Science.gov

Sample records for safety equipment considerations

  1. Critical Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Considerations for Seismic Qualification of Safety Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Q A

    2004-03-04

    While developing seismic analysis models for buildings that support safety-related equipment, a number of issues should be considered to ensure that the input motions for performing seismic qualification of safety-related equipment are properly defined. These considerations are listed and discussed here with special attention to the effect and importance of the interaction among the foundation soil, the building structure, the equipment anchors, and the equipment structure. Typical industry practices are critically examined to assess their adequacy for determining the input motions for equipment seismic qualification. The features that are considered essential in a soil-structure interaction (SSI) model are described. Also, the effects of inappropriate treatment or representation of these features are discussed.

  2. Safety Equipment in the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Willard A.S.

    1964-01-01

    Findings of two recent surveys on safety equipment in laboratory facilities are presented. The first survey was a pilot study of emergency shower and eye wash equipment. This study was followed by a more comprehensive random survey of safety equipment in 2,820 labs. Among other findings, the surveys indicate that many plants are underequipped, or…

  3. Safety equipment list

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, J.C.; Roe, N.A.

    1995-04-13

    This analysis assigns preliminary safety class (SC) designations to major systems and structures associated with the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project in accordance with the Multi-Function QAPP, W-236A (Hall 1994). Also included are SC assignments for those subsystems and major components of the major systems discussed in this document (see Appendices A and B). Component safety classifications have been completed through inspection (using engineering judgement) for simple systems, and through use of logic models (i.e., fault trees) for complicated systems. This analysis is intended to augment the SC systems list supplied in Chapter 9 of the MWTF Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (WHC 1994). Whereas WHC (1994) only addresses select systems, this analysis addresses the SC ramifications of all MWTF systems and structures as identified in the Title 1 design media. This document provides additional analyses of the system safety classifications assignments, and classifies systems not addressed in WHC (1994). This analysis specifically describes the safety functions) that must be performed by each MWTF system.

  4. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  9. Microbiology--Safety Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Sheryl K.

    This paper discusses the risk assessment associated with microbiology instruction based on grade level, general control measures, appropriate activities for middle school and high school students, the preparation and sterilization of equipment, and safe handling techniques. Appended are instructions and figures on making wire loops and the…

  10. Ultrasonic imaging: safety considerations

    PubMed Central

    ter Haar, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Modern ultrasound imaging for diagnostic purposes has a wide range of applications. It is used in obstetrics to monitor the progress of pregnancy, in oncology to visualize tumours and their response to treatment, and, in cardiology, contrast-enhanced studies are used to investigate heart function and physiology. An increasing use of diagnostic ultrasound is to provide the first photograph for baby's album—in the form of a souvenir or keepsake scan that might be taken as part of a routine investigation, or during a visit to an independent high-street ‘boutique’. It is therefore important to ensure that any benefit accrued from these applications outweighs any accompanying risk, and to evaluate the existing ultrasound bio-effect and epidemiology literature with this in mind. This review considers the existing laboratory and epidemiological evidence about the safety of diagnostic ultrasound and puts it in the context of current clinical usage. PMID:22866238

  11. Analytical substantiation of the safety of modern water-development works and characteristics of consideration of effects due to production equipment during an earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Mgalobelov, Yu. B.; Deineko, A. V.

    2011-01-15

    A modern approach is proposed for analytical investigation of the stress-strain state, strength, and stability of water-development works. Actual trends in the refinement of analytical investigations are noted: incorporation of parallel-calculation technology, integration of analytical programs and automated design systems, development of structural analyses, etc. A procedure for consideration of the influence exerted by massive production equipment on the stress-strain state of a structure DURING a seismic event is examined.

  12. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  17. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  5. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  7. LABORATORY DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR SAFETY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Safety Council, Chicago, IL. Campus Safety Association.

    THIS SET OF CONSIDERATIONS HAS BEEN PREPARED TO PROVIDE PERSONS WORKING ON THE DESIGN OF NEW OR REMODELED LABORATORY FACILITIES WITH A SUITABLE REFERENCE GUIDE TO DESIGN SAFETY. THERE IS NO DISTINCTION BETWEEN TYPES OF LABORATORY AND THE EMPHASIS IS ON GIVING GUIDES AND ALTERNATIVES RATHER THAN DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS. AREAS COVERED INCLUDE--(1)…

  8. 46 CFR 153.215 - Safety equipment lockers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety equipment lockers. 153.215 Section 153.215... Vessel Requirements § 153.215 Safety equipment lockers. Each self-propelled ship must have the following: (a) Each tankship must have at least two safety equipment lockers. (b) One safety equipment...

  9. 46 CFR 153.215 - Safety equipment lockers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety equipment lockers. 153.215 Section 153.215... Vessel Requirements § 153.215 Safety equipment lockers. Each self-propelled ship must have the following: (a) Each tankship must have at least two safety equipment lockers. (b) One safety equipment...

  10. Flywheel containment and safety considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppa, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    Flywheel safety and containment design technology are discussed. The effects of axial loading resulting from composite rotor burst tests are considered. Analysis of the radial burst problem is also included.

  11. Biomedical equipment considerations for aeromedical transports.

    PubMed

    Riha, C D

    1993-01-01

    Due to the eight stresses of flight and Federal Aeronautics Administration (FAA) requirements, biomedical equipment that is utilized in aeromedical transports presents certain challenges that the biomedical department should be aware of. U.S. Air Force military studies of a large number of specific models are available through the government. This author recommends prepurchase flight tests and input from flight crews to ensure safe operation of any new equipment. The equipment should also be designed for air transport. Permanent pacemakers should be programmed to a non-atrial sensing mode or an asynchronous mode before the patient is on board the aircraft. Temporary pacers and automatic defibrillators should also be set to a mode where the vibrations of flight will not trigger any errant behavior. With the proper precautions, aeromedical transports will continue to be a rapidly growing transport system for both trauma patients and intrahospital transfers. With a little research, the biomedical engineer can also be a valuable asset to the ground support crew.

  12. Next generation of dock safety equipment.

    PubMed

    Swietlik, Walt

    2013-09-01

    OSHA and forklift manufacturers have made extensive efforts to improve the safety of forklift operation in and around industrial facilities and warehouses. However, the use of next-generation vehicle restraint and light communications technology will go much farther toward protecting forklift operators and pedestrians, reducing accidents, and improving productivity at the loading dock. While these new technologies mark a significant advance in loading dock safety, they cannot replace forklift and loading dock safety policies. Employers must continue to focus on forklift safety training and consider the use of multiple safety devices, such as strategically placed signs, painted aisles, and guarded walkways. The best practice is to seek the advice of safety consultants and qualified loading dock equipment representatives.

  13. [Safety analysis for astronaut and the personal protective equipment].

    PubMed

    Chen, J D; Sun, J B; Shi, H P; Sun, H L

    1999-12-01

    Objective. To analyze and study astronaut and his personal equipment safety. Method. Three of the most widely used approaches, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), fault tree analysis (FTA) and system hazards analysis (SHA) were used. Result. It was demonstrated that astronaut and the personal equipment are subjected to various potential hazards, such as human errors, astronaut illness, fire or space suit emergency decompression, etc. Their causes, mechanisms, possible effects and criticality of some critical potential hazards were analyzed and identified in more details with considerations of the historic accidents of manned spaceflight. And the compensating provisions and preventive measures for each hazard were discussed. Conclusion. The analysis study may be helpful in enhancing the safety of the astronaut and its personal protective equipment.

  14. Safety considerations in vector development.

    PubMed

    Kappes, J C; Wu, X

    2001-11-01

    The inadvertent production of replication competent retrovirus (RCR) constitutes the principal safety concern for the use of lentiviral vectors in human clinical protocols. Because of limitations in animal models to evaluate lentiviral vectors for their potential to recombine and induce disease, the vector design itself should ensure against the emergence of RCR in vivo. Issues related to RCR generation and one approach to dealing with this problem are discussed in this chapter. To assess the risk of generating RCR, a highly sensitive biological assay was developed to specifically detect vector recombination in transduced cells. Analysis of lentiviral vector stocks has shown that recombination occurs during reverse transcription in primary target cells. Rejoining of viral protein-coding sequences of the packaging construct and cis-acting sequences of the vector was demonstrated to generate env-minus recombinants (LTR-gag-pol-LTR). Mobilization of recombinant lentiviral genomes was also demonstrated but was dependent on pseudotyping of the vector core with an exogenous envelope protein. 5' sequence analysis has demonstrated that recombinants consist of U3, R, U5, and the psi packaging signal joined with an open gag coding region. Analysis of the 3' end has mapped the point of vector recombination to the poly(A) tract of the packaging construct's mRNA. The state-of-the-art third generation packaging construct and SIN vector also have been shown to generate env-minus proviral recombinants capable of mobilizing retroviral DNA when pseudotyped with an exogenous envelope protein. A new class of HIV-based vector (trans-vector) was recently developed that splits the gag-pol component of the packaging construct into two parts: one that expresses Gag/Gag-Pro and another that expresses Pol (RT and IN) fused with Vpr. Unlike other lentiviral vectors, the trans-vector has not been shown to form recombinants capable of DNA mobilization. These results indicate the trans

  15. Seeding materials: Health and safety considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The choice of a proper seeding material for laser velocimeters must include health and safety considerations. Failure to do so can lead to catastrophic results. All materials are toxic, and laser velocimeter seeding materials are no exception. Toxicity may be considered an inherent property of a given material. The manifestation of that property or the physiological response to the material is dependent on dose and exposure conditions. An approximate physiological classification of toxicity is given in tablular form. Toxicity in some situations is not necessarily the most restrictive factor in selection of materials. It is also very important to consider how the material is used so that actual exposure to the material in a damaging form can result. For example, nickel and cadmium are both extremely toxic as systemic poisons and in the case of nickel as a carcinogen. Seeding materials are dispersed in air under conditions that favor personnel exposure. Dispersal equipment is frequently if not normally manned, and personnel are often required to make frequent adjustments to assure proper operations.

  16. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE... Pipeline Components § 192.171 Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment. (a) Each compressor station...

  17. Burn Safety Awareness on Playgrounds: Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Awareness on Playgrounds Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission CPSC wants ... of the risk of thermal burns from playground equipment. You may remember the metal slides of your ...

  18. 46 CFR 153.214 - Personnel emergency and safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Personnel emergency and safety equipment. 153.214... Equipment General Vessel Requirements § 153.214 Personnel emergency and safety equipment. Each self... breathing apparatus of the pressure demand type, approved by the Mining Safety and Health Administration...

  19. 46 CFR 153.214 - Personnel emergency and safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personnel emergency and safety equipment. 153.214... Equipment General Vessel Requirements § 153.214 Personnel emergency and safety equipment. Each self... breathing apparatus of the pressure demand type, approved by the Mining Safety and Health Administration...

  20. Basic Considerations on Defining Safety Goals

    SciTech Connect

    Hakata, Tadakuni

    2003-06-15

    A study on considerations and strategies for developing safety goals applicable to all nuclear facilities is presented. A scheme of basic safety goals and subsidiary safety goals is assumed, and quantitative basic safety goals for radiation protection of individuals in the vicinity of nuclear facilities are discussed. The risk limit rules are based on comparative risk factors for various health effects, including annual dose, health detriments, acute fatality, latent cancers, and severe hereditary effects. The comparative factor of 1% is used for nonfatal health detriments and 0.1% for fatal effects. A risk limit profile is generated from the risk factors, biological effects, and statistics of injury and mortality rates from general causes. The approaches have potential for developing integrated and comprehensive safety goals.

  1. 46 CFR 107.405 - Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974. (b) A Safety Equipment Certificate expires 60 months after the date... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974...

  2. Key factors influencing management decisions concerning safety equipment selection.

    PubMed

    Chinda, Thanwadee; Ammarapala, Veeris; Suanmali, Suthathip

    2017-08-31

    The construction industry involves many hazardous activities that may expose workers to a wide variety of health hazards. Selection of construction safety equipment is crucial in ensuring workers' safety. This article aims to examine key factors influencing management decisions concerning safety equipment selection, utilizing exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). A questionnaire survey is conducted in the construction companies in Bangkok, Thailand. The factor analysis extracts 103 sets of data into six key factors - namely supplier agreements, supplier support, personal, equipment design, safety-related policies and cost value factors - with a total of 20 associated items. The AHP results conclude that the safety-related policies, equipment design and personal factors are the most important factors when selecting construction safety equipment. A construction company can use the study results as a checklist to help assess different safety equipment, and to select the best equipment.

  3. 75 FR 1276 - Requirements for Subsurface Safety Valve Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... Equipment AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The MMS is... Subsurface Safety Valve Equipment (API Spec 14A) into its regulations. The MMS is incorporating the Eleventh.../API Specification 14A, Specification for Subsurface Safety Valve Equipment, Eleventh Edition, October...

  4. 46 CFR 107.405 - Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety Equipment Certificate. 107.405 Section 107.405... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 107.405 Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) A self-propelled unit of at least 500 gross tons...

  5. Plutonium finishing plant safety systems and equipment list

    SciTech Connect

    Bergquist, G.G.

    1995-01-06

    The Safety Equipment List (SEL) supports Analysis Report (FSAR), WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010. The SEL is a breakdown and classification of all Safety Class 1, 2, and 3 equipment, components, or system at the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex.

  6. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design...

  7. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design...

  8. Safety considerations in large-volume lipoplasty.

    PubMed

    Giese, S Y

    2001-11-01

    Proper patient selection, diligent fluid management, and attention to body temperature are important safety considerations in large-volume lipoplasty (LVL). Complications related to fluid overload, lidocaine toxicity, coagulopathies, and lengthy combined surgical procedures are preventable and not directly linked to LVL technique. Benefits as well as morbidity and mortality from LVL can be weighed against risk factors such as obesity, a prediabetic condition, and/or adverse effects of weight-loss medications. The author describes how she incorporates safeguards into her LVL procedures. (Aesthetic Surg J 2001;21:545-548.).

  9. 46 CFR 154.1400 - Safety equipment: All vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety equipment: All vessels. 154.1400 Section 154.1400 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment...

  10. Safety Considerations in the Ground Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul D.; Palo, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    In the history of humankind, every great space adventure has begun on the ground. While this seems to be stating the obvious, mission and spacecraft designers who have overlooked this fact have paid a high price, either in loss or damage to the spacecraft pre-launch, or in mission failure or reduction. Spacecraft personnel may risk not only their flight hardware, but they may also risk their lives, their co-workers lives and even the general public by not heeding safety on the ground. Their eyes may be on the stars but their feet are on the ground! One additional comment: Although the design requirements are very different for human rated and nonhuman rated flight hardware, while on the ground that flight hardware (and its ground support equipment) doesn't care about what it is flying on. On the ground, additional requirements are often levied to protect the work force and general public. (Authors' Note: The source material for this chapter is primarily taken from the Kennedy Space Center Handbook (KHB) 1700.7/45 SW Handbook S-100 Space Shuttle Payload Ground Safety Handbook and the authors' personal experiences.

  11. 48 CFR 50.205-1 - SAFETY Act Considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false SAFETY Act Considerations... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies Act of 2002 50.205-1 SAFETY Act Considerations. (a) SAFETY Act...

  12. 48 CFR 50.205-1 - SAFETY Act Considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false SAFETY Act Considerations... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies Act of 2002 50.205-1 SAFETY Act Considerations. (a) SAFETY Act...

  13. Design review report for modifications to RMCS safety class equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.E.

    1997-05-30

    This report documents the completion of the formal design review for modifications to the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) safety class equipment. These modifications are intended to support core sampling operations in waste tanks requiring flammable gas controls. The objective of this review was to approve the Engineering Change Notices affecting safety class equipment used in the RMCS system. The conclusion reached by the review committee was that these changes are acceptable.

  14. Performance and Safety Characteristics in Ice-Climbing Equipment Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, W. Tom

    This study sought to determine whether Alaskan ice climbers place more emphasis on performance characteristics or on safety characteristics when selecting their various ice-climbing equipment. A survey distributed to members of the Alaska Alpine Club and the Alaska Alpine Rescue Group was developed to contain responses related to both safety and…

  15. Food safety considerations for innovative nutrition solutions.

    PubMed

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Cohn, Marjorie Nolan; Farber, Jeffrey M; Harris, Linda J; Roberts, Tanya; Salin, Victoria; Singh, Manpreet; Jaferi, Azra; Sperber, William H

    2015-07-01

    Failure to secure safe and affordable food to the growing global population leads far too often to disastrous consequences. Among specialists and other individuals, food scientists have a key responsibility to improve and use science-based tools to address risk and advise food handlers and manufacturers with best-practice recommendations. With collaboration from production agriculture, food processors, state and federal agencies, and consumers, it is critical to implement science-based strategies that address food safety and that have been evaluated for effectiveness in controlling and/or eliminating hazards. It is an open question whether future food safety concerns will shift in priority given the imperatives to supply sufficient food. This report brings together leading food safety experts to address these issues with a focus on three areas: economic, social, and policy aspects of food safety; production and postharvest technology for safe food; and innovative public communication for food safety and nutrition.

  16. 48 CFR 50.205-1 - SAFETY Act Considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies Act of 2002 50.205-1 SAFETY Act Considerations. (a) SAFETY Act applicability. Requiring activities should review requirements to identify potential technologies that...

  17. 48 CFR 50.205-1 - SAFETY Act Considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies Act of 2002 50.205-1 SAFETY Act Considerations. (a) SAFETY Act applicability. Requiring activities should review requirements to identify potential technologies that...

  18. 48 CFR 50.205-1 - SAFETY Act Considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies Act of 2002 50.205-1 SAFETY Act Considerations. (a) SAFETY Act applicability. Requiring activities should review requirements to identify potential technologies that...

  19. How Stereochemistry Considerations can Improve Pesticide Safety

    EPA Science Inventory

    About 30% of pesticides are chiral molecules and therefore exist as two or more stereoisomers, which can differ significantly in their toxicity, biodegradation, and persistence. Such differences can impact their relative safety to humans and environmental species. Enantiomers, mi...

  20. How Stereochemistry Considerations can Improve Pesticide Safety

    EPA Science Inventory

    About 30% of pesticides are chiral molecules and therefore exist as two or more stereoisomers, which can differ significantly in their toxicity, biodegradation, and persistence. Such differences can impact their relative safety to humans and environmental species. Enantiomers, mi...

  1. [Challenges Analysis and Strategic Consideration on Medical Equipment Maintenance].

    PubMed

    Deng, Tianhua; Yu, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Expounding the status of the current domestic medical equipment maintenance management, and puting forward the strategic thinking of medical maintenance for the challenges of equipment maintenance management in the hospital. This discussion can be performed to control the maintenance costs of hospital effectively, increase the income and social benefits of the hospital.

  2. Special considerations for vibration analysis on longwall equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Towles, B.

    1996-12-31

    West Elk Mine has included vibration analysis as a part of the longwall maintenance program since 1993. Longwall equipment presents several special problems which are not common to most vibration analysis applications: (1) Heavy construction of equipment damps some signals making machine condition determinations difficult, and (2) Complexity of longwall equipment; (3) Difficulty in isolating spectrum frequencies to individual machinery components; (4) Flexing of equipment frames and housings due to longwall face advance affects vibration spectrums; (5) Difficulty of obtaining necessary information on internal machinery components from longwall equipment suppliers; (6) Permissibility of data collection instruments. In spite of these difficulties, West Elk has had positive results in preventing catastrophic failures, predicting life expectancy of failing components, making general machinery improvements in cooperation with manufacturers and determining rebuild quality.

