown on oxides compared to systems deposited on Pt, i.e. with sharper interfaces.

  12. Impact of buffer layer and Pt thickness on the interface structure and magnetic properties in (Co/Pt) multilayers.

    PubMed

    Bersweiler, M; Dumesnil, K; Lacour, D; Hehn, M

    2016-08-24

    The influence of Pt thickness on the interface structure (roughness / intermixing) and magnetic properties has been investigated for (Co / Pt) multilayers sputtered on a Pt or a thin oxide (MgO or AlO x ) buffer layer. When Pt thickness increases from 1.2 nm-2.2 nm, we observe that the effective anisotropy increases with the Pt thickness, simultaneously with the decrease of roughness, i.e. the occurrence of sharper interfaces. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is still achieved on the oxide buffer layers, but with a lower effective anisotropy correlated to more perturbed interfaces. The detailed analysis of the saturation magnetization shows that: (i) M s is significantly enhanced in the case of rough/intermixed interfaces, which is attributed to and discussed in the framework of Pt induced polarization, (ii) the change in volume dipolar anisotropy is the main factor responsible for the reduction of K eff for systems grown on oxides. Beyond the major role of volume dipolar contribution that reduces PMA, a supplemental positive contribution promoting PMA can be invoked for rough interfaces and large M s (deposit on oxide). This contribution is consistent with a dipolar surface anisotropy term and increases for rough interfaces, in contrast to the Néel surface anisotropy. These opposite variations may interestingly lead to an enhanced anisotropy in (Co / Pt) stackings grown on oxides compared to systems deposited on Pt, i.e. with sharper interfaces.

  13. Description of Saccharomyces turicensis sp. nov., a new species from kefyr.

    PubMed

    Wyder, M T; Meile, L; Teuber, M

    1999-09-01

    The new species Saccharomyces turicensis sp. nov. isolated from different kefyr grains is described. Although its morphological properties differ, its physiological characteristics come close to those of Saccharomyces bayanus Saccardo and Saccharomyces pastorianus Reess ex E. C. Hansen. However, electrophoretic karyotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region yield clear differences. Sequences (270 nucleotides) of the D2 domain at the 5'-terminal end of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene reveal 98.0% identity with Saccharomyces exiguus. Since strains of a particular yeast species usually show less than 1% substitution in the D2 domain, the yeast in question is considered to be a new species. The name Saccharomyces turicensis is proposed indicating the place Zürich (Turicum in Latin) where the yeast had been isolated.

  14. Construction of Killer Industrial Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hau-1 and its Fermentation Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Bijender K.; Sharma, S.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 475, a killer strain. The resultant fusants were characterized for desirable fermentation characteristics. All the technologically important characteristics of distillery yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 were retained in the fusants, and in addition the killer trait was also introduced into them. Further, the killer activity was found to be stably maintained during hostile conditions of ethanol fermentations in dextrose or molasses, and even during biomass recycling. PMID:24031519

  15. Laser-excited luminescence and absorption study of mixed valence for K 2Pt(CN) 4—K 2Pt(CN) 6 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasi Viswanath, A.; Smith, Wayne L.; Patterson, H.

    1982-04-01

    Crystals of K 2Pt(CN) 6 doped with Pt(CN) 2-4 show an absorption band at 337 nm which is assigned as a mixed-valence (MV) transition from Pt (II) to Pt(IV). From a Hush model analysis, the absorption band is interpreted to be class II in the Day—Robin scheme. When the MV band is laser excited at 337 nm, emmision is observed from Pt(CN) 2-4 clusters.

  16. Composition-Mediated Order-Disorder Transformation in FePt Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Cullen, David A.; Tracy, Joseph B.

    2013-07-08

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract Heat-treated alloy FePt nanoparticles transform into L10 FePt and mixed L10/L12 FePt3 intermetallic phases. Enrichment in Pt in some nanoparticles, rather than intrinsic thermodynamic effects, drives phase segregation. FePt nanoparticles of uniform, equimolar composition are expected to transform into phase-pure, highly ordered L10 FePt nanoparticles.

  17. A Selective Blocking Method To Control the Overgrowth of Pt on Au Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A method for the preparation of smooth deposits of Pt on Au nanorods is described, involving sequential deposition steps with selective blocking of surface sites that reduces Pt-on-Pt deposition. The Au–Pt nanorods prepared by this method have higher long-term stability than those prepared by standard Pt deposition. Electrochemical data show that the resulting structure has more extended regions of Pt surface and enhanced activity toward the carbon monoxide oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. PMID:23594230

  18. Biotechnology of non-Saccharomyces yeasts-the basidiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric A

    2013-09-01

    Yeasts are the major producer of biotechnology products worldwide, exceeding production in capacity and economic revenues of other groups of industrial microorganisms. Yeasts have wide-ranging fundamental and industrial importance in scientific, food, medical, and agricultural disciplines (Fig. 1). Saccharomyces is the most important genus of yeast from fundamental and applied perspectives and has been expansively studied. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts (non-conventional yeasts) including members of the Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes also have substantial current utility and potential applicability in biotechnology. In an earlier mini-review, "Biotechnology of non-Saccharomyces yeasts-the ascomycetes" (Johnson Appl Microb Biotechnol 97: 503-517, 2013), the extensive biotechnological utility and potential of ascomycetous yeasts are described. Ascomycetous yeasts are particularly important in food and ethanol formation, production of single-cell protein, feeds and fodder, heterologous production of proteins and enzymes, and as model and fundamental organisms for the delineation of genes and their function in mammalian and human metabolism and disease processes. In contrast, the roles of basidiomycetous yeasts in biotechnology have mainly been evaluated only in the past few decades and compared to the ascomycetous yeasts and currently have limited industrial utility. From a biotechnology perspective, the basidiomycetous yeasts are known mainly for the production of enzymes used in pharmaceutical and chemical synthesis, for production of certain classes of primary and secondary metabolites such as terpenoids and carotenoids, for aerobic catabolism of complex carbon sources, and for bioremediation of environmental pollutants and xenotoxicants. Notwithstanding, the basidiomycetous yeasts appear to have considerable potential in biotechnology owing to their catabolic utilities, formation of enzymes acting on recalcitrant substrates, and through the production of unique primary

  19. Prion Variants and Species Barriers Among Saccharomyces Ure2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Edskes, Herman K.; McCann, Lindsay M.; Hebert, Andrea M.; Wickner, Reed B.

    2009-01-01

    As hamster scrapie cannot infect mice, due to sequence differences in their PrP proteins, we find “species barriers” to transmission of the [URE3] prion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae among Ure2 proteins of S. cerevisiae, paradoxus, bayanus, cariocanus, and mikatae on the basis of differences among their Ure2p prion domain sequences. The rapid variation of the N-terminal Ure2p prion domains results in protection against the detrimental effects of infection by a prion, just as the PrP residue 129 Met/Val polymorphism may have arisen to protect humans from the effects of cannibalism. Just as spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion variant is less impaired by species barriers than is sheep scrapie, we find that some [URE3] prion variants are infectious to another yeast species while other variants (with the identical amino acid sequence) are not. The species barrier is thus prion variant dependent as in mammals. [URE3] prion variant characteristics are maintained even on passage through the Ure2p of another species. Ure2p of Saccharomyces castelli has an N-terminal Q/N-rich “prion domain” but does not form prions (in S. cerevisiae) and is not infected with [URE3] from Ure2p of other Saccharomyces. This implies that conservation of its prion domain is not for the purpose of forming prions. Indeed the Ure2p prion domain has been shown to be important, though not essential, for the nitrogen catabolism regulatory role of the protein. PMID:19124570

  20. Flocculation of industrial and laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sieiro, C; Reboredo, N M; Villa, T G

    1995-06-01

    A comparative study has been made of different laboratory and industrial wild-type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to their flocculation behavior. All strains were inhibited by mannose and only one by maltose. In regard to the stability of these characters in the presence of proteases and high salt concentrations, a relevant degree of variation was found among the strains. This was to such an extent that it did not allow their inclusion in the Flo1 or NewFlo phenotypes. Genetic characterization of one wild-type strain revealed that the flocculation-governing gene was allelic to FLO1 found in genetic strains.

  1. [Purification and properties of intercellular inorganic pyrophosphatase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Gou, P; Yang, S

    1998-06-01

    An inorganic pyrophosphatase (EC3.6.1.1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to PAGE homogeneity by sonication disruption, (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were 7.4-7.8 and 60 degrees C, respectively. The Km was 19.3 mmol/L. The enzyme required Mg2+ as a cofactor for hydrolysis of pyrophosphate and was inhibited by Ca2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, Mn2+.

  2. Improved anaerobic use of arginine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Martin, Olga; Brandriss, Marjorie C; Schneider, Gisbert; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2003-03-01

    Anaerobic arginine catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was genetically modified to allow assimilation of all four rather than just three of the nitrogen atoms in arginine. This was accomplished by bypassing normal formation of proline, an unusable nitrogen source in the absence of oxygen, and causing formation of glutamate instead. A pro3 ure2 strain expressing a PGK1 promoter-driven PUT2 allele encoding Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase lacking a mitochondrial targeting sequence produced significant cytoplasmic activity, accumulated twice as much intracellular glutamate, and produced twice as much cell mass as the parent when grown anaerobically on limiting arginine as sole nitrogen source.

  3. Evolution and variation of the yeast (Saccharomyces) genome.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, R K

    2000-04-01

    In this review we describe the role of the yeast Saccharomyces in the development of human societies including the use of this organism in the making of wine, bread, beer, and distilled beverages. We also discuss the tremendous diversity of yeast found in natural (i.e., noninoculated) wine fermentations and the scientific uses of yeast over the past 60 years. In conclusion, we present ideas on the model of "genome renewal" and the use of this model to explain the mode by which yeast has evolved and how diversity can be generated.

  4. Fluid-phase endocytosis in yeasts other than Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, N; Puente, P; Leal, F

    1990-05-01

    A FITC-dextran internalization assay with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as positive control was used to determine whether fluid-phase endocytosis is a general characteristic of yeasts. Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Pichia polymorpha, Kluyveromyces phaseolosporus, Yarrowia lipolytica and Candida albicans were clearly positive, whereas results obtained with Debaryomyces marama were inconclusive. In all cases internalized FITC-dextran was found to be localized in the vacuoles and the process was always time- and temperature-dependent. Lower eucaryotes, particularly yeasts, appear to have the ability to incorporate substances from the extracellular medium through fluid-phase endocytosis.

  5. High-throughput expression in microplate format in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Holz, Caterina; Lang, Christine

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a high-throughput technology that allows parallel expression, purification, and analysis of large numbers of cloned cDNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The technology is based on a vector for intracellular protein expression under control of the inducible CUP1 promoter, where the gene products are fused to specific peptide sequences. These N-terminal and C-terminal epitope tags allow the immunological identification and purification of the gene products independent of the protein produced. By introducing the method of recombinational cloning we avoid time-consuming re-cloning steps and enable the easy switching between different expression vectors and host systems.

  6. Expression of acylphosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhances ethanol fermentation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Raugei, G.; Modesti, A.; Magherini, F.

    1996-06-01

    Previous experiments in vitro have demonstrated the ability of acylphosphatase to increase the rate of glucose fermentation in yeast. To evaluate the possibility of increasing fermentation in vivo also, a chemically synthesized DNA sequence coding for human muscle acylphosphatase was expressed at high level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ethanol production was measured in these engineered strains in comparison with a control. Acylphosphatase expression strongly increased the rate of ethanol production both in aerobic and anaerobic culture. This finding may be potentially important for the development of more efficient industrial fermentation processes. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Serotypes in Saccharomyces telluris: Their relation to source of isolation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasenclever, H.F.; Kocan, R.M.

    1973-01-01

    Three serotypes have been characterized with three reference strains of Saccharomyces telluris and designated as A, B, and C. One reference strain of Torpulopsis bovina, the imperfect form of S. telluris, belonged to serotype B. Strains of S. telluris isolated from four columbid species were serotyped. All 98 strains of this yeast isolated from Columba livia belonged to serotype B. Three other columbid species, C. leucocephala, C. fasciata, and Zenaidura macroura harbored strains of serotype C only. Serotype A was not isolated from any of the avian species.

  8. Identification of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Hildyard, John C W; Halestrap, Andrew P

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate transport is fundamental for metabolism and mediated by a specific inhibitable carrier. We have identified the yeast mitochondrial pyruvate carrier by measuring inhibitor-sensitive pyruvate uptake into mitochondria from 18 different Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants, each lacking an unattributed member of the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF). Only mitochondria from the YIL006w deletion mutant exhibited no inhibitor-sensitive pyruvate transport, but otherwise behaved normally. YIL006w encodes a 41.9 kDa MCF member with homologous proteins present in both the human and mouse genomes. PMID:12887330

  9. Design criteria for stable Pt/C fuel cell catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Katsounaros, Ioannis; Witte, Jonathon; Bongard, Hans J; Topalov, Angel A; Baldizzone, Claudio; Mezzavilla, Stefano; Schüth, Ferdi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Platinum and Pt alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon are the state of the art electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To develop a better understanding on how material design can influence the degradation processes on the nanoscale, three specific Pt/C catalysts with different structural characteristics were investigated in depth: a conventional Pt/Vulcan catalyst with a particle size of 3–4 nm and two Pt@HGS catalysts with different particle size, 1–2 nm and 3–4 nm. Specifically, Pt@HGS corresponds to platinum nanoparticles incorporated and confined within the pore structure of the nanostructured carbon support, i.e., hollow graphitic spheres (HGS). All three materials are characterized by the same platinum loading, so that the differences in their performance can be correlated to the structural characteristics of each material. The comparison of the activity and stability behavior of the three catalysts, as obtained from thin film rotating disk electrode measurements and identical location electron microscopy, is also extended to commercial materials and used as a basis for a discussion of general fuel cell catalyst design principles. Namely, the effects of particle size, inter-particle distance, certain support characteristics and thermal treatment on the catalyst performance and in particular the catalyst stability are evaluated. Based on our results, a set of design criteria for more stable and active Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C materials is suggested. PMID:24605273

  10. Nontrivial anomalous Hall effect in ultrathin Pt/permalloy bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanqing; Shan, Rong

    2015-03-01

    Anomalous Hall effect of Pt (2.5 nm)/permalloy bilayers with the thickness tPy = 0.6 ~10 nm; Pt/permalloy (2.2 nm) bilayers with the thickness tPt = 1.5 ~10 nm and Pt (2.5 nm)/permalloy (2.2 nm) bilayers with the post-annealing temperature 100 ~500° grown on MgO (001) substrates are investigated. The Pt/permalloy bilayer shows distinguished performance from the single permalloy layer due to the interfacial influence. Effective magnetic anisotropy of the bilayer with tPy <2.2 nm turns to be perpendicular to the film plane and it increases with decreasing measured temperature. More interestingly, the anomalous Hall effect is also greatly enhanced in these Pt/permalloy bilayers, comparing with that in bulk permalloy. The parameters presenting skew scattering, side jump and intrinsic contribution become extremely large, indicating a strong influence of spin orbit coupling coming from Pt/permalloy interface on the anomalous Hall effect.

  11. Electronic Structure and Phase Stability of PdPt Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa

    2016-03-03

    To understand the origin of the physicochemical nature of bimetallic PdPt nanoparticles, we theoretically investigated the phase stability and electronic structure employing the PdPt nanoparticles models consisting of 711 atoms (ca. 3 nm). For the Pd-Pt core-shell nanoparticle, the PdPt solid-solution phase was found to be a thermodynamically stable phase in the nanoparticle as the result of difference in surface energy of Pd and Pt nanoparticles and configurational entropy effect, while it is well known that the Pd and Pt are the immiscible combination in the bulk phase. The electronic structure of nanoparticles is conducted to find that the electron transfer occurs locally within surface and subsurface layers. In addition, the electron transfer from Pd to Pt at the interfacial layers in core-shell nanoparticles is observed, which leads to unique geometrical and electronic structure changes. Our results show a clue for the tunability of the electronic structure of nanoparticles by controlling the arrangement in the nanoparticles.

  12. Macromolecular Pt(IV) Prodrugs from Poly(organo)phosphazenes

    PubMed Central

    Banfić, Jelena; Theiner, Sarah; Körner, Wilfried; Brüggemann, Oliver; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Heffeter, Petra; Teasdale, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The preparation of novel macromolecular prodrugs via the conjugation of two platinum(IV) complexes to suitably functionalized poly(organo)phosphazenes is presented. The inorganic/organic polymers provide carriers with controlled dimensions due to the use of living cationic polymerization and allow the preparation of conjugates with excellent aqueous solubility but long-term hydrolytic degradability. The macromolecular Pt(IV) prodrugs are designed to undergo intracellular reduction and simultaneous release from the macromolecular carrier to present the active Pt(II) drug derivatives. In vitro investigations show a significantly enhanced intracellular uptake of Pt for the macromolecular prodrugs when compared to small molecule Pt complexes, which is also reflected in an increase in cytotoxicity. Interestingly, drug-resistant sublines also show a significantly smaller resistance against the conjugates compared to clinically established platinum drugs, indicating that an alternative uptake route of the Pt(IV) conjugates might also be able to overcome acquired resistance against Pt(II) drugs. In vivo studies of a selected conjugate show improved tumor shrinkage compared to the respective Pt(IV) complex. PMID:27169668

  13. Mesoporous Trimetallic PtPdRu Spheres as Superior Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Ataee-Esfahani, Hamed; Li, Cuiling; Alshehri, Saad M; Ahamad, Tansir; Henzie, Joel; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-05-17

    Mesoporous Trimetallic PtPdRu Spheres with well-defined spherical morphology and uniformly sized pores were synthesized in an aqueous solution using ascorbic acid as the reducing agent and triblock copolymer F127 as the pore directing agent. These mesoporous PtPdRu spheres exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity compared to commercial Pt black, resulting in a ∼4.9 times improvement in mass activity for the methanol oxidation reaction. The excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability are due to the unique mesoporous architecture and electronic landscape between different elements.

  14. Inverse spin Hall effect in Pt/(Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, H.; Chen, L.; Chang, H. W.; Ohno, H.; Matsukura, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate dc voltages under ferromagnetic resonance in a Pt/(Ga,Mn)As bilayer structure. A part of the observed dc voltage is shown to originate from the inverse spin Hall effect. The sign of the inverse spin Hall voltage is the same as that in Py/Pt bilayer structure, even though the stacking order of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers is opposite to each other. The spin mixing conductance at the Pt/(Ga,Mn)As interface is determined to be of the order of 10{sup 19 }m{sup −2}, which is about ten times greater than that of (Ga,Mn)As/p-GaAs.

  15. Bound states of PT-symmetric separable potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Carl M.; Jones, Hugh F.

    2011-09-15

    All of the PT-symmetric potentials that have been studied so far have been local. In this paper, nonlocal PT-symmetric separable potentials of the form V(x,y)=i{epsilon}[U(x)U(y)-U(-x)U(-y)], where U(x) is real, are examined. Two specific models are examined. In each case, it is shown that there is a parametric region of the coupling strength {epsilon} for which the PT symmetry of the Hamiltonian is unbroken and the bound-state energies are real. The critical values of {epsilon} that bound this region are calculated.

  16. Surface morphology after low coverage Pt deposition on Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, Markus B.; de Beauvais, Christophe

    1994-04-01

    The morphology of a Cu(110) surface after low coverage Pt atom deposition from the vapour phase is studied with thermal energy atom scattering (TEAS) in the temperature range of 200-800 K. Both cross section measurements and diffraction analysis reveal different structures. At low temperatures, isolated defects containing a metal adatom are observed. Between 350 and 650 K, experimental results suggest that these aggregates are dissociated, leaving behind them an almost flat surface patch with an incorporated Pt atom. Above 650 K, bulk dissolution of Pt occurs.

  17. Non-Hermitian quantum Hamiltonians with PT symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jones-Smith, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh

    2010-10-15

    We formulate quantum mechanics for non-Hermitian Hamiltonians that are invariant under PT, where P is the parity and T denotes time reversal, for the case that time-reversal symmetry is odd (T{sup 2}=-1), generalizing prior work for the even case (T{sup 2}=1). We discover an analog of Kramer's theorem for PT quantum mechanics, present a prototypical example of a PT quantum system with odd time reversal, and discuss potential applications of the formalism.

  18. Giant Goos-Hänchen shift using PT symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin; Chuang, You-Lin; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2015-07-01

    Influence of PT symmetry on the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift in the reflected light is presented for an ensemble of atomic medium in a cavity, in the configuration of four-level N -type (87Rb atoms) systems driving by two copropagating strong laser fields and a weak probe field. The atom-field interaction follows the realization of PT symmetry by adjusting the coupling field detunings [J. Shenget al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 041803(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.041803]. A giant enhancement for the GH shift in the reflected light is revealed when the PT -symmetry condition is satisfied.

  19. Effects of low-intensity ultrasound on the growth, cell membrane permeability and ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chunhua; Xiong, Feng; He, Ronghai; Zhang, Weiwei; Ma, Haile

    2017-05-01

    Effects of low-intensity ultrasound (at different frequency, treatment time and power) on Saccharomyces cerevisiae in different growth phase were evaluated by the biomass in the paper. In addition, the cell membrane permeability and ethanol tolerance of sonicated Saccharomyces cerevisiae were also researched. The results revealed that the biomass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae increased by 127.03% under the optimum ultrasonic conditions such as frequency 28kHz, power 140W/L and ultrasonic time 1h when Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultured to the latent anaphase. And the membrane permeability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in latent anaphase enhanced by ultrasound, resulting in the augment of extracellular protein, nucleic acid and fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP) contents. In addition, sonication could accelerate the damage of high concentration alcohol to Saccharomyces cerevisiae although the ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was not affected significantly by ultrasound.

  20. Development of a PtSn bimetallic catalyst for direct fuel cells using bio-butanol fuel.

    PubMed

    Puthiyapura, V K; Brett, D J L; Russell, A E; Lin, W F; Hardacre, C

    2015-09-07

    Pt and PtSn catalysts were studied for n-butanol electro-oxidation at various temperatures. PtSn showed a higher activity towards butanol electro-oxidation compared to Pt in acidic media. The onset potential for n-butanol oxidation on PtSn is ∼520 mV lower than that found on Pt, and significantly lower activation energy was found for PtSn compared with that for Pt.

  1. Competing {PT} potentials and the re-entrant {PT}-symmetric phase: a particle in a box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Yogesh N.; Bagchi, Bijan

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the effects of competition between two complex, {PT}-symmetric potentials on the {PT}-symmetric phase of a ‘particle in a box’. These potentials, given by VZ(x) = iZsign(x) and Vξ(x) = iξ[δ(x - a) - δ(x + a)], represent long-range and localized gain/loss regions, respectively. We obtain the {PT}-symmetric phase in the (Z, ξ) plane, and find that for locations ±a near the edge of the box, surprisingly, the {PT}-symmetric phase is strengthened by additional losses to the loss region. Consequently, we predict that a broken {PT}-symmetry will be restored by increasing the strength ξ of the localized potential. By comparing the results for this problem and its lattice counterpart, we show that a robust {PT}-symmetric phase in the continuum is consistent with the fragile phase on the lattice. Our results demonstrate that systems with multiple, {PT}-symmetric potentials show unique, unexpected properties.

