Science.gov

Sample records for safe work procedures

  1. Working safely in confined spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.; Versweyveld, J. )

    1992-08-13

    Working in confined spaces is a delicate balance of the correct equipment, hazard knowledge, proper training, and common sense. Anything less has potentially deadly consequences. The dangerous atmospheric and physical hazards often encountered in confined spaces must be recognized and accounted for. In addition, procedures and practices must conform to Occupational Safety and health Administration (OSHA) confined space regulations. Last year, three men were asphyxiated while surveying beneath a manhole in Boulder, CO. An area newspaper called the deaths the result of a freak accident. Whatever the cause, entering a manhole without first monitoring the air and posting an outside attendant is both extremely dangerous and a violation of safe entry procedures. The National Institute for Health and Occupational Safety (NIOSH) estimates that millions of workers from a wide range of occupations and industries are exposed to confined space hazards every year. Although confined space deaths are not a new phenomenon, only recently has the problem received serious study. Government regulatory agencies are becoming more involved OSHA recently proposed ruling 1910.146, Permit Required Confined Spaces, to mandate safe entry practices and procedures. The ruling requires all employers to develop a specific action plan for confined space entry, including entry procedures, worker training, safety equipment, and emergency action. This first article defines a confined space and examines some common hazards, including toxic, combustible, and oxygen-deficient atmospheres and combustible dusts. A subsequent article will review the use of test instruments, personal protective equipment, worker training, and emergency response.

  2. Guide for preparing Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, T.K.; Patrician, D.E.; Lucas, H.; Ware, R.A.; Wright, D.A.; Izzo, J.

    1981-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' Safe Operating Procedures (SOP) are written for activities that involve the use of explosives, dangerous chemicals, radioactive materials, hazardous systems, and for certain types of operational facilities that present hazards. This guide states SOP requirements for Sandia Livermore in detail and gives a format for writing an SOP.

  3. Safe Haven Laws and School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopels, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    "Safe haven" laws are designed to protect infants from being killed or otherwise harmed. This article examines the safe haven laws from the states that comprise the Midwest School Social Work Council and the variations between these laws regarding the age of the infant, where the infant can be left, who is allowed to leave the infant, whether…

  4. [Is undirected liver biopsy a safe procedure?].

    PubMed

    Oliva, L; Hirt, M

    1993-09-01

    In the authors' group of 976 umaimed liver biopsies (ULB) 10 complications were recorded. The authors described them and compared them with reports from the world literature. Two patients from the group died after ULB. One as a result of biopsy from haemoperitoneum, the other patient died with delirium tremens after surgery called for by persisting peritoneal syndrome. In eight patients mild complications were involved. In five patients complications receded spontaneously, in three after administration of an analgetic. From the submitted paper ensues that ULB is not quite safe, even when used by an experienced physician and when all contraindications are respected. A smooth course is not ensured by a risk-free diagnosis, previous uncomplicated biopsies normal prebioptic haemocoagulation tests. It is essential to realize this with regard to every patient where we indicate ULB. It is better to omit it unless we are unequivocally convinced of its asset. The question thus is: What will be the benefit of ULB for the patient?

  5. Working with Self-Injurious Adolescents Using the Safe Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article offers a guide for using the Safe Kit when working with clients who self-injure. The Safe Kit can be used as a supplement to more traditional approaches to counseling and offers clients alternatives to self-injury when they need alternatives the most. The Safe Kit works under the assumption that individuals differ in the meaning they…

  6. Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation. (ACR)

  7. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350... Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a..., in accordance with § 35.1345. A person performing this work shall be trained on hazards and either...

  8. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Marjorie C.; Berry, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses’ success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  9. Infected physicians and invasive procedures: safe practice management.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, Angelique M; Closen, Michael L; Cunningham, Marshall; Lombardo, Paul A; Minich, Henry N F; Moreno, Jonathan D; Nichols, Ronald L; Pearson, Richard D; Sawyer, Robert G; Wispelwey, Brian; Tereskerz, Patricia M

    2005-06-01

    There is currently no public policy that provides guidance concerning whether and when physicians infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can safely perform invasive procedures. A committee of experts in the fields of medicine, law, and biomedical ethics and 1 community member, aided by an advisory board, was established to produce recommendations for policy reform. An extensive literature review was conducted for these 3 infectious diseases, medicine, surgery, epidemiology, law, and bioethics to gather all relevant data. Special recommendations are made regarding the management of physicians who are infected with HIV, HBV, and/or HCV. This policy proposal includes a list of exposure-prone procedures and a decision chart that indicates under what conditions infected physicians can practice beyond the need for disclosure of their serological status.

  10. 29 CFR 1919.76 - Safe working load reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe working load reduction. 1919.76 Section 1919.76 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.76 Safe...

  11. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

  12. Robotic surgery in Cardiology: a safe and effective procedure

    PubMed Central

    Poffo, Robinson; Toschi, Alisson Parrilha; Pope, Renato Bastos; Celullare, Alex Luiz; Benício, Anderson; Fischer, Claudio Henrique; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Teruya, Alexandre; Hatanaka, Dina Mie; Rusca, Gabriel Franzin; Makdisse, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the short and medium-term outcomes of patients undergoing robotic-assisted minimally invasive cardiac surgery. Methods: From March 2010 to March 2013, 21 patients underwent robotic-assisted cardiac surgery. The procedures performed were: mitral valve repair, mitral valve replacement, surgical correction of atrial fibrillation, surgical correction of atrial septal defect, intracardiac tumor resection, totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery and pericardiectomy. Results: The mean age was 48.39±18.05 years. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 151.7±99.97 minutes, and the mean aortic cross-clamp time was 109.94±81.34 minutes. The mean duration of intubation was 7.52±15.2 hours, and 16 (76.2%) patients were extubated in the operating room immediately after the procedure. The mean length of intensive care unit stay was 1.67±1.46 days. There were no conversions to sternotomy. There was no in-hospital death or deaths during the medium-term follow-up. Patients mean follow up time was 684±346 days, ranging from 28 to 1096 days. Conclusion: Robotic-assisted cardiac surgery proved to be feasible, safe and effective and can be applied in the correction of various intra and extracardiac pathologies. PMID:24136755

  13. Introduction to working safely with large animals in containment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript examines biosafety challenges posed when conducting work with animals and zoonotic pathogens. It provides solutions for working with animals in a manner that promotes both safe and responsible research. Good safety and animal husbandry are essential for good science. Best practices w...

  14. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Methods and Standards for Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a... be cleaned using cleaning methods, products, and devices that are successful in cleaning up...

  15. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Methods and Standards for Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a... be cleaned using cleaning methods, products, and devices that are successful in cleaning up...

  16. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Methods and Standards for Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a... be cleaned using cleaning methods, products, and devices that are successful in cleaning up...

  17. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Methods and Standards for Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a... be cleaned using cleaning methods, products, and devices that are successful in cleaning up...

  18. Living and Working Safely Around High-Voltage Power Lines.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2001-06-01

    High-voltage transmission lines can be just as safe as the electrical wiring in the homes--or just as dangerous. The crucial factor is ourselves: they must learn to behave safely around them. This booklet is a basic safety guide for those who live and work around power lines. It deals primarily with nuisance shocks due to induced voltages, and with potential electric shock hazards from contact with high-voltage lines. References on possible long-term biological effects of transmission lines are shown. In preparing this booklet, the Bonneville Power Administration has drawn on more than 50 years of experience with high-voltage transmission. BPA operates one of the world`s largest networks of long-distance, high-voltage lines. This system has more than 400 substations and about 15,000 miles of transmission lines, almost 4,400 miles of which are operated at 500,000 volts.

  19. Sociotechnical attributes of safe and unsafe work systems

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Brian M.; Hettinger, Lawrence J.; DeJoy, David M.; Huang, Yuang-Hsiang; Love, Peter E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and practical approaches to safety based on sociotechnical systems principles place heavy emphasis on the intersections between social–organisational and technical–work process factors. Within this perspective, work system design emphasises factors such as the joint optimisation of social and technical processes, a focus on reliable human–system performance and safety metrics as design and analysis criteria, the maintenance of a realistic and consistent set of safety objectives and policies, and regular access to the expertise and input of workers. We discuss three current approaches to the analysis and design of complex sociotechnical systems: human–systems integration, macroergonomics and safety climate. Each approach emphasises key sociotechnical systems themes, and each prescribes a more holistic perspective on work systems than do traditional theories and methods. We contrast these perspectives with historical precedents such as system safety and traditional human factors and ergonomics, and describe potential future directions for their application in research and practice. Practitioner Summary: The identification of factors that can reliably distinguish between safe and unsafe work systems is an important concern for ergonomists and other safety professionals. This paper presents a variety of sociotechnical systems perspectives on intersections between social–organisational and technology–work process factors as they impact work system analysis, design and operation. PMID:25909756

  20. Adoption of Sun Safe Work Place Practices by Local Governments

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Allan; Andersen, Peter A.; Buller, David B.; Walkosz, Barbara; Lui, Lucia; Buller, Mary; Scott, Michael D.; Jenkins, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Context Outdoor workers are especially susceptible to skin cancer, the most common, but also one of the most preventable, forms of cancer. Colorado, the location of the study, has the second highest rate of skin cancer deaths in the nation. Objective Local government managers in Colorado—in municipalities, counties and special districts—were surveyed in order to ascertain the extent to which they engage in formal (written) and informal practices to protect their outdoor workers against excessive exposure to sun. Design The survey consisted of 51 question assessing awareness of formal or informal practices for sun protection of outdoor workers. An index of practices--the study's dependent variable--was created that was comprised or practices such as providing employees free or reduced-cost sunscreen, wide-brimmed hats, sunglasses, long-sleeved work shirts, long work pants, and temporary or permanent outdoor shade shelters. Proscriptive policies, such as restricting the use of broad brimmed hats, were subtracted from the index. Surveys were completed by 825 administrators representing 98 jurisdictions. Responses from administrators in the same jurisdiction were averaged. Results Over 40 percent of responding jurisdictions indicated that they engaged in informal sun safety practices. Tests conducted to determine what variables might account for the adoption of these sun protection practices found that the degree to which a community could be regarded as cosmopolite and as having an individualistic political culture were significant predictors. Type of government was also significant. Although, higher community income was a significant predictor, neither local government budget nor size was significant. Conclusions The adoption of sun safe practices bears low costs with potentially high returns. Findings from this study suggest that awareness campaigns might most effectively target cosmopolite communities, but that the greatest impact might be achieved by targeting

  1. Second-generation lithotripsy: a safe, noninvasive, ambulatory procedure.

    PubMed

    Baert, L; Claes, H; Billiet, I; D'Hallewin, M; Vandeursen, H; Van Poppel, H

    1989-01-01

    A total of 600 patients underwent 696 treatments of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) during the period between June and November 1987. Our progressively increasing experience with the second-generation device shows that this new unit is as effective as the conventional one, and reveals several advantages. The focusing of the stone is easier; therapy time is shorter; general or regional anesthesia is no longer necessary; distal ureteral stones can be disintegrated, and adjuvant procedures are easily performed during the ESWL session. Of the last 400 patients of our series, 76% were treated on an outpatient basis without any major complications.

  2. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  3. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  4. Working safely with robot workers: Recommendations for the new workplace.

    PubMed

    Murashov, Vladimir; Hearl, Frank; Howard, John

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of robots in performing tasks alongside or together with human co-workers raises novel occupational safety and health issues. The new 21st century workplace will be one in which occupational robotics plays an increasing role. This article describes the increasing complexity of robots and proposes a number of recommendations for the practice of safe occupational robotics. PMID:26554511

  5. A Simple and Safe Procedure to Repair Rectal Prolapse Perineally Using Stapling Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Fumitake; Nishimori, Hidefumi; Ikeda, Shinichiro; Yajima, Tomomi; Nishio, Akihiko; Ishiyama, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Rectal prolapses are not life-threatening, however the bleeding and fecal incontinence associated with them significantly erode quality of life and can cause concern among patients’ caregivers in nursing homes. Many procedures have been reported that repair rectal prolapses, and the procedure used depends on the severity of the prolapse; however, the treatments are yet to be established. Here we report a simple and safe procedure to repair rectal prolapse perineally using stapling devices. We performed this procedure on 5 patients within a short time. All patients were followed up for over 24 months and none had any recurrences of their rectal prolapses. No complications occurred during the operations and postoperative periods. Most patients who have prolapses are elderly and fragile, so the treatment must be easy, safe, and rapid. While rectal prolapse is not life-threatening, the goal of treatment is to alleviate its symptoms. The procedure we describe is consistent with this concept. We suggest that this procedure, which uses surgical stapling devices, might be a better option for the treatment of complete rectal prolapse. We will continue to surgically correct complete rectal prolapses and investigate the long-term outcomes of the procedure. PMID:24574948

  6. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  7. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  8. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  9. 11 Ways to Stay Safe When Doing Risky Tree Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risky Tree Work For starters, always assume nearby power lines are energized and take precautions To use ... precautions are ignored, a U.S. agency warns. Nearby power lines, bad weather and lack of experience with ...

  10. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... minimize work zone crashes; and the safe entry/exit of work vehicles onto/from the travel lanes. Each...

  11. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... minimize work zone crashes; and the safe entry/exit of work vehicles onto/from the travel lanes. Each...

  12. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... minimize work zone crashes; and the safe entry/exit of work vehicles onto/from the travel lanes. Each...

  13. Nature and engineering Working Together for a Safe Repository

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2000-09-12

    If a repository were built at Yucca Mountain, it would rely on two distinct systems to prevent radioactive materials from escaping into the environment. These systems act as barriers to the movement of radionuclides. The first system involves natural barriers--the rocks, water, and climate at Yucca Mountain. The second system is comprised of an array of engineered, or man-made, barriers that give the repository defense in depth and add safety margins. These systems would work together to protect the public and the environment. The mountain's natural features present a formidable line of defense against possible movement by radionuclides. These barriers include Yucca Mountain's unique geology, the region's dry climate, and, in general, a range of enclosed water systems that should slow water that contains radioactive particles from reaching rivers or other groundwater systems. The mountain's natural barriers and planned man-made barriers should prevent most moisture from ever reaching the waste packages within a repository. Moreover, the natural barriers would slow the movement of radioactive particles that do dissolve in water. The engineering, or technological measures, that would be built into a repository at Yucca Mountain would help ensure that health and safety standards are maintained even if some components of the natural system do not perform as expected for the first 10,000 years of repository operation.

  14. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  15. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  16. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  17. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  18. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  19. Authentication Procedures - The Procedures and Integration Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Bratcher, Leigh; Gosnell, Tom; Langner, Diana; MacArthur, D.; Mihalczo, John T.; Pura, Carolyn; Riedy, Alex; Rexroth, Paul; Scott, Mary; Springarn, Jay

    2001-05-31

    Authentication is how we establish trust in monitoring systems and measurements to verify compliance with, for example, the storage of nuclear weapons material. Authentication helps assure the monitoring party that accurate and reliable information is provided by any measurement system and that any irregularities are detected. The U.S. is developing its point of view on the procedures for authentication of monitoring systems now planned or contemplated for arms reduction and control applications. The authentication of a system utilizes a set of approaches, including: functional testing using trusted calibration sources, evaluation of documentation, evaluation of software, evaluation of hardware, random selection of hardware and software, tamper-indicating devices, and operational procedures. Authentication of measurement systems should occur throughout their lifecycles, starting with the elements of design, and moving to off-site authentication, on-siste authentication, and continuing with authentication following repair. The most important of these is the initial design of systems. Hardware and software design criteria and procurement decisions can make future authentication relatively straightforward or conversely very difficult. Facility decisions can likewise ease the procedures for authentication since reliable and effective monitoring systems and tampering indicating devices can help provide the assurance needed in the integrity of such items as measurement systems, spare equipment, and reference sources. This paper will summarize the results of the U.S. Authentication Task Force discussion on the role of procedures in authentication.

  20. Simultaneous resection for rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastasis is a safe procedure

    PubMed Central

    Silberhumer, Gerd R.; Paty, Philip B.; Temple, Larissa K.; Araujo, Raphael L. C.; Denton, Brian; Gonen, Mithat; Nash, Garret M.; Allen, Peter J.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Guillem, Jose; Weiser, Martin R.; D'Angelica, Michael I.; Jarnagin, William R.; Wong, W. Douglas; Fong, Yuman

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the outcome of simultaneous resection for rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases. BACKGROUND One quarter of colorectal cancer patients will present with liver metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Recent studies have shown that simultaneous resections are safe and feasible for stage IV colon cancer. Limited data are available for simultaneous surgery in stage IV rectal cancer patients. METHODS One hundred ninety-eight patients underwent surgical treatment for stage IV rectal cancer. In 145 (73%) patients, a simultaneous procedure was performed. Fifty-three (27%) patients underwent staged liver resection. A subpopulation of 69 (35%) patients underwent major liver resection (3 segments or more) and 30 (44%) patients with simultaneous surgery. RESULTS The demographics of the 2 groups were similar. Complication rates were comparable for simultaneous or staged resections, even in the group subjected to major liver resection. Total hospital stay was significantly shorter for the simultaneously resected patients (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS Simultaneous resection of rectal primaries and liver metastases is a safe procedure in carefully selected patients at high-volume institutions, even if major liver resections are required. PMID:25601556

  1. [Bioethical procedure: judicial experience, working of committees].

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Is it possible to speak of procedure in bioethics? The answer ought to be negative if one had to express an opinion on procedure in ethics. What could be more contradictory than a notion of philosophical colour asserted and a group of rules guaranteeing the effective realisation of an objective? That is where the prefix "bio" helps to avoid the difficulty. By using it, it is no longer a question exclusively of ethics, but of ethics applied to life sciences. From this angle it is not unjustified to accept some procedure. We shall see that in France there has been no reluctance to do this. PMID:17902322

  2. Rapid and Efficient Filtration-Based Procedure for Separation and Safe Analysis of CBRN Mixed Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bentahir, Mostafa; Laduron, Frederic; Irenge, Leonid; Ambroise, Jérôme; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Separating CBRN mixed samples that contain both chemical and biological warfare agents (CB mixed sample) in liquid and solid matrices remains a very challenging issue. Parameters were set up to assess the performance of a simple filtration-based method first optimized on separate C- and B-agents, and then assessed on a model of CB mixed sample. In this model, MS2 bacteriophage, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis baculovirus (AcNPV), Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores were used as biological agent simulants whereas ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphophonic acid (PMPA) were used as VX and soman (GD) nerve agent surrogates, respectively. Nanoseparation centrifugal devices with various pore size cut-off (30 kD up to 0.45 µm) and three RNA extraction methods (Invisorb, EZ1 and Nuclisens) were compared. RNA (MS2) and DNA (AcNPV) quantification was carried out by means of specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCR). Liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) methods was used for quantifying EMPA and PMPA. Culture methods and qPCR demonstrated that membranes with a 30 kD cut-off retain more than 99.99% of biological agents (MS2, AcNPV, Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores) tested separately. A rapid and reliable separation of CB mixed sample models (MS2/PEG-400 and MS2/EMPA/PMPA) contained in simple liquid or complex matrices such as sand and soil was also successfully achieved on a 30 kD filter with more than 99.99% retention of MS2 on the filter membrane, and up to 99% of PEG-400, EMPA and PMPA recovery in the filtrate. The whole separation process turnaround-time (TAT) was less than 10 minutes. The filtration method appears to be rapid, versatile and extremely efficient. The separation method developed in this work constitutes therefore a useful model for further evaluating and comparing additional separation alternative procedures for a safe handling and

  3. No matter how large or how small, oilwell servicing firms work safely

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, D.

    1995-07-01

    In working safely, the size of the company doesn`t matter as much as the dedication of the people in maintaining a safe workplace. Poe Servicing Inc. of Oberlin, Kan., earned the 1994 Association of Oilwell Servicing Contractors (AOSC) gold safety award for smaller companies that put in 10,000 to 50,000 man-hours of work. AOSC`s group one. The employees watch out for each other, and they use common sense. The common sense part of the program means the company knows new people are most susceptible to accidents, so they send them out to observe before putting them to work.

  4. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  5. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection: Recent technical advances for safe and successful procedures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Katsumi; Michida, Tomoki; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Shiro; Naito, Masafumi; Ito, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is very useful in en bloc resection of large superficial colorectal tumors but is a technically difficult procedure because the colonic wall is thin and endoscopic maneuverability is poor because of colonic flexure and extensibility. A high risk of perforation has been reported in colorectal ESD. To prevent complications such as perforation and unexpected bleeding, it is crucial to ensure good visualization of the submucosal layer by creating a mucosal flap, which is an exfoliated mucosa for inserting the tip of the endoscope under it. The creation of a mucosal flap is often technically difficult; however, various types of equipment, appropriate strategy, and novel procedures including our clip-flap method, appear to facilitate mucosal flap creation, improving the safety and success rate of ESD. Favorable treatment outcomes with colorectal ESD have already been reported in many advanced institutions, and appropriate understanding of techniques and development of training systems are required for world-wide standardization of colorectal ESD. Here, we describe recent technical advances for safe and successful colorectal ESD. PMID:26468335

  6. 29 CFR 1919.21 - Marking and posting of safe working loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marking and posting of safe working loads. 1919.21 Section 1919.21 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... controls and visible to the crane operator. Ratings may be stated in pounds. When they are stated in...

  7. Planned Cardiac Reexploration in the Intensive Care Unit Is a Safe Procedure

    PubMed Central

    LaPar, Damien J.; Isbell, James M.; Mulloy, Daniel P.; Stone, Matthew L.; Kern, John A.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Kron, Irving L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgical reexploration is necessary in approximately 5% of all patients. However, the impact of routine, planned reexploration performed in the intensive care unit (ICU) remains poorly defined. This study evaluated postoperative outcomes after cardiac reexplorations to determine the safety and efficacy of a planned approach in the ICU. Methods All patients undergoing ICU cardiac reexplorations (2000 to 2011) at a single institution were stratified according to a routine, planned ICU approach to reexploration (planned) versus unplanned ICU or operating room reexploration. Patient risk and outcomes were compared by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results 8,151 total patients underwent cardiac operations, including 267 (3.2%) reexplorations (planned ICU = 75% and unplanned ICU = 18%). Among planned ICU reexplorations, 38% of patients had an identifiable surgical bleeding source, and 60% underwent reexploration less than 12 hours after the index procedure. Unplanned ICU reexplorations had a higher Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) predicted mortality (5% vs 3%, p < 0.001) and incurred higher observed mortality (37% vs 6%, p < 0.001) and morbidity. Sternal wound infections were rare and were similar between groups (p = 0.81). Furthermore, upon STS mortality risk adjustment, unplanned ICU reexplorations were associated with significantly increased odds of mortality (OR = 26.6 [7.1, 99.7], p < 0.001) compared with planned ICU reexplorations. Conclusions Planned reexploration in the ICU is a safe procedure with acceptable mortality and morbidity and low infection rates. Unplanned reexplorations, however, increase postoperative risk and are associated with high mortality and morbidity. These data argue for coordinated, routine approaches to planned ICU reexploration to avoid delay in treatment for postoperative hemorrhage. PMID:25173720

  8. Head and neck cancer in elderly patients: is microsurgical free-tissue transfer a safe procedure?

    PubMed

    Tarsitano, A; Pizzigallo, A; Sgarzani, R; Oranges, C M; Cipriani, R; Marchetti, C

    2012-12-01

    The safety and success of microvascular transfer have been well documented in the general population, but the good results achieved with the use of free flaps in elderly patients have received little attention. This study sought to identify differences in complications, morbidity and functional outcomes between elderly (≥ 75 years) and younger (< 75 years) patients treated surgically for advanced head and neck cancer using the Head and Neck 35 module of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire. Patient treatment consisted of composite resection, including excision of the primary tumour with ipsilateral or bilateral neck dissection and microvascular reconstruction. Eighty-five microvascular tissue transfers were performed to reconstruct major surgical defects. Postoperative radiation therapy was performed when indicated. Total flap loss occurred in three cases in elderly patients and two cases in younger patients. The rates of major surgical complication were 9% in young patients and 11% in elderly patients. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in the rates of major and minor flap complications, morbidity or long-term functional outcome. The results of the present analysis indicate that free-flap microvascular reconstruction can be considered a safe procedure in elderly patients with head and neck cancer.

  9. Blue dye can be safely omitted in most sentinel node procedures for melanoma.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Iris M C; Madu, Max F; van der Hage, Jos A; Wouters, Michel W J M; Klop, W Martin C; van der Hiel, Bernies; van de Wiel, Bart A; van Akkooi, Alexander J C

    2016-10-01

    Sentinel node biopsy is a widely used staging procedure in melanoma. It is usually performed using the triple technique: lymphatic mapping after injection of a radiopharmaceutical, blue dye injection, and the use of a gamma probe. Blue dye offers visual confirmation of the location of the sentinel lymph node (SN). There are some disadvantages such as blurring of the surgical field, skin coloring, and possible anaphylactic reactions. We aimed to answer the question whether patent blue is truly necessary for correct intraoperative identification of the SN. One day preoperatively, lymphoscintigraphy (with or without single-photon emission computed tomography with integrated computed tomography) is performed and the location of the SN is marked on the skin. Perioperatively, patent blue is injected around the tumor. A handheld gamma-ray detection probe is used to determine the location of the incision and detect the SN during the operation. SNs are pursued in all regions indicated by imaging. In only six of the 681 patients (0.9%) a blue, not radioactive, sentinel node was removed. In one of them (0.15%), this was the only node excised. None of these lymph nodes harbored metastases. This study suggests that blue dye has no additional value in finding the sentinel node and is of low significance in detecting metastases. Therefore, blue dye can be safely omitted from the standardized triple technique. It may be useful in selected cases according to the surgeon's discretion.

  10. SUNRAYCE 93: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-11-03

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems, and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use, and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

  11. Working, declarative and procedural memory in specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Lum, Jarrad A G; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Page, Debra; Ullman, Michael T

    2012-10-01

    According to the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH), abnormalities of brain structures underlying procedural memory largely explain the language deficits in children with specific language impairment (SLI). These abnormalities are posited to result in core deficits of procedural memory, which in turn explain the grammar problems in the disorder. The abnormalities are also likely to lead to problems with other, non-procedural functions, such as working memory, that rely at least partly on the affected brain structures. In contrast, declarative memory is expected to remain largely intact, and should play an important compensatory role for grammar. These claims were tested by examining measures of working, declarative and procedural memory in 51 children with SLI and 51 matched typically-developing (TD) children (mean age 10). Working memory was assessed with the Working Memory Test Battery for Children, declarative memory with the Children's Memory Scale, and procedural memory with a visuo-spatial Serial Reaction Time task. As compared to the TD children, the children with SLI were impaired at procedural memory, even when holding working memory constant. In contrast, they were spared at declarative memory for visual information, and at declarative memory in the verbal domain after controlling for working memory and language. Visuo-spatial short-term memory was intact, whereas verbal working memory was impaired, even when language deficits were held constant. Correlation analyses showed neither visuo-spatial nor verbal working memory was associated with either lexical or grammatical abilities in either the SLI or TD children. Declarative memory correlated with lexical abilities in both groups of children. Finally, grammatical abilities were associated with procedural memory in the TD children, but with declarative memory in the children with SLI. These findings replicate and extend previous studies of working, declarative and procedural memory in SLI. Overall, we

  12. 76 FR 37014 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... expedited methods approval action for determining dalapon in drinking water (75 FR 32295, June 8, 2010... the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures. 75 FR 32295. June 8, 2010. List of... Alkalinity of Water. Method B--Electrometric or Color-Change Titration. ASTM International, 100 Barr...

  13. Separating predictable and unpredictable work to manage interruptions and promote safe and effective work flow.

    PubMed

    Kowinsky, Amy M; Shovel, Judith; McLaughlin, Maribeth; Vertacnik, Lisa; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Martin, Susan Christie; Minnier, Tamra E

    2012-01-01

    Predictable and unpredictable patient care tasks compete for caregiver time and attention, making it difficult for patient care staff to reliably and consistently meet patient needs. We have piloted a redesigned care model that separates the work of patient care technicians based on task predictability and creates role specificity. This care model shows promise in improving the ability of staff to reliably complete tasks in a more consistent and timely manner. PMID:22036831

  14. Safe working hours--doctors in training a best practice issue.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    In 1995, the Australian Medical Association launched its Safe Working Hours campaign. By 1998, this had been developed into a National Code of Conduct that continues to resonate in the Australian public health system. However, and particularly in respect of Doctors in Training (DITs) who continue to work long hours, there are levels of resistance to proposals that seek to re-organise work or change prevailing professional and cultural expectations. Long working hours have substantial impacts on a DIT's capacity to consistently deliver high quality patient care, dilute the effectiveness of their training regime and have negative consequences on their health, social life and family responsibilities. While public hospitals often maintain the view that minimal budget flexibility restricts their capacity to affect change in a positive way, in fact devisable productivity and efficiency gains can be achieved by reducing working hours. Further, the medical profession needs to consider whether long hours provide an optimal environment for quality learning and performance. PMID:12536869

  15. Operational and Medical Procedures for a Declared Contingency Shuttle (CSCS) Shuttle Mission Due to a Failure that Precludes a Safe Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Adrien; Patlach, Bob; Duchense, Ted; Chandler, Mike; Stepaniak, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This poster paper outlines the operational and medical procedures for a shuttle mission that has a failure that precludes a safe return to Earth. Information about the assumptions, procedures and limiting consumables is included.

  16. CEL Working procedures for WRAP 2A formulation development test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchsherer, M.J.

    1994-08-02

    The WRAP 2A facility will encapsulate retrieved, stored, and newly generated contact-handled mixed low level waste (MLLW) into 55-500 gal cementitous forms. Standardized test procedures will be required to facilitate this process. Cementitous specimens will be prepared from simulated drum wastes and will be tested in the Chemical Engineering Laboratory using the laboratory operating/working procedures encorporated into this document.

  17. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  18. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  19. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  20. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  1. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  2. Safe Schools, Safe Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Julie E.; Pickett, Dean; Pulliam, Janet L.; Schwartz, Richard A.; St. Germaine, Anne-Marie; Underwood, Julie; Worona, Jay

    Schools must work together with agencies, groups, and individuals to eliminate the forces leading children to violence. Chapter 1, "School Safety: Working Together to Keep Schools Safe," stresses the importance of community collaboration in violence prevention. Effective prevention requires sharing information about students, consistent with…

  3. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reclassification procedures to determine that... suggested conditions of use. 601.26 Section 601.26 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...)(3), the Commissioner of Food and Drugs (Commissioner) has proposed under § 601.25(f)(3), or...

  4. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2007-01-01

    In space, astronauts are constantly bombarded with energetic particles. The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the NASA Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. Among the identified radiation risks are cancer, acute and late CNS damage, chronic and degenerative tissue decease, and acute radiation syndrome. The term "safely" means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences can be defined. The NASA Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting the identified radiation risks. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus, the fourth element develops computer algorithms to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining

  5. A Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. The term safely means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences (for example, excess lifetime fatal cancer risk) can be defined. The Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the understanding of health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus the fourth element develops computer codes to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining methods to mitigate the risks are keys to a successful radiation protection strategy.

  6. Construction and maintenance procedure recommendations for proposed federal guidelines of safe havens for vehicles carrying Class A or Class B explosives

    SciTech Connect

    1985-02-10

    This document focuses on the design, construction, and maintenance of commercial safe havens operated by truck stops. In the context of this document, the term `safe haven` describes a designated area for parking motor vehicles transporting Class A or Class B explosives. Its objective is to inculcate acceptable construction practices and maintenance procedures in the organization of commercial safe havens in order to insure public safety.

  7. Reducing patient discomfort during digital blockade: The subcutaneous single injection digital block – A simple, safe and fast procedure

    PubMed Central

    Brutus, JP; Nikolis, A; Baeten, Y; Chahidi, N; Kinnen, L; Ledoux, P; Moermans, JP

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regional anesthesia of a single finger is commonly achieved by the traditional ring block, which requires at least two painful injections in the digit. Single injection digital block techniques have been described to avoid this problem. Among these, the subcutaneous technique described by Harbison appears to be safe and to allow most procedures to be carried out with good tolerance. OBJECTIVES: A prospective study was designed to evaluate the results of the subcutaneous technique in terms of patient tolerance, distribution of anesthesia and efficiency. METHODS: All blocks were performed by a single investigator. A visual analog scale was used to evaluate pain associated with the injection. Prick testing was used to evaluate the quality of anesthesia at the volar and dorsal aspects of the phalanxes. Tolerance to the surgical procedure and the need for additional injections were also recorded. RESULTS: This technique allowed surgery to be performed without complementary injection most of the time and was very well tolerated. The dorsum of the proximal phalanx, however, was unpredictably included in the anesthetized territory. CONCLUSION: The subcutaneous single injection digital block is safe, efficient and easy to perform. It allows the treatment of all conditions on the volar aspect of the finger and on the dorsal aspect of the distal and middle phalanxes. For surgery on the dorsal aspect of the proximal phalanx, a combined single injection technique or a supplementary dorsal block should be used. PMID:24115847

  8. Video-assisted thoracic surgery for pulmonary sequestration: a safe alternative procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Ming; Cao, Jin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary sequestration (PS), a rare congenital anatomic anomaly of the lung, is usually treated through resection by a conventional thoracotomy procedure. The efficacy and safety of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in PS treatment has seldom been evaluated. To address this research gap, we assessed the efficacy and safety of VATS in the treatment of PS in a large Chinese cohort. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 58 patients with PS who had undergone surgical resection in our department between January 2003 and April 2014. Of these patients, 42 (72.4%) underwent thoracotomy, and 16 (27.6%) underwent attempted VATS resection. Clinical and demographic data, including patients’ age, sex, complaints, sequestration characteristics, approach and procedures, operative time, resection range, blood loss, drainage volume, chest tube duration, hospital stay, and complications were collected, in addition to short-term follow-up data. Results Of the 58 participating patients, 55 accepted anatomic lobectomy, 2 accepted wedge resection, and 1 accepted left lower lobectomy combined with lingular segmentectomy. All lesions were located in the lower lobe, with 1–4 aberrant arteries, except one right upper lobe sequestration. Three cases (18.8%) in the VATS group were converted to thoracotomy because of dense adhesion (n=1), hilar fusion (n=1), or bleeding (n=1). No significant differences in operative time, postoperative hospital stay, or perioperative complications were observed between the VATS and thoracotomy groups, although the VATS patients had less blood loss (P=0.032), a greater drainage volume (P=0.001), and a longer chest tube duration (P=0.001) than their thoracotomy counterparts. Conclusions VATS is a viable alternative procedure for PS in some patients. Simple sequestration without a thoracic cavity or hilum adhesion is a good indication for VATS resection, particularly for VATS anatomic lobectomy. Thoracic cavity and hilum adhesion remain a

  9. Liver transplantation from living donors with Gilbert's syndrome is a safe procedure for both donors and recipients.

    PubMed

    Tanoglu, Alpaslan; Artis, Tarik; Donmez, Ramazan; Kargi, Ahmet; Sit, Mustafa; Aslan, Serdar; Yazar, Serafettin; Beyazit, Yavuz; Polat, Kamil Yalcin

    2015-11-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) has become a favorable therapeutic option for patients with end-stage liver diseases. Gilbert's syndrome (GS) is a benign condition characterized by intermittent mild jaundice due to unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. It is not obvious whether living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) from a donor with GS could result in a normal outcome for both the recipient and the donor. We aimed to determine whether right lobe hepatectomy is a safe procedure for living donors with GS and LT recipients. Between September 2011 and March 2015, 305 LDLT procedures using right lobe grafts were performed at Atasehir Memorial Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Nineteen of 305 LT candidates who had been diagnosed with GS were included in the current study. After a 12-h overnight fast, total and indirect bilirubin levels of donors and recipients were measured. The median follow-up after transplant was 16 months (range 3-36 months). The median age of donors was 25 (range 20-55 yr). Four donors (21%) were female, and 15 donors (89%) were male. The median age of donors was 51 (range 23-68 yr). Eleven recipients (57%) were female, and 8 (43%) were male. The median preoperative total bilirubin level of donors was 1.69 mg/dL (range 1.26-2.43 mg/dL) (normal range <1.2 mg/dL). The median total bilirubin level of donors on postoperative day 7 was 1.04 mg/dL (range 0.71-3.23 mg/dL). As our study has included a large number of donors with GS, it produced reliable evidence that right lobe hepatectomy is a safe procedure for living donors with GS and LT recipients. PMID:26271485

  10. Potential Health Risks Associated to ICSI: Insights from Animal Models and Strategies for a Safe Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Calabuig, María Jesús; López-Cardona, Angela Patricia; Fernández-González, Raúl; Ramos-Ibeas, Priscila; Fonseca Balvís, Noelia; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Pericuesta, Eva; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Bermejo-Álvarez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Artificial reproductive techniques are currently responsible for 1.7–4% of the births in developed countries and intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) is the most commonly used, accounting for 70–80% of the cycles performed. Despite being an invaluable tool for infertile couples, the technique bypasses several biological barriers that naturally select the gametes to achieve an optimal embryonic and fetal development. In this perspective, ICSI has been associated with an increased risk for diverse health problems, ranging from premature births and diverse metabolic disorders in the offspring to more severe complications such as abortions, congenital malformations, and imprinting disorders. In this review, we discuss the possible implications of the technique per se on these adverse outcomes and highlight the importance of several experiments using mammalian models to truthfully test these implications and to uncover the molecular base that origins these health problems. We also dissect the specific hazards associated to ICSI and describe some strategies that have been developed to mimic the gamete selection occurring in natural conception in order to improve the safety of the procedure. PMID:25478554

  11. Potential Health Risks Associated to ICSI: Insights from Animal Models and Strategies for a Safe Procedure.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Calabuig, María Jesús; López-Cardona, Angela Patricia; Fernández-González, Raúl; Ramos-Ibeas, Priscila; Fonseca Balvís, Noelia; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Pericuesta, Eva; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Bermejo-Álvarez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Artificial reproductive techniques are currently responsible for 1.7-4% of the births in developed countries and intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) is the most commonly used, accounting for 70-80% of the cycles performed. Despite being an invaluable tool for infertile couples, the technique bypasses several biological barriers that naturally select the gametes to achieve an optimal embryonic and fetal development. In this perspective, ICSI has been associated with an increased risk for diverse health problems, ranging from premature births and diverse metabolic disorders in the offspring to more severe complications such as abortions, congenital malformations, and imprinting disorders. In this review, we discuss the possible implications of the technique per se on these adverse outcomes and highlight the importance of several experiments using mammalian models to truthfully test these implications and to uncover the molecular base that origins these health problems. We also dissect the specific hazards associated to ICSI and describe some strategies that have been developed to mimic the gamete selection occurring in natural conception in order to improve the safety of the procedure.