  3. Broken safety pin in bronchus - Anaesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Shad, Roona; Agarwal, Aditya

    2012-11-01

    Safety pins are not commonly aspirated objects in infants and form only a small fraction of all the metallic foreign body (FB) which accounts for 4.4% of all foreign bodies found in tracheobronchial tree. Bronchoscopy procedure has various complications, in addition to failure to remove FB due to its impaction, especially with metallic pointed objects ending up in open surgical removal. Infant with inhaled foreign body are always a challenge to anaesthetist. We had one such case of broken safety pin impacted in the wall of right bronchus of an infant with failure to remove on repeated attempts at rigid bronchoscopy.

  4. Broken safety pin in bronchus - Anaesthetic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Shad, Roona; Agarwal, Aditya

    2012-01-01

    Safety pins are not commonly aspirated objects in infants and form only a small fraction of all the metallic foreign body (FB) which accounts for 4.4% of all foreign bodies found in tracheobronchial tree. Bronchoscopy procedure has various complications, in addition to failure to remove FB due to its impaction, especially with metallic pointed objects ending up in open surgical removal. Infant with inhaled foreign body are always a challenge to anaesthetist. We had one such case of broken safety pin impacted in the wall of right bronchus of an infant with failure to remove on repeated attempts at rigid bronchoscopy. PMID:23325944

  5. Office procedures: practical and safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Ty B

    2012-09-01

    Gynecologic invasive procedures have moved into the physician's office due to improved reimbursement and convenience. Creating a just and safe office culture has generated robust conversations in the medical literature. This article reviews the foundational principles relating to safe practices in the office including: checklists, drills, selecting a safety officer, achieving office certification, medication usage, and engaging the patient in the safety culture. Reduction of medical errors in the office will require open dialogue between the stake holders: providers, insurers, patients, state and federal agencies, and educational bodies such as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  6. Safety considerations of anesthetic drugs in children.

    PubMed

    Brown, Raeford E

    2017-04-01

    Great strides have been made in the last twenty years in providing safe anesthesia care for infants and children. Despite a historical record of safety, recent findings have called to question the toxicities of many anesthetic agents. Observations concerning the inherent safety of these agents, their appropriate management in infants, and new findings which suggest overlooked toxicities will be discussed. Areas covered: A literature search using Pub Med identified journal articles relating to the safety of anesthetic agents in infants and children. From this group, representative classical articles, as well as more recent offerings, were chosen that were germane to the topic of anesthetic drug safety in children. Expert opinion: Anesthetic agents used in children in the US are generally safe in the short term and are administered to thousands of children daily without demonstrable harm. The question of a deleterious effect of anesthetics on the developing central nervous system when used for long periods and on multiple occasions continues to be open to debate. Conservative elective management of these agents in infants and young children is reasonable until such time as more is known about the toxicities on the central nervous system.

  7. Safety assessment of adjuvanted vaccines: Methodological considerations

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Fernanda Tavares; Di Pasquale, Alberta; Yarzabal, Juan P; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvants mainly interact with the innate immune response and are used to enhance the quantity and quality of the downstream adaptive immune response to vaccine antigens. Establishing the safety of a new adjuvant-antigen combination is achieved through rigorous evaluation that begins in the laboratory, and that continues throughout the vaccine life-cycle. The strategy for the evaluation of safety pre-licensure is guided by the disease profile, vaccine indication, and target population, and it is also influenced by available regulatory guidelines. In order to allow meaningful interpretation of clinical data, clinical program methodology should be optimized and standardized, making best use of all available data sources. Post-licensure safety activities are directed by field experience accumulated pre- and post-licensure clinical trial data and spontaneous adverse event reports. Continued evolution of safety evaluation processes that keep pace with advances in vaccine technology and updated communication of the benefit-risk profile is necessary to maintain public confidence in vaccines. PMID:26029975

  8. 46 CFR 154.1400 - Safety equipment: All vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Safety... Requirements for Industrial Head Protection, Z-89.1 (1969). (7) Six sets of boots and gloves that are made of... Requirements for Industrial Head Protection, Z-89.1 (1969). (7) Eight sets of boots and gloves that are made...

  9. NIF special equipment construction health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicki, R.H.

    1997-07-28

    The purpose of this plan is to identify how the construction and deployment activities of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Special Equipment (SE) will be safely executed. This plan includes an identification of (1) the safety-related responsibilities of the SE people and their interaction with other organizations involved; (2) safety related requirements, policies, and documentation; (3) a list of the potential hazards unique to SE systems and the mechanisms that will be implemented to control them to acceptable levels; (4) a summary of Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) training requirements; and (5) requirements of contractor safety plans that will be developed and used by all SE contractors participating in site activities. This plan is a subsidiary document to the NIF Construction Safety Program (CSP) and is intended to compliment the requirements stated therein with additional details specific to the safety needs of the SE construction-related activities. If a conflict arises between these two documents, the CSP will supersede. It is important to note that this plan does not list all of the potential hazards and their controls because the design and safety analysis process is still ongoing. Additional safety issues win be addressed in the Final Safety Analysis Report, Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs), and other plans and procedures as described in Section 3.0 of this plan.

  10. Providing child safety equipment to prevent injuries: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael; Kendrick, Denise; Coupland, Carol; Woods, Amanda; Futers, Deb; Robinson, Jean

    2005-01-22

    To assess the effectiveness of safety advice and safety equipment in reducing unintentional injuries for families with children aged under 5 years and living in deprived areas. Randomised controlled trial. 47 general practices in Nottingham. 3428 families with children under 5. A standardised safety consultation and provision of free and fitted stair gates, fire guards, smoke alarms, cupboard locks, and window locks. Primary outcome measures were whether a child in the family had at least one injury that required medical attendance and rates of attendance in primary and secondary care and of hospital admission for injury over a two year period. Secondary outcome measures included possession of safety equipment and safety practices. No significant difference was found in the proportion of families in which a child had a medically attended injury (odds ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval 0.98 to 1.50) or in the rates of attendance in secondary care (incidence rate ratio 1.02, 0.90 to 1.13) or admission to hospital (1.02, 0.70 to 1.48). However, children in the intervention arm had a significantly higher attendance rate for injuries in primary care (1.37, 1.11 to 1.70, P = 0.003). At both one and two years' follow up, families in the intervention arm were significantly more likely to have a range of safety practices, but absolute differences in the percentages were relatively small. The intervention resulted in significant improvements in safety practices for up to two years but did not reduce injuries that necessitated medical attendance. Although equipment was provided and fitted free of charge, the observed changes in safety practices may not have been large enough to affect injury rates.

  11. Transition to Office-based Obstetric and Gynecologic Procedures: Safety, Technical, and Financial Considerations.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Lisa M; Thomassee, May E; Williams, Valerie L; Young, Amy E

    2015-06-01

    Office-based surgery is increasingly desired by patients and providers due to ease of access, overall efficiency, reimbursement, and satisfaction. The adoption of office-based surgery requires careful consideration of safety, efficacy, cost, and feasibility within a providers practice. This article reviews the currently available data regarding patient and provider satisfaction as well as practical considerations of staffing, equipment, and supplies. To aid the practitioner, issues of office-based anesthesia and safety with references to currently available national guidelines and protocols are provided. Included is a brief review of billing, coding, and reimbursement. Technical procedural aspects with information and recommendations are summarized.

  12. Safety considerations for fabricating lithium battery packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, J. J.

    1986-09-01

    Lithium cell safety is a major issue with both manufacturers and end users. Most manufacturers have taken great strides to develop the safest cells possible while still maintaining performance characteristics. The combining of lithium cells for higher voltages, currents, and capacities requires the fabricator of lithium battery packs to be knowledgable about the specific electrochemical system being used. Relatively high rate, spirally wound (large surface area) sulfur oxychloride cells systems, such as Li/Thionyl or Sulfuryl chloride are considered. Prior to the start of a design of a battery pack, a review of the characterization studies for the cells should be conducted. The approach for fabricating a battery pack might vary with cell size.

  13. Safety considerations for fabricating lithium battery packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Lithium cell safety is a major issue with both manufacturers and end users. Most manufacturers have taken great strides to develop the safest cells possible while still maintaining performance characteristics. The combining of lithium cells for higher voltages, currents, and capacities requires the fabricator of lithium battery packs to be knowledgable about the specific electrochemical system being used. Relatively high rate, spirally wound (large surface area) sulfur oxychloride cells systems, such as Li/Thionyl or Sulfuryl chloride are considered. Prior to the start of a design of a battery pack, a review of the characterization studies for the cells should be conducted. The approach for fabricating a battery pack might vary with cell size.

  14. DNA Vaccines: Regulatory Considerations and Safety Aspects.

    PubMed

    Myhr, Anne Ingeborg

    2017-01-01

    DNA vaccines have great potential as preventive or therapeutic vaccines against viral, bacterial, or parasitic diseases as well as cancer, and may also be used as gene therapy products. Although many human and veterinary DNA vaccines have been investigated in laboratory trials, only four of these have been approved for commercial use. In this paper an overview of the regulatory requirements for the development of DNA vaccines is given. The regulatory process in EU and USA is described. A discussion concerning the relevance of national regulations on gene technology is included. In addition the main safety concerns associated with DNA vaccines, relating to unwanted side effects in the vaccinated mammal or fish, are presented. Finally, the need for greater openness regarding the assessment information is discussed.

  15. Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program for safety-related equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L.L.; Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.; Salazar, E.A.; Buckalew, W.H.; Thome, F.V.; Stuetzer, O.M.; Feit, R.

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear power industry is required to demonstrate that certain safety-related equipment is ''qualified'' and will function even in the event of a severe reactor accident. Demonstration of qualification by testing is the preferred approach. International interest in equipment qualification, and its recognition as being paramount to safety, is rapidly increasing, with most major supplier-countries developing sophisticated qualification testing facilities. An aspect of the demonstration of qualification is to assure that the qualification testing applied to safety-related equipment is both realistic and conservative; that is, a program of qualification methodology assessment and improvement is imperative. In the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is sponsoring the Qualification Testing Evaluation Program with the goal of obtaining data that will confirm or improve the technical bases for equipment qualification programs. This multi-task Program has long-term, continuing objectives, but recent new results have been obtained and these results are being incorporated into NRC regulations with attendant impact on the nuclear industry. 19 refs. (JDB)

  16. Rig safety depends on equipment, regulations, and personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, T.R. Jr.; Tait, S. ); Mumford, G. )

    1990-03-05

    The authors discuss how improvements that can increase rig safety can be made in equipment, regulations, and stabilized personnel levels. With regard to equipment, exposure to material handling must be reduced through automation, and well-control technology must be improved by enhanced use of computers and better systems to handle gas. According to this analysis, regulations are needed that are global in scope and have had their costs-to-benefits fully and fairly assessed. Self regulation must be used effectively throughout the industry. Job security and wages should be made adequate to maintain an experienced, motivated, and safe work force.

  17. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance... install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in wells located on the OCS. SPPE...

  18. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment... this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in wells...

  19. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment... this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in wells...

  20. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment... this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in wells...

  1. Safety considerations with fenofibrate/simvastatin combination.

    PubMed

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2015-01-01

    Fenofibrate/simvastatin combination is useful for patients with mixed dyslipidemia. Aim of this review is to critically present the safety aspects of the fenofibrate/simvastatin combination. Current evidence regarding the adverse effects of fenofibrate/simvastatin combination is critically presented based on the results of large randomized controlled trials and other relevant studies. Additionally, clinical pharmacology, drug interactions and the effects of fenofibrate and simvastatin on metabolic variables and cardiovascular risk are briefly described. Large randomized clinical trials show that the combined administration of fenofibrate with simvastatin is not associated with significantly increased incidence of serious adverse events compared with simvastatin monotherapy. The incidence of rhabdomyolysis is slightly increased with fibrate/statin combination compared with monotherapy but the actual risk is very low. Although fenofibrate increases creatinine and homocysteine serum levels, the incidence of diabetic nephropathy and thrombotic events was not significantly increased with fenofibrate/simvastatin combination compared with simvastatin monotherapy in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Lipid trial. Furthermore, a decrease in albuminuria was observed with fenofibrate in the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) and ACCORD Lipid trials. Overall, the combined administration of fenofibrate with simvastatin appears to be safe, unless clinicians give fenofibrate/simvastatin combination to patients with predisposing risk factors for the occurrence of adverse events.

  2. Safety considerations for synthetic sling surgery.

    PubMed

    Blaivas, Jerry G; Purohit, Rajveer S; Benedon, Matthew S; Mekel, Gabriel; Stern, Michael; Billah, Mubashir; Olugbade, Kola; Bendavid, Robert; Iakovlev, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    Implantation of a synthetic midurethral sling (SMUS) is the most commonly performed anti-incontinence operation in women worldwide. The effectiveness of the SMUS is comparable to that of the historical gold standards--autologous fascial slings and the Burch colposuspension. Much controversy, however, has evolved regarding the safety of this type of sling. Overall, the quality of the studies with respect to assessing risks of SMUS-associated complications is currently poor. The most common risks in patients with SMUS include urethral obstruction requiring surgery (2.3% of patients with SMUS), vaginal, bladder and/or urethral erosion requiring surgery (1.8%) and refractory chronic pain (4.1%); these data likely represent the minimum risks. In addition, the failure rate of SMUS implantation surgery is probably at least 5% in patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Furthermore, at least one-third of patients undergoing sling excision surgery develop recurrent SUI. Considering the additional risks of refractory overactive bladder, fistulas and bowel perforations, among others, the overall risk of a negative outcome after SMUS implantation surgery is ≥15%.

  3. Radiation safety considerations in proton aperture disposal.

    PubMed

    Walker, Priscilla K; Edwards, Andrew C; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2014-04-01

    Beam shaping in scattered and uniform scanned proton beam therapy (PBT) is made commonly by brass apertures. Due to proton interactions, these devices become radioactive and could pose safety issues and radiation hazards. Nearly 2,000 patient-specific devices per year are used at Indiana University Cyclotron Operations (IUCO) and IU Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC); these devices require proper guidelines for disposal. IUCO practice has been to store these apertures for at least 4 mo to allow for safe transfer to recycling contractors. The devices require decay in two staged secure locations, including at least 4 mo in a separate building, at which point half are ready for disposal. At 6 mo, 20-30% of apertures require further storage. This process requires significant space and manpower and should be considered in the design process for new clinical facilities. More widespread adoption of pencil beam or spot scanning nozzles may obviate this issue, as apertures then will no longer be necessary.

  4. Comparison of safety equipment between London underground and Beijing subway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Zhang, S. Y.; Zhao, L. Z.; Xia, J. J.; Fu, X. C.; Bao, Z. M.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Wang, R. J.; Hu, C.; Jing, L. S.; Wang, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to improve the safety equipment’s effectiveness through the comparison. Firstly, the history and safety accident of London Underground and Beijing Subway were shown. Secondly, fire equipment between these two cities was compared including station’s hardware installations and carriage’s hardware installations. Thirdly, the relative software installations were also compared such as emergency drills. The results showed that Beijing Subway’s hardware installations were better than London. However, London Underground’s some installations were more effective than Beijing. Both cities would pay more attention on anti-terrorist in tunnel.

  5. Energy considerations for hospital construction and equipment, 1984 edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    The intent of this document is to promote energy conservation without reducing indoor environmental quality below the acceptable levels set forth in Guidelines for Construction and Equipment of Hospital and Medical Facilities. The Guidelines currently describe acceptable performances that are considered minimums and direct the designer to conserve energy to the extent practical. This companion document provides guidance on conservation measures. Specifically, it provides general directions for: Technical Feasibility--implications of design solutions; Life Cycle Cost Procedures--economic justification for systems and procedures; Operational Manageability--assuring quality performance during the lifetime of the building. By using the Guidelines as the basis, this guidance allows for maximum freedom of design and flexibility within which the designer, architect, engineer, and administrative staff can work together in a unified design process to resolve special problems.

  6. [Technical consideration of setting up a specification for human centrifuge evaluation of anti-G equipment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, C L; Geng, X C; Zhang, W X; Yan, G D; Chu, X

    1999-12-01

    Anti-G equipment needs to be evaluated using human centrifuge before further developed. However, there isn't a general specification for human centrifuge evaluation of anti-G equipment. From related literature and from our over thirty years experience in this area, we sum up to five aspect technical consideration below: human centrifuge, medical specification for using human in +Gz stress experiment, anti-G equipment experimental assembly, principle should be abided by during human centrifuge evaluation of anti-G equipment. We hope that the technical considerations mentioned in the paper should be helpful to the work of setting up a specification for human centrifuge evaluation anti-G equipment. After we have a specification, the research will be conducted orderly and the anti-G [correction of an-G] equipment will be developed sequentially.

  7. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety... Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. (a) Applicability of standards or regulations prescribed by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Boats and associated equipment (as...

  8. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety... Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. (a) Applicability of standards or regulations prescribed by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Boats and associated equipment (as...

  9. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety... Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. (a) Applicability of standards or regulations prescribed by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Boats and associated equipment (as...

  10. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety... Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. (a) Applicability of standards or regulations prescribed by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Boats and associated equipment (as...

  11. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety... Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. (a) Applicability of standards or regulations prescribed by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Boats and associated equipment (as...

  12. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the applicable...

  13. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  14. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  15. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  16. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the applicable...

  17. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the applicable...

  18. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the applicable...

  19. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  20. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  1. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the applicable...

  2. 46 CFR 309.6 - Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other considerations. 309.6 Section 309.6 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS VALUES FOR WAR RISK INSURANCE § 309.6 Adjustments for condition, equipment, and...

  3. Safety considerations in the design of an electron beam melter for a fissile metal

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of the EBM in the melting of highly enriched uranium metal is principally to recycle machining swarf but it may also be used for the manufacture of alloys and the recycling of alloy swarf. The current recycling of swarf involves the cleaning and compaction of swarf to pellets, these are then melted in a VIF with losses of > 20% of the metal as dross lift in the crucible. This has to be converted to oxide and then chemically recycled, a very expensive process. Use of the EBM would limit losses to less than 3% and make significant savings and also solve some safety problems. The EBM will be attached to a glove box and fume cupboard and the hazards addressed by the design include: (1) Criticality, (2) Radiation, (3) Release of Radioactive Contamination, (4) Explosion, (5) Fire, (6) Mechanical Handling, (7) Electrical, (8) Other Safety Considerations. These are addressed with details of the considerations including interlocks required to mitigate the hazards. The requirements of Safety documentation and Hazard and Operability studies are outlined together with Quality Assurance demands and training requirements. A number of safety considerations are based on previous accident scenarios in which Dangerous Occurrences took place involving equipment faults and operator errors on high vacuum equipment associated with glove boxes in a radioactive controlled area.

  4. Equipment fragility data base. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, L.E.

    1983-01-10

    Part of the effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has been directed at generating a fragility data base for equipment used in control and safety systems in commercial nuclear power plants. Component fragility data have been compiled in various forms, depending on their content, intended use, and level of reduction. The data are stored in a relational data base on the LLNL CEC 7600 computers; this provides easy accessibility for LLNL computer users. This report describes the present structure of the data base and presents its contents through the use of tables. This report is a revision of an earlier one of the same name and numbers (NUREG/CR-2680) and (UCRL-53038). Additional data have been included and the presentation has been revised to enhance its usability.

  5. Material & equipment, procurement & maintenance: Impact on blood safety.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Jean C

    2010-01-01

    Blood Transfusion Safety is dependent on effectively organised and managed blood services, which have adequate financial resources, skilled manpower, appropriate infrastructure and quality management systems in place. 80% of the world's population has access to 20% of the supply blood products, of which little is consistently safe. HIV highlighted the importance of blood safety. The lack of effective blood services in low human development index (LHDI), developing countries, has lead to international funding and capacity building for more than three decades. The initial strategies focused on providing HIV testing reagents to prevention transmission, however this only addresses one part of blood safety. Blood safety is not only dependent on preventing HIV transmission. In many populations there are other infectious agents, which have a higher prevalence. Ensuring the correct blood is provided to the patient depends on: well managed services with effective leadership and adequate budgets; capacity building and retention of skilled experienced staff; availability of laboratory equipment, correctly maintained; blood cold chain systems; procedures for tendering, purchasing and ensuring an unbroken supply of reagents and consumables; and quality management systems. Barriers for simplified effective tendering, procurement and contracting require urgent attention and coordination of all funding organisations to ensure an unbroken supply of reagents. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Football (soccer) safety equipment use and parental attitudes toward safety equipment in a community youth sports program.