  2. Enhancement of perpendicular coercivity for CoPt top layer in CoPt/AlN multilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Youxing; Shi, Ji; Nakamura, Yoshio

    2010-07-01

    The magnetic behavior of sputter deposited AlN20 nm/[CoPt2 nm/AlN2 nm]5/CoPt(x) (x as the thickness of the top CoPt layer) multilayer structure has been studied. It has been found that the magnetic anisotropy of the structure strongly depends on thermal annealing. With increasing the annealing temperature, the film changes from the in-plane magnetic anisotropy to the perpendicular anisotropy. Especially, for the top CoPt layer, the perpendicular coercivity increases much rapidly compared with that of the CoPt layers inside the base multilayer, when increasing the annealing temperature to 500 °C or above. The coercivity difference between the top CoPt layer and the base multilayer caused in this way results in an antiparallel alignment state during the magnetization process. The perpendicular magnetization and the coercivity enhancement for the CoPt top layer are correlated with the change in the residual stress inside this layer.

  3. Monolayer PtSe 2 , a New Semiconducting Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenide, Epitaxially Grown by Direct Selenization of Pt

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yeliang; Li, Linfei; Yao, Wei; ...

    2015-05-21

    For single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) receive significant attention due to their intriguing physical properties for both fundamental research and potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics, catalysis, and so on. Here, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of high-quality single-crystal, monolayer platinum diselenide (PtSe2), a new member of the layered TMDs family, by a single step of direct selenization of a Pt(111) substrate. We found that a combination of atomic-resolution experimental characterizations and first-principle theoretic calculations reveals the atomic structure of the monolayer PtSe2/Pt(111). Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements confirm for the first time the semiconducting electronic structure of monolayer PtSe2 (in contrastmore » to its semimetallic bulk counterpart). The photocatalytic activity of monolayer PtSe2 film is evaluated by a methylene-blue photodegradation experiment, demonstrating its practical application as a promising photocatalyst. Moreover, circular polarization calculations predict that monolayer PtSe2 has also potential applications in valleytronics.« less

  4. Origin of high oxygen reduction reaction activity of Pt12 and strategy to obtain better catalyst using sub-nanosized Pt-alloy clusters

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Kasumi; Mori, Hirotoshi

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, methods to enhance the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of sub-nanosized Pt clusters were investigated in a theoretical manner. Using ab initio molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations based on density functional theory, we have succeeded in determining the origin of the superior ORR activity of Pt12 compared to that of Pt13. That is, it was clarified that the electronic structure of Pt12 fluctuates to a greater extent compared to that of Pt13, which leads to stronger resistance against catalyst poisoning by O/OH. Based on this conclusion, a set of sub-nanosized Pt-alloy clusters was also explored to find catalysts with better ORR activities and lower financial costs. It was suggested that Ga4Pt8, Ge4Pt8, and Sn4Pt8 would be good candidates for ORR catalysts. PMID:28349985

  5. Interaction of Prions Causes Heritable Traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Ryzhova, Tatyana A; Volkov, Kirill V; Zadorsky, Sergey P; Sopova, Julia V; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Galkin, Alexey P

    2016-12-01

    The concept of "protein-based inheritance" defines prions as epigenetic determinants that cause several heritable traits in eukaryotic microorganisms, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Podospora anserina. Previously, we discovered a non-chromosomal factor, [NSI+], which possesses the main features of yeast prions, including cytoplasmic infectivity, reversible curability, dominance, and non-Mendelian inheritance in meiosis. This factor causes omnipotent suppression of nonsense mutations in strains of S. cerevisiae bearing a deleted or modified Sup35 N-terminal domain. In this work, we identified protein determinants of [NSI+] using an original method of proteomic screening for prions. The suppression of nonsense mutations in [NSI+] strains is determined by the interaction between [SWI+] and [PIN+] prions. Using genetic and biochemical methods, we showed that [SWI+] is the key determinant of this nonsense suppression, whereas [PIN+] does not cause nonsense suppression by itself but strongly enhances the effect of [SWI+]. We demonstrated that interaction of [SWI+] and [PIN+] causes inactivation of SUP45 gene that leads to nonsense suppression. Our data show that prion interactions may cause heritable traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  6. Investigation of the Best Saccharomyces cerevisiae Growth Condition

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Roshanak; Salari, Rosita

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known as one of the useful yeasts which are utilized in baking and other industries. It can be easily cultured at an economic price. Today the introduction of safe and efficient carriers is being considered. Due to its generally round shape, and the volume that is enclosed by its membrane and cell wall, it is used to encapsulate active materials to protect them from degradation or to introduce a sustained release drug delivery system. Providing the best conditions in order to achieve the best morphological properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a carrier. Methods In this research, the most suitable growth condition of yeast cells which provides the best size for use as drug carriers was found by a bioreactor in a synthetic culture medium. Yeast cell reproduction and growth curves were obtained, based on pour plate colony counting data and UV/Visible sample absorption at 600 nm. Yeast cell growth patterns and growth rates were determined by Matlab mathematical software. Results Results showed that pH=4 and dissolving oxygen (DO) 5% was the best condition for yeast cells to grow and reproduce. This condition also provided the largest size (2 × 3 μ) yeast cells. Conclusion Owing to the yeast cells’ low-cost production and their structural characteristics, they could be used as potent drug carriers. Funding This work was supported by a grant from the Vice Chancellor of Research of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. PMID:28243411

  7. Why are essential genes essential? - The essentiality of Saccharomyces genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaojie; Ren, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Essential genes are defined as required for the survival of an organism or a cell. They are of particular interests, not only for their essential biological functions, but also in practical applications, such as identifying effective drug targets to pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has approximately 6,000 open reading frames, 15 to 20% of which are deemed as essential. Some of the essential genes, however, appear to perform non-essential functions, such as aging and cell death, while many of the non-essential genes play critical roles in cell survival. In this paper, we reviewed and analyzed the levels of essentiality of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes and have grouped the genes into four categories: (1) Conditional essential: essential only under certain circumstances or growth conditions; (2) Essential: required for survival under optimal growth conditions; (3) Redundant essential: synthetic lethal due to redundant pathways or gene duplication; and (4) Absolute essential: the minimal genes required for maintaining a cellular life under a stress-free environment. The essential and non-essential functions of the essential genes were further analyzed. PMID:28357303

  8. The mannoprotein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D R; Cooper, D G; Neufeld, R J

    1988-06-01

    The mannoprotein which is a major component of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier. Mannoprotein emulsifier was extracted in a high yield from whole cells of fresh bakers' yeast by two methods, by autoclaving in neutral citrate buffer and by digestion with Zymolase (Miles Laboratories; Toronto, Ontario, Canada), a beta-1,3-glucanase. Heat-extracted emulsifier was purified by ultrafiltration and contained approximately 44% carbohydrate (mannose) and 17% protein. Treatment of the emulsifier with protease eliminated emulsification. Kerosene-in-water emulsions were stabilized over a broad range of conditions, from pH 2 to 11, with up to 5% sodium chloride or up to 50% ethanol in the aqueous phase. In the presence of a low concentration of various solutes, emulsions were stable to three cycles of freezing and thawing. An emulsifying agent was extracted from each species or strain of yeast tested, including 13 species of genera other than Saccharomyces. Spent yeast from the manufacture of beer and wine was demonstrated to be a possible source for the large-scale production of this bioemulsifier.

  9. 'Yeast mail': a novel Saccharomyces application (NSA) to encrypt messages.

    PubMed

    Rosemeyer, Helmut; Paululat, Achim; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2014-09-01

    The universal genetic code is used by all life forms to encode biological information. It can also be used to encrypt semantic messages and convey them within organisms without anyone but the sender and recipient knowing, i.e., as a means of steganography. Several theoretical, but comparatively few experimental, approaches have been dedicated to this subject, so far. Here, we describe an experimental system to stably integrate encrypted messages within the yeast genome using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based, one-step homologous recombination system. Thus, DNA sequences encoding alphabetical and/or numerical information will be inherited by yeast propagation and can be sent in the form of dried yeast. Moreover, due to the availability of triple shuttle vectors, Saccharomyces cerevisiae can also be used as an intermediate construction device for transfer of information to either Drosophila or mammalian cells as steganographic containers. Besides its classical use in alcoholic fermentation and its modern use for heterologous gene expression, we here show that baker's yeast can thus be employed in a novel Saccharomyces application (NSA) as a simple steganographic container to hide and convey messages.

  10. The mannoprotein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, D R; Cooper, D G; Neufeld, R J

    1988-01-01

    The mannoprotein which is a major component of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier. Mannoprotein emulsifier was extracted in a high yield from whole cells of fresh bakers' yeast by two methods, by autoclaving in neutral citrate buffer and by digestion with Zymolase (Miles Laboratories; Toronto, Ontario, Canada), a beta-1,3-glucanase. Heat-extracted emulsifier was purified by ultrafiltration and contained approximately 44% carbohydrate (mannose) and 17% protein. Treatment of the emulsifier with protease eliminated emulsification. Kerosene-in-water emulsions were stabilized over a broad range of conditions, from pH 2 to 11, with up to 5% sodium chloride or up to 50% ethanol in the aqueous phase. In the presence of a low concentration of various solutes, emulsions were stable to three cycles of freezing and thawing. An emulsifying agent was extracted from each species or strain of yeast tested, including 13 species of genera other than Saccharomyces. Spent yeast from the manufacture of beer and wine was demonstrated to be a possible source for the large-scale production of this bioemulsifier. PMID:3046488

  11. Interaction of Prions Causes Heritable Traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ryzhova, Tatyana A.; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G.; Galkin, Alexey P.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of "protein-based inheritance" defines prions as epigenetic determinants that cause several heritable traits in eukaryotic microorganisms, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Podospora anserina. Previously, we discovered a non-chromosomal factor, [NSI+], which possesses the main features of yeast prions, including cytoplasmic infectivity, reversible curability, dominance, and non-Mendelian inheritance in meiosis. This factor causes omnipotent suppression of nonsense mutations in strains of S. cerevisiae bearing a deleted or modified Sup35 N-terminal domain. In this work, we identified protein determinants of [NSI+] using an original method of proteomic screening for prions. The suppression of nonsense mutations in [NSI+] strains is determined by the interaction between [SWI+] and [PIN+] prions. Using genetic and biochemical methods, we showed that [SWI+] is the key determinant of this nonsense suppression, whereas [PIN+] does not cause nonsense suppression by itself but strongly enhances the effect of [SWI+]. We demonstrated that interaction of [SWI+] and [PIN+] causes inactivation of SUP45 gene that leads to nonsense suppression. Our data show that prion interactions may cause heritable traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:28027291

  12. Overproduction of fatty acids in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Daoyi; Cheng, Yongbo; Zhu, Fayin; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2014-09-01

    The long hydrocarbon fatty acyl chain is energy rich, making it an ideal precursor for liquid transportation fuels and high-value oleo chemicals. As Saccharomyces cerevisiae has many advantages for industrial production compared to Escherichia coli. Here, we attempted to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for overproduction of fatty acids. First, disruption of the beta-oxidation pathway, elimination of the acyl-CoA synthetases, overexpression of different thioesterases and acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC1, and engineering the supply of precursor acetyl-CoA. The engineered strain XL122 produced more than 120 mg/L of fatty acids. In parallel, we inactivated ADH1, the dominant gene for ethanol production, to redirect the metabolic flux to fatty acids synthesis. The engineered strain DG005 produced about 140 mg/L fatty acids. Additionally, Acetyl-CoA carboxylase was identified as a critical bottleneck of fatty acids synthesis in S. cerevisiae with a cell-free system. However, overexpression of ACC1 has little effect on fatty acids biosynthesis. As it has been reported that phosphorylation of ACC1 may influent its activity, so phosphorylation sites of ACC1 were further identified. Although the regulatory mechanisms remain unclear, our results provide rationale for future studies to target this critical step. All these efforts, particularly the discovery of the limiting step are critical for developing a "cell factory" for the overproduction of fatty acids by using type I fatty acids synthase in yeast or other fungi.

  13. Mitochondrial introgression suggests extensive ancestral hybridization events among Saccharomyces species.

    PubMed

    Peris, David; Arias, Armando; Orlić, Sandi; Belloch, Carmela; Pérez-Través, Laura; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio

    2017-03-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotic plastids and mitochondrial genomes is common, and plays an important role in organism evolution. In yeasts, recent mitochondrial HGT has been suggested between S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus. However, few strains have been explored given the lack of accurate mitochondrial genome annotations. Mitochondrial genome sequences are important to understand how frequent these introgressions occur, and their role in cytonuclear incompatibilities and fitness. Indeed, most of the Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller genetic incompatibilities described in yeasts are driven by cytonuclear incompatibilities. We herein explored the mitochondrial inheritance of several worldwide distributed wild Saccharomyces species and their hybrids isolated from different sources and geographic origins. We demonstrated the existence of several recombination points in mitochondrial region COX2-ORF1, likely mediated by either the activity of the protein encoded by the ORF1 (F-SceIII) gene, a free-standing homing endonuclease, or mostly facilitated by A+T tandem repeats and regions of integration of GC clusters. These introgressions were shown to occur among strains of the same species and among strains of different species, which suggests a complex model of Saccharomyces evolution that involves several ancestral hybridization events in wild environments.

  14. Transcriptional changes associated with ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dragana; Chambers, Paul J; Stanley, Grant A; Borneman, Anthony; Fraser, Sarah

    2010-09-01

    Saccharomyces spp. are widely used for ethanol production; however, fermentation productivity is negatively affected by the impact of ethanol accumulation on yeast metabolic rate and viability. This study used microarray and statistical two-way ANOVA analysis to compare and evaluate gene expression profiles of two previously generated ethanol-tolerant mutants, CM1 and SM1, with their parent, Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A, in the presence and absence of ethanol stress. Although sharing the same parentage, the mutants were created differently: SM1 by adaptive evolution involving long-term exposure to ethanol stress and CM1 using chemical mutagenesis followed by adaptive evolution-based screening. Compared to the parent, differences in the expression levels of genes associated with a number of gene ontology categories in the mutants suggest that their improved ethanol stress response is a consequence of increased mitochondrial and NADH oxidation activities, stimulating glycolysis and other energy-yielding pathways. This leads to increased activity of energy-demanding processes associated with the production of proteins and plasma membrane components, which are necessary for acclimation to ethanol stress. It is suggested that a key function of the ethanol stress response is restoration of the NAD(+)/NADH redox balance, which increases glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and higher glycolytic flux in the ethanol-stressed cell. Both mutants achieved this by a constitutive increase in carbon flux in the glycerol pathway as a means of increasing NADH oxidation.

  15. A systematic forest survey showing an association of Saccharomyces paradoxus with oak leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Kowallik, Vienna; Greig, Duncan

    2016-08-02

    Although we understand the genetics of the laboratory model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae very well, we know little about the natural ecology and environment that shaped its genome. Most isolates of Saccharomyces paradoxus, the wild relative of S. cerevisiae, come from oak trees, but it is not known whether this is because oak is their primary habitat. We surveyed leaf litter in a forest in Northern Germany and found a strong correlation between isolation success of wild Saccharomyces and the proximity of the nearest oak. We compared the four most common tree genera and found Saccharomyces most frequently in oak litter. Interestingly, we show that Saccharomyces is much more abundant in oak leaf litter than on oak bark, suggesting that it grows in litter or soil rather than on the surfaces of oaks themselves. The distribution and abundance of Saccharomyces over the course of a year shows that oak leaf litter provides a stable habitat for the yeast, although there was significant tree-to-tree variation. Taken together, our results suggest that leaf litter rather than tree surfaces provide the better habitat for wild Saccharomyces, with oak being the preferred tree genus. 99.5% of all strains (633/636) isolated were S. paradoxus.

  16. Crystallographic parameters of compounds and solid solutions in binary systems Cu-Pt and Ga-Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Potekaev, Alexandr; Probova, Svetlana; Klopotov, Anatolii; Vlasov, Viktor; Markov, Tatiana; Klopotov, Vladimir

    2015-10-27

    The study establishes that the packing index in compounds of the system Cu-Pt is close to the value 0.74 against a slight deviation from the Zen law of atomic volumes. The compounds in the system Ga-Pt have the highest values of the packing index in the range of the equiatomic composition, which greatly exceed ψ for close-packed structures based on FCC and HCP lattices for compounds made of the same kind of atoms. A correlation between singular points on the phase diagram of the system Ga-Pt and high values of the packing index in compounds is established.

  17. Modification of magnetic properties of Pt/Co/Pt trilayers driven by nanosecond pulses of extreme ultraviolet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveklo, I.; Kurant, Z.; Bartnik, A.; Klinger, D.; Sobierajski, R.; Wawro, A.; Kisielewski, J.; Tekielak, M.; Maziewski, A.

    2017-01-01

    An irreversible rotation of magnetization from in-plane to an out-of-plane direction was induced in Pt/Co/Pt epitaxial trilayers by single and multiple pulses of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiations. The radial dependence of remanence, coercivity and saturation fields across the irradiated spots was studied with the help of magneto-optical techniques for the samples with various Co and Pt buffer layer thicknesses. The sample surface and magnetic ordering were investigated using atomic force and magnetic force microscopies. Based on magnetic and morphological changes, the residual stress after thermoplastic deformation in the spot area is discussed as a reason for the observed transformation.

  18. Asymmetric magnetic bubble expansion under in-plane field in Pt/Co/Pt: Effect of interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrijsen, R.; Hartmann, D. M. F.; van den Brink, A.; Yin, Y.; Barcones, B.; Duine, R. A.; Verheijen, M. A.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the impact of growth conditions on the asymmetric magnetic bubble expansion under an in-plane field in ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films. Specifically, using sputter deposition, we vary the Ar pressure during the growth of the top Pt layer. This induces a large change in the interfacial structure as evidenced by a factor three change in the effective perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Strikingly, a discrepancy between the current theory for domain-wall propagation based on a simple domain-wall energy density and our experimental results is found. This calls for further theoretical development of domain-wall creep under in-plane fields and varying structural asymmetry.

  19. Tunable topological states in electron-doped HTT-Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Zhenhai; Zhao, Mingwen; Liu, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Modulating topologically nontrivial states in trivial materials is of both scientific and technological interest. Using first-principles calculations, we propose a demonstration of electron-doping- (or gate-voltage-) induced multiple quantum states; namely, quantum spin Hall (QSH) and quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) states, in a single material of the organometallic framework (HTT-Pt) synthesized from triphenylene hexathiol molecules (HTT) and PtC l2 . At a low doping level, the trivial HTT-Pt converts to a QSH insulator protected by time-reversal symmetry (TRS). When the electronic doping concentration is further increased, TRS will be broken, making the HTT-Pt a QAH insulator. The band gaps of these topologically nontrivial states can be as large as 42.5 meV, suggesting robustness at high temperatures. The possibility of switching between the QSH and QAH states offers an intriguing platform for a different device paradigm by interfacing between QSH and QAH states.

  20. Single Pt nanowire electrode: preparation, electrochemistry, and electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Wu, Qingqing; Jiao, Shoufeng; Xu, Chaodi; Wang, Lun

    2013-04-16

    A single Pt nanowire electrode (SPNE) was fabricated through HF etching process from Pt disk nanoelectrode and an underpotential deposition (UPD) redox replacement technique. The electrochemical experiments showed that SPNE had steady-state electrochemical responses at redox species solution and the mass transfer rates were affected by the lengths and radii of SPNEs. The prepared SPNEs were utilized to examine the oxygen-reduction reaction in a KOH solution to explore the feasibility of electrocatalytic activity of single Pt nanowire and the results showed that the electrocatalytic activity of SPNE was dependent on the surface position of single Pt nanowire: the tip end position is more active than the sidewall position. Meanwhile, the electrocatalytic activity of SPNE was related to the radius of nanowire. These observations are not only important to understand the structure-function relationship in single nanowire level but have significant implications for the synthesis and selection of novel catalysts with high efficiency used in electrochemistry, energy, bioanalysis, etc.

  1. Thermoelectric effect in very thin film Pt/Au thermocouples

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M.C.; Vaz, A.R.; Teixeira, F.S.; Cattani, M.; Brown,I.G.

    2006-01-10

    The thickness dependence of the thermoelectric power of Pt films of variable thickness on a reference Au film has been determined for the case when the Pt film thickness, t, is not large compared to the charge carrier mean free path, {ell}, that is, t/{ell}. Pt film thicknesses down to 2.2 nm were investigated. We find that {Delta}S{sub F} = S{sub B}-S{sub F} (where S{sub B} and S{sub F} are the thermopowers of the Pt bulk and film, respectively) does not vary linearly as 1/t as is the case for thin film thermocouples when the film thickness is large compared to the charge carrier mean free path.

  2. Diastereoselective Pt catalyzed cycloisomerization of polyenes to polycycles.

    PubMed

    Geier, Michael J; Gagné, Michel R

    2014-02-26

    Application of a tridentate NHC containing pincer ligand to Pt catalyzed cascade cyclization reactions has allowed for the catalytic, diastereoselective cycloisomerization of biogenic alkene terminated substrates to the their polycyclic counterparts.

  3. Anomalous surface phase formation on Pt sub 3 Sn <110>

    SciTech Connect

    Haner, A.N.; Ross, P.N. ); Bardi, U. . Dipt. di Chimica)

    1990-06-01

    LEED analysis of the clean annealed surface of a {l angle}110{r angle} oriented Pt{sub 3}Sn single crystal surface indicates the formation of a multilayer surface phase which does not have the L1{sub 2} bulk structure. LEISS analysis indicates a surface stoichiometry of ca. 1:1 with Sn atoms displaced ca. 1.4 above the plane of Pt atoms. The surface phase is hypothesized to be a rhombic distortion of the {l angle}0001{r angle} plant of PtSn, which has a B8{sub 1} (NiAs-type) bulk structure. It is not clear whether the phase forms by precipitation of PtSn due to a slight (0.5%) stoichiometric excess of Sn in the bulk, or due to multilayer reconstruction driven by surface segregation. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Observation of optical solitons in PT-symmetric lattices

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Martin; Regensburger, Alois; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Bersch, Christoph; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Peschel, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Controlling light transport in nonlinear active environments is a topic of considerable interest in the field of optics. In such complex arrangements, of particular importance is to devise strategies to subdue chaotic behaviour even in the presence of gain/loss and nonlinearity, which often assume adversarial roles. Quite recently, notions of parity-time (PT) symmetry have been suggested in photonic settings as a means to enforce stable energy flow in platforms that simultaneously employ both amplification and attenuation. Here we report the experimental observation of optical solitons in PT-symmetric lattices. Unlike other non-conservative nonlinear arrangements where self-trapped states appear as fixed points in the parameter space of the governing equations, discrete PT solitons form a continuous parametric family of solutions. The possibility of synthesizing PT-symmetric saturable absorbers, where a nonlinear wave finds a lossless path through an otherwise absorptive system is also demonstrated. PMID:26215165

  5. Electrical oscillation in Pt/VO{sub 2} bilayer strips

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Qi, Long; Xu, Yanjun; Wu, Yihong; Chai, Jianwei; Wang, Shijie; Yang, Yumeng; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-02-14

    We report on the observation of stable electrical oscillation in Pt/vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) bilayer strips, in which the Pt overlayer serves the dual purposes of heating up the VO{sub 2} and weakening the electric field in the VO{sub 2} layer. Systematic measurements in an ultrahigh vacuum nanoprobe system show that the oscillation frequency increases with the bias current and/or with decreasing device dimension. In contrast to most VO{sub 2}-based oscillators reported to date, which are electrically triggered, current-induced Joule heating in the Pt overlayer is found to play a dominant role in the generation of oscillation in Pt/VO{sub 2} bilayers. A simple model involving thermally triggered transition of VO{sub 2} on a heat sink is able to account for the experimental observations. The results in this work provide an alternative view of the triggering mechanism in VO{sub 2}-based oscillators.