  12. The laparoscopic hiatoplasty with antireflux surgery is a safe and effective procedure to repair giant hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although minimally invasive repair of giant hiatal hernias is a very surgical challenge which requires advanced laparoscopic learning curve, several reports showed that is a safe and effective procedure, with lower morbidity than open approach. In the present study we show the outcomes of 13 patients who underwent a laparoscopic repair of giant hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 13 patients underwent laparoscopic posterior hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Follow-up evaluation was done clinically at intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery using the Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality of Life scale, a barium swallow study, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an oesophageal manometry, a combined ambulatory 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring. Anatomic recurrence was defined as any evidence of gastric herniation above the diaphragmatic edge. Results There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open technique. Symptomatic GORD-HQL outcomes demonstrated a statistical significant decrease of mean value equal to 3.2 compare to 37.4 of preoperative assessment (p < 0.0001). Combined 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring after 12 months did not show any evidence of pathological acid or non acid reflux. Conclusion All patients were satisfied of procedure and no hernia recurrence was recorded in the study group, treated respecting several crucial surgical principles, e.g., complete sac excision, appropriate crural closure, also with direct hiatal defect where possible, and routine use of antireflux procedure. PMID:24401085

  13. Universal safe procedure of laparoscopic cholecystectomy standardized by exposing the inner layer of the subserosal layer (with video).

    PubMed

    Honda, Goro; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Umezawa, Akiko

    2016-09-01

    An incorrect approach to the critical view of safety can cause bile duct and/or vascular injury. However, only superficial anatomical features have been proposed as surgical landmarks to initiate laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) safely in previous reports. Accordingly, we have proposed a novel surgical anatomical definition of the gallbladder wall, in which the subserosal (SS) layer is divided into the inner layer of the SS (SS-Inner) layer consisting of vasculature and fibrous tissue, and the outer layer of the SS (SS-Outer) layer consisting of abundant fat tissue. By dissecting the gallbladder along the SS-Inner layer after exposure at a safe region, bile duct and/or vascular injury can be avoided, even in cholecystitis cases. Furthermore, recognition of this surgical anatomy reveals several aspects. In cholecystitis cases associated with severe fibrotic change, completion of LC by dissecting along the SS-Inner layer is impossible, resulting in abandonment of regular LC. An abscess in the liver bed associated with acute cholecystitis usually forms in the SS-Outer layer, thus, the gallbladder can be dissected easily. In the dome-down technique, the right hepatic duct is endangered by whole-layer dissection, in which the SS-Outer layer is also removed. The proposed procedure should become the universal standard for LC. PMID:27515579

  14. The push-pull T technique: an easy and safe procedure in children with the buried bumper syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furlano, Raoul I; Sidler, Marc; Haack, Horst

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement is a well-established procedure in adults as well as in pediatric patients who cannot be orally fed. However, potential serious complications may occur. The buried bumper syndrome is a well-recognized long-term complication of PEG. Overgrowth of gastric mucosa over the inner bumper of the tube will cause mechanical failure of formula delivery, rendering the tube useless. However, published experience in children with buried bumper syndrome is very scarce. In the authors' clinic, 76 PEG tubes were placed from 2001 to 2008, and buried bumper syndrome occurred in 1 patient. The authors report on their experience with buried bumper syndrome, an adapted safe endoscopic removal technique, as well as recommendations for prevention of buried bumper syndrome.

  15. Safe Spaces, Support, Social Capital: A Critical Analysis of Artists Working with Vulnerable Young People in Educational Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellman, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a critical and thematic analysis of three research projects involving artists working with vulnerable young people in educational contexts. It argues that artists create safe spaces in contrast to traditional educational activities but it will also raise questions about what constitutes such a space for participants. It will…

  16. Safety on the Job. Some Guidelines for Working Safely. Instructor's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide was developed to help teachers (especially in Oklahoma) promote safe practices on the job. As a supplement to existing programs in the requirements for job safety, this book can also promote same basic safety attitudes and help support basic safety concepts, with an emphasis on accident prevention. The guide contains eight…

  17. Working from the Inside Out: A Case Study of Mackay Safe Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze…

  18. Is Stapled Hemorrhoidectomy a Safe Procedure for Third and Fourth Grade Hemorrhoids? An Experience at Civil Hospital Karachi.

    PubMed

    Bota, Rafaqat; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Aziz, Adnan

    2015-12-01

    Hemorrhoids are amongst the most frequent anorectal conditions affecting approximately 4-36 % of the general population. The study was carried out to assess the clinical consequences of stapled hemorrhoidectomy comparing results with other published literature regarding postoperative pain, bleeding, incontinence, and other complications. A total of 120 patients were included in this study with symptomatic grade 3 or 4 prolapsed hemorrhoids, who underwent stapled hemorrhoidectomy from January 2006 to January 2012 at the Civil Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. In 92 patients (76.6 %), proctological examination showed grade 3 hemorrhoids. Fourth degree hemorrhoids were found in 28 cases (23.4 %). Hospitalization time ranged between 1 and 3 days (median time was 34 h). Seventy-eight patients were discharged on the first postoperative day, without severe pain, and the remaining 42 patients were discharge on the third day. Two cases of postoperative pain and thrombosis were found as postoperative complications. Stapled hemorrhoidectomy is a safe and quick procedure associated with less pain, better outcome, and early recovery with shorter hospital stay.

  19. One stage bilateral endoscopic sympathectomy under local anesthesia: Is a valid, and safe procedure for treatment of palmer hyperhidrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Mohamed Salah; Elzeftawy, Awny; Mansour, Salah; Elshelfa, Wael

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Thoracoscopic sympathetic surgery is currently the best treatment for hyperhidrosis, and the success rate is quite high, but poor emphasis has been given to the type of anaesthesia and its application through either one or two stages of surgery. This study has evaluated the operative and postoperative results of one-stage bilateral thoracoscopic sympathectomy under local anaesthesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 2003 to 2007, n=14 patients with hyperhidrosis of the upper limbs [4 females and 10 males] with a mean age of 28±2.11 year [range 26-44] were included. They were operated on by means of bilateral ETS under local anaesthesia. The mean follow-up was 1.5 years (range 13-24 months). RESULTS: No operative mortality was recorded. The mean operating room time for the whole bilateral procedure under was 73. 5±14.5 range [60 -120] min most of the patients were discharged the same day after a chest roentgenogram except, only two patients with gustatory sweating one recurrent sweating in the patient who had previously axillary hyperhidrosis. Also among them two patients (20%) experienced a minimal pneumothorax that required no treatment. Postoperative quality of life and satisfaction were excellent and cost was significantly reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral thoracoscopic sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis could be safely and effectively performed in patients refusing GA regarding cost and satisfaction. PMID:20585488

  20. Making highly flammable liquid wastes of petrochemical works safe by combustion without burners

    SciTech Connect

    Shelygin, B.L.; Bakhirev, V.I.; Gudzyuk, V.L.

    1983-11-01

    At the V.I. Lenin Energy Institute in Ivanov a technological program was implementd for combustion of highly flammable bulk wastes (for example, piperylene fractions) of petrochemical enterprises, with a moisture content of under 10% and mechanical admixtures (particles of catalyst dust) of up to 5%, without the use of burners. In devising the program, the results of mathematical theoretical analysis of pre-igniting preparation of substances to make them safe were utilized as well as the experience acquired in burning petroleum sludge in furnaces with bubbling equipment.

  1. The SAFE strategy for the elimination of trachoma by 2020: will it work?

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, R.; Lietman, T.

    2001-01-01

    WHO has recently launched a programme (GET 2020) for the elimination of trachoma, the leading cause of preventable blindness. GET 2020 has adopted the SAFE strategy, a comprehensive set of control measures (Surgery for entropion/trichiasis; Antibiotics for infectious trachoma; Facial cleanliness to reduce transmission; Environmental improvements such as control of disease-spreading flies and access to clean water). The present article reviews the strengths and weaknesses of each component of the strategy. Although significant hurdles remain to be overcome there is every reason to hope that GET 2020 will be successful. PMID:11285668

  2. Safe Handling Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    In 1977 Compugraphic Corporation was experiencing an unacceptable failure rate on microelectronic chips. Company engineers suspected that static electricity was causing the trouble because some electronic components are highly susceptible to damage by electrostatic charge. From a NASA Tech Brief, they learned that Rockwell International had prepared a report on safe handling practices for electronic components. NASA provided a Technical Support Package detailing 50 safe handling procedures affecting workers, work areas, equipment and packaging materials. Where poor practices were discovered, re-education of employees and other corrective measures were undertaken.

  3. Government agencies and industry working together for a safe and economical U.I.C. program

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, N.K.; Sanborn, K.W.

    1995-12-01

    The Osage UIC Program was developed to address and regulate injection wells in Osage County, Oklahoma. It was initiated to protect the environment according to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) but was tailored it allow operators to continue using injection wells with a minimum amount of additional compliance with the new law. This meant that costly repairs or modifications to the wells were avoided in most cases. In addition, various methods have been developed to further fulfill the regulatory requirements with cost savings in mind. Newly permitted wells have also experienced positive changes to make pressure and volume modification requests possible, and to make other permit changes faster and more efficient. The allowance of modifications to permits has increased oil production without compromising the environment.

  4. Safe places for pedestrians: using cognitive work analysis to consider the relationships between the engineering and urban design of footpaths.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Nicholas; Salmon, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Footpaths provide an integral component of our urban environments and have the potential to act as safe places for people and the focus for community life. Despite this, the approach to designing footpaths that are safe while providing this sense of place often occurs in silos. There is often very little consideration given to how designing for sense of place impacts safety and vice versa. The aim of this study was to use a systems analysis and design framework to develop a design template for an 'ideal' footpath system that embodies both safety and sense of place. This was achieved through using the first phase of the Cognitive Work Analysis framework, Work Domain Analysis, to specify a model of footpaths as safe places for pedestrians. This model was subsequently used to assess two existing footpath environments to determine the extent to which they meet the design requirements specified. The findings show instances where the existing footpaths both meet and fail to meet the design requirements specified. Through utilising a systems approach for footpaths, this paper has provided a novel design template that can inform new footpath design efforts or be used to evaluate the extent to which existing footpaths achieve their safety and sense of place requirements. PMID:25089766

  5. Safe places for pedestrians: using cognitive work analysis to consider the relationships between the engineering and urban design of footpaths.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Nicholas; Salmon, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Footpaths provide an integral component of our urban environments and have the potential to act as safe places for people and the focus for community life. Despite this, the approach to designing footpaths that are safe while providing this sense of place often occurs in silos. There is often very little consideration given to how designing for sense of place impacts safety and vice versa. The aim of this study was to use a systems analysis and design framework to develop a design template for an 'ideal' footpath system that embodies both safety and sense of place. This was achieved through using the first phase of the Cognitive Work Analysis framework, Work Domain Analysis, to specify a model of footpaths as safe places for pedestrians. This model was subsequently used to assess two existing footpath environments to determine the extent to which they meet the design requirements specified. The findings show instances where the existing footpaths both meet and fail to meet the design requirements specified. Through utilising a systems approach for footpaths, this paper has provided a novel design template that can inform new footpath design efforts or be used to evaluate the extent to which existing footpaths achieve their safety and sense of place requirements.

  6. Working from the inside out: a case study of Mackay Safe Community.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C

    2015-04-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze structural, social, and political changes that empowered the community and, ultimately, individuals within the community, to modify their environment and their behavior to reduce the risk of injury. A community network consisting of 118 members and an external support network of 50 members was established. A social network analysis conducted in 2000 and 2004 indicated that the network doubled its cohesiveness, thereby strengthening its ability to collaborate for mutual benefit. However, while MWSC was rich in social resources, human and financial resources were largely controlled by external agencies. The bridging and linking relationships that connected MWSC to its external support network were the social mechanism MWSC used to access the resources it required to run programs. These boundary-spanning relationships accessed an estimated 6.5 full-time equivalents of human resources and US$750,000 in 2004 that it used to deliver a suite of injury control and safety promotion activities, associated with a 33% reduction in injury deaths over the period 2002 to 2010. MWSC can only be understood in its ecological context. The productivity of MWSC was vulnerable to the changing policy priorities of external sponsoring agents and critically dependent on the advocacy skills of its leaders.

  7. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education.

  8. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  9. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  10. Improving Written Instructions for Procedural Tasks. Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Catherine

    Guthrie, Bennett, and Weber (1990) have proposed a transformational model of procedural document processing. They suggest that successful completion of written instruction occurs when sources of information are combined with certain cognitive processes. Optimal combinations of information and cognition include the following: using the exposition…

  11. Service station requirements for safe use of hydrogen based fuels: NHA work group update

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the results of the meeting of the working group on safety standards. A standard for an odorant for hydrogen leak detection is set forth. Recent activities with the National Fire Protection Association and the International Standard Organization are enumerated. The path forward is also summarized.

  12. How Safe Are You at Work? Occupational Health and Safety Issues for School Counsellors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, John A.

    Schools are becoming increasingly violent places. This workshop presentation examines ways to improve counselor facilities and to enhance work safety. Client populations for school counselors have changed significantly in recent times as school administrators refer more welfare related problems for help. Although violent attacks on counselors may…

  13. Safety and the Supervisor. A Safe System of Work. Members' Occasional Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, Tony

    In 1981 four supervisors at a chemical company in Great Britain were each fined 100 pounds under the country's 1974 Health and Safety at Work Act after a fifth supervisor was injured because of a faulty interlock guard. The supervisors were convicted because they had all known about but had done nothing to rectify the potential safety hazard. The…

  14. An innovative safety model and e-learning guide to working safely with beryllium throughout the industrial supply chain.

    PubMed

    Knudson, Theodore L; Kolanz, Marc E

    2009-12-01

    Over the past 10 years, Brush Wellman Inc., the primary beryllium producer, has partnered with the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH) and others in conducting research to develop a beryllium safety model to prevent chronic beryllium disease. As the result of this research-to-practice partnership, a philosophically different worker protection model evolved based on the premise of addressing all routes and pathways of potential worker exposure. The model's fundamental principles involve keeping beryllium (1) out of the lungs, (2) work areas clean, (3) off the skin, (4) off clothing, (5) at the source, (6) in the work area, (7) on the plant site, and (8) workers prepared to work safely. Recent research by NIOSH is demonstrating that the model has reduced beryllium sensitization and lowered the risk of chronic beryllium disease in employees hired since 2001. As a result, an e-learning tool was created to enhance the communication of the model throughout the industrial supply chain.

  15. SUNRAYCE 95: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1994-05-27

    This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

  16. SUNRAYCE 1995: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dephillips, M. P.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1994-05-01

    This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

  17. Human-rating Automated and Robotic Systems - (How HAL Can Work Safely with Astronauts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroff, Lynn; Dischinger, Charlie; Fitts, David

    2009-01-01

    Long duration human space missions, as planned in the Vision for Space Exploration, will not be possible without applying unprecedented levels of automation to support the human endeavors. The automated and robotic systems must carry the load of routine housekeeping for the new generation of explorers, as well as assist their exploration science and engineering work with new precision. Fortunately, the state of automated and robotic systems is sophisticated and sturdy enough to do this work - but the systems themselves have never been human-rated as all other NASA physical systems used in human space flight have. Our intent in this paper is to provide perspective on requirements and architecture for the interfaces and interactions between human beings and the astonishing array of automated systems; and the approach we believe necessary to create human-rated systems and implement them in the space program. We will explain our proposed standard structure for automation and robotic systems, and the process by which we will develop and implement that standard as an addition to NASA s Human Rating requirements. Our work here is based on real experience with both human system and robotic system designs; for surface operations as well as for in-flight monitoring and control; and on the necessities we have discovered for human-systems integration in NASA's Constellation program. We hope this will be an invitation to dialog and to consideration of a new issue facing new generations of explorers and their outfitters.

  18. Procedures and Version 2 Standards Handbook. What Works Clearinghouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This handbook describes the structure and processes that the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) uses for its reviews, presenting in one place all the standards the WWC currently uses to assess research. The handbook will be revised as new standards are developed and major new features are finalized. A distinguishing feature of the WWC is that it does…

  19. Assessing the 'system' in safe systems-based road designs: using cognitive work analysis to evaluate intersection designs.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, M; Salmon, P M; Stanton, N A; McClure, R

    2015-01-01

    While a safe systems approach has long been acknowledged as the underlying philosophy of contemporary road safety strategies, systemic applications are sparse. This article argues that systems-based methods from the discipline of Ergonomics have a key role to play in road transport design and evaluation. To demonstrate, the Cognitive Work Analysis framework was used to evaluate two road designs - a traditional Melbourne intersection and a cut-through design for future intersections based on road safety safe systems principles. The results demonstrate that, although the cut-through intersection appears different in layout from the traditional intersection, system constraints are not markedly different. Furthermore, the analyses demonstrated that redistribution of constraints in the cut-through intersection resulted in emergent behaviour, which was not anticipated and could prove problematic. Further, based on the lack of understanding of emergent behaviour, similar design induced problems are apparent across both intersections. Specifically, incompatibilities between infrastructure, vehicles and different road users were not dealt with by the proposed design changes. The importance of applying systems methods in the design and evaluation of road transport systems is discussed.

  20. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Review procedures to determine that licensed... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Biologics Licensing § 601.25 Review procedures to... category of products. (a) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs shall appoint...

  1. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Review procedures to determine that licensed... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Biologics Licensing § 601.25 Review procedures to... category of products. (a) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs shall appoint...

  2. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Review procedures to determine that licensed... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Biologics Licensing § 601.25 Review procedures to... category of products. (a) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs shall appoint...

  3. Stay Safe at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... from drinks with caffeine (like coffee, soda, and energy drinks) several hours before you go to sleep. Get regular physical activity, but don’t exercise right before you go to bed. Make sure your bedroom is dark and quiet. Stay healthy. A healthy body helps ...

  4. Procedures and Standards Handbook. Version 3.0. What Works Clearinghouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This "What Works Clearinghouse Procedures and Standards Handbook (Version 3.0)" provides a detailed description of the standards and procedures of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC). The remaining chapters of this Handbook are organized to take the reader through the basic steps that the WWC uses to develop a review protocol, identify…

  5. Characterisation of wax works of art by gas chromatographic procedures.

    PubMed

    Regert, M; Langlois, J; Colinart, S

    2005-10-14

    To identify the various natural and synthetic substances used by sculptors at the end of the 19th century, several contemporary reference samples were investigated by high temperature gas chromatography (HT GC) and HT GC-MS. Using specific chromatographic conditions and minimising sample preparation, we could separate, detect and identify a wide range of biomolecular markers covering a great variety of molecular weights and volatilities, with a minimum amount of sample, in a single run. Beeswax, spermaceti, carnauba, candellila and Japan waxes as well as pine resin derivatives, animal fats, paraffin, ozokerite and stearin, used as additives in wax works of art, were chemically investigated. In the case of low volatile compounds, transbutylation was performed. The structure of long-chain esters of spermaceti was elucidated for the first time by HT GC-MS analysis. Such a method was then carried out on 10 samples collected on a statuette of Junon by Antoine-Louis Barye (Louvre Museum, Paris, France) and on a sculpture by Aimé-Jules Dalou (Musée de la Révolution Française, Vizille, France). The analytical results obtained provide new data on the complex recipes elaborated by sculptors at the end of the 19th century.

  6. Early awareness of emerging risks associated with food and feed production: synopsis of pertinent work carried out within the SAFE FOODS project.

    PubMed

    Marvin, H J P; Kleter, G A

    2009-05-01

    This introduction to the journal's supplement on emerging food and feed safety issues summarizes the objectives and activities of the EU-funded SAFE FOODS project in general and its work package focusing on the early identification of emerging food safety risks, in particular. Within this work package, a number of studies have been carried out on methods enabling the early awareness, identification, and prevention of emerging issues before they can become real risks. The various reviews in this supplement explore the background of the emergence of known food safety risks, both of microbial and chemical/biochemical nature, as well the methods that can be used to identify such risks. Another review identifies a number of chemical and microbiological hazards that are likely to be affected by a changing climate. A major conclusion from these explorative reviews is that monitoring and information exchange systems or procedures are in place to detect, in an early phase, the emergence of potential food safety risks linked to known hazards. Additional systems are needed to predict the development of new potential food safety risks, which are linked to either new hazards or known hazards to which exposure has been altered. PMID:19232376

  7. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Procedure for establishing OTC drug monographs—(1) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner shall appoint advisory review panels of qualified experts to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of OTC drugs, to review OTC drug labeling, and to advise him on the promulgation of monographs establishing...

  8. 78 FR 32558 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... earlier expedited methods approval action (74 FR 38348, August 3, 2009) (USEPA 2009b). Both EPA Methods... Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures. 74 FR 38348. August 3, 2009. USEPA. 2013. EPA Method 524.4...). 1997b. Standard Method 2320 B-97. Alkalinity. Titration Method. Approved by Standard Methods...

  9. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Procedure for establishing OTC drug monographs—(1) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner shall appoint advisory review panels of qualified experts to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of OTC drugs, to review OTC drug labeling, and to advise him on the promulgation of monographs establishing...

  10. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Procedure for establishing OTC drug monographs—(1) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner shall appoint advisory review panels of qualified experts to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of OTC drugs, to review OTC drug labeling, and to advise him on the promulgation of monographs establishing...

  11. Rapid Training and Implementation of the Pollock Technique, a Safe, Effective Newborn Circumcision Procedure, in a Low-Resource Setting.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Noah; Bristow, Claire C; Pollock, Neil; Crouse, Pierre; Theodore, Harry; Bonhomme, Jerry; Gaston, Claire F Stéphanie; Dévieux, Jessy G; Pape, Jean William; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Male circumcision is highly protective against urinary tract infections, inflammatory conditions of the penis, sexually transmitted infections, and urogenital cancers. We aimed to reintroduce newborn male circumcision through the creation of a training program in Port-au-Prince, Haiti-an area with a considerable burden of preventable urogenital infections, sexually transmitted infections, and low circumcision rate-after an earlier study reported that a majority of Haitian medical providers were in need of and wanted newborn circumcision training. The program was conducted at the GHESKIO Health Centers, a large, non-governmental clinic offering comprehensive pediatric and adult health services. Two Haitian obstetricians and seven nurses learned circumcision procedures. On training completion, one of two obstetricians achieved surgical competence. Introduction of a newborn male circumcision training program was feasible, achieving an acceptable rate of procedural competency and high-quality services. Permanent resources now exist in Haiti to train additional providers to perform newborn male circumcisions. PMID:27335959

  12. Rapid Training and Implementation of the Pollock Technique, a Safe, Effective Newborn Circumcision Procedure, in a Low-Resource Setting

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Claire C.; Pollock, Neil; Crouse, Pierre; Theodore, Harry; Bonhomme, Jerry; Gaston, Claire F. Stéphanie; Dévieux, Jessy G.; Pape, Jean William; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Male circumcision is highly protective against urinary tract infections, inflammatory conditions of the penis, sexually transmitted infections, and urogenital cancers. We aimed to reintroduce newborn male circumcision through the creation of a training program in Port-au-Prince, Haiti—an area with a considerable burden of preventable urogenital infections, sexually transmitted infections, and low circumcision rate—after an earlier study reported that a majority of Haitian medical providers were in need of and wanted newborn circumcision training. The program was conducted at the GHESKIO Health Centers, a large, non-governmental clinic offering comprehensive pediatric and adult health services. Two Haitian obstetricians and seven nurses learned circumcision procedures. On training completion, one of two obstetricians achieved surgical competence. Introduction of a newborn male circumcision training program was feasible, achieving an acceptable rate of procedural competency and high-quality services. Permanent resources now exist in Haiti to train additional providers to perform newborn male circumcisions. PMID:27335959

  13. 48 CFR 808.405-2 - Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Federal Supply Schedules 808.405-2 Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work. When placing an order or establishing a BPA for supplies or services requiring a statement of work, the... services requiring a statement of work. 808.405-2 Section 808.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  14. 48 CFR 808.405-2 - Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Federal Supply Schedules 808.405-2 Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work. When placing an order or establishing a BPA for supplies or services requiring a statement of work, the... services requiring a statement of work. 808.405-2 Section 808.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  15. 48 CFR 808.405-2 - Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Federal Supply Schedules 808.405-2 Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work. When placing an order or establishing a BPA for supplies or services requiring a statement of work, the... services requiring a statement of work. 808.405-2 Section 808.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  16. 48 CFR 808.405-2 - Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Supply Schedules 808.405-2 Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work. When placing an order or establishing a BPA for supplies or services requiring a statement of work, the... services requiring a statement of work. 808.405-2 Section 808.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  17. 48 CFR 808.405-2 - Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Federal Supply Schedules 808.405-2 Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work. When placing an order or establishing a BPA for supplies or services requiring a statement of work, the... services requiring a statement of work. 808.405-2 Section 808.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  18. 30 CFR 250.1933 - What procedures must be included for reporting unsafe working conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1933 What procedures must be included for... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What procedures must be included for reporting unsafe working conditions? 250.1933 Section 250.1933 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND...

  19. 30 CFR 250.1933 - What procedures must be included for reporting unsafe working conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SHELF Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1933 What procedures must be included for... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What procedures must be included for reporting unsafe working conditions? 250.1933 Section 250.1933 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND...

  20. Sentinel Lymph Node Navigation Surgery for Early Gastric Cancer: Is It a Safe Procedure in Countries with Non-Endemic Gastric Cancer Levels? A Preliminary Experience

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Elizabeth Gomes; Victer, Felipe Carvalho; Neves, Marcelo Soares; Pinto, Márcia Ferreira; Carvalho, Carlos Eduardo De Souza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Early diagnosis of gastric cancer is still the exception in Western countries. In the East, as in Japan and Korea, this disease is an endemic disorder. More conservative surgical procedures are frequently performed in early gastric cancer cases in these countries where sentinel lymph node navigation surgery is becoming a safe option for some patients. This study aims to evaluate preliminary outcomes of patients with early gastric cancer who underwent sentinel node navigation surgeries in Brazil, a country with non-endemic gastric cancer levels. Materials and Methods From September 2008 to March 2014, 14 out of 205 gastric cancer patients underwent sentinel lymph node navigation surgeries, which were performed using intraoperative, endoscopic, and peritumoral injection of patent blue dye. Results Antrectomies with Billroth I gastroduodenostomies were performed in seven patients with distal tumors. The other seven patients underwent wedge resections. Sentinel basin resections were performed in four patients, and lymphadenectomies were extended to stations 7, 8, and 9 in the other 10. Two patients received false-negative results from sentinel node biopsies, and one of those patients had micrometastasis. There was one postoperative death from liver failure in a cirrhotic patient. Another cirrhotic patient died after two years without recurrence of gastric cancer, also from liver failure. All other patients were followed-up for 13 to 79 months with no evidence of recurrence. Conclusions Sentinel lymph node navigation surgery appears to be a safe procedure in a country with non-endemic levels of gastric cancer. PMID:27104022

  1. Differences between Presentation Methods in Working Memory Procedures: A Matter of Working Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricker, Timothy J.; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Understanding forgetting from working memory, the memory used in ongoing cognitive processing, is critical to understanding human cognition. In the past decade, a number of conflicting findings have been reported regarding the role of time in forgetting from working memory. This has led to a debate concerning whether longer retention intervals…

  2. Are Environmental Procedures Relating To Visual Health, In the Workplace, Academia, Computer Usage, and Governmental Jobs, Adequately Safe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillger, Robert; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2004-03-01

    Visual acuity diminishes following extensive computer use in workplace environments. Similar job-induced damage must surely be noticed by many millions of independent observers. Nonetheless, academia, some businesses, governmental and other parties which should be engaged in protecting the productivity and visual health of their constituencies seem to be reluctant to do so. Practical procedures to achieve this end were empirically established over a hundred years ago by the late ophthalmologist, Dr. William Bates. RDM has proposed that Bates results are predictable on the basis of a straightforward formulation from spatial Fourier optics. It is the first zero radius distance in the diffraction pattern produced by the human pupil, r = 1.22 lf/a, where chromatic aberration yields the isolated quasi-monochromatic wavelength range l, in product with that wavelength's focal length f, divided by the pupil diameter, a. Procedural and other practices may yield benefits! *This paper does not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. E.P.A.

  3. Safe Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Stewart, Helen; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The biggest users of GRID technologies came from the science and technology communities. These consist of government, industry and academia (national and international). The NASA GRID is moving into a higher technology readiness level (TRL) today; and as a joint effort among these leaders within government, academia, and industry, the NASA GRID plans to extend availability to enable scientists and engineers across these geographical boundaries collaborate to solve important problems facing the world in the 21 st century. In order to enable NASA programs and missions to use IPG resources for program and mission design, the IPG capabilities needs to be accessible from inside the NASA center networks. However, because different NASA centers maintain different security domains, the GRID penetration across different firewalls is a concern for center security people. This is the reason why some IPG resources are been separated from the NASA center network. Also, because of the center network security and ITAR concerns, the NASA IPG resource owner may not have full control over who can access remotely from outside the NASA center. In order to obtain organizational approval for secured remote access, the IPG infrastructure needs to be adapted to work with the NASA business process. Improvements need to be made before the IPG can be used for NASA program and mission development. The Secured Advanced Federated Environment (SAFE) technology is designed to provide federated security across NASA center and NASA partner's security domains. Instead of one giant center firewall which can be difficult to modify for different GRID applications, the SAFE "micro security domain" provide large number of professionally managed "micro firewalls" that can allow NASA centers to accept remote IPG access without the worry of damaging other center resources. The SAFE policy-driven capability-based federated security mechanism can enable joint organizational and resource owner approved remote

  4. Subxiphoid and subcostal arch thoracoscopic extended thymectomy: a safe and feasible minimally invasive procedure for selective stage III thymomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinbo; Wang, Juzheng; Zhao, Zhengwei; Han, Yong; Huang, Lijun; Li, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has been applied to resection of small and well-encapsulated thymomas. However, few data are available regarding to the application of VATS in stage III thymomas. Methods A novel subxiphoid and subcostal arch approach for thoracoscopic extended thymectomy was developed by us. From January 2014 to August 2015, 14 patients with stage III thymoma were treated by using this new technique in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tangdu hospital, Xi’an, China. These patients were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results Among the 14 patients, 1 patient was converted to transsternal approach owning to invasion of the superior vena cava. The other 13 patients with thymomas invading the pericardium, lung tissues and left innominate vein (LIV), were successfully operated on by using this new technique. The average operation time was 120.0±32.7 min (80–170 min), the average volume of estimated blood loss was 51.5±44.8 min (10–150 mL) and the average postoperative hospital stay was 4.8±1.5 days (3-9 days). There was no perioperative death. Two patients suffered postoperative complications including one patient with atrial fibrillation (AF) and the other one with myasthenic crisis (MC). The postoperative pain score decreased dramatically from 3.8±1.0 [3–6] at 24 hours to 1.5±0.9 [0–6] at 48 hours, and finally to 0 at 3 months after surgery (P=0.000). The patients reported a higher cosmetic score of 92.6±2.7 [90–96]. There was no tumor recurrence and the five patients with myasthenia gravis had improvement and did not need any medication until follow-up. Conclusions Based on our limited experience, the subxiphoid and subcostal arch thoracoscopic extended thymectomy is safe and feasible for selective stage III thymoma, and might reduce the postoperative pain and provide satisfied cosmetic effect. PMID:27014472

  5. Differences between presentation methods in working memory procedures: a matter of working memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Ricker, Timothy J; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-03-01

    Understanding forgetting from working memory, the memory used in ongoing cognitive processing, is critical to understanding human cognition. In the past decade, a number of conflicting findings have been reported regarding the role of time in forgetting from working memory. This has led to a debate concerning whether longer retention intervals necessarily result in more forgetting. An obstacle to directly comparing conflicting reports is a divergence in methodology across studies. Studies that find no forgetting as a function of retention-interval duration tend to use sequential presentation of memory items, while studies that find forgetting as a function of retention-interval duration tend to use simultaneous presentation of memory items. Here, we manipulate the duration of retention and the presentation method of memory items, presenting items either sequentially or simultaneously. We find that these differing presentation methods can lead to different rates of forgetting because they tend to differ in the time available for consolidation into working memory. The experiments detailed here show that equating the time available for working memory consolidation equates the rates of forgetting across presentation methods. We discuss the meaning of this finding in the interpretation of previous forgetting studies and in the construction of working memory models. PMID:24059859

  6. Procedures for safe handling of off-gases from electric vehicle lead-acid batteries during overcharge

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, S.J.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Loutfy, R.O.; Varma, R.

    1980-01-25

    The potential for generation of toxic gases from lead-acid batteries has long been recognized. Prior to the current interest in electric vehicles, there were no studies specificaly oriented to toxic gas release from traction batteries, however. As the Department of Energy Demonstration Project (in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program) progresses, available data from past studies and parallel health effects programs must be digested into guidance to the drivers and maintenance personnel, tailored to their contact with electric vehicles. The basic aspects of lead-acid battery operation, vehicle use, and health effects of stibine and arsine to provide electric vehicle users with the information behind the judgment that vehicle operation and testing may proceed are presented. Specifically, it is concluded that stibine generation or arsine generation at rapid enough rates to induce acute toxic response is not at all likely. Procedures to guard against low-level exposure until more definitive data on ambient concentrations of the gases are collected are presented for both charging the batteries and driving the vehicles. A research plan to collect additional quantitative data from electric traction batteries is presented.