    PubMed

    Khodaee, Morteza; Fetters, Michael D; Gorenflo, Daniel W

    2011-04-01

    While a growing number of children are playing football (soccer), there are limited data on prevalence of injuries, actual use of football safety equipment (SE), and parental attitudes about football SE. We distributed a self-administered survey by mail to parents of all players enrolled in a community recreation youth football program. Parents of 865 children responded. Overall, 32 (3.7%) children were reported as having injuries requiring medical/dental evaluation. Upper/lower extremities were the most commonly injured sites. Shinguards (SGs) were the only equipment commonly used. While there was high parental support for SG use (97.4%) and moderate support for mouthguards (MGs; 53.8%), there was less support for other SE. Many parents were unfamiliar with available SE, but they were mostly willing to pay for it. In a community youth sports program, reports of football injuries were low as was the use of football SE other than SGs.

  7. Child Injury Prevention in the Home: A National Survey of Safety Practices and Use of Safety Equipment in Deprived Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, C. A.; Watson, M. C.; Smith, S.; Coupland, C.; Kendrick, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of home safety practices and use of safety equipment by disadvantaged families participating in a national home safety equipment scheme in England. Design: Cross-sectional postal survey sent to a random sample of 1,000 families. Setting: England, United Kingdom. Results: Half the families (51%) returned a…

  8. Child Injury Prevention in the Home: A National Survey of Safety Practices and Use of Safety Equipment in Deprived Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, C. A.; Watson, M. C.; Smith, S.; Coupland, C.; Kendrick, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of home safety practices and use of safety equipment by disadvantaged families participating in a national home safety equipment scheme in England. Design: Cross-sectional postal survey sent to a random sample of 1,000 families. Setting: England, United Kingdom. Results: Half the families (51%) returned a…

  9. Tools and Equipment in Nontraditional Spaces: Safety and Liability Issues. Safety Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken R.

    2017-01-01

    "Safety Spotlight" encourages the submission of questions from Technology and Engineering (T&E) Educators, and this month's question involves the risks of placing hazardous equipment (e.g., 3D printer, laser cutter, CNC router, etc.) in a non-technology & engineering lab under the supervision of teachers not certified to teach…

  10. Home safety education and provision of safety equipment for injury prevention (Review).

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Denise; Young, Ben; Mason-Jones, Amanda J; Ilyas, Nohaid; Achana, Felix A; Cooper, Nicola J; Hubbard, Stephanie J; Sutton, Alex J; Smith, Sherie; Wynn, Persephone; Mulvaney, Caroline; Watson, Michael C; Coupland, Carol

    2013-05-01

    In industrialised countries injuries (including burns, poisoning or drowning) are the leading cause of childhood death and steep social gradients exist in child injury mortality and morbidity. The majority of injuries in pre-school children occur at home but there is little meta-analytic evidence that child home safety interventions reduce injury rates or improve a range of safety practices, and little evidence on their effect by social group. We evaluated the effectiveness of home safety education, with or without the provision of low cost, discounted or free equipment (hereafter referred to as home safety interventions), in reducing child injury rates or increasing home safety practices and whether the effect varied by social group. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2009, Issue 2) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), ISI Web of Science: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S), CINAHL (EBSCO) and DARE (2009, Issue 2) in The Cochrane Library. We also searched websites and conference proceedings and searched the bibliographies of relevant studies and previously published reviews. We contacted authors of included studies as well as relevant organisations. The most recent search for trials was May 2009. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled trials and controlled before and after (CBA) studies where home safety education with or without the provision of safety equipment was provided to those aged 19 years and under, and which reported injury, safety practices or possession of safety equipment. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. We attempted to obtain individual participant level data (IPD) for all included studies and summary data and IPD were simultaneously combined in meta-regressions by social

  11. Home safety education and provision of safety equipment for injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Denise; Young, Ben; Mason-Jones, Amanda J; Ilyas, Nohaid; Achana, Felix A; Cooper, Nicola J; Hubbard, Stephanie J; Sutton, Alex J; Smith, Sherie; Wynn, Persephone; Mulvaney, Caroline; Watson, Michael C; Coupland, Carol

    2012-09-12

    In industrialised countries injuries (including burns, poisoning or drowning) are the leading cause of childhood death and steep social gradients exist in child injury mortality and morbidity. The majority of injuries in pre-school children occur at home but there is little meta-analytic evidence that child home safety interventions reduce injury rates or improve a range of safety practices, and little evidence on their effect by social group. We evaluated the effectiveness of home safety education, with or without the provision of low cost, discounted or free equipment (hereafter referred to as home safety interventions), in reducing child injury rates or increasing home safety practices and whether the effect varied by social group. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2009, Issue 2) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), ISI Web of Science: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S), CINAHL (EBSCO) and DARE (2009, Issue 2) in The Cochrane Library. We also searched websites and conference proceedings and searched the bibliographies of relevant studies and previously published reviews. We contacted authors of included studies as well as relevant organisations. The most recent search for trials was May 2009. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled trials and controlled before and after (CBA) studies where home safety education with or without the provision of safety equipment was provided to those aged 19 years and under, and which reported injury, safety practices or possession of safety equipment. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. We attempted to obtain individual participant level data (IPD) for all included studies and summary data and IPD were simultaneously combined in meta-regressions by

  12. A Study on Performance and Safety Tests of Electrosurgical Equipment.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli Golpaygani, A; Movahedi, M M; Reza, M

    2016-09-01

    Modern medicine employs a wide variety of instruments with different physiological effects and measurements. Periodic verifications are routinely used in legal metrology for industrial measuring instruments. The correct operation of electrosurgical generators is essential to ensure patient's safety and management of the risks associated with the use of high and low frequency electrical currents on human body. The metrological reliability of 20 electrosurgical equipment in six hospitals (3 private and 3 public) was evaluated in one of the provinces of Iran according to international and national standards. The achieved results show that HF leakage current of ground-referenced generators are more than isolated generators and the power analysis of only eight units delivered acceptable output values and the precision in the output power measurements was low. Results indicate a need for new and severe regulations on periodic performance verifications and medical equipment quality control program especially in high risk instruments. It is also necessary to provide training courses for operating staff in the field of meterology in medicine to be acquianted with critical parameters to get accuracy results with operation room equipment.

  13. A Study on Performance and Safety Tests of Electrosurgical Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Golpaygani, A.; Movahedi, M.M.; Reza, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Modern medicine employs a wide variety of instruments with different physiological effects and measurements. Periodic verifications are routinely used in legal metrology for industrial measuring instruments. The correct operation of electrosurgical generators is essential to ensure patient’s safety and management of the risks associated with the use of high and low frequency electrical currents on human body. Material and Methods: The metrological reliability of 20 electrosurgical equipment in six hospitals (3 private and 3 public) was evaluated in one of the provinces of Iran according to international and national standards. Results: The achieved results show that HF leakage current of ground-referenced generators are more than isolated generators and the power analysis of only eight units delivered acceptable output values and the precision in the output power measurements was low. Conclusion: Results indicate a need for new and severe regulations on periodic performance verifications and medical equipment quality control program especially in high risk instruments. It is also necessary to provide training courses for operating staff in the field of meterology in medicine to be acquianted with critical parameters to get accuracy results with operation room equipment. PMID:27853725

  14. Telecommuting: Occupational health considerations for employee health and safety.

    PubMed

    Healy, M L

    2000-06-01

    1. Information technology has moved "work" out of a centralized location. Employees who telecommute pose significant challenges and considerations for the practice of occupational health nursing. 2. Employer and employee benefits associated with telecommuting are reportedly associated with high levels of job satisfaction. However, the occupational health and safety risks of this new work environment need to be fully assessed and understood. 3. The ergonomic controls to minimize the risk of repetitive motion injuries are the same for both office and home locations. Additional attention need to be paid to implementing risk controls for other physical hazards and psychosocial considerations, as well as personal safety and security issues. 4. The scope of occupational health nursing practice needs to remain dynamic, recognizing the impact new technologies have on the workplace, to continue to meet the needs of the changing workplace.

  15. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary for...

  16. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary for...

  17. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary for...

  18. 46 CFR 111.05-33 - Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors. 111.05-33 Section 111.05-33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL... § 111.05-33 Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors. (a) Each equipment-grounding conductor...

  19. 46 CFR 111.05-33 - Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors. 111.05-33 Section 111.05-33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL... § 111.05-33 Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors. (a) Each equipment-grounding conductor...

  20. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  1. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary for...

  2. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable requirements...

  3. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable requirements...

  4. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable requirements...

  5. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable requirements...

  6. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable requirements...

  7. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... Corporations (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of... coal mine safety equipment (as defined in § 1.187-2), based on a period of 60 months. Such...

  8. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... Corporations (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of... coal mine safety equipment (as defined in § 1.187-2), based on a period of 60 months. Such...

  9. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... Corporations (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of... coal mine safety equipment (as defined in § 1.187-2), based on a period of 60 months. Such...

  10. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... Corporations (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of... coal mine safety equipment (as defined in § 1.187-2), based on a period of 60 months. Such...

  11. Methodological considerations with data uncertainty in road safety analysis.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, Matthias; Stütz, Rainer

    2017-02-16

    The analysis of potential influencing factors that affect the likelihood of road accident occurrence has been of major interest for safety researchers throughout the recent decades. Even though steady methodological progresses were made over the years, several impediments pertaining to the statistical analysis of crash data remain. While issues related to methodological approaches have been subject to constructive discussion, uncertainties inherent to the most fundamental part of any analysis have been widely neglected: data. This paper scrutinizes data from various sources that are commonly used in road safety studies with respect to their actual suitability for applications in this area. Issues related to spatial and temporal aspects of data uncertainty are pointed out and their implications for road safety analysis are discussed in detail. These general methodological considerations are exemplary illustrated with data from Austria, providing suggestions and methods how to overcome these obstacles. Considering these aspects is of major importance for expediting further advances in road safety data analysis and thus for increasing road safety.

  12. STS-99 crew look over safety equipment during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39A, members of the STS-99 crew and others look over part of the safety equipment. Standing left to right (in uniform) are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST.

  13. Safety equipment list for the light duty utility arm system

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-03-02

    The initial issue (Revision 0) of this Safety Equipment List (SEL) for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) requires an explanation for both its existence and its being what it is. All LDUA documentation leading up to creation of this SEL, and the SEL itself, is predicated on the LDUA only being approved for use in waste tanks designated as Facility Group 3, i.e., it is not approved for use in Facility Group 1 or 2 waste tanks. Facility Group 3 tanks are those in which a spontaneous or induced hydrogen gas release would be small, localized, and would not exceed 25% of the LFL when mixed with the remaining air volume in the dome space; exceeding these parameters is considered unlikely. Thus, from a NFPA flammable gas environment perspective the waste tank interior is not classified as a hazardous location. Furthermore, a hazards identification and evaluation (HNF-SD-WM-HIE-010, REV 0) performed for the LDUA system concluded that the consequences of actual LDUA system postulated accidents in Flammable Gas Facility Group 3 waste tanks would have either NO IMPACT or LOW IMPACT on the offsite public and onsite worker. Therefore, from a flammable gas perspective, there is not a rationale for classifying any of SSCs associated with the LDUA as either Safety Class (SC) or Safety Significant (SS) SSCs, which, by default, categorizes them as General Service (GS) SSCs. It follows then, based on current PHMC procedures (HNF-PRO-704 and HNF-IP-0842, Vol IV, Section 5.2) for SEL creation and content, and from a flammable gas perspective, that an SEL is NOT REQ@D HOWEVER!!! There is both a precedent and a prudency to capture all SSCS, which although GS, contribute to a Defense-In-Depth (DID) approach to the design and use of equipment in potentially flammable gas environments. This Revision 0 of the LDUA SEL has been created to capture these SSCs and they are designated as GS-DID in this document. The specific reasons for doing this are listed.

  14. Human factors and safety considerations of night-vision systems flight using thermal imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rash, Clarence E.; Verona, Robert W.; Crowley, John S.

    1990-10-01

    Helmet Mounted Systems (HMS) must be lightweight, balanced and compatible with life support and head protection assemblies. This paper discusses the design of one particular HMS, the GEC Ferranti NITE-OP/NIGHTBIRD aviator's Night Vision Goggle (NVG) developed under contracts to the Ministry of Defence for all three services in the United Kingdom (UK) for Rotary Wing and fast jet aircraft. The existing equipment constraints, safety, human factor and optical performance requirements are discussed before the design solution is presented after consideration of these material and manufacturing options.

  15. Practical considerations for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Carmel M; Hart, Bruce W

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a well established class of therapeutics as evidenced by a large number of FDA approved mAbs for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases. Monoclonal antibodies that are molecularly engineered for enhanced functions and pharmacokinetic properties are routinely being considered for development by many biotechnology companies. Safety evaluation of current generation of mAbs poses new challenges due to the highly complex nature of engineering aspects and variability induced by the diverse recombinant cell systems to generate them. This review provides a basic outline for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic antibodies. Important considerations for planning a preclinical program, the types of nonclinical safety studies, and a general timeline for their conduct in relation to clinical trials are described. A list of relevant regulatory documents issued by government agencies is also provided. Adoption of these principles will greatly enhance the quality and relevance of the nonclinical safety data generated and will facilitate future development of mAb therapeutics. PMID:20046568

  16. Environment, safety, and health considerations for a new accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    J. Donald Cossairt

    2001-04-23

    A study of siting considerations for possible future accelerators at Fermilab is underway. Each candidate presents important challenges in environment, safety, and health (ES&H) that are reviewed generically in this paper. Some of these considerations are similar to those that have been encountered and solved during the construction and operation of other accelerator facilities. Others have not been encountered previously on the same scale. The novel issues will require particular attention coincident with project design efforts to assure their timely cost-effective resolution. It is concluded that with adequate planning, the issues can be addressed in a manner that merits the support of the Laboratory, the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the public.

  17. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements. (a) General requirements. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution...

  18. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment. 307.7 Section 307.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION.../or slaughter animals or to facilitate hide removal. Electrical stimulating equipment consists of two...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.93 - Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance... General Working Conditions § 1915.93 Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance. (a) Application. (1) This section applies to any motor vehicle used to transport employees, materials, or property...

  20. Flight Test Safety Considerations for Airborne Science Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Randolph S.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the scientific community that require scientific data or scientific measurements from aircraft do not understand the full implications of putting certain equipment on board high performance aircraft. It is the duty of the NASA Flight Operations personnel to ensure that all Principal Investigators who are given space on NASA flight research aircraft, comply with stringent safety requirements. The attitude of the experienced Flight operations personnel given this duty has been and remains one of insuring that the PI's experiment is allowed to be placed on the aircraft (facility) and can be operated in a manner that will obtain the expected data. This is sometimes a challenge. The success that NASA has in this regard is due to the fact that it is its own authority under public law, to certify its aircraft as airworthy. Airworthiness, fitness for flight, is a complex issue which pulls together all aspects of configuration management, engineering, quality, and flight safety. It is often the case at each NASA Center that is conducting airborne research, that unique solutions to some challenging safety issues are required. These solutions permit NASA to do things that would not be permitted by the Department of Transportation. This paper will use examples of various flight research configurations to show the necessity of a disciplined process leading up to flight test and mission implementation. All new configurations required engineering flight test but many, as noted in this paper, require that the modifications be flight tested to insure that they do not negatively impact on any part of the aircraft operational profiles. The success of these processes has been demonstrated over many years and NASA has accommodated experimental packages that cannot be flown on any other aircraft.

  1. Flight Test Safety Considerations for Airborne Science Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Randolph S.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the scientific community that require scientific data or scientific measurements from aircraft do not understand the full implications of putting certain equipment on board high performance aircraft. It is the duty of the NASA Flight Operations personnel to ensure that all Principal Investigators who are given space on NASA flight research aircraft, comply with stringent safety requirements. The attitude of the experienced Flight operations personnel given this duty has been and remains one of insuring that the PI's experiment is allowed to be placed on the aircraft (facility) and can be operated in a manner that will obtain the expected data. This is sometimes a challenge. The success that NASA has in this regard is due to the fact that it is its own authority under public law, to certify its aircraft as airworthy. Airworthiness, fitness for flight, is a complex issue which pulls together all aspects of configuration management, engineering, quality, and flight safety. It is often the case at each NASA Center that is conducting airborne research, that unique solutions to some challenging safety issues are required. These solutions permit NASA to do things that would not be permitted by the Department of Transportation. This paper will use examples of various flight research configurations to show the necessity of a disciplined process leading up to flight test and mission implementation. All new configurations required engineering flight test but many, as noted in this paper, require that the modifications be flight tested to insure that they do not negatively impact on any part of the aircraft operational profiles. The success of these processes has been demonstrated over many years and NASA has accommodated experimental packages that cannot be flown on any other aircraft.

  2. Laser safety considerations for a mobile laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flor, Mary

    1997-05-01

    An increased demand for advanced laser technology, especially in the area of cutaneous and cosmetic procedures has prompted physicians to use mobile laser services. Utilization of a mobile laser service allows physicians to provide the latest treatments for their patients while minimizing overhead costs. The high capital expense of laser systems is often beyond the financial means of individual clinicians, group practices, free-standing clinics and smaller community hospitals. Historically rapid technology turnover with laser technology places additional risk which is unacceptable to many institutions. In addition, health care reform is mandating consolidation of equipment within health care groups to keep costs at a minimum. In 1994, Abbott Northwestern Hospital organized an in-house mobile laser technology service which employs a group of experienced laser specialists to deliver and support laser treatments for hospital outreach and other regional physicians and health care facilities. Many of the hospital's internal safety standards and policies are applicable to the mobile environment. A significant challenge is client compliance because of the delicate balance of managing risk while avoiding being viewed as a regulator. The clinics and hospitals are assessed prior to service to assure minimum laser safety standards for both the patient and the staff. A major component in assessing new sites is to inform them of applicable regulatory standards and their obligations to assure optimum laser safety. In service training is provided and hospital and procedures are freely shared to assist the client in establishing a safe laser environment. Physician and nursing preceptor programs are also made available.

  3. Addressing patient safety through the use of 'criteria of acceptability' for medical radiation equipment.

    PubMed

    Gilley, Debbie Bray; Holmberg, Ola

    2013-02-01

    Patient safety should be considered in the use of ionising radiation equipment in medicine. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) establishes standards of safety and provides for the application of these standards, also in the area of medical use of radiation. Equipment acceptability, as it relates to radiation in medicine, is the need to satisfy the requirements or standards prior to the use of the device in patient imaging or treatment. Through IAEA activities in establishing and developing Safety Standards, Safety Reports and recommendations to regulatory authorities and end-users, it encourages the adoption of acceptability criteria that are relevant to the medical equipment and its use.

  4. Spaceflight Ground Support Equipment Reliability & System Safety Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Rene; Riddlebaugh, Jeffrey; Brinkman, John; Wilkinson, Myron

    2012-01-01

    Presented were Reliability Analysis, consisting primarily of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), and System Safety Analysis, consisting of Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA), performed to ensure that the CoNNeCT (Communications, Navigation, and Networking re- Configurable Testbed) Flight System was safely and reliably operated during its Assembly, Integration and Test (AI&T) phase. A tailored approach to the NASA Ground Support Equipment (GSE) standard, NASA-STD-5005C, involving the application of the appropriate Requirements, S&MA discipline expertise, and a Configuration Management system (to retain a record of the analysis and documentation) were presented. Presented were System Block Diagrams of selected GSE and the corresponding FMEA, as well as the PHAs. Also discussed are the specific examples of the FMEAs and PHAs being used during the AI&T phase to drive modifications to the GSE (via "redlining" of test procedures, and the placement of warning stickers to protect the flight hardware) before being interfaced to the Flight System. These modifications were necessary because failure modes and hazards were identified during the analysis that had not been properly mitigated. Strict Configuration Management was applied to changes (whether due to upgrades or expired calibrations) in the GSE by revisiting the FMEAs and PHAs to reflect the latest System Block Diagrams and Bill Of Material. The CoNNeCT flight system has been successfully assembled, integrated, tested, and shipped to the launch site without incident. This demonstrates that the steps taken to safeguard the flight system when it was interfaced to the various GSE were successful.