  6. Site selectivity in the protonation of a phosphinito bridged Pt(I)-Pt(I) complex: a combined NMR and density-functional theory mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Mario; Polini, Flavia; Gallo, Vito; Mastrorilli, Piero; Calmuschi-Cula, Beatrice; Englert, Ulli; Re, Nazzareno; Repo, Timo; Räisänen, Minna

    2008-11-03

    The protonation of the dinuclear phosphinito bridged complex [(PHCy2)Pt(mu-PCy2){kappa(2)P,O-mu-P(O)Cy2}Pt(PHCy2)] (Pt-Pt) (1) by Brønsted acids affords hydrido bridged Pt-Pt species the structure of which depends on the nature and on the amount of the acid used. The addition of 1 equiv of HX (X = Cl, Br, I) gives products of formal protonation of the Pt-Pt bond of formula syn-[(PHCy2)(X)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2){kappaP-P(O)Cy2}] (Pt-Pt) (5, X = Cl; 6, X = Br; 8, X = I), containing a Pt-X bond and a dangling kappa P-P(O)Cy2 ligand. Uptake of a second equivalent of HX results in the protonation of the P(O)Cy2 ligand with formation of the complexes [(PHCy2)(X)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2){kappaP-P(OH)Cy2}]X (Pt-Pt) (3, X = Cl; 4, X = Br; 9, X = I). Each step of protonation is reversible, thus reactions of 3, 4, with NaOH give, first, the corresponding neutral complexes 5, 6, and then the parent compound 1. While the complexes 3 and 4 are indefinitely stable, the iodine analogue 9 transforms into anti-[(PHCy2)(I)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2)(I)] (Pt-Pt) (7) deriving from substitution of an iodo group for the P(OH)Cy2 ligand. Complexes 3 and 4 are isomorphous crystallizing in the triclinic space group P1 and show an intramolecular hydrogen bond and an interaction between the halide counteranion and the POH hydrogen. The occurrence of such an interaction also in solution was ascertained for 3 by (35)Cl NMR. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy (including (31)P-(1)H HOESY) and density-functional theory calculations indicate that the mechanism of the reaction starts with a prior protonation of the oxygen with formation of an intermediate (12) endowed with a six membered Pt(1)-X...H-O-P-Pt(2) ring that evolves into thermodynamically stable products featuring the hydride ligand bridging the Pt atoms. Energy profiles calculated for the various steps of the reaction between 1 and HCl showed very low barriers for the proton transfer and the subsequent rearrangement to 12, while a barrier

  7. Monodispersive CoPt Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Chemical Reduction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Cheng-Min; Hui, Chao; Yang, Tian-Zhong; Xiao, Cong-Wen; En, Shu-Tang; Ding, Hao; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2008-04-01

    Monodispersive CoPt nanoparticles in sizes of about 2.2 nm are synthesized by superhydride reduction of CoCl2 and PtCl2 in diphenyl ether. The as-prepared nanoparticles show a chemically disordered A1 structure and are superparamagnetic. Thermal annealing transforms the A1 structure into chemically ordered L10 structure and the particles are ferromagnetic at room temperature.

  8. Highly sensitive NIR PtSi/Si-nanostructure detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-gao; Guo, Pei; Yuan, An-bo; Long, Fei; Li, Rui-zhi; Li, Ping; Li, Yi

    2016-10-01

    We report a high external quantum efficiency (EQE) photodiode detector with PtSi/Si-nanostructures. Black silicon nanostructures were fabricated by metal-assist chemical etching (MCE), a 2 nm Pt layer was subsequently deposited on black silicon surface by DC magnetron sputtering system, and PtSi/Si-nanostructures were formed in vacuum annealing at 450 oC for 5 min. As the PtSi/Si-nanostructures presented a spiky shape, the absorption of incident light was remarkably enhanced for the repeat reflection and absorption. The breakdown voltage, dark current, threshold voltage and responsivity of the device were investigated to evaluate the performance of the PtSi/Si-nanostructures detector. The threshold voltage and dark currents of the PtSi/Si-nanostructure photodiode tends to be slightly higher than those of the standard diodes. The breakdown voltage remarkably was reduced because of existing avalanche breakdown in PtSi/Si-nanostructures. However, the photodiodes had high response at room temperature in near infrared region. At -5 V reverse bias voltage, the responsivity was 0.72 A/W in 1064 nm wavelength, and the EQE was 83.9%. By increasing the reverse bias voltage, the responsivity increased. At -60 V reverse bias voltage, the responsivity was 3.5 A/W, and the EQE was 407.5%, which means the quantum efficiency of PtSi/Si-nanostructure photodiodes was about 10 times higher than that of a standard diode. Future research includes how to apply this technology to enhance the NIR sensitivity of image sensors, such as Charge Coupled Devices (CCD).

  9. Large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Pt foil.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jin Cheol; Yun, Seok Joon; Kim, Hyun; Luong, Dinh Hoa; Kim, Soo Min; Choi, Soo Ho; Yang, Woochul; Kong, Jing; Kim, Ki Kang; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-08-26

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has recently been in the spotlight due to its numerous applications including its being an ideal substrate for two-dimensional electronics, a tunneling material for vertical tunneling devices, and a growth template for heterostructures. However, to obtain a large area of h-BN film while maintaining uniform thickness is still challenging and has not been realized. Here, we report the systematical study of h-BN growth on Pt foil by using low pressure chemical vapor deposition with a borazine source. The monolayer h-BN film was obtained over the whole Pt foil (2 × 5 cm(2)) under <100 mTorr, where the size is limited only by the Pt foil size. A borazine source was catalytically decomposed on the Pt surface, leading to the self-limiting growth of the monolayer without the associating precipitation, which is very similar to the growth of graphene on Cu. The orientation of the h-BN domains was largely confined by the Pt domain, which is confirmed by polarizing optical microscopy (POM) assisted by the nematic liquid crystal (LC) film. The total pressure and orientation of the Pt lattice plane are crucial parameters for thickness control. At high pressure (∼0.5 Torr), thick film was grown on Pt (111), and in contrast, thin film was grown on Pt (001). Our advances in monolayer h-BN growth will play an important role to further develop a high quality h-BN film that can be used for vertical tunneling, optoelectronic devices and growth templates for a variety of heterostructures.

  10. FAST-PT: Convolution integrals in cosmological perturbation theory calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Joseph E.; Fang, Xiao; Hirata, Christopher M.; Blazek, Jonathan A.

    2016-03-01

    FAST-PT calculates 1-loop corrections to the matter power spectrum in cosmology. The code utilizes Fourier methods combined with analytic expressions to reduce the computation time down to scale as N log N, where N is the number of grid point in the input linear power spectrum. FAST-PT is extremely fast, enabling mode-coupling integral computations fast enough to embed in Monte Carlo Markov Chain parameter estimation.

  11. The role of hydrogen during Pt-Ga nanocatalyst formation.

    PubMed

    Filez, Matthias; Redekop, Evgeniy A; Galvita, Vladimir V; Poelman, Hilde; Meledina, Maria; Turner, Stuart; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bell, Alexis T; Marin, Guy B

    2016-01-28

    Hydrogen plays an essential role during the in situ assembly of tailored catalytic materials, and serves as key ingredient in multifarious chemical reactions promoted by these catalysts. Despite intensive debate for several decades, the existence and nature of hydrogen-involved mechanisms - such as hydrogen-spillover, surface migration - have not been unambiguously proven and elucidated up to date. Here, Pt-Ga alloy formation is used as a probe reaction to study the behavior and atomic transport of H and Ga, starting from Pt nanoparticles on hydrotalcite-derived Mg(Ga)(Al)Ox supports. In situ XANES spectroscopy, time-resolved TAP kinetic experiments, HAADF-STEM imaging and EDX mapping are combined to probe Pt, Ga and H in a series of H2 reduction experiments up to 650 °C. Mg(Ga)(Al)Ox by itself dissociates hydrogen, but these dissociated hydrogen species do not induce significant reduction of Ga(3+) cations in the support. Only in the presence of Pt, partial reduction of Ga(3+) into Ga(δ+) is observed, suggesting that different reaction mechanisms dominate for Pt- and Mg(Ga)(Al)Ox-dissociated hydrogen species. This partial reduction of Ga(3+) is made possible by Pt-dissociated H species which spillover onto non-reducible Mg(Al)Ox or partially reducible Mg(Ga)(Al)Ox and undergo long-range transport over the support surface. Moderately mobile Ga(δ+)Ox migrates towards Pt clusters, where Ga(δ+) is only fully reduced to Ga(0) on condition of immediate stabilization inside Pt-Ga alloyed nanoparticles.

  12. Super Bloch oscillation in a PT symmetric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turker, Z.; Yuce, C.

    2016-07-01

    Wannier-Stark ladder in a PT symmetric system is generally complex that leads to amplified/damped Bloch oscillation. We show that a non-amplified wave packet oscillation with very large amplitude can be realized in a non-Hermitian tight binding lattice if certain conditions are satisfied. We show that pseudo PT symmetry guarantees the reality of the quasi energy spectrum in our system.

  13. Serum Anti-Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Antibodies in Greek Patients with Behcet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaiopoulos, George; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Papp, Maria; Kaklamanis, Faedon; Economou, Efrosyni; Zevgolis, Vassilis; Sourdis, John

    2011-01-01

    We tested 59 Greek patients with Behcet's Disease (BD) for serum anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies. No increase of these antibodies was detected in the cases compared to 55 healthy unrelated blood donors from the same population. This finding is in contrast with the correlation between Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies and BD as reported in other populations. It seems that environmental factors may contribute to disease expression in different populations, producing different effects according to the individual's genetic predisposition. Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies do not seem to be of any significance in the Greek population. PMID:21319357

  14. Saccharomyces paradoxus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae reside on oak trees in New Zealand: evidence for migration from Europe and interspecies hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanyao; Skelton, Aaron; Gardner, Richard C; Goddard, Matthew R

    2010-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus are used as model systems for molecular, cell and evolutionary biology; yet we know comparatively little of their ecology. One niche from which these species have been isolated is oak bark. There are no reports of these species from oak in the Southern Hemisphere. We describe the recovery of both S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus from oak in New Zealand (NZ), and provide evidence for introgression between the species. Genetic inference shows that the oak S. cerevisiae are closely related to strains isolated from NZ and Australian vineyards, but that the S. paradoxus strains are very closely related to European isolates. This discovery is surprising as the current model of S. paradoxus biogeography suggests that global dispersal is rare. We test one idea to explain how members of the European S. paradoxus population might come to be in NZ: they were transported here along with acorns brought by migrants approximately 200 years ago. We show that S. paradoxus is associated with acorns and thus provide a potential mechanism for the unwitting global dispersal of S. paradoxus by humans.

  15. Formaldehyde decomposition and oxidation on Pt(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, G. A.; Ebert, H. D.; Parsons, R.

    1990-12-01

    The decomposition reactions of formaldehyde on clean and oxygen dosed Pt(110) have been studied by LEED, XPS and TPRS. Formaldehyde is adsorbed in two states, a monolayer phase and a multilayer phase which were distinguishable by both TPRS and XPS. The saturated monolayer (corresponding to 8.06 × 10 14 molecules cm -2) desorbed at 134 K and the multilayer phase (which could not be saturated) desorbed at 112 K. The only other reaction products observed at higher temperatures were CO and H 2 produced in desorption limited processes and these reached a maximum upon saturation of the formaldehyde monolayer. The desorption spectrum of hydrogen was found to be perturbed by the presence of CO as reported by Weinberg and coworkers. It is proposed that local lifting of the clean surface (1 × 2) reconstruction is responsible for this behaviour. Analysis of the TPRS and XPS peak areas demonstrated that on the clean surface approximately 50% of the adsorbed monolayer dissociated with the remainder desorbing intact. Reaction of formaldehyde with preadsorbed oxygen resulted in the formation of H 2O (hydroxyl recombination) and CO 2 (decomposition of formate) desorbing at 200 and 262 K, respectively. The CO and H 2 desorption peaks were both smaller relative to formaldehyde decomposition on the clean surface and in particular, H 2 desorbed in a reaction limited process associated with decomposition of the formate species. No evidence was found for methane or hydrocarbon evolution in the present study under any circumstances. The results of this investigation are discussed in the light of our earlier work on the decomposition of methanol on the same platinum surface.

  16. Domain-wall pinning by local control of anisotropy in Pt/Co/Pt strips.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Hoeijmakers, M; Lavrijsen, R; Swagten, H J M

    2012-01-18

    We theoretically and experimentally analyze the pinning of a magnetic domain wall (DW) at engineered anisotropy variations in Pt/Co/Pt strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. An analytical model is derived showing that a step in the anisotropy acts as an energy barrier for the DW. Quantitative measurements are performed showing that the anisotropy can be controlled by focused ion beam irradiation with Ga ions. This tool is used to experimentally study the field-induced switching of nanostrips which are locally irradiated. The boundary of the irradiated area indeed acts as a pinning barrier for the domain wall and the pinning strength increases with the anisotropy difference. Varying the thickness of the Co layer provides an additional way to tune the anisotropy, and it is shown that a thinner Co layer gives a higher starting anisotropy thereby allowing tunable DW pinning in a wider range of fields. Finally, we demonstrate that not only the anisotropy itself, but also the width of the anisotropy barrier can be tuned on the length scale of the domain wall.

  17. The nature of the cataclysmic variable PT Per

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, M. G.; Bruce, A.; MacLeod, C.; Osborne, J. P.; Schwope, A. D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the cataclysmic variable star PT Per based on archival XMM-Newton X-ray data and new optical spectroscopy from the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) with Intermediate dispersion Spectrograph and Imaging System (ISIS). The X-ray data show deep minima which recur at a period of 82 min and a hard, unabsorbed X-ray spectrum. The optical spectra of PT Per show a relatively featureless blue continuum. From an analysis of the X-ray and optical data we conclude that PT Per is likely to be a magnetic cataclysmic variable of the polar class in which the minima correspond to those phase intervals when the accretion column rotates out of the field of view of the observer. We suggest that the optical spectrum, obtained around 4 yr after the X-ray coverage, is dominated by the white dwarf in the system, implying that PT Per was in a low accretion state at the time of the observations. An analysis of the likely system parameters for PT Per suggests a distance of ≈90 pc and a very low mass secondary, consistent with the idea that PT Per is a `period-bounce' binary. Matching the observed absorption features in the optical spectrum with the expected Zeeman components constrains the white dwarf polar field to be Bp ≈ 25-27 MG.

  18. PMN-PT/PVDF Nanocomposite for High Output Nanogenerator Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Luo, Wenbo; Liu, Xingzhao; Xu, Dong; He, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The 0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3(0.7PMN-0.3PT) nanorods were obtained via hydrothermal method with high yield (over 78%). Then, new piezoelectric nanocomposites based on (1−x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 (PMN-PT) nanorods were fabricated by dispersing the 0.7PMN-0.3PT nanorods into piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) polymer. The mechanical behaviors of the nanocomposites were investigated. The voltage and current generation of PMN-PT/PVDF nanocomposites were also measured. The results showed that the tensile strength, yield strength, and Young’s modulus of nanocomposites were enhanced as compared to that of the pure PVDF. The largest Young’s modulus of 1.71 GPa was found in the samples with 20 wt % nanorod content. The maximum output voltage of 10.3 V and output current of 46 nA were obtained in the samples with 20 wt % nanorod content, which was able to provide a 13-fold larger output voltage and a 4.5-fold larger output current than that of pure PVDF piezoelectric polymer. The current density of PMN-PT/PVDF nanocomposites is 20 nA/cm2. The PMN-PT/PVDF nanocomposites exhibited great potential for flexible self-powered sensing applications. PMID:28335195

  19. Interfacial oxygen migration and its effect on the magnetic anisotropy in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt films

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Feng, Chun E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Shaolong; Hua Li, Ming; Hua Yu, Guang E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Long Wu, Zheng; Yang, Feng

    2014-02-03

    This paper reports the interfacial oxygen migration effect and its induced magnetic anisotropy evolution in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt films. During depositing the MgO layer, oxygen atoms from the MgO combine with the neighboring Co atoms, leading to the formation of CoO at the Co/MgO interface. Meanwhile, the films show in-plane magnetic anisotropy (IMA). After annealing, most of the oxygen atoms in CoO migrate back to the MgO layer, resulting in obvious improvement of Co/MgO interface and the enhancement of effective Co-O orbital hybridization. These favor the evolution of magnetic anisotropy from IMA to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). The oxygen migration effect is achieved by the redox reaction at the Co/MgO interface. On the contrary, the transfer from IMA to PMA cannot be observed in Pt/Co/Pt films due to the lack of interfacial oxygen migration.

  20. A fully relativistic study of the Pt(CN)42- and Pt(CN)62- photodetachment spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernpointner, Markus

    2007-09-01

    In this work the photoelectron spectra of the doubly charged transition metal complexes Pt(CN)42- and Pt(CN)62- are calculated by application of the one-particle propagator method in a fully relativistic framework. In systems with highly relativistic atoms spin-orbit coupling, electron correlation and scalar relativistic effects are hereby coupled in an intricate way and need to be treated consistently in order to obtain accurate results. The obtained ionization spectra are in very good agreement to experiment and the first ionization potentials were calculated as 1.40 eV for Pt(CN)42- and 4.00 eV for Pt(CN)62- compared to the experimental values of 1.69 eV and 4.01 eV [X.B. Wang, Y.L. Wang, H.K. Woo, J. Li, G.S. Wu, L.S. Wang, Chem. Phys. 329 (2006) 230].

  1. Resistive switching of Pt/TiO x /Pt devices fabricated on flexible Parylene-C substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiat, Ali; Cortese, Simone; Serb, Alexander; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2017-01-01

    Pt/TiO x /Pt resistive switching (RS) devices are considered to be amongst the most promising candidates in memristor family and the technology transfer to flexible substrates could open the way to new opportunities for flexible memory implementations. Hence, an important goal is to achieve a fully flexible RS memory technology. Nonetheless, several fabrication challenges are present and must be solved prior to achieving reliable device fabrication and good electronic performances. Here, we propose a fabrication method for the successful transfer of Pt/TiO x /Pt stack onto flexible Parylene-C substrates. The devices were electrically characterised, exhibiting both digital and analogue memory characteristics, which are obtained by proper adjustment of pulsing schemes during tests. This approach could open new application possibilities of these devices in neuromorphic computing, data processing, implantable sensors and bio-compatible neural interfaces.

  2. The PtAl{sup −} and PtAl{sub 2}{sup −} anions: Theoretical and photoelectron spectroscopic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinxing; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: ana@chem.ucla.edu; Alexandrova, Anastassia N. E-mail: ana@chem.ucla.edu

    2014-04-28

    We report a joint photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical study of the PtAl{sup −} and PtAl{sub 2}{sup −} anions. The ground state structures and electronic configurations of these species were identified to be C{sub ∞v}, {sup 1}Σ{sup +} for PtAl{sup −}, and C{sub 2v}, {sup 2}B{sub 1} for PtAl{sub 2}{sup −}. Structured anion photoelectron spectra of these clusters were recorded and interpreted using ab initio calculations. Good agreement between theory and experiment was found. All experimental features were successfully assigned to one-electron transitions from the ground state of the anions to the ground or excited states of the corresponding neutral species.

  3. Nanocomposite for methanol oxidation: synthesis and characterization of cubic Pt nanoparticles on graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Tung-Yuan; Lee, Jer-Yeu; Liu, Ling-Kang

    2013-06-01

    We present our recent results on Pt nanoparticles on graphene sheets (Pt-NPs/G), a nanocomposite prepared with microwave assistance in ionic liquid 2-hydroxyethanaminiumformate. Preparation of Pt-NPs/G was achieved without the addition of extra reductant such as hydrazine or ethylene glycol. The Pt nanoparticles on graphene have a cubic-like shape (about 60 wt% Pt loading, Pt-NPs/G) and the particle size is 6 ± 3 nm from transmission electron microscopy results. Electrochemical cyclic voltammetry studies in 0.5 M aqueous H2SO4 were performed using Pt-NPs/G and separately, for comparison, using a commercially available electrocatalyst (60 wt% Pt loading, Pt/C). The electrochemical surface ratio of Pt-NPs/G to Pt/C is 0.745. The results of a methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in 0.5 M aqueous H2SO4 + 1.0 M methanol for the two samples are presented. The MOR results show that the ratios of the current density of oxidation (If) to the current density of reduction (Ib) are 3.49 (Pt-NPs/G) and 1.37 (Pt/C), respectively, with a preference by 2.55 times favoring Pt-NPs/G. That is, the tolerance CO poisoning of Pt-NPs/G is better than that of commercial Pt/C.

  4. Evaluation of Pt Alloys as Electrocatalysts for Oxalic Acid Oxidation: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    DOE PAGES

    Perry, Albert; Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; ...

    2016-07-14

    Here in this study we combined experimental approaches and density functional theory to evaluate novel platinum-based materials as electrocatalysts for oxalic acid oxidation. Several Pt alloys, PtSn (1:1), PtSn (19:1), PtRu (1:4), PtRuSn (5:4:1), and PtRhSn (3:1:4), were synthetized using sacrificial support method and tested for oxidation of oxalic acid at pH 4. It was shown that PtSn (1:1) and PtRu (1:4) have higher mass activity relative to Pt. These two materials along with Pt and one of the least active alloys, PtSn (19:1), were further analyzed for the oxidation of oxalic acid at different pHs. The results show thatmore » all samples tested followed an identical trend of decreased onset potential with increased pH and increased catalytic activity with decreased pH. Density functional theory was further utilized to gain a fundamental knowledge about the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt, PtSn (1:1), and PtRu (1:4). In conclusion, the results of the calculations along with the experimentally observed dependence of generated currents on the oxalic acid concentration indicate that the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt proceeds without the participation of surface oxidizing species, while on Pt alloys it involves their participation.« less

  5. Evaluation of Pt Alloys as Electrocatalysts for Oxalic Acid Oxidation: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Albert; Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; Neumman, Anica; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-07-14

    Here in this study we combined experimental approaches and density functional theory to evaluate novel platinum-based materials as electrocatalysts for oxalic acid oxidation. Several Pt alloys, PtSn (1:1), PtSn (19:1), PtRu (1:4), PtRuSn (5:4:1), and PtRhSn (3:1:4), were synthetized using sacrificial support method and tested for oxidation of oxalic acid at pH 4. It was shown that PtSn (1:1) and PtRu (1:4) have higher mass activity relative to Pt. These two materials along with Pt and one of the least active alloys, PtSn (19:1), were further analyzed for the oxidation of oxalic acid at different pHs. The results show that all samples tested followed an identical trend of decreased onset potential with increased pH and increased catalytic activity with decreased pH. Density functional theory was further utilized to gain a fundamental knowledge about the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt, PtSn (1:1), and PtRu (1:4). In conclusion, the results of the calculations along with the experimentally observed dependence of generated currents on the oxalic acid concentration indicate that the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt proceeds without the participation of surface oxidizing species, while on Pt alloys it involves their participation.