  7. Differential effects of socioeconomic status on working and procedural memory systems

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Julia A.; Mackey, Allyson P.; Finn, Amy S.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2015-01-01

    While prior research has shown a strong relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and working memory performance, the relation between SES and procedural (implicit) memory remains unknown. Convergent research in both animals and humans has revealed a fundamental dissociation, both behaviorally and neurally, between a working memory system that depends on medial temporal-lobe structures and the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) vs. a procedural memory system that depends on the basal ganglia. Here, we measured performance in adolescents from lower- and higher-SES backgrounds on tests of working memory capacity (complex working memory span) and procedural memory (probabilistic classification) and their hippocampal, DLPFC, and caudate volumes. Lower-SES adolescents had worse working memory performance and smaller hippocampal and DLPFC volumes than their higher-SES peers, but there was no significant difference between the lower- and higher-SES groups on the procedural memory task or in caudate volumes. These findings suggest that SES may have a selective influence on hippocampal-prefrontal-dependent working memory and little influence on striatal-dependent procedural memory. PMID:26500525

  8. Distributive justice, procedural justice, and psychological distress: the moderating effect of coworker support and work autonomy.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Vincent; Salek, Salwa; Aubé, Caroline; Morin, Estelle M

    2009-07-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that the perception of injustice at work may increase psychological health-related problems. The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating effect of coworker support and work autonomy on the relationships between both distributive and procedural justice and psychological distress. Results, on the basis of responses to questionnaires given to 248 prison employees, show that coworker support moderates the relationships between both forms of justice and psychological distress. Specifically, these relationships are weakened when employees benefit from a high level of coworker support. Furthermore, work autonomy moderates the relationship between procedural justice and psychological distress but not the relationship between distributive justice and psychological distress. Thus, procedural injustice is less likely to increase psychological distress when the level of work autonomy is high.

  9. A prototype on-line work procedure system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator production

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1991-09-01

    An on-line system to manage work procedures is being developed to support radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) assembly and testing in a new production facility. This system implements production work procedures as interactive electronic documents executed at the work site with no intermediate printed form. It provides good control of the creation and application of work procedures and provides active assistance to the worker in performing them and in documenting the results. An extensive prototype of this system is being evaluated to ensure that it will have all the necessary features and that it will fit the user's needs and expectations. This effort has involved the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) operations organization and technology transfer between Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and EG G Mound Applied Technologies Inc. (Mound) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Site. 1 ref.

  10. Safe Hazmat Storage Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Angela

    1996-01-01

    Provides a list of recommendations for safely managing hazardous waste containers. Encourages training of employees on the hazards of the wastes they handle and the correct procedures for managing containers. (DDR)

  11. Update on neurotoxins for facial rejuvenation: what they are, how they work, and how to effectively and safely use them.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The formal aesthetic introduction of botulinum toxin (i.e., neurotoxins) more than a decade ago has revolutionized the nonsurgical aesthetic market and transformed society's view of facial rejuvenation. Understanding the similarities and differences between U.S. commercially available neurotoxins, their characteristics and composition, where they are effective, their mechanism of action, and how to safely administer them will enable the aesthetic provider to successfully utilize this powerful tool and ultimately deliver optimal facial rejuvenation outcomes. An update on neurotoxins on the horizon is also provided. Please note that this article discusses neurotoxin use in treatment areas that are considered "off label" by the Food and Drug Administration.

  12. The relation between receptive grammar and procedural, declarative, and working memory in specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Ullman, Michael T; Lum, Jarrad A G

    2015-01-01

    What memory systems underlie grammar in children, and do these differ between typically developing (TD) children and children with specific language impairment (SLI)? Whilst there is substantial evidence linking certain memory deficits to the language problems in children with SLI, few studies have investigated multiple memory systems simultaneously, examining not only possible memory deficits but also memory abilities that may play a compensatory role. This study examined the extent to which procedural, declarative, and working memory abilities predict receptive grammar in 45 primary school aged children with SLI (30 males, 15 females) and 46 TD children (30 males, 16 females), both on average 9;10 years of age. Regression analyses probed measures of all three memory systems simultaneously as potential predictors of receptive grammar. The model was significant, explaining 51.6% of the variance. There was a significant main effect of learning in procedural memory and a significant group × procedural learning interaction. Further investigation of the interaction revealed that procedural learning predicted grammar in TD but not in children with SLI. Indeed, procedural learning was the only predictor of grammar in TD. In contrast, only learning in declarative memory significantly predicted grammar in SLI. Thus, different memory systems are associated with receptive grammar abilities in children with SLI and their TD peers. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate a significant group by memory system interaction in predicting grammar in children with SLI and their TD peers. In line with Ullman's Declarative/Procedural model of language and procedural deficit hypothesis of SLI, variability in understanding sentences of varying grammatical complexity appears to be associated with variability in procedural memory abilities in TD children, but with declarative memory, as an apparent compensatory mechanism, in children with SLI.

  13. When the science fails and the ethics works: 'Fail-safe' ethics in the FEM-PrEP study.

    PubMed

    Kingori, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    This paper will explore the concept of 'fail safe' ethics in the FEM PrEP trial, and the practice of research and ethics on the ground. FEM-PrEP examined the efficacy of PrEP in African women after promising outcomes in research conducted with MSM. This was a hugely optimistic time and FEM-PrEP was mobilised using rights-based ethical arguments that women should have access to PrEP. This paper will present data collected during an ethnographic study of frontline research workers involved in FEM-PrEP. During our discussions, 'fail-safe' ethics emerged as concept that encapsulated their confidence that their ethics could not fail. However, in 2011, FEM-PrEP was halted and deemed a failure. The women involved in the study were held responsible because contrary to researcher's expectations they were not taking the oral PrEP being researched. This examination of FEM-PrEP will show that ethical arguments are increasingly deployed to mobilise, maintain and in some cases stop trials in ways which, at times, are superseded or co-opted by other interests. While promoting the interests of women, rights-based approaches are argued to indirectly justify the continuation of individualised, biomedical interventions which have been problematic in other women-centred trials. In this examination of FEM-PrEP, the rights-based approach obscured: ethical concerns beyond access to PrEP; the complexities of power relationships between donor and host countries; the operations of the HIV industry in research-saturated areas and the cumulative effect of unfilled expectations in HIV research and how this has shaped ideas of research and ethics.

  14. Cross-national research on contractor evaluation procedures in public works procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Seiya; Sato, Naoyoshi; Matsumoto, Naoya

    Contractor evaluation methods in Japan's public works procurement, beginning with construction business licensure, going through biennial preliminary firm rating, up to project-by-project prequalification and comprehensive point rating, were developed during the period when public works were mostly procured through designated competitive bidding. It is essential to focus attention on contractor evaluation methods for introducing different types of procurement procedures which enhance the use of technological capabilities held by private businesses. An overall review of contractor evaluation procedures should be conducted in view of the present situation, where the open competitive bidding has become mainly used in combination with comprehensive evaluation, as well as to allow for further diversification of procurement methods. In Western countries, improvements have been made for the past several years in contractor evaluation procedures with more emphasis on "Value for Money." Advanced efforts made by these countries will be useful as a reference for overhauling Japan's contractor evaluation system. This study conducts a comparative review of contractor evaluation procedures for public procurement in Western countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France by identifying similarities and differences between those of Japan and the above mentioned countries. This reveals that a contractor's technical or professional ability is looked at separately from its economic and financial standing in those countries studied, and there is no case like Japan in which those two factors are integrated into one for evaluation.

  15. 30 CFR 250.1914 - What criteria must be documented in my SEMS program for safe work practices and contractor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... associated with operating, maintenance, and modification activities and the handling of materials and... domestic services to the lessee or other contractors. Domestic services include janitorial work, food...

  16. 30 CFR 250.1914 - What criteria must be documented in my SEMS program for safe work practices and contractor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... associated with operations, maintenance, modification activities, and the handling of materials and... other contractors. Domestic services include janitorial work, food and beverage service, laundry...

  17. 30 CFR 250.1914 - What criteria must be documented in my SEMS program for safe work practices and contractor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... associated with operations, maintenance, modification activities, and the handling of materials and... other contractors. Domestic services include janitorial work, food and beverage service, laundry...

  18. Reprint of "Safe places for pedestrians: using cognitive work analysis to consider the relationships between the engineering and urban design of footpaths".

    PubMed

    Stevens, Nicholas; Salmon, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Footpaths provide an integral component of our urban environments and have the potential to act as safe places for people and the focus for community life. Despite this, the approach to designing footpaths that are safe while providing this sense of place often occurs in silos. There is often very little consideration given to how designing for sense of place impacts safety and vice versa. The aim of this study was to use a systems analysis and design framework to develop a design template for an 'ideal' footpath system that embodies both safety and sense of place. This was achieved through using the first phase of the Cognitive Work Analysis framework, Work Domain Analysis, to specify a model of footpaths as safe places for pedestrians. This model was subsequently used to assess two existing footpath environments to determine the extent to which they meet the design requirements specified. The findings show instances where the existing footpaths both meet and fail to meet the design requirements specified. Through utilising a systems approach for footpaths, this paper has provided a novel design template that can inform new footpath design efforts or be used to evaluate the extent to which existing footpaths achieve their safety and sense of place requirements. PMID:25455808

  19. An empirical test of the independence between declarative and procedural working memory in Oberauer's (2009) theory.

    PubMed

    Barrouillet, Pierre; Corbin, Lucie; Dagry, Isabelle; Camos, Valérie

    2015-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that working memory could be conceived as two symmetrical subsystems with analogous structure and processing principles: a declarative working memory storing objects of thought available for cognitive operations, and a procedural working memory holding representations of what to do with these objects (Oberauer, Psychology of learning and motivation 51: 45-100, 2009). Within this theoretical framework, the two subsystems are thought to be independent and fueled by their own capacity. The present study tested this hypothesis through two experiments using a complex span task in which participants were asked to maintain consonants for further recall while performing response selection tasks. In line with Oberauer's conception, the load of the procedural working memory was varied by manipulating the number of stimulus-response mappings of the response selection task. Increasing the number of these mappings had a strong detrimental effect on recall performance. Besides contradicting Oberauer's proposal, this finding supports models that assume a resource-sharing between processing and storage in working memory.

  20. Fail safe logic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shield, I.

    1983-03-01

    Ideally, a circuit is said to be fail safe, if for every possible failure configuration, the circuit results in a safe side output. In order to guarantee safe side failures, it is imperative that the circuit detects any faults within it. A suitable procedure for doing this can be based on an error detecting code, such as the K out of N code. A number of circuit types are considered, taking into account a fault tolerant circuit, a fault secure circuit, a self testing circuit, a self checking circuit, a self checking checker, and a fail safe circuit. Attention is given to the realization of combinational circuits, aspects of safety and reliability, sequential circuits, the realization of sequential circuits, the occurrence of clock failure, and the design procedure.

  1. Prevalence of gallstones in 1,229 patients submitted to surgical laparoscopic treatment of GERD and esophageal achalasia: associated cholecystectomy was a safe procedure

    PubMed Central

    SALLUM, Rubens Antonio Aissar; PADRÃO, Eduardo Messias Hirano; SZACHNOWICZ, Sergio; SEGURO, Francisco C. B. C.; BIANCHI, Edno Tales; CECCONELLO, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background Association between esophageal achalasia/ gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and cholelithiasis is not clear. Epidemiological data are controversial due to different methodologies applied, the regional differences and the number of patients involved. Results of concomitant cholecistectomy associated to surgical treatment of both diseases regarding safety is poorly understood. Aim To analyze the prevalence of cholelithiasis in patients with esophageal achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux submitted to cardiomyotomy or fundoplication. Also, to evaluate the safety of concomitant cholecistectomy. Methods Retrospective analysis of 1410 patients operated from 2000 to 2013. They were divided into two groups: patients with GERD submitted to laparocopic hiatoplasty plus Nissen fundoplication and patients with esophageal achalasia to laparoscopic cardiomyotomy plus partial fundoplication. It was collected epidemiological data, specific diagnosis and subgroups, the presence or absence of gallstones, surgical procedure, operative and clinical complications and mortality. All groups/subgroups were compared. Results From 1,229 patients with GERD or esophageal achalasia, submitted to laparoscopic cardiomyotomy or fundoplication, 138 (11.43%) had cholelitiasis, occurring more in females (2.38:1) with mean age of 50,27 years old. In 604 patients with GERD, 79 (13,08%) had cholelitiasis. Lower prevalence occurred in Barrett's esophagus patients 7/105 (6.67%) (p=0.037). In 625 with esophageal achalasia, 59 (9.44%) had cholelitiasis, with no difference between chagasic and idiopathic forms (p=0.677). Complications of patients with or without cholecystectomy were similar in fundoplication and cardiomyotomy (p=0.78 and p=1.00).There was no mortality or complications related to cholecystectomy in this series. Conclusions Prevalence of cholelithiasis was higher in patients submitted to fundoplication (GERD). Patients with chagasic or idiopatic forms of achalasia had the

  2. The MERSADE (European Union) project: testing procedures and environmental impact for the safe storage of liquid mercury in the Almadén district, Spain.

    PubMed

    Llanos, W; Higueras, P; Oyarzun, R; Esbrí, J M; López-Berdonces, M A; García-Noguero, E M; Martínez-Coronado, A

    2010-09-15

    The MERSADE Project (LIFE--European Union) tested the Las Cuevas decommissioned mining complex (Almadén mercury district, Spain) as a potential site for the installation of a future European prototype safe deposit of surplus mercury from industrial activities. We here present the results of a baseline study on the distribution of mercury in soils and air in the Las Cuevas complex and surrounding areas, and show the results of a plume contamination model using the ISC-AERMOD software. Despite restoration works carried out in 2004, the Las Cuevas complex can still be regarded as hotspot of mercury contamination, with large anomalies above 800 microg g(-1) Hg (soils) and 300 ng Hg m(-3) (air). In the case of soils, high, and persistent concentrations above 26 microg g(-1) Hg extend well beyond the complex perimeter for more than 2 km. These concentrations are about three orders of magnitude above world baselines. The same applies to mercury in air, with high concentrations above 300 ng Hg m(-3) inside the perimeter, which nonetheless fade away in a few hundred meters. Air contamination modelling (Hg gas) predicts formation of a NW-SE oriented narrow plume extending for a few hundred meters from the complex perimeter. The geographic isolation of Las Cuevas and its mining past make the complex an ideal site for mercury stocking. The only potential environmental hazards are the raising of livestock only a few hundred meters away from the complex and flash floods.

  3. Measurement of Nursing's Complex Health Care Work: Evolution of the Science For Determining the Required Staffing For Safe and Effective Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Malloch, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    The availability of technology to monitor and manage data increases our ability to better understand the processes and outcomes needed for patient care. It is important to remember this work requires not only the science of data management, but also the art of integrating the multiple variables involved in the dynamic of safe staffing. Fasoli and Haddock (2010) provided an excellent summary of the literature. Nurse leaders must be open to new additions to this work and the possibility that the essential ingredient of the gold standard for patient classification systems (PCS) might still be missing. The goal of a new approach to determine time for nurse work was to advance the science of PCS from the perspective of the characteristics identified by Fasoli and Haddock.

  4. Measurement of functional capacity requirements to aid in development of an occupation-specific rehabilitation training program to help firefighters with cardiac disease safely return to work.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jenny; Roberts, Joanne; Simms, Kay; Cheng, Dunlei; Hartman, Julie; Bartlett, Charles

    2009-03-15

    We designed a study to measure the functional capacity requirements of firefighters to aid in the development of an occupation-specific training program in cardiac rehabilitation; 23 healthy male firefighters with no history of heart disease completed a fire and rescue obstacle course that simulated 7 common firefighting tasks. They wore complete personal protective equipment and portable metabolic instruments that included a data collection mask. We monitored each subject's oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and working heart rate, then calculated age-predicted maximum heart rates (220 - age) and training target heart rates (85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate). During performance of the obstacle course, the subjects' mean working heart rates and peak heart rates were higher than the calculated training target heart rates (t(22) = 5.69 [working vs target, p <0.001] and t(22) = 15.14 [peak vs target, p <0.001]). These findings, with mean results for peak VO(2) (3,447 ml/min) and metabolic equivalents (11.9 METs), show that our subjects' functional capacity greatly exceeded that typically attained by patients in traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs (5 to 8 METs). In conclusion, our results indicate the need for intense, occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training that will help firefighters safely return to work after a cardiac event.

  5. Probabilistic risk assessment of dietary exposure to single and multiple pesticide residues or contaminants: summary of the work performed within the SAFE FOODS project.

    PubMed

    van Klaveren, Jacob D; Boon, Polly E

    2009-12-01

    This introduction to the journal's supplement on probabilistic risk assessment of single and multiple exposure to pesticide residues or contaminants summarizes the objectives and results of the work performed in work package 3 of the EU-funded project SAFE FOODS. Within this work package, we developed an electronic platform of food consumption and chemical concentration databases harmonised at raw agricultural commodity level. In this platform the databases are connected to probabilistic software to allow probabilistic modelling of dietary exposure in a standardised way. The usefulness of this platform is demonstrated in two papers, which describe the exposure to pesticides and glycoalkaloids in several European countries. Furthermore, an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (IPRA) model was developed: a new tool to integrate exposure and effect modelling, including uncertainty analyses. The use of this model was shown in a paper on the cumulative exposure to anti-androgen pesticides. Combined with a health impact prioritization system, developed within this work package to compare heath risks between chemicals, the IPRA tool can also be used to compare health risks between multiple chemicals in complex risk assessment situation such as risk-benefit and risk trade-off analyses. Both the electronic platform of databases as the IPRA model may proof to be powerful tools to tackle the challenges risk managers are or will be faced with in the future.

  6. Analogous Mechanisms of Selection and Updating in Declarative and Procedural Working Memory: Experiments and a Computational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberauer, Klaus; Souza, Alessandra S.; Druey, Michel D.; Gade, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The article investigates the mechanisms of selecting and updating representations in declarative and procedural working memory (WM). Declarative WM holds the objects of thought available, whereas procedural WM holds representations of what to do with these objects. Both systems consist of three embedded components: activated long-term memory, a…

  7. Working Safe and Feeling Fine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the problem of repetitive stress disorders in the administrative workplace and shares some quick fixes to aid ergonomics. Some thoughts on the ergonomics of office chairs are provided as is the use of professional guidance in furniture purchasing. (GR)

  8. Safe sex.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, G; Ghosh, T K

    1994-01-01

    The main objectives of health care for people with AIDS are to help them adjust to changing sexual status and to provide them with information on safe sex. Sections consider the risks of various types of sexual activity and safe sex education. With regard to the risk of transmitting or contracting HIV, sexual activities may be high risk, medium risk, low risk, or no risk. High-risk activities include unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, oral-anal sexual contact, sharing sex toys, and traumatic sexual activity. Medium-risk activities include anal and vaginal intercourse using a latex condom with or without spermicide, and sex using a vaginal diaphragm or contraceptive vaginal sponge. Oral sex on a woman or oral sex on a man without ejaculation into the mouth are low-risk activities. Mutual masturbation, erotic touching, caressing and massage, kissing and non-genital licking pose no risk of infection. All general practitioners and family physicians should teach about safe sex. Prevention messages may be conveyed through individual and social counseling as well as with printed media and other forms of mass media. Messages should definitely reach prostitutes and brothel owners, as well as pre-pubertal children and older youths. PMID:8207282

  9. Safe sex.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, G; Ghosh, T K

    1994-01-01

    The main objectives of health care for people with AIDS are to help them adjust to changing sexual status and to provide them with information on safe sex. Sections consider the risks of various types of sexual activity and safe sex education. With regard to the risk of transmitting or contracting HIV, sexual activities may be high risk, medium risk, low risk, or no risk. High-risk activities include unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, oral-anal sexual contact, sharing sex toys, and traumatic sexual activity. Medium-risk activities include anal and vaginal intercourse using a latex condom with or without spermicide, and sex using a vaginal diaphragm or contraceptive vaginal sponge. Oral sex on a woman or oral sex on a man without ejaculation into the mouth are low-risk activities. Mutual masturbation, erotic touching, caressing and massage, kissing and non-genital licking pose no risk of infection. All general practitioners and family physicians should teach about safe sex. Prevention messages may be conveyed through individual and social counseling as well as with printed media and other forms of mass media. Messages should definitely reach prostitutes and brothel owners, as well as pre-pubertal children and older youths.

  10. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... interim Work Verification Plan by September 30, 2006 and a complete Work Verification Plan that we approved by September 30, 2007. (b) A “complete” Work Verification Plan means that: (1) The plan includes... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will we determine whether a State's...

  11. Safe Lock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Model 1150 electronic spring latch, which provides controlled and timed access to a safe, was developed by Burnett Electronics Lab, Inc., San Diego, CA, and is marketed by KeyOne, Inc. also of San Diego. The Model 1150 is a spinoff from a spinoff. The original spinoff, the acoustic pinger, is an underwater transmitting device developed by Langley Research Center and the Navy for location and recovery of sounding rocket research payloads from the ocean. Long functioning life is a vital requirement for both the acoustic pinger and the Model 1150. The electronic spring latch employs the pinger power management technology to get long life out of the battery power source.

  12. Developing Ethical Institutional Policies and Procedures for Working with Suicidal Students on a College Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Perry C.

    2003-01-01

    College and university personnel are often confronted with several ethical and legal issues when responding to students who present with suicidal ideation or suicide attempts on campus. Article presents an overview of issues and solutions addressing ethical guidelines of the counseling profession and the university's goal of a safe learning…

  13. TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT TO SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY COMPLETE NUCLEAR CONSTRUCTION WORK

    SciTech Connect

    LESO KF; HAMILTON HM; FARNER M; HEATH T

    2010-01-14

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business construction subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC contract, Construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper describes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method. This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by DRS personnel. Each small

  14. When Is Safe, Safe Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neil, Kirk

    2002-01-01

    Discusses events affecting parental school-safety concerns and what school districts can do to alleviate those concerns. Addresses post-September 11 crisis-management procedures, preventing sports-related student deaths, maintaining healthy indoor air quality. (PKP)

  15. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations

  16. Scaling the Acceptability of Behavior Decelerative Procedures: Perceptions of Staff Working with Persons with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, David B.; Silverstein, Jay M.

    This study sought to examine the structure and consistency of perceptions of behavior deceleration procedures within populations, provide a preliminary "index" of acceptability, determine if these procedures can be categorized into meaningful groups, and examine the consistency of perceptions across populations. Subjects were 20 professional-level…

  17. Plastic matters: an analytical procedure to evaluate the degradability of contemporary works of art.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Massimo; Ledo-Suárez, Ana; López, Thaïs; Scalarone, Dominique; López-Quintela, M Arturo

    2011-03-01

    The most significant results concerning a chemical study to evaluate the degradability of polymeric components in four contemporary works of art, partially or completely realized in plastics, are presented and discussed in this paper. The procedure applied is mainly based on the use of Fourier transform IR and UV-vis spectroscopies and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and consists of the following steps: (1) compositional analysis of the artworks, with particular attention to components which may have a negative effect on the overall ageing; (2) evaluation of the actual state of conservation; (3) investigation of the accelerated ageing of reference polymer samples; and (4) monitoring of the natural ageing of the artworks. On such a basis, the following could be concluded. Stage Evidence by Loris Cecchini is made of poly(ether urethane) elastomer which contains a high amount of phthalates. Their exudation gives a sticky appearance to the artwork and their removal during ageing is the main cause of the loss of flexibility. The latex used by Andrés Pinal for tailoring Traxe de Home is a natural polyisoprene, whose oxidative degradation accounts for the extensive deterioration and yellowing of the artwork. The plaster sculptures of 3D Bodyscans 1:9 by Karin Sander are coated with an aliphatic epoxy resin. Its oxidation with formation of amides is the cause of the surface yellowing. The adhesive used by Dario Villalba for Tierra, Ladrillo y Agua is a commercial poly(vinyl acetate). Simulated photoageing suggests a fast deterioration due to deacetylation and cross-linking, which possibly is the main reason for the actual detachment of debris from the support.

  18. Safe handling of large animals.

    PubMed

    Grandin, T

    1999-01-01

    The major causes of accidents with cattle, horses, and other grazing animals are: panic due to fear, male dominance aggression, or the maternal aggression of a mother protecting her newborn. Danger is inherent when handling large animals. Understanding their behavior patterns improves safety, but working with animals will never be completely safe. Calm, quiet handling and non-slip flooring are beneficial. Rough handling and excessive use of electric prods increase chances of injury to both people and animals, because fearful animals may jump, kick, or rear. Training animals to voluntarily cooperate with veterinary procedures reduces stress and improves safety. Grazing animals have a herd instinct, and a lone, isolated animal can become agitated. Providing a companion animal helps keep an animal calm. PMID:10329901

  19. See one, do one, teach one--is this still how it works? A comparison of the medical and nursing professions in the teaching of practical procedures.

    PubMed

    Mason, W T M; Strike, P W

    2003-11-01

    A survey of 80 junior doctors and nurses was performed to compare the methods of teaching medical and nursing students in eight common practical procedures. Nurses were more likely to have received formal teaching and to be supervised when first performing a procedure. Some 42% percent of doctors felt inadequately trained to carry out a practical procedure safely when performing it alone for the first time compared with 7% of nurses. This study confirms that much of the training of doctors in practical procedures is still received on an informal basis, compared with that of nurses. It also reveals that many doctors view this training as insufficient.

  20. SAFE Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Whitehouse, Sheldon [D-RI

    2013-06-20

    07/16/2014 Committee on Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Water and Wildlife. Hearings held. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Safe Manual Jettison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Jay

    2008-01-01

    In space, the controlled release of certain cargoes is no less useful than the maritime jettisons from which they take their name but is also much more dangerous. Experience has shown that jettisons can be performed safely, but the process is complicated with the path to performing a jettison taking months or even years. In the background, time is also required to write procedures, train the crew, configure the vehicle, and many other activities. This paper outlines the current process used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for manual jettisons, detailing the methods used to assure that the jettisons and the jettisoned objects are as safe as achievable and that the crew is adequately trained to be able to affect the safe jettison. The goal of this paper is not only to capture what it takes to perform safe jettisons in the near Earth environment but to extrapolate this knowledge to future space exploration scenarios that will likely have Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and International Partner (IP) interfaces.

  2. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... standards and/or guidance contained in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) and the AASHTO... ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1106... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  3. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... standards and/or guidance contained in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) and the AASHTO... ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1106... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  4. Prenatal Diagnosis: Current Procedures and Implications for Early Interventionists Working with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Patricia M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of procedures commonly used in prenatal screening and diagnosis including ultrasound, amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis. Emphasis is on the role of the early interventionist in supporting families during prenatal diagnosis. (Author/DB)

  5. Teaching Common Errors in Applying a Procedure. IDD&E Working Paper No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garduno, Alberto O.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the Bentti, Golden, and Reigeluth study (1983), which explored the use of nonexamples to teach common errors as an effective strategy in teaching a procedure. A total of 24 undergraduate students enrolled in the Syracuse University Symphonic Band were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a…

  6. Causing Students to Choose More Language Arts Work: Enhancing the Validity of the Additive Interspersal Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadows, Sadonya F.; Skinner, Christopher H.

    2005-01-01

    Research on the additive interspersal procedure was extended by exposing seventh-grade students to curricula-based (e.g., educationally valid) language arts assignments. In Experiment I, each student was given a control language arts assignment containing 20 discrete target items and an experimental assignment containing 24 equivalent target…

  7. Social Science Research and the Grievance Arbitration Procedure. Work Place Topics, Volume 1, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work Place Topics, 1989

    1989-01-01

    This report contains four papers presented at conferences jointly sponsored by trade unionists and members of the academic community. As explained in the introduction by Michael E. Gordon, the papers focus on grievance procedures, examining both recent research on the topic and its implications for organized labor. The following papers are…

  8. Working Memory, Task Switching, and Executive Control in the Task Span Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments explored the task span procedure: Subjects received lists of 1-10 task names to remember and then lists of 1-10 stimuli on which to perform the tasks. Task span is the number of tasks performed in order perfectly. Experiment 1 compared the task span with the traditional memory span in 6 practiced subjects and found little…

  9. Safe Passage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razwick, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Many schools are almost entirely reliant on alarms and sprinklers for their fire protection. As these devices need to be triggered and supplied with power or water to work properly, they are vulnerable to errors. To provide adequate safety, a good fire-protection program must have three primary elements: fire protection and suppression, and…

  10. Working with stories in nursing research: procedures used in narrative analysis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the procedures undertaken in a qualitative study that used nurses' stories to examine the influence of Gestalt therapy training on the professional practice of psychiatric nurses. The paper places narrative research methodologies within a nursing context before introducing narrative inquiry, specifically narrative analysis methodology. Procedures used in the study are subsequently described in sufficient detail to serve as a guide for novice researchers interested in undertaking a narrative analysis study. An exemplar of a storied outcome is provided to evidence the product of the narrative analysis research process. The paper concludes with reflections on the importance of articulating the process of narrative analysis as a means of developing interest and competence in narrative research, and using nurses' stories as a means of exploring, understanding, and communicating nursing practice. PMID:17348965

  11. Guidelines for safe work practices in human and animal medical diagnostic laboratories. Recommendations of a CDC-convened, Biosafety Blue Ribbon Panel.

    PubMed

    Miller, J Michael; Astles, Rex; Baszler, Timothy; Chapin, Kimberle; Carey, Roberta; Garcia, Lynne; Gray, Larry; Larone, Davise; Pentella, Michael; Pollock, Anne; Shapiro, Daniel S; Weirich, Elizabeth; Wiedbrauk, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of injuries and occupational infections in U.S. laboratories has been a concern for many years. CDC and the National Institutes of Health addressed the topic in their publication Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, now in its 5th edition (BMBL-5). BMBL-5, however, was not designed to address the day-to-day operations of diagnostic laboratories in human and animal medicine. In 2008, CDC convened a Blue Ribbon Panel of laboratory representatives from a variety of agencies, laboratory organizations, and facilities to review laboratory biosafety in diagnostic laboratories. The members of this panel recommended that biosafety guidelines be developed to address the unique operational needs of the diagnostic laboratory community and that they be science based and made available broadly. These guidelines promote a culture of safety and include recommendations that supplement BMBL-5 by addressing the unique needs of the diagnostic laboratory. They are not requirements but recommendations that represent current science and sound judgment that can foster a safe working environment for all laboratorians. Throughout these guidelines, quality laboratory science is reinforced by a common-sense approach to biosafety in day-to-day activities. Because many of the same diagnostic techniques are used in human and animal diagnostic laboratories, the text is presented with this in mind. All functions of the human and animal diagnostic laboratory--microbiology, chemistry, hematology, and pathology with autopsy and necropsy guidance--are addressed. A specific section for veterinary diagnostic laboratories addresses the veterinary issues not shared by other human laboratory departments. Recommendations for all laboratories include use of Class IIA2 biological safety cabinets that are inspected annually; frequent hand washing; use of appropriate disinfectants, including 1:10 dilutions of household bleach; dependence on risk assessments for many activities

  12. When do procedural fairness and outcome fairness interact to influence employees' work attitudes and behaviors? The moderating effect of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    De Cremer, David; Brockner, Joel; Fishman, Ariel; van Dijke, Marius; van Olffen, Woody; Mayer, David M

    2010-03-01

    Prior research has shown that procedural fairness interacts with outcome fairness to influence employees' work attitudes (e.g., organizational commitment) and behaviors (e.g., job performance, organizational citizenship behavior), such that employees' tendencies to respond more positively to higher procedural fairness are stronger when outcome fairness is relatively low. In the present studies, we posited that people's uncertainty about their standing as organizational members would have a moderating influence on this interactive relationship between procedural fairness and outcome fairness, in that the interactive relationship was expected to be more pronounced when uncertainty was high. Using different operationalizations of uncertainty of standing (i.e., length of tenure as a proxy, along with self-reports and coworkers' reports), we found support for this hypothesis in 4 field studies spanning 3 different countries.

  13. Chromogenic assay of human coagulation factor VIII: statistical comparison of 2 working dilution procedures.

    PubMed

    Alonso, C; Gonzalez, A; Frutos, G

    2005-08-01

    The effect of 2 different practices for preparation of working dilutions in the chromogenic substrate method for potency assay of factor VIII was evaluated. In this study the potency of several concentrate materials was shown to be statistically equivalent, whether performing the assay with independent or serial working dilutions.

  14. Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Methods Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49) for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bullying was established using international criteria (ICD-10 and DSM-IV). Results After interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation (Occupational Medicine Unit, Psychology and Psychiatry Service), the diagnosis of bullying was formulated in 35 subjects, 12 males and 23 females (2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and 33 of Adjustment Disorder). Fifty-four (20 males, 34 females) suffered from work-related anxiety, while work-unrelated Adjustment Disorder and other psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 7 and 112 subjects, respectively. Women between 34 and 45 years showed a high prevalence (65%) of "mobbing syndrome" or other work-related stress disorders. Conclusions At work, women are more subject to harassment (for personal aspects related to emotional and relational factors) than men. The knowledge of the phenomenon is an essential requisite to contrast bullying; prevention can be carried out only through effective information and training of workers and employers, who have the legal obligation to preserve the integrity of the mental and physical status of their employees during work. PMID:22088163

  15. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker... or permit a roadway worker who is a member of a roadway work group to foul a track unless on-track....331 of this part. (b) No roadway worker who is a member of a roadway work group shall foul a...

  16. Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act. Report (To Accompany S. 1697) from the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    This report was written to accompany the Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act (S.1697), a bill that provides for radon testing of schools located in high risk radon areas and provides limited financial assistance to schools for mitigation of high levels of radon. A description of radon, its harmful effects, and the radon levels detected in schools…

  17. Mesothelioma in a wine cellar man: detailed description of working procedures and past asbestos exposure estimation.

    PubMed

    Nemo, Alessandro; Silvestri, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    A pleural mesothelioma arose in an employee of a wine farm whose work history shows an unusual occupational exposure to asbestos. The information, gathered directly from the case and from a work colleague, clarifies some aspects of the use of asbestos in the process of winemaking which has not been previously reported in such details. The man had worked as a winemaker from 1960 to 1988 in a farm, which in those years produced around 2500 hectoliters of wine per year, mostly white. The wine was filtered to remove impurities; the filter was created by dispersing in the wine asbestos fibers followed by diatomite while the wine was circulating several times and clogging a prefilter made of a dense stainless steel net. Chrysotile asbestos was the sole asbestos mineralogical variety used in these filters and exposure could occur during the phase of mixing dry fibers in the wine and during the filter replacement. A daily and annual time weighted average level of exposure and cumulative dose have been estimated in the absence of airborne asbestos fiber monitoring performed in that workplace. Since 1993, the Italian National Mesothelioma Register, an epidemiological surveillance system, has recorded eight cases with at least one work period spent as winemaker. Four of them never used asbestos filters and presented exposures during other work periods, the other four used asbestos filters but had also other exposures in other industrial divisions. For the information hitherto available, this is the first mesothelioma case with exclusive exposure in the job of winemaking.

  18. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations

  19. Method Matters: Systematic Effects of Testing Procedure on Visual Working Memory Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makovski, Tal; Watson, Leah M.; Koutstaal, Wilma; Jiang, Yuhong V.

    2010-01-01

    Visual working memory (WM) is traditionally considered a robust form of visual representation that survives changes in object motion, observer's position, and other visual transients. This article presents data that are inconsistent with the traditional view. We show that memory sensitivity is dramatically influenced by small variations in the…

  20. Dysfunctional Workers, Functional Texts: The Transformation of Work in Institutional Procedure Manuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Francis J.

    1997-01-01

    Examines how conflicts between management and workers over division of labor are enacted in two manuals--the official manual operationalizing Internal Revenue Service (IRS) regulations and a "translation" of the official manual--governing tax examiners' work in an IRS Service Center. Finds that systemic differences between the manuals offer…

  1. Student Admissions Policies and Procedures: Seriously Carry Out the Work of Student Recruitment in the Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Chairman Mao's directive concerning student recruitment is used as the basis for selection of students from among workers and peasants to study at socialist institutes for higher learning. Support is stated for the Party organization's policies for educational reform and for development of a force of intellectuals from the working class. (SM)

  2. Guidelines and Procedures: Directed Work-Experience Programs in Vocational Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Harold R.; And Others

    The growing demand for increased diversification of programs and greater specialization in work experience for students of vocational agriculture has created a need for sound teacher guidelines for initiating, establishing, and administering a vocational education program that combines the benefits of school instruction, on-the-job training, and…

  3. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker... provisions of this part shall require or permit a roadway worker who is a member of a roadway work group to....325, 214.327, 214.329 and 214.331 of this part. (b) No roadway worker who is a member of a...