  5. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  6. Safety considerations in the design of Spacelab refrigerator/freezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hye, A.

    1985-07-01

    A vapor compression refrigerator/freezer has been designed for Spacelab to conduct life sciences experiments. It is equipped with different safety features to eliminate all probable types of failures. The whole Freon loop is enclosed in a second containment so that any leakage of Freon can be contained. The unit is provided with an 'Emergency On' switch to actuate during backup mode which provides the spacecraft power directly to the compressor and the cooling fans while removing the power supply and all normal control elements from the circuit. During this mode, the compressor runs continuously when operating as a freezer (-22 C) and is controlled by a thermostat to cycle when operating as a refrigerator (4 C). It has a push button switch at the front panel to momentarily power the thermometer by a battery to monitor the inside temperature during an emergency. It has a door switch which shuts off the internal cooling fans when the door is opened. All the important critical performance data will be downlinked through a data connector to monitor during mission.

  7. TANK VAPOR CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN & EXISTING DIRECT READING INSTRUMENTION & PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT CONSIDERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    BUTLER, N.K.

    2004-11-01

    This document takes the newly released Industrial Hygiene Chemical Vapor Technical Basis (RPP-22491) and evaluates the chemicals of potential concern (COPC) identified for selected implementation actions by the industrial hygiene organization. This document is not intended as a hazard analysis with recommended controls for all tank farm activities. Not all of the chemicals listed are present in all tanks; therefore, hazard analyses can and should be tailored as appropriate. Detection of each chemical by current industrial hygiene non-specific instrumentation in use at the tank farms is evaluated. Information gaps are identified and recommendations are made to resolve these needs. Of the 52 COPC, 34 can be detected with existing instrumentation. Three additional chemicals could be detected with a photoionization detector (PID) equipped with a different lamp. Discussion with specific instrument manufacturers is warranted. Consideration should be given to having the SapphIRe XL customized for tank farm applications. Other instruments, sampling or modeling techniques should be evaluated to estimate concentrations of chemicals not detected by direct reading instruments. In addition, relative instrument response needs to be factored in to action levels used for direct reading instruments. These action levels should be correlated to exposures to the COPC and corresponding occupational exposure limits (OELs). The minimum respiratory protection for each of the COPC is evaluated against current options. Recommendations are made for respiratory protection based on each chemical. Until exposures are sufficiently quantified and analyzed, the current use of supplied air respiratory protection is appropriate and protective for the COPC. Use of supplied air respiratory protection should be evaluated once a detailed exposure assessment for the COPC is completed. The established tank farm OELs should be documented in the TFC-PLN-34. For chemicals without an established tank farm OEL

  8. Administration of Substances to Laboratory Animals: Equipment Considerations, Vehicle Selection, and Solute Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Patricia V; Pekow, Cynthia; Vasbinder, Mary Ann; Brabb, Thea

    2011-01-01

    Administration of substances to laboratory animals requires careful consideration and planning to optimize delivery of the agent to the animal while minimizing potential adverse experiences from the procedure. The equipment selected to deliver substances to animals depends on the length of the study and the nature of the material being administered. This selection provides a significant opportunity for refining animal treatment. Similarly, when substances are administered as solutions or suspensions, attention should be given to selection of vehicles and methods used for preparing the solutions and suspensions. The research team, veterinarian, technical personnel, and IACUC members should be aware of reasons underlying selection of equipment for substance delivery and should consider carefully how substances will be prepared and stored prior to administration to animals. Failure to consider these factors during experimental planning may result in unintentional adverse effects on experimental animals and confounded results. PMID:22330706

  9. Administration of substances to laboratory animals: equipment considerations, vehicle selection, and solute preparation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Patricia V; Pekow, Cynthia; Vasbinder, Mary Ann; Brabb, Thea

    2011-09-01

    Administration of substances to laboratory animals requires careful consideration and planning to optimize delivery of the agent to the animal while minimizing potential adverse experiences from the procedure. The equipment selected to deliver substances to animals depends on the length of the study and the nature of the material being administered. This selection provides a significant opportunity for refining animal treatment. Similarly, when substances are administered as solutions or suspensions, attention should be given to selection of vehicles and methods used for preparing the solutions and suspensions. The research team, veterinarian, technical personnel, and IACUC members should be aware of reasons underlying selection of equipment for substance delivery and should consider carefully how substances will be prepared and stored prior to administration to animals. Failure to consider these factors during experimental planning may result in unintentional adverse effects on experimental animals and confounded results.

  10. Safety considerations for graphene: lessons learnt from carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-03-19

    carbon nanotubes are rare, making comparative considerations of their overall safety and risk assessment challenging. In this Account, we attempt to offer a set of rules for the development of graphene and its derivatives to enhance their overall safety and minimize the risks for adverse reactions in humans from exposure. These rules are: (1) to use small, individual graphene sheets that macrophages in the body can efficiently internalize and remove from the site of deposition; (2) to use hydrophilic, stable, colloidal dispersions of graphene sheets to minimize aggregation in vivo; and (3) to use excretable graphene material or chemically-modified graphene that can be degraded effectively. Such rules can only act as guidelines at this early stage in the development of graphene-based technologies, yet they offer a set of design principles for the fabrication and safe use of graphene material that will come in contact with the human body. In a broader context, the safety risks associated with graphene materials will be entirely dependent on the specific types of graphene materials and how they are investigated or applied. Therefore, generalizations about the toxicity of "graphene" as a whole will be inaccurate, possibly misleading, and should be avoided.

  11. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of... must have adequate fire protection facilities. If fire pumps are a part of these facilities, their...) Each compressor unit in a compressor station must have a shutdown or alarm device that operates in the...

  12. [Ecological and food safety considerations about products of vegetable origin].

    PubMed

    Tapia de Daza, M S; Díaz, R V

    1994-12-01

    Media have paid much attention in recent years to emerging microbiological problems in foods of plant origin. The potential for contamination of fruits and vegetables is high because of the wide variety of conditions to which produce is exposed during growth, harvest, processing and distribution. These considerations acquire great significance in the current scenario of the new processing techniques that offer attributes of convenience and fresh-likeness in response to changes in consumption patterns and increased demand of fresh and minimally processed fruits and vegetables. Thus, reliance on low temperature storage and on improved packaging materials/techniques have increased. Even if produce had not been considered a major vector for foodborne diseases, technologies that extend shelf-life by decreasing the rate of product deterioration might increase the risks associated with pathogenic microorganisms, especially of psychotropic nature, by allowing sufficient time for their growth when retarding the development of competitive spoilage organisms. Processing steps that modify the food microenvironment open new possibilities to support pathogens that, for ecological reason, would have never been naturally present in produce. Ecological and safety aspects related to fruits and vegetables as well as foodborne disease outbreaks traceable to produce and reportedly due to Salmonella and Shigella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium botulinum, Aeromonas hydrophila, Campylobacter jejuni are reviewed.

  13. 29 CFR 1915.93 - Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements in 29 CFR 1910.178 continue to apply to powered industrial trucks used for shipyard employment. (b... initially used after August 1, 2011 is equipped with a safety belt for each employee operating or riding in...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.93 - Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements in 29 CFR 1910.178 continue to apply to powered industrial trucks used for shipyard employment. (b... initially used after August 1, 2011 is equipped with a safety belt for each employee operating or riding in...

  15. Comparison of approaches to weighting of multiple criteria for selecting equipment to optimise performance and safety.

    PubMed

    Agarski, Boris; Hadzistevic, Miodrag; Budak, Igor; Moraca, Slobodan; Vukelic, Djordje

    2017-06-12

    Nowadays every piece of working equipment and tool has to comply with safety standards and laws. This study investigated multi-criteria methods for selecting working equipment in order to optimise performance and occupational safety. The multi-criteria decision-making (MDCM) method was applied to the problem of selecting optimal working equipment using four different criterion weighting approaches (direct weighting, revised Simos procedure, Fuller's triangle and analytic hierarchy process). Groups of economic, technical, and safety criteria were defined and five weighting scenarios were developed. Although the four weighting methods produced similar results, in some situations they produced different criterion weighting factors. The final output of the MCDM method was the identification of the optimal forklift in the five weighting scenarios. Although we have applied the MCDM method to a forklift selection problem it can be applied to all sorts of working equipment in contexts where economic, technical and safety selection criteria can be identified.

  16. Advanced Avalanche Safety Equipment of Backcountry Users: Current Trends and Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pearlly; Smith, William R; Wheeler, Albert; McIntosh, Scott E

    2015-09-01

    Backcountry travelers should carry a standard set of safety gear (transceiver, shovel, and probe) to improve rescue chances and reduce mortality risk. Many backcountry enthusiasts are using other advanced equipment such as an artificial air pocket (eg, the AvaLung) or an avalanche air bag. Our goal was to determine the numbers of backcountry users carrying advanced equipment and their perceptions of mortality and morbidity benefit while carrying this gear. A convenience sample of backcountry skiers, snowboarders, snowshoers, and snowmobilers was surveyed between February and April 2014. Participants of this study were backcountry mountain users recruited at trailheads in the Wasatch and Teton mountain ranges of Utah and Wyoming, respectively. Questions included prior avalanche education, equipment carried, and perceived safety benefit derived from advanced equipment. In all, 193 surveys were collected. Skiers and snowboarders were likely to have taken an avalanche safety course, whereas snowshoers and snowmobilers were less likely to have taken a course. Most backcountry users (149, 77.2%), predominantly skiers and snowboarders, carried standard safety equipment. The AvaLung was carried more often (47 users) than an avalanche air bag (10 users). The avalanche air bag had a more favorable perceived safety benefit. A majority of participants reported cost as the barrier to obtaining advanced equipment. Standard avalanche safety practices, including taking an avalanche safety course and carrying standard equipment, remain the most common safety practices among backcountry users in the Wasatch and Tetons. Snowshoers remain an ideal target for outreach to increase avalanche awareness and safety. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 49 CFR 214.507 - Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... maintenance machines. 214.507 Section 214.507 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Roadway Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.507 Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines. (a) Each new on-track roadway maintenance machine shall be equipped with:...

  18. 49 CFR 214.507 - Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... maintenance machines. 214.507 Section 214.507 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Roadway Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.507 Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines. (a) Each new on-track roadway maintenance machine shall be equipped with:...

  19. 49 CFR 214.507 - Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... maintenance machines. 214.507 Section 214.507 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Roadway Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.507 Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines. (a) Each new on-track roadway maintenance machine shall be equipped with:...

  20. Safety and Health Evaluation-Communication/Electronic Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-15

    DT. e. Schedule an initial examination of the test Item with the maintenance evaluator, human factors engineer , and safety engineer precent. Discuss...hazards associated with the test Item. Use the appropriate checklists appended to this TOP throughout all operations duri’.g the DT cycle . Direct...durirn Development and Acquisition of Materiel, 29 August 1975. 2. AR 385-16, System Safety Engineering and Management, I December 1980. 3. AR 40-5

  1. NASA safety standard for lifting devices and equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    NASA's minimum safety requirements are established for the design, testing, inspection, maintenance, certification, and use of overhead and gantry cranes (including top running monorail, underhung, and jib cranes), mobile cranes, derrick hoists, and special hoist supported personnel lifting devices (these do not include elevators, ground supported personnel lifts, or powered platforms). Minimum requirements are also addressed for the testing, inspection, and use of Hydra-sets, hooks, and slings. Safety standards are thoroughly detailed.

  2. NASA safety standard for lifting devices and equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's minimum safety requirements are established for the design, testing, inspection, maintenance, certification, and use of overhead and gantry cranes (including top running monorail, underhung, and jib cranes), mobile cranes, derrick hoists, and special hoist supported personnel lifting devices (these do not include elevators, ground supported personnel lifts, or powered platforms). Minimum requirements are also addressed for the testing, inspection, and use of Hydra-sets, hooks, and slings. Safety standards are thoroughly detailed.

  3. Design considerations in an active medical product safety monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Joshua J; Fireman, Bruce; Ryan, Patrick B; Maclure, Malcolm; Gerhard, Tobias; Toh, Sengwee; Rassen, Jeremy A; Nelson, Jennifer C; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Active medical product monitoring systems, such as the Sentinel System, will utilize electronic healthcare data captured during routine health care. Safety signals that arise from these data may be spurious because of chance or bias, particularly confounding bias, given the observational nature of the data. Applying appropriate monitoring designs can filter out many false-positive and false-negative associations from the outset. Designs can be classified by whether they produce estimates based on between-person or within-person comparisons. In deciding which approach is more suitable for a given monitoring scenario, stakeholders must consider the characteristics of the monitored product, characteristics of the health outcome of interest (HOI), and characteristics of the potential link between these. Specifically, three factors drive design decisions: (i) strength of within-person and between-person confounding; (ii) whether circumstances exist that may predispose to misclassification of exposure or misclassification of the timing of the HOI; and (iii) whether the exposure of interest is predominantly transient or sustained. Additional design considerations include whether to focus on new users, the availability of appropriate active comparators, the presence of an exposure time trend, and the measure of association of interest. When the key assumptions of self-controlled designs are fulfilled (i.e., lack of within-person, time-varying confounding; abrupt HOI onset; and transient exposure), within-person comparisons are preferred because they inherently avoid confounding by fixed factors. The cohort approach generally is preferred in other situations and particularly when timing of exposure or outcome is uncertain because cohort approaches are less vulnerable to biases resulting from misclassification.

  4. Need for an "integrated safety assessment" of GMOs, linking food safety and environmental considerations.

    PubMed

    Haslberger, Alexander G

    2006-05-03

    information. An integrated assessment might help to focus and save capacities in highly technical areas such as molecular characterization or profiling, which are often necessary for both assessments. In the area of establishing international standards for traded foods, such as for the newly created Standards in Trade and Development Facility (STDF), an integrated assessment might help in the consideration of important environmental aspects involved in health and food safety. Furthermore, an established integrated view on GMOs may create greater consumer confidence in the technology.

  5. [On meeting sanitary legal requirements in technical regulation of medical equipment safety].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, O K; Prokopenko, L V

    2007-01-01

    The article covered observance of sanitary legal requirements in special technical regulations "On requirements to medical equipment and medical products safety". The authors discussed problems of applied terminology, classification of medical products, occupational risk, control over observance of safety requirements on all stages of medical products circulation--design, production, usage.

  6. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... stimulating (EST) equipment. 307.7 Section 307.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... manual stimulation or before the carcass chain is started in an automatic system. (c) Operation—(1..., Technical Services, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250...

  7. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... stimulating (EST) equipment. 307.7 Section 307.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... manual stimulation or before the carcass chain is started in an automatic system. (c) Operation— (1..., Technical Services, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250...

  8. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of deduction—(1) In... respect to the amortization of the adjusted basis (for determining gain) of any certified coal mine...

  9. Equipment Safety, Maintenance and Inspection: What the Oral Surgeon Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Katherine A

    2017-05-01

    Many oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures are done in an office-based setting, with many oral and maxillofacial surgeons involved in oversight of equipment maintenance. Goals in equipment management are to prevent harm to patients and staff, stay compliant with current regulations, and increase equipment longevity. This article covers the safety, maintenance, and inspection related to electrical equipment used in the treatment of patients, autoclaves, radiograph machines, nitrous oxide and oxygen medical gases, and required back-up power and lighting. An office should always follow manufacturer's recommendations regarding maintenance and inspection and document policies and monitoring so compliance can be assured. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety Considerations in the Design of Riot-Control Grenades

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    fuze design resulted in injuries to the user, because the user would not maintain the required pressure after removing the safety pin . The grenade...of the M25A2 grenade was the accidental functioning of the grenade with the safety pin intact. If the ferenade was dropped onto a hard surface

  11. Design Considerations and Selection of Equipment for Assured Life Cycle Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Vikas; Sant, S.; Parmar, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Navy has been taking giant strides in pursuance of the aim of being a Blue Water Navy. Life cycle support for the ships and submarines, therefore, will have a significant bearing in order to meet the ever increasing operational requirements in the service life of a ship. Technology, processes and the functionality of equipments and on-board systems have undergone considerable development in the recent past. The obsolescence of the ship systems is a constant cause of concern with availability of ever changing technology. Consequently, the availability of ships/submarines for operation gets affected. The maintenance of the ships/submarines thus becomes an ominous task. The focus of the paper is to establish key parameters which consistently would meet the defined goals in support of the ship's life cycle.

  12. Design considerations, tooling, and equipment for remote in-service inspection of radioactive piping and pressure-vessel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swannack, D.L.; Schmoker, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes results obtained in use of remotely-operated nondestructive testing (NDT) equipment for inspection of reactor-system components. Experience obtained in operating the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has provided a basis for field verification of remote NDT equipment designs and has suggested development improvements. Remote Viewing and data gathering systems used include periscopes, borescopes, fiberscopes, hybrid borescopes/fiberscopes, and closed circuit television. A summary of design consideration for inspection equipment and power plant design is presented to achieve improved equipment operation and reduction of plant maintenance downtime.

  13. Stereochemistry Considerations Can Improve Pesticide Safety and Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    About 30% of pesticides are chiral molecules and therefore exist as two or more stereoisomers, which can differ significantly in their toxicity, biodegradation, and persistence. Such differences determine their relative safety to humans and environmental species. Enantiomers, mir...

  14. Improving traffic safety: conceptual considerations for successful action.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Michael; Tsimhoni, Omer

    2008-01-01

    In the early stages of motorization, it did not take rigorous scientific research to achieve major improvements in traffic safety. Instead, early traffic-safety countermeasures were often based exclusively on common sense. Since then, scientific research has gradually increased in importance as the basis for developing successful interventions. This shift was not made by choice but mostly by necessity: many of the "easy" problems have already been addressed, and the remaining problems are generally too complex for an approach based solely on common sense. Fortunately, our understanding of the complexities involved in traffic safety has recently made major gains, and common sense can now be supplemented, to some degree, by valid technical analysis. This article discusses major conceptual issues that should be considered in guiding the future development of effective, science-based traffic-safety countermeasures. After briefly discussing the conceptual issues, the article offers a list of implications for action.

  15. Analysis of medical equipment management in relation to the mandatory medical equipment safety manager (MESM) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kai; Hirose, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Tsuruta, Harukazu; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Half a decade has passed since the fifth revision of the medical law and mandatory appointment of a medical equipment safety manager (MESM) in hospitals in Japan. During this period, circumstances have changed regarding maintenance of medical equipment (ME). We conducted a survey to examine these changes and the current situation in ME management. Maintenance of ME and related work were found to have increased in many hospitals, but the number of clinical engineering technologists (CETs) has only slightly increased. The appointed MESM was a CET or physician in most hospitals. In hospitals where physicians were appointed as the MESM, 81% had operation managers. Many respondents commented that it was difficult for one person to cover all the tasks required by the MESM, due to a lack of knowledge, too much work, or other reasons. This suggests the importance of an operation manager for ME to work under the MESM.

  16. System safety analysis of well-control equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.H.; Roche, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    In the wake of recent disasters in the oil and gas E and P and petrochemical industries, the importance of system safety analysis is becoming recognized. Reliability assessment techniques, which were developed in the nuclear-power-generation and defense industries, are potentially valuable tools for engineers in the offshore oil and gas business. BOP's and their control systems used on offshore rigs are typically made up of several subsystems. Hydraulic, pneumatic, and electronic modules are interfaced to provide functional control and monitoring of the mechanical BOP's and valves. Two techniques are used for reliability analysis of a blowout preventer (BOP) and a hydraulic control system. Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) examines each part and the consequences of its malfunction. Fault tree analysis (FTA) traces undesired events to their causes. Reliability calculations and data sources are addressed.