  6. Facile preparation of high-quality Pt/reduced graphene oxide nanoscrolls for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Xia, Yunxue; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Yunsong; Zhao, Maojun; Pan, Guangtang

    2013-06-01

    A simple and novel approach for the preparation of a Pt/reduced graphene oxide nanoscroll (Pt/RGOS) nanocatalyst is reported for the first time. The Pt/reduced graphene oxide (Pt/RGO) was fabricated by the co-reduction of GO and Pt salt using ethylene glycol under microwave irradiation, then the Pt/RGOSs were obtained by oxygen implosion in situ rolling up of the Pt/RGO using catalytic decomposition of Pt towards H2O2 under ultrasonication. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the Pt nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed on the reduced graphene oxide nanoscrolls with tubular structure, open edges and ends, and tubular diameter ranging from 10 to 100 nm. X-ray diffraction indicates that the crystal structure and diffraction intensity of the platinum practically remains unchanged, and the RGO has not been oxidized before or after rolling. Raman spectroscopy reveals that the Pt/RGOSs have a higher D/G ratio (1.2) than Pt/RGO (1.1). BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller) results exhibit that the Pt/RGOSs possess higher specific surface area and broader pore size range (188 m2 g-1, 25-45 nm) than Pt/RGO (122 m2 g-1, 30-38 nm). Additionally, the electrocatalytic performance of the Pt/RGOSs for methanol oxidation was evaluated, and the results show that the Pt/RGOSs possess significantly higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than Pt/RGO.

  7. Nanocomposite for methanol oxidation: synthesis and characterization of cubic Pt nanoparticles on graphene sheets

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Tung-Yuan; Lee, Jer-Yeu; Liu, Ling-Kang

    2013-01-01

    We present our recent results on Pt nanoparticles on graphene sheets (Pt-NPs/G), a nanocomposite prepared with microwave assistance in ionic liquid 2-hydroxyethanaminiumformate. Preparation of Pt-NPs/G was achieved without the addition of extra reductant such as hydrazine or ethylene glycol. The Pt nanoparticles on graphene have a cubic-like shape (about 60 wt% Pt loading, Pt-NPs/G) and the particle size is 6 ± 3 nm from transmission electron microscopy results. Electrochemical cyclic voltammetry studies in 0.5 M aqueous H2SO4 were performed using Pt-NPs/G and separately, for comparison, using a commercially available electrocatalyst (60 wt% Pt loading, Pt/C). The electrochemical surface ratio of Pt-NPs/G to Pt/C is 0.745. The results of a methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in 0.5 M aqueous H2SO4 + 1.0 M methanol for the two samples are presented. The MOR results show that the ratios of the current density of oxidation (If) to the current density of reduction (Ib) are 3.49 (Pt-NPs/G) and 1.37 (Pt/C), respectively, with a preference by 2.55 times favoring Pt-NPs/G. That is, the tolerance CO poisoning of Pt-NPs/G is better than that of commercial Pt/C. PMID:27877574

  8. Syntheses, Structures, and Electrochemistry of the Defective ccp [Pt33(CO)38](2-) and the bcc [Pt40(CO)40](6-) Molecular Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Cattabriga, Enrico; Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Funaioli, Tiziana; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Zacchini, Stefano

    2016-06-20

    The molecular [Pt33(CO)38](2-) nanocluster was obtained from the thermal decomposition of Na2[Pt15(CO)30] in methanol. The reaction of [Pt19(CO)22](4-) with acids (1-2 equiv) affords the unstable [Pt19(CO)22](3-) trianion, which evolves with time leading eventually to the [Pt40(CO)40](6-) hexa-anion. The total structures of both nanoclusters were determined via single-crystal X-ray diffraction. [Pt33(CO)38](2-) displays a defective ccp Pt33 core and shows that localized deformations occur in correspondence of atomic defects to "repair" them. In contrast, [Pt40(CO)40](6-) shows a bcc Pt40 core and represents the largest Pt cluster with a body-centered structure. The rich electrochemistry of the two high-nuclearity platinum carbonyl clusters was studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The redox changes of [Pt33(CO)38](2-) show features of chemical reversibility and electrochemical quasi-reversibility, and the vibrational spectra in the CO stretching region of the nine redox forms of the cluster [Pt33(CO)38](n) (n = 0 to -4, -6 to -9) are reported. Almost all the redox processes exhibited by [Pt40(CO)40](6-) are chemically and electrochemically reversible, and the eight oxidation states of [Pt40(CO)40] from -4 to -11 were spectroscopically characterized. The effect of the more regular bcc Pt-carbonyl cluster structure of [Pt40(CO)40](6-) with respect to that of the defective ccp Pt33 core on the redox behavior is discussed.

  9. Molybdenum-Doped PdPt@Pt Core-Shell Octahedra Supported by Ionic Block Copolymer-Functionalized Graphene as a Highly Active and Durable Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kie Yong; Yeom, Yong Sik; Seo, Heun Young; Kumar, Pradip; Lee, Albert S; Baek, Kyung-Youl; Yoon, Ho Gyu

    2017-01-18

    Development of highly active and durable electrocatalysts that can effectively electrocatalyze oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) still remains one important challenge for high-performance electrochemical conversion and storage applications such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Herein, we propose the combination of molybdenum-doped PdPt@Pt core-shell octahedra and the pyrene-functionalized poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly[(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] ionic block copolymer-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (Mo-PdPt@Pt/IG) to effectively augment the interfacial cohesion of both components using a tunable ex situ mixing strategy. The rationally designed Mo-PdPt@Pt core-shell octahedra have unique compositional benefits, including segregation of Mo atoms on the vertexes and edges of the octahedron and 2-3 shell layers of Pt atoms on a PdPt alloy core, which can provide highly active sites to the catalyst for ORR along with enhanced electrochemical stability. In addition, the ionic block copolymer functionalized graphene can facilitate intermolecular charge transfer and good stability of metal NPs, which arises from the ionic block copolymer interfacial layer. When the beneficial features of the Mo-PdPt@Pt and IG are combined, the Mo-PdPt@Pt/IG exhibits substantially enhanced activity and durability for ORR relative to those of commercial Pt/C. Notably, the Mo-PdPt@Pt/IG shows mass activity 31-fold higher than that of Pt/C and substantially maintains high activities after 10 000 cycles of intensive durability testing. The current study highlights the crucial strategies in designing the highly active and durable Pt-based octahedra and effective combination with functional graphene supports toward the synergetic effects on ORR.

  10. Use of Hydrogen Chemisorption and Ethylene Hydrogenation as Predictors for Aqueous Phase Reforming of Lactose over Ni@Pt and Co@Pt Bimetallic Overlayer Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Qinghua; Skoglund, Michael D.; Zhang, Chen; Morris, Allen R.; Holles, Joseph H.

    2016-10-20

    Overlayer Pt on Ni (Ni@Pt) or Co (Co@Pt) were synthesized and tested for H2 generation from APR of lactose. H2 chemisorption descriptor showed that Ni@Pt and Co@Pt overlayer catalysts had reduced H2 adsorption strength compared to a Pt only catalyst, which agree with computational predictions. The overlayer catalysts also demonstrated lower activity for ethylene hydrogenation than the Pt only catalyst, which likely resulted from decreased H2 binding strength decreasing the surface coverage of H2. XAS results showed that overlayer catalysts exhibited higher white line intensity than the Pt catalyst, which indicates a negative d-band shift for the Pt overlayer, further providing evidence for overlayer formation. Lactose APR studies showed that lactose can be used as feedstock to produce H2 and CO under desirable reaction conditions. The Pt active sites of Ni@Pt and Co@Pt overlayer catalysts showed significantly enhanced H2 production selectivity and activity when compared with that of a Pt only catalyst. The single deposition overlayer with the largest d-band shift showed the highest H2 activity. The results suggest that overlayer formation using directed deposition technique could modify the behavior of the surface metal and ultimately modify the APR activity.

  11. Electric field mediated non-volatile tuning magnetism in CoPt/PMN-PT heterostructure for magnetoelectric memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. T.; Li, J.; Peng, X. L.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, D. H.; Cao, Q. Q.; Du, Y. W.

    2016-02-01

    We report a power efficient non-volatile magnetoelectric memory in the CoPt/(011)PMN-PT heterostructure. Two reversible and stable electric field induced coercivity states (i.e., high-HC or low-HC) are obtained due to the strain mediated converse magnetoelectric effect. The reading process of the different coercive field information written by electric fields is demonstrated by using a magnetoresistance read head. This result shows good prospects in the application of novel multiferroic devices.

  12. Surface segregation effects in electrocatalysis: Kinetics ofoxygen reduction reaction on polycrystalline Pt3Ni alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stamenkovic, V.; Schmidt, T.J.; Ross, P.N.; Markovic, N.M.

    2002-11-01

    Effects of surface segregation on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been studied on a polycrystalline Pt3Ni alloy in acid electrolyte using ultra high vacuum (UHV) surface sensitive probes and the rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) method. Preparation, modification and characterization of alloy surfaces were done in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Depending on the preparation method, two different surface compositions of the Pt3Ni alloy are produced: a sputtered surface with 75 % Pt and an annealed surface (950 K ) with 100 % Pt. The latter surface is designated as the 'Pt-skin' structure, and is a consequence of surface segregation, i.e., replacement of Ni with Pt atoms in the first few atomic layers. Definitive surface compositions were established by low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS). The cyclic voltammetry of the 'Pt-skin' surface as well as the pseudocapacitance in the hydrogen adsorption/desorption potential region is similar to a polycrystalline Pt electrode. Activities of ORR on Pt3Ni alloy surfaces were compared to polycrystalline Pt in 0.1M HClO4 electrolyte for the observed temperature range of 293 < T < 333 K. The order of activities at 333 K was: 'Pt-skin' > Pt3Ni (75% Pt) > Pt with the maximum catalytic enhancement obtained for the 'Pt-skin' being 4 times that for pure Pt. Catalytic improvement of the ORR on Pt3Ni and 'Pt-skin' surfaces was assigned to the inhibition of Pt-OHad formation (on Pt sites) versus polycrystalline Pt. Production of H2O2 on both surfaces were similar compared to the pure Pt. Kinetic analyses of RRDE data confirmed that kinetic parameters for the ORR on the Pt3Ni and 'Pt-skin' surfaces are the same as on pure Pt: reaction order, m=1, two identical Tafel slopes, activation energy, {approx} 21-25 kJ/mol. Therefore the reaction mechanism on both Pt3Ni and 'Pt-skin' surfaces is the same as one proposed for pure Pt i.e. 4e{sup -} reduction pathway.

  13. Non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces strains co-fermentation increases acetaldehyde accumulation: effect on anthocyanin-derived pigments in Tannat red wines.

    PubMed

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Fariña, Laura; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    During fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae releases into the medium secondary metabolic products, such as acetaldehyde, able to react with anthocyanins, producing more stable derived pigments. However, very limited reports are found about non-Saccharomyces effects on grape fermentation. In this study, six non-Saccharomyces yeast strains, belonging to the genera Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora, were screened for their effect on red wine colour and wine-making capacity under pure culture conditions and mixed with Saccharomyces. An artificial red grape must was prepared, containing a phenolic extract of Tannat grapes that allows monitoring changes of key phenol parameters during fermentation, but without skin solids in the medium. When fermented in pure cultures, S. cerevisiae produced higher concentrations of acetaldehyde and vitisin B (acetaldehyde reaction-dependent) compared to M. pulcherrima M00/09G, Hanseniaspora guillermondii T06/09G, H. opuntiae T06/01G, H. vineae T02/05F and H. clermontiae (A10/82Fand C10/54F). However, co-fermentation of H. vineae and H. clermontiae with S. cerevisiae resulted in a significantly higher concentration of acetaldehyde compared with the pure S. cerevisiae control. HPLC-DAD-MS analysis confirmed an increased formation of vitisin B in co-fermentation treatments when compared to pure Saccharomyces fermentation, suggesting the key role of acetaldehyde. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Site-selective Cu deposition on Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles: correlation of theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Carino, Emily V; Kim, Hyun You; Henkelman, Graeme; Crooks, Richard M

    2012-03-07

    The voltammetry of Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) onto Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) containing an average of 147 Pt atoms (Pt(147)) is correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Specifically, the voltammetric peak positions are in good agreement with the calculated energies for Cu deposition and stripping on the Pt(100) and Pt(111) facets of the DENs. Partial Cu shells on Pt(147) are more stable on the Pt(100) facets, compared to the Pt(111) facets, and therefore, Cu UPD occurs on the 4-fold hollow sites of Pt(100) first. Finally, the structures of Pt DENs having full and partial monolayers of Cu were characterized in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The results of XAS studies are also in good agreement with the DFT-optimized models.

  15. Preparation and electrocatalytic properties of Pt-SiO2 nanocatalysts for ethanol electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Chen, J H; Zhong, X X; Cui, K Z; Zhou, H H; Kuang, Y F

    2007-03-01

    Due to their high stability in general acidic solutions, SiO(2) nanoparticles were selected as the second catalyst for ethanol oxidation in sulfuric acid aqueous solution. Pt-SiO(2) nanocatalysts were prepared in this paper. The micrography and elemental composition of Pt-SiO(2) nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The electrocatalytic properties of Pt-SiO(2) nanocatalysts for ethanol oxidation were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Under the same Pt loading mass and experimental conditions for ethanol oxidation, Pt-SiO(2) nanocatalysts show higher activity than PtRu/C (E-Tek), Pt/C (E-Tek), and Pt catalysts. Additionally, Pt-SiO(2) nanocatalysts possess good anti-poisoning ability. The results indicate that Pt-SiO(2) nanocatalysts may have good potential applications in direct ethanol fuel cells.

  16. Microscopic evidence of strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling in Co/Pt multilayers/PMN-PT(011) heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Weida; Zheng, Xiaoli; Cai, Jianwang; Zhao, Yonggang; Liu, Ming

    A promising way to control magnetization(M) via an electric field(E-field) is using magnetoelectric(ME) effect in FM/FE heterostructures. We use magnetic(electric) force microscopy(M(e)FM) to study the strain-mediated E-field modulation of M in (Co/Pt)n with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy(PMA) or in-plane anisotropy on PMN-PT(011) substrates. MFM were performed on (Co/Pt)n with an DC E-field applied to PMN-PT. In MeFM, we superimpose an AC modulation on a DC one and utilize lock-in technique to detect weak ME effect. For (Co/Pt)n with PMA, MFM images show stripe domains with no obvious changes at varied DC E-fields. However, MeFM shows interesting structures and the image contrast reverses sign at opposite strain slopes of the PMN-PT substrate. For sample with in-plane anisotropy, both MFM and MeFM images show dipole-like domains. Interestingly, the MeFM image contrast reverses sign at opposite strain slopes of the substrate. The sign reversal of MeFM contrast indicates that features revealed by MeFM are intrinsic local ME effect. Our MeFM data are consistent with the ferromagnetic resonance results showing that strain-induced anisotropy change will cause part of M switching to the in-plane direction. Possible scenarios will be discussed.

  17. Origin of Multiple Peaks in the Potentiodynamic Oxidation of CO Adlayers on Pt and Ru-Modified Pt Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongsen; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-05-21

    The study of the electrooxidation mechanism of CO(ad) on Pt based catalysts is very important for designing more effective CO-tolerant electrocatalysts for fuel cells. We have studied the origin of multiple peaks in the cyclic voltammograms of CO stripping from polycrystalline Pt and Ru modified polycrystalline Pt (Pt/Ru) surfaces in both acidic and alkaline media by differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS), DFT calculations, and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. A new CO(ad) electrooxidation kinetic model on heterogeneous Pt and Pt/Ru catalysts is proposed to account for the multiple peaks experimentally observed. In this model, OH species prefer to adsorb at low-coordination sites or Ru sites and, thus, suppress CO repopulation from high-coordination sites onto these sites. Therefore, CO(ad) oxidation occurs on different facets or regions, leading to multiplicity of CO stripping peaks. This work provides a new insight into the CO electrooxidation mechanism and kinetics on heterogeneous catalysts.

  18. Dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene using Pt, Mo, and Pt-Mo catalysts supported on clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Morán, Cesar; González, Eduardo; Sánchez, Jorge; Solano, Roger; Carruyo, Gabriela; Moronta, Alexander

    2007-11-01

    A synthetic clay (TS-1) was modified with a nonionic surfactant (IGEPAL CO-720) and magnesium oxide. The resulting solid was used as a support of Pt, Mo, and Pt-Mo catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of H(2)PtCl(6)6H(2)O and (NH(4))(6)-Mo(7)O(24)4H(2)O. In both monometallic and bimetallic catalysts, the molybdenum content was 3 wt% and the platinum content was 0.5 or 1 wt%. The surface area of the starting material was 454 m(2)/g and after the modification treatment with IGEPAL it increased up to 649 m(2)/g, while platinum and molybdenum catalysts showed surface areas between 495 and 550 m(2)/g. The reduction profiles showed different Pt and Mo species and the existence of metal-support interactions. The reduced catalysts were more active than those in the unreduced form. The most active catalysts for the ethylbenzene dehydrogenation were those of monometallic Pt (0.5 and 1 wt%) with a maximum styrene conversion around 50%. The presence of Mo species masked Pt atoms and reduced the activity.

  19. First-principles study of nitric oxide oxidation on Pt(111) versus Pt overlayer on 3d transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo, Ryan Lacdao; Escaño, Mary Clare Sison; Kasai, Hideaki

    2015-03-15

    Catalytic oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} is a significant research interest for improving the quality of air through exhaust gas purification systems. In this paper, the authors studied this reaction on pure Pt and Pt overlayer on 3d transition metals using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations coupled with density functional theory based first principles calculations. The authors found that on the Pt(111) surface, NO oxidation proceeds via the Eley–Rideal mechanism, with O{sub 2} dissociative adsorption as the rate-determining step. The oxidation path via the Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism is very slow and does not significantly contribute to the overall reaction. However, in the Pt overlayer systems, the oxidation of NO on the surface is more thermodynamically and kinetically favorable compared to pure Pt. These findings are attributed to the weaker binding of O and NO on the Pt overlayer systems and the binding configuration of NO{sub 2} that promotes easier N-O bond formation. These results present insights for designing affordable and efficient catalysts for NO oxidation.

  20. Packings of Os layers for the development of L10 order of FePt in nanoscale [Os-FePt]n multilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, T. T.; Hsiao, Ching-Hung; Lo, Shen-Chuan; Ouyang, Wen; Li, Tzu-Yuan; Ouyang, H.; Yao, Y. D.

    2013-05-01

    The element osmium (Os), with high melting and boiling points, plays a crucial role in the development of the L10 order for FePt in [Os(5 nm)/FePt(25 nm)]4 and [Os(1 nm)/FePt(5 nm)]20 systems. The large mismatches of lattice constants between Os and FePt, with specific epitaxial relations, induce a great strain in the [Os(5 nm) /FePt(25 nm)]4 system with fixed total thicknesses for the FePt and Os layers. Due to this large strain effect, the L10 order in a FePt structure can be enhanced through an application of stressing along the c axis for the face-centered cubic structure, which results in a higher coercivity. However, a smaller degree of average strain was observed in the 5 nm-thickness FePt system due to the existence of pinholes.

  1. Atomic structure of PtCu nanoparticles in PtCu/C catalysts prepared by simultaneous and sequential deposition of components on carbon support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, L. A.; Srabionyan, V. V.; Pryadchenko, V. V.; Bugaev, A. L.; Avakyan, L. A.; Belenov, S. V.; Guterman, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocatalysts PtCu/C with different distribution of components in bimetallic PtCu nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simultaneous and sequential deposition of Cu and Pt on carbon support. Electrochemical stability of the obtained samples PtCu/C was studied using the cyclic voltammetry. Characterization of atomic structure of as prepared PtCu NPs and obtained after acid treatment was performed by Pt L 3- and Cu K-edge EXAFS using the technique for determining local structure parameters of the absorbing atom under strong correlations among them. EXAFS derived parameters were used for generation of structural models of PtCu NPs by the method of cluster simulations. Within this approach, the models of atomic structure of PtCu NPs obtained by the two methods of synthesis, before and after post treatment and after two months from their preparation were revealed.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae GUJ105 From Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Detroja, Rajesh; Rathore, Ankita

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain GUJ105, isolated clinically. The size of the genome is approximately 11.5 Mb and contains 5,447 protein-coding genes. PMID:27908989

  3. Silicon ion irradiation effects on the magnetic properties of ion beam synthesized CoPt phase

    SciTech Connect

    Balaji, S.; Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Mangamma, G.; Kalavathi, S.; Gupta, Ajay; Nair, K. G. M.

    2012-06-05

    Ion beam mixing of Pt/Co bilayers using self ion (Pt{sup +}) beam results in formation of CoPt phase. Upon ion beam annealing the ion mixed samples using 4 MeV Si{sup +} ions at 300 deg. C, diffusion of Co towards the Pt/Co interface is observed. The Si{sup +} ion beam rotates the magnetization of the CoPt phase from in plane to out of plane of the film.

  4. Atomically and Electronically Coupled Pt and CoO Hybrid Nanocatalysts for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chao; Ling, Tao; Ma, Tian-Yi; Wang, Hui; Hu, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Yue; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Atomically and electronically coupled Pt and CoO hybrid nanocatalysts are fabricated for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction. The atomic coupling between the Pt and the CoO endows precise control of the atomic interface between the Pt and the CoO, which directly results in electron donation from the CoO to the Pt, and thus favorable tuning of the electronic structure of the Pt.

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yta7 Regulates Histone Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gradolatto, Angeline; Rogers, Richard S.; Lavender, Heather; Taverna, Sean D.; Allis, C. David; Aitchison, John D.; Tackett, Alan J.

    2008-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yta7 protein is a component of a nucleosome bound protein complex that maintains distinct transcriptional zones of chromatin. We previously found that one protein copurifying with Yta7 is the yFACT member Spt16. Epistasis analyses revealed a link between Yta7, Spt16, and other previously identified members of the histone regulatory pathway. In concurrence, Yta7 was found to regulate histone gene transcription in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. Association at the histone gene loci appeared to occur through binding of the bromodomain-like region of Yta7 with the N-terminal tail of histone H3. Our work suggests a mechanism in which Yta7 is localized to chromatin to establish regions of transcriptional silencing, and that one facet of this cellular mechanism is to modulate transcription of histone genes. PMID:18493054

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa contain heavy metal sequestering phytochelatin.

    PubMed

    Kneer, R; Kutchan, T M; Hochberger, A; Zenk, M H

    1992-01-01

    In fungi, cellular resistance to heavy metal cytotoxicity is mediated either by binding of metal ions to proteins of the metallothionein type or by chelation to phytochelatin-peptides of the general formula (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gly. Hitherto, only one fungus, Candida glabrata has been shown to contain both metal inactivating systems. Here we show by unambiguous FAB-MS analysis that both a metallothionein-free mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as a wildtype strain synthesize phytochelatin (PC2) upon exposure to 250 microM Cd2+ ions. The presence of Zn and/or Cu ions in the nutrient broth also induces PC2 synthesis in this organism. By 109Cd exchange and subsequent monobromobimane fluorescence HPLC, it could be shown that the presence of Cd2+ in the growth medium also induces phytochelatin synthesis in Neurospora crassa, which contains metallothioneins.

  7. Patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast colonies via magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tenório, Rômulo P; Barros, Wilson

    2017-01-23

    We report the use of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods to observe pattern formation in colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate substantial signal loss localized in specific regions of the colony rendering useful imaging contrast. This imaging contrast is recognizable as being due to discontinuities in magnetic susceptibility (χ) between different spatial regions. At the microscopic pixel level, the local variations in the magnetic susceptibility (Δχ) induce a loss in the NMR signal, which was quantified via T2 and T2* maps, permitting estimation of Δχ values for different regions of the colony. Interestingly the typical petal/wrinkling patterns present in the colony have a high degree of correlation with the estimated susceptibility distribution. We conclude that the presence of magnetic susceptibility inclusions, together with their spatial arrangement within the colony, may be a potential cause of the susceptibility distribution and therefore the contrast observed on the images.