  4. Procedures and Standards Handbook. Version 2.1. What Works Clearinghouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With its critical assessments of scientific evidence on the effectiveness of education programs, policies, and practices (referred to as "interventions"), and a range of products summarizing this evidence, the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) is an important part of the Institute of Education Sciences' strategy to use rigorous and relevant…

  5. Electric overhead traveling cranes: procedures for certification, inspection, and preventive maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this procedure is to describe the overhead crane maintenance, inspection, and certification procedures in sufficient detail so that an experienced craftsman can perform the required work efficiently and safely. It is expected that job procedures will be standardized, that criteria for satisfactory job performance will be provided, and that responsibilities will be established. Applicable sections of safety standards and codes are given to assist with their compliance and to make possible the use of safe work practices.

  6. Load weight determination during dynamic working procedures using the pedar foot pressure distribution measuring system.

    PubMed

    Ellegast, R; Kupfer, J; Reinert, D

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: In 1994 a new BIA research project was launched, which deals with the development of a portable measuring system for recording of external stress parameters (e.g. body postures and handled load weights) at different places of employment. The investigations are carried out against the background of a newly recognized occupational disease (since 1993), which is that of damage of the spine following long-term repetitive lifting and carrying of heavy loads as well as working in an extreme trunk bending posture. As a part of the study it should be clarified if the worker's handled load weight can be determined by using a foot pressure distribution measuring system. METHODS:: In the case of a static working posture the handled load weight can simply be calculated by taking the difference of the measured weight and the known body rest weight of the worker. In dynamic situations the measured total foot reaction force consists of a static and a dynamic component, which is caused by the body movement and which is normally bigger than the load gravitational force. For load weight determination it is important to separate the dynamic forces from the measured total force to get an idea about its gravitational rest part. Therefore the body dynamics are measured synchronously to the foot pressure by using angle and angular velocity sensors. The herewith received data are used as input values for a developed biomechanical link segment model, with which it is possible to predict the foot reaction force. So even in dynamic situations an estimation of the handled load weight can be made by comparison of the predicted with the measured foot reaction force. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:: In laboratory tests the load weight could be determinated reliably for different working processes over a total measuring time of 40 seconds. During the measurements the Pedar insoles were placed directly under the foot so that the accuracy of the static force measurement was reasonably high

  7. Analogous mechanisms of selection and updating in declarative and procedural working memory: experiments and a computational model.

    PubMed

    Oberauer, Klaus; Souza, Alessandra S; Druey, Michel D; Gade, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    The article investigates the mechanisms of selecting and updating representations in declarative and procedural working memory (WM). Declarative WM holds the objects of thought available, whereas procedural WM holds representations of what to do with these objects. Both systems consist of three embedded components: activated long-term memory, a central capacity-limited component for building structures through temporary bindings, and a single-element focus of attention. Five experiments test the hypothesis of analogous mechanisms in declarative and procedural WM, investigating repetition effects across trials for individual representations (objects and responses) and for sets (memory sets and task sets), as well as set-congruency effects. Evidence for analogous processes was obtained from three phenomena: (1) Costs of task switching and of list switching are reduced with longer preparation interval. (2) The effects of task congruency and of list congruency are undiminished with longer preparation interval. (3) Response repetition interacts with task repetition in procedural WM; here we show an analogous interaction of list repetition with item repetition in declarative WM. All three patterns were reproduced by a connectionist model implementing the assumed selection and updating mechanisms. The model consists of two modules, an item-selection module selecting individual items from a memory set, or responses from a task set, and a set-selection module for selecting memory sets or task sets. The model codes the matrix of binding weights in the item-selection module as a pattern of activation in the set-selection module, thereby providing a mechanism for building chunks in LTM, and for unpacking them as structures into working memory.

  8. Developing a Safe Cycling Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Amy Backus

    1983-01-01

    A cycling course can take advantage of students' interests, teach safe cycling, and give students a fuller appreciation of a lifetime sport. Suggestions for planning and scheduling a cycling course, covering safety procedures, and considering other elements necessary for a successful course are given. (PP)

  9. The Effect of Principle-Procedure and Procedure-Principle Sequencing on Learning Outcomes. IDD&E Working Paper No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim-Quek, Muriel; And Others

    This study tested the effects of two instructional sequences--principle-procedure and procedure-principle--on the application and transfer of learning. It was hypothesized that a principle-procedure sequence would result in better near-transfer and far-transfer and that students would prefer this sequence. The 38 freshmen enrolled in a business…

  10. Implementation of the Safe Drinking Water Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Superfund, Ocean, and Water Protection of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, May 17, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A hearing on the protection of drinking water brought testimony from members of Congress, as well as from environmental and water works groups. The area of most concern was assessing the progress in implementing the Safe Drinking Water Act. Drinking water contamination is one of the most serious environmental health risks in the United States. A key element discussed is controlling the dangerous levels of lead still in drinking water.

  11. Safe handling practices for electrostatic-sensitive devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Review is detailed compilation of safe handling practices for Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) circuit elements and other devices that are susceptible to damage by electrostatic discharge. Article lists safety procedures for all aspects of handling and use of these components. Included are guidelines for setting up static-free work station and list of materials and equipment needed to maintain antistatic protection. Appendix gives vendors of these items.

  12. Anesthesia Safe for Kids, Doctors' Group Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safe for Kids, Doctors' Group Says But concerns, child's health history should be discussed with anesthesiologists before surgery ... surgery is only recommended when necessary for the child's health, so parents should not avoid an important procedure ...

  13. Safe Finger Tourniquet--Ideas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result.

  14. Technologies for safe births.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The basic elements of a safe birth are proper prenatal care, adequate preparation of the mother, health worker, and site, awareness of the progress of labor and safe delivery, recognition of danger signs, and appropriate follow-up care. Technologies are differentiated by determining 1) the needs of rural birth attendants, 2) the nature of delivery kits, 3) proper cleanliness of the hands and equipment, and appropriate use of 5) disinfecting equipment, 6) drugs and medications, 7) the vertical position, 8) specialized instruments, and 9) records and support materials. Alternatives for measuring time are indicated. Customized kits available from UNICEF are described; some of the problems with these kits are reported. The logistics, referral procedures, and training and supervision needed for appropriate program managements are discussed. Adapting technologies to the local environment requires assessing the practices of traditional birth attendants (TBAs), the provision of kits (cost, ease of use and maintenance, replacement, durability, availability), the training required for proper use of equipment, the logistics of kit use, side effects of technologies, community attitudes, and evaluation. The advantages and disadvantages of including or not including particular supplies in the kit are discussed, i.e., the container for boiling water would either be a local pot or the aluminum carrying case. In lieu of a fingernail brush, a twig may be used for nail cleaning. Hand washing where water shortages exist might entail using a tin with a hole plugged with a stick to let water trickle as needed. Antiseptic solutions such a Dettol or Savlon can be used where a severe shortage exists. Basic equipment includes: soap and water, a container for boiling, other sterile containers, a protective cover of delivery area, towels, swabs, an optional apron, cord ties, a cutting instrument, gauze, a receiving blanket, records, and a carrying case.

  15. Procedure-Authoring Tool Improves Safety on Oil Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Dark, cold, and dangerous environments are plentiful in space and on Earth. To ensure safe operations in difficult surroundings, NASA relies heavily on procedures written well ahead of time. Houston-based TRACLabs Inc. worked with Ames Research Center through the SBIR program to create an electronic procedure authoring tool, now used by NASA and companies in the oil and gas industry.

  16. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  17. Safe driving for teens

    MedlinePlus

    Driving and teenagers; Teens and safe driving; Automobile safety - teenage drivers ... Make a Commitment to Safety Teens also need to commit to being safe and responsible drivers in order to improve the odds in their favor. Reckless driving ...

  18. Effect of clozapine on interval timing and working memory for time in the peak-interval procedure with gaps.

    PubMed

    Buhusi, Catalin V; Meck, Warren H

    2007-02-22

    Previous research indicates that dopamine controls both the speed of an internal clock [Maricq, A.V., Church, R.M., 1983. The differential effects of haloperidol and methamphetamine on time estimation in the rat. Psychopharmacology 79, 10-15] and sharing of resources between the timer and other cognitive processes [Buhusi, C.V., 2003. Dopaminergic mechanisms of interval timing and attention. In: Meck, W.H. (Ed.), Functional and Neural Mechanisms of Interval Timing. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 317-338]. For example, dopamine agonist methamphetamine increases the speed of an internal clock and resets timing after a gap, while dopamine antagonist haloperidol decreases the speed of an internal clock and stops timing during a gap [Buhusi, C.V., Meck, W.H., 2002. Differential effects of methamphetamine and haloperidol on the control of an internal clock. Behav. Neurosci. 116, 291-297]. Using a 20-s peak-interval procedure with gaps we examined the acute effects of clozapine (2.0mg/kg i.p.), which exerts differential effects on dopamine and serotonin in the cortex and striatum, two brain areas involved in interval timing and working memory. Relative to saline, clozapine injections shifted the response functions leftward both in trials with and without gaps, suggesting that clozapine increased the speed of an internal clock and facilitated the maintenance of the pre-gap interval in working memory. These results suggest that clozapine exerts effects in different brain areas in a manner that allows for the pharmacological separation of clock speed and working memory as a function of peak trials without and with gaps.

  19. Handbook for Sponsors; Standards and Procedures for Work-Training Experience Programs under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, as Amended.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Bureau of Work-Training Programs.

    The standards and procedures presented establish the basic rules governing the development and operation of various programs administered by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Work Programs under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, as amended. Basic standards relate to qualification of sponsors, eligibility of enrollees, hours of work,…

  20. Safe Disposal of Highly Reactive Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1994-01-01

    Provides specific procedures for the disposal of a variety of highly reactive chemicals and reports the results of a study of their safe disposal. Disposal of some problematic sulfur-containing compounds are included. Procedures are based on a combination of literature review and author development. (LZ)

  1. Development of a systems theoretical procedure for evaluation of the work organization of the cockpit crew of a civil transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, M.; Vees, C.

    1983-01-01

    To achieve optimum design for the man machine interface with aircraft, a description of the interaction and work organization of the cockpit crew is needed. The development of system procedure to evaluate the work organization of pilots while structuring the work process is examined. Statistical data are needed to simulate sequences of pilot actions on the computer. Investigations of computer simulation and applicability for evaluation of crew concepts are discussed.

  2. Creating Food-Safe Schools: A How-to Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006

    2006-01-01

    A food-safe school takes the steps to minimize the risk of foodborne illness throughout the school's environment and has procedures in place to identify and manage outbreaks if they occur. This booklet introduces the Food-Safe Schools Action Guide, which helps schools identify gaps in food safety and develop an action plan for becoming food-safe.…

  3. Staying Healthy and Safe at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... rest often throughout the day. Wear comfortable shoes. Computers and desks Many of today's jobs involve computer ... rest often throughout the day. Wear comfortable shoes. Computers and desks Many of today's jobs involve computer ...

  4. Safe Kids Worldwide

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your inbox Sign up today Text Help Us Protect Kids on the Move Let's make every kid a safe kid Donate today BAFFLED ABOUT CAR SEATS? The Ultimate Car Seat Guide can help. Check it out Safe Sleep 5 tips to create safer sleeping environment Learn ...

  5. Safe Space: Student Perspectives on Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Lynn C.; Steiner, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Based on data from a survey of 121 baccalaureate and master of social work students at a western university, this study explores students' perspectives of "safe" and "unsafe" classroom environments. The majority reported that being in a safe classroom changed both what and how much they learned. Students offered a wide range of instructor, fellow…

  6. Aflatoxins and safe storage

    PubMed Central

    Villers, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post-harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb) before vs. after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice, and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field vs. after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post-harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide, or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described. PMID:24782846

  7. Safe handling and disposal of laboratory animal waste.

    PubMed

    Hill, D

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory animal handlers have a strict obligation to consider the safe handling and disposal of their animal waste streams. It is their responsibility to evaluate the hazards, assess the risks, and choose an appropriate strategy. Potential hazards include chemicals, such as commonly used sterilants and disinfectants; physical risks, such as heavy or repetitive lifting activities; hazardous micro-organisms or allergens; and radiologic agents. Furthermore, many animal studies involve compounds with unknown toxicity, which may require special precautions. Animal handlers must protect themselves by using appropriate engineering controls of work practice to minimize their exposure, adding the use of personal protective equipment when necessary. In addition, compliance with institutional waste handling procedures that meet federal, state, and local environmental requirements is essential to ensure the safe transport and disposal of animal waste streams.

  8. Creating a Safe Haven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    Examines security issues that planners must address at the programming and schematic design phase in key areas of the school building. They include the front door, safe halls and stairs, positive classrooms, and secure assembly. (EV)

  9. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  10. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  11. Using Medications Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... health systems play an important role in preventing medication errors. To make sure you use medicines safely and effectively, ASHP recommends that you: Keep a list of all medications that you take (prescribed drugs, nonprescription medicines, herbal ...

  12. Asymptotically safe inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Inflation is studied in the context of asymptotically safe theories of gravitation. Conditions are explored under which it is possible to have a long period of nearly exponential expansion that eventually comes to an end.

  13. Karate: Keep It Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, David

    1981-01-01

    Safety guidelines for each phase of a karate practice session are presented to provide an accident-free and safe environment for teaching karate in a physical education or traditional karate training program. (JMF)

  14. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  15. Strategies for selecting optimal sampling and work-up procedures for analysing alkylphenol polyethoxylates in effluents from non-activated sludge biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Stenholm, Ake; Holmström, Sara; Hjärthag, Sandra; Lind, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Trace-level analysis of alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) in wastewater containing sludge requires the prior removal of contaminants and preconcentration. In this study, the effects on optimal work-up procedures of the types of alkylphenols present, their degree of ethoxylation, the biofilm wastewater treatment and the sample matrix were investigated for these purposes. The sampling spot for APEO-containing specimens from an industrial wastewater treatment plant was optimized, including a box that surrounded the tubing outlet carrying the wastewater, to prevent sedimented sludge contaminating the collected samples. Following these changes, the sampling precision (in terms of dry matter content) at a point just under the tubing leading from the biofilm reactors was 0.7% RSD. The findings were applied to develop a work-up procedure for use prior to a high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection analysis method capable of quantifying nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs) and poorly investigated dinonylphenol polyethoxylates (DNPEOs) at low microg L(-1) concentrations in effluents from non-activated sludge biofilm reactors. The selected multi-step work-up procedure includes lyophilization and pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) followed by strong ion exchange solid phase extraction (SPE). The yields of the combined procedure, according to tests with NP10EO-spiked effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, were in the 62-78% range. PMID:22519096

  16. Improved water does not mean safe water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, L. H.; Guo, Y.; Schwab, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    This work presents a model for estimating global access to drinking water that meets World Health Organization (WHO) water quality guidelines. The currently accepted international estimate of global access to safe water, the WHO and United Nations Children's Fund's (UNICEF) Joint Monitoring Program (JMP) report, estimates the population with access to water service infrastructure that is classified as improved and unimproved. The JMP report uses access to improved water sources as a proxy for access to safe water, but improved water sources do not always meet drinking water quality guidelines. Therefore, this report likely overestimates the number of people with access to safe water. Based on the JMP estimate, the United Nations has recently announced that the world has reached the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target for access to safe water. Our new framework employs a statistical model that incorporates source water quality, water supply interruptions, water storage practices, and point of use water treatment to estimate access to safe water, resulting in a figure that is lower than the JMP estimate of global access to safe water. We estimate that at least 28% of the world does not have access to safe water today, as compared to the JMP estimate of 12%. These findings indicate that much more work is needed on the international scale to meet the MDG target for access to safe water.

  17. The Food-Safe Schools Action Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "The Food-Safe School Needs Assessment and Planning Guide" is a tool that can help schools assess their food safety policies, procedures, and programs and develop plans for improvement. This tool includes a simple, straightforward questionnaire, score card, and planning guide that give administrators, school staff, families, and students a chance…

  18. Strategies for safe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Stoeckel, P.; Da Silva, A.; Nelson, C.; Bass, A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, faced with growing international concern, WHO set out an approach for achieving injection safety that encompassed all elements from patients' expectations and doctors' prescribing habits to waste disposal. This article follows that lead and describes the implications of the approach for two injection technologies: sterilizable and disposable. It argues that focusing on any single technology diverts attention from the more fundamental need for health services to develop their own comprehensive strategies for safe injections. National health authorities will only be able to ensure that injections are administered safely if they take an approach that encompasses the whole system, and choose injection technologies that fit their circumstances. PMID:10680247

  19. Safe drinking water: the toxicologist's approach.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, F X

    2000-01-01

    The production of adequate and safe drinking water is a high priority issue for safeguarding the health and well-being of humans all over the world. Traditionally, microbiological quality of drinking water has been the main concern, but over the last decades the attention of the general public and health officials on the importance of chemical quality and the threat of chemical pollutants have increased with the increase of our knowledge on the hazards of chemical substances. There are many sources of contamination of drinking water. Broadly they can be divided into two categories: contaminants originating from surface and groundwater, and contaminants used or formed during the treatment and distribution of drinking water. Contaminants in surface and groundwater can range from natural substances such as arsenic and manganese leaching from soil, to contaminants introduced by human activities, such as run-off from agricultural activities, controlled discharge from sewage treatment works and industrial plants, and uncontrolled discharges or leakage from landfill sites and from chemical accidents. Disinfectants and disinfectant by-products are well known contaminants resulting from the processes used by the drinking water industry for the treatment and distribution of water. The basic question in the production of drinking water is how to rid drinking water of potentially dangerous microorganisms and chemicals without introducing new hazards that might pose new and different threats to human health. It is the responsibility of toxicologists to provide risk assessments for chemical pollutants and to derive guidelines or standards for drinking water quality below which no significant health risk is encountered, to assure consumers that drinking water is safe and can be consumed without any risk. This paper will focus on the toxicological procedures used by the World Health Organization to derive guideline values for chemical compounds in drinking water, and will touch

  20. Safe Entry, Easy Exit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2008-01-01

    After violent episodes too numerous to list and too terrible to forget, schools and universities have been focused for several years on enhancing security in their facilities. Doors are among the most critical points of concern for school personnel responsible for keeping buildings safe. Education institutions want doors that let the right people…

  1. Safe and Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder, Lanny I.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a comprehensive security program that includes access control, surveillance methods, and personnel awareness, designed to keep public schools safe for students and faculty. Alternatives to traditional lock and key systems are discussed, as are patrolling tips for high crime sites and the need to educate staff and students. (GR)

  2. Keeping Campuses Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Describes how colleges and universities are using technology, as well as traditional methods, to keep campuses safe and reduce crime. Topics include using free pizza in a successful contest to teach students about campus safety, installing security cameras, using access-control cards, providing adequate lighting, and creating a bicycle patrol…

  3. Safe Halloween Thrills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuersten, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Two PTAs sponsored events that capitalized on Halloween themes, engaged their communities in fall celebrations, and were safe, wholesome, and fun. With help from local volunteers, one school turned its gymnasium into a 19th-century British town with a fall/Halloween theme. Another PTA hosted a carnival, Spooktacular, that involved community…

  4. Analysis of organo-chlorine pesticides residue in raw coffee with a modified "quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe" extraction/clean up procedure for reducing the impact of caffeine on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurement.

    PubMed

    Bresin, Bruno; Piol, Maria; Fabbro, Denis; Mancini, Maria Antonietta; Casetta, Bruno; Del Bianco, Clorinda

    2015-01-01

    The control of pesticide residues on raw coffee is a task of great importance due to high consumption of this beverage in Italy and in many other countries. High caffeine content can hamper extraction and measurement of any pesticide residue. A tandem extraction protocol has been devised by exploiting the quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe (QuEChERS) scheme for extraction, coupled to a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) in order to drastically reduce caffeine content in the final extract. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been used for quantification of organo-chlorine pesticides in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method has been validated and performances meet the criteria prescribed by European Union regulations. PMID:25537171

  5. Effects of environmental and pharmacological manipulations on a novel delayed nonmatching-to-sample ‘working memory’ procedure in unrestrained rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hutsell Blake, A; Banks Matthew, L

    2015-01-01

    Background Working memory is a domain of ‘executive function.’ Delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMTS) procedures are commonly used to examine working memory in both human laboratory and preclinical studies. New Method The aim was to develop an automated DNMTS procedure maintained by food pellets in rhesus monkeys using a touch-sensitive screen attached to the housing chamber. Specifically, the DNMTS procedure was a 2-stimulus, 2-choice recognition memory task employing unidimensional discriminative stimuli and randomized delay interval presentations. Results DNMTS maintained a delay-dependent decrease in discriminability that was independent of the retention interval distribution. Eliminating reinforcer availability during a single delay session or providing food pellets before the session did not systematically alter accuracy, but did reduce total choices. Increasing the intertrial interval enhanced accuracy at short delays. Acute Δ9-THC pretreatment produced delay interval-dependent changes in the forgetting function at doses that did not alter total choices. Acute methylphenidate pretreatment only decreased total choices. Comparison with existing methods All monkeys were trained to perform NMTS at the 1 s training delay within 60 days of initiating operant touch training. Furthermore, forgetting functions were reliably delay interval-dependent and stable over the experimental period (~6 months). Conclusions Consistent with previous studies, increasing the intertrial interval improved DNMTS performance, whereas Δ9-THC disrupted DNMTS performance independent of changes in total choices. Overall, the touchscreen-based DNMTS procedure described provides an efficient method for training and testing experimental manipulations on working memory in unrestrained rhesus monkeys. PMID:26003863

  6. Is herniography useful and safe?

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, Gregor R; Kidambi, Ananta V

    2011-11-01

    117 consecutive herniograms were reviewed for patients who had symptoms suggestive of hernia but with no evidence or inconclusive findings on physical examination. The traditional approach has been to explore patients with suspected occult hernias. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of herniography in minimizing needless groin exploration and to evaluate its safety. Thirty-three herniograms were positive and showed unilateral and bilateral inguinal hernias. There were no false positive examinations and two false negative examinations. No complications were present. Patients with positive herniograms were explored, and operative findings correlated well with herniographic findings. Twenty-four patients were referred to other specialities. Follow-up in clinic and telephone interviews showed symptomatic improvement in the majority of patients. Herniography is useful in evaluating obscure groin pain and occult hernias. It is a safe procedure and more cost effective than a negative exploration or diagnostic laparoscopy. PMID:20833494

  7. Experience with fluorine and its safe use as a propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, D. L.; Guenther, M. E.; Stimpson, L. D.; Toth, L. R.; Young, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The industrial and the propulsion experience with fluorine and its derivatives is surveyed. The hazardous qualities of fluorine and safe handling procedures for the substance are emphasized. Procedures which fulfill the safety requirements during ground operations for handling fluorinated propulsion systems are discussed. Procedures to be implemented for use onboard the Space Transportation System are included.

  8. Safe Passage: Making It through Adolescence in a Risky Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryfoos, Joy G.

    The primary job of parents is to ensure safe passage for their children from infancy through adolescence to adulthood. Research has indicated many things schools can do to turn the privilege of safe passage into a right. Three research-based programs that work to achieve safe passage are described. The first is Caring Connection, a "one-stop-shop"…

  9. Health and Safety Procedures Manual for hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Thate, J.E.

    1992-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chemical Assessments Team (ORNL/CAT) has developed this Health and Safety Procedures Manual for the guidance, instruction, and protection of ORNL/CAT personnel expected to be involved in hazardous waste site assessments and remedial actions. This manual addresses general and site-specific concerns for protecting personnel, the general public, and the environment from any possible hazardous exposures. The components of this manual include: medical surveillance, guidance for determination and monitoring of hazards, personnel and training requirements, protective clothing and equipment requirements, procedures for controlling work functions, procedures for handling emergency response situations, decontamination procedures for personnel and equipment, associated legal requirements, and safe drilling practices.

  10. Approaching Suspicious Substances Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A mineral identification tool that was developed for NASA's Mars Rover Technology Development program is now serving as a powerful tool for U.S. law enforcement agencies and military personnel to identify suspicious liquid and solid substances. The tool can measure unknown substances through glass and plastic packaging materials with the RamanProbe(TradeMark) focused fiber-optic probe. The probe length can be extended up to 200 meters to enable users to analyze potentially dangerous substances at a safe distance. In many cases, the spectrometer and personnel are kept in a safe zone while the probe is positioned next to the sample being analyzed. Being able to identify chemicals in remote locations also saves users time and labor, since otherwise the samples would need to be collected, transported, and prepared prior to measurement in the laboratory.

  11. Microelectromechanical safe arm device

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.

    2012-06-05

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

  12. Decommissioning procedures for an 11 MeV self-shielded medical cyclotron after 16 years of working time.

    PubMed

    Calandrino, R; del Vecchio, A; Savi, A; Todde, S; Griffoni, V; Brambilla, S; Parisi, R; Simone, G; Fazio, F

    2006-06-01

    The present article describes the decommissioning of a compact, self-shielded, 11 MeV medical cyclotron. A Monte Carlo simulation of the possible nuclear reactions was performed in order to plan the decommissioning activities. In the course of the cyclotron dismantling, cyclotron components, shields, and floor concrete samples were measured. Residual activities were analyzed with a Ge(Li) detector and compared with simulation data. Doses to staff involved in the decommissioning procedure were monitored by individual TL dosimeters. The simulations identified five radioactive nuclides in shields and floor concrete: 55Fe and 45Ca (beta emitters, total specific activity: 2.29 x 10(4) Bq kg) and 152Eu, 154Eu, 60Co (gamma emitters, total specific activity: 1.62 x 10(3) Bq kg-1). Gamma-ray spectrometry confirmed the presence of gamma emitters, corresponding to a total specific activity of 3.40 x 10(2) Bq kg-1. The presence of the radioisotope 124Sb in the lead contained in the shield structure, corresponding to a simulated specific activity of 9.38 x 10(3) Bq kg-1, was experimentally confirmed. The measured dose from external exposure of the involved staff was <20 muSv, in accordance with the expected range of values between 10 and 20 muSv. The measured dose from intake was negligible. Finally, the decommissioning of the 11 MeV cyclotron does not represent a risk for the involved staff, but due to the presence of long-lived radioisotopes, the cyclotron components are to be treated as low level radioactive waste and stored in an authorized storage area. PMID:16691108

  13. Preparing injectable medicines safely.

    PubMed

    Beaney, Alison M; Black, Anne

    Risks to patients are greater when injectable medicines are prepared in clinical areas (wards, theatres, clinics or even patients' homes), rather than provided in ready-to-use form. This article describes the risks involved in preparing injectable medicines in such areas and outlines key principles to ensure they are prepared safely. It also suggests that high-risk injectable medicines be provided in ready-to-use form, either in house, by pharmacy or by pharmaceutical companies. PMID:22359855

  14. Iodised salt is safe.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, S

    1995-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders are prevalent in all the States and Union Territories in India. Under the National Iodine Deficiency Disorders control programme, the Government of India has adopted a strategy to iodisation of all edible salt in the country which is a long term and sustainable preventive solution to eliminate iodine deficiency disorders. The benefits to be derived from universal salt iodisation are more to the population. Iodised salt is safe and does not cause any side effect. PMID:8690505

  15. Safe handling of cytotoxic compounds in a biopharmaceutical environment.

    PubMed

    Hensgen, Miriam I; Stump, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Handling cytotoxic drugs such as antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) in a biopharmaceutical environment represents a challenge based on the potency of the compounds. These derivatives are dangerous to humans if they accidentally get in contact with the skin, are inhaled, or are ingested, either as pure compounds in their solid state or as a solution dissolved in a co-solvent. Any contamination of people involved in the manufacturing process has to be avoided. On the other hand, biopharmaceuticals need to be protected simultaneously against any contamination from the manufacturing personnel. Therefore, a tailor-made work environment is mandatory in order to manufacture ADCs. This asks for appropriate technical equipment to keep potential hazardous substances contained. In addition, clearly defined working procedures based on risk assessments as well as proper training for all personnel involved in the manufacturing process are needed to safely handle these highly potent pharmaceuticals. PMID:23913145

  16. A novel convenient procedure for extractive work-up of whole-cell biotransformations using de-emulsifying hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Jörg, Gerhard; Leppchen, Kathrin; Daussmann, Thomas; Bertau, Martin

    2004-08-20

    Extractive work-up of whole-cell biotransformations generally suffers from the formation of stable gels and slimes upon addition of the organic solvent to the cell suspension and the cell-free solution, respectively. This problem has been overcome by enzymatic lysis of emulsifying agents present in the medium through addition of hydrolases. Of these agents, proteases have exhibited the most powerful de-emulsifying activity. Enzyme treatment of cell-free culture media of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with pronase E drastically reduced phase separation time (t(p)) from 1 week to 30 min without significantly affecting product integrity. Yeast cell suspensions were de-emulsified best with protease N-01, where phase separation was complete after 1 h. As was exemplified with cell-free culture media of Lactobacillus kefir, wherein addition of pronase E or protease N-01 reduced t(p) from 1 week to 2 h each, this practical, ready-to-use method is appropriate for both fungal and bacterial biocatalysts.

  17. Transcoding abilities in typical and atypical mathematics achievers: the role of working memory and procedural and lexical competencies.

    PubMed

    Moura, Ricardo; Wood, Guilherme; Pinheiro-Chagas, Pedro; Lonnemann, Jan; Krinzinger, Helga; Willmes, Klaus; Haase, Vitor Geraldi

    2013-11-01

    Transcoding between numerical systems is one of the most basic abilities acquired by children during their early school years. One important topic that requires further exploration is how mathematics proficiency can affect number transcoding. The aim of the current study was to investigate transcoding abilities (i.e., reading Arabic numerals and writing dictation) in Brazilian children with and without mathematics difficulties, focusing on different school grades. We observed that children with learning difficulties in mathematics demonstrated lower achievement in number transcoding in both early and middle elementary school. In early elementary school, difficulties were observed in both the basic numerical lexicon and the management of numerical syntax. In middle elementary school, difficulties appeared mainly in the transcoding of more complex numbers. An error analysis revealed that the children with mathematics difficulties struggled mainly with the acquisition of transcoding rules. Although we confirmed the previous evidence on the impact of working memory capacity on number transcoding, we found that it did not fully account for the observed group differences. The results are discussed in the context of a maturational lag in number transcoding ability in children with mathematics difficulties.

  18. Addressing Lead-Based Paint Hazards During Renovation, Remodeling, and Rehabilitation in Federally Owned and Assisted Housing. Instructor Manual for Use in HUD-Sponsored Lead-Safe Work Practices Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    This document is the instructor's manual for a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) training course that reflects the requirements of HUD's Lead Safe Housing Rule and is designed to provide training contractors with information regarding containment, minimization, and cleanup of lead hazards during activities that disturb…

  19. Safe venting of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Asymptotically safe Higgs inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; He, Hong-Jian E-mail: hjhe@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    We construct a new inflation model in which the standard model Higgs boson couples minimally to gravity and acts as the inflaton. Our construction of Higgs inflation incorporates the standard model with Einstein gravity which exhibits asymptotic safety in the ultraviolet region. The slow roll condition is satisfied at large field value due to the asymptotically safe behavior of Higgs self-coupling at high energies. We find that this minimal construction is highly predictive, and is consistent with both cosmological observations and collider experiments.

  1. Safe N’ Sound

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Janice; Nansel, Tonja R.; Weaver, Nancy L.; Tse, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Safe N’ Sound is a computer-based tool that prioritizes key injury risks for toddlers and infants and provides tailored feedback. The program was implemented in 5 pediatric sites. Caregiver risk behaviors were analyzed and compared with corresponding national and state morbidity and mortality data. The priority risks identified were generally consistent with the incidence of injury. Frequencies of several risk behaviors varied across sites and differences were observed across ages. Use of a prioritization scheme may facilitate risk behavior counseling and reasonably result in a decrease in injury mortality or morbidity. PMID:22617412

  2. Cool and Safe: Multiplicity in Safe Innovation at Unilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the making of a safe innovation: the application of ice structuring protein (ISP) in edible ices. It argues that safety is not the absence of risk but is an active accomplishment; innovations are not "made safe afterward" but "safe innovations are made". Furthermore, there are multiple safeties to be accomplished in the…

  3. Type Safe Extensible Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Wonseok

    2009-10-01

    Software products evolve over time. Sometimes they evolve by adding new features, and sometimes by either fixing bugs or replacing outdated implementations with new ones. When software engineers fail to anticipate such evolution during development, they will eventually be forced to re-architect or re-build from scratch. Therefore, it has been common practice to prepare for changes so that software products are extensible over their lifetimes. However, making software extensible is challenging because it is difficult to anticipate successive changes and to provide adequate abstraction mechanisms over potential changes. Such extensibility mechanisms, furthermore, should not compromise any existing functionality during extension. Software engineers would benefit from a tool that provides a way to add extensions in a reliable way. It is natural to expect programming languages to serve this role. Extensible programming is one effort to address these issues. In this thesis, we present type safe extensible programming using the MLPolyR language. MLPolyR is an ML-like functional language whose type system provides type-safe extensibility mechanisms at several levels. After presenting the language, we will show how these extensibility mechanisms can be put to good use in the context of product line engineering. Product line engineering is an emerging software engineering paradigm that aims to manage variations, which originate from successive changes in software.

  4. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and ... from other foods. Cook —Cook to the right temperature. Chill —Refrigerate food promptly. Cook all food to ...

  5. SUPRAPUR®: Safe and convenient percutaneous suprapubic catheterisation in high-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Philipp; Ritter, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound-guided percutaneous placement of a suprapubic cystostomy is a common and generally safe procedure in everyday surgery. In case of adverse patient characteristics such as small bladder capacity or high body mass index, however, the procedure carries an increased risk of severe complications, including bowel perforation. The Suprapur® cystostomy set is supposed to enable a safer procedure. The aim of our work was to evaluate the safety and ease of use of the Suprapur® cystostomy set. Material and methods We prospectively evaluated the Suprapur® set in high-risk patients, having either a small bladder capacity below 250 ml or a BMI above 30 kg/m2. Complications and surgical outcome were monitored. In addition, patients’ contentment and pain during the procedure was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS). Possible drawbacks and ease of use were evaluated by customized questionnaires for the operating physician. Results In total, 26 cystostomies were performed by 15 different physicians, 40% (n = 6) of whom were inexperienced first or second year residents. No complications occurred. Mild gross haematuria occurred in 11.5% (n = 4) of cases. Average VAS for pain during and two hours after the procedure was 2.1 (±1.2) and 0.3 (±0.5) respectively. In 91%, (n = 20) of the procedures, the physicians claimed to have felt safe using SUPRAPUR® and more comfortable (82%, n = 18) than with a conventional cystostomy set. Conclusions SUPRAPUR® allows a safe and simple placement of a suprapubic cystostomy even in high-risk patients or in inexperienced hands. It might help to reduce the complications of a common and frequent surgical procedure. PMID:26855806

  6. Asymptotically safe cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Litim, Daniel; Rahmede, Christoph E-mail: d.litim@sussex.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    We study quantum modifications to cosmology in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe with and without scalar fields by taking the renormalisation group running of gravitational and matter couplings into account. We exploit the Bianchi identity to relate the renormalisation group scale with scale factor and derive the improved cosmological evolution equations. We find two types of cosmological fixed points where the renormalisation group scale either freezes in, or continues to evolve with scale factor. We discuss the implications of each of these, and classify the different cosmological fixed points with and without gravity displaying an asymptotically safe renormalisation group fixed point. We state conditions of existence for an inflating ultraviolet cosmological fixed point for Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field. We also discuss other fixed point solutions such as 'scaling' solutions, or fixed points with equipartition between kinetic and potential energies.

  7. Safe pill-dispensing.

    PubMed

    Testa, Massimiliano; Pollard, John

    2007-01-01

    Each patient is supplied with a smart-card containing a Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) chip storing a unique identification code. The patient places the Smart-card on a pill-dispenser unit containing an RFID reader. The RFID chip is read and the code sent to a Base-station via a wireless Bluetooth link. A database containing both patient details and treatment information is queried at the Base-station using the RFID as the search key. The patient's treatment data (i.e., drug names, quantities, time, etc.) are retrieved and sent back to the pill-dispenser unit via Bluetooth. Appropriate quantities of the required medications are automatically dispensed, unless the patient has already taken his/her daily dose. Safe, confidential communication and operation is ensured.