  17. Does non-medical grade power cord compromise the safety of medical equipment?

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathi, V; Prasad, PS Vishnu; Kundra, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    A tertiary care 1000 bedded hospital contains more than 10,000 pieces of equipment worth approximately 41 million USD, while the power cords supplied along with the imported equipment do not comply with country-specific norms. Moreover, the local vendors procure power cords with type D/M plug to complete installation and also on-site electrical safety test is not performed. Hence, this project was undertaken to evaluate the electrical safety of all life-saving equipment purchased in the year 2013, referring to the guidelines of International Electrotechnical Commission 62353, the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-99 hospital standard for the analysis of protective earth resistance and chassis leakage current. This study was done with a measuring device namely electrical safety analyser 612 model from Fluke Biomedical. PMID:26903668

  18. [Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anaesthesiology--Part 8: SOP for checking equipment and drugs].

    PubMed

    Happel, Oliver; Roewer, Norbert; Kranke, Peter

    2013-09-01

    In 2010 the Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anaesthesiology was launched. In this joined statement under the auspice of the European Society of Anaesthesiology the need for protocols for different aspects of perioperative procedures that could affect patient safety was stated. All participating institutions should have--among others--protocols for checking equipment and drugs required for the delivery of safe anaesthesia. The background for this being the fact that the lack of carefully checking equipment and drugs--or not adhering to existing checklists--is a latent threat to patient safety and thus may increase morbidity and mortality.In this part of a series the authors present protocols existing in their clinic for checking anaesthesia equipment and drugs.

  19. Paradigms and safety requirements for a new generation of workplace equipment.

    PubMed

    Missala, Tadeusz

    2014-01-01

    A workplace in the manufacturing industry consists of not only stationary equipment (e.g., machining centres, fixed robots) but also mobile equipment (e.g., automated guided vehicles, mobile robots), with both kinds cooperating directly with workers. Workplace equipment should not only be safe, it should also not generate fear or anxiety; still better if it should inspire calm and confidence. In view of robot laws, this article presents selected examples of robot-human co-operation, reviews safety requirements and safety functions developed to date. It also proposes a package of selected new safety functions, necessary to fulfil this paradigm. It also suggests and presents examples of actions that can make the workplace a human-friendly environment and presents examples of such actions.

  20. Multilevel Vehicle Design: Fuel Economy, Mobility and Safety Considerations, Part B. Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-11

    apeak) Livermore Software Technology Corporation (2007). LS - DYNA Keyword User’s Manual. http://lstc.com/pdf/ ls -dyna_971_manual_k.pdf, accessed April...B Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading Steven Hoffenson, presenter (U of M) Panos Papalambros, PI (U of M) Michael...Safety Considerations, Part B Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  1. What Are the Safety Considerations for Insulin Control for Athletes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Olson, Sara; Gaudet, Laura; Jackson, Allen

    2010-01-01

    Athletes diagnosed with diabetes may have difficulty with their blood sugar levels fluctuating during intense exercise. Considerations for athletes with insulin concerns may range anywhere from exercise rehabilitation to the use of an automatic insulin pump. The automatic insulin pump is a small battery-operated device about the size of a pager.…

  2. Repository Safety Strategy: Plan to Prepare Safety Case to Support Yucca Mountain Site Recommendation and Licensing Considerations.

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2001-01-18

    A key issue for the site recommendation and license application considerations for a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain is the ability of that site to protect the public from any undue radiological risk before and after permanent closure. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is therefore preparing a case regarding preclosure and postclosure safety of a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain. This document, Revision 4 of the Repository Safety Strategy (RSS), reports the current status of this safety case and the plans to complete it. This document updates its predecessors to reflect project developments and information learned since previous revisions. This revision is based on the work to date, including RSS workshops conducted from February through June 2000. While previous revisions focused solely on postclosure safety, Revision 4 also addresses the preclosure safety case. This volume, Volume I, presents the preclosure safety strategy. Volume II presents the postclosure safety strategy.

  3. Neurovestibular Effects of Spaceflight - Considerations for Human Safety and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, E.

    2012-01-01

    From orbital spaceflight we know that astronauts may suffer from sensori-motor problems during the first days in weightlessness, and again upon return to Earth. Symptoms include spatial disorientation, motion illusions, postural imbalance, and motion sickness. Symptoms are typically triggered by head movements, indicating a central role of the vestibular system. TNO research has shown that the same symptoms can be elicited by exposing subjects to hyper-gravity in a human centrifuge. This suggests that not weightlessness itself, but the change in G-load causes vestibular adaptation problems. Suborbital spaceflight will expose participants to a sequence of highly variable G-levels. Hence it can be anticipated that this will affect vestibular functioning, with potential consequences for ride comfort (passengers) and flight safety (crew). We therefore propose to invest in research on the physiological responses to G-load profiles specific for suborbital flights with the purpose to establish comfort and safety guidelines for the commercial spaceflight sector.

  4. Safety and emergency preparedness considerations for geotechnical field operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, R.P.

    1989-04-01

    The GEO Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories is involved in several remote-site drilling and/or experimental operations each year. In 1987, the Geothermal Research Division of the Department developed a general set of Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs) that could be applied to a variety of projects. This general set is supplemented by site-specific SOPs as needed. Effective field operations require: integration of safety and emergency preparedness planning with overall project planning, training of field personnel and inventorying of local emergency support resources, and, developing a clear line of responsibility and authority to enforce the safety requirements. Copies of SOPs used in recent operations are included as examples of working documents for the reader.

  5. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Safety Showers and Eyewash Fountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronaugh, John C.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews safety and emergency equipment in their application to chemical laboratories. Discusses American National Standards (ANSI) for equipment. Presents practical considerations for the placement and purchase of equipment. (MVL)

  6. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Safety Showers and Eyewash Fountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronaugh, John C.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews safety and emergency equipment in their application to chemical laboratories. Discusses American National Standards (ANSI) for equipment. Presents practical considerations for the placement and purchase of equipment. (MVL)

  7. General Consideration in the History, Physical Examination, and Safety Determination.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Jonathan; Dexter, William; Powell, Amy; Wright, Justin

    2015-09-01

    A thorough medical history is perhaps the most important aspect when evaluating an athlete before wilderness adventure. A physical examination should follow focusing on conditions that may be affected by changes in atmospheric pressure, extremes of temperature, or altitude. This information can then be used to make safety recommendations ensuring that adventurers are able to safely enjoy participation in the wilderness pursuit of their choice.

  8. General Consideration in the History, Physical Examination, and Safety Determination.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Jonathan; Dexter, William; Powell, Amy; Wright, Justin

    2015-12-01

    A thorough medical history is perhaps the most important aspect when evaluating an athlete before wilderness adventure. A physical examination should follow focusing on conditions that may be affected by changes in atmospheric pressure, extremes of temperature, or altitude. This information can then be used to make safety recommendations ensuring that adventurers are able to safely enjoy participation in the wilderness pursuit of their choice.

  9. Overview of Therapeutic Ultrasound Applications and Safety Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas; Smith, Nadine; Bailey, Michael; Czarnota, Gregory; Hynynen, Kullervo; Makin, Inder

    2013-01-01

    Summary Applications of ultrasound in medicine for therapeutic purposes have been an accepted and beneficial use of ultrasonic biological effects for many years. Low power ultrasound of about 1 MHz frequency has been widely applied since the 1950s for physical therapy in conditions such as tendinitis or bursitis. In the 1980s, high pressure-amplitude shockwaves came into use for mechanically resolving kidney stones, and “lithotripsy” rapidly replaced surgery as the most frequent treatment choice. The use of ultrasonic energy for therapy continues to expand, and approved applications now include uterine fibroid ablation, cataract removal (phacoemulsification), surgical tissue cutting and hemostasis, transdermal drug delivery, and bone fracture healing, among others. Undesirable bioeffects can occur including burns for thermal-based therapies and significant hemorrhage for mechanical-based therapies (e. g. lithotripsy). In all these therapeutic applications for bioeffects of ultrasound, standardization, ultrasound dosimetry, benefits assurance and side-effects risk minimization must be carefully considered in order to insure an optimal benefit to risk ratio for the patient. Therapeutic ultrasound typically has well-defined benefits and risks, and therefore presents a tractable safety problem to the clinician. However, safety information can be scattered, confusing or subject to commercial conflict of interest. Of paramount importance for managing this problem is the communication of practical safety information by authoritative groups, such as the AIUM, to the medical ultrasound community. In this overview, the Bioeffects Committee outlines the wide range of therapeutic ultrasound methods, which are in clinical use or under study, and provides general guidance for assuring therapeutic ultrasound safety. PMID:22441920

  10. Overview of therapeutic ultrasound applications and safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Smith, Nadine B; Bailey, Michael R; Czarnota, Gregory J; Hynynen, Kullervo; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2012-04-01

    Applications of ultrasound in medicine for therapeutic purposes have been accepted and beneficial uses of ultrasonic biological effects for many years. Low-power ultrasound of about 1 MHz has been widely applied since the 1950s for physical therapy in conditions such as tendinitis and bursitis. In the 1980s, high-pressure-amplitude shock waves came into use for mechanically resolving kidney stones, and "lithotripsy" rapidly replaced surgery as the most frequent treatment choice. The use of ultrasonic energy for therapy continues to expand, and approved applications now include uterine fibroid ablation, cataract removal (phacoemulsification), surgical tissue cutting and hemostasis, transdermal drug delivery, and bone fracture healing, among others. Undesirable bioeffects can occur, including burns from thermal-based therapies and severe hemorrhage from mechanical-based therapies (eg, lithotripsy). In all of these therapeutic applications of ultrasound bioeffects, standardization, ultrasound dosimetry, benefits assurance, and side-effect risk minimization must be carefully considered to ensure an optimal benefit to risk ratio for the patient. Therapeutic ultrasound typically has well-defined benefits and risks and therefore presents a manageable safety problem to the clinician. However, safety information can be scattered, confusing, or subject to commercial conflicts of interest. Of paramount importance for managing this problem is the communication of practical safety information by authoritative groups, such as the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, to the medical ultrasound community. In this overview, the Bioeffects Committee of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine outlines the wide range of therapeutic ultrasound methods, which are in clinical use or under study, and provides general guidance for ensuring therapeutic ultrasound safety.

  11. Canadian and US drug approval times and safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Nigel S B; Kaitin, Kenneth I

    2003-10-01

    Approval times of new drugs are frequently longer in Canada than in the US, but it has been argued that reducing approval times might lead to unsafe drugs receiving marketing approval. To compare new drug approval times in Canada and the US over a 10-year period and to relate them to safety discontinuations. Application and approval dates of all new drugs except diagnostic products, new salts, esters, isomers, and dosage forms of already-marketed drugs, as well as combinations containing previously approved substances approved in the US and Canada between January 1992 and December 2001 were obtained from the respective drug regulatory agencies and other sources. Information about drugs discontinued for safety reasons was obtained from the agencies' publications and Web sites and from journal articles. New drug approval times were significantly longer in Canada than in the US. The difference occurs in all drug categories and by review type (priority/standard). However, the proportion of new drugs approved and later discontinued for safety reasons from the Canadian market (2.0%) was just over half that in the US (3.6%). When serious drug safety problems were identified in a timely manner after US approval, the products were not subsequently approved in Canada. Canada avoided potential dangers because its longer approval times provided an opportunity to observe actual market experience in other countries. However, the trade-off is that new drugs, including those for conditions for which current therapy has limited efficacy, take significantly longer to be approved in Canada and, hence, to be available to Canadians.

  12. Safety considerations of lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbarao, Surampudi; Halpert, Gerald; Stein, Irving

    1986-06-01

    The use of spirally wound lithium-thionyl chloride (Li-SOCl2) cells is currently limited because of their hazardous behavior. Safety hazards have ranged from mild venting of toxic materials to violent explosions and fires. These incidents may be related to both user- and manufacturer-induced causes. Many explanations have been offered to explain the unsafe behavior of the cells under operating and abuse conditions. Explanations fall into two categories: (1) thermal mechanisms, and (2) chemical mechanisms. However, it is quite difficult to separate the two. Both may be responsible for cell venting or explosion. Some safety problems encountered with these cells also may be due to design deficiencies and ineffective quality control during cell fabrication. A well-coordinated basic and applied research program is needed to develop safe Li-SOCl2 cells. Recommendations include: (1) learnig more about Li-SOL2 cell chemistry; (2) modeling cell and battery behavior; (3) optimizing cell design for safety and performance, (4) implementing quality control procedures; and (5) educating users.

  13. Safety considerations of lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, Surampudi; Halpert, Gerald; Stein, Irving

    1986-01-01

    The use of spirally wound lithium-thionyl chloride (Li-SOCl2) cells is currently limited because of their hazardous behavior. Safety hazards have ranged from mild venting of toxic materials to violent explosions and fires. These incidents may be related to both user- and manufacturer-induced causes. Many explanations have been offered to explain the unsafe behavior of the cells under operating and abuse conditions. Explanations fall into two categories: (1) thermal mechanisms, and (2) chemical mechanisms. However, it is quite difficult to separate the two. Both may be responsible for cell venting or explosion. Some safety problems encountered with these cells also may be due to design deficiencies and ineffective quality control during cell fabrication. A well-coordinated basic and applied research program is needed to develop safe Li-SOCl2 cells. Recommendations include: (1) learnig more about Li-SOL2 cell chemistry; (2) modeling cell and battery behavior; (3) optimizing cell design for safety and performance, (4) implementing quality control procedures; and (5) educating users.

  14. Safety considerations with omega-3 fatty acid therapy.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E

    2007-03-19

    It has been suggested that the potential antithrombotic effect of fish oils may theoretically increase the risk for bleeding, which may be a safety concern for individual patients. However, clinical trial evidence has not supported increased bleeding with omega-3 fatty acid intake, even when combined with other agents that might also increase bleeding (such as aspirin and warfarin). Another potential safety concern is the susceptibility of omega-3 fatty acid preparations to undergo oxidation, which contributes to patient intolerance and potential toxicity. Finally, large amounts of fish consumption may result in adverse experiences due to the potential presence of environmental toxins such as mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, and other contaminants. The risks of exposure to environmental toxins and hypervitaminosis with fish consumption are substantially reduced through purification processes used to develop selected concentrated fish oil supplements and prescription preparations. Thus, in choosing which fish oil therapies to recommend, clinicians should be aware of available information to best assess their relative safety, which includes the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) advisory statement regarding fish consumption, the meaning of certain labeling (such as "verification" through the US Pharmacopeia) and the differences in FDA regulatory requirements between nonprescription fish oil supplements and prescription fish oil preparations, and how all of this is important to the optimal treatment of patients.

  15. 46 CFR 309.6 - Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other... OPERATIONS VALUES FOR WAR RISK INSURANCE § 309.6 Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other... stated valuation. (b) Special equipment. If the depreciated reproduction cost less construction subsidy...

  16. Comparative assessment of nanomaterial definitions and safety evaluation considerations.

    PubMed

    Boverhof, Darrell R; Bramante, Christina M; Butala, John H; Clancy, Shaun F; Lafranconi, Mark; West, Jay; Gordon, Steve C

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials continue to bring promising advances to science and technology. In concert have come calls for increased regulatory oversight to ensure their appropriate identification and evaluation, which has led to extensive discussions about nanomaterial definitions. Numerous nanomaterial definitions have been proposed by government, industry, and standards organizations. We conducted a comprehensive comparative assessment of existing nanomaterial definitions put forward by governments to highlight their similarities and differences. We found that the size limits used in different definitions were inconsistent, as were considerations of other elements, including agglomerates and aggregates, distributional thresholds, novel properties, and solubility. Other important differences included consideration of number size distributions versus weight distributions and natural versus intentionally-manufactured materials. Overall, the definitions we compared were not in alignment, which may lead to inconsistent identification and evaluation of nanomaterials and could have adverse impacts on commerce and public perceptions of nanotechnology. We recommend a set of considerations that future discussions of nanomaterial definitions should consider for describing materials and assessing their potential for health and environmental impacts using risk-based approaches within existing assessment frameworks. Our intent is to initiate a dialogue aimed at achieving greater clarity in identifying those nanomaterials that may require additional evaluation, not to propose a formal definition.

  17. Safety Requirements for Home Playground Equipment. (Voluntary Product Standard PS 66-75).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American National Standards Inst., Inc., New York, NY.

    This document presents the National Bureau of Standards safety requirements for home playground equipment intended for use by children 2 through 10 years old. The requirements are concerned with the design and performance of the units and their components, the structural integrity of the units and their components during and after exposure to…

  18. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... equipment that provides electric shock treatment to carcasses for the purpose of accelerating rigor mortis... traveling with the carcass, or any other acceptable method. (b) Safety requirements—(1) Circuits, grounding... stimulating enclosure to the service ground, or the secondary voltage (stimulating circuit) shall be insulated...

  19. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... equipment that provides electric shock treatment to carcasses for the purpose of accelerating rigor mortis... traveling with the carcass, or any other acceptable method. (b) Safety requirements—(1) Circuits, grounding... stimulating enclosure to the service ground, or the secondary voltage (stimulating circuit) shall be insulated...

  20. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY...

  1. 77 FR 74196 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Product Design To Minimize Medication...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Product Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication Errors... using a systems approach to minimize medication errors relating to product design. The draft...

  2. Safety considerations in learning new procedures: a survey of surgeons.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Todd A; Hasday, Steven J; Knol, Meghan; Pradarelli, Jason; Quamme, Sudha R Pavuluri; Greenberg, Caprice C; Dimick, Justin B

    2017-10-01

    There exists a tension between surgical innovation and safety. The learning curve associated with the introduction of new procedures/technologies has been associated with preventable patient harm. Surgeon's perceptions regarding the safety of methods for learning new procedures/technologies are largely uncharacterized. A survey was designed to evaluate surgeons' perceptions related to learning new procedures/technologies. This included clinical vignettes across two domains: (1) experience with an operation (e.g., colectomy) and (2) experience with a technology (e.g., laparoscopy). This study also focuses on a surgeon's perceptions of existing credentialing/privileging requirements. Participants were faculty surgeons (n = 150) at two large Midwestern academic health centers. Survey response rate was 77% (116/150). 69% of respondents believed the processes of credentialing/privileging is "far too relaxed" or "too relaxed" for ensuring patient safety. Surgeons most commonly indicated a mini-fellowship is required to learn a new laparoscopic procedure. However, that requirement differed based on a surgeon's prior experience with laparoscopy. For example, to learn laparoscopic colectomy, 35% of respondents felt a surgeon with limited laparoscopic experience should complete a mini-fellowship, whereas 3% felt this was necessary if the surgeon had extensive laparoscopic experience. In the latter scenario, most respondents felt a surgeon should scrub in cases performed by an expert (38%) or perform cases under a proctor's supervision (33%) when learning laparoscopic colectomy. Many surgeons believe existing hospital credentialing/privileging practices may be too relaxed. Moreover, surgeons believe the "one-size-fits-all" approach for training practicing surgeons may not protect patients from unsafe introduction of new procedures/technologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Engineering nucleases for gene targeting: safety and regulatory considerations.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Katia; Podevin, Nancy; Breyer, Didier; Carroll, Dana; Herman, Philippe

    2014-01-25

    Nuclease-based gene targeting (NBGT) represents a significant breakthrough in targeted genome editing since it is applicable from single-celled protozoa to human, including several species of economic importance. Along with the fast progress in NBGT and the increasing availability of customized nucleases, more data are available about off-target effects associated with the use of this approach. We discuss how NBGT may offer a new perspective for genetic modification, we address some aspects crucial for a safety improvement of the corresponding techniques and we also briefly relate the use of NBGT applications and products to the regulatory oversight.