  8. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites.

  9. Effect of different glucose concentrations on proteome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Francesca; Francesca, Guidi; Magherini, Francesca; Francesca, Magherini; Gamberi, Tania; Tania, Gamberi; Borro, Marina; Marina, Borro; Simmaco, Maurizio; Maurizio, Simmaco; Modesti, Alessandra; Alessandra, Modesti

    2010-07-01

    We performed a proteomic study to understand how Saccharomyces cerevisiae adapts its metabolism during the exponential growth on three different concentrations of glucose; this information will be necessary to understand yeast carbon metabolism in different environments. We induced a natural diauxic shift by growing yeast cells in glucose restriction thus having a fast and complete glucose exhaustion. We noticed differential expressions of groups of proteins. Cells in high glucose have a decreased growth rate during the initial phase of fermentation; in glucose restriction and in high glucose we found an over-expression of a protein (Peroxiredoxin) involved in protection against oxidative stress insult. The information obtained in our study validates the application of a proteomic approach for the identification of the molecular bases of environmental variations such as fermentation in high glucose and during a naturally induced diauxic shift.

  10. Direct evidence for a xylose metabolic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Batt, C.A.; Carvallo, S.; Easson, D.D.; Akedo, M.; Sinskey, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    Xylose transport, xylose reductase, and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are demonstrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzymes in the xylose catabolic pathway necessary for the conversion of xylose xylulose are present, although S. cerevisiae cannot grow on xylose as a sole carbon source. Xylose transport is less efficient than glucose transport, and its rate is dependent upon aeration. Xylose reductase appears to be a xylose inducible enzyme and xylitol dehydrogenase activity is constitutive, although both are repressed by glucose. Both xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are five- to tenfold lower in S. cerevisie as compared to Candida utilis. In vivo conversion of /sup 14/C-xylose in S. cerevisiage is demonstrated and xylitol is detected, although no significant levels of any other /sup 14/C-labeled metabolites (e.g., ethanol) are observed. 22 references.

  11. Diversity and adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces wine yeast: a review

    PubMed Central

    Marsit, Souhir; Dequin, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species, the main workhorses of wine fermentation, have been exposed to stressful conditions for millennia, potentially resulting in adaptive differentiation. As a result, wine yeasts have recently attracted considerable interest for studying the evolutionary effects of domestication. The widespread use of whole-genome sequencing during the last decade has provided new insights into the biodiversity, population structure, phylogeography and evolutionary history of wine yeasts. Comparisons between S. cerevisiae isolates from various origins have indicated that a variety of mechanisms, including heterozygosity, nucleotide and structural variations, introgressions, horizontal gene transfer and hybridization, contribute to the genetic and phenotypic diversity of S. cerevisiae. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the diversity and evolutionary history of wine yeasts, focusing on the domestication fingerprints identified in these strains. PMID:26205244

  12. Saccharomyces boulardii fungemia caused by treatment with a probioticum.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Glerup, Henning; Tarp, Britta

    2012-03-27

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, known as baker's yeast, is normally considered a non-pathogenic yeast. A genetically very similar subtype, S boulardii, is used in a probioticum (Sacchaflor) to prevent antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea. The authors present a case report of a 79-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis, who after a bowel resection developed S boulardii fungemia. Her postoperative course was complicated by nutritional problems, anaemia and several nosocomial infections including recurrent C difficile associated diarrhoea. The diarrhoea was treated with metronidazole, vancomycin and Sacchaflor. After 13 days of treatment, the patient developed fungemia with S boulardii. Treatment with Sacchaflor was immediately discontinued and the patient was successfully treated with amphotericin B. Fungemia is a rare, but a serious complication to treatment with probiotics. Accordingly, the authors find it important to remind the clinicians of this risk when prescribing probiotics especially to immunocompromised patients.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae thermal inactivation kinetics combined with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    López-Malo, A; Guerrero, S; Alzamora, S M

    1999-10-01

    Inactivation kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during thermal treatments at moderate temperatures (45.0, 47.5, 50.0, 52.5, or 55.0 degrees C) combined with application of 20 kHz of ultrasound were evaluated. S. cerevisiae inactivation under the combined effects of heat and ultrasound followed first-order reaction kinetics, with decimal reduction times (D) that varied from 22.3 to 0.8 min. D values in treatments that combined heat and ultrasound were significantly smaller (P < 0.05) than D values obtained for thermal treatments and were more noticeable at temperatures below 50 degrees C. The dependence of the D value on temperature had a significantly (P < 0.05) greater z value for combined treatments. Yeast heat inactivation kinetics revealed decreased thermal resistance caused by ultrasound.

  14. Molecular architecture of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae activated spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Rauhut, Reinhard; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Dybkov, Olexandr; Hartmuth, Klaus; Pena, Vladimir; Chari, Ashwin; Kumar, Vinay; Lee, Chung-Tien; Urlaub, Henning; Kastner, Berthold; Stark, Holger; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-09-23

    The activated spliceosome (B(act)) is in a catalytically inactive state and is remodeled into a catalytically active machine by the RNA helicase Prp2, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we describe a 3D electron cryomicroscopy structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae B(act) complex at 5.8-angstrom resolution. Our model reveals that in B(act), the catalytic U2/U6 RNA-Prp8 ribonucleoprotein core is already established, and the 5' splice site (ss) is oriented for step 1 catalysis but occluded by protein. The first-step nucleophile-the branchsite adenosine-is sequestered within the Hsh155 HEAT domain and is held 50 angstroms away from the 5'ss. Our structure suggests that Prp2 adenosine triphosphatase-mediated remodeling leads to conformational changes in Hsh155's HEAT domain that liberate the first-step reactants for catalysis.

  15. Technology development for natural product biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Billingsley, John M; DeNicola, Anthony B; Tang, Yi

    2016-12-01

    The explosion of genomic sequence data and the significant advancements in synthetic biology have led to the development of new technologies for natural products discovery and production. Using powerful genetic tools, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been engineered as a production host for natural product pathways from bacterial, fungal, and plant species. With an expanding library of characterized genetic parts, biosynthetic pathways can be refactored for optimized expression in yeast. New engineering strategies have enabled the increased production of valuable secondary metabolites by tuning metabolic pathways. Improvements in high-throughput screening methods have facilitated the rapid identification of variants with improved biosynthetic capabilities. In this review, we focus on the molecular tools and engineering strategies that have recently empowered heterologous natural product biosynthesis.

  16. Bioaccumulation of cadmium by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Yinglian; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Meng, Xianghong; Xu, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Bioaccumulation via growing cells is a potential technique for heavy metal removal from food materials. The cadmium bioaccumulation characteristics by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Z. rouxii displayed powerful cadmium removal ability at low cadmium concentrations, which mainly depended on the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. The percentage of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts obviously decreased with the increase of initial biomass and cadmium concentrations. Low pH and elevated concentrations of zinc and copper significantly decreased the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts but improved the cadmium tolerance and the cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii. Cadmium removal of Z. rouxii was improved by zinc and copper conditionally. Z. rouxii that possessed more powerful cadmium tolerance and removal ability at low pH and high concentration of competing ions can be developed into a potential cadmium removal agent using in complex food environment in future.

  17. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose/whey fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Pedro MR; Oliveira, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Lactose is an interesting carbon source for the production of several bio-products by fermentation, primarily because it is the major component of cheese whey, the main by-product of dairy activities. However, the microorganism more widely used in industrial fermentation processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, does not have a lactose metabolization system. Therefore, several metabolic engineering approaches have been used to construct lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae strains, particularly involving the expression of the lactose genes of the phylogenetically related yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also the lactose genes from Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger, as reviewed here. Due to the existing large amounts of whey, the production of bio-ethanol from lactose by engineered S. cerevisiae has been considered as a possible route for whey surplus. Emphasis is given in the present review on strain improvement for lactose-to-ethanol bioprocesses, namely flocculent yeast strains for continuous high-cell-density systems with enhanced ethanol productivity. PMID:21326922

  18. Phenotypic effects of membrane protein overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melén, Karin; Blomberg, Anders; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    Large-scale protein overexpression phenotype screens provide an important complement to the more common gene knockout screens. Here, we have targeted the so far poorly understood Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome and report growth phenotypes for a strain collection overexpressing 600 C-terminally tagged integral membrane proteins grown both under normal and three different stress conditions. Although overexpression of most membrane proteins reduce the growth rate in synthetic defined medium, we identify a large number of proteins that, when overexpressed, confer specific resistance to various stress conditions. Our data suggest that regulation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and the Na+/K+ homeostasis system constitute major downstream targets of the yeast PKA/RAS pathway and point to a possible connection between the early secretory pathway and the cells' response to oxidative stress. We also have quantified the expression levels for >550 membrane proteins, facilitating the choice of well expressing proteins for future functional and structural studies. caffeine | paraquat | salt tolerance | yeast

  19. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose/whey fermentation.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Lucília; Guimarães, Pedro M R; Oliveira, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Lactose is an interesting carbon source for the production of several bio-products by fermentation, primarily because it is the major component of cheese whey, the main by-product of dairy activities. However, the microorganism more widely used in industrial fermentation processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, does not have a lactose metabolization system. Therefore, several metabolic engineering approaches have been used to construct lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae strains, particularly involving the expression of the lactose genes of the phylogenetically related yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also the lactose genes from Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger, as reviewed here. Due to the existing large amounts of whey, the production of bio-ethanol from lactose by engineered S. cerevisiae has been considered as a possible route for whey surplus. Emphasis is given in the present review on strain improvement for lactose-to-ethanol bioprocesses, namely flocculent yeast strains for continuous high-cell-density systems with enhanced ethanol productivity.

  20. Bioethanol production from cellulosic hydrolysates by engineered industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ye-Gi; Jin, Yong-Su; Cha, Young-Lok; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2017-03-01

    Even though industrial yeast strains exhibit numerous advantageous traits for the production of bioethanol, their genetic manipulation has been limited. This study demonstrates that an industrial polyploidy Saccharomyces cerevisiae JHS200 can be engineered through Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9)-based genome editing. Specifically, we generated auxotrophic mutants and introduced a xylose metabolic pathway into the auxotrophic mutants. As expected, the engineered strain (JX123) enhanced ethanol production from cellulosic hydrolysates as compared to other engineered haploid strains. However, the JX123 strain produced substantial amounts of xylitol as a by-product during xylose fermentation. Hypothesizing that the xylitol accumulation might be caused by intracellular redox imbalance from cofactor difference, the NADH oxidase from Lactococcus lactis was introduced into the JX123 strain. The resulting strain (JX123_noxE) not only produced more ethanol, but also produced xylitol less than the JX123 strain. These results suggest that industrial polyploidy yeast can be modified for producing biofuels and chemicals.

  1. Identification of NAD+ capped mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robert W.; Matheny, Tyler; Mizoue, Laura S.; Rao, Bhalchandra S.; Muhlrad, Denise; Parker, Roy

    2017-01-01

    RNAs besides tRNA and rRNA contain chemical modifications, including the recently described 5′ nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) RNA in bacteria. Whether 5′ NAD-RNA exists in eukaryotes remains unknown. We demonstrate that 5′ NAD-RNA is found on subsets of nuclear and mitochondrial encoded mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. NAD-mRNA appears to be produced cotranscriptionally because NAD-RNA is also found on pre-mRNAs, and only on mitochondrial transcripts that are not 5′ end processed. These results define an additional 5′ RNA cap structure in eukaryotes and raise the possibility that this 5′ NAD+ cap could modulate RNA stability and translation on specific subclasses of mRNAs. PMID:28031484

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of ascospores of Debaryomyces and Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, C P; Smiley, M J; Baker, F L

    1975-02-28

    Ascospores from species of Debaryomyces and the Torulaspora-group of Saccharomyces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Ornamentation on ascospores of D. hansenii varied from short to long interconnected ridges or broad based, elongated conical protuberances. A spiral rigde system was detected on the ascospores of D. marama, but wart-like protuberances occurred on those of D. cantarelli, D. castellii, D. coudertii, D. formicarius, D. phaffii, D. vanriji and D. yarrowii. Ascospores of D. halotolerans did not have protuberances and the species appears to be identical with Pichia farinosa. Wart-like protuberances also were found on ascospores of S. delbrueckii, S. microellipsodes, S. rosei, S. inconspicuus, S. fermentati, S. montanus and S. vafer, but the ascospore surface of S. pretoriensis was covered by fine ridges. Short tapered ridges covered the ascospores of S. kloeckerianus.

  3. Mechanism and Regulation of Protein Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dever, Thomas E; Kinzy, Terri Goss; Pavitt, Graham D

    2016-05-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of protein synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae The mechanism of protein synthesis is well conserved between yeast and other eukaryotes, and molecular genetic studies in budding yeast have provided critical insights into the fundamental process of translation as well as its regulation. The review focuses on the initiation and elongation phases of protein synthesis with descriptions of the roles of translation initiation and elongation factors that assist the ribosome in binding the messenger RNA (mRNA), selecting the start codon, and synthesizing the polypeptide. We also examine mechanisms of translational control highlighting the mRNA cap-binding proteins and the regulation of GCN4 and CPA1 mRNAs.

  4. Advanced biofuel production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-06-01

    Replacement of conventional transportation fuels with biofuels will require production of compounds that can cover the complete fuel spectrum, ranging from gasoline to kerosene. Advanced biofuels are expected to play an important role in replacing fossil fuels because they have improved properties compared with ethanol and some of these may have the energy density required for use in heavy duty vehicles, ships, and aviation. Moreover, advanced biofuels can be used as drop-in fuels in existing internal combustion engines. The yeast cell factory Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be turned into a producer of higher alcohols (1-butanol and isobutanol), sesquiterpenes (farnesene and bisabolene), and fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel), and here we discusses progress in metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for production of these advanced biofuels.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide removal with magnetically responsive Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Safarik, Ivo; Sabatkova, Zdenka; Safarikova, Mirka

    2008-09-10

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is a promising chemical sanitizer for use in the food industry. Its residues have to be decomposed, usually using an enzyme process employing catalase. In order to offer an inexpensive biocatalyst and to simplify subsequent manipulation, we have prepared magnetically responsive alginate beads containing entrapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and magnetite microparticles. Larger beads (2-3 mm in diameter) were prepared by dropping the mixture into calcium chloride solution, while microbeads (the diameter of majority of particles ranged between 50 and 100 microm) were prepared using the water in oil emulsification process. In general, microbeads enabled more efficient HP decomposition. The prepared microparticulate biocatalyst caused efficient decomposition of HP in water solutions (up to 2% concentration), leaving very low residual HP concentration after treatment (below 0.001% under appropriate conditions). The biocatalyst was stable; the same catalytic activity was observed after one month storage at 4 degrees C, and the microbeads could be used at least five times.

  6. Domestication and Divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Beer Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Gallone, Brigida; Steensels, Jan; Prahl, Troels; Soriaga, Leah; Saels, Veerle; Herrera-Malaver, Beatriz; Merlevede, Adriaan; Roncoroni, Miguel; Voordeckers, Karin; Miraglia, Loren; Teiling, Clotilde; Steffy, Brian; Taylor, Maryann; Schwartz, Ariel; Richardson, Toby; White, Christopher; Baele, Guy; Maere, Steven; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-09-08

    Whereas domestication of livestock, pets, and crops is well documented, it is still unclear to what extent microbes associated with the production of food have also undergone human selection and where the plethora of industrial strains originates from. Here, we present the genomes and phenomes of 157 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. Our analyses reveal that today's industrial yeasts can be divided into five sublineages that are genetically and phenotypically separated from wild strains and originate from only a few ancestors through complex patterns of domestication and local divergence. Large-scale phenotyping and genome analysis further show strong industry-specific selection for stress tolerance, sugar utilization, and flavor production, while the sexual cycle and other phenotypes related to survival in nature show decay, particularly in beer yeasts. Together, these results shed light on the origins, evolutionary history, and phenotypic diversity of industrial yeasts and provide a resource for further selection of superior strains. PAPERCLIP.

  7. Calorie restriction extends Saccharomyces cerevisiae lifespan by increasing respiration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Su-Ju; Kaeberlein, Matt; Andalis, Alex A; Sturtz, Lori A; Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Culotta, Valeria C; Fink, Gerald R; Guarente, Leonard

    2002-07-18

    Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan in a wide spectrum of organisms and is the only regimen known to lengthen the lifespan of mammals. We established a model of CR in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this system, lifespan can be extended by limiting glucose or by reducing the activity of the glucose-sensing cyclic-AMP-dependent kinase (PKA). Lifespan extension in a mutant with reduced PKA activity requires Sir2 and NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). In this study we explore how CR activates Sir2 to extend lifespan. Here we show that the shunting of carbon metabolism toward the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle and the concomitant increase in respiration play a central part in this process. We discuss how this metabolic strategy may apply to CR in animals.

  8. Overproduction of threonine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to hydroxynorvaline.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, C; Calderon, I L

    1992-01-01

    In this work, we isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce threonine from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutants were selected for resistance to the threonine analog alpha-amino-beta-hydroxynorvalerate (hydroxynorvaline), and, of these, the ones able to excrete threonine to the medium were chosen. The mutant strains produce between 15 and 30 times more threonine than the wild type does, and, to a lesser degree, they also accumulate isoleucine. Genetic and biochemical studies have revealed that the threonine overproduction is, in all cases studied, associated with the presence in the strain of a HOM3 allele coding for a mutant aspartate kinase that is totally or partially insensitive to feedback inhibition by threonine. This enzyme seems, therefore, to be crucial in the regulation of threonine biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The results obtained suggest that this strategy could be efficiently applied to the isolation of threonine-overproducing strains of yeasts other than S. cerevisiae, even those used industrially. PMID:1622238

  9. Genetic engineering of industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Genetic engineering has been successfully applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains for different purposes: extension of substrate range, improvement of productivity and yield, elimination of by-products, improvement of process performance and cellular properties, and extension of product range. The potential of genetically engineered yeasts for the massive production of biofuels as bioethanol and other nonfuel products from renewable resources as lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates has been recognized. For such applications, robust industrial strains of S. cerevisiae have to be used. Here, some relevant genetic and genomic characteristics of industrial strains are discussed in relation to the problematic of the genetic engineering of such strains. General molecular tools applicable to the manipulation of S. cerevisiae industrial strains are presented and examples of genetically engineered industrial strains developed for the production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass are given.

  10. The concentration of ammonia regulates nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1995-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in a continuous culture at a single dilution rate with input ammonia concentrations whose effects ranged from nitrogen limitation to nitrogen excess and glucose limitation. The rate of ammonia assimilation (in millimoles per gram of cells per hour) was approximately constant. Increased extracellular ammonia concentrations are correlated with increased intracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, increases in levels of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH2), and decreases in levels of NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH1), as well as decreases in the levels of mRNA for the amino acid permease-encoding genes GAP1 and PUT4. The governing factor of nitrogen metabolism might be the concentration of ammonia rather than its flux.

  11. Antimutagenic and antioxidant activity of Lisosan G in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Frassinetti, Stefania; Della Croce, Clara Maria; Caltavuturo, Leonardo; Longo, Vincenzo

    2012-12-01

    In the present study the antimutagenic and antioxidant effects of a powder of grain (Lisosan G) in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. Results showed that Lisosan G treatment decreased significantly the intracellular ROS concentration and mutagenesis induced by hydrogen peroxide in S. cerevisiae D7 strain. The effect of Lisosan G was then evaluated by using superoxide dismutase (SOD) proficient and deficient strains of S. cerevisiae. Lisosan G showed protective activity in sod1Δ and sod2Δ mutant strains, indicating an in vivo antioxidant effect. A high radical scavenging activity of Lisosan G was also demonstrated in vitro using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The obtained results showed a protective effect of Lisosan G in yeast cells, indicating that its antioxidant capacity contributes to its antimutagenic action.

  12. Hydrolysis and fermentation of amorphous cellulose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Den Haan, Riaan; Rose, Shaunita H; Lynd, Lee R; van Zyl, Willem H

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we expressed two cellulase encoding genes, an endoglucanase of Trichoderma reesei (EGI) and the beta-glucosidase of Saccharomycopsis fibuligera (BGL1), in combination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The resulting strain was able to grow on phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC) through simultaneous production of sufficient extracellular endoglucanase and beta-glucosidase activity. Anaerobic growth (0.03h(-1)) up to 0.27gl(-1) DCW was observed on medium containing 10gl(-1) PASC as sole carbohydrate source with concomitant ethanol production of up to 1.0gl(-1). We have thus demonstrated the construction of a yeast strain capable of growth on and one-step conversion of amorphous cellulose to ethanol, representing significant progress towards realization of one-step processing of cellulosic biomass in a consolidated bioprocessing configuration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae growing on pure cellulose.

  13. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with its full complement of organelles, synthesizes membrane phospholipids by pathways that are generally common to those found in higher eukaryotes. Phospholipid synthesis in yeast is regulated in response to a variety of growth conditions (e.g., inositol supplementation, zinc depletion, and growth stage) by a coordination of genetic (e.g., transcriptional activation and repression) and biochemical (e.g., activity modulation and localization) mechanisms. Phosphatidate (PA), whose cellular levels are controlled by the activities of key phospholipid synthesis enzymes, plays a central role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, phosphorylation of key phospholipid synthesis catalytic and regulatory proteins controls the metabolism of phospholipid precursors and products. PMID:21275641

  14. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  15. Production of natural products through metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Many high-value metabolites are produced in nature by organisms that are not ideal for large-scale production. Therefore, interest exists in expressing the biosynthetic pathways of these compounds in organisms that are more suitable for industrial production. Recent years have seen developments in both the discovery of various biosynthetic pathways, as well as development of metabolic engineering tools that allow reconstruction of complex pathways in microorganisms. In the present review we discuss recent advances in reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathways of various high-value products in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a commonly used industrial microorganism. Key achievements in the production of different isoprenoids, aromatics and polyketides are presented and the metabolic engineering strategies underlying these accomplishments are discussed.

  16. Preferentially quantized linker DNA lengths in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Ping; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Xi, Liqun; Tsai, Guei-Feng; Segal, Eran; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-09-12

    The exact lengths of linker DNAs connecting adjacent nucleosomes specify the intrinsic three-dimensional structures of eukaryotic chromatin fibers. Some studies suggest that linker DNA lengths preferentially occur at certain quantized values, differing one from another by integral multiples of the DNA helical repeat, approximately 10 bp; however, studies in the literature are inconsistent. Here, we investigate linker DNA length distributions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, using two novel methods: a Fourier analysis of genomic dinucleotide periodicities adjacent to experimentally mapped nucleosomes and a duration hidden Markov model applied to experimentally defined dinucleosomes. Both methods reveal that linker DNA lengths in yeast are preferentially periodic at the DNA helical repeat ( approximately 10 bp), obeying the forms 10n+5 bp (integer n). This 10 bp periodicity implies an ordered superhelical intrinsic structure for the average chromatin fiber in yeast.