  8. Refinements in husbandry, care and common procedures for non-human primates: Ninth report of the BVAAWF/FRAME/RSPCA/UFAW Joint Working Group on Refinement.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M; Prescott, M J; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M; Gamble, Malcolm R; Gore, Mauvis; Hawkins, Penny; Hubrecht, Robert; Hudson, Shirley; Jennings, Maggy; Keeley, Joanne R; Morris, Keith; Morton, David B; Owen, Steve; Pearce, Peter C; Prescott, Mark J; Robb, David; Rumble, Rob J; Wolfensohn, Sarah; Buist, David

    2009-04-01

    Preface Whenever animals are used in research, minimizing pain and distress and promoting good welfare should be as important an objective as achieving the experimental results. This is important for humanitarian reasons, for good science, for economic reasons and in order to satisfy the broad legal principles in international legislation. It is possible to refine both husbandry and procedures to minimize suffering and improve welfare in a number of ways, and this can be greatly facilitated by ensuring that up-to-date information is readily available. The need to provide such information led the British Veterinary Association Animal Welfare Foundation (BVAAWF), the Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments (FRAME), the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) and the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) to establish a Joint Working Group on Refinement (JWGR) in the UK. The chair is Professor David Morton and the secretariat is provided by the RSPCA. This report is the ninth in the JWGR series. The RSPCA is opposed to the use of animals in experiments that cause pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm and together with FRAME has particular concerns about the continued use of non-human primates. The replacement of primate experiments is a primary goal for the RSPCA and FRAME. However, both organizations share with others in the Working Group, the common aim of replacing primate experiments wherever possible, reducing suffering and improving welfare while primate use continues. The reports of the refinement workshops are intended to help achieve these aims. This report produced by the British Veterinary Association Animal Welfare Foundation (BVAAWF)/Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments (FRAME)/Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA)/Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) Joint Working Group on Refinement (JWGR) sets out practical guidance on refining the

  9. Safe Space Oddity: Revisiting Critical Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by an incident in a social work graduate classroom in which she was a teaching assistant, the author reflects on her commitment to constructivist teaching methods, critical theory, and critical pedagogy. Exploring the educational utility of notions such as public space and safe space, the author employs this personal experience to examine…

  10. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm.

  11. Safe Spaces, Nurturing Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrell, Linda; Littlefield, Melissa; Washington, Earlie M.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the limited yet important literature on the contributions of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) to students and the profession of social work. The vital role of HBCUs in social work education and their mission to advocate for social and economic justice for disenfranchised populations is also discussed. A…

  12. On safe motherhood.

    PubMed

    Mahler, H

    1988-05-01

    After a general discussion of the factors contributing to maternal mortality and morbidity, a solution to both of these problems is suggested for India: an initiative at the district level to improve support, supervision, training, essential midwifery and obstetric care. The general causes of the 200 or more times higher maternal morality risks in developing countries act throughout the woman's lifetime: powerlessness, illiteracy, malnutrition, deficiency of calcium, vitamin D and iron, heavy physical labor, unchecked fertility, lack of prenatal and obstetric care and illegal abortion. The most common causes of maternal morality and morbidity, eclampsia, obstructed labor, hemorrhage and sepsis, have been prevented in developed countries and in China. We know how to prevent them, by technical support and management at the district level. 4 elements are required: 1) adequate primary health care, food and universal family planning; 2) prenatal care and nutrition with referral if needed; 3) assistance of a trained person at every childbirth; 4) access to obstetric care for those at high risk. Rather than spend money or urban specialized hospital centers, half to 2/3 of all fatal complications of childbirth can be eliminated by local hospitals with the ability to do basic obstetrics such as caesareans and blood transfusions. There is a need for further health systems research in the given locale, but what we need now is an initiative on making pregnancy and childbirth safe for all women. PMID:3420000

  13. Injections--how safe.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saurabh

    2005-04-01

    Injection, is a skin-piercing event performed by a syringe and needle with the purpose of introducing a curative substance or vaccine in a patient. According to WHO, safe injection is one which does not harm to the recepient, does not expose the health worker to any risk and does not result in waste that is dangerous for the community. To achieve this injection should be prepared on a clean workspace, provider should clean his hands appropriately, sterility of the syringe and needle to be maintained, skin of the recipient should be cleaned and above all sharps waste should be managed appropriately. Common danger of unsafe injection is infection. Most medication used in primary care can be administered orally. So firstly the behaviour of healthcare providers and patients must be changed so as to decrease overuse of injections, secondly provision of sufficient quantities of appropriate injection equipment and infection control supplies should be made available and thirdly a sharp waste management system should be set up. PMID:16173426

  14. Take Your Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... better, the antibiotic is working in killing the bacteria, but it might not completely give what they call a "bactericidal effect." That means taking the bacteria completely out of the system. It might be ...

  15. Safe Child Penarth: experience with a Safe Community strategy for preventing injuries to children

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, A.; Gibbs, N.; Vafidis, G.; Sibert, J.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives—To evaluate the process of establishing a Safe Community project for children. Design—A descriptive study. Setting—Penarth, a town (population 20 430) Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales. Subjects—3943 children and their families in Penarth. Main outcome measures—Whether the 12 criteria for a Safe Community project (World Health Organisation) were met. Implementation of the safety agenda set by the community. Results—Safe Child Penarth met 10 of the 12 criteria for the Safe Community network. All the items on the agenda were introduced in the initial two years of the project. There were difficulties, however, achieving sustained community ownership of the project. Conclusions—The Safe Community concept stimulated work to improve child safety in Penarth. Community safety initiatives should involve all local agencies to identify the problems and work with the community to set and meet the safety agenda. Partnership with the local authority is valuable to improve the safety of the environment. The experience generated from Safe Child Penarth has been used to develop a county wide, all age community safety project. PMID:9595337

  16. Protection from Potential Exposure for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, Dillard B.; Rudko, Vladimir; Batiy, Valeriy; Timmins, Douglas C.; Brothers, Alan J.; Schmidt, John P.; Swearingen, Gary L.; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2004-03-24

    The Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium has recently completed developing the conceptual design for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (NSC). Battelle has the scope of work related to environment and safety of the design. As part of the safety analysis, an analysis was performed to determine the degree of protection to be provided during the construction and 100-year operation period for expected upsets and lower-probability events that would occur from errors, procedures, other human factors, and equipment failures, i.e., ''potential exposures'' other than normal operations. The analysis was based on results of the Preliminary Hazards Analysis. The potential exposure analysis was performed in accordance with existing Ukranian regulations and working processes and procedures in place at the Shelter Object. KSK (a Ukranian Consortium), a subcontractor to the Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium, performed much of the dose analysis. The analysis concluded that potential exposures, outside of those expected during normal operations, would be acceptable and that design criteria and features, and preventative and mitigative measures currently in place at the Shelter would be sufficient to meet operating exposure limits.

  17. Safe Zones: Creating LGBT Safe Space Ally Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poynter, Kerry John; Tubbs, Nancy Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses model LGBT Safe Space Ally programs. These programs, often called "Safe Zones," include self selected students, faculty, and employees who publicly show support by displaying stickers, signs, and other identifiable items. Issues covered in the article include history, development, training, membership, assessment, and…

  18. Medications: Using Them Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine may upset an empty stomach or that food may improve its absorption. In this case, your child should eat a snack or meal right before or after taking the ... after a meal because food may prevent the medicine from working properly or ...

  19. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective ‘titanic’. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the ‘Seven C's’. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  20. Thoracoscopic Lobectomy Is a Safe and Versatile Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Onaitis, Mark W.; Petersen, Rebecca P.; Balderson, Stafford S.; Toloza, Eric; Burfeind, William R.; Harpole, David H.; D'Amico, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Advantages of thoracoscopic lobectomy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as compared with lobectomy by conventional thoracotomy, include less postoperative pain and shorter length of hospitalization. The outcomes after thoracoscopic lobectomy in patients with more complex pulmonary conditions are analyzed to determine safety, efficacy, and versatility. Methods: A prospective database of 500 consecutive patients who underwent thoracoscopic lobectomy between June 1999 and January 2006 was queried. Demographic, histopathologic, perioperative, and outcome variables were assessed using standard descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Results: Thoracoscopic lobectomy was successfully performed in 492 patients (conversion rate, 1.6%). Pathologic analysis included primary NSCLC in 416 patients (83.2%), centrally located secondary pulmonary malignancy in 37 patients (7.4%), and a variety of benign conditions in 45 patients (9%). Among the 416 patients with NSCLC, pathologic analysis demonstrated stage I in 330 patients (55.3%), stage II in 40 patients (9.6%), and stage III or greater NSCLC in 44 patients (10.6%). The operative and perioperative (30-day) mortality was 0% and 1%, respectively. The overall 2-year survival rate for the entire cohort was 80%, and the 2-year overall survival rates for stage I NSCLC, stage II or greater NSCLC, secondary pulmonary malignancy, and granulomatous disease patients were 85%, 77%, 73%, and 89%, respectively. Conclusions: Thoracoscopic lobectomy is applicable to a spectrum of malignant and benign pulmonary disease and is associated with a low perioperative morbidity and mortality rate. Survival rates are comparable to those for lobectomy with thoracotomy. PMID:16926568

  1. Bold Steps Build Safe Havens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiner, Michael E.

    1996-01-01

    Following the National Alliance of Safe Schools' recommendations, a suburban New Jersey school district developed a successful school/police liaison program, issued photo ID cards, and initiated a "safe haven," zero-tolerance substance abuse policy. The district metes out immediate, serious penalties for violations, but also teaches students…

  2. Young Children Can Be Key to Fire-Safe Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kourofsky, Carolyn E.; Cole, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    For more than 15 years, preschool programs nationwide have worked with Fireproof Children/Prevention First, an international center for injury prevention research and education, to bring fire safety education to young children and their families. The "play safe! be safe!"[R] curriculum includes lessons that young children can learn and understand,…

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1080 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1926.1080 Section 1926.1080 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Safe practices manual. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1080 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1926.1080 Section 1926.1080 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Safe practices manual. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section...

  5. Creating Safe and Drug-Free Schools: An Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    It is essential that communities, businesses, parents, and students work together to develop a disciplined environment for children which includes safe and drug-free schools. Emphasizing the need for commitment and community will, this guide outlines steps each of these groups can take to create safe schools. Communities must place school safety…

  6. Implementing AORN recommended practices for a safe environment of care.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Antonia B

    2013-08-01

    Providing a safe environment for every patient undergoing a surgical or other invasive procedure is imperative. AORN's "Recommended practices for a safe environment of care" provides guidance on a wide range of topics related to the safety of perioperative patients and health care personnel. The recommendations are intended to provide guidance for establishing best practices and implementing safety measures in all perioperative practice settings. Perioperative nurses should be aware of risks related to musculoskeletal injuries, fire, equipment, latex, and chemicals, among others, and understand strategies for reducing the risks. Evidence-based recommendations can give practitioners the tools to guide safe practice.

  7. Production Line Materials. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students understand the operation of an assembly line, including safe working procedures. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize youth with the…

  8. Methods and Procedures for Shielding Analyses for the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Remec, Igor; Lu, Wei; Popova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide radiologically safe Spallation Neutron Source operation, shielding analyses are performed according to Oak Ridge National Laboratory internal regulations and to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations. An overview of on-going shielding work for the accelerator facility and neutrons beam lines, methods, used for the analyses, and associated procedures and regulations is presented. Methods used to perform shielding analyses are described as well.

  9. Safe genetically engineered plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosellini, D.; Veronesi, F.

    2007-10-01

    The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work.

  10. A Study of Modified-Guttman and IRT-Based Level Scoring Procedures for Work Keys Assessments. ACT Research Report Series 97-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, E. Matthew; Kolen, Michael J.; Nicewander, W. Alan

    This paper compares modified Guttman and item response theory (IRT) based procedures for classifying examinees in ordered levels when each level is represented by several multiple choice test items. In the modified Guttman procedure, within-level number correct scores are mapped to binary level mastery scores. Examinees are then assigned to levels…

  11. Staying Safe in the Car and on the Bus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids Home How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Recipes & Cooking Staying Safe Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Health Problems of Grown Ups People, Places & Things That Help Feelings Q&A ...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  17. Is Rinsing Your Sinuses Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    ... water that is used with nasal rinsing devices. Tap water that is not filtered, treated, or processed in ... safe for use as a nasal rinse. Some tap water contains low levels of organisms, such as bacteria ...

  18. DOPS (Direct Observation of Procedural Skills) in undergraduate skills-lab: Does it work? Analysis of skills-performance and curricular side effects

    PubMed Central

    Profanter, Christoph; Perathoner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Sufficient teaching and assessing clinical skills in the undergraduate setting becomes more and more important. In a surgical skills-lab course at the Medical University of Innsbruck fourth year students were teached with DOPS (direct observation of procedural skills). We analyzed whether DOPS worked or not in this setting, which performance levels could be reached compared to tutor teaching (one tutor, 5 students) and which curricular side effects could be observed. Methods: In a prospective randomized trial in summer 2013 (April – June) four competence-level-based skills were teached in small groups during one week: surgical abdominal examination, urethral catheterization (phantom), rectal-digital examination (phantom), handling of central venous catheters. Group A was teached with DOPS, group B with a classical tutor system. Both groups underwent an OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) for assessment. 193 students were included in the study. Altogether 756 OSCE´s were carried out, 209 (27,6%) in the DOPS- and 547 (72,3%) in the tutor-group. Results: Both groups reached high performance levels. In the first month there was a statistically significant difference (p<0,05) in performance of 95% positive OSCE items in the DOPS-group versus 88% in the tutor group. In the following months the performance rates showed no difference anymore and came to 90% in both groups. In practical skills the analysis revealed a high correspondence between positive DOPS (92,4%) and OSCE (90,8%) results. Discussion: As shown by our data DOPS furnish high performance of clinical skills and work well in the undergraduate setting. Due to the high correspondence of DOPS and OSCE results DOPS should be considered as preferred assessment tool in a students skills-lab. The approximation of performance-rates within the months after initial superiority of DOPS could be explained by an interaction between DOPS and tutor system: DOPS elements seem to have improved

  19. Safe motherhood partners -- the International Children's Centre.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The International Children's Centre (ICC) works worldwide to improve child health in the least developed countries. In its training and research projects the agency contributes to the Safe Motherhood Initiative to improve the health of mothers and infants. ICC is based in Paris, it was established in 1949, and the agency has cooperated with governments, nongovernmental organizations and international bodies like the World Health Organization (WHO) in child care. ICC's activities reflect concern for the health of women before and during pregnancy and the rest of their lives. The center's work comprises training, research, local projects, and information and documentation. Following the 1987 Nairobi conference on safe motherhood, ICC organized a seminar in Paris on maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan francophone Africa, which led to participation in the Safe Motherhood Initiative with a variety of training and research programs. ICC training is integrated, community-based, and multidisciplinary. Anthropology, psychology, economics and management have played a role in ICC training courses. The center runs an international course on maternal and child health from January to April each year and also organizes distance training courses on problem solving in health care. ICC training programs have taken place in Laos, Senegal, and Vietnam to strengthen the work of maternal and child health training centers there. A 4-week course on economic evaluation of health programs is held in Paris each July. In 1989 and 1990, ICC organized in collaboration with WHO safe motherhood workshops on research methodology in Benin and in Burkina Faso with participants from 6 francophone African countries. One research project in Benin is on risk factors for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and the other in Cameroon on improving surveillance of pregnancy, delivery, and the postnatal period. ICC focuses on long-term planning and action for the benefit of mothers and children.

  20. Flexible fibreoptic sigmoidoscopy. Safe and effective for family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible fibreoptic sigmoidoscopy can detect malignancy, polyps, and other common diseases of the large bowel when they are distal to the splenic flexure. The procedure is safe and not painful when correctly performed. Family physicians could play an important role in the earlier diagnosis and prevention of colorectal cancer by adding the procedure to their repertoire. Images p1928-a p1930-a PMID:8219841

  1. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Fiscon, Valentino; Portale, Giuseppe; Mazzeo, Antonio; Migliorini, Giovanni; Frigo, Flavio

    2014-12-01

    Reestablishing continuity after a Hartmann's procedure is considered a major surgical procedure with high morbidity/mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the short-/long-term outcome of laparoscopic restoration of bowel continuity after HP. A prospectively collected database of colorectal laparoscopic procedures (>800) performed between June 2005 and June 2013 was used to identify 20 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure (LHR). Median age was 65.4. Ten patients (50 %) had undergone surgery for perforated diverticulitis, 3 (15 %) for cancer, and 7 (35 %) for other reasons (volvulus, posttraumatic perforation, and sigmoid perforation from foreign body). Previous HP had been performed laparoscopically in only 3 patients. Median operative time was 162.5 min. All the procedures were completed laparoscopically. Intraoperative complication rate was nil. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were respectively 0 and 10 % (1 pneumonia, 1 bowel obstruction from post-anastomotic stenosis which required resection and redo of the anastomosis). Median time to first flatus was 3 days, to normal diet 5 days. Median hospital stay was 9 days without readmissions. We followed up the patients for a median of 44 months: when asked, all 20 (100 %) said they would undergo the operation (LHR) again; 3 (15 %) had been re-operated of laparoscopic mesh repair for incisional hernia. When performed by experienced surgeons, LHR is a feasible, safe, reproducible operation, which allows early return of bowel function, early discharge and fast return to work for the patient. It has a low morbidity rate.

  2. Practical pearls for oral procedures.

    PubMed

    Davari, Parastoo; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    We provide an overview of clinically relevant principles of oral surgical procedures required in the workup and management of oral mucosal diseases. An understanding of the fundamental concepts of how to perform safely and effectively minor oral procedures is important to the practicing dermatologist and can minimize the need for patient referrals. This chapter reviews the principles of minor oral procedures, including incisional, excisional, and punch biopsies, as well as minor salivary gland excision. Pre- and postoperative patient care is also discussed.

  3. SAFE DRINKING WATER FROM SMALL SYSTEMS: TREATMENT OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bringing small water systems into compliance with the ever-increasing number of regulations will require flexibility in terms of technology application and institional procedures. his article looks at the means by which small systems can provide safe drinking water, focusing on t...

  4. Inexpensive and Safe DNA Gel Electrophoresis Using Household Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ens, S.; Olson, A. B.; Dudley, C.; Ross, N. D., III; Siddiqi, A. A.; Umoh, K. M.; Schneegurt, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is the single most important molecular biology technique and it is central to life sciences research, but it is often too expensive for the secondary science classroom or homeschoolers. A simple safe low-cost procedure is described here that uses household materials to construct and run DNA gel electrophoresis. Plastic…

  5. Addressing barriers to safe abortion.

    PubMed

    Culwell, Kelly R; Hurwitz, Manuelle

    2013-05-01

    The latest World Health Organization data estimate that the total number of unsafe abortions globally has increased to 21.6 million in 2008. There is increasing recognition by the international community of the importance of the contribution of unsafe abortion to maternal mortality. However, the barriers to delivery of safe abortion services are many. In 68 countries, home to 26% of the world's population, abortion is prohibited altogether or only permitted to save a woman's life. Even in countries with more liberal abortion legal frameworks, additional social, economic, and health systems barriers and the stigma surrounding abortion prevent adequate access to safe abortion services and postabortion care. While much has been achieved to reduce the barriers to comprehensive abortion care, much remains to be done. Only through the concerted action of public, private, and civil society partners can we ensure that women have access to services that are safe, affordable, confidential, and stigma free. PMID:23477700

  6. Practical procedures: oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Olive, Sandra

    Knowing when to start patients on oxygen therapy can save lives, but ongoing assessment and evaluation must be carried out to ensure the treatment is safe and effective. This article outlines when oxygen therapy should be used and the procedures to follow. It also describes the delivery methods applicable to different patient groups, along with the appropriate target saturation ranges, and details relevant nurse competencies.

  7. Dietary Supplements: What Is Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    ... escape to close saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Dietary Supplements: What Is Safe? Download Printable Version [PDF] » Dietary supplements include things like vitamins, minerals, herbs, or products made from plants, animal parts, algae, seafood, or yeasts. The information here can ...

  8. Making Cyberspace Safe for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Joyce; McLaughlin, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Despite the 1998 Children's Online Privacy Act's supposed protections, most web sites still collect personal information and post no privacy statements. Internet-filtering software packages are described and suggestions given for creating a safe environment, dismantling "cookies," informing parents and teachers, and checking "history" submenus on…

  9. Finding a Safe Way Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Steven M.; Derby, Joel

    1996-01-01

    Building designers, owners, and managers are morally responsible for providing persons with disabilities with a safe way out of multistory buildings. Although codes, standards, and elevator features may make the job more complicated, all of the difficulties can be overcome. Four figures illustrate elevator egress. (MLF)

  10. How Safe Are Our Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younghusband, Lynda

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a study she conducted in Newfoundland to determine the level of abuse and/or violence experienced by teachers, the nature of that abuse/violence, its personal impact, and whether Newfoundland teachers feel safe in their workplaces. The experiences presented are those of a focus group of eight teachers,…

  11. Flywheel Rotor Safe-Life Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, J. K. H.; Chang, J. B.; Christopher, D. A.; McLallin, Kerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1960s, research has been conducted into the use of flywheels as energy storage systems. The-proposed applications include energy storage for hybrid and electric automobiles, attitude control and energy storage for satellites, and uninterruptible power supplies for hospitals and computer centers. For many years, however, the use of flywheels for space applications was restricted by the total weight of a system employing a metal rotor. With recent technological advances in the manufacturing of composite materials, however, lightweight composite rotors have begun to be proposed for such applications. Flywheels with composite rotors provide much higher power and energy storage capabilities than conventional chemical batteries. However, the failure of a high speed flywheel rotor could be a catastrophic event. For this reason, flywheel rotors are classified by the NASA Fracture Control Requirements Standard as fracture critical parts. Currently, there is no industry standard to certify a composite rotor for safe and reliable operation forth( required lifetime of the flywheel. Technical problems hindering the development of this standard include composite manufacturing inconsistencies, insufficient nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for detecting defects and/or impact damage, lack of standard material test methods for characterizing composite rotor design allowables, and no unified proof (over-spin) test for flight rotors. As part of a flywheel rotor safe-life certification pro-ram funded b the government, a review of the state of the art in composite rotors is in progress. The goal of the review is to provide a clear picture of composite flywheel rotor technologies. The literature review has concentrated on the following topics concerning composites and composite rotors: durability (fatigue) and damage tolerance (safe-life) analysis/test methods, in-service NDE and health monitoring techniques, spin test methods/ procedures, and containment options

  12. Building a safe care-providing robot.

    PubMed

    Fotoohi, Leila; Gräser, Axel

    2011-01-01

    A service robot especially a care-providing robot, works in the vicinity of a human body and is sometimes even in direct contact with it. Conventional safety methods and precautions in industrial robotics are not applicable to such robots. This paper presents a safety approach for designing the safe care-providing robot FRIEND. The approach is applied in each step of design iteratively to identify and assess the potential hazards during design. The steps are explained briefly in this work. The main contribution of this paper is verification of safety requirements using the Ramadge-Wonham (RW) framework. The greater complexity of the tasks the robot will perform, the more complex is the identification of safety requirements. Use of this framework led us to analyze the requirements and verify them formally, systematically and on a modular basis. In our approach human-robot interaction (HRI) is also modeled by a set of uncontrolled events that may happen any time during operation. Subsequently the safety requirements are modified to consider these interactions. As a result the safety module behaves like a controller, running in parallel with the system, which maintains the system safe and works according to the safety requirements by enabling the admissible sequences of events.

  13. 105-H Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    E.G. Ison

    2008-11-08

    The following information documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the 105-H Reactor facility, and placement of the reactor core into interim safe storage. The D&D of the facility included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and restoration of the site. The ISS work also included construction of the safe storage enclosure, which required the installation of a new roofing system, power and lighting, a remote monitoring system, and ventilation components.

  14. Co-creating Emotionally Safe Environments at Camp: Training Staff To Facilitate Adventure Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, Matt; Yerkes, Rita

    2003-01-01

    An emotionally safe environment helps campers participate in adventure activities. Staff development tips for creating a safe environment include using cooperative goal setting; using parallel training processes; developing working lesson plans that outline facilitation techniques for creating emotionally safe environments; and using co-created…

  15. A model for a space shuttle safing and failure-detection expert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeilingold, Daphna; Hoey, John

    1990-01-01

    The safing and failure-detection expert (SAFE) is a prototype for a malfunction detection, diagnosis, and safing system for the atmospheric revitalization subsystem (ARS) in the Space Shuttle orbiter. SAFE, whose knowledge was extracted from expert-provided heuristics and documented procedures, automatically manages all phases of failure handling: detection, diagnosis, testing procedures, and recovery instructions. The SAFE architecture allows it to handle correctly sensor failures and multiple malfunctions. Since SAFE is highly interactive, it was used as a test bed for the evaluation of various advanced human-computer interface (HCI) techniques. The use of such expert systems in the next generation of space vehicles would increase their reliability and autonomy to levels not achievable before.

  16. Development of Safe Food Handling Guidelines for Korean Consumers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee-Jin; Lee, Min-Woo; Hwang, In-Kyeong; Kim, Jeong-Weon

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines for Korean consumers with regard to safe food handling practices at home by identifying current food handling issues. Korean consumers' behaviors regarding their safe food handling were identified via survey questionnaires that included items on individual hygiene practices, prepreparation steps when cooking, the cooking process, and the storage of leftover foods. The subjects were 417 Korean parents with elementary school children living in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province in the central area of Korea. The survey results revealed gaps between the knowledge or practices of Korean consumers and scientific evidence pertaining to safe food handling practices. Based on these findings, a leaflet on safe food handling guidelines was developed in accordance with Korean food culture. These guidelines suggest personal hygiene practices as well as fundamental principles and procedures for safe food handling from the stage of food purchase to that of keeping leftover dishes. A pilot application study with 50 consumers revealed that the guidelines effectively improved Korean consumers' safe food handling practices, suggesting that they can serve as practical educational material suitable for Korean consumers.

  17. Safe-haven locking device

    DOEpatents

    Williams, J.V.

    1984-04-26

    Disclosed is a locking device for eliminating external control of a secured space formed by fixed and movable barriers. The locking device uses externally and internally controlled locksets and a movable strike, operable from the secured side of the movable barrier, to selectively engage either lockset. A disengagement device, for preventing forces from being applied to the lock bolts is also disclosed. In this manner, a secured space can be controlled from the secured side as a safe-haven. 4 figures.

  18. Safe abortion: a woman's right.

    PubMed

    Sangala, Vanessa

    2005-07-01

    Complications of induced abortion sadly remain significant causes of maternal mortality and morbidity around the world, but only in countries that do not provide access to safe abortion services. This article presents a brief account of how high maternal mortality from induced abortion became history in the UK and the dire consequences to women's health that unsafe abortion still has in many countries of the world. It gives a brief overview of the methods available to evacuate the uterus, with particular reference to manual vacuum aspiration. The status of the law in different countries is discussed, together with the need for health professionals to interpret repressive laws in ways that enables them to care for women who seek their help. Safe abortion services are cost effective, essential services for women. Men are part and parcel of the reason women resort to terminating a pregnancy, and, together with the countless children whose lives are dependent on a healthy caring mother, are also beneficiaries of safe abortion services. There can be no excuse for continuing to deny these services to so many women around the world.

  19. Supporting the future nuclear workforce with computer-based procedures

    DOE PAGES

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya

    2016-05-01

    Here we see that computer-based tools have dramatically increased ease and efficiency of everyday tasks. Gone are the days of paging through a paper catalog, transcribing product numbers, and calculating totals. Today, a consumer can find a product online with a simple search engine, and then purchase it in a matter of a few clicks. Paper catalogs have their place, but it is hard to imagine life without on-line shopping sites. All tasks conducted in a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures, which helps ensure safe and reliable operation of the plants. One prominent goal of the nuclear industrymore » is to minimize the risk of human errors. To achieve this goal one has to ensure tasks are correctly and consistently executed. This is partly achieved by training and by a structured approach to task execution, which is provided by procedures and work instructions. Procedures are used in the nuclear industry to direct workers' actions in a proper sequence. The governing idea is to minimize the reliance on memory and choices made in the field. However, the procedure document may not contain sufficient information to successfully complete the task. Therefore, the worker might have to carry additional documents such as turnover sheets, operation experience, drawings, and other procedures to the work site. The nuclear industry is operated with paper procedures like paper catalogs of the past. A field worker may carry a large stack of documents needed to complete a task to the field. Even though the paper process has helped keep the industry safe for decades, there are limitations to using paper. Paper procedures are static (i.e., the content does not change after the document is printed), difficult to search, and rely heavily on the field worker’s situational awareness and ability to consistently meet the high expectation of human performance excellence. With computer-based procedures (CBPs) that stack of papers may be reduced to the size of a small tablet or even

  20. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  1. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  2. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  3. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  4. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  5. Creating a Safe Zone: LGBTQ Work in NCTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkin, Roxanne

    2011-01-01

    Reading through her files, the author takes a journey back in time to 1991 when a few lesbians and gay men met in a conference room at the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Annual Convention in Seattle to discuss issues relating to their lives and their teaching. It was at this meeting that NCTE first discussed forming a new group…

  6. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or original design limitations unless such increase meets with the manufacturer's approval. Where the manufacturer's services are not available, or where the equipment is of foreign manufacture, engineering...

  7. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... manufacturer's services are not available, or where the equipment is of foreign manufacture, engineering design analysis by, or acceptable to, the accredited certification agency is required. All necessary...

  8. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... manufacturer's services are not available, or where the equipment is of foreign manufacture, engineering design analysis by, or acceptable to, the accredited certification agency is required. All necessary...

  9. Organizing delivery care: what works for safe motherhood?

    PubMed Central

    Koblinsky, M. A.; Campbell, O.; Heichelheim, J.

    1999-01-01

    The various means of delivering essential obstetric services are described for settings in which the maternal mortality ratio is relatively low. This review yields four basic models of care, which are best described by organizational characteristics relating to where women give birth and who performs deliveries. In Model 1, deliveries are conducted at home by a community member who has received brief training. In Model 2, delivery takes place at home but is performed by a professional. In Model 3, delivery is performed by a professional in a basic essential obstetric care facility, and in Model 4 all women give birth in a comprehensive essential obstetric care facility with the help of professionals. In each of these models it is assumed that providers do not increase the risk to women, either iatrogenically or through traditional practices. Although there have been some successes with Model 1, there is no evidence that it can provide a maternal mortality ratio under 100 per 100,000 live births. If strong referral mechanisms are in place the introduction of a professional attendant can lead to a marked reduction in the maternal mortality ratio. Countries using Models 2-4, involving the use of professional attendants at delivery, have reduced maternal mortality ratios to 50 or less per 100,000. However, Model 4, although arguably the most advanced, does not necessarily reduce the maternal mortality ratio to less than 100 per 100,000. It appears that not all countries are ready to adopt Model 4, and its affordability by many developing countries is doubtful. There are few data making it possible to determine which configuration with professional attendance is the most cost-effective, and what the constraints are with respect to training, skill maintenance, supervision, regulation, acceptability to women, and other criteria. A successful transition to Models 2-4 requires strong links with the community through either traditional providers or popular demand. PMID:10361757

  10. From Barrier Free to Safe Environments: The New Zealand Experience. Monograph #44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrightson, William; Pope, Campbell

    Intrinsically safe design is presented as a logical extension of the principles of barrier free design, and as a higher level design strategy for effecting widespread implementation of the basic accessibility requirements for people with disabilities. Two fundamental planning procedures are proposed: including principles of safe and accessible…

  11. Practical Tips for the Safe Handling of Micro-organisms in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, G.

    1974-01-01

    Outlines safe laboratory procedures for the handling of micro-organisms including aseptic technique, manipulation of cultures, and treatment of contaminated equipment. Identifies the principal hazard as the microbial aerosol, explains its possible effects, and describes the appropriate precautions. (GS)

  12. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  13. The ethics of safe sex.

    PubMed

    Broom, N D; Rickett, C E

    1988-12-14

    Western society has undergone a vast sociological change during the 20th century in terms of the value of sexuality. Sexual choice has gained a new legitimacy never before experienced. There is less guilt surrounding issues of sexuality and it is now common place to hear and see explicit discussions about sex in the mass media. This acceptance has undoubtedly encouraged many people to be more daring and promiscuous in their sexual activities. Proof of this can be seen in the increase is the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Presently there are more than 20 epidemiologically significant diseases that are sexually transmitted. Beyond the 5 old standards of gonorrhea, syphilis, chancroid, lyphogranuloma venereum, and granuloma inguinala STDs now include: chlamydia trachomatis, genital herpes, human papillomavirus, human immunodeficiency virus, genital mycoplasms, cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, vaginitis, enteric infections, and ectoparasitic diseases. Keeping all this in mind, the question of the ethics of safe sex must be addressed. In many countries, the governments have undertaken large public education programs to encourage safe sex practices. All these programs a founded upon two ideas: that safe sex should be promoted free of any ethical discussions or considerations, and that technology alone, the condom, will protect the public from the problem of STDs. However these campaigns will fail to protect the public unless they try to intervene at some level other than the mechanical aspect of the sex act itself. Condoms have failure rates too high to be relied upon as the sole means of protecting the public. Sex education for children and an inclusion of the ethical aspects of sex, now that the consequences can mean death, must be included in these government programs if they are to be successful.

  14. Varying influences of motivation factors on employees' likelihood to perform safe food handling practices because of demographic differences.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason D; Arendt, Susan W; Strohbehn, Catherine H; Meyer, Janell; Paez, Paola

    2010-11-01

    Food safety training has been the primary avenue for ensuring food workers are performing proper food handling practices and thus, serving safe food. Yet, knowledge of safe food handling practices does not necessarily result in actual performance of these practices. This research identified participating food service employees' level of agreement with four factors of motivation (internal motivations, communication, reward-punishment, and resources) and determined if respondents with different demographic characteristics reported different motivating factors. Data were collected from 311 food service employees who did not have any supervisory responsibilities. Intrinsic motivation agreement scores were consistently the highest of all four motivational factors evaluated and did not differ across any of the demographic characteristics considered. In contrast, motivation agreement scores for communication, reward-punishment, and resources did differ based on respondents' gender, age, place of employment, job status, food service experience, completion of food handler course, or possession of a food safety certification. In general, respondents agreed that these motivation factors influenced their likelihood to perform various safe food handling procedures. This research begins to illustrate how employees' demographic characteristics influence their responses to various motivators, helping to clarify the complex situation of ensuring safe food in retail establishments. Future research into why employee willingness to perform varies more for extrinsic motivation than for intrinsic motivation could assist food service managers in structuring employee development programs and the work environment, in a manner that aids in improving external motivation (communication, reward-punishment, and resources) and capitalizing on internal motivation. PMID:21219719

  15. Varying influences of motivation factors on employees' likelihood to perform safe food handling practices because of demographic differences.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason D; Arendt, Susan W; Strohbehn, Catherine H; Meyer, Janell; Paez, Paola

    2010-11-01

    Food safety training has been the primary avenue for ensuring food workers are performing proper food handling practices and thus, serving safe food. Yet, knowledge of safe food handling practices does not necessarily result in actual performance of these practices. This research identified participating food service employees' level of agreement with four factors of motivation (internal motivations, communication, reward-punishment, and resources) and determined if respondents with different demographic characteristics reported different motivating factors. Data were collected from 311 food service employees who did not have any supervisory responsibilities. Intrinsic motivation agreement scores were consistently the highest of all four motivational factors evaluated and did not differ across any of the demographic characteristics considered. In contrast, motivation agreement scores for communication, reward-punishment, and resources did differ based on respondents' gender, age, place of employment, job status, food service experience, completion of food handler course, or possession of a food safety certification. In general, respondents agreed that these motivation factors influenced their likelihood to perform various safe food handling procedures. This research begins to illustrate how employees' demographic characteristics influence their responses to various motivators, helping to clarify the complex situation of ensuring safe food in retail establishments. Future research into why employee willingness to perform varies more for extrinsic motivation than for intrinsic motivation could assist food service managers in structuring employee development programs and the work environment, in a manner that aids in improving external motivation (communication, reward-punishment, and resources) and capitalizing on internal motivation.