  4. Human Factors And Safety Considerations Of Night Vision Systems Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verona, Robert W.; Rash, Clarence E.

    1989-03-01

    Military aviation night vision systems greatly enhance the capability to operate during periods of low illumination. After flying with night vision devices, most aviators are apprehensive about returning to unaided night flight. Current night vision imaging devices allow aviators to fly during ambient light conditions which would be extremely dangerous, if not impossible, with unaided vision. However, the visual input afforded with these devices does not approach that experienced using the unencumbered, unaided eye during periods of daylight illumination. Many visual parameters, e,g., acuity, field-of-view, depth perception, etc., are compromised when night vision devices are used. The inherent characteristics of image intensification based sensors introduce new problems associated with the interpretation of visual information based on different spatial and spectral content from that of unaided vision. In addition, the mounting of these devices onto the helmet is accompanied by concerns of fatigue resulting from increased head supported weight and shift in center-of-gravity. All of these concerns have produced numerous human factors and safety issues relating to thb use of night vision systems. These issues are identified and discussed in terms of their possible effects on user performance and safety.

  5. Exposure Factor considerations for safety evaluation of modern disposable diapers.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swatee; Purdon, Mike; Kirsch, Taryn; Helbich, HansMartin; Kerr, Kenny; Li, Lijuan; Zhou, Shaoying

    2016-11-01

    Modern disposable diapers are complex products and ubiquitous globally. A robust safety assessment for disposable diapers include two important exposure parameters, i) frequency of diaper use & ii) constituent transfer from diaper to skin from direct and indirect skin contact materials. This article uses published information and original studies to quantify the exposure parameters for diapers. Using growth tables for the first three years of diapered life, an average body weight of 10-11 kg can be calculated, with a 10th percentile for females (8.5-8.8 kg). Data from surveys and diary studies were conducted to determine the frequency of use of diapers. The overall mean in the US is 4.7 diapers per day with a 75th, 90th, and 95th percentile of 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 respectively. Using diaper topsheet-lotion transfer as a model, direct transfer to skin from the topsheet was 3.0-4.3% of the starting amount of lotion. Indirect transfer of diaper core materials as a measure of re-wetting of the skin via urine resurfacing back to the topsheet under pressure was estimated at a range of 0.32-0.66% averaging 0.46%. As described, a thorough data-based understanding of exposure is critical for a robust exposure based safety assessment of disposable diapers.

  6. SU-F-P-08: Medical Physics Perspective On Radiation Therapy Quality and Safety Considerations in Low Income Settings

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, J; Meghzifene, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The last few years have seen a significant growth of interest in the global radiation therapy crisis. Various organizations are quantifying the need and providing aid in support of addressing the shortfall existing in many low-to-middle income countries (LMICs). The Lancet Oncology Commission report (Lancet Oncol. Sep;16(10):1153-86, 2015) projects a need of 22,000 new medical physicists in LMICs by 2035 if there is to be equal access globally. With the tremendous demand for new facilities, equipment and personnel, it is very important to recognize quality and safety considerations and to address them directly. Methods: A detailed examination of quality and safety publications was undertaken. A paper by Dunscombe (Front. Oncol. 2: 129, 2012) reviewed the recommendations of 7 authoritative reports on safety in radiation therapy and found the 12 most cited recommendations, summarized in order of most to least cited: training, staffing, documentation/standard operating procedures, incident learning, communication/questioning, check lists, QC/PM, dosimetric audit, accreditation, minimizing interruptions, prospective risk assessment, and safety culture. However, these authoritative reports were generally based on input from high income contexts. In this work, the recommendations were analyzed with a special emphasis on issues that are significant in LMICs. Results: The review indicated that there are significant challenges in LMICs with training and staffing ranking at the top in terms quality and safety. Conclusion: With the recognized need for expanding global access to radiation therapy, especially in LMICs, and the backing by multiple support organizations, quality and safety considerations must be overtly addressed. While multidimensional, training and staffing are top priorities. The use of outdated systems with poor interconnectivity, coupled with a lack of systematic QA in high patient load settings are additional concerns. Any support provided to lower

  7. Safety Climate and Use of Personal Protective Equipment and Safety Medical Devices among Home Care and Hospice Nurses

    PubMed Central

    LEISS, Jack K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and safety medical devices is mandated for healthcare workers to reduce the risk of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) from exposure to patients’ blood. Research has shown that a strong safety climate may promote increased use of PPE. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the association between safety climate and use of PPE among homecare/hospice nurses in North Carolina. To this end, a mail survey was conducted in 2006. The response rate, adjusted on the assumption that the proportion of eligible nurses from among those who did not return the questionnaire or could not be contacted was similar to the proportion among those who did return the questionnaire, was 69% (n=833 eligibles). The percentage of nurses who used the specified PPE was two to three times greater among nurses who had a strong safety climate. Safety climate was only weakly associated with using safety devices. These results suggest that improving safety climate may be a powerful tool for increasing use of PPE. PMID:25055845

  8. Factors Influencing the Safety Behavior of German Equestrians: Attitudes towards Protective Equipment and Peer Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ikinger, Christina-Maria; Baldamus, Jana; Spiller, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary The handling and riding of horses can be quite dangerous. Although the use of protective gear among equestrians is increasing, a high number of incidents occur and the voluntary use of safety equipment is described as inconsistent to low. Therefore, this study looks at the safety behavior of German equestrians and at factors influencing this behavior to decrease the high number of horse-related injuries. The results reveal that attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners and riding pupils from the stable are key factors that might alter the safety behavior of equestrians. Abstract Human interactions with horses entail certain risks. Although the acceptance and use of protective gear is increasing, a high number of incidents and very low or inconsistent voluntary use of safety equipment are reported. While past studies have examined factors influencing the use of safety gear, they have explored neither their influence on the overall safety behavior, nor their relative influence in relation to each other. The aim of the present study is to fill this gap. We conducted an online survey with 2572 participants. By means of a subsequent multiple regression analysis, we explored 23 different variables in view of their influence on the protective behavior of equestrians. In total, we found 17 variables that exerted a significant influence. The results show that both having positive or negative attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners or riding pupils from the stable have the strongest influence on the safety behavior of German equestrians. We consider such knowledge to be important for both scientists and practitioners, such as producers of protective gear or horse sport associations who might alter safety behavior in such a way that the number of horse-related injuries decreases in the long term. PMID:26901229

  9. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) decontaminated equipment self-container

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnke, W.M.

    1998-09-29

    The purpose of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) is to demonstrate that specific decontaminated equipment can be safely used as its own self-container. As a Decontaminated Equipment Self-Container (also referred to as a self-container), no other packaging, such as a burial box, would be required to transport the equipment onsite. The self-container will consist of a piece of equipment or apparatus which has all readily removable interior contamination removed, all of its external openings sealed, and all external surfaces decontaminated to less than 2000 dpm/100 cm for gamma-emitting radionuclides and less than 220 dpm/100 CM2 for alpha-emitting radionuclides.

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy: safety considerations in pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Makol, Ashima; Wright, Kerry; Amin, Shreyasee

    2011-10-22

    Pregnancy can pose a challenge to the physician caring for women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While many women with RA experience a spontaneous improvement in joint pain and inflammation during pregnancy, in others it remains active and they continue to need ongoing therapy. It is important to tailor the treatment regimen so that the disease is stabilized prior to conception and to use medications that are safe throughout pregnancy and lactation. The use of immunomodulating medications considered low risk during pregnancy allows for optimal outcomes. NSAIDs should be avoided in the third trimester. Corticosteroids may be used throughout pregnancy in the lowest effective dose. Antimalarial agents, sulfasalazine and azathioprine are safe options, but methotrexate and leflunomide are contraindicated as they are teratogenic and must, therefore, be withdrawn before a planned pregnancy. The risk for some of the newer biological therapies for RA is not necessarily their proven teratogenicity, but the absence of proven safety for the fetus. As such, it is recommended that abatacept, rituximab and tocilizumab be withheld prior to pregnancy; however, tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and anakinra may be continued until conception. In this review, we provide an overview of the RA treatment issues pre-conception, during pregnancy and in the post-partum period with respect to breastfeeding, and we provide guidelines for drugs that may be used relatively safely for RA management in pregnant women. Where available, pre-conception guidelines for men using these medications for RA are also discussed.

  11. Criticality safety considerations for MSRE fuel drain tank uranium aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Hopper, C.M.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary criticality safety study of some potential effects of uranium reduction and aggregation in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel drain tanks (FDTs) during salt removal operations. Since the salt was transferred to the FDTs in 1969, radiological and chemical reactions have been converting the uranium and fluorine in the salt to UF{sub 6} and free fluorine. Significant amounts of uranium (at least 3 kg) and fluorine have migrated out of the FDTs and into the off-gas system (OGS) and the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The loss of uranium and fluorine from the salt changes the chemical properties of the salt sufficiently to possibly allow the reduction of the UF{sub 4} in the salt to uranium metal as the salt is remelted prior to removal. It has been postulated that up to 9 kg of the maximum 19.4 kg of uranium in one FDT could be reduced to metal and concentrated. This study shows that criticality becomes a concern when more than 5 kg of uranium concentrates to over 8 wt% of the salt in a favorable geometry.

  12. The FDA's Final Rule on Expedited Safety Reporting: Statistical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wittes, Janet; Crowe, Brenda; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Guettner, Achim; Hall, David; Jiang, Qi; Odenheimer, Daniel; Xia, H. Amy; Kramer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    In March 2011, a Final Rule for expedited reporting of serious adverse events took effect in the United States for studies conducted under an Investigational New Drug (IND) application. In December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) promulgated a final Guidance describing the operationalization of this Final Rule. The Rule and Guidance clarified that a clinical trial sponsor should have evidence suggesting causality before defining an unexpected serious adverse event as a suspected adverse reaction that would require expedited reporting to the FDA. The Rule's emphasis on the need for evidence suggestive of a causal relation should lead to fewer events being reported but, among those reported, a higher percentage actually being caused by the product being tested. This article reviews the practices that were common before the Final Rule was issued and the approach the New Rule specifies. It then discusses methods for operationalizing the Final Rule with particular focus on relevant statistical considerations. It concludes with a set of recommendations addressed to Sponsors and to the FDA in implementing the Final Rule. PMID:26550466

  13. PPAR- γ agonist in treatment of diabetes: cardiovascular safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Aamer; Blandon, Jimena; Rude, Jennifer; Elfar, Ahmed; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2012-06-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear fatty acid receptors, which contain a type II zinc finger DNA binding motif and a hydrophobic ligand binding pocket. These receptors are thought to play an important role in metabolic diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, and coronary artery disease. Three subtypes of PPAR receptors have been described: PPARα, PPARδ/β, and PPARγ. PPARα is found in the liver, muscle, kidney, and heart. In the liver, its role is to up-regulate genes involved in fatty acid uptake, binding, β-oxidation and electron transport, and oxidative phosphorylation in subcutaneous fat but not in skeletal muscle. PPARδ/β is expressed in many tissues but markedly in brain, adipose tissue, and skin. PPARγ has high expression in fat, low expression in the liver, and very low expression in the muscle. The thiazolidinediones (TZD) are synthetic ligands of PPARγ. By activating a number of genes in tissues, PPARγ increases glucose and lipid uptake, increases glucose oxidation, decreases free fatty acid concentration, and decreases insulin resistance. Although, there is a rationale for the use of TZDs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, clinical studies have produced conflicting data. While currently used TZDs are clearly associated with heart failure (HF) worsening; with regards to cardiovascular outcomes, pioglitazone seems to be related to a trend toward reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, whereas rosiglitazone may actually increase risk of cardiovascular events. We review the existing literature on TZDs and discuss role and cardiovascular safety of these agents for the contemporary treatment of diabetes. Other side effects of these agents i.e. increase in osteoporosis and possible risk of bladder cancer is also discussed.

  14. Safety plan for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval system equipment development area

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, T.J.; Jessmore, J.J.

    1995-07-01

    This plan establishes guidelines to minimize safety risks for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval project at the North Boulevard Annex (NBA). This plan has the dual purpose of minimizing safety risks to workers and visitors and of securing sensitive equipment from inadvertent damage by nonqualified personnel. This goal will be accomplished through physical control of work zones and through assigned responsibilities for project personnel. The scope of this plan is limited to establishing the working zone boundaries and entry requirements, and assigning responsibilities for project personnel. This plan does not supersede current safety organization responsibilities for the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area Transuranic (LSFA TRU) Arid outlined in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Plan for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program; Tenant Manual; Idaho Falls Building Emergency Control Plan;; applicable Company Procedures; the attached Interface Agreement (Appendix A).

  15. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility safety equipment list

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-02-24

    This document provides the safety equipment list (SEL) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The SEL was prepared in accordance with the procedure for safety structures, systems, and components (SSCs) in HNF-PRO-516, ''Safety Structures, Systems, and Components,'' Revision 0 and HNF-PRO-097, Engineering Design and Evaluation, Revision 0. The SEL was developed in conjunction with HNF-SO-SNF-SAR-O02, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998). The SEL identifies the SSCs and their safety functions, the design basis accidents for which they are required to perform, the design criteria, codes and standards, and quality assurance requirements that are required for establishing the safety design basis of the SSCs. This SEL has been developed for the CVDF Phase 2 Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future phases of the CVDF SAR until the CVDF final SAR is approved.

  16. Safety analysis report for packaging, onsite, long-length contaminated equipment transport system

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-05-09

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the components of the long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) transport system (TS) and provides the analyses, evaluations, and associated operational controls necessary for the safe use of the LLCE TS on the Hanford Site. The LLCE TS will provide a standardized, comprehensive approach for the disposal of approximately 98% of LLCE scheduled to be removed from the 200 Area waste tanks.

  17. Medical equipment ordinance and lack of personnel: two contrary factors influencing anesthesia patient safety.

    PubMed

    Peter, K; Dieterich, H J

    1991-01-01

    In January 1986, West German legislators enacted the Medical Equipment Ordinance (MedGV) to define specific regulations for both manufacturers and operators of medical equipment and to offer a measure of safety to patients. We describe the history of MedGV, its regulations, and the mechanisms developed to enforce those regulations. We also evaluate its impact on clinical practice in light of the current staff shortages in anesthesia practice and research in Germany. Finally, we focus our discussion on the distinction between improved equipment as a minor factor in critical-incidents and the inadequate manpower as a major factor in anesthesia mishaps. It is unclear what will develop after 1993, when the national states in Europe form a common market.

  18. Preliminary safety equipment list for Tank 241-C-106 Manipulator Retrieval System, Project W-340

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, R.L.

    1994-09-23

    This document identifies the anticipated safety classification of the estimated major subsystems, based on the projected major functions, that will be used as guidance for the development of the conceptual design of the Manipulator Retrieval System for Tank 241-C-106. This document is intended to be updated as the design of the Manipulator Retrieval System evolves through the conceptual and definitive design phases. The Manipulator Retrieval System is to be capable of removing the hardened sludge heel at the bottom of single shell Tank 241-C-106 and to perform an overall clean out of the tank that leaves a maximum of 360 ft{sup 3} (TPA milestone M-45-00). The thickness of the heel prior to initiation of waste retrieval with the Manipulator Retrieval System is estimated to be 1- to 2-ft. The Manipulator Retrieval System is currently in the pre-conceptual phase with no definitive systems or subsystems. The anticipated retrieval functions for the Manipulator Retrieval System is based on Table 6-2 of WHC-SD-W340-ES-001, Rev. 1. Projected equipment to accomplish these functions were based on the following systems and equipment: Rotary Mode Core Sampling Equipment (WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032); Light Duty Utility Arm System Equipment (WHC-SD-WM-SEL-034); Single Shell Tanks Equipment (WHC-SD-WM-SEL-020).

  19. [Personal protective equipments: considerations on the requirements and characteristics of selection and use].

    PubMed

    Galbiati, C

    2010-01-01

    The choice of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) required two steps: the first related to the security features and the second related to ergonomics assessments and acceptance by the user. For the first aspect the legislation and technical regulations set clear requirements PPE, but choose a PPE's supplier means, of course, also make an assessment on the cost for PPE and service providers related. We will consider the technical, structural and ergonomic for PPE, to understand how to move towards the right solution. An important reference is the Ministerial Decree 2 maggio 2001: Criteria for identification and use of personal protective equipment (PPE), which describes the criteria for selection of proper protective equipment only for certain types of PPE for other the references is the European legislation or some guidelines.

  20. The OECD Blue Book on Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations: it's influence on ISBR and EFSA activities.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Biosafety regulatory frameworks are intended to serve as mechanisms for ensuring the safe use of biotechnology products without imposing unacceptable risk to human health or the environment, or unintended constraints to technology transfer. The OECD Blue Book on "Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations", setting out principles and concepts for handling genetically modified organisms safely outside of contained laboratory conditions, was a milestone in the history of biotechnology. The "Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations" definitively became the major resource for the formulation of national regulatory frameworks and international regulations, including the Cartagena Protocol.

  1. Evaluation of Electrical Characteristics of Protective Equipment - a Prerequisite for Ensuring Safety and Health of Workers at Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buică, G.; Beiu, C.; Antonov, A.; Dobra, R.; Păsculescu, D.

    2017-06-01

    The protecting electrical equipment in use are subject to various factors generated by the use, maintenance, storage and working environment, which may change the characteristics of protection against electric shock. The study presents the results of research on the behaviour over time of protective characteristics of insulating covers of material of work equipment in use, in order to determine the type and periodicity of safety tests. There were tested and evaluated safety equipment with plastic and insulating rubber covers used in operations of verifying functionality, safety and maintenance of machinery used in manufacturing industries and specific services from electric, energy and food sector.

  2. Safety equipment list for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, Project W-320: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.C.

    1994-11-15

    The goals of the C-106 sluicing operation are: (1) to stabilize the tank by reducing the heat load in the tank to less than 42 MJ/hr (40,000 Btu/hour), and (2) to initiate demonstration of single-shell tank (SST) retrieval technology. The purpose of this supporting document (SD) is as follows: (1) to provide safety classifications for items (systems, structures, equipment, components, or parts) for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), and (2) to document and methodology used to develop safety classifications. Appropriate references are made with regard to use of existing systems, structures, equipments, components, and parts for C-106 single-shell transfer tank located in the C Tank Farm, and 241-AY-102 (AY-102) double shell receiver tanks (DST) located in the Aging Waste Facility (AWF). The Waste Retrieval Sluicing System consists of two transfer lines that would connect the two tanks, one to carry the sluiced waste slurry to AY-102, and the other to return the supernatant liquid to C-106. The supernatant, or alternate fluid, will be used to mobilize waste in C-106 for the sluicing process. The equipment necessary for the WRSS include pumps in each tank, sluicers to direct the supernatant stream in C-106, a slurry distributor in AY-102, HVAC for C-106, instrumentation and control devices, and other existing components as required.