  17. On the Mechanism of Gene Silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Steakley, David Lee; Rine, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms have been proposed for gene silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ranging from steric occlusion of DNA binding proteins from their recognition sequences in silenced chromatin to a specific block in the formation of the preinitiation complex to a block in transcriptional elongation. This study provided strong support for the steric occlusion mechanism by the discovery that RNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7 could be substantially blocked from transcribing from its cognate promoter when embedded in silenced chromatin. Moreover, unlike previous suggestions, we found no evidence for stalled RNA polymerase II within silenced chromatin. The effectiveness of the Sir protein–based silencing mechanism to block transcription activated by Gal4 at promoters in the domain of silenced chromatin was marginal, yet it improved when tested against mutant forms of the Gal4 protein, highlighting a role for specific activators in their sensitivity to gene silencing. PMID:26082137

  18. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains.

  19. Consolidated bioprocessing for bioethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Willem H; Lynd, Lee R; den Haan, Riaan; McBride, John E

    2007-01-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of lignocellulose to bioethanol refers to the combining of the four biological events required for this conversion process (production of saccharolytic enzymes, hydrolysis of the polysaccharides present in pretreated biomass, fermentation of hexose sugars, and fermentation of pentose sugars) in one reactor. CBP is gaining increasing recognition as a potential breakthrough for low-cost biomass processing. Although no natural microorganism exhibits all the features desired for CBP, a number of microorganisms, both bacteria and fungi, possess some of the desirable properties. This review focuses on progress made toward the development of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) for CBP. The current status of saccharolytic enzyme (cellulases and hemicellulases) expression in S. cerevisiae to complement its natural fermentative ability is highlighted. Attention is also devoted to the challenges ahead to integrate all required enzymatic activities in an industrial S. cerevisiae strain(s) and the need for molecular and selection strategies pursuant to developing a yeast capable of CBP.

  20. Glucose- and nitrogen sensing and regulatory mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rødkaer, Steven V; Faergeman, Nils J

    2014-08-01

    Pro- and eukaryotic cells are constantly challenged by varying concentrations of nutrients in their environment. Perceiving and adapting to such changes are therefore crucial for cellular viability. Thus, numerous specialized cellular receptors continuously sense and react to the availability of nutrients such as glucose and nitrogen. When stimulated, these receptors initiate various cellular signaling pathways, which in concert constitute a complex regulatory network. To ensure a highly specific response, these pathways and networks cross-communicate with each other and are regulated at several steps and by numerous different regulators. As numerous of these regulating proteins, biochemical mechanisms, and cellular pathways are evolutionary conserved, complex biochemical information relevant to humans can be obtained by studying simple organisms. Thus, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been recognized as a powerful model system to study fundamental biochemical processes. In the present review, we highlight central signaling pathways and molecular circuits conferring nitrogen- and glucose sensing in S. cerevisiae.

  1. Global mapping of DNA conformational flexibility on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Menconi, Giulia; Bedini, Andrea; Barale, Roberto; Sbrana, Isabella

    2015-04-01

    In this study we provide the first comprehensive map of DNA conformational flexibility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae complete genome. Flexibility plays a key role in DNA supercoiling and DNA/protein binding, regulating DNA transcription, replication or repair. Specific interest in flexibility analysis concerns its relationship with human genome instability. Enrichment in flexible sequences has been detected in unstable regions of human genome defined fragile sites, where genes map and carry frequent deletions and rearrangements in cancer. Flexible sequences have been suggested to be the determinants of fragile gene proneness to breakage; however, their actual role and properties remain elusive. Our in silico analysis carried out genome-wide via the StabFlex algorithm, shows the conserved presence of highly flexible regions in budding yeast genome as well as in genomes of other Saccharomyces sensu stricto species. Flexibile peaks in S. cerevisiae identify 175 ORFs mapping on their 3'UTR, a region affecting mRNA translation, localization and stability. (TA)n repeats of different extension shape the central structure of peaks and co-localize with polyadenylation efficiency element (EE) signals. ORFs with flexible peaks share common features. Transcripts are characterized by decreased half-life: this is considered peculiar of genes involved in regulatory systems with high turnover; consistently, their function affects biological processes such as cell cycle regulation or stress response. Our findings support the functional importance of flexibility peaks, suggesting that the flexible sequence may be derived by an expansion of canonical TAYRTA polyadenylation efficiency element. The flexible (TA)n repeat amplification could be the outcome of an evolutionary neofunctionalization leading to a differential 3'-end processing and expression regulation in genes with peculiar function. Our study provides a new support to the functional role of flexibility in genomes and a

  2. Copper Tolerance and Biosorption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Alcoholic Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Ling-Ling; Jia, Bo; Zhao, Fang; Huang, Wei-Dong; Zhan, Ji-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    At high levels, copper in grape mash can inhibit yeast activity and cause stuck fermentations. Wine yeast has limited tolerance of copper and can reduce copper levels in wine during fermentation. This study aimed to understand copper tolerance of wine yeast and establish the mechanism by which yeast decreases copper in the must during fermentation. Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (lab selected strain BH8 and industrial strains AWRI R2 and Freddo) and a simple model fermentation system containing 0 to 1.50 mM Cu2+ were used. ICP-AES determined Cu ion concentration in the must decreasing differently by strains and initial copper levels during fermentation. Fermentation performance was heavily inhibited under copper stress, paralleled a decrease in viable cell numbers. Strain BH8 showed higher copper-tolerance than strain AWRI R2 and higher adsorption than Freddo. Yeast cell surface depression and intracellular structure deformation after copper treatment were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy; electronic differential system detected higher surface Cu and no intracellular Cu on 1.50 mM copper treated yeast cells. It is most probably that surface adsorption dominated the biosorption process of Cu2+ for strain BH8, with saturation being accomplished in 24 h. This study demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BH8 has good tolerance and adsorption of Cu, and reduces Cu2+ concentrations during fermentation in simple model system mainly through surface adsorption. The results indicate that the strain selected from China's stress-tolerant wine grape is copper tolerant and can reduce copper in must when fermenting in a copper rich simple model system, and provided information for studies on mechanisms of heavy metal stress.

  3. Spectroelectrochemical Study of Carbon Monoxide and Ethanol Oxidation on Pt/C, PtSn(3:1)/C and PtSn(1:1)/C Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rizo, Rubén; Lázaro, María Jesús; Pastor, Elena; García, Gonzalo

    2016-09-12

    PtSn-based catalysts are one of the most active materials toward that contribute ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). In order to gain a better understanding of the Sn influence on the carbon monoxide (principal catalyst poison) and ethanol oxidation reactions in acidic media, a systematic spectroelectrochemical study was carried out. With this end, carbon-supported PtSnx (x = 0, 1/3 and 1) materials were synthesized and employed as anodic catalysts for both reactions. In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) indicate that Sn diminishes the amount of bridge bonded CO (COB) and greatly improves the CO tolerance of Pt-based catalysts. Regarding the effect of Sn loading on the EOR, it enhances the catalytic activity and decreases the onset potential. FTIRS and DEMS analysis indicate that the C-C bond scission occurs at low overpotentials and at the same potential values regardless of the Sn loading, although the amount of C-C bond breaking decreases with the rise of Sn in the catalytic material. Therefore, the elevated catalytic activity toward the EOR at PtSn-based electrodes is mainly associated with the improved CO tolerance and the incomplete oxidation of ethanol to form acetic acid and acetaldehyde species, causing the formation of a higher amount of both C2 products with the rise of Sn loading.

  4. A first-principle calculation of sulfur oxidation on metallic Ni(111) and Pt(111), and bimetallic Ni@Pt(111) and Pt@Ni(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chen-Hao; Ho, Jia-Jen

    2012-09-17

    Sulfur, a pollutant known to poison fuel-cell electrodes, generally comes from S-containing species such as hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S). The S-containing species become adsorbed on a metal electrode and leave atomic S strongly bound to the metal surface. This surface sulfur is completely removed typically by oxidation with O(2) into gaseous SO(2). According to our DFT calculations, the oxidation of sulfur at 0.25 ML surface sulfur coverage on pure Pt(111) and Ni(111) metal surfaces is exothermic. The barriers to the formation of SO(2) are 0.41 and 1.07 eV, respectively. Various metals combined to form bimetallic surfaces are reported to tune the catalytic capabilities toward some reactions. Our results show that it is more difficult to remove surface sulfur from a Ni@Pt(111) surface with reaction barrier 1.86 eV for SO(2) formation than from a Pt@Ni(111) surface (0.13 eV). This result is in good agreement with the statement that bimetallic surfaces could demonstrate more or less activity than to pure metal surfaces by comparing electronic and structural effects. Furthermore, by calculating the reaction free energies we found that the sulfur oxidation reaction on the Pt@Ni(111) surface exhibits the best spontaneity of SO(2) desorption at either room temperature or high temperatures.

  5. Oxidation of Half-Lantern Pt2(II,II) Compounds by Halocarbons. Evidence of Dioxygen Insertion into a Pt(III)-CH3 Bond.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, V; Baya, M; Borja, P; Martín, A

    2015-08-03

    The half-lantern compound [{Pt(bzq)(μ-N^S)}2] (1) [bzq = benzo[h]quinoline, HN^S = 2-mercaptopyrimidine (C4H3N2HS)] reacts with CH3I and haloforms CHX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) to give the corresponding oxidized diplatinum(III) derivatives [{Pt(bzq)(μ-N^S)X}2] (X = Cl 2a, Br 2b, I 2c). These compounds exhibit half-lantern structures with short intermetallic distances (∼2.6 Å) due to Pt-Pt bond formation. The halogen abstraction mechanisms from the halocarbon molecules by the Pt2(II,II) compound 1 were investigated. NMR spectroscopic evidence using labeled reagents support that in the case of (13)CH3I the reaction initiates with an oxidative addition through an SN2 mechanism giving rise to the intermediate species [I(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)((13)CH3)}]. However, with haloforms the reactions proceed through a radical-like mechanism, thermally (CHBr3, CHI3) or photochemically (CHCl3) activated, giving rise to mixtures of species [X(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)R] (3a-c) and [X(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)X] (2a-c). In these cases the presence of O2 favors the formation of species 2 over 3. Transformation of 3 into 2 was possible upon irradiation with UV light. In the case of [I(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)((13)CH3)}] (3d), in the presence of O2 the formation of the unusual methylperoxo derivative [I(bzq)Pt(μ-N^S)2Pt(bzq)(O-O(13)CH3)}] (4d) was detected, which in the presence of (13)CH3I rendered the final product [{Pt(bzq)(μ-N^S)I}2] (2c) and (13)CH3OH.

  6. Anti-prothrombin (aPT) and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies and the risk of thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sciascia, Savino; Sanna, Giovanni; Murru, Veronica; Roccatello, Dario; Khamashta, Munther A; Bertolaccini, Maria Laura

    2014-02-01

    Antibodies to prothrombin are detected by directly coating prothrombin on irradiated ELISA plates (aPT) or by using the phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex as antigen (aPS/PT). Although these antibodies have both been associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and a correlation between the two assays have been reported, it seems that aPT and aPS/PT belong to different populations of autoantibodies. It was our objective to systematically review the available evidence on aPT and aPS/PT antibodies and the risk of thrombosis in APS. Medline-reports published between 1988 and 2013 investigating aPT and aPS/PT as a risk factor for thrombosis were included. Whenever possible, antibody isotype(s) and site of thrombosis were analysed. This systematic review is based on available data from more than 7,000 patients and controls from 38 studies analysing aPT and 10 aPS/PT. Antibodies to prothrombin (both aPT and aPS/PT) increased the risk of thrombosis (odds ratio [OR] 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.72-3.5). aPS/PT seemed to represent a stronger risk factor for thrombosis, both arterial and/or venous than aPT (OR 5.11; 95%CI 4.2-6.3 and OR 1.82; 95%CI 1.44-2.75, respectively). In conclusion, routine measurement of aPS/PT (but not aPT) might be useful in establishing the thrombotic risk of patients with previous thrombosis and/or systemic lupus erythematosus. Their inclusion as laboratory criteria for the APS should be indisputably further explored.

  7. Production of Dengue 2 Envelope Protein in the Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-15

    PRODUCTION OF DENGUE 2 ENVELOPE PROTEIN IN THE YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE FINAL, PHASE I REPORT JOHN M. IVY KATHY HOUTCHENS FEBRUARY 15, 1990...SUBTITLE Production of Dengue 2 Envelope Protein in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ( 6. AUTHOR(S) John M. Ivy Kathy Houtchens 7 PERFORMING...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (Mammum 200 words) The four serotypes of dengue viruses are a leading cause of morbidity throughout the tropics and subtropics

  8. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOEpatents

    Krauter, Paula A. W.; Krauter, Gordon W.

    2002-01-01

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  9. Interactions between Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in tequila must type medium fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Claudia Lorena Fernandez; Beaufort, Sandra; Brandam, Cédric; Taillandier, Patricia

    2014-08-01

    Traditional tequila fermentation is a complex microbial process performed by different indigenous yeast species. Usually, they are classified in two families: Saccharomyces and Non-Saccharomyces species. Using mixed starter cultures of several yeasts genera and species is nowadays considered to be beneficial to enhance the sensorial characteristics of the final products (taste, odor). However, microbial interactions occurring in such fermentations need to be better understood to improve the process. In this work, we focussed on a Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Kluyveromyces marxianus yeast couple. Indirect interactions due to excreted metabolites, thanks to the use of a specific membrane bioreactor, and direct interaction due to cell-to-cell contact have been explored. Comparison of pure and mixed cultures was done in each case. Mixed cultures in direct contact showed that both yeast were affected but Saccharomyces rapidly dominated the cultures whereas Kluyveromyces almost disappeared. In mixed cultures with indirect contact the growth of Kluyveromyces was decreased compared to its pure culture but its concentration could be maintained whereas the growth of Saccharomyces was enhanced. The loss of viability of Kluyveromyces could not be attributed only to ethanol. The sugar consumption and ethanol production in both cases were similar. Thus the interaction phenomena between the two yeasts are different in direct and indirect contact, Kluyveromyces being always much more affected than Saccharomyces.

  10. [Fabrication and photocatalytic activity of Pt-inserted titania nanotubes].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Long; Luo, Wu-Lin; Tian, Wen-Yu; Chen, Tao; Li, Chun; Sun, Mao; Zhu, Di; Liu, Ran-Ran; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Liu, Chun-Li

    2009-06-01

    Titania nanotubes (TNTs) were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment of rutile-phase TiO2 nanoparticals in NaOH solution at 110 degrees C for 24 hours. After drying in aceton for 36 h, the TNTs were under vacuum drying for 24 h at room temperature. The Pt-inserted titania nanotubes (Pt/TNTs) were obtained by filling H2 PtCl6 ethanol solution into the TNTs after vacuum drying. The characterizations of the as-synthesized samples were confirmed by TEM, XRD, and UV-Vis. The photocatalytic activity of the Pt/TNTs was investigated by photo-induced decomposition of methyl orange(MO)under the main 365 nm UV-light. In order to comparison, the photocatalytic activity of both the rutile-phase TiO2 nanoparticles and pure TNTs were also investigated at the same time under the same experimental conditions. The TEM images show that the TNTs are hollow, a few hundred nanometers long, and the inner/outer diameter is about 6/10 nm. The crystal structure of TNTs is H2Ti2O5 x H2O with a little Na. Both the shape and the crystalline of the TNTs are not changed after the modification. The oval or round Pt0 nanoparticals, about 3 nm in diameter, are found only in the nanotubes. Pt/TNTs exhibit enhanced absorption at the visible range in the UV-Vis spectra and its start absorption band edge(lambda0 approximately 457 nm)is obviously redshifted compared to the rutile-phase TiO2 nanoparticals and pure TNTs. The Pt nanoparticles are found to significantly enhance the photocatalytic activity of TNTs. Pt/TNTs are demonstrated to be highly efficient for the UV-light induced photocatalytic decomposition of MO compared to both the rutile-phase TiO2 nanoparticals and pure TNTs. After irradiation for 60 min, the photocatalysis decomposition rate of MO in rutile-phase TiO2 nanoparticals, TNTs and Pt/TNTs are 46.8%, 57.2% and 84.6% respectively.

  11. Site-specific growth of a Pt shell on Au nanoplates: tailoring their surface plasmonic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hee-Jeong; Hong, Soonchang; Ham, Songyi; Shuford, Kevin L.; Park, Sungho

    2014-06-01

    In this report, we tune the surface plasmonic behavior of Au nanoplates depending on the morphology of the Pt shell in which Pt is considered as a less optically inactive element. We describe the synthesis of flat Au nanoplates coated with Pt via rim-preferential or uniform growth methods. Depending on the site-selective growth of Pt on core Au nanoplates, the aspect ratio of the resulting Au@Pt nanoplates was tunable and their corresponding surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands were controlled accordingly. Although Pt is regarded as an optically weak component in visible and near infrared spectral windows, a Pt coating affects the SPR behavior of core Au nanoplates due to effective surface plasmon (SP) coupling between the Au core and the deposited Pt shell. We systematically investigated the optical properties of uniformly grown (Au@Pt(uni)) and rim-preferentially grown (Au@Pt(rim)) Au@Pt nanoplates by observing their SPR band shifts compared to SPR of Au nanoplates. Due to the structural rigidity conferred by the Pt coating, the Au@Pt nanoplates can be easily transferred to the investigated solvents.In this report, we tune the surface plasmonic behavior of Au nanoplates depending on the morphology of the Pt shell in which Pt is considered as a less optically inactive element. We describe the synthesis of flat Au nanoplates coated with Pt via rim-preferential or uniform growth methods. Depending on the site-selective growth of Pt on core Au nanoplates, the aspect ratio of the resulting Au@Pt nanoplates was tunable and their corresponding surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands were controlled accordingly. Although Pt is regarded as an optically weak component in visible and near infrared spectral windows, a Pt coating affects the SPR behavior of core Au nanoplates due to effective surface plasmon (SP) coupling between the Au core and the deposited Pt shell. We systematically investigated the optical properties of uniformly grown (Au@Pt(uni)) and rim

  12. Surfactant-Assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of PMN-PT Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Liu, Xingzhao; Luo, Wenbo; Xu, Dong; He, Kai

    2016-12-01

    The effects of surfactant polyacrylate acid (PAA) on shape evolution of 0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 (0.7PMN-0.3PT) nanorods were studied. The results revealed that the polyacrylic acid content had great influence on the morphology of 0.7PMN-0.3PT. With increasing PAA concentration from 0.45 to 0.82 g/ml, the ratio of perovskite phase (PMN-PT nanorod) increased, while the ratio of pyrochlore phase decreased. When the PAA concentration was 0.82 g/ml, pure 0.7PMN-0.3PT nanorods were obtained. However, when PAA concentration was higher than 0.82 g/ml, the excess of PAA would hindered their [100] orientation growth. The piezoelectric coefficient d 33 of 0.7PMN-0.3PT nanorod was obtained by linear fitting, and the d 33 value was 409 pm/V.

  13. Surfactant-Assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of PMN-PT Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Liu, Xingzhao; Luo, Wenbo; Xu, Dong; He, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The effects of surfactant polyacrylate acid (PAA) on shape evolution of 0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 (0.7PMN-0.3PT) nanorods were studied. The results revealed that the polyacrylic acid content had great influence on the morphology of 0.7PMN-0.3PT. With increasing PAA concentration from 0.45 to 0.82 g/ml, the ratio of perovskite phase (PMN-PT nanorod) increased, while the ratio of pyrochlore phase decreased. When the PAA concentration was 0.82 g/ml, pure 0.7PMN-0.3PT nanorods were obtained. However, when PAA concentration was higher than 0.82 g/ml, the excess of PAA would hindered their [100] orientation growth. The piezoelectric coefficient d 33 of 0.7PMN-0.3PT nanorod was obtained by linear fitting, and the d 33 value was 409 pm/V.

  14. DFT Study of Optical Properties of Pt-based Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprea, Corneliu I.; Dumbravǎ, Anca; Moscalu, Florin; Nicolaides, Atnanassios; Gîrţu, Mihai A.

    2010-01-01

    We report Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations providing the geometrical and electronic structures, as well as the vibrational and optical properties of the homologous series of Pt-pyramidalized olefin complexes (CH2)n-(C8H10)Pt(PH3)2, where n = 0, 1, and 2, in their neutral and oxidized states. All complexes were geometry optimized for the singlet ground state in vacuum using DFT methods with B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the Effective Core Potential LANL2DZ basis set, within the frame of Gaussian03 quantum chemistry package. We find the coordination geometry of Pt to be distorted square planar, with dihedral angles ranging from 0°, for n = 0 and 1, which have C2V symmetry to 3.4°, for n = 2 with C2 symmetry. The Mulliken charge analysis allows a discussion of the oxidation state of the Pt ion. Electronic transitions were calculated at the same level of theory by means of Time Dependant-DFT. For n = 2 the electronic absorption bands are located in the UV region of the spectrum, the transitions being assigned to metal to ligand charge transfers. The relevance of these Pt-based compounds as possible pigments for dye-sensitized solar cells is discussed.

  15. Antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compound CePt3P

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Wang, Zhen; Zheng, Shiyi; Feng, Chunmu; Dai, Jianhui; Xu, Zhu’an

    2017-01-01

    A new ternary platinum phosphide CePt3P was synthesized and characterized by means of magnetic, thermodynamic and transport measurements. The compound crystallizes in an antiperovskite tetragonal structure similar to that in the canonical family of platinum-based superconductors APt3P (A = Sr, Ca, La) and closely related to the noncentrosymmetric heavy fermion superconductor CePt3Si. In contrast to all the superconducting counterparts, however, no superconductivity is observed in CePt3P down to 0.5 K. Instead, CePt3P displays a coexistence of antiferromagnetic ordering, Kondo effect and crystalline electric field effect. A field-induced spin-flop transition is observed below the magnetic ordering temperature TN1 of 3.0 K while the Kondo temperature is of similar magnitude as TN1. The obtained Sommerfeld coefficient of electronic specific heat is γCe = 86 mJ/mol·K2 indicating that CePt3P is a moderately correlated antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compound. PMID:28157184

  16. Novel mitoviruses in Rhizoctonia solani AG-3PT infecting potato.

    PubMed

    Das, Subha; Falloon, Richard E; Stewart, Alison; Pitman, Andrew R

    2016-03-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) elements are ubiquitous in Rhizoctonia solani. Total dsRNA was randomly amplified from a R. solani isolate (RS002) belonging to anastomosis group-3PT (AG-3PT), associated with black scurf in potato. Assembly of resulting cDNA sequences identified a nearly complete genome of a novel virus related to the genus Mitovirus (family Narnaviridae), herein named Rhizoctonia mitovirus 1 RS002 (RMV-1-RS002). The 2797 nucleotide partial genome of RMV-1-RS002 is A-U rich (59.06 %), and can be folded into stable stem-loop structures at 5' and 3' ends. Universal and mold mitochondrial codon usages revealed a large open reading frame in the genome, putatively encoding an 826 amino acid polypeptide, which has conserved motifs for mitoviral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The full length putative polypeptide shared 25.6 % sequence identity with the corresponding region of Tuber excavatum mitovirus (TeMV). The partial genome of a second mitovirus (proposed name Rhizoctonia mitovirus 2 RS002 (RMV-2-RS002)) was also amplified from RS002. A nearly identical copy of RMV-1-RS002 was detected in two additional AG-3PT isolates. These data indicate that multiple mitoviruses can exist in a single isolate of R. solani AG-3PT, and that mitoviruses such as RMV-1-RS002 are probably widespread in this pathogen. The roles of mitoviruses in the biology of R. solani AG-3PT remain unknown.