  16. Midwifery education for safe motherhood.

    PubMed

    O'Heir, J M

    1997-09-01

    A series of new safe motherhood midwifery education modules was evaluated in nursing and midwifery education institutions, regional training centers, acute care hospitals, and community settings in Ethiopia, Fiji, Lesotho, Mozambique, and Nepal in 1995. The series was developed by the World Health Organization's Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood Program. A total of 36 teachers, 82 midwives or nurse-midwives, and 60 post-basic midwifery students were enrolled in a 2-week clinical skills course and an 8-day training in module use. In subsequent questionnaires and focus group discussions, participants indicated the modules were understandable, relevant, easy to use, and of high quality and the guidelines for assessing competence were adequate. Difficulties encountered included insufficient recommended time frames for some of the sessions, a limited availability of clinical cases for teaching the specific skills in the modules, difficulties obtaining data for a community profile, and a lack of resources to support application of skills learned. Participants indicated they would benefit from having copies of the technical material used in the modules for reference after the course. Overall, these findings indicate the modules have the potential to strengthen the education of midwives in developing countries and thereby to make motherhood safer. Weak health system infrastructures, including regulatory measures, represent the major obstacle to successful program application.

  17. Galileo spacecraft anomaly and safing recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilio, Ralph R.; Durham, David M.

    1993-01-01

    A high-level anomaly recovery plan which identifies the steps necessary to recover from a spacecraft 'Safing' incident was developed for the Galileo spacecraft prior to launch. Since launch, a total of four in-flight anomalies have lead to entry into a system fault protection 'Safing' routine which has required the Galileo flight team to refine and execute the recovery plan. These failures have allowed the flight team to develop an efficient recovery process when permanent spacecraft capability degradation is minimal and the cause of the anomaly is quickly diagnosed. With this previous recovery experience and the very focused boundary conditions of a specific potential failure, a Gaspra asteroid recovery plan was designed to be implemented in as quickly as forty hours (desired goal). This paper documents the work performed above, however, the Galileo project remains challenged to develop a generic detailed recovery plan which can be implemented in a relatively short time to configure the spacecraft to a nominal state prior to future high priority mission objectives.

  18. Estimated Maximal Safe Dosages of Tumescent Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumescent lidocaine anesthesia consists of subcutaneous injection of relatively large volumes (up to 4 L or more) of dilute lidocaine (≤1 g/L) and epinephrine (≤1 mg/L). Although tumescent lidocaine anesthesia is used for an increasing variety of surgical procedures, the maximum safe dosage is unknown. Our primary aim in this study was to measure serum lidocaine concentrations after subcutaneous administration of tumescent lidocaine with and without liposuction. Our hypotheses were that even with large doses (i.e., >30 mg/kg), serum lidocaine concentrations would be below levels associated with mild toxicity and that the concentration-time profile would be lower after liposuction than without liposuction. METHODS: Volunteers participated in 1 to 2 infiltration studies without liposuction and then one study with tumescent liposuction totally by local anesthesia. Serum lidocaine concentrations were measured at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 24 hours after each tumescent lidocaine infiltration. Area under the curve (AUC∞) of the serum lidocaine concentration-time profiles and peak serum lidocaine concentrations (Cmax) were determined with and without liposuction. For any given milligram per kilogram dosage, the probability that Cmax >6 μg/mL, the threshold for mild lidocaine toxicity was estimated using tolerance interval analysis. RESULTS: In 41 tumescent infiltration procedures among 14 volunteer subjects, tumescent lidocaine dosages ranged from 19.2 to 52 mg/kg. Measured serum lidocaine concentrations were all <6 μg/mL over the 24-hour study period. AUC∞s with liposuction were significantly less than those without liposuction (P = 0.001). The estimated risk of lidocaine toxicity without liposuction at a dose of 28 mg/kg and with liposuction at a dose of 45 mg/kg was ≤1 per 2000. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary estimates for maximum safe dosages of tumescent lidocaine are 28 mg/kg without liposuction and 45 mg/kg with liposuction. As a

  19. ToP: a trend-of-disease-progression procedure works well for identifying cancer genes from multi-state cohort gene expression data for human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Feng-Hsiang; Lee, Henry Hsin-Chung; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Significantly expressed genes extracted from microarray gene expression data have proved very useful for identifying genetic biomarkers of diseases, including cancer. However, deriving a disease related inference from a list of differentially expressed genes has proven less than straightforward. In a systems disease such as cancer, how genes interact with each other should matter just as much as the level of gene expression. Here, in a novel approach, we used the network and disease progression properties of individual genes in state-specific gene-gene interaction networks (GGINs) to select cancer genes for human colorectal cancer (CRC) and obtain a much higher hit rate of known cancer genes when compared with methods not based on network theory. We constructed GGINs by integrating gene expression microarray data from multiple states--healthy control (Nor), adenoma (Ade), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and CRC--with protein-protein interaction database and Gene Ontology. We tracked changes in the network degrees and clustering coefficients of individual genes in the GGINs as the disease state changed from one to another. From these we inferred the state sequences Nor-Ade-CRC and Nor-IBD-CRC both exhibited a trend of (disease) progression (ToP) toward CRC, and devised a ToP procedure for selecting cancer genes for CRC. Of the 141 candidates selected using ToP, ∼50% had literature support as cancer genes, compared to hit rates of 20% to 30% for standard methods using only gene expression data. Among the 16 candidate cancer genes that encoded transcription factors, 13 were known to be tumorigenic and three were novel: CDK1, SNRPF, and ILF2. We identified 13 of the 141 predicted cancer genes as candidate markers for early detection of CRC, 11 and 2 at the Ade and IBD states, respectively.

  20. Developing Safe Schools Partnerships with Law Enforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosiak, John

    2009-01-01

    Safe schools are the concern of communities throughout the world. If a school is safe, and if children feel safe, students "are better able to learn. But what are the steps to make" this happen? First, it is important to understand the problem: What are the threats to school safety? These include crime-related behaviors that find their way to…

  1. Primer on tritium safe handling practices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This Primer is designed for use by operations and maintenance personnel to improve their knowledge of tritium safe handling practices. It is applicable to many job classifications and can be used as a reference for classroom work or for self-study. It is presented in general terms for use throughout the DOE Complex. After reading it, one should be able to: describe methods of measuring airborne tritium concentration; list types of protective clothing effective against tritium uptake from surface and airborne contamination; name two methods of reducing the body dose after a tritium uptake; describe the most common method for determining amount of tritium uptake in the body; describe steps to take following an accidental release of airborne tritium; describe the damage to metals that results from absorption of tritium; explain how washing hands or showering in cold water helps reduce tritium uptake; and describe how tritium exchanges with normal hydrogen in water and hydrocarbons.

  2. Safe new reactor for radionuclide production

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.L.

    1995-02-15

    In late 1995, DOE is schedule to announce a new tritium production unit. Near the end of the last NPR (New Production Reactors) program, work was directed towards eliminating risks in current designs and reducing effects of accidents. In the Heavy Water Reactor Program at Savannah River, the coolant was changed from heavy to light water. An alternative, passively safe concept uses a heavy-water-filled, zircaloy reactor calandria near the bottom of a swimming pool; the calandria is supported on a light-water-coolant inlet plenum and has upflow through assemblies in the calandria tubes. The reactor concept eliminates or reduces significantly most design basis and severe accidents that plague other deigns. The proven, current SRS tritium cycle remains intact; production within the US of medical isotopes such as Mo-99 would also be possible.

  3. Thermodynamics of asymptotically safe theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rischke, Dirk H.; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a novel class of gauge-Yukawa theories that have recently been shown to be completely asymptotically safe, because their short-distance behavior is determined by the presence of an interacting fixed point. Not only do all the coupling constants freeze at a constant and calculable value in the ultraviolet, their values can even be made arbitrarily small for an appropriate choice of the ratio Nc/Nf of fermion colors and flavors in the Veneziano limit. Thus, a perturbative treatment can be justified. We compute the pressure, entropy density, and thermal degrees of freedom of these theories to next-to-next-to-leading order in the coupling constants.

  4. Is periconceptional opioid use safe?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Felix; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Question A patient in my practice who takes buprenorphine for chronic pain would like to conceive. Is it safe for her to continue taking her medication? Answer The literature regarding periconceptional opioid use is conflicted as to whether opioids pose an elevated risk of birth defects. Confounding factors such as socioeconomic status, stress, and alcohol consumption might play a role. The first trimester of pregnancy is the critical period of development for many organ systems in the embryo. A chemical or environmental insult is more likely to produce major congenital malformations such as neural tube defects or mental retardation if it occurs within this window. Medical practitioners should judiciously consider a risk-benefit analysis before making their decisions. PMID:26167561

  5. Practical pearls for oral procedures.

    PubMed

    Davari, Parastoo; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    We provide an overview of clinically relevant principles of oral surgical procedures required in the workup and management of oral mucosal diseases. An understanding of the fundamental concepts of how to perform safely and effectively minor oral procedures is important to the practicing dermatologist and can minimize the need for patient referrals. This chapter reviews the principles of minor oral procedures, including incisional, excisional, and punch biopsies, as well as minor salivary gland excision. Pre- and postoperative patient care is also discussed. PMID:27343958

  6. Writer`s guide for technical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    A primary objective of operations conducted in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex is safety. Procedures are a critical element of maintaining a safety envelope to ensure safe facility operation. This DOE Writer`s Guide for Technical Procedures addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities. The DOE Writer`s Guide for Management Control Procedures and DOE Writer`s Guide for Emergency and Alarm Response Procedures are being developed to assist writers in developing nontechnical procedures. DOE is providing this guide to assist writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations that comply with DOE orders, including DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities, and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors.

  7. Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

  8. Evaluation of Revised Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand; Cheradan Fikstad

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear power industry is very procedure driven, i.e. almost all activities that take place at a nuclear power plant are conducted by following procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by the industry do a good job at keeping the industry safe. However, these procedures are most often paired with methods and tools put in place to anticipate, prevent, and catch errors related to hands-on work. These tools are commonly called human performance tools. The drawback with the current implementation of these tools is that the task of performing one procedure becomes time and labor intensive. For example, concurrent and independent verification of procedure steps are required at times, which essentially means that at least two people have to be actively involved in the task. Even though the current use of PBPs and human performance tools are keeping the industry safe, there is room for improvement. The industry could potentially increase their efficiency and safety by replacing their existing PBPs with CBPs. If implemented correctly, the CBP system could reduce the time and focus spent on using the human performance tools. Some of the tools can be completely incorporated in the CBP system in a manner that the performer does not think about the fact that these tools are being used. Examples of these tools are procedure use and adherence, placekeeping, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduce the time and labor they require, such as concurrent and independent verification. The incorporation of advanced technology, such as CBP systems, may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. The introduction of advanced technology may also make the existing LWR fleet more attractive to the future workforce, which will be of importance when the future workforce will chose between existing fleet and the newly built nuclear power plants.

  9. 78 FR 48800 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... changes are designed to provide safe and efficient use of the navigable airspace and to promote safe flight operations under instrument flight rules at the affected airports. DATES: This rule is effective... Office of the region in which the affected airport is located; 3. The National Flight Procedures...

  10. High output stomas: ensuring safe discharge from hospital to home.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa

    High-output stomas are a challenge for the patient and all health professionals involved. This article discusses safe discharge home for this patient group, encouraging collaborative working practices between acute care trust and the community services. The authors also discuss the management of a high-output stoma and preparation and education of the patient before discharge home.

  11. Exercising for Two. What's Safe for the Active Pregnant Woman?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jacqueline

    1992-01-01

    Clinical experience and recent research challenge the current standards of exercise duration and intensity for pregnant women. By carefully assessing patients' self-monitoring techniques, physicians can work with active women to create safe exercise programs during pregnancy. Safety guidelines for developing home exercise programs are included.…

  12. How Principals Can Help to Ensure Safe Science Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Most schools inadequately protect the health and safety of students involved in science study. Echoing industry standards (and safety records), schools should have safety policies and committees, develop safety orientation programs, make working safely an employment condition, reward good safety performance, inspect and correct, and supply…

  13. Students and School Adults: Partners in Keeping Schools Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastic, Billie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the important roles that students, school staff and teachers play in keeping the school safe particularly from weapons. The author believes that one way that they do this is by working together to reduce the problem of weapons in school. The role of school staff and teachers extends beyond prevention and…

  14. Is There a Safe Level of Exposure to a Carcinogen?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrudey, Steve E.; Krewski, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Presents an approach to estimating the "safe" levels of low-dose exposure to carcinogens that involves working upward from the smallest conceivable chronic dose instead of extrapolating downward from high exposures. Discusses expert and public opinion and other issues related to quantitative cancer risk assessment. (LZ)

  15. Safe patient handling for rehabilitation professionals.

    PubMed

    Waters, Thomas R; Rockefeller, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Every day, thousands of physical therapists and rehabilitation nurses are required to perform physically demanding therapeutic patient handling tasks that are stressful to the caregiver and increase his or her risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). In rehabilitation, patient handling tasks might be classified as"traditional" or "therapeutic."Traditional tasks have a practical goal, such as transferring a patient from bed to a wheelchair, and therapeutic tasks have more targeted goals such as facilitating patient function and independence. Therapeutic patient handling tasks present a greater risk for caregivers to sustain work-related MSDs than typical patient handling tasks do because caregivers are exposed to high mechanical loads on the spinal tissues for longer amounts of time. The Veterans Health Administration, Association of Rehabilitation Nurses, and the American Physical Therapy Association endorse the use of modern patient handling technology as part of a comprehensive safe patient handling program for providing therapy in rehabilitation settings. Information about patient handling technology that is effective in reducing the risk of work-related MSDs from performing therapeutic patient handling and movement tasks is also presented and discussed in this article.

  16. Alternative Antimicrobial Commercial Egg Washing Procedures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial table eggs are washed prior to packaging. Standard wash procedures use an alkaline pH and warm water. If a cool water method could be developed that would still provide a microbiologically safe egg, the industry may save energy costs associated with water heating. Four wash procedures ...

  17. [Wrinkle fillers in cosmetic facial procedures].

    PubMed

    Jaspers, G W C; Schepers, R H; Pijpe, J; Jansma, J

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade cosmeticfacial procedures have become part of the professional work of both dentists and maxillofacial surgeons. A shift has taken place from invasive surgical treatment towards minimally invasive treatments. Besides the use ofbotulinum toxin type A, non-permanent wrinkle fillers can be an alternative to invasive surgical treatment. Since botulism was first described in the 18th century, the neurotoxin has continued to develop, as a result of which Botox, now available in synthetically produced form, can safely be employed in healthcare. The frequency with which patients visit dentists and maxillofacial surgeons offers the professional group the possibility to inform patients about cosmetic facial treatments and to carry them out according to diagnosis.

  18. When procedures meet practice in community pharmacies: qualitative insights from pharmacists and pharmacy support staff

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, Darren M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to explore how members of community pharmacy staff perceive and experience the role of procedures within the workplace in community pharmacies. Setting Community pharmacies in England and Wales. Participants 24 community pharmacy staff including pharmacists and pharmacy support staff were interviewed regarding their view of procedures in community pharmacy. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Results 3 main themes were identified. According to the ‘dissemination and creation of standard operating procedures’ theme, community pharmacy staff were required to follow a large amount of procedures as part of their work. At times, complying with all procedures was not possible. According to the ‘complying with procedures’ theme, there are several factors that influenced compliance with procedures, including work demands, the high workload and the social norm within the pharmacy. Lack of staff, pressure to hit targets and poor communication also affected how able staff felt to follow procedures. The third theme ‘procedural compliance versus using professional judgement’ highlighted tensions between the standardisation of practice and the professional autonomy of pharmacists. Pharmacists feared being unsupported by their employer for working outside of procedures, even when acting for patient benefit. Some support staff believed that strictly following procedures would keep patients and themselves safe. Dispensers described following the guidance of the pharmacist which sometimes meant working outside of procedures, but occasionally felt unable to voice concerns about not working to rule. Conclusions Organisational resilience in community pharmacy was apparent and findings from this study should help to inform policymakers and practitioners regarding factors likely to influence the implementation of procedures in community pharmacy settings. Future research should focus on exploring community pharmacy employees' intentions

  19. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David Cm; Kirkpatrick, Carl Mj

    2015-06-01

    The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal. PMID:26648628

  20. Safe testing nuclear rockets economically

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S. D.; Travis, B. J.; Zerkle, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

  1. Time to prioritise safe walking.

    PubMed

    Toroyan, Tami; Khayesi, Meleckidzedeck; Peden, Margie

    2013-01-01

    This study draws on information from two recently published documents on pedestrian safety and global status of road safety to draw attention to the need to prioritize safe walking in planning and policy at local, national and international levels. The study shows that each year, more than 270 000 pedestrians lose their lives on the world's roads. The study argues that this situation need not persist because proven pedestrian safety interventions exist but do not attract the merit they deserve in many locations. The study further shows that the key risk factors for pedestrian road traffic injury such as vehicle speed, alcohol use by drivers and pedestrians, lack of infrastructure facilities for pedestrians and inadequate visibility of pedestrians are fairly well documented. The study concludes that pedestrian collisions, like all road traffic crashes, should not be accepted as inevitable because they are, in fact, both predictable and preventable. While stressing that reduction or elimination of risks faced by pedestrians is an important and achievable policy goal, the study emphasizes the importance of a comprehensive, holistic approach that includes engineering, enforcement and education measures. PMID:23701478

  2. What is a safe lift?

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Kathy

    2013-09-01

    In a perfect world, a "safe" lift would be 51 pounds if the object is within 7 inches from the front of the body, if it is at waist height, if it is directly in front of the person, if there is a handle on the object, and if the load inside the box/bucket doesn't shift once lifted. If the load to be lifted does not meet all of these criteria, then it is an unsafe lift, and modifications must be made. Modifications would include lightening the load, getting help, or using a mechanical lifting device. There is always a way to turn an unsafe lift into a safer lift. An excellent resource for anyone interested in eliminating some of the hazards associated with lifting is the "Easy Ergonomics" publication from Cal/OSHA. This booklet offers practical advice on how to improve the workplace using engineering and administrative controls, problem-solving strategies and solutions, and a vast amount of ergonomics information and resources. "Easy Ergonomics" can be obtained by calling Cal/OSHA's education and training unit in Sacramento at 800-963-9424. A free copy can be obtained via www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/puborder.asp.

  3. Inflation from asymptotically safe theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund; Sannino, Francesco; Svendsen, Ole

    2015-05-01

    We investigate models in which inflation is driven by an ultraviolet safe and interacting scalar sector stemming from a new class of nonsupersymmetric gauge field theories. These new theories, different from generic scalar models, are well defined to arbitrary short distances because of the existence of a controllable ultraviolet interacting fixed point. The scalar couplings at the ultraviolet fixed point and their overall running are predicted by the geometric structure of the underlying theory. We analyze the minimal and nonminimal coupling to gravity of these theories and the consequences for inflation. In the minimal coupling case the theory requires large nonperturbative quantum corrections to the quantum potential for the theory to agree with the data, while in the nonminimal coupling case the perturbative regime in the couplings of the theory is preferred. Requiring the theory to reproduce the observed amplitude of density perturbations constrains the geometric data of the theory such as the number of colors and flavors for generic values of the nonminimal coupling.

  4. Reactive, Safe Navigation for Lunar and Planetary Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utz, Hans; Ruland, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    When humans return to the moon, Astronauts will be accompanied by robotic helpers. Enabling robots to safely operate near astronauts on the lunar surface has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of crew surface operations. Safely operating robots in close proximity to astronauts on the lunar surface requires reactive obstacle avoidance capabilities not available on existing planetary robots. In this paper we present work on safe, reactive navigation using a stereo based high-speed terrain analysis and obstacle avoidance system. Advances in the design of the algorithms allow it to run terrain analysis and obstacle avoidance algorithms at full frame rate (30Hz) on off the shelf hardware. The results of this analysis are fed into a fast, reactive path selection module, enforcing the safety of the chosen actions. The key components of the system are discussed and test results are presented.

  5. Do junior doctors know where to insert chest drains safely?

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, J; Roberts, N

    2005-01-01

    Background: The safe insertion of a chest drain is a skill doctors across specialties require. Incorrect placement can lead to significant morbidity and even mortality. Methods: This audit surveyed junior doctors working in a teaching hospital about their specialty and level of experience with intercostal drains. They were then asked to mark on a photograph where they would insert a chest drain for a pneumothorax in a non-emergency situation. Results: Of the 55 junior doctors surveyed, 45% were outside the safe area of chest drain insertion as defined by the British Thoracic Society. The most common error was a choice of insertion site too low (24%). Conclusions: In this audit 45% of juniors surveyed would have placed a chest drain outside the safe triangle recommended by the British Thoracic Society. The common mistake of a choice of insertion site too low should be discussed in postgraduate teaching programmes. PMID:15998822

  6. [Hospitals safe from disasters: a reflection on architecture and biosafety].

    PubMed

    Saba, Lucia Cristina de Paiva; Cardoso, Telma Abdalla de Oliveira; Navarro, Marli B M de Albuquerque

    2012-02-01

    One of the biggest challenges in today's society is facing adversity caused by disasters. Health facilities, especially hospitals, are considered essential in these situations. This article discusses the principles of architectural design of hospitals safe from disasters, as proposed by the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization. Designing a safe hospital requires multidisciplinary efforts, involving administrators, architects, engineers, physicians, and nurses. The planning of each hospital demands the analysis of specific risks and safety concerns. The concept of biosafety should also be addressed in planning safe hospitals. The balance between architectural aspects and biosafety provides an understanding of work-associated risks, facilitating the adequate planning of spaces to support response actions to emergencies. In short, the planning of a safe hospital requires the synthesis of various types of expertise, including those relating to biosafety and architecture. These principles should support the appraisal of safe hospitals and architectural planning with a focus on preparing facilities to function at full capacity even in the face of adverse situations.

  7. 33 CFR 150.615 - What safe practices are required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section follow the lockout or tagging procedures specified in 29 CFR 1910... electrical shock, personnel receive training in electrical, safety-related work practices in the area of...

  8. 33 CFR 150.615 - What safe practices are required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section follow the lockout or tagging procedures specified in 29 CFR 1910... electrical shock, personnel receive training in electrical, safety-related work practices in the area of...

  9. How Safe Are Your Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetzner, Kate

    1999-01-01

    A Montana superintendent and presidential appointee explains federal initiatives (funded programs and directives) that school leaders can apply to their own violence-prevention work. These include support for zero-tolerance policies, community programs, afterschool activities, and school-uniform policies. Resource centers are listed. (MLH)

  10. Review of "Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.; Barnett, Steven; Welner, Kevin G.

    2010-01-01

    The research summary "Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students" presents the research background for the Obama administration's proposals for comprehensive, community-wide services in high-poverty neighborhoods, extended learning time, family engagement and safe schools. While these policies have broad and common-sense appeal, the research…

  11. Virus Alert: Ten Steps to Safe Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Glenda A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses computer viruses and explains how to detect them; discusses virus protection and the need to update antivirus software; and offers 10 safe computing tips, including scanning floppy disks and commercial software, how to safely download files from the Internet, avoiding pirated software copies, and backing up files. (LRW)

  12. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION RULE § 312.10 Safe harbors. (a) In general. An operator will be deemed to be...

  13. Safe Schools: The Threat from within?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Donn

    2011-01-01

    Safe school policies in many urban schools in Ontario have featured security guards, electronic surveillance, student identification tags, discipline, and zero tolerance. In 2000, the Ontario Ministry of Education passed the Safe Schools Act, which set out a list of offences that could trigger expulsion, suspension, and other disciplinary…

  14. Safe Homes: Is It Worth the Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSena, A.D.; Murphy, R.A.; Douglas-Palumberi, H.; Blau, G.; Kelly, B.; Horwitz, S.M.; Kaufman, J.

    2005-01-01

    .001). Conclusion:: Improvements in outcomes related to continuity of care can be attained through staff training. The SAFE Home model of care is not cost-effective for first-time placements.Objective:: To evaluate the SAFE Homes (SH) program, a short-term group care program for children between 3 and 12 years of age who enter care for the first…

  15. Safe Haven Laws as "Crime Control Theater"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Michelle; Miller, Monica K.; Griffin, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This article examines safe haven laws, which allow parents to legally abandon their infants. The main objective is to determine whether safe haven laws fit the criteria of "crime control theater", a term used to describe public policies that produce the appearance, but not the effect, of crime control, and as such are essentially…

  16. A fail-safe CMOS logic gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobin, V.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a design technique to make Complex CMOS Gates fail-safe for a class of faults. Two classes of faults are defined. The fail-safe design presented has limited fault-tolerance capability. Multiple faults are also covered.

  17. Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... consultant to create a policy that fits your child care center or home. Safe Sleep Practices Practice SIDS reduction ... questions about safe sleep practices please contact Healthy Child Care America at the American Academy of Pediatrics at childcare@aap.org or 888/227-5409. Remember, if ...

  18. Creating Safe Spaces for Music Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Karin S.; Smith, Tawnya D.; Stanuch, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a practical model for fostering emotionally safe learning environments that instill in music students a positive sense of self-belief, freedom, and purpose. The authors examine the implications for music educators of creating effective learning environments and present recommendations for creating a safe space for learning,…

  19. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  20. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  1. Using Performance-Based Assessments to Prepare Safe Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Elizabeth; Shane, Joseph; Brownstein, Erica M.; Ezrailson, Cathy; Hagevik, Rita; Veal, William

    2009-12-01

    Standard 9 of the National Science Teachers Association Standards for Science Teacher Preparation is designed to ensure that science teacher preparation programs provide preservice science teachers with the knowledge and skills to understand and successfully engage students in a safe and ethical manner. This standard contains four components describing science teachers’ legal and ethical responsibilities, appropriate use of instructional materials (chemicals in particular), emergency procedures and safety equipment, and guidelines for proper use of living organisms in the classroom. In this article, we describe the requirements of Standard 9 and provide guidance on assessments that can be used to present evidence for preservice teachers’ competence in each of the four components.

  2. Improved Quick Disconnect (QD) Interface Through Fail Safe Parts Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanch-Payne, Evelyn

    2001-01-01

    An extensive review of existing Quick Disconnects (QDs) mating and demating operations was performed to determine which shuttle part interface identifications and procedures contribute to human factor errors. The research methods used consisted of interviews with engineers and technicians, examination of incident reports, critiques of video and audio tapes of QD operations, and attendance of a Hyper QD operational course. The data strongly suggests that there are inherit human factor errors involved in QD operations. To promote fail-safe operations, QD interface problem areas and recommendations were outlined and reviewed. It is suggested that dialogue, investigations and recommendations continue.

  3. SafeNet: a methodology for integrating general-purpose unsafe devices in safe-robot rehabilitation systems.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Federico; Pedrocchi, Nicola; Malosio, Matteo; Molinari Tosatti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Robot-assisted neurorehabilitation often involves networked systems of sensors ("sensory rooms") and powerful devices in physical interaction with weak users. Safety is unquestionably a primary concern. Some lightweight robot platforms and devices designed on purpose include safety properties using redundant sensors or intrinsic safety design (e.g. compliance and backdrivability, limited exchange of energy). Nonetheless, the entire "sensory room" shall be required to be fail-safe and safely monitored as a system at large. Yet, sensor capabilities and control algorithms used in functional therapies require, in general, frequent updates or re-configurations, making a safety-grade release of such devices hardly sustainable in cost-effectiveness and development time. As such, promising integrated platforms for human-in-the-loop therapies could not find clinical application and manufacturing support because of lacking in the maintenance of global fail-safe properties. Under the general context of cross-machinery safety standards, the paper presents a methodology called SafeNet for helping in extending the safety rate of Human Robot Interaction (HRI) systems using unsafe components, including sensors and controllers. SafeNet considers, in fact, the robotic system as a device at large and applies the principles of functional safety (as in ISO 13489-1) through a set of architectural procedures and implementation rules. The enabled capability of monitoring a network of unsafe devices through redundant computational nodes, allows the usage of any custom sensors and algorithms, usually planned and assembled at therapy planning-time rather than at platform design-time. A case study is presented with an actual implementation of the proposed methodology. A specific architectural solution is applied to an example of robot-assisted upper-limb rehabilitation with online motion tracking. PMID:24750989

  4. SafeNet: a methodology for integrating general-purpose unsafe devices in safe-robot rehabilitation systems.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Federico; Pedrocchi, Nicola; Malosio, Matteo; Molinari Tosatti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Robot-assisted neurorehabilitation often involves networked systems of sensors ("sensory rooms") and powerful devices in physical interaction with weak users. Safety is unquestionably a primary concern. Some lightweight robot platforms and devices designed on purpose include safety properties using redundant sensors or intrinsic safety design (e.g. compliance and backdrivability, limited exchange of energy). Nonetheless, the entire "sensory room" shall be required to be fail-safe and safely monitored as a system at large. Yet, sensor capabilities and control algorithms used in functional therapies require, in general, frequent updates or re-configurations, making a safety-grade release of such devices hardly sustainable in cost-effectiveness and development time. As such, promising integrated platforms for human-in-the-loop therapies could not find clinical application and manufacturing support because of lacking in the maintenance of global fail-safe properties. Under the general context of cross-machinery safety standards, the paper presents a methodology called SafeNet for helping in extending the safety rate of Human Robot Interaction (HRI) systems using unsafe components, including sensors and controllers. SafeNet considers, in fact, the robotic system as a device at large and applies the principles of functional safety (as in ISO 13489-1) through a set of architectural procedures and implementation rules. The enabled capability of monitoring a network of unsafe devices through redundant computational nodes, allows the usage of any custom sensors and algorithms, usually planned and assembled at therapy planning-time rather than at platform design-time. A case study is presented with an actual implementation of the proposed methodology. A specific architectural solution is applied to an example of robot-assisted upper-limb rehabilitation with online motion tracking.

  5. Capacity building in safe nanotechnologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Markus; Gommel, Udo

    2011-07-01

    In all places where engineered Nanoparticles (ENPs) are produced, used or handled, adequate workplace safety precautions should be implemented due to the protection of workers and the surrounding environment. Any possible accidental release of ENPs should be evaluated. Thereby detected potential risks have to be eliminated as far as possible. An implemented reasonable safety culture in each ENP-related company will help to meet this challenge. Different infrastructures and workplace design can help to reduce the risk of an accidentally contact of the workers with ENPs: Transferable examples will be shown from the semiconductor and life-science Industry. These systems like clean rooms, glove boxes, fume cupboards, filter and suction systems and other restricted area barrier access systems (RABS) are mainly being developed to protect sensitive products, but they can also be used to protect working personnel. Clean environments regarding airborne particulate contaminations can be classified according to ISO 14644-1. A short insight into this ISO-classification will be given. But overall, a simple and reasonable workplace and workflow organization will reduce the risk of an accidental release of ENPs largely. This may lead to a therefore necessary adaption of existing workflow patterns. The workers have to get aware about the potential risks! This can be done with appropriate education materials, leaflets, posters and brochures. These are some of the later outcomes from the NanoDevice dissemination and handbook work package.

  6. Costing imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Bretland, P M

    1988-01-01

    The existing National Health Service financial system makes comprehensive costing of any service very difficult. A method of costing using modern commercial methods has been devised, classifying costs into variable, semi-variable and fixed and using the principle of overhead absorption for expenditure not readily allocated to individual procedures. It proved possible to establish a cost spectrum over the financial year 1984-85. The cheapest examinations were plain radiographs outside normal working hours, followed by plain radiographs, ultrasound, special procedures, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, angiography and angiographic interventional procedures in normal working hours. This differs from some published figures, particularly those in the Körner report. There was some overlap between fluoroscopic interventional and the cheaper nuclear medicine procedures, and between some of the more expensive nuclear medicine procedures and the cheaper angiographic ones. Only angiographic and the few more expensive nuclear medicine procedures exceed the cost of the inpatient day. The total cost of the imaging service to the district was about 4% of total hospital expenditure. It is shown that where more procedures are undertaken, the semi-variable and fixed (including capital) elements of the cost decrease (and vice versa) so that careful study is required to assess the value of proposed economies. The method is initially time-consuming and requires a computer system with 512 Kb of memory, but once the basic costing system is established in a department, detailed financial monitoring should become practicable. The necessity for a standard comprehensive costing procedure of this nature, based on sound cost accounting principles, appears inescapable, particularly in view of its potential application to management budgeting. PMID:3349241

  7. Costing imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Bretland, P M

    1988-01-01

    The existing National Health Service financial system makes comprehensive costing of any service very difficult. A method of costing using modern commercial methods has been devised, classifying costs into variable, semi-variable and fixed and using the principle of overhead absorption for expenditure not readily allocated to individual procedures. It proved possible to establish a cost spectrum over the financial year 1984-85. The cheapest examinations were plain radiographs outside normal working hours, followed by plain radiographs, ultrasound, special procedures, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, angiography and angiographic interventional procedures in normal working hours. This differs from some published figures, particularly those in the Körner report. There was some overlap between fluoroscopic interventional and the cheaper nuclear medicine procedures, and between some of the more expensive nuclear medicine procedures and the cheaper angiographic ones. Only angiographic and the few more expensive nuclear medicine procedures exceed the cost of the inpatient day. The total cost of the imaging service to the district was about 4% of total hospital expenditure. It is shown that where more procedures are undertaken, the semi-variable and fixed (including capital) elements of the cost decrease (and vice versa) so that careful study is required to assess the value of proposed economies. The method is initially time-consuming and requires a computer system with 512 Kb of memory, but once the basic costing system is established in a department, detailed financial monitoring should become practicable. The necessity for a standard comprehensive costing procedure of this nature, based on sound cost accounting principles, appears inescapable, particularly in view of its potential application to management budgeting.

  8. Interactive eLearning - a safe place to practice.

    PubMed

    Einarson, Elisabeth; Moen, Anne; Kolberg, Ragnhild; Flingtorp, Gry; Linnerud, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Interactive web-based learning environment offers refreshing opportunities to create innovative solutions to explore and exploit informatics support on-the-job training. We report from a study where a hospital is created a interactive eLearning resource. The modules are creating a safe place to practice - to be used for introduction to the work and preparation for certification or re-certification of competencies. PMID:19593010

  9. InaSAFE applications in disaster preparedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranantyo, Ignatius Ryan; Fadmastuti, Mahardika; Chandra, Fredy

    2015-04-01

    Disaster preparedness activities aim to reduce the impact of disasters by being better prepared to respond when a disaster occurs. In order to better anticipate requirements during a disaster, contingency planning activities can be undertaken prior to a disaster based on a realistic disaster scenario. InaSAFE is a tool that can inform this process. InaSAFE is a free and open source software that estimates the impact to people and infrastructure from potential hazard scenarios. By using InaSAFE, disaster managers can develop scenarios of disaster impacts (people and infrastructures affected) to inform their contingency plan and emergency response operation plan. While InaSAFE provides the software framework exposure data and hazard data are needed as inputs to run this software. Then InaSAFE can be used to forecast the impact of the hazard scenario to the exposure data. InaSAFE outputs include estimates of the number of people, buildings and roads are affected, list of minimum needs (rice and clean water), and response checklist. InaSAFE is developed by Indonesia's National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB) and the Australian Government, through the Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction (AIFDR), in partnership with the World Bank - Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR). This software has been used in many parts of Indonesia, including Padang, Maumere, Jakarta, and Slamet Mountain for emergency response and contingency planning.

  10. Safe Use of Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maes, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This is a viewgraph presentation that is a course for teaching the safe use of hydrogen. The objectives of the course are 1. To familiarize the student with H2 safety properties 2. To enable the identification, evaluations and addressing of H2 system hazards 3. To teach: a. Safe practices for, b. Design, c. Materials selection, d. H2 system operation, e. Physical principles and empirical observations on which these safe practices are based, f. How to respond to emergency situations involving H2, g How to visualize safety concepts through in-class exercises, h. Identify numerous parameters important to H2 safety.

  11. Safe actinide disposition in molten salt reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.

    1997-03-01

    Safe molten salt reactors (MSR) can readily accommodate the burning of all fissile actinides. Only minor compromises associated with plutonium are required. The MSRs can dispose safely of actinides and long lived isotopes to result in safer and simpler waste. Disposing of actinides in MSRs does increase the source term of a safety optimized MSR. It is concluded that the burning and transmutation of actinides in MSRs can be done in a safe manner. Development is needed for the processing to handle and separate the actinides. Calculations are needed to establish the neutron economy and the fuel management. 9 refs.