  3. Safety challenges of medical equipment in nurse anaesthetist training in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Santos, A L R; Wauben, L S G L; Guilavogui, S; Brezet, J C; Goossens, R; Rosseel, P M J

    2016-03-01

    Safety challenges related to the use of medical equipment were investigated during the training of nurse anaesthetists in Haiti, using a systems approach to Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE). The Observable Performance Obstacles tool, based on the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model, was used in combination with exploratory observations during 13 surgical procedures, to identify performance obstacles created by the systemic interrelationships of medical equipment. The identification of performance obstacles is an effective way to study the accumulation of latent factors and risk hazards, and understand its implications in practice and behaviour of healthcare practitioners. In total, 123 performance obstacles were identified, of which the majority was related to environmental and organizational aspects. These findings show how the performance of nurse anaesthetists and their relation to medical equipment is continuously affected by more than user-related aspects. The contribution of systemic performance obstacles and coping strategies to enrich system design interventions and improve healthcare system is highlighted. In addition, methodological challenges of HFE research in low-resource settings related to professional culture and habits, and the potential of community ergonomics as a problem-managing approach are described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. National Ignition Facility start-up/operations engineering and special equipment construction health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, P C

    1998-05-08

    This document sets forth the responsibilities, interfaces, guidelines, rules, policy, and regulations for all workers involved in the S/O and SE construction, installation, and acceptance testing. This document is enforced from the first day that S/O and SE workers set foot on the NIF construction site until the end of the Project at Critical Decision 4. This document is applicable only to site activities, which are defined as those that occur within the perimeter of the fenced-off NIF construction zone and the Target Chamber Assembly Area (Helipad). The associated Special Equipment laydown and construction support areas listed in Appendix B are not under this plan; their safety provisions are discussed in the Appendix. Prototype and other support activities, such as the Amplifier Laboratory and Frame Assembly Unit assembly area, are not included in this plan. After completion of the Operational Readiness Review, the Facility Safety Procedure, Operational Safety Requirements, and Operational Safety Procedures are the governing safety documents for the operating facility. The S/O and SE project elements are required to implement measures that create a universal awareness of and promote safe job practices at the site. This includes all Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester, supplement labor organization, and subcontractor employees; visitors; and guests serving the S/O and SE effort.

  5. Health and Safety Considerations: Caring for Young Children with Exceptional Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presler, Betty

    This manual on health and safety considerations in caring for young children with exceptional health care needs is a product of Project EXCEPTIONAL (EXceptional Children: Education in Preschool Techniques for Inclusion, Opportunity-building, Nurturing And Learning), which has the goal of increasing the quality and quantity of inclusive child care…

  6. Anesthesia and safety considerations for office-based cosmetic surgery practice.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    With more surgical procedures than ever before being performed in office settings, office-based anesthesia is a rapidly growing area of anesthesia practice. Although there are many advantages to office-based practice, limitations inherent to this setting, if not recognized and addressed, may threaten patient safety. The demand for cosmetic surgery is considered one of the driving factors in the exponential growth of office-based anesthesia. Anesthesia for cosmetic surgery procedures in the office setting is frequently performed under monitored anesthesia care (MAC) with its own unique safety considerations. Anesthetists practicing in office-based cosmetic surgery practices must understand the special characteristics of this setting, the MAC-based approach often used, the anesthesia and safety considerations for the cosmetic surgical procedures performed, and the importance of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism.

  7. Paralympic sports medicine--current evidence in winter sport: considerations in the development of equipment standards for paralympic athletes.

    PubMed

    Burkett, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    To highlight and discuss the considerations for the future development of equipment standards for Winter Paralympic sports. Literature searches were performed (in English) during May 2011 using the key words "technology, winter sport, Olympic, and Paralympic" in the computerized databases PubMed, PsycINFO, Science Direct, and Google Scholar. In addition, personal scientific observations were made at several Winter Paralympic Games. The retrieved articles were screened and assessed for relevance to the biological, biomechanical, and sport medicine aspects of equipment. There are 3 key areas in which technology has influenced sports performance in Paralympic winter sports, namely, specialized prostheses, crutch skis or outriggers (in lieu of poles), and sport-specific wheelchairs (such as the sit-ski). From a sport medicine perspective, a crucial factor not considered in the standard laboratory test of mechanical efficiency is the influence of the human-equipment connection, such as the stump-to-prosthesis interface or the required human-to-wheelchair control. This connectivity is critical to the effective operation of the assistive device. When assessing the efficiency of this equipment, the not-so-obvious, holistic, compensatory factors need to be considered. Assistive equipment is fundamental for a person with a disability to participate and compete in winter sport activities. Although there have been improvements in the mechanical function of some assistive devices, the key issue is matching the residual function of the person with the assistive equipment. Equitable access to this technology will also ensure that the fundamental spirit of fair play that underpins the Paralympic Games is maintained.

  8. Personal Protective Equipment Use and Safety Behaviors among Farm Adolescents: Gender Differences and Predictors of Work Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah B.; Browning, Steven R.; Westneat, Susan C.; Kidd, Pamela S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Children on farms perform work that places them at risk for acute and chronic negative health outcomes. Despite strategies for preventing and reducing the risk of disease and injury, children's use of personal protective equipment and safety equipped farm machinery has generally remained unreported. Purpose: This paper reports the use of…

  9. 33 CFR 164.72 - Navigational-safety equipment, charts or maps, and publications required on towing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the following navigational-safety equipment: (1) Marine radar. By August 2, 1997, a marine radar that... engages in towing on navigable waters of the U.S., including Western Rivers, the radar must meet— (A) The... for Marine Radar Equipment Installed on Ships of Less Than 300 Tons Gross Tonnage, RTCM Paper 71-95...

  10. 33 CFR 164.72 - Navigational-safety equipment, charts or maps, and publications required on towing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the following navigational-safety equipment: (1) Marine radar. By August 2, 1997, a marine radar that... engages in towing on navigable waters of the U.S., including Western Rivers, the radar must meet— (A) The... for Marine Radar Equipment Installed on Ships of Less Than 300 Tons Gross Tonnage, RTCM Paper 71-95...

  11. 33 CFR 164.72 - Navigational-safety equipment, charts or maps, and publications required on towing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the following navigational-safety equipment: (1) Marine radar. By August 2, 1997, a marine radar that... engages in towing on navigable waters of the U.S., including Western Rivers, the radar must meet— (A) The... for Marine Radar Equipment Installed on Ships of Less Than 300 Tons Gross Tonnage, RTCM Paper 71-95...

  12. Safety and the Human Factor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ann

    1982-01-01

    Discusses four elements of safety programs: (1) safety training; (2) safety inspections; (3) accident investigations; and (4) protective safety equipment. Also discusses safety considerations in water/wastewater treatment facilities focusing on falls, drowning hazards, trickling filters, confined space entry, collection/distribution system safety,…

  13. Safety and the Human Factor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ann

    1982-01-01

    Discusses four elements of safety programs: (1) safety training; (2) safety inspections; (3) accident investigations; and (4) protective safety equipment. Also discusses safety considerations in water/wastewater treatment facilities focusing on falls, drowning hazards, trickling filters, confined space entry, collection/distribution system safety,…

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1410 - Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations closer than the Table A zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accessories) to a complete stop; wind conditions; degree of sway in the power line; lighting conditions, and... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations... FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1410 Power line safety (all...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1410 - Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations closer than the Table A zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... accessories) to a complete stop; wind conditions; degree of sway in the power line; lighting conditions, and... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations... FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1410 Power line safety (all...

  16. The Design of Transportation Equipment in Terms of Human Capabilities. The Role of Engineering Psychology in Transport Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Ross A.

    Human factors engineering is considered with regard to the design of safety factors for aviation and highway transportation equipment. Current trends and problem areas are identified for jet air transportation and for highway transportation. Suggested solutions to transportation safety problems are developed by applying the techniques of human…

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1410 - Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations closer than the Table A zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations... FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1410 Power line safety (all voltages... and lifting accessories) is closer than the minimum approach distance under Table A of § 1926.1408 to...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1410 - Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations closer than the Table A zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accessories) to a complete stop; wind conditions; degree of sway in the power line; lighting conditions, and... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations... FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1410 Power line safety (all...

  19. Technical considerations related to interim source-term assumptions for emergency planning and equipment qualification. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczyk, S.J.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.

    1982-09-01

    The source terms recommended in the current regulatory guidance for many considerations of light water reactor (LWR) accidents were developed a number of years ago when understandings of many of the phenomena pertinent to source term estimation were relatively primitive. The purpose of the work presented here was to develop more realistic source term assumptions which could be used for interim regulatory purposes for two specific considerations, namely, equipment qualification and emergency planning. The overall approach taken was to adopt assumptions and models previously proposed for various aspects of source term estimation and to modify those assumptions and models to reflect recently gained insights into, and data describing, the release and transport of radionuclides during and after LWR accidents. To obtain illustrative estimates of the magnitudes of the source terms, the results of previous calculations employing the adopted assumptions and models were utilized and were modified to account for the effects of the recent insights and data.

  20. Environmental, Safety, and Health Considerations: Composite Materials in the Aerospace Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Huai-Pu (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Aerospace Industries Association, Suppliers of Advanced Composite Materials Association, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration co-sponsored a conference on 'Environmental, Safety, and Health Considerations--Composite Materials in the Aerospace Industry.' The conference was held in Mesa, Arizona, on October 20-21, 1994. Seventeen papers were presented in four sessions including general information, safety, waste, and emissions from composites. Topics range from product stewardship, best work practice, biotransformation of uncured composite materials, to hazardous waste determination and offgassing of composite materials.

  1. Resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-48, Hydrogen control measures and effects of hydrogen burns on safety equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, C.M.; Soffer, L.

    1989-09-01

    Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-48 arose as a result of the large amount of hydrogen generated and burned within containment during the Three Mile Island accident. This issue covers hydrogen control measures for recoverable degraded-core accidents for all boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and those pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) with ice-condenser containments. The Commission and the nuclear industry have sponsored extensive research in this area, which has led to significant revision of the Commission's hydrogen control regulations, given in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50 (10 CFR 50), Section 50.44. BWRs having Mark I and II containments are presently required to operate with inerted containment atmospheres that effectively prevent hydrogen combustion. BWRs with Mark III containments and PWRs with ice-condenser containments are now required to be equipped with hydrogen control systems to protect containment integrity and safety systems inside containment. Industry has chosen to use hydrogen igniter systems to burn hydrogen produced in a controlled fashion to prevent damage. An independent review by a Committee of the National Research Council concluded that, for most accident scenarios, current regulatory requirements make it highly unlikely that hydrogen detonation would be the cause of containment failure. On the basis of the extensive research effort conducted and current regulatory requirements, including their implementation, the staff concludes that no new regulatory guidance on hydrogen control for recoverable degraded-core accidents for these types of plants is necessary and that USI A-48 is resolved.

  2. Control considerations for high frequency, resonant, power processing equipment used in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.; Schreiner, K. E.; Wolff, F.

    1987-01-01

    Addressed is a class of resonant power processing equipment designed to be used in an integrated high frequency (20 KHz domain), utility power system for large, multi-user spacecraft and other aerospace vehicles. It describes a hardware approach, which has been the basis for parametric and physical data used to justify the selection of high frequency ac as the PMAD baseline for the space station. This paper is part of a larger effort undertaken by NASA and General Dynamics to be sure that all potential space station contractors and other aerospace power system designers understand and can comfortably use this technology, which is now widely used in the commercial sector. In this paper, we will examine control requirements, stability, and operational modes; and their hardware impacts from an integrated system point of view. The current space station PMAD system will provide the overall requirements model to develop an understanding of the performance of this type of system with regard to: (1) regulation; (2) power bus stability and voltage control; (3) source impedance; (4) transient response; (5) power factor effects; and (6) limits and overloads.

  3. Control considerations for high frequency, resonant, power processing equipment used in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.; Schreiner, K. E.; Wolff, F.

    1987-01-01

    Addressed is a class of resonant power processing equipment designed to be used in an integrated high frequency (20 KHz domain), utility power system for large, multi-user spacecraft and other aerospace vehicles. It describes a hardware approach, which has been the basis for parametric and physical data used to justify the selection of high frequency ac as the PMAD baseline for the space station. This paper is part of a larger effort undertaken by NASA and General Dynamics to be sure that all potential space station contractors and other aerospace power system designers understand and can comfortably use this technology, which is now widely used in the commercial sector. In this paper, we will examine control requirements, stability, and operational modes; and their hardware impacts from an integrated system point of view. The current space station PMAD system will provide the overall requirements model to develop an understanding of the performance of this type of system with regard to: (1) regulation; (2) power bus stability and voltage control; (3) source impedance; (4) transient response; (5) power factor effects, and (6) limits and overloads.

  4. LED eye safety considerations in the design of iris capture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovich, Gil; Wheeler, Frederick W.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a standoff iris biometrics system for improved usability in access-control applications. The system employs an eye illuminator, which is composed of an array of encapsulated near-infrared light emitting diodes (NIRLEDs), which are triggered at the camera frame rate for reduced motion blur and ambient light effects. Neither the standards / recommendations for NIR laser and lamp safety, nor the LED-specific literature address all the specific aspects of LED eye-safety measurement. Therefore, we established exposure limit criteria based on a worst-case scenario combining the following: the CIE/ANSI standard/recommendations for exposure limits; concepts for maximum irradiance level and for strobing from the laser safety standards; and ad-hoc rules minimizing irradiance on the fovea, for handling LED arrays, and for LED mounting density. Although our system was determined as eye safe, future variants may require higher exposure levels and lower safety margins. We therefore discuss system configuration for accurate LED radiometric measurement that will ensure reliable eye-safety evaluation. The considerations and ad hoc rules described in this paper are not, and should not be treated as safety recommendations.

  5. Quality control on endoscopic maintenance and repair services: safety considerations for the patient.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    Quality control and maintenance services are 2 important points when we organize an endoscopic unit. From the medical side, we have always expected to purchase the most advanced equipment and obtained the best-repaired service. From the hospital administrators' point of view the global costs of endoscopic equipment is the most important criterion. These 2 goals should be compatible by a close relationship between medical doctors and hospital administrators. The quality of maintenance and the reliability of services are important points considering quality control and safety for our patients. Endoscope malfunctions and inadequate repair services could be a threat for our patients. In this case, legal responsibility could rely on hospital and medical doctors if services and maintenance have not been carefully planned. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Continuous safety monitoring for randomized controlled clinical trials with blinded treatment information. Part 3: Design considerations.

    PubMed

    Ball, Greg; Silverman, Michael H

    2011-09-01

    Ongoing safety monitoring of clinical trials of investigational treatments must operate at levels that range from the minute and detailed - namely, mathematical treatment of trial data - to the philosophical and societal - namely, ethical concerns for individuals and populations. Between those two poles lies a realm of environmental and pragmatic considerations that reflect the goals, biases, risk-tolerance, and constraints of study sponsors and organizers. These factors, while more difficult to quantify or, at times, to justify, also have a meaningful impact on the approach to safety monitoring and the resulting actions and outcomes. This paper considers the influence and interaction of two such factors, study design and statistical framework, on continuous safety monitoring procedures. Group sequential designs have been generally preferred for clinical trials over continuous sequential designs because of practical considerations. The group means and greater time for deliberation when using a group sequential procedure, as opposed to a continuous sequential procedure, can improve the quality of the analyses with minimal loss in sensitivity. However, undertaking any sequential analysis within a frequentist framework provokes considerable theoretical and practical difficulties. Continuous monitoring with a likelihood based method, on the other hand, has the advantages that all available information, including new data, can be used; sample sizes need not be fixed; and decisions can be made at any time without statistical penalty, irrespective of trial design. Such responsive statistical rules are needed to provide guidance to the human beings charged with trial monitoring.

  7. Thermodynamic finite-element-method (FEM) eye model for laser safety considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heussner, Nico; Holl, Lukas; Shults, Ariana; Beuth, Thorsten; Umesh Babu, Harsha; Shinohara, Leilei; Bogatscher, Siegwart; Wippler, Matthias; Stork, Wilhelm

    2013-02-01

    With the recent development in the field of micro displays, retinal display and emerging technologies the issue of laser safety of these new devices becomes more and more important. To tackle these problems a lot of basic research will be necessary in order to find appropriate laser safety standards, since the current standards are not fully suitable. In order to avoid animal experiments as far as possible and also aiming for a simulation tool which would assist the manufacturers in their safety considerations, we have developed a thermodynamic model of the whole human eye. Using the software Hypermeshand Ansys Fluentwe created a Finite-Volume-Method model capable of simulating the behavior of all parts of the eye. I.e. the temperature distribution at any point of the eye can be predicted over time. The model also includes the blood flow within the choroid aiming for a realistic thermal behavior.

  8. How to evaluate the risks of work equipment and installations for health and safety? Research and activities of the German Committee for Plant Safety and consequences for regulation.

    PubMed

    Pieper, R

    2012-01-01

    Work equipment and installations with a high risk for health and safety of employees should be paid a special attention. The German Product Safety Act, which is aimed to manufacturers or distributors in order to protect consumers, maintains a conclusive catalogue of these so-called "installations in need of monitoring" fixing the work equipment and installations for which such special inspections can be demanded. This catalogue has remained unchanged for decades and has been transformed nearly unmodified into the Plant Safety Ordinance. Currently, there is a discussion about this catalogue in Germany. A major point of concern is the definition and the significance of "especially" dangerous work equipment and installations. Two recent research projects are dealing with the problem how to define "especially".

  9. Qualitative Research for Patient Safety Using ICTs: Methodological Considerations in the Technological Age.

    PubMed

    Yee, Kwang Chien; Wong, Ming Chao; Turner, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Considerable effort and resources have been dedicated to improving the quality and safety of patient care through health information systems, but there is still significant scope for improvement. One contributing factor to the lack of progress in patient safety improvement especially where technology has been deployed relates to an over-reliance on purely objective, quantitative, positivist research paradigms as the basis for generating and validating evidence of improvement. This paper argues the need for greater recognition and accommodation of evidence of improvement generated through more subjective, qualitative and pragmatic research paradigms to aid patient safety especially where technology is deployed. This paper discusses how acknowledging the role and value of more subjective ontologies and pragmatist epistemologies can support improvement science research. This paper illustrates some challenges and benefits from adopting qualitative research methods in patient safety improvement projects, particularly focusing challenges in the technological era. While adopting methods that can more readily capture, analyse and interpret direct user experiences, attitudes, insights and behaviours in their contextual settings, patient safety can be enhanced 'on the ground' and errors reduced and/or mitigated, challenges of using these methods with the younger "technologically-centred" healthcare professionals and patients needs to recognised.

  10. Safety evaluation for packaging transportation of equipment for tank 241-C-106 waste sluicing system

    SciTech Connect

    Calmus, D.B.

    1994-08-25

    A Waste Sluicing System (WSS) is scheduled for installation in nd waste storage tank 241-C-106 (106-C). The WSS will transfer high rating sludge from single shell tank 106-C to double shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (102-AY). Prior to installation of the WSS, a heel pump and a transfer pump will be removed from tank 106-C and an agitator pump will be removed from tank 102-AY. Special flexible receivers will be used to contain the pumps during removal from the tanks. After equipment removal, the flexible receivers will be placed in separate containers (packagings). The packaging and contents (packages) will be transferred from the Tank Farms to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) for interim storage and then to T Plant for evaluation and processing for final disposition. Two sizes of packagings will be provided for transferring the equipment from the Tank Farms to the interim storage facility. The packagings will be designated as the WSSP-1 and WSSP-2 packagings throughout the remainder of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP). The WSSP-1 packagings will transport the heel and transfer pumps from 106-C and the WSSP-2 packaging will transport the agitator pump from 102-AY. The WSSP-1 and WSSP-2 packagings are similar except for the length.

  11. Technical basis for environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.; Hassan, M.; Tanaka, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the results of studies sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide the technical basis for environmental qualification of computer-based safety equipment in nuclear power plants. The studies were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The studies address the following: (1) adequacy of the present test methods for qualification of digital I and C systems; (2) preferred (i.e., Regulatory Guide-endorsed) standards; (3) recommended stressors to be included in the qualification process during type testing; (4) resolution of need for accelerated aging for equipment to be located in a benign environment; and (5) determination of an appropriate approach for addressing the impact of smoke in digital equipment qualification programs. Significant findings from the studies form the technical basis for a recommended approach to the environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants.

  12. The impact of regulations, safety considerations and physical limitations on research progress at maximum biocontainment.

    PubMed

    Shurtleff, Amy C; Garza, Nicole; Lackemeyer, Matthew; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony; Patterson, Jean; Edwin, Samuel S; Bavari, Sina

    2012-12-01

    We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review.