  17. Strong Spin Hall effect in PtMn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yongxi; Shi, Shengjie; Ralph, Daniel; Buhrman, Robert

    Recent reports indicate that certain metallic antiferromagnets (AFM) can exhibit a significant spin Hall effect. Here we report a large damping-like spin torque efficiency (ξDL) in PtMn/ferromagnet(FM) bilayer structures, determined from both FM-thickness-dependent spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR), and harmonic response (HR) measurements of layers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). We find that ξDL can vary from <0.1 to >0.15, depending on the thickness of PtMn, the stacking order of the samples, and the choice of the FM material. The field-like spin torque efficiency (ξFL) is also quite variable, 0<|ξFL|<0.5. The large broadening of the ST-FMR linewidth suggests extra spin attenuation at the AFM/FM interface that is possibly due to intermixing. The PtMn/FeCoB/MgO structures that exhibit PMA have a comparatively low switching current density and an unusual asymmetric switching phase diagram. These results indicate that AFM PtMn has significant potential both for advancing the understanding the physics of the spin Hall effect in Pt alloys, and for enabling new spintronics functionality.

  18. PT symmetry in classical and quantum statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Meisinger, Peter N; Ogilvie, Michael C

    2013-04-28

    PT-symmetric Hamiltonians and transfer matrices arise naturally in statistical mechanics. These classical and quantum models often require the use of complex or negative weights and thus fall outside the conventional equilibrium statistical mechanics of Hermitian systems. PT-symmetric models form a natural class where the partition function is necessarily real, but not necessarily positive. The correlation functions of these models display a much richer set of behaviours than Hermitian systems, displaying sinusoidally modulated exponential decay, as in a dense fluid, or even sinusoidal modulation without decay. Classical spin models with PT-symmetry include Z(N) models with a complex magnetic field, the chiral Potts model and the anisotropic next-nearest-neighbour Ising model. Quantum many-body problems with a non-zero chemical potential have a natural PT-symmetric representation related to the sign problem. Two-dimensional quantum chromodynamics with heavy quarks at non-zero chemical potential can be solved by diagonalizing an appropriate PT-symmetric Hamiltonian.

  19. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Co-Pt granular multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolomé, J.; Figueroa, A. I.; García, L. M.; Bartolomé, F.; Ruiz, L.; González-Calbet, J. M.; Petroff, F.; Deranlot, C.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Brookes, N.

    2012-09-01

    Magnetization hysteresis curves have been measured on Co granular multilayers, (Al2O3/Co/Pt)N (N = 1 and 25), with the applied magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the substrate plane. In all samples perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was observed. For Co particles with average diameter 3 nm, the coercive field at low temperature is μ0HC = 0.5 T. HC decreases for increasing temperature and disappears at ≈200 K. A soft magnetic component is also present in all samples up to the freezing temperature Tf = 365 K. Co and Pt XMCD measurements at the L2,3 edges were performed, yielding to the orbital mL and spin mS contributions to the total magnetic moment of the system. These results, in addition to XANES ones, indicate the presence of CoxPt1-x alloy. Particles conformed of CoPt alloy, embedded in Pt and coupled magnetically by dipolar or RKKY interaction, may explain the phenomenology observed in these systems.

  20. Insight into the Reaction Mechanisms of Methanol on PtRu/Pt(111): A Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qiuyue; Xu, Wenbin; Sang, Pengpeng; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Lianming; He, Xiaoli; Guo, Wenyue

    2016-04-01

    Periodic DFT calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the mechanisms of methanol decomposition and oxidation on the PtRu/Pt(111) surface. Geometries and energies for the primary species involved are analyzed and the reaction network has been mapped out. The calculation shows that among three initial Csbnd H, Osbnd H, and Csbnd O bond scissions of methanol, the Osbnd H bond scission is found to be the most favorable and bears a lower energy barrier than the desorption of methanol. The decomposition of CH3O occurs via the path CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO with the limiting step of the first dehydrogenation. Although the oxidation of CO is hindered by a high barrier, the CHO oxidation to CHOOH could occur facilely. Further decomposition of formic acid to CO2 and/or CO could occur via four possible pathways, that is, initial Csbnd H, Osbnd H, and Csbnd O bond activations as well as simultaneous activation of Csbnd H and Csbnd O bonds, where the first pathway, HCOOH → COOH → CO2, is the most favorable from a kinetic point of view. Compared to that on Pt(111), methanol on PtRu/Pt(111) prefers to decomposition rather than desorption and then oxidation via the favorable non-CO path with a lower rate-determining energy barrier of CH3O → CH2O for the whole reaction, which indicates that PtRu alloy can improved tolerance toward CO poisoning compared with pure Pt.

  1. Tuning the Photoelectrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution of Pt-Decorated Silicon Photocathodes by the Temperature and Time of Electroless Pt Deposition.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Bruno; Li, Gaozeng; Gouttefangeas, Francis; Joanny, Loic; Loget, Gabriel

    2016-11-15

    The electroless deposition of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on hydrogen-terminated silicon (H-Si) surfaces is studied as a function of the temperature and the immersion time. It is demonstrated that isolated Pt structures can be produced at all investigated temperatures (between 22 and 75 °C) for short deposition times, typically within 1-10 min if the temperature is 45 °C or less than 5 min at 75 °C. For longer times, dendritic metal structures start to grow, ultimately leading to highly rough interconnected Pt networks. Upon increasing the temperature from 22 to 75 °C and for an immersion time of 5 min, the average size of the observed Pt NPs monotonously increases from 120 to 250 nm, and their number density calculated using scanning electron microscopy decreases from (4.5 ± 1.0) × 10(8) to (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10(8) Pt NPs cm(-2). The impact of both the morphology and the distribution of the Pt NPs on the photoelectrocatalytic activity of the resulting metallized photocathodes is then analyzed. Pt deposited at 45 °C for 5 min yields photocathodes with the best electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Under illumination at 33 mW cm(-2), this optimized photoelectrode shows a fill factor of 45%, an efficiency (η) of 9.7%, and a short-circuit current density (|Jsc|) at 0 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode of 15.5 mA cm(-2).

  2. Xylose Isomerase Improves Growth and Ethanol Production Rates from Biomass Sugars for Both Saccharomyces Pastorianus and Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kristen P.; Gowtham, Yogender Kumar; Henson, J. Michael; Harcum, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    The demand for biofuel ethanol made from clean, renewable nonfood sources is growing. Cellulosic biomass, such as switch grass (Panicum virgatum L.), is an alternative feedstock for ethanol production; however, cellulosic feedstock hydrolysates contain high levels of xylose, which needs to be converted to ethanol to meet economic feasibility. In this study, the effects of xylose isomerase on cell growth and ethanol production from biomass sugars representative of switch grass were investigated using low cell density cultures. The lager yeast species Saccharomyces pastorianus was grown with immobilized xylose isomerase in the fermentation step to determine the impact of the glucose and xylose concentrations on the ethanol production rates. Ethanol production rates were improved due to xylose isomerase; however, the positive effect was not due solely to the conversion of xylose to xylulose. Xylose isomerase also has glucose isomerase activity, so to better understand the impact of the xylose isomerase on S. pastorianus, growth and ethanol production were examined in cultures provided fructose as the sole carbon. It was observed that growth and ethanol production rates were higher for the fructose cultures with xylose isomerase even in the absence of xylose. To determine whether the positive effects of xylose isomerase extended to other yeast species, a side-by-side comparison of S. pastorianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was conducted. These comparisons demonstrated that the xylose isomerase increased ethanol productivity for both the yeast species by increasing the glucose consumption rate. These results suggest that xylose isomerase can contribute to improved ethanol productivity, even without significant xylose conversion. PMID:22866331

  3. A pathway for the growth of core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Yang, Xiaofan; Li, Chen; Pennycook, Stephen J; Lupini, Andrew R

    2015-10-12

    In this study, the aging of both Pt-Pd nanoparticles and core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles has been reported to result in alloying of Pt with Pd. In comparison to monometallic Pt catalysts, the growth of Pd-Pt bimetallics is slower; however, the mechanism of growth of particles and the mechanism by which Pd improves the hydrothermal durability of bimetallic Pd-Pt particles remains uncertain. In our work on hydrothermal aging of core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles, synthesized by solution methods, with varying Pd:Pt ratio of 1:4, 1:1, and 4:1, we compare the growth of core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles and find that particles grow by migrating and joining together. The unique feature of the observed growth is that Pd shells from both particles open up and join, allowing the cores to merge. At high temperatures, alloying occurs in good agreement with reports by other workers.

  4. Facile Synthesis of Nanoporous Pt-Y alloy with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity and Durability.

    PubMed

    Cui, Rongjing; Mei, Ling; Han, Guangjie; Chen, Jiyun; Zhang, Genhua; Quan, Ying; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong; Qian, Bin; Jiang, Xuefan; Han, Zhida

    2017-02-02

    Recently, Pt-Y alloy has displayed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and is regarded as a promising cathode catalyst for fuel cells. However, the bulk production of nanoscaled Pt-Y alloy with outstanding catalytic performance remains a great challenge. Here, we address the challenge through a simple dealloying method to synthesize nanoporous Pt-Y alloy (NP-PtY) with a typical ligament size of ~5 nm. By combining the intrinsic superior electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Y alloy with the special nanoporous structure, the NP-PtY bimetallic catalyst presents higher activity for ORR and ethanol oxidation reaction, and better electrocatalytic stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst and nanoporous Pt alloy. The as-made NP-PtY holds great application potential as a promising electrocatalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to the advantages of facile preparation and excellent catalytic performance.

  5. Facile synthesis of PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high activity for formic acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-02-15

    We report the facile synthesis of carbon supported PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high electrocatalytic activity as the anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). PtAu alloy nanopaticles are synthesized by co-reducing HAuCl4 and H2PtCl6 with NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate and then the nanoparticles are deposited on Vulcan XC-72R carbon support (PtAu/C). The obtained catalysts are characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), which reveal PtAu alloy formation with an average diameter of 4.6 nm. PtAu/C exhibits 8 times higher catalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation than Pt/C. The enhanced activity of PtAu/C catalyst is attributed to noncontinuous Pt sites formed in the presence of the neighbored Au sites, which promotes direct oxidation of formic acid by avoiding poison CO.

  6. Facile Synthesis of Nanoporous Pt-Y alloy with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity and Durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Rongjing; Mei, Ling; Han, Guangjie; Chen, Jiyun; Zhang, Genhua; Quan, Ying; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong; Qian, Bin; Jiang, Xuefan; Han, Zhida

    2017-02-01

    Recently, Pt-Y alloy has displayed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and is regarded as a promising cathode catalyst for fuel cells. However, the bulk production of nanoscaled Pt-Y alloy with outstanding catalytic performance remains a great challenge. Here, we address the challenge through a simple dealloying method to synthesize nanoporous Pt-Y alloy (NP-PtY) with a typical ligament size of ~5 nm. By combining the intrinsic superior electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Y alloy with the special nanoporous structure, the NP-PtY bimetallic catalyst presents higher activity for ORR and ethanol oxidation reaction, and better electrocatalytic stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst and nanoporous Pt alloy. The as-made NP-PtY holds great application potential as a promising electrocatalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to the advantages of facile preparation and excellent catalytic performance.

  7. Pd-Pt Bimetallic Nanodendrites with High Activity for Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.; Tao, J.; Jiang, M.; Camargo, P.H.C.; Cho, E.C.; Lu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Xia, Y.

    2009-06-05

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide a great opportunity to improve their catalytic properties and increase their activity on a mass basis. We synthesized Pd-Pt bimetallic nanodendrites consisting of a dense array of Pt branches on a Pd core by reducing K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} with L-ascorbic acid in the presence of uniform Pd nanocrystal seeds in an aqueous solution. The Pt branches supported on faceted Pd nanocrystals exhibited relatively large surface areas and particularly active facets toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the rate-determining step in a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell. The Pd-Pt nanodendrites were two and a half times more active on the basis of equivalent Pt mass for the ORR than the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst and five times more active than the first-generation supportless Pt-black catalyst.

  8. Networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes as superior catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Meihua; Zhang, Jianshuo; Wu, Chuxin; Guan, Lunhui

    2017-02-01

    The high cost and short lifetime of the Pt-based anode catalyst for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) hamper the widespread commercialization of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Therefore, improving the activity of Pt-based catalysts is necessary for their practical application. For the first time, we prepared networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes with loading ratio as high as 91 wt% (Pt/MWCNTs). Thanks for the unique connected structure, the Pt mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs for methanol oxidation reaction is 4.4 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C (20 wt%). When carbon support is considered, the total mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs is 20 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C. The durability and anti-poisoning ability are also improved greatly.

  9. Facile Synthesis of Nanoporous Pt-Y alloy with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity and Durability

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Rongjing; Mei, Ling; Han, Guangjie; Chen, Jiyun; Zhang, Genhua; Quan, Ying; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong; Qian, Bin; Jiang, Xuefan; Han, Zhida

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Pt-Y alloy has displayed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and is regarded as a promising cathode catalyst for fuel cells. However, the bulk production of nanoscaled Pt-Y alloy with outstanding catalytic performance remains a great challenge. Here, we address the challenge through a simple dealloying method to synthesize nanoporous Pt-Y alloy (NP-PtY) with a typical ligament size of ~5 nm. By combining the intrinsic superior electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Y alloy with the special nanoporous structure, the NP-PtY bimetallic catalyst presents higher activity for ORR and ethanol oxidation reaction, and better electrocatalytic stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst and nanoporous Pt alloy. The as-made NP-PtY holds great application potential as a promising electrocatalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to the advantages of facile preparation and excellent catalytic performance. PMID:28150732

  10. Equiatomic CoPt thin films with extremely high coercivity

    SciTech Connect

    Varghese, Binni; Piramanayagam, S. N. Yang, Yi; Kai Wong, Seng; Khume Tan, Hang; Kiat Lee, Wee; Okamoto, Iwao

    2014-05-07

    In this paper, magnetic and structural properties of near-equiatomic CoPt thin films, which exhibited a high coercivity in the film-normal direction—suitable for perpendicular magnetic recording media applications—are reported. The films exhibited a larger coercivity of about 6.5 kOe at 8 nm. The coercivity showed a monotonous decrease as the film thickness was increased. The transmission electron microscopy images indicated that the as fabricated CoPt film generally consists of a stack of magnetically hard hexagonal-close-packed phase, followed by stacking faults and face-centred-cubic phase. The thickness dependent magnetic properties are explained on the basis of exchange-coupled composite media. Epitaxial growth on Ru layers is a possible factor leading to the unusual observation of magnetically hard hcp-phase at high concentrations of Pt.

  11. Misfit strain phase diagrams of epitaxial PMN-PT films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakpash, N.; Khassaf, H.; Rossetti, G. A.; Alpay, S. P.

    2015-02-01

    Misfit strain-temperature phase diagrams of three compositions of (001) pseudocubic (1 - x).Pb (Mgl/3Nb2/3)O3 - x.PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) thin films are computed using a phenomenological model. Two (x = 0.30, 0.42) are located near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) of bulk PMN-PT at room temperature (RT) and one (x = 0.70) is located far from the MPB. The results show that it is possible to stabilize an adaptive monoclinic phase over a wide range of misfit strains. At RT, the stability region of this phase is much larger for PMN-PT compared to barium strontium titanate and lead zirconate titanate films.

  12. PMN-PT nanowires with a very high piezoelectric constant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shiyou; Poirier, Gerald; Yao, Nan

    2012-05-09

    A profound way to increase the output voltage (or power) of the piezoelectric nanogenerators is to utilize a material with higher piezoelectric constants. Here we report the synthesis of novel piezoelectric 0.72Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-0.28PbTiO(3) (PMN-PT) nanowires using a hydrothermal process. The unpoled single-crystal PMN-PT nanowires show a piezoelectric constant (d(33)) up to 381 pm/V, with an average value of 373 ± 5 pm/V. This is about 15 times higher than the maximum reported value of 1-D ZnO nanostructures and 3 times higher than the largest reported value of 1-D PZT nanostructures. These PMN-PT nanostructures are of good potential being used as the fundamental building block for higher power nanogenerators, high sensitivity nanosensors, and large strain nanoactuators.

  13. PT-Symmetric Real Dirac Fermions and Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y X; Lu, Y

    2017-02-03

    Recently, Weyl fermions have attracted increasing interest in condensed matter physics due to their rich phenomenology originated from their nontrivial monopole charges. Here, we present a theory of real Dirac points that can be understood as real monopoles in momentum space, serving as a real generalization of Weyl fermions with the reality being endowed by the PT symmetry. The real counterparts of topological features of Weyl semimetals, such as Nielsen-Ninomiya no-go theorem, 2D subtopological insulators, and Fermi arcs, are studied in the PT symmetric Dirac semimetals and the underlying reality-dependent topological structures are discussed. In particular, we construct a minimal model of the real Dirac semimetals based on recently proposed cold atom experiments and quantum materials about PT symmetric Dirac nodal line semimetals.

  14. PT -symmetric spectral singularity and negative-frequency resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendharker, Sarang; Guo, Yu; Khosravi, Farhad; Jacob, Zubin

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum consists of a bath of balanced and symmetric positive- and negative-frequency fluctuations. Media in relative motion or accelerated observers can break this symmetry and preferentially amplify negative-frequency modes as in quantum Cherenkov radiation and Unruh radiation. Here, we show the existence of a universal negative-frequency-momentum mirror symmetry in the relativistic Lorentzian transformation for electromagnetic waves. We show the connection of our discovered symmetry to parity-time (PT ) symmetry in moving media and the resulting spectral singularity in vacuum fluctuation-related effects. We prove that this spectral singularity can occur in the case of two metallic plates in relative motion interacting through positive- and negative-frequency plasmonic fluctuations (negative-frequency resonance). Our work paves the way for understanding the role of PT -symmetric spectral singularities in amplifying fluctuations and motivates the search for PT symmetry in novel photonic systems.

  15. Misfit strain phase diagrams of epitaxial PMN–PT films

    SciTech Connect

    Khakpash, N.; Khassaf, H.; Rossetti, G. A.; Alpay, S. P.

    2015-02-23

    Misfit strain–temperature phase diagrams of three compositions of (001) pseudocubic (1 − x)·Pb (Mg{sub l/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} − x·PbTiO{sub 3} (PMN–PT) thin films are computed using a phenomenological model. Two (x = 0.30, 0.42) are located near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) of bulk PMN–PT at room temperature (RT) and one (x = 0.70) is located far from the MPB. The results show that it is possible to stabilize an adaptive monoclinic phase over a wide range of misfit strains. At RT, the stability region of this phase is much larger for PMN–PT compared to barium strontium titanate and lead zirconate titanate films.

  16. Pt- and Au-induced monodirectional nanowires on Ge(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Yamada, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Sakai, S.; Yamauchi, Y.

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption of Pt or Au on Ge(110) and subsequent annealing resulted in formation of well-ordered monodirectional nanowires (NWs) throughout the surface over a cm-scale. The NWs were aligned along the [ 1 1 bar 0] direction, independent of the surface reconstruction of Ge(110). Metastable-atom deexcitation spectroscopy of Pt-NWs revealed that the topmost part of the NWs comprised Ge atoms, suggesting the exchange of the Ge and metal atoms, leaving an ultrathin Ge layer on top of the NWs. The increase in the electronic density of state near the Fermi energy was observed from both the MDS and UPS spectra of the Pt-NWs, suggesting a metallicity of the NWs.

  17. Level densities and thermodynamical properties of Pt and Au isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacoppo, F.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Eriksen, T. K.; Firestone, R. B.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hagen, T. W.; Kheswa, B. V.; Klintefjord, M.; Koehler, P. E.; Larsen, A. C.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.

    2014-11-01

    The nuclear level densities of Pt-196194 and Au,198197 below the neutron separation energy have been measured using transfer and scattering reactions. All the level density distributions follow the constant-temperature description. Each group of isotopes is characterized by the same temperature above the energy threshold corresponding to the breaking of the first Cooper pair. A constant entropy excess Δ S =1.9 kB and 1.1 kB is observed in 195Pt and 198Au with respect to 196Pt and 197Au, respectively, giving information on the available single-particle level space for the last unpaired valence neutron. The breaking of nucleon Cooper pairs is revealed by sequential peaks in the microcanonical caloric curve.

  18. Designed nanostructured pt film for electrocatalytic activities by underpotential deposition combined chemical replacement techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minghua; Jin, Yongdong; Jiang, Heqing; Sun, Xuping; Chen, Hongjun; Liu, Baifeng; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2005-08-18

    Multiple-deposited Pt overlayer modified Pt nanoparticle (MD-Pt overlayer/PtNPs) films were deliberately constructed on glassy carbon electrodes through alternately multiple underpotential deposition (UPD) of Ag followed redox replacement reaction by Pt (II) cations. The linear and regular growth of the films characterized by cyclic voltammetry was observed. Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) provides the surface morphology of the nanostructured Pt films. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry demonstrate that the MD-Pt overlayer/PtNPs films can catalyze an almost four-electron reduction of O(2) to H(2)O in air-saturated 0.1 M H(2)SO(4). Thus-prepared Pt films behave as novel nanostructured electrocatalysts for dioxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with enhanced electrocatalytic activities, in terms of both reduction peak potential and peak current, when compared to that of the bulk polycrystalline Pt electrode. Additionally, it is noted that after multiple replacement cycles, the electrocatalytic activities improved remarkably, although the increased amount of Pt is very low in comparison to that of pre-modified PtNPs due to the intrinsic feature of the UPD-redox replacement technique. In other words, the electrocatalytic activities could be improved markedly without using very much Pt by the technique of tailoring the catalytic surface. These features may provide an interesting way to produce Pt catalysts with a reliable catalytic performance as well as a reduction in cost.

  19. Reducing Pt use in the catalysts for formic acid electrooxidation via nanoengineered surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Mengyin; Wang, Yulu; Chen, Guoqin; Zhou, Hua; Li, Yunhua; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Chen, Bing H.

    2014-07-01

    The design of active and durable catalysts for formic acid (FA) electrooxidation requires controlling the amount of three neighboring platinum atoms in the surface of Pt-based catalysts. Such requirement is studied by preparing Pt decorated Pd/C (donated as Pt-Pd/C) with various Pt:Pd molar ratios via galvanic displacement making the amount of three neighboring Pt atoms in the surface of Pt-Pd/C tunable. The decorated nanostructures are confirmed by XPS, HS-LEIS, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric measurements, demonstrating that Pt-Pd/C (the optimal molar ratio, Pt:Pd = 1:250) exhibits superior activity and durability than Pd/C and commercial Pt/C (J-M, 20%) catalysts for FA electrooxidation. The mass activity of Pt-Pd/C (Pt:Pd = 1:250) (3.91 A mg-1) is about 98 and 6 times higher than that of commercial Pt/C (0.04 A mg-1) and Pd/C (0.63 A mg-1) at a given potential of 0.1 V vs SCE, respectively. The controlled synthesis of Pt-Pd/C lead to the formation of largely discontinuous Pd and Pt sites and inhibition of CO formation, exhibiting unprecedented electrocatalytic performance toward FA electrooxidation while the cost of the catalyst almost the same as Pd/C. These findings have profound implications to the design and nanoengineering of decorated surfaces of catalysts for FA electrooxidation.