  12. Paediatric procedural sedation within the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Krieser, David; Kochar, Amit

    2016-02-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia in children requires the use of non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches to facilitate the management of painful procedures. The development of skills in such techniques has mirrored the development of paediatric emergency medicine as a subspecialty. Governance, education and credentialing must facilitate safe sedation practice, using a structured approach, as sedating children in the busy environment of an emergency department is not without risk. Emergency clinicians, patients and caregivers all have a role to play in developing a safe, effective sedation plan. PMID:27062624

  13. Safe Use of Pesticides, Guidelines. Occupational Safety and Health Series No. 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This document provides guidance on the safe use of pesticides in agricultural work. General principles are given and followed by more detailed safety requirements for the various pesticide application techniques. Finally, the medical aspects of pesticides are considered. (BB)

  14. Using over-the-counter medicines safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000882.htm Using over-the-counter medicines safely To use the sharing features on this ... need to know about OTC drugs. About OTC Medicines You can buy OTC medicines without a prescription ...

  15. Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... back to top Dos and Don'ts for Contact Lens Wearers DO: Always wash your hands before ...

  16. Patient Safety: Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Consumer Information > Patient Safety Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery Patient Safety More Resources Choose a surgeon ... Important facts about the safety and risks of plastic surgery Questions to ask my plastic surgeon Choose ...

  17. Expedition 25 Crew Lands Safely in Kazakhstan

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 25 Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin, NASA International Space Station Commander Doug Wheelock and NASA Flight Engineer Shannon Walker landed safely on the steppe of Kazakhstan on Nov. 2...

  18. Common Vaccine Safe for Mother, Fetus

    MedlinePlus

    ... TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis) vaccine is safe for pregnant ... Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pregnancy Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis Vaccines About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  19. Bottled Water Everywhere: Keeping it Safe

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Bottled Water Everywhere: Keeping it Safe Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... sanitary conditions back to top Types of Bottled Water FDA describes bottled water as water that’s intended ...

  20. Ergonomics: safe patient handling and mobility.

    PubMed

    Hallmark, Beth; Mechan, Patricia; Shores, Lynne

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews and investigates the issues surrounding ergonomics, with a specific focus on safe patient handling and mobility. The health care worker of today faces many challenges, one of which is related to the safety of patients. Safe patient handling and mobility is on the forefront of the movement to improve patient safety. This article reviews the risks associated with patient handling and mobility, and informs the reader of current evidence-based practice relevant to this area of care. PMID:25680494

  1. Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

    2012-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The introduction of advanced technology in existing nuclear power plants may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. In addition, the incorporation of advanced technology in the existing LWR fleet may entice the future workforce, who will be familiar with advanced technology, to work for these utilities rather than more newly built nuclear power plants. Advantages are being sought by developing and deploying technologies that will increase safety and efficiency. One significant opportunity for existing plants to increase efficiency is to phase out the paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used at most nuclear power plants and replace them, where feasible, with computer-based procedures (CBPs). PBPs have ensured safe operation of plants for decades, but limitations in paper-based systems do not allow them to reach the full potential for procedures to prevent human errors. The environment in a nuclear power plant is constantly changing depending on current plant status and operating mode. PBPs, which are static by nature, are being applied to a constantly changing context. This constraint often results in PBPs that are written in a manner that is intended to cover many potential operating scenarios. Hence, the procedure layout forces the operator to search through a large amount of irrelevant information to locate the pieces of information

  2. Managing Cassini Safe Mode Attitude at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. In the event safe mode interrupts normal orbital operations, Cassini has flight software fault protection algorithms to detect, isolate, and recover to a thermally safe and commandable attitude and then wait for further instructions from the ground. But the Saturn environment is complex, and safety hazards change depending on where Cassini is in its orbital trajectory around Saturn. Selecting an appropriate safe mode attitude that insures safe operation in the Saturn environment, including keeping the star tracker field of view clear of bright bodies, while maintaining a quiescent, commandable attitude, is a significant challenge. This paper discusses the Cassini safe table management strategy and the key criteria that must be considered, especially during low altitude flybys of Titan, in deciding what spacecraft attitude should be used in the event of safe mode.

  3. A ‘Simple Anterior Fish Excluder’ (SAFE) for Mitigating Penaeid-Trawl Bycatch

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew J.; Broadhurst, Matt K.; Sterling, David J.; Millar, Russell B.

    2015-01-01

    Various plastic strips and sheets (termed ‘simple anterior fish excluders’−SAFEs) were positioned across the openings of penaeid trawls in attempts at reducing the unwanted bycatches of small teleosts. Initially, three SAFEs (a single wire without, and with small and large plastic panels) were compared against a control (no SAFE) on paired beam trawls. All SAFEs maintained targeted Metapenaeus macleayi catches, while the largest plastic SAFE significantly reduced total bycatch by 51% and the numbers of Pomatomus saltatrix, Mugil cephalus and Herklotsichthys castelnaui by up to 58%. A redesigned SAFE (‘continuous plastic’) was subsequently tested (against a control) on paired otter trawls, significantly reducing total bycatch by 28% and P. saltatrix and H. castelnaui by up to 42%. The continuous-plastic SAFE also significantly reduced M. macleayi catches by ~7%, but this was explained by ~5% less wing-end spread, and could be simply negated through otter-board refinement. Further work is required to refine the tested SAFEs, and to quantify species-specific escape mechanisms. Nevertheless, the SAFE concept might represent an effective approach for improving penaeid-trawl selectivity. PMID:25837892

  4. Percutaneous renal biopsy as an outpatient procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Alebiosu, Christopher O.; Kadiri, Solomon

    2004-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is a safe and effective tool in the diagnosis and management of renal disease. It is the gold standard for evaluating renal parenchymal disease. It is both useful for diagnosis and monitoring progress of renal diseases. Where facilities and personnel are available to carry out the procedure in developing countries, it has become increasingly difficult for patients to pay for hospital admission fees, the procedure, and processing of the samples obtained. Information on the success rate and safety of the procedure is of interest to nephrologists for cost-benefit considerations and medicolegal purposes. This paper reports the outcome of outpatient PRB done among patients of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. With the use of ultrasound guidance, PRB remains a safe procedure and can be done on an outpatient basis. PMID:15481751

  5. Investigation of safe-life fail-safe criteria for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the effects of a safe-life design approach and a fail-safe design approach on the space shuttle booster vehicle structure, and to recommend any changes to the structural design criteria. Two configurations of the booster vehicle were considered, one incorporating a delta wing (B-9U configuration) and the other a swept wing (B-16B configuration). Several major structural components of the booster were studied to determine the fatigue life, safe-life, and fail-safe capabilities of the baseline design. Each component was investigated to determine the practicability of applying a safe-life or fail-safe design philosophy, the changes such design approaches might require, and the impact of these changes on weight, cost, development plans, and performance.

  6. Sous vide processed foods: are they safe for the elderly?

    PubMed

    Briley, M E

    1992-01-01

    Demographic trends and market analyses indicate that Americans' interest in convenience foods that are nutritious, safe, and high quality will influence the food industry into the next century. The increase in individuals over 55 plus working women, and the changing family have caused the food industry to develop a new generation of foods. One of the processes, sous vide, is an advanced method where fresh foods are vacuum sealed in impermeable plastic, cooked at low temperature in circulating water, and chilled and held at refrigerator temperature for up to three weeks. Nutritionists and food scientists have concerns about the food safety of sous vide products and the possible increase in food borne illnesses. Continued research is needed for the food industry to deliver safe, nutritious foods, particularly to the elderly. PMID:1460553

  7. Can Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision Fund Brazilians' Educations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flávia Ribiero, Silvia; Carmem Ribeiro Duarte, Célia; Mc Leod, Roger David

    2008-10-01

    Directors of Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision, Inc., US Patent Office, April 8, 2008, trademark issued, grants ``The David Matthew Mc Leod Memorial Award,'' to individuals like Sylvia Flavia Ribeiro. Instructions at American locations enhance patenting, trade-marking, and propagation to individuals, and youth through parents. Naturoptics' earnings go by agreed percentages to named academic entities and awardees who sign non-disclosure agreements. These say the US Government trademarked the processes as safe, and that diagnostic or treatment techniques are not used, necessary, or allowed for Naturoptic Methods. These educationally explain how the inventor, Roger David Mc Leod, recovered his vision. Taught processes are released to awardees signing agreements this is an educational service, providing teaching services for clients. Non-disclosure agreements are required from clients. Work-study grants, ``The Kaan Balam Matagamon Memorial Award,'' in memory of DMM, may be awarded through the American Indians in Science and Engineering Society, AISES, and to other women and minorities.

  8. Procedural knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeff, M.P.; Lansky, A.L.

    1986-10-01

    Much of commonsense knowledge about the real world is in the form of procedures or sequences of actions for achieving particular goals. In this paper, a formalism is presented for representing such knowledge using the notion of process. A declarative semantics for the representation is given, which allows a user to state facts about the effects of doing things in the problem domain of interest. An operational semantics is also provided, which shows how this knowledge can be used to achieve particular goals or to form intentions regarding their achievement. Given both semantics, our formalism additionally serves as an executable specification language suitable for constructing complex systems. A system based on this formalism is described, and examples involving control of an autonomous robot and fault diagnosis for NASA's space shuttle are provided.

  9. Household's willingness to pay for arsenic safe drinking water in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nasreen Islam; Brouwer, Roy; Yang, Hong

    2014-10-01

    This study examines willingness to pay (WTP) in Bangladesh for arsenic (As) safe drinking water across different As-risk zones, applying a double bound discrete choice value elicitation approach. The study aims to provide a robust estimate of the benefits of As safe drinking water supply, which is compared to the results from a similar study published almost 10 years ago using a single bound estimation procedure. Tests show that the double bound valuation design does not suffer from anchoring or incentive incompatibility effects. Health risk awareness levels are high and households are willing to pay on average about 5 percent of their disposable average annual household income for As safe drinking water. Important factors influencing WTP include the bid amount to construct communal deep tubewell for As safe water supply, the risk zone where respondents live, household income, water consumption, awareness of water source contamination, whether household members are affected by As contamination, and whether they already take mitigation measures.

  10. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that acts like a scalpel (surgical knife). An electric current is passed through the loop, which cuts away ... A procedure in which an instrument works with electric current to destroy tissue. Local Anesthesia: The use of ...

  11. 23 CFR 650.313 - Inspection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... member and underwater inspection. (c) Rate each bridge as to its safe load-carrying capacity in... standard State or Federal agency forms. (e) Identify bridges with FCMs, bridges requiring underwater.... Inspect FCMs according to these procedures. (2) Bridges requiring underwater inspections. Identify...

  12. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  13. What are fire-safe valves

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, J.M.; Riccioli, F.D.

    1985-05-27

    The definition of a fire-safe valve has more than one answer since different standards exist for such valves. The major standards are presented in this article and their criteria discussed as an aid in specifying these devices. Fire-safety standards for equipment used in the chemical process industries (CPI) are critical however no single test for fire-safe valves has been developed that covers all of CPI. Since all fires are not alike, safety precautions should not all be the same for all situations. This article attempts to answer such questions as whether the refining industry's standards cover fire hazards posed by media and processes specific to the rest of the CPI and which criteria come closest to providing proper guidelines for choosing a fire-safe valve for non-oilrefining service.

  14. What Does a Safe Sleep Environment Look Like?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Skip sharing on social media links What Does a Safe Sleep Environment Look Like? Page Content ... safe sleep environment information are available below: What does a safe sleep environment look like? Reduce the ...

  15. Safe chemotherapy in the home environment.

    PubMed

    Chavis-Parker, Paula

    2015-05-01

    The Oncology Nursing Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology have established guidelines for the safe and effective use of chemotherapeutic medications in the acute and outpatient care settings. A review of literature was performed to determine the safe and effective administration of chemotherapy in the home environment. The administration of oral and intravenous chemotherapy in the home has become a common intervention for patients being treated for cancer based on patient preference, cost-effectiveness of healthcare delivery, and increasing demand for oncology services. Home healthcare nurses can greatly impact the management of adverse effects of chemotherapy in the home, increasing the quality of life and improving patient outcomes.

  16. "Safe Schools within Safe Communities: A Regional Summit in the Heartland." Policy Briefs Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huertas, Aurelio, Jr.; Sullivan, Carol

    This report documents the proceedings of a regional policy seminar hosted by the Iowa Department of Education with support from the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL) and the Midwest Regional Center for Drug-Free Schools and Communities (MRC). The seminar, "Safe Schools Within Safe Communities," was held on September 19-20,…

  17. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Sun Safe Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, Joseph; Roger, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a spacecraft designed and built at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD, was launched on June 18, 2009 from Cape Canaveral. It is currently in orbit about the Moon taking detailed science measurements and providing a highly accurate mapping of the suface in preparation for the future return of astronauts to a permanent moon base. Onboard the spacecraft is a complex set of algorithms designed by the attitude control engineers at GSFC to control the pointig for all operational events, including anomalies that require the spacecraft to be put into a well known attitude configuration for a sufficiently long duration to allow for the investigation and correction of the anomaly. GSFC level requirements state that each spacecraft s control system design must include a configuration for this pointing and lso be able to maintain a thermally safe and power positive attitude. This stable control algorithm for anomalous events is commonly referred to as the safe mode and consists of control logic thatwill put the spacecraft in this safe configuration defined by the spacecraft s hardware, power and environment capabilities and limitations. The LRO Sun Safe mode consists of a coarse sun-pointing set of algorithms that puts the spacecraft into this thermally safe and power positive attitude and can be achieved wihin a required amount of time from any initial attitude, provided that the system momentum is within the momentum capability of the reaction wheels. On LRO the Sun Safe mode makes use of coarse sun sensors (CSS), an inertial reference unit (IRU) and reaction wheels (RW) to slew the spacecraft to a solar inertial pointing. The CSS and reaction wheels have some level of redundancy because of their numbers. However, the IRU is a single-point-failure piece of hardware. Without the rate information provided by the IRU, the Sun Safe control algorithms could not

  18. Transient Approximation of SAFE-100 Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Reid, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have designed several heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, ranging in power from 15 kWt to 800 kWt, for both surface power systems and nuclear electric propulsion systems. The Safe, Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) is now being developed in a collaborative effort between LANL and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC). NASA is responsible for fabrication and testing of non-nuclear, electrically heated modules in the Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at MSFC. In-core heat pipes must be properly thawed as the reactor power starts. Computational models have been developed to assess the expected operation of a specific heat pipe design during start-up, steady state operation, and shutdown. While computationally intensive codes provide complete, detailed analyses of heat pipe thaw, a relatively simple. concise routine can also be applied to approximate the response of a heat pipe to changes in the evaporator heat transfer rate during start-up and power transients (e.g., modification of reactor power level) with reasonably accurate results. This paper describes a simplified model of heat pipe start-up that extends previous work and compares the results to experimental measurements for a SAFE-100 type heat pipe design.

  19. The use of collaboration to implement evidence-based safe practices.

    PubMed

    Clarke, John R

    2013-12-01

    The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority receives over 235,000 reports of medical error per year. Near miss and serious event reports of common and interesting problems are analysed to identify best practices for preventing harmful errors. Dissemination of this evidence-based information in the peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory and presentations to medical staffs are not sufficient for adoption of best practices. Adoption of best practices has required working with institutions to identify local barriers to and incentives for adopting best practices and redesigning the delivery system to make desired behaviour easy and undesirable behaviour more difficult. Collaborations, where institutions can learn from the experiences of others, have show decreases in harmful events. The Pennsylvania Program to Prevent Wrong-Site Surgery is used as an example. Two collaborations to prevent wrong-site surgery have been completed, one with 30 institutions in eastern Pennsylvania and one with 19 in western Pennsylvania. The first collaboration achieved a 73% decrease in the rolling average of wrong-site events over 18 months. The second collaboration experienced no wrong-site operating room procedures over more than one year. Significance for public healthSince the Institute of Medicine's To Err is Human identified medical errors as a major cause of death, the public has been interested in the recommendations for reporting of medical errors and implementing safe systems for the delivery of healthcare. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has followed those recommendations and found that an essential intermediate step between analysing reports and implementing safe systems is collaborative learning among healthcare institutions. The experience in Pennsylvania should be useful to other public organizations wishing to improve safety. PMID:25170497

  20. Revised Unfilling Procedure for Solid Lithium Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Leveling, A.; /Fermilab

    2003-06-03

    A procedure for unfilling used lithium lenses to has been described in Pbar Note 664. To date, the procedure has been used to disassemble lenses 20, 21, 17, 18, and 16. As a result of this work, some parts of the original procedure were found to be time consuming and ineffective. Modifications to the original procedure have been made to streamline the process and are discussed in this note. The revised procedure is included in this note.

  1. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  2. Classrooms as Safe Places To Be Wrong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankey, Derek

    This paper contends that classrooms should be safe places for students and their teachers to be wrong, suggesting that this concept should provide the mainspring for educational reform in Hong Kong and in other places in the world. It notes that education in Hong Kong is harsh and has a tendency to label students; for the majority of students,…

  3. Submarine 'safe to escape' studies in man.

    PubMed

    Jurd, K M; Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Blogg, S L; Stansfield, M R D; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Navy requires reliable advice on the safe limits of escape from a distressed submarine (DISSUB). Flooding in a DISSUB may cause a rise in ambient pressure, increasing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and decreasing the maximum depth from which it is safe to escape. The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure/depth limits to escape following saturation at raised ambient pressure. Exposure to saturation pressures up to 1.6 bar (a) (160 kPa) (n = 38); escapes from depths down to 120 meters of sea water (msw) (n = 254) and a combination of saturation followed by escape (n = 90) was carried out in the QinetiQ Submarine Escape Simulator, Alverstoke, United Kingdom. Doppler ultrasound monitoring was used to judge the severity of decompression stress. The trials confirmed the previously untested advice, in the Guardbook, that if a DISSUB was lying at a depth of 90 msw, then it was safe to escape when the pressure in the DISSUB was 1.5 bar (a), but also indicated that this advice may be overly conservative. This study demonstrated that the upper DISSUB saturation pressure limit to safe escape from 90 msw was 1.6 bar (a), resulting in two cases of DCS. PMID:25109084

  4. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  5. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J. Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  6. Exploring Safely: A Guide for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Terry; Texley, Juliana

    It is very important to provide a safe learning environment for students while engaging them in investigative and observational hands-on science activities. This teacher's guide provides information on safety rules and regulations in a narrative style while discussing both self-contained classroom teachers and science specialists in the elementary…

  7. Safe Schools for the Roller Coaster Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inlay, Linda

    2005-01-01

    The dramatic ups and downs so often witnessed in adolescents are the result of changes in their brain activity. It is vital that the emotional and psychological needs that arise from such intense brain development are acknowledged and addressed so that middle school becomes a safe environment for the budding adults.

  8. Safe Schools: What the Southeast Is Doing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SERVE Policy Brief, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Virtually no school is safe from violence. FBI statistics, which show that juvenile crimes actually peaked during the mid-1970s, are at odds with the public perception that crime rates among young people are at an all-time high. The FBI acknowledges, however, that the crimes committed by young people tend to be more serious than in the past, and…

  9. Hitting the Road: Safe Student Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labriola, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the importance of school administrators' taking an active role in selecting motor coach carriers for their school trips. School administrators must be able to prove due diligence in selecting safe motor carriers. If not, they risk significant liability exposure for neglecting this critical responsibility. The article…

  10. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., issued by representatives of the marketing or online industries, or by other persons, that, after notice... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S...

  11. Creating a Safe and Positive Classroom Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kimberly A.

    To insure that each child has a safe and positive environment at school, teachers should earn their pupils' respect and classroom activities should be oriented to helping each child succeed. Three key phrases reinforce the expectation of success. These phrases, which teacher and pupils should understand and remember, are: (1) It is O.K. to make a…

  12. Submarine 'safe to escape' studies in man.

    PubMed

    Jurd, K M; Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Blogg, S L; Stansfield, M R D; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Navy requires reliable advice on the safe limits of escape from a distressed submarine (DISSUB). Flooding in a DISSUB may cause a rise in ambient pressure, increasing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and decreasing the maximum depth from which it is safe to escape. The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure/depth limits to escape following saturation at raised ambient pressure. Exposure to saturation pressures up to 1.6 bar (a) (160 kPa) (n = 38); escapes from depths down to 120 meters of sea water (msw) (n = 254) and a combination of saturation followed by escape (n = 90) was carried out in the QinetiQ Submarine Escape Simulator, Alverstoke, United Kingdom. Doppler ultrasound monitoring was used to judge the severity of decompression stress. The trials confirmed the previously untested advice, in the Guardbook, that if a DISSUB was lying at a depth of 90 msw, then it was safe to escape when the pressure in the DISSUB was 1.5 bar (a), but also indicated that this advice may be overly conservative. This study demonstrated that the upper DISSUB saturation pressure limit to safe escape from 90 msw was 1.6 bar (a), resulting in two cases of DCS.

  13. 49 CFR 230.70 - Safe condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and... of each day the locomotive is used, the steam locomotive operator shall ensure that: (1) The brakes on the steam locomotive and tender are in safe and suitable condition for service; (2) The...

  14. Safe Schools: A Best Practices Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Educational Facility Planners International, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Every day in America more than 50 million children go to neighborhood public schools. Parents send them off with every hope they will be safe while there. And yet, as has been the case in too many cities, violence shatters that hope. The Council of Educational Facilities Planners International (CEFPI) seeks to lead in the effort to bolster schools…

  15. Is Your Child's School Really Safe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, James

    2002-01-01

    Presents a brief quiz for parents to see if their child's school building is taking basic steps to ensure a safe learning environment (e.g., Is the building locked? Are strict guidelines in place when students participate in field trips? Is adult supervision always maintained on playgrounds?). Suggested action plans are included. A sidebar offers…

  16. Going Online to Save Data Safely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsbourough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of saving data safely. Suggestions include making backup copies of all important computer documents; frequently hitting the Ctrl-S keys to save current documents to the hard disk; periodically save a backup copy to a floppy disk; periodically saving a copy through the Internet to an offsite backup disk; and…

  17. Safe practice in syringe pump management.

    PubMed

    Mukoreka, Juliette; Sisay, Isatta

    Syringe pumps offer an alternative route for delivering medicine when the oral route cannot be used. This is particularly important for patients receiving palliative care, for whom a continuous infusion of medication can improve symptom control. This article explains how to administer drugs safely using these devices. PMID:26182586

  18. 49 CFR 230.70 - Safe condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and... of each day the locomotive is used, the steam locomotive operator shall ensure that: (1) The brakes on the steam locomotive and tender are in safe and suitable condition for service; (2) The...

  19. 49 CFR 230.70 - Safe condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and... of each day the locomotive is used, the steam locomotive operator shall ensure that: (1) The brakes on the steam locomotive and tender are in safe and suitable condition for service; (2) The...

  20. Disabled Children: The Right to Feel Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mepham, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the fundamental right of disabled children to feel safe and be free from bullying, harassment and abuse. The article proposes that, 20 years since the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, disabled children are still facing barriers to securing this right. The article focuses on recent Mencap research that…

  1. Campaign Safe & Sober. Youth & Generation X Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This packet contains information on safe and sober driving for members of Generation X. The packet includes information on "Buckle Up America! Week 1998," which was designed to encourage everyone on the road to use seat belts and child safety seats and to use them properly. It also offers a safety city brochure and multiple program materials…

  2. Freeze plug proves safe, economical in riser repair

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    In October 1992, Exxon Pipeline Co., Houston, performed in the Gulf of Mexico what the company believes to have been the first underwater freeze-plug procedure. To form a plug, water in a small section of the pipe is frozen with liquid nitrogen. In partially replacing a 10-in. riser at South Marsh Island Block 6A, Exxon Pipeline worked closely with a freeze-plug service company to minimize environmental and personnel exposure and to avoid the chance of an oil spill. The freeze plug reduced the time the pipe was open-ended during the repair, and hydrotesting the freeze plug area and repair section ensured integrity. The paper describes onshore testing of the procedures, pre-work surface cleaning, and the freeze-plug procedure.

  3. Undiagnosed myopathy before surgery and safe anaesthesia table.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Carlo P; Accorsi, Alma; Morandi, Lucia O; Mongini, Tiziana; Savoia, Gennaro; Gravino, Elvira; Angelini, Corrado; Tegazzin, Vincenzo

    2013-10-01

    Patients with muscle pathology are a challenge for anaesthesiologists because of possible life-threatening general anaesthesia complications. A review of the current medical literature on the issue clearly indicates that increasing awareness by anaesthesiologists in recent years has led to a reduction in the occurrence of adverse events in patients with diagnostically well-defined muscle disease. On the other hand, the current emerging aspect is that the great majority of complications concern subjects with clinically non-overt (silent to mildly symptomatic) and thus undiagnosed myopathy. With a view to improving prevention of possible critical anaesthesia complications in such patients, we present a "Safe Anaesthesia Table", listing both the anaesthetic drugs to be avoided and those considered harmless for myopathic patients, irrespective of age and type of pathology. In addition, a brief outline about the clinical aspects suggestive of a possible muscle pathology is also provided. Using "safe drugs" during routine surgical procedures in subjects with suspected undiagnosed myopathy will enable the anaesthesiologist to avoid delaying surgery, while protecting them from anaesthesia complications. By following this approach the presumed myopathy can be properly investigated after surgery.

  4. Safe Handling of Parenteral Cytotoxics: Recommendations for Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Green, Esther; Johnston, Mary; Trudeau, Maureen; Schwartz, Lisa; Poirier, Susan; Macartney, Gail; Milliken, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a set of recommendations for the safe handling of parenteral cytotoxics in health care facilities in Ontario, Canada. Methods: Systematic reviews were conducted to assemble evidence on risks to health care staff who prepare or administer cytotoxic drugs for cancer care and on closed systems for handling these drugs. Recent guidelines on safe handling of hazardous drugs were also reviewed. A multidisciplinary expert panel used an ethical framework to interpret this evidence and develop a set of recommendations to guide oncology practice in Ontario. Practitioners were surveyed and asked to provide input for the final set of recommendations. Results: Available evidence on risks associated with handling cytotoxic drugs is of poor quality, but it suggests that health care workers exposed to cytotoxic agents may be at increased risk for miscarriages. There is general agreement across guideline development groups in North America, Europe, and Australia concerning recommendations related to policies and procedures for handling cytotoxic drugs, use of personal protective equipment, and standards for ventilated cabinets, syringes and intravenous sets, transport and labeling, and education and training of staff. Limited evidence from poor-quality studies suggests that closed systems may reduce surface contamination with hazardous drugs during preparation. Conclusion: A set of recommendations was formulated by the expert panel and approved by practitioners surveyed across Ontario. PMID:20856737

  5. Human round trip to Mars: Six months and radiation safe

    SciTech Connect

    Lazareth, O.W.; Schmidt, E.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a different type of round trip to Mars, using a combination of spacecraft. Compared to typical proposals, this flight is relatively fast and relatively safe from biological radiation dosage. Our study is concerned with the trip from Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Four spacecraft are required for the round trip. The crew spends most of their time on board a comparatively large, well shielded spacecraft (LC) which is in free (non-powered) orbit about the sun. The crew travels from Earth orbit to the LC while on board a comparatively small, powered spacecraft (SC). At Mars, the procedure is reversed and the crew returns on a second LC. In addition, a cargo craft, with no crew, is sent to Mars prior to the crew leaving Earth orbit. The trip time is about six months and the radiation dose equivalent is within guidelines recommended by the National Commission on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  6. Defect specific maintenance of SG tubes -- How safe is it?

    SciTech Connect

    Cizelj, L.; Mavko, B.; Dvorsek, T.

    1997-02-01

    The efficiency of the defect specific plugging criterion for outside diameter stress corrosion cracking at tube support plates is assessed. The efficiency is defined by three parameters: (1) number of plugged tubes, (2) probability of steam generator tube rupture and (3) predicted accidental leak rate through the defects. A probabilistic model is proposed to quantify the probability of tube rupture, while procedures available in literature were used to define the accidental leak rates. The defect specific plugging criterion was then compared to the performance of traditional (45%) plugging criterion using realistic data from Krsko nuclear power plant. Advantages of the defect specific approach over the traditional one are clearly shown. Some hints on the optimization of safe life of steam generator are also given.

  7. Safe Affordable Fission Engine-(SAFE-) 100a Heat Exchanger Thermal and Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.

    2005-01-01

    A potential fission power system for in-space missions is a heat pipe-cooled reactor coupled to a Brayton cycle. In this system, a heat exchanger (HX) transfers the heat of the reactor core to the Brayton gas. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine- (SAFE-) 100a is a test program designed to thermally and hydraulically simulate a 95 Btu/s prototypic heat pipe-cooled reactor using electrical resistance heaters on the ground. This Technical Memorandum documents the thermal and structural assessment of the HX used in the SAFE-100a program.

  8. Realistic Testing of the Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) Thermal Simulator Using Fiber Bragg Gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Fielder, Robert S.; Van Dyke, Melissa K.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2004-02-04

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. Distributed high temperature measurements were made with 20 FBG temperature sensors installed in the SAFE-100 thermal simulator at the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center. Experiments were performed at temperatures approaching 800 deg. C and 1150 deg. C for characterization studies of the SAFE-100 core. Temperature profiles were successfully generated for the core during temperature increases and decreases. Related tests in the SAFE-100 successfully provided strain measurement data.

  9. Comparison of a standardized procedure with current laboratory practices for the detection of lupus anticoagulant in France. Working Group on Hemostasis of the Société Française de Biologie Clinique.

    PubMed

    1993-11-15

    A multicenter study involving 13 laboratories was designed to compare a common procedure for screening lupus anticoagulants (LA) to the different practices currently in use in these laboratories. The common procedure combined 3 phospholipid-dependent assays, including mixing studies and a phospholipid neutralizing test. Due to the heterogeneity of LA expression, an abnormal result in at least one of the tests was sufficient to classify a sample as positive for LA. Consecutive samples referred for LA diagnosis were evaluated in parallel by each participant and the data found using the common procedure were analyzed independently according to mutually agreed cut-offs and criteria for sample classification. Within a period of 3 months, 535 samples were included, of which 147 were judged LA positive, 29 undetermined and 359 negative by the respective laboratories using their current practice. When using the common procedure, 149 plasmas were said to be positive, 38 undetermined and 348 negative. Absolute concordance occurred for 81% of the specimen population and absolute discordance (positive versus negative) for 7%. The level of agreement between the common procedure and the current practices, assessed by kappa indexes, indicated noticeable variations in the rates of detection from laboratory to laboratory. Among the different tests used in the common procedure, regular APTT was the least sensitive (about 50% detection) but none of the other tests alone recognized more than 73% of specimens from the LA positive population. This yield increased to about 90% with any combination of 2 sensitive tests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Versatile, Reusable, and Inexpensive Ultrasound Phantom Procedural Trainers.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Dustin S; Cupp, Julia A; Broder, Joshua S

    2016-04-01

    We have constructed simple and inexpensive models for ultrasound-guided procedural training using synthetic ballistic gelatin. These models are durable, leak resistant, and able to be shaped to fit a variety of simulation scenarios to teach procedures. They provide realistic tactile and sonographic training for our learners in a safe, idealized setting. PMID:26969595

  11. Driving Procedures. A Resource Guide for Driver Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Public Safety, Austin.

    Designed to provide instructors with resource materials for driver education, this book contains mainly materials on established safe driving procedures. An introduction defines a procedure as describing ways in which a driver can comply with the law to do something extra that will increase his/her safety and prevent congestion and collision.…

  12. 33 CFR 83.06 - Safe speed (Rule 6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe speed (Rule 6). 83.06... Safe speed (Rule 6). Every vessel shall at all times proceed at a safe speed so that she can take... prevailing circumstances and conditions. In determining a safe speed the following factors shall be...

  13. 33 CFR 83.06 - Safe speed (Rule 6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safe speed (Rule 6). 83.06... Safe speed (Rule 6). Every vessel shall at all times proceed at a safe speed so that she can take... prevailing circumstances and conditions. In determining a safe speed the following factors shall be...

  14. 33 CFR 83.06 - Safe speed (Rule 6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safe speed (Rule 6). 83.06... Safe speed (Rule 6). Every vessel shall at all times proceed at a safe speed so that she can take... prevailing circumstances and conditions. In determining a safe speed the following factors shall be...

  15. 33 CFR 83.06 - Safe speed (Rule 6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe speed (Rule 6). 83.06... Safe speed (Rule 6). Every vessel shall at all times proceed at a safe speed so that she can take... prevailing circumstances and conditions. In determining a safe speed the following factors shall be...

  16. 33 CFR 83.06 - Safe speed (Rule 6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safe speed (Rule 6). 83.06... Safe speed (Rule 6). Every vessel shall at all times proceed at a safe speed so that she can take... prevailing circumstances and conditions. In determining a safe speed the following factors shall be...

  17. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fail safe monitoring systems. 77.312 Section 77... Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which will safely shut down the system and any related...

  18. Promoting safe IV management in practice using H.A.N.D.S.

    PubMed

    Frimpong, Angela; Caguioa, Jennifer; Octavo, Genevi

    The aim of this article is to promote best practice for the insertion and care of intravascular (IV) devices. The H.A.N.D.S. acronym was created to serve as an aide memoire to general and specialist nurses regarding the 5 key interventions to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). In order to promote safe and evidence-based practice in IV therapy a practical guide with clinical information about common IV procedures has been developed. This article provides back-to-basics guidance on how to deliver IV therapy safely and effectively.

  19. 32 CFR 159.6 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... as country information and cultural training, and guidance on working with host country nationals and... Chief of Mission, will issue guidance and procedures implementing the standing combatant...

  20. Office procedures: practical and safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Ty B

    2012-09-01

    Gynecologic invasive procedures have moved into the physician's office due to improved reimbursement and convenience. Creating a just and safe office culture has generated robust conversations in the medical literature. This article reviews the foundational principles relating to safe practices in the office including: checklists, drills, selecting a safety officer, achieving office certification, medication usage, and engaging the patient in the safety culture. Reduction of medical errors in the office will require open dialogue between the stake holders: providers, insurers, patients, state and federal agencies, and educational bodies such as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  1. [Consensus on safe infant's furniture: brief version].

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Several products that are used for support, transportation or recreation in infants and children can cause non intentional injuries. This consensus tries to provide pediatricians and families with the necessary elements to recognize and choose safe infant's furniture. A group of 24 experts developed a consensus according to Delphi's method, which consists in successiverounds of questions. Recommendations are supported with bibliography. Infant walkers are not recommended, as they are considered useless and dangerous. Guidelines are given to choose appropriate child restraint systems, when and how to use them, and how to install them in a safe way. Injuries and prevention measures related to strollers, high chairs, cribs and bunk beds are described. Risks and the way to avoid them are diagrammed in figures that can be used to transmit recommendations to families. PMID:27079398

  2. [Consensus on safe infant's furniture: brief version].

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Several products that are used for support, transportation or recreation in infants and children can cause non intentional injuries. This consensus tries to provide pediatricians and families with the necessary elements to recognize and choose safe infant's furniture. A group of 24 experts developed a consensus according to Delphi's method, which consists in successiverounds of questions. Recommendations are supported with bibliography. Infant walkers are not recommended, as they are considered useless and dangerous. Guidelines are given to choose appropriate child restraint systems, when and how to use them, and how to install them in a safe way. Injuries and prevention measures related to strollers, high chairs, cribs and bunk beds are described. Risks and the way to avoid them are diagrammed in figures that can be used to transmit recommendations to families.

  3. Perioperative Care of Prisoners: Providing Safe Care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-03-01

    Correctional nurses are trained to care for prisoners in a controlled security environment; however, when a convict is transferred to a noncorrectional health care facility, the nurses there are often unfamiliar with custody requirements or how to safely care for these patients. The care of prisoners outside of prison has not been adequately investigated, and a gap exists between research and nursing education and practice. Nurses rarely have to consider how providing care for a prisoner in custody affects their practice, the potential dissonance between routine nursing care and the requirements to maintain security, or that care of prisoners in unsecured clinical areas places the nurse and other personnel at risk for physical assault or prisoner escape. Educating perioperative nurses in the care of prisoners in a public hospital environment is important for the provision of safe care and prevention of physical and emotional repercussions to personnel.