  20. Atomic structure of PtCu nanoparticles in PtCu/C catalysts from EXAFS spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srabionyan, V. V.; Pryadchenko, V. V.; Kurzin, A. A.; Belenov, S. V.; Avakyan, L. A.; Guterman, V. E.; Bugaev, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Deposited electrocatalysts with different distributions of components in PtCu bimetallic nanoparticles involved in their composition were synthesized by simultaneous and sequential reduction of Cu(2+) and Pt(IV) in a carbon suspension. The dependence of the atomic structure of PtCu nanoparticles on the synthesis conditions and the degree of influence of post-treatment was established from analysis of the changes in Fourier transforms of the experimental Pt and Cu EXAFS spectra, as well as the structural parameters obtained by their fitting before and after the treatment of the materials in an acid solution. A technique was proposed for visualizing the atomic structure of synthesized bimetallic nanoparticles. This technique made it possible to determine the character of the distribution of the components over the nanoparticle volume in accordance with the component composition and local atomic structure parameters determined from EXAFS spectroscopy and to obtain the visualization of the distribution of the components in PtCu nanoparticles synthesized by the aforementioned methods.

  1. Graphene on Pt(111): Growth and substrate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Peter; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Eli

    2009-12-01

    In situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) of graphene growth combined with measurements of the graphene structure and electronic band structure has been used to study graphene on Pt(111). Growth by carbon segregation produces macroscopic monolayer graphene domains extending continuously across Pt(111) substrate steps and bounded by strongly faceted edges. LEEM during cooling from the growth temperature shows the propagation of wrinkles in the graphene sheet, driven by thermal stress. The lattice mismatch between graphene and Pt(111) is accommodated by moiré structures with a large number of different rotational variants, without a clear preference for a particular interface geometry. Fast and slow growing graphene domains exhibit moiré structures with small [e.g., (3×3)G , (6×6)R2G , and (2×2)R4G ] and large unit cells [e.g., (44×44)R15G , (52×52)R14G , and (8×8)G ], respectively. A weak substrate coupling, suggested by the growth and structural properties of monolayer graphene on Pt(111), is confirmed by maps of the band structure, which is close to that of isolated graphene aside from minimal hole doping due to charge transfer from the metal. Finally, the decoupled graphene monolayer on Pt(111) appears impenetrable to carbon diffusion, which self-limits the graphene growth at monolayer thickness. Thicker graphene domains, which can form at boundaries between monolayer domains, have been used to characterize the properties of few-layer graphene on Pt(111).

  2. Graphene on Pt(111): Growth and Substrate interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, P.; Sadowski, J.T.; Sutter, E.

    2009-12-01

    In situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) of graphene growth combined with measurements of the graphene structure and electronic band structure has been used to study graphene on Pt(111). Growth by carbon segregation produces macroscopic monolayer graphene domains extending continuously across Pt(111) substrate steps and bounded by strongly faceted edges. LEEM during cooling from the growth temperature shows the propagation of wrinkles in the graphene sheet, driven by thermal stress. The lattice mismatch between graphene and Pt(111) is accommodated by moire structures with a large number of different rotational variants, without a clear preference for a particular interface geometry. Fast and slow growing graphene domains exhibit moire structures with small [e.g., (3 x 3){sub G}, ({radical}6 x {radical}6)R2{sub G}, and (2 x 2)R4{sub G}] and large unit cells [e.g., ({radical}44 x {radical}44)R15{sub G}, ({radical}52 x {radical}52)R14{sub G}, and (8 x 8){sub G}], respectively. A weak substrate coupling, suggested by the growth and structural properties of monolayer graphene on Pt(111), is confirmed by maps of the band structure, which is close to that of isolated graphene aside from minimal hole doping due to charge transfer from the metal. Finally, the decoupled graphene monolayer on Pt(111) appears impenetrable to carbon diffusion, which self-limits the graphene growth at monolayer thickness. Thicker graphene domains, which can form at boundaries between monolayer domains, have been used to characterize the properties of few-layer graphene on Pt(111).

  3. Exchange-Coupled FePt Nanoparticle Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hao; Vedantam, T.; Dai, Z. R.; Wang, Z. L.; Liu, J. P.; Sun, Shouheng

    2002-03-01

    High-performance permanent magnetic materials for energy-related applications need large energy-products. A permanent magnet with large (BH) products should exhibit both a high saturation magnetization , M_s, and a large coercive field, H_c. L10 ordered FePt has high Ms ( ~ 1100 emu/cm^3) and large magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant Ku (> 5e10^7 erg/cm^3), therefore may be a suitable candidates for permanent magnetic materials. We report synthesis of exchange-coupled FePt nanoparticle assemblies via solution phase deposition and controlled thermal annealing. FePt nanoparticles are prepared by high temperature solution phase decomposition of Fe(CO)_5and reduction of Pt(acac)2 in the presence of oleic acid and oleyl amine. The Fe and Pt composition of the nanoparticles is tuned by adjusting the molar ratio of Fe(CO)5 to Pt(acac)_2. The nanoparticles are easily dispersed into alkane solvent. Depositing particle dispersion on a solid substrate and controlling solvent evaporation yield self-organized magnetic nanoparticle assemblies. Magnetic hysteresis loops, remanence curves, and δM measurements show that annealing for short time under nitrogen yields isolated particle assemblies with random crystalline orientations. Prolonged annealing under reducing atmosphere leads to the evaporation of the organic surfactants, and results in grain agglomeration and inter grain exchange coupling. The degree of coupling can be readily controlled by annealing conditions. Changes in the magnetization reversal behavior have also been observed.This work is supported by DARPA No. DAAD 19-01-1-0546.

  4. CO2 hydrogenation on Pt, Pt/SiO2 and Pt/TiO2: Importance of synergy between Pt and oxide support

    SciTech Connect

    Kattel, Shyam; Yan, Binhang; Chen, Jingguang G.; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-27

    In this paper we combined density functional theory (DFT), kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations and experimental measurements to gain insight into the mechanisms of CO2 conversion by hydrogen on the Pt nanoparticle (NP). The results show that in spite of the presence of active, low-coordinated sites, Pt NP alone is not able to catalyze the reaction due to the weak CO2 binding on the catalyst. Once CO2 is stabilized, the hydrogenation of CO2 to CO via the reverse-water–gas shift (RWGS) reaction is promoted; in contrast, the enhancement for further *CO hydrogenation to CH4 is less significant and no CH3OH is observed. The selectivity to CO is mainly determined by CO binding energy and the energetics of *CO hydrogenation to *HCO, while that for CH4 and CH3OH is determined by the competition between hydrogenation and C–O bond scission reactions of the *H2COH species. Using SiO2 and TiO2 as the support, Pt NP is able to promote the overall CO2 conversion, while the impact on the selectivity is rather small. The theoretically predicted trend in activity and selectivity is in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, the enhanced activity of Pt/oxide over Pt is originated from the sites at the Pt–oxide interface, where the synergy between Pt and oxide plays an important role.

  5. Ternary Pt-Ru-Ni catalytic layers for methanol electrooxidation prepared by electrodeposition and galvanic replacement

    PubMed Central

    Papaderakis, Athanasios; Pliatsikas, Nikolaos; Prochaska, Chara; Papazisi, Kalliopi M.; Balomenou, Stella P.; Tsiplakides, Dimitrios; Patsalas, Panagiotis; Sotiropoulos, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Ternary Pt-Ru-Ni deposits on glassy carbon substrates, Pt-Ru(Ni)/GC, have been formed by initial electrodeposition of Ni layers onto glassy carbon electrodes, followed by their partial exchange for Pt and Ru, upon their immersion into equimolar solutions containing complex ions of the precious metals. The overall morphology and composition of the deposits has been studied by SEM microscopy and EDS spectroscopy. Continuous but nodular films have been confirmed, with a Pt ÷ Ru ÷ Ni % bulk atomic composition ratio of 37 ÷ 12 ÷ 51 (and for binary Pt-Ni control systems of 47 ÷ 53). Fine topographical details as well as film thickness have been directly recorded using AFM microscopy. The composition of the outer layers as well as the interactions of the three metals present have been studied by XPS spectroscopy and a Pt ÷ Ru ÷ Ni % surface atomic composition ratio of 61 ÷ 12 ÷ 27 (and for binary Pt-Ni control systems of 85 ÷ 15) has been found, indicating the enrichment of the outer layers in Pt; a shift of the Pt binding energy peaks to higher values was only observed in the presence of Ru and points to an electronic effect of Ru on Pt. The surface electrochemistry of the thus prepared Pt-Ru(Ni)/GC and Pt(Ni)/GC electrodes in deaerated acid solutions (studied by cyclic voltammetry) proves the existence of a shell consisting exclusively of Pt-Ru or Pt. The activity of the Pt-Ru(Ni) deposits toward methanol oxidation (studied by slow potential sweep voltammetry) is higher from that of the Pt(Ni) deposit and of pure Pt; this enhancement is attributed both to the well-known Ru synergistic effect due to the presence of its oxides but also (based on the XPS findings) to a modification effect of Pt electronic properties. PMID:24959530

  6. EXAFS Characterization of Dendrimer-Derived Pt/γ-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siani, A.; Alexeev, O. S.; Williams, C. T.; Ploehn, H. J.; Amiridis, M. D.

    2007-02-01

    The various steps involved in the preparation of a Pt/γ-Al2O3 material using hydroxyl-terminated generation four (G4OH) PAMAM dendrimers as templates were monitored by EXAFS. The results indicate that Cl ligands in the Pt precursors (H2PtCl6 and K2PtCl4) were partially replaced by aquo ligands upon hydrolysis to form [PtCl3(H2O)3]+ and [PtCl2(H2O)2] species. After interaction of such species with G4OH, Cl ligands from the first coordination shell of Pt were further replaced by nitrogen atoms from the dendrimer interior, indicating the complexation of Pt with the dendrimer. This process was accompanied by a transfer of the electron density from the dendrimer to Pt, indicating that the former plays the role of a ligand. Following treatment of the H2PtCl6/G4OH and K2PtCl4/G4OH composites with NaBH4, no substantial changes were detecteded in the electronic or coordination environment of Pt, and no formation of metal nanoparticles was observed. However, when the reduction treatment was performed with H2, the formation of extremely small Pt clusters incorporating no more than 4 Pt atoms was observed. These Pt species remained strongly bonded to the dendrimer and their nuclearity depends on the length of the H2 treatment. Formation of Pt nanoparticles with an average diameter of approximately 10 Å was finally observed after the deposition of H2PtCl6/G4OH on γ-Al2O3 and drying, suggesting that their formation may be related to the collapse of the dendrimer structure. The Pt nanoparticles formed appear to have high mobility, since subsequent thermal treatment in O2/H2 led to further sintering.

  7. One-dimensional Pt induced chains on Si(337)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McChesney, Jessica; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Lapeyre, Gerald

    2006-03-01

    The use of high index Si surfaces as templates for the formation of adsorbate induced one-dimensional chain structures have attracted considerable interest. These systems have been used as a test bed in which to study low-dimension physics and components of nanoelectronics. In addition to the Ag and Au induced chains reported to form on the Si(337) surface, Pt also produces one-dimensional chains. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy was used to investigate the electronic structure of these new Pt chains. The valence band mapping confirms the one-dimensional nature of these chains as seen in LEED. Supported by ONR and DOE.

  8. Light propagation through a PT-symmetric photonic-crystal.

    PubMed

    Konotop, Vladimir V; Mantsyzov, Boris I

    2016-11-14

    Light propagation through a finite-width periodically modulated layer obeying parity-time (PT) symmetry is considered. We consider the configuration when the resonant conditions of mode coupling by the grating are satisfied. It is shown that the dependence of the transmission and reflection coefficients on the slab width has resonant character featuring strong amplification of reflected and transmitted waves with negative angles. The dependence of the scattering data on the gain-and-loss intensity also feature strong resonances near the PT-symmetry breaking point, when the slab strongly amplifies waves reflected and transmitted with negative angles, provided the incident wave has a positive angle of incidence.

  9. Multi-color imaging of magnetic Co/Pt heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Felix; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Weder, David; Günther, Christian M.; Schneider, Michael; Pfau, Bastian; Meise, Sven; Guehrs, Erik; Geilhufe, Jan; Merhe, Alaa El Din; Jal, Emmanuelle; Vodungbo, Boris; Lüning, Jan; Mahieu, Benoit; Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Gauthier, David; Manfredda, Michele; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We present an element specific and spatially resolved view of magnetic domains in Co/Pt heterostructures in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range. Resonant small-angle scattering and coherent imaging with Fourier-transform holography reveal nanoscale magnetic domain networks via magnetic dichroism of Co at the M2,3 edges as well as via strong dichroic signals at the O2,3 and N6,7 edges of Pt. We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous, two-color coherent imaging at a free-electron laser facility paving the way for a direct real space access to ultrafast magnetization dynamics in complex multicomponent material systems. PMID:28289691

  10. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  11. Replication of staphylococcal plasmid pT48.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, I R; Dyke, K G

    1992-02-01

    Insertion of a synthetic DNA linker into the repL gene of staphylococcal plasmid pT48 inactivates the replication system. This defect can be complemented in trans by the presence of a pT48 repL gene, but not by the rep genes of the related Staphylococcus areus plasmids pSN2 and pOX1000. Comparison of the sequences of the three replication proteins indicates that specificity may be determined by a putative helix-turn-helix region.

  12. PT Symmetry and Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in a Microwave Billiard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, S.; Dietz, B.; Günther, U.; Harney, H. L.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.; Schäfer, F.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the presence of parity-time (PT) symmetry for the non-Hermitian two-state Hamiltonian of a dissipative microwave billiard in the vicinity of an exceptional point (EP). The shape of the billiard depends on two parameters. The Hamiltonian is determined from the measured resonance spectrum on a fine grid in the parameter plane. After applying a purely imaginary diagonal shift to the Hamiltonian, its eigenvalues are either real or complex conjugate on a curve, which passes through the EP. An appropriate basis choice reveals its PT symmetry. Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs at the EP.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of Au/Pt/Ti/Pt/GaAs ohmic contacts for high power GaAs/InGaAs semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Łaszcz, A; Czerwinski, A; Ratajczak, J; Szerling, A; Phillipp, F; Van Aken, P A; Katcki, J

    2010-03-01

    We report on transmission electron microscopy studies of Au/Pt/Ti/Pt(10-30 nm) contact structures for high power GaAs/InGaAs semiconductor lasers. The studies showed that annealing at 450 degrees C of contact structures causes the reaction of whole Pt with substrate components (Ga and As) and the formation of Pt-GaAs interlayers with smooth interfaces as required for such structures. Annealing of the structures at 470 and 490 degrees C unfavourably affects the contact structure. At this condition, the strong downward diffusion of Au and Pt from the top layers causes a formation of Au-Pt pits, which break the Ti barrier. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that Au/Pt/Ti/Pt(10-30 nm) system annealed at 450 degrees C is appropriate for practical applications. The EDS technique used to identify the phase composition in the Pt(30 nm)/GaAs structure (specially produced for the EDS analysis) annealed at 450 degrees C showed that two layers were formed as a result of the reaction of the whole Pt layer with GaAs, and they consist of Ga, Pt and As. The top layer has the highest concentration of Ga. However, the bottom layer, which is close to the substrate, has the highest concentration of As.

  14. Monodisperse core/shell Ni/FePt nanoparticles and their con-version to Ni/Pt to catalyze oxygen reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Sen; Hao, Yizhou; Su, Dong; ...

    2014-10-28

    We report a size-controllable synthesis of monodisperse core/shell Ni/FePt nanoparticles (NPs) via a seed-mediated growth and their subsequent conversion to Ni/Pt NPs. Preventing surface oxidation of the Ni seeds is essential for the growth of uniform FePt shells. These Ni/FePt NPs have a thin (≈ 1 nm) FePt shell, and can be converted to Ni/Pt by acetic acid wash to yield active catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Tuning the core size allow for optimization of their electrocatalytic activity. The specific activity and mass activity of 4.2 nm/0.8 nm core/shell Ni/FePt reach 1.95 mA/cm² and 490 mA/mgPt at 0.9 Vmore » (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE), which are much higher than those of benchmark commercial Pt catalyst (0.34 mA/cm² and 92 mA/mgPt at 0.9 V). Our studies provide a robust approach to monodisperse core/shell NPs with non-precious metal core, making it possible to develop advanced NP catalysts with ultralow Pt content for ORR and many other heterogeneous reactions.« less

  15. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by metabolites of copper pyrithione (CuPT) and its possible involvement in vertebral deformity of a CuPT-exposed marine teleostean fish.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Kazuhiko; Ito, Katsutoshi; Harino, Hiroya; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Onduka, Toshimitsu; Kakuno, Akira; Fujii, Kazunori

    2009-05-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that exposure to an antifouling biocide, copper pyrithione (CuPT), early during life induced vertebral deformity in the larvae of a marine fish, the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus). Skeletal deformities may be caused by inhibition by of acetylcholiensterase (AChE) activity, and to elucidate the mechanism underlying the CuPT-associated vertebral deformity, we first examined whether CuPT, zinc pyrithione (ZnPT), and their degradation products could inhibit AChE activity in the fish. Two of the degradation products, 2,2'-dipyridyldisulfide [(PS)(2)] and 2,2'-dithiobispyridine-N-oxide [(PT)(2)], but neither CuPT nor ZnPT, exhibited prominent AChE-inhibiting activity. Secondly, thin-layer chromatography revealed that mummichog hepatic microsomes metabolized CuPT to produce (PS)(2) in a microsome-dependent manner. The AChE inhibition induced in CuPT-exposed fish is likely due to (PS)(2) that was produced through metabolism of acquired CuPT. (PS)(2) may cause therefore skeletal deformity in CuPT-exposed fish by means of its neuromuscular blocking properties, through a mechanism similar to that proposed for animals exposed to organophosphorous pesticides.

  16. Same-View Nano-XAFS/STEM-EDS Imagings of Pt Chemical Species in Pt/C Cathode Catalyst Layers of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Takao, Shinobu; Sekizawa, Oki; Samjeské, Gabor; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Kaneko, Takuma; Yamamoto, Takashi; Higashi, Kotaro; Nagasawa, Kensaku; Uruga, Tomoya; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-04

    We have made the first success in the same-view imagings of 2D nano-XAFS and TEM/STEM-EDS under a humid N2 atmosphere for Pt/C cathode catalyst layers in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) with Nafion membrane to examine the degradation of Pt/C cathodes by anode gas exchange cycles (start-up/shut-down simulations of PEFC vehicles). The same-view imaging under the humid N2 atmosphere provided unprecedented spatial information on the distribution of Pt nanoparticles and oxidation states in the Pt/C cathode catalyst layer as well as Nafion ionomer-filled nanoholes of carbon support in the wet MEA, which evidence the origin of the formation of Pt oxidation species and isolated Pt nanoparticles in the nanohole areas of the cathode layer with different Pt/ionomer ratios, relevant to the degradation of PEFC catalysts.

  17. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of 4-aminothiophenol sandwiched between Ag nanocubes and smooth Pt substrate: The effect of the thickness of Pt film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuangmei; Fan, Chunzhen; Wang, Junqiao; He, Jinna; Liang, Erjun; Chao, Mingju

    2014-07-01

    Ag nanocubes (NCs)/4-aminothiophenol (p-ATP)/smooth platinum (Pt) film (Ag-NCs @ p-ATP/Pt) sandwich structure is created for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The proposed sandwich structure is shown to exhibit better performance than the Ag-NCs only as SERS substrate. The dependence of the Raman signal intensity on the thickness of the Pt films is examined. It is shown that the Raman signal increases with the thickness of the Pt films from 42 to 90 nm, suggesting the electromagnetic coupling of the localized surface plasmons of the Ag-NCs with the surface plasmon polaritons of the underneath Pt film, which is confirmed by our numerical simulations. The SERS enhancement factor in Ag-NCs @ p-ATP/Pt is estimated to be (4.1 ± 0.2) × 106 for a Pt film of 90 nm.

  18. Binuclear Pt-Tl bonded complex with square pyramidal coordination around Pt: a combined multinuclear NMR, EXAFS, UV-Vis, and DFT/TDDFT study in dimethylsulfoxide solution.

    PubMed

    Purgel, Mihály; Maliarik, Mikhail; Glaser, Julius; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Persson, Ingmar; Tóth, Imre

    2011-07-04

    The structure and bonding of a new Pt-Tl bonded complex formed in dimethylsulfoxide (dmso), (CN)(4)Pt-Tl(dmso)(5)(+), have been studied by multinuclear NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies, and EXAFS measurements in combination with density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. This complex is formed following the equilibrium reaction Pt(CN)(4)(2-) + Tl(dmso)(6)(3+) ⇆ (CN)(4)Pt-Tl(dmso)(5)(+) + dmso. The stability constant of the Pt-Tl bonded species, as determined using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, amounts to log K = 2.9 ± 0.2. The (NC)(4)Pt-Tl(dmso)(5)(+) species constitutes the first example of a Pt-Tl bonded cyanide complex in which the sixth coordination position around Pt (in trans with respect to the Tl atom) is not occupied. The spectral parameters confirm the formation of the metal-metal bond, but differ substantially from those measured earlier in aqueous solution for complexes (CN)(5)Pt-Tl(CN)(n)(H(2)O)(x)(n-) (n = 0-3). The (205) Tl NMR chemical shift, δ = 75 ppm, is at extraordinary high field, while spin-spin coupling constant, (1)J(Pt-Tl) = 93 kHz, is the largest measured to date for a Pt-Tl bond in the absence of supporting bridging ligands. The absorption spectrum is dominated by two strong absorption bands in the UV region that are assigned to MMCT (Pt → Tl) and LMCT (dmso → Tl) bands, respectively, on the basis of MO and TDDFT calculations. The solution of the complex has a bright yellow color as a result of a shoulder present on the low energy side of the band at 355 nm. The geometry of the (CN)(4)Pt-Tl core can be elucidated from NMR data, but the particular stoichiometry and structure involving the dmso ligands are established by using Tl and Pt L(III)-edge EXAFS measurements. The Pt-Tl bond distance is 2.67(1) Å, the Tl-O bond distance is 2.282(6) Å, and the Pt-C-N entity is linear with Pt-C and Pt···N distances amounting to 1.969(6) and 3.096(6) Å, respectively. Geometry optimizations on

  19. Design and fabrication of PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal high-frequency ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Zhou, Qifa; Zhu, Benpeng; Wu, Dawei; Hu, Changhong; Cannata, Jonathan M; Tian, Jin; Han, Pengdi; Wang, Gaofeng; Shung, K Kirk

    2009-12-01

    High-frequency PIN-PMN-PT single crystal ultrasound transducers at center frequencies of 35 MHz and 60 MHz were successfully fabricated using lead indium niobate-lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (0.23PIN- 0.5PMN-0.27PT) single crystal. The new PIN-PMN-PT single crystal has higher coercivity (6.0 kV/cm) and higher Curie temperature (160 degrees C) than PMN-PT crystal. Experimental results showed that the PIN-PMN-PT transducers have similar performance but better thermal stability compared with the PMN-PT transducers.

  20. Novel Sol-Gel Based Pt Nanocluster Catalysts for Propane Dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Boespflug, Elaine; Kawola, Jeffrey S.; Martino, Anthony; Sault, Allen G.

    1999-08-09

    We report propane dehydrogenation behavior of catalysts prepared using two novel synthesis strategies that combine inverse micelle Pt nanocluster technology with silica and alumina sol-gel processing. Unlike some other sol-gel catalyst preparations. Pt particles in these catalysts are not encapsulated in the support structure and the entire Pt particle surface is accessible for reaction. Turnover frequencies (TOF) for these catalysts are comparable to those obtained over Pt catalysts prepared by traditional techniques such as impregnation, yet the resistance to deactivation by carbon poisoning is much greater in our catalysts. The deactivation behavior is more typical of traditionally prepared PtSn catalysts than of pure Pt catalysts.