  4. Safe and efficient use of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Downes, P K

    2007-07-14

    A minority of people abuse the freedom of the Internet to the detriment of the vast majority. Many people feel that the Internet requires more regulation to reduce the burden of hackers, viruses, hoaxes, adverts and spam that continue to proliferate unabated. Until this ever happens, it is down to the individual person or business to protect themselves against malicious attacks and to use the Internet in a safe and efficient manner. PMID:17632481

  5. Safe exercise prescription for children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Alleyne, Julia MK

    1998-01-01

    This article provides practical advice on healthy exercise prescription for children. There is growing scientific evidence about the abilities and limits of child athletes in both recreational and competitive environments. As exercise becomes essential for the prevention of illness and maintenance of health, the counselling for an exercise prescription requires enhanced knowledge. The latest recommendations on safe strength, resistance and weight training are presented in a concise format for office use. PMID:20401276

  6. Energy week `96 - PETRO-SAFE

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Proceedings of the Petro-Safe Energy Week Conference and Exhibition held January 29-February 2, 1996 in Houston, Texas are presented. A separate abstract was prepared for 53 papers for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database. The papers covered such topics as environmental issues in the petroleum industry, process safety management, waste and remediation issues, safety issues, and health, safety, and environemental training issues.

  7. Safe and efficient use of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Downes, P K

    2007-07-14

    A minority of people abuse the freedom of the Internet to the detriment of the vast majority. Many people feel that the Internet requires more regulation to reduce the burden of hackers, viruses, hoaxes, adverts and spam that continue to proliferate unabated. Until this ever happens, it is down to the individual person or business to protect themselves against malicious attacks and to use the Internet in a safe and efficient manner.

  8. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  9. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  10. Total laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Masoni, Luigi; Mari, Francesco Saverio; Nigri, Giuseppe; Favi, Francesco; Pindozzi, Fioralba; Dall'Oglio, Anna; Pancaldi, Alessandra; Brescia, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Hartmann's procedure is still performed in those cases in which colorectal anastomosis might be unsafe. Reversal of Hartmann's procedure (HR) is considered a major surgical procedure with a high morbidity (55 to 60%) and mortality rate (0 to 4%). To decrease these rates, laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal procedure was successfully experienced. We report our totally laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal technique. Between 2004 and 2010 we performed 27 HRs with a totally laparoscopic approach. The efficacy and safety of this technique were demonstrated evaluating the operative data, postoperative complications, and the outcome of the patients. There were no open conversions or major intraoperative complications. Anastomotic leaking occurred in one patient requiring an ileostomy; one patient needed a blood transfusion and one had a nosocomial pneumonia. The mean postoperative hospitalization was 5.7 days. Laparoscopic HR is a feasible and safe procedure and can be considered a valid alternative to open HR.

  11. Directors of Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision, Inc. Release Patented Process to Awardees for their Personal Use and Mentored Teaching of the Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Paul J.; D., N.; C., D.; McLeod, Roger David

    2008-05-01

    The Board of Directors of Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision, Inc., US Patent Office, trademark issued, patent issue date April 8, 2008, has granted ``The David Matthew Mc Leod Memorial Award,'' to named individuals. Naturoptics teaching earnings by recipients are to be disbursed according to agreed percentages to named academic entities and to the awardees. When awardees sign non-disclosure agreements, they are shown why the process is safe. They are also taught that no diagnostic or treatment techniques are used, necessary or allowed for the processes. This is an educational consultation that explains how Naturoptics inventor, Roger David Mc Leod, safely and rapidly recovered his vision. The now patented processes as taught is released for the use of those awardees that sign agreements that they were merely provided a teaching service, and will only be doing educational consulting for their clients. Such clients must follow similar procedures. Other equivalent work-study grants are named ``The Kaan Balam Matagamon Memorial Award,'' also in memory of DMM. The American Indians in Science and Engineering Society may also be participating.

  12. Safe, efficient, and cost-effective orthognathic surgery in the outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Brian B; Tucker, Myron R

    2009-10-01

    There has been a dramatic decline in the number of orthognathic surgery cases over the past 15 to 20 years. This decrease is a result of several compounding factors including decreasing coverage by major medical insurance companies and increasing health care costs. The difficulty associated with making orthognathic surgery financially practical has turned the interest of many oral and maxillofacial surgeons away from orthognathic procedures. The combination of these factors has resulted in decreased availability of surgeons participating in the correction of dentofacial deformities and has forced orthodontists and patients, without surgical correction as an option, to settle for less-than-ideal treatment results. To reverse this trend and make surgery more affordable and available, surgeons must work to make surgical treatment more acceptable to patients. This can be accomplished in several ways. First, the oral and maxillofacial surgery profession must reinforce the importance and value of orthognathic surgery to insurance providers, patients, and referring clinicians, as well as to surgeons within our own specialty. Alternative methods for providing high-quality surgical services at a reasonable cost must be explored including providing options for cost-effective outpatient surgical care, making better arrangements for financial assistance, and exploring options to obtain coverage from third-party providers. Outpatient surgery in facilities that can substantially reduce cost can be an effective way of providing quality treatment that is affordable to patients. Efficient, safe, and effective outpatient orthognathic surgery will help patients benefit from this valuable service.

  13. 30 CFR 77.803 - Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.803 Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems. On and after September 30, 1971, all...

  14. 30 CFR 77.803 - Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.803 Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems. On and after September 30, 1971, all...

  15. 30 CFR 77.803 - Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.803 Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems. On and after September 30, 1971, all...

  16. Leadership for Safe and Inclusive Schools: An Examination of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Educators' Perceptions of School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    Effective school leaders work to assist students and staff alike in feeling safe within the school environment. Educators need to feel safe in order to successfully carry out their professional responsibilities. Historically and presently, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) educators have felt unsafe in school settings, even though…

  17. Procedures in complex systems: the airline cockpit.

    PubMed

    Degani, A; Wiener, E L

    1997-05-01

    In complex human-machine systems, successful operations depend on an elaborate set of procedures which are specified by the operational management of the organization. These procedures indicate to the human operator (in this case the pilot) the manner in which operational management intends to have various tasks done. The intent is to provide guidance to the pilots and to ensure a safe, logical, efficient, and predictable (standardized) means of carrying out the objectives of the job. However, procedures can become a hodge-podge. Inconsistent or illogical procedures may lead to noncompliance by operators. Based on a field study with three major airlines, the authors propose a model for procedure development called the "Four P's": philosophy, policies, procedures, and practices. Using this model as a framework, the authors discuss the intricate issue of designing flight-deck procedures, and propose a conceptual approach for designing any set of procedures. The various factors, both external and internal to the cockpit, that must be considered for procedure design are presented. In particular, the paper addresses the development of procedures for automated cockpits--a decade-long, and highly controversial issue in commercial aviation. Although this paper is based on airline operations, we assume that the principles discussed here are also applicable to other high-risk supervisory control systems, such as space flight, manufacturing process control, nuclear power production, and military operations. PMID:11541101

  18. 77 FR 56762 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... each SIAP is listed on the appropriate FAA Form 8260, as modified by the National Flight Data Center... promote safe flight operations under instrument flight rules at the affected airports. DATES: This rule is... Office of the region in which the affected airport is located; 3. The National Flight Procedures...

  19. 78 FR 25384 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Takeoff Minimums and textual ODP amendments may have been issued previously by the FAA in a Flight Data... promote safe flight operations under instrument flight rules at the affected airports. DATES: This rule is... Office of the region in which the affected airport is located; 3. The National Flight Procedures...

  20. Safe Schools: A Planning Guide for Action Workbook. Using the Seven-Step Planning Process for Safe and Effective Schools. 2002 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Carol

    This workbook presents a seven-step planning process for safe and effective schools. Though specifically directed to schools in California, most of the components of the plan will pertain to schools everywhere. The workbook contains requirements of the California Education Code; many work sheets, sample forms, summary sheets, checklists, rubrics,…

  1. Stem Cells Deemed Safe for ALS Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby step forward," said lead researcher Dr. Jonathan Glass, of Emory University, in Atlanta. "We can say this procedure is doable in ALS patients," Glass said. "Now we have to test whether it's ...

  2. A guide to safe field operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Yorke, T.H.; Mycyk, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    Most functions of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Water Resources Division (WRD) require employees to participate in numerous field activities ranging from routine meetings with cooperators, other federal and public officials, and private citizens to potentially hazardous assignments, such as making flood measurements and scuba diving to service underwater instruments. It is paramount that each employee be aware of safety procedures and operational policies of the WRD to ensure that (1) their activities avoid or minimize personal injury to the employee, coworkers, or anyone in the vicinity of the field activity, and (2) their conduct does not infringe on the personal or property rights of any individual or organization. The purpose of the guide is to familiarize employees with the operational and safety procedures expected to be followed by each employee as a representative of the WRD. It is also intended as a training tool for all new employees and a document to be reviewed by each employee before undertaking a field assignment. It includes general procedures that are standard and applicable to all field operations, such as communication, vehicle operation, and adequate preparation for anticipated weather conditions. It also includes a discussion of specific procedures and safety considerations for most of the routine field assignments undertaken by hydrologists and hydrologic technicians of the WRD. The guide is not intended to be a technical handbook outlining step-by-step procedures for performing specific tasks or a comprehensive discussion of every possible activity that may be undertaken by a USGS employee. Employees are referred to the Techniques for Water-Resources Investigations (TWRI) series for specific technical procedures and to the U.S. Geological Survey Safety and Environmental Health Handbook 445-1-H (USGS, August 1989), USGS Occupational Hazards and Safety Procedures Handbook 445-2-H (December 1993), the WRD notebook on Safety Policy and

  3. Designing Flight-Deck Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, L.; Shafto, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A complex human-machine system consists of more than merely one or more human operators and a collection of hardware components. In order to operate a complex system successfully, the human-machine system must be supported by an organizational infrastructure of operating concepts, rules, guidelines, and documents. The coherency of such operating concepts, in terms of consistency and logic, is vitally important for the efficiency and safety of any complex system. In high-risk endeavors such as aircraft operations, space flight, nuclear power production, manufacturing process control, and military operations, it is essential that such support be flawless, as the price of operational error can be high. When operating rules are not adhered to, or the rules are inadequate for the task at hand, not only will the system's goals be thwarted, but there may also be tragic human and material consequences. To ensure safe and predictable operations, support to the operators, in this case flight crews, often comes in the form of standard operating procedures. These provide the crew with step-by-step guidance for carrying out their operations. Standard procedures do indeed promote uniformity, but they do so at the risk of reducing the role of human operators to a lower level. Management, however, must recognize the danger of over-procedurization, which fails to exploit one of the most valuable assets in the system, the intelligent operator who is "on the scene." The alert system designer and operations manager recognize that there cannot be a procedure for everything, and the time will come in which the operators of a complex system will face a situation for which there is no written procedure. Procedures, whether executed by humans or machines, have their place, but so does human cognition.

  4. Establishing a safe container for learning in simulation: the role of the presimulation briefing.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Jenny W; Raemer, Daniel B; Simon, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Summary statement: In the absence of theoretical or empirical agreement on how to establish and maintain engagement in instructor-led health care simulation debriefings, we organize a set of promising practices we have identified in closely related fields and our own work. We argue that certain practices create a psychologically safe context for learning, a so-called safe container. Establishing a safe container, in turn, allows learners to engage actively in simulation plus debriefings despite possible disruptions to that engagement such as unrealistic aspects of the simulation, potential threats to their professional identity, or frank discussion of mistakes. Establishing a psychologically safe context includes the practices of (1) clarifying expectations, (2) establishing a "fiction contract" with participants, (3) attending to logistic details, and (4) declaring and enacting a commitment to respecting learners and concern for their psychological safety. As instructors collaborate with learners to perform these practices, consistency between what instructors say and do may also impact learners' engagement.

  5. Establishing a safe container for learning in simulation: the role of the presimulation briefing.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Jenny W; Raemer, Daniel B; Simon, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Summary statement: In the absence of theoretical or empirical agreement on how to establish and maintain engagement in instructor-led health care simulation debriefings, we organize a set of promising practices we have identified in closely related fields and our own work. We argue that certain practices create a psychologically safe context for learning, a so-called safe container. Establishing a safe container, in turn, allows learners to engage actively in simulation plus debriefings despite possible disruptions to that engagement such as unrealistic aspects of the simulation, potential threats to their professional identity, or frank discussion of mistakes. Establishing a psychologically safe context includes the practices of (1) clarifying expectations, (2) establishing a "fiction contract" with participants, (3) attending to logistic details, and (4) declaring and enacting a commitment to respecting learners and concern for their psychological safety. As instructors collaborate with learners to perform these practices, consistency between what instructors say and do may also impact learners' engagement. PMID:25188485

  6. Microbial ecology laboratory procedures manual NASA/MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    1990-01-01

    An essential part of the efficient operation of any microbiology laboratory involved in sample analysis is a standard procedures manual. The purpose of this manual is to provide concise and well defined instructions on routine technical procedures involving sample analysis and methods for monitoring and maintaining quality control within the laboratory. Of equal importance is the safe operation of the laboratory. This manual outlines detailed procedures to be followed in the microbial ecology laboratory to assure safety, analytical control, and validity of results.

  7. Safe handling of potential peroxide forming compounds and their corresponding peroxide yielded derivatives.

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Boyle, Timothy J.; Dean, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    This report addresses recent developments concerning the identification and handling of potential peroxide forming (PPF) and peroxide yielded derivative (PYD) chemicals. PPF chemicals are described in terms of labeling, shelf lives, and safe handling requirements as required at SNL. The general peroxide chemistry concerning formation, prevention, and identification is cursorily presented to give some perspective to the generation of peroxides. The procedure for determining peroxide concentrations and the proper disposal methods established by the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility are also provided. Techniques such as neutralization and dilution are provided for the safe handling of any PYD chemicals to allow for safe handling. The appendices are a collection of all available SNL documentation pertaining to PPF/PYD chemicals to serve as a single reference.

  8. Motala Municipality - a sustainable Safe Community in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Kent

    2012-01-01

    An extensive research project concerning injury prevention was planned and initiated in Motala Municipality in the early 1980s. This article summarises 25 years of work for injury prevention and safety promotion in Motala. Evaluation of both process and effect were conducted based on a quasi-experimental study design, as well as cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses of interventions. Initial evaluations results showed an annual incidence of injuries of 118.9/1000 citizens in 1983/1984 consisting of injuries at home (35%), sports injuries (18.9%), injuries at work (13.7%), traffic-related injuries (12.8%) and other injuries (19.5%). The annual social economic costs of injuries were estimated at 116 million Swedish crowns (SEK). By 1989, after two years of preventive work, the incidence of injuries was reduced by 13%. The greatest decrease was among the moderate severity category of injuries (41%). The social economic costs were thereby reduced by 21 million SEK per year. Since then, work with injury prevention has continued and annual evaluations have shown that the incidence of injuries, with some fluctuation, has continued to decrease up to the latest evaluation in 2008. The total decrease during the study period was 37%. This study shows that community-based injury prevention work according to the Safe Community model is a successful and cost-effective way of reducing injuries in the local community.

  9. Promoting safe motherhood in rural India.

    PubMed

    Maclean, G

    1997-01-01

    This article identifies some activities performed to promote safe motherhood in rural India. Nurses from a voluntary organization in Hyderabad, India, trained women's groups from 32 villages in rural Andhra Pradesh state over 3 days in 1996 in maternal and child care, health and family welfare, gender issues, sanitation, leadership, literacy, negotiating skills, and health monitoring. The women were encouraged to perform health activities in their villages. In October 1996, a Conference of Women celebrated the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, with women's groups reporting on health activities in specific villages. Each women's group had its own banner. Every woman wore a conference delegate badge. One woman's group was rewarded for making the most significant progress. Participants included women from 29 villages and auxiliary nurse-midwives. For some women, this was the first time away from home. Conference delegates toured the primary health center facilities at Shamirpet and met with staff. The aim was to reduce fear and reluctance to use the services and to promote awareness of available health care. Most villages in India rely on auxiliary nurse-midwives for maternal and child health care. Promotion of safe motherhood requires close cooperation between the auxiliary nurse-midwifes and women's groups. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of India is introducing in-service training to improve the clinical skills of auxiliary nurse-midwives in eight states. The nurse-midwives use adapted and new educational material from WHO's safe motherhood midwifery training modules. A workshop was used to introduce the new modules and to propose teaching methods for senior project staff. The five modules include a trainers' manual of educational methods. PMID:12321357

  10. Promoting safe motherhood in rural India.

    PubMed

    Maclean, G

    1997-01-01

    This article identifies some activities performed to promote safe motherhood in rural India. Nurses from a voluntary organization in Hyderabad, India, trained women's groups from 32 villages in rural Andhra Pradesh state over 3 days in 1996 in maternal and child care, health and family welfare, gender issues, sanitation, leadership, literacy, negotiating skills, and health monitoring. The women were encouraged to perform health activities in their villages. In October 1996, a Conference of Women celebrated the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, with women's groups reporting on health activities in specific villages. Each women's group had its own banner. Every woman wore a conference delegate badge. One woman's group was rewarded for making the most significant progress. Participants included women from 29 villages and auxiliary nurse-midwives. For some women, this was the first time away from home. Conference delegates toured the primary health center facilities at Shamirpet and met with staff. The aim was to reduce fear and reluctance to use the services and to promote awareness of available health care. Most villages in India rely on auxiliary nurse-midwives for maternal and child health care. Promotion of safe motherhood requires close cooperation between the auxiliary nurse-midwifes and women's groups. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of India is introducing in-service training to improve the clinical skills of auxiliary nurse-midwives in eight states. The nurse-midwives use adapted and new educational material from WHO's safe motherhood midwifery training modules. A workshop was used to introduce the new modules and to propose teaching methods for senior project staff. The five modules include a trainers' manual of educational methods.

  11. Gender and development: a SAFE recipe.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S

    1996-05-01

    It is argued that an alternative strategy to women's involvement in development is the development of a whole "new dish, prepared, baked, and distributed equally" rather than acquisition of a "bigger piece of the pie." The issues of gender and development (GAD) involve women gaining power and control of the decision making processes. Past development has been too much of a "fixed menu" approach. Feminist development involves the satisfaction of the strategic needs of women, an agenda-setting direction, flexibility, and empowerment (SAFE). Strategic gender needs were conceptualized first by Maxine Malyneaux. Within women's defined roles, there are needs for access to adequate and clean water supplies, nutrition, health care, and income. Women in development (WID) approaches are strong in serving practical needs. The SAFE approach combines both the strategic and practical needs of women. Some argue that a focus on strategic and/or practical needs should be conceptualized in terms of changing women's position within a structurally unequal set of social relations. Some emphasize autonomy. The basic concepts of strategic needs is viewed as including the change in women's status and movement toward autonomy. Aid agencies and development groups have been mainstreaming WID and GAD over the past decade by integrating women and women's needs into administration, decision making, and the project cycle. Gender issues could be built into existing development paradigms or could change the existing development agenda with a gender perspective. It is argued that an agenda-setting approach is needed in order to assure that the strategic needs of women are incorporated. Flexibility and adaptation of approaches means that WID and GAD can be adjusted to all cultures. It is cited by Buvinic and Moser that welfare, equity, anti-poverty, efficiency, and empowerment are five ethical policy approaches. The policy approach of SAFE is that of empowerment or the knowledge and exercise of

  12. 'High profile health facilities can add to your trouble': Women, stigma and un/safe abortion in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Izugbara, Chimaraoke O; Egesa, Carolyne; Okelo, Rispah

    2015-09-01

    Public health discourses on safe abortion assume the term to be unambiguous. However, qualitative evidence elicited from Kenyan women treated for complications of unsafe abortion contrasted sharply with public health views of abortion safety. For these women, safe abortion implied pregnancy termination procedures and services that concealed their abortions, shielded them from the law, were cheap and identified through dependable social networks. Participants contested the notion that poor quality abortion procedures and providers are inherently dangerous, asserting them as key to women's preservation of a good self, management of stigma, and protection of their reputation, respect, social relationships, and livelihoods. Greater public health attention to the social dimensions of abortion safety is urgent.

  13. Laser patterning of platinum electrodes for safe neurostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. A.; Matteucci, P. B.; Dodds, C. W. D.; Palmer, J.; Dueck, W. F.; Hassarati, R. T.; Byrnes-Preston, P. J.; Lovell, N. H.; Suaning, G. J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Laser surface modification of platinum (Pt) electrodes was investigated for use in neuroprosthetics. Surface modification was applied to increase the surface area of the electrode and improve its ability to transfer charge within safe electrochemical stimulation limits. Approach. Electrode arrays were laser micromachined to produce Pt electrodes with smooth surfaces, which were then modified with four laser patterning techniques to produce surface structures which were nanosecond patterned, square profile, triangular profile and roughened on the micron scale through structured laser interference patterning (SLIP). Improvements in charge transfer were shown through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and biphasic stimulation at clinically relevant levels. A new method was investigated and validated which enabled the assessment of in vivo electrochemically safe charge injection limits. Main results. All of the modified surfaces provided electrical advantage over the smooth Pt. The SLIP surface provided the greatest benefit both in vitro and in vivo, and this surface was the only type which had injection limits above the threshold for neural stimulation, at a level shown to produce a response in the feline visual cortex when using an electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of the eye. This surface was found to be stable when stimulated with more than 150 million clinically relevant pulses in physiological saline. Significance. Critical to the assessment of implant devices is accurate determination of safe usage limits in an in vivo environment. Laser patterning, in particular SLIP, is a superior technique for improving the performance of implant electrodes without altering the interfacial electrode chemistry through coating. Future work will require chronic in vivo assessment of these electrode patterns.

  14. Power control of SAFE reactor using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Claude

    2002-01-01

    Controlling the 100 kW SAFE (Safe Affordable Fission Engine) reactor consists of design and implementation of a fuzzy logic process control system to regulate dynamic variables related to nuclear system power. The first phase of development concentrates primarily on system power startup and regulation, maintaining core temperature equilibrium, and power profile matching. This paper discusses the experimental work performed in those areas. Nuclear core power from the fuel elements is simulated using resistive heating elements while heat rejection is processed by a series of heat pipes. Both axial and radial nuclear power distributions are determined from neuronic modeling codes. The axial temperature profile of the simulated core is matched to the nuclear power profile by varying the resistance of the heating elements. The SAFE model establishes radial temperature profile equivalence by establishing 32 control zones as the nodal coordinates. Control features also allow for slow warm up, since complete shutoff can occur in the heat pipes if heat-source temperatures drop/rise below a certain minimum value, depending on the specific fluid and gas combination in the heat pipe. The entire system is expected to be self-adaptive, i.e., capable of responding to long-range changes in the space environment. Particular attention in the development of the fuzzy logic algorithm shall ensure that the system process remains at set point, virtually eliminating overshoot on start-up and during in-process disturbances. The controller design will withstand harsh environments and applications where it might come in contact with water, corrosive chemicals, radiation fields, etc. .

  15. Implementing safe obstetric anesthesia in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M; Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2009-08-01

    The position of woman in any civilization is an index of the advancement of that civilization; the position of woman is gauged best by the care given her at the birth of her child. Obstetric anesthesia, by definition, is a subspecialty of anesthesia devoted to peripartum, perioperative, pain and anesthetic management of women during pregnancy and the puerperium. Today, obstetric anesthesia has become a recognized subspecialty of anesthesiology and an integral part of practice of most anesthesiologists. Perhaps, no other subspecialty of anesthesiology provides more personal gratification than the practice of obstetric anesthesia. This article reviews the challenges associated with implementing safe obstetric anesthesia practice in Eastern Europe.

  16. Keeping sports participants safe in hot weather.

    PubMed

    Sparling, P B; Millard-Stafford, M

    1999-07-01

    Keeping in mind the key concepts of heat dissipation and using sound strategies for heat acclimatization and fluid replacement can help keep participants and spectators safe during hot-weather sports activities. Acclimatization to heat requires 10 to 14 days of training. Prudent hydration involves drinking plenty of fluid 2 hours before exercise, 5 to 10 oz of fluid every 15 minutes during exercise, and fluids with increased sodium content after exercise. A sidebar on environmental conditions and heat-related medical encounters during the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta illustrates the importance of prevention strategies at the individual and event level.

  17. The Journey from Safe Yield to Sustainability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, W.M.; Leake, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Safe-yield concepts historically focused attention on the economic and legal aspects of ground water development. Sustainability concerns have brought environmental aspects more to the forefront and have resulted in a more integrated outlook. Water resources sustainability is not a purely scientific concept, but rather a perspective that can frame scientific analysis. The evolving concept of sustainability presents a challenge to hydrologists to translate complex, and sometimes vague, socioeconomic and political questions into technical questions that can be quantified systematically. Hydrologists can contribute to sustainable water resources management by presenting the longer-term implications of ground water development as an integral part of their analyses.

  18. Inherently safe passive gas monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Bellamy, John Stephen; Shuler, James M.; Shull, Davis J.; Leduc, Daniel R.

    2016-09-06

    Generally, the present disclosure is directed to gas monitoring systems that use inductive power transfer to safely power an electrically passive device included within a nuclear material storage container. In particular, the electrically passive device can include an inductive power receiver for receiving inductive power transfer through a wall of the nuclear material storage container. The power received by the inductive power receiver can be used to power one or more sensors included in the device. Thus, the device is not required to include active power generation components such as, for example, a battery, that increase the risk of a spark igniting flammable gases within the container.

  19. Infrared safe definition of jet flavor

    SciTech Connect

    Banfi, Andrea; Salam, Gavin P.; Zanderighi, Giulia; /Fermilab /CERN

    2006-01-01

    It is common, in both theoretical and experimental studies, to separately discuss quark and gluon jets. However, even at parton level, widely-used jet algorithms fail to provide an infrared safe way of making this distinction. We examine the origin of the problem, and propose a solution in terms of a new ''flavour-kt'' algorithm. As well as being of conceptual interest this can be a powerful tool when combining fixed-order calculations with multi-jet resummations and parton showers. It also has applications to studies of heavy-quark jets.

  20. [Ultrasonography-guided procedures of the doctor on call].

    PubMed

    Lehtimäki, Tiina E

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrasonography in guiding minor procedures reduces the possibility of procedural complications. Fluid is easy to identify, enabling the utilization of ultrasonography even with a lesser experience. In skilled hands, drainage of ascitic fluid, pleurocentesis and insertion of a suprapubic catheter are safe procedures. Careful planning of the procedure in advance will contribute to safety. Before undertaking the procedure, one should confirm the patient's coagulation status and appropriate interruption of possible antithrombotic medication. The injection site is chosen on anatomical grounds, avoiding any blood vessels. The ultrasound view is adjusted optimally so that the route of injection can be seen as clearly as possible on the screen. PMID:27244936

  1. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... committees, professional organizations, or experts. The Commissioner shall take such action by notice... that intelligent and informed consent be given and that a clear opportunity to refuse is presented....

  2. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... committees, professional organizations, or experts. The Commissioner shall take such action by notice... that intelligent and informed consent be given and that a clear opportunity to refuse is presented....

  3. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... committees, professional organizations, or experts. The Commissioner shall take such action by notice... that intelligent and informed consent be given and that a clear opportunity to refuse is presented....

  4. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... committees, professional organizations, or experts. The Commissioner shall take such action by notice... that intelligent and informed consent be given and that a clear opportunity to refuse is presented....

  5. 78 FR 35909 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Final Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... to human health or the environment due to disruption of the endocrine system. The determination of whether a chemical has the potential to interact with the endocrine system will be made on a weight of... endocrine system necessarily meets the standard for information that must be reported in accordance...

  6. 75 FR 70557 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Draft Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... to human health or the environment due to disruption of the endocrine system. The determination that a chemical does or is not likely to have the potential to interact with the endocrine system will be... determine ] that a particular chemical has the potential to interact with the endocrine system and...

  7. Safely Enabling Civilian Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Operations in Low-Altitude Airspace by Unmanned Aerial System Traffic Management (UTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal Hemchandra

    2015-01-01

    Many UAS will operate at lower altitude (Class G, below 2000 feet). There is an urgent need for a system for civilian low-altitude airspace and UAS operations. Stakeholders want to work with NASA to enable safe operations.

  8. Safely Enabling Civilian Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Operations In Low-Altitude Airspace By Unmanned Aerial System Traffic Management (UTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2015-01-01

    Many UAS will operate at lower altitude (Class G, below 2000 feet)There is urgent need for a system for civilian low-altitude airspace and UAS operations. Stakeholders want to work with NASA to enable safe operations.

  9. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum.

  10. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15.2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US $6.2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery--e.g., pathology and imaging--are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning.

  11. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  12. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their

  13. Automatic Data Processing to Achieve a Safe Telemedical Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. Elena; García-Sáez, Gema; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Pérez-Gandía, Carmen; Rigla, Mercedes; de Leiva, Alberto; Capel, Ismael; Pons, Belén; Gómez, Enrique J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of telemedicine for diabetes care has evolved over time, proving that it contributes to patient self-monitoring, improves glycemic control, and provides analysis tools for decision support. The timely development of a safe and robust ambulatory artificial pancreas should rely on a telemedicine architecture complemented with automatic data analysis tools able to manage all the possible high-risk situations and to guarantee the patient's safety. Methods The Intelligent Control Assistant system (INCA) telemedical artificial pancreas architecture is based on a mobile personal assistant integrated into a telemedicine system. The INCA supports four control strategies and implements an automatic data processing system for risk management (ADP-RM) providing short-term and medium-term risk analyses. The system validation comprises data from 10 type 1 pump-treated diabetic patients who participated in two randomized crossover studies, and it also includes in silico simulation and retrospective data analysis. Results The ADP-RM short-term risk analysis prevents hypoglycemic events by interrupting insulin infusion. The pump interruption has been implemented in silico and tested for a closed-loop simulation over 30 hours. For medium-term risk management, analysis of capillary blood glucose notified the physician with a total of 62 alarms during a clinical experiment (56% for hyperglycemic events). The ADP-RM system is able to filter anomalous continuous glucose records and to detect abnormal administration of insulin doses with the pump. Conclusions Automatic data analysis procedures have been tested as an essential tool to achieve a safe ambulatory telemedical artificial pancreas, showing their ability to manage short-term and medium-term risk situations. PMID:20144417

  14. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15.2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US $6.2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery--e.g., pathology and imaging--are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning. PMID:26427363

  15. Unsafe and potentially safe herbal therapies.

    PubMed

    Klepser, T B; Klepser, M E

    1999-01-15

    Unsafe and potentially safe herbal therapies are discussed. The use of herbal therapies is on the rise in the United States, but most pharmacists are not adequately prepared educationally to meet patients' requests for information on herbal products. Pharmacists must also cope with an environment in which there is relatively little regulation of herbal therapies by FDA. Many herbs have been identified as unsafe, including borage, calamus, coltsfoot, comfrey, life root, sassafras, chaparral, germander, licorice, and ma huang. Potentially safe herbs include feverfew, garlic, ginkgo, Asian ginseng, saw palmetto, St. John's wort, and valerian. Clinical trials have been used to evaluate feverfew for migraine prevention and rheumatoid arthritis; garlic for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and infections; ginkgo for circulatory disturbances and dementia; ginseng for fatigue and cancer prevention; and saw palmetto for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Also studied in formal trials have been St. John's wort for depression and valerian for insomnia. The clinical trial results are suggestive of efficacy of some herbal therapies for some conditions. German Commission E, a regulatory body that evaluates the safety and efficacy of herbs on the basis of clinical trials, cases, and other scientific literature, has established indications and dosage recommendations for many herbal therapies. Pharmacists have a responsibility to educate themselves about herbal therapies in order to help patients discern the facts from the fiction, avoid harm, and gain what benefits may be available.

  16. Making Human Spaceflight as Safe as Possible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Frederick D.

    2005-01-01

    We articulated the safety hierarchy a little over two years ago, as part of our quest to be the nation s leader in safety and occupational health, and in the safety of the products and services we provide. The safety hierarchy stresses that we are all accountable for assuring that our programs, projects, and operations do not impact safety or health for the public, astronauts and pilots, employees on the ground, and high-value equipment and property. When people are thinking about doing things safely, they re also thinking about doing things right. And for the past couple of years, we ve had some pretty good results. In the time since the failures of the Mars 98 missions that occurred in late 1999, every NASA spacecraft launch has met the success objectives, and every Space Shuttle mission has safely and successfully met all mission objectives. Now I can t say that NASA s safety program is solely responsible for these achievements, but, as we like to say, "mission success starts with safety." In the future, looking forward, we will continue to make spaceflight even safer. That is NASA s vision. That is NASA s duty to both those who will travel into space and the American people who will make the journey possible.

  17. Emergency Response Virtual Environment for Safe Schools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasfy, Ayman; Walker, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    An intelligent emergency response virtual environment (ERVE) that provides emergency first responders, response planners, and managers with situational awareness as well as training and support for safe schools is presented. ERVE incorporates an intelligent agent facility for guiding and assisting the user in the context of the emergency response operations. Response information folders capture key information about the school. The system enables interactive 3D visualization of schools and academic campuses, including the terrain and the buildings' exteriors and interiors in an easy to use Web..based interface. ERVE incorporates live camera and sensors feeds and can be integrated with other simulations such as chemical plume simulation. The system is integrated with a Geographical Information System (GIS) to enable situational awareness of emergency events and assessment of their effect on schools in a geographic area. ERVE can also be integrated with emergency text messaging notification systems. Using ERVE, it is now possible to address safe schools' emergency management needs with a scaleable, seamlessly integrated and fully interactive intelligent and visually compelling solution.

  18. Safe abortion: a right for refugees?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Aimee

    2002-05-01

    Thanks to initiatives since 1994, most reproductive health programmes for refugee women now include family planning and safe delivery care. Emergency contraception and post-abortion care for complications of unsafe abortion are recommended, but provision of these services has lagged behind, while services for women who wish to terminate an unwanted pregnancy are almost non-existent. Given conditions in refugee settings, including high levels of sexual violence, unwanted pregnancies are of particular concern. Yet the extent of need for abortion services among refugee women remains undocumented. UNFPA estimates that 25-50% of maternal deaths in refugee settings are due to complications of unsafe abortion. Barriers to providing abortion services may include internal and external political pressure, legal restrictions, or the religious affiliation of service providers. Women too may be pressured to continue pregnancies and are often unable to express their needs or assert their rights. Abortion advocacy efforts should highlight the specific needs of refugee women and encourage provision of services where abortion is legally indicated, especially in cases of rape or incest, and risk to a woman's physical and mental health. Implementation of existing guidelines on reducing the occurrence and consequences of sexual violence in refugee settings is also important. Including refugee women in international campaigns for expanded access to safe abortion is critical in addressing the specific needs of this population. PMID:12369319

  19. Risk management for assuring safe drinking water.

    PubMed

    Hrudey, Steve E; Hrudey, Elizabeth J; Pollard, Simon J T

    2006-12-01

    Millions of people die every year around the world from diarrheal diseases much of which is caused by contaminated drinking water. By contrast, drinking water safety is largely taken for granted by many citizens of affluent nations. The ability to drink water that is delivered into households without fear of becoming ill may be one of the key defining characteristics of developed nations in relation to the majority of the world. Yet there is well-documented evidence that disease outbreaks remain a risk that could be better managed and prevented even in affluent nations. A detailed retrospective analysis of more than 70 case studies of disease outbreaks in 15 affluent nations over the past 30 years provides the basis for much of our discussion [Hrudey, S.E. and Hrudey, E.J. Safe Drinking Water--Lessons from Recent Outbreaks in Affluent Nations. London, UK: IWA Publishing; 2004.]. The insights provided can assist in developing a better understanding within the water industry of the causes of drinking water disease outbreaks, so that more effective preventive measures can be adopted by water systems that are vulnerable. This preventive feature lies at the core of risk management for the provision of safe drinking water.

  20. Human factors engineering of enhanced spaceport procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Barth, Tim; Blankmann-Alexander, Donna; Parker, D. Blake; Coan, Hester

    2001-02-01

    Because operational procedures provide a first line of defense against human error, human-centered design is key for streamlining work processes, standardizing work practices, and providing invaluable reminders and cautions during high risk, complex operations. In contrast, inaccurate or poorly designed operational procedures and documentation can impede the work process, encourage unsafe work practices, and confuse or mislead operators during safety critical steps. In response to several internal KSC studies that concluded that operational procedures (work instructions) were the leading contributors to Shuttle ground processing incidents and inefficiencies, the Shuttle Work Instruction Task Team (WITT) was chartered to develop a vision for a new work instruction system. This paper describes some of the original WITT recommendations and activities, as well as collaborative human factors engineering projects supporting the WITT efforts. Past achievements as well as ongoing and planned initiatives to provide continued support for the enhancement of spaceport procedures are described. .