  13. The Impact of Regulations, Safety Considerations and Physical Limitations on Research Progress at Maximum Biocontainment

    PubMed Central

    Shurtleff, Amy C.; Garza, Nicole; Lackemeyer, Matthew; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony; Patterson, Jean; Edwin, Samuel S.; Bavari, Sina

    2012-01-01

    We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review. PMID:23342380

  14. Radiation Oncology Quality and Safety Considerations in Low-Resource Settings: A Medical Physics Perspective.

    PubMed

    Van Dyk, Jacob; Meghzifene, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    The past few years have seen a significant growth of interest in the global radiation therapy (RT) crisis. Various organizations have quantified the need and are providing aid in support of addressing the shortfalls existing in many low-to-middle income countries. With the tremendous demand for new facilities, equipment, and personnel, it is very important to recognize the quality and safety challenges and to address them directly. An examination of publications on quality and safety in RT indicates a consistency in a number of the recommendations; however, these authoritative reports were generally based on input from high-resourced contexts. Here, we review these recommendations with a special emphasis on issues that are significant in low-to-middle income countries. Although multidimensional, training, and staffing are top priorities, any support provided to lower-resourced settings must address the numerous facets associated with quality and safety indicators. Strong partnerships between high income and other countries will enhance the development of safe and resource-appropriate strategies for advancing the radiation treatment process. The real challenge is the engagement of a strong spirit of cooperation, collaboration, and communication among the multiple organizations in support of reducing the cancer divide and improving the provision of safe and effective RT.

  15. Organizational climate, staffing, and safety equipment as predictors of needlestick injuries and near-misses in hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sean P; Rockett, Joan L; Sloane, Douglas M; Aiken, Linda H

    2002-06-01

    Recently passed federal legislation requires institutions to adopt safety equipment to prevent needlesticks, but there is little empirical evidence of the effectiveness of specific types of safety devices or the contribution of safety devices to reducing needlesticks relative to the contributions of staffing, organizational climate, and clinicians' experience. In 1998, 2287 medical-surgical unit nurses in 22 US hospitals were surveyed in regard to staffing and organizational climate in their hospitals and about patient and nurse outcomes, including needlestick injuries. Hospitals provided information about available protective devices at the time of the survey. Relationships between nurse and hospital characteristics and protective equipment and the likelihood of needlestick injuries and near-miss incidents were examined. Poor organizational climate and high workloads were associated with 50% to 2-fold increases in the likelihood of needlestick injuries and near-misses to hospital nurses. Capless-valve secondary intravenous set systems and use of any type of protective equipment for IV starts or blood draws were associated with 20% to 30% lowered risks of both event types. Nurse staffing and organizational climate are key determinants of needlestick risk and must be considered with the adoption of safety equipment to effectively reduce sharps injuries.

  16. Dermatotoxicology: Safety Evaluation of Topical Products in Minipigs: Study Designs and Practical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Willard-Mack, Cynthia; Ramani, Thulasi; Auletta, Carol

    2016-04-01

    The minipig has long been identified as the nonrodent animal of choice for preclinical safety evaluation of topically applied materials. This article reviews types of topical applications, study designs, and practical considerations. Dermal administration to the minipig presents multiple challenges. Issues to be considered are the area of exposure, the nature of the test article, the need for covering of the dose site, preparation of the dose site, and procedures for administration. The potential for cross-contamination (exposure of control animals to test article) is very high in topical studies and appropriate safeguards to prevent this are discussed. Topical administration to the intact skin is the most commonly utilized form of safety evaluation, but procedures have also been developed for intradermal administration and for the use of nonintact/wounded skin; these will be discussed. Evaluation of local (topical) effects is critical and can become complicated. Considerations in evaluations of the skin are interobserver variability, use of different scoring systems and discrepancies betweenin vivoobservations, necropsy observations, and microscopic pathology findings. Causes for apparent discrepancies and suggestions for practical resolution through appropriate procedures are discussed. Practical issues in necropsy and histotechnology procedures and techniques to optimize preservation of skin are also discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Safety considerations of intranasal corticosteroids for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Blaiss, Michael S

    2007-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a major chronic inflammatory disease of the upper airways. AR is increasing in prevalence and causes negative effects on quality of life, impairs performance and productivity, and imposes a serious economic burden. More than 20% of the American population suffers from AR. Intranasal corticosteroids (INS) are an effective and safe first-line treatment for AR, with potent anti-inflammatory properties and a high therapeutic ratio. The systemic bioavailability of the majority of INS is relatively low; however, the pharmacokinetics of absorption, first-pass metabolism, volume of distribution, half-life, and clearance of INS varies considerably, depending on lipophilicity, receptor affinity, and lipid conjugation in the nasal tissue. The short-term (e.g., effect on linear lower-leg growth rate) and long-term (e.g., effect on height) systemic side effects of INS in patients with AR are determined by these important characteristics. AR is present in up to 75% of patients with asthma, and patients with AR are three times more likely to develop asthma compared with patients without AR. Therefore, the overall increased systemic steroid burden resulting from concomitant use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and INS in adult and pediatric patients with comorbid AR and asthma warrants critical monitoring of systemic side effects. This review evaluates the overall safety of INS in AR and the importance of systemic safety considerations of INS, particularly when coadministered with ICS.

  18. The long term storage of radioactive waste and spent fuel: safety and policy considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Rowat, J.; Metcalf, P.

    2007-07-01

    Storage is a necessary step in the overall management of radioactive waste. In recent years, due to the unavailability of disposal facilities, storage facilities intended originally as temporary, have had their lifetimes extended and consideration has been given, in some countries, to the use of long term storage (LTS) as a management option. In 2003, the IAEA published a position paper titled 'The Long Term Storage of Radioactive Waste: Safety and Sustainability'. The position paper, which written for a non-specialist audience, focused on seven key factors for safety and sustainability of LTS, namely: safety, maintenance/institutional control, retrieval, security, costs, community attitudes and retention of information. The Agency is preparing a follow-up report to the position paper that elaborates in a more technical manner upon the issues raised in the position paper and issues important for implementation of LTS. It also provides some discussion of the reasons for implementing a LTS option and contrasts LTS with aspects of other management options. The present paper provides an overview of the draft follow-up report. (authors)

  19. Personal protective equipment and work safety climate among Latino poultry processing workers in Western North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Anderson, Andrea M; Mora, Dana C; Carrillo, Lourdes; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A

    2012-01-01

    Job-appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is important for decreasing the high rates of occupational injury experienced by poultry processing workers. This analysis describes the job-appropriate PPE provided to poultry processing workers by their employers and the PPE used by these workers, and it delineates the association of work safety climate with job-appropriate PPE. Data are from a cross-sectional study of 403 Latino poultry processing workers in North Carolina. Most poultry processing workers are not provided with nor use job-appropriate PPE; however, more workers use PPE than are provided. The provision and use of PPE differs by employer. Work safety climate was associated with use of job-appropriate PPE. Poultry processing workers should be provided with job-appropriate PPE. Workers' use of PPE is an indicator of safety climate. Further research about work safety climate and other work organization characteristics and job safety characteristics is needed.

  20. Disinfection protocols for necropsy equipment in rabies laboratories: Safety of personnel and diagnostic outcome.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Roberta; Zecchin, Barbara; Tiozzo Caenazzo, Silvia; Cattoli, Giovanni; De Benedictis, Paola

    2016-08-01

    In the last decades, molecular techniques have gradually been adopted for the rapid confirmation of results obtained through gold standard methods. However, international organisations discourage their use in routine laboratory investigations for rabies post-mortem diagnosis, as they may lead to false positive results due to cross-contamination. Cleaning and disinfection are essential to prevent cross-contamination of samples in the laboratory environment. The present study evaluated the efficacy of selected disinfectants on rabies-contaminated necropsy equipment under organic challenge using a carrier-based test. The occurrence of detectable Rabies virus (RABV) antigen, viable virus and RNA was assessed through the gold standard Fluorescent Antibody Test, the Rabies Tissue Culture Infection Test and molecular techniques, respectively. None of the tested disinfectants proved to be effective under label conditions. Off label disinfection protocols were found effective for oxidizing agents and phenolic, only. Biguanide and quaternary ammonium compound were both ineffective under all tested conditions. Overall, discordant results were obtained when different diagnostic tests were compared, which means that in the presence of organic contamination common disinfectants may not be effective enough on viable RABV or RNA. Our results indicate that an effective disinfection protocol should be carefully validated to guarantee staff safety and reliability of results. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Navy Safety Center data on the effects of fire protection systems on electrical equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Robert S.

    1991-04-01

    Records of the Navy Safety Center, Norfolk, VA were reviewed to find data relevant to inadvertant operation of installed fire extinguishing systems in civilian nuclear power plants. Navy data show the incidence of collateral fire or other damage by fresh water on operating electrical equipment in submarines and in shore facilities is about the same as the civilian experience, about 30 percent. Aboard surface ships, however, the collateral damage incidence in much lower, about 15 percent. With sea water, the collateral damage incidence is at least 75 percent. It is concluded that the fire extinguisher water has to be contaminated, as by rust in sprinkler systems or deposited salt spray, for most collateral damage to occur. Reasons for inadvertant operation (or advertant operation) of firex systems at shore facilities, submarines, and surface ships resemble those for nuclear power plants. Mechanical or electrical failures lead the list, followed by mishaps during maintenance. Detector and alarm system failures are significant problems at Navy shore facilities, and significant at nuclear power plants. Fixed halon and CO2 systems in shore facilities cause no collateral damage. Lists of individual Navy incidents with water and with halon and carbon dioxide are included as appendices.

  2. STS-81 CREW DURING SAFETY EQUIPMENT DEMONSTRATION AT LC 39B DURING TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The STS-81 crew gets a description of safety equipment and emergency egress routes on Launch Pad 39B during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) exercises for that mission. They are (from left): Mission Specialists Marsha S. Ivins, J.M. 'Jerry' Linenger and Peter J. K. 'Jeff' Wisoff; Mission Commander Michael A. Baker; Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld; and Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr. STS-81 is the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission and will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19 after arrival there during the STS-79 mission. During STS-81, Shuttle and Mir crews will conduct risk mitigation, human life science, microgravity and materials processing experiments that will provide data for the design, development and operation of the International Space Station. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB-DM double module will provide space for more than 2,000 pounds of hardware, food and water that will be transferred into the Russian space station during five days of docking operations during the 10-day mission. The SPACEHAB will also be used to return experiment samples from the Mir to Earth for analysis and for microgravity experiments during the mission.

  3. Blood Cytokines as Biomarkers of In Vivo Toxicity in Preclinical Safety Assessment: Considerations for Their Use

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Jacqueline M.

    2010-01-01

    In the drive to develop drugs with well-characterized and clinically monitorable safety profiles, there is incentive to expand the repertoire of safety biomarkers for toxicities without routine markers or premonitory detection. Biomarkers in blood are pursued because of specimen accessibility, opportunity for serial monitoring, quantitative measurement, and the availability of assay platforms. Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors (here referred to collectively as cytokines) show robust modulation in proximal events of inflammation, immune response, and repair. These are key general processes in many toxicities; therefore, cytokines are commonly identified during biomarker discovery studies. In addition, multiplexed cytokine immunoassays are easily applied to biomarker discovery and routine toxicity studies to measure blood cytokines. However, cytokines pose several challenges as safety biomarkers because of a short serum half-life; low to undetectable baseline levels; lack of tissue-specific or toxicity-specific expression; complexities related to cytokine expression with multiorgan involvement; and species, strain, and interindividual differences. Additional challenges to their application are caused by analytical, methodological, and study design–related variables. A final consideration is the strength of the relationship between changes in cytokine levels and the development of phenotypic or functional manifestations of toxicity. These factors should inform the integrated judgment-based qualification of novel biomarkers in preclinical, and potentially clinical, risk assessment. The dearth of robust, predictive cytokine biomarkers for specific toxicities is an indication of the significant complexity of these challenges. This review will consider the current state of the science and recommendations for appropriate application of cytokines in preclinical safety assessment. PMID:20447938

  4. Effects of safety climate on safety norm violations: exploring the mediating role of attitudinal ambivalence toward personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Nicoletta; Serpe, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Research on the role of organizational and psychosocial factors in influencing risk behaviors and the likelihood of injury at work showed that safety climate also has great impact on workers' behavior. However, the mechanisms through which this impact operates are still partially unclear. In order to explore the role that attitudinal ambivalence toward wearing PPE might play in mediating the impact of safety climate on safety norm violations, a questionnaire was administered to 345 Italian workers. Three dimensions of safety climate (i.e., company safety concern, senior managers' safety concern, supervisors' attitudes towards safety) were found to be positively associated with the individual ambivalence level, whereas the fourth one (i.e., work pressure) was negatively correlated with it. In turn, low levels of ambivalence were associated with a lower tendency to break the safety norms, even though the perception of a good safety climate also maintained a direct effect on unsafe behaviors. Designers of training program for the prevention of work related injuries must pay great attention to the psycho-social factors (such as the effects of the safety climate perception by employees on their attitudes and behaviors), and include specific contents into the prevention programs in order to improve workers compliance with safety norms.

  5. Environment, safety, and health considerations for a neutrino source based on a muon storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    J. Donald Cossairt

    2000-05-15

    The Neutrino Source presents a number of challenges in the general area of environment, safety, and health. It is the intent of this paper to identify these challenges and make a preliminary, but not detailed assessment of how they might be addressed and of their potential impact on the project. Some of the considerations which must be taken into account are very similar to those that have been encountered and solved during the construction and operation of other facilities at Fermilab and at similar laboratories elsewhere in the US and worldwide. Other considerations have not been encountered previously in connection with the construction and operation of accelerator laboratories. These novel issues will require particular attention as such a project proceeds to assure their timely resolution in a manner that is cost-effective and that meets the approval of the public. In this paper, both the conventional and the novel issues are discussed, with more emphasis on the latter. It is concluded here that with adequate planning in the design stages, these problems can be adequately addressed in a manner that merits the support of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and the public. An abbreviated version of this paper appears as Chapter 14 in the report of a recent feasibility study (Ho 00)and the figures have come from that work.

  6. Patient safety considerations concerning the scheduling of emergency-off system tests.

    PubMed

    Brezovich, Ivan A; Popple, Richard A

    2014-03-06

    Emergency-off systems (EOS) are essential to the safe operation of medical accelerators and other high-risk equipment. To assure reliable functioning, some states require weekly tests; others permit monthly, tri-monthly or even six-monthly tests, while some do not specify test intervals. We investigate the relative safety of the various test schedules by computing the fraction of time during which a nonfunctional state of the EOS may remain undetected. Special attention is given to the effect of flexibility (i.e., to regulations that specify the number of tests that have to be done in any given time interval, but allow a range within the interval during which a test can be done). Compared to strict test intervals, a schedule that provides flexibility increases risk only marginally. Performing tests on any arbitrary day of the week when weekly tests are required increases the time span during which a nonfunctionality goes undetected by only 17%, compared to an exact one-week schedule. The same ratio applies for monthly tests. For a three-month schedule, the relative risk increases by only 2% if tests are done on an arbitrarily chosen day during each due-month, compared to tests done on an exact three-month schedule. The most irregular time intervals possible in a three-calendar month schedule increase the relative risk by 11%. For the six-month and the 12-month schedule the ratio of risks is even smaller. The relative risk is virtually independent of the mean time between failures of the EOS, but the absolute risk decreases in proportion the mean time between failures. Adherence to strict, resource-intensive test intervals provides little extra safety compared to flexible intervals that require the same number of tests per year. Regulations should be changed to provide the practicality offered by flexible test schedules. Any additional increase in patient safety could be achieved by strict regulations concerning reliability of emergency-stop (e-stop) systems.

  7. Safety equipment list for the 241-SY-101 RAPID mitigation project

    SciTech Connect

    MORRIS, K.L.

    1999-06-29

    This document provides the safety classification for the safety (safety class and safety RAPID Mitigation Project. This document is being issued as the project SEL until the supporting authorization basis documentation, this document will be superseded by the TWRS SEL (LMHC 1999), documentation istlralized. Upon implementation of the authorization basis significant) structures, systems, and components (SSCS) associated with the 241-SY-1O1 which will be updated to include the information contained herein.

  8. 76 FR 53072 - Certification; Importation of Vehicles and Equipment Subject to Federal Safety, Bumper, and Theft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Agency May Deny Registration to, or Revoke the RI Status of, Entities Convicted of Certain Crimes The... Vehicle Safety Standards AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT. ACTION... safety. The agency is amending RI application and renewal requirements to enable the agency to deny...

  9. 76 FR 23255 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards..., final rule reorganizing Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108). The... the Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking concerning 49 CFR 571.108 (Federal Motor Vehicle...

  10. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... power plant platform may be equipped with high- and low-pressure sensors (PSHL), which activate audible... shall be protected by high- and low-pressure sensors (PSHL) to directly or indirectly shut in all... subsea tie-in shall be equipped with a block valve and an FSV. Bidirectional pipelines connected to...

  11. Normal people working in normal organizations with normal equipment: system safety and cognition in a mid-air collision.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Paulo Victor Rodrigues; Gomes, José Orlando; Huber, Gilbert Jacob; Vidal, Mario Cesar

    2009-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in improving the safety of complex systems is to understand how accidents emerge in normal working situations, with equipment functioning normally in normally structured organizations. We present a field study of the en route mid-air collision between a commercial carrier and an executive jet, in the clear afternoon Amazon sky in which 154 people lost their lives, that illustrates one response to this challenge. Our focus was on how and why the several safety barriers of a well structured air traffic system melted down enabling the occurrence of this tragedy, without any catastrophic component failure, and in a situation where everything was functioning normally. We identify strong consistencies and feedbacks regarding factors of system day-to-day functioning that made monitoring and awareness difficult, and the cognitive strategies that operators have developed to deal with overall system behavior. These findings emphasize the active problem-solving behavior needed in air traffic control work, and highlight how the day-to-day functioning of the system can jeopardize such behavior. An immediate consequence is that safety managers and engineers should review their traditional safety approach and accident models based on equipment failure probability, linear combinations of failures, rules and procedures, and human errors, to deal with complex patterns of coincidence possibilities, unexpected links, resonance among system functions and activities, and system cognition.

  12. Long Duration Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest Studies: Safety Considerations Regarding Vision Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Taibbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.

    2012-01-01

    Visual symptoms reported in astronauts returning from long duration missions in low Earth orbit, including hyperopic shift, choroidal folds, globe flattening and papilledema, are thought to be related to fluid shifts within the body due to microgravity exposure. Because of this possible relation to fluid shifts, safety considerations have been raised regarding the ocular health of head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest subjects. HDT is a widely used ground ]based analog that simulates physiological changes of spaceflight, including fluid shifts. Thus, vision monitoring has been performed in bed rest subjects in order to evaluate the safety of HDT with respect to vision health. Here we report ocular outcomes in 9 healthy subjects (age range: 27-48 years; Male/Female ratio: 8/1) completing bed rest Campaign 11, an integrated, multidisciplinary 70-day 6 degrees HDT bed rest study. Vision examinations were performed on a weekly basis, and consisted of office-based (2 pre- and 2 post-bed rest) and in-bed testing. The experimental design was a repeated measures design, with measurements for both eyes taken for each subject at each planned time point. Findings for the following tests were all reported as normal in each testing session for every subject: modified Amsler grid, red dot test, confrontational visual fields, color vision and fundus photography. Overall, no statistically significant differences were observed for any of the measures, except for both near and far visual acuity, which increased during the course of the study. This difference is not considered clinically relevant as may result from the effect of learning. Intraocular pressure results suggest a small increase at the beginning of the bed rest phase (p=0.059) and lesser increase at post-bed rest with respect to baseline (p=0.046). These preliminary results provide the basis for further analyses that will include correlations between intraocular pressure change pre- and post-bed rest, and optical coherence

  13. CTLA-4 blockade with ipilimumab: biology, safety, efficacy, and future considerations

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Luis H

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma remains a critical public health problem worldwide. Patients with stage IV disease have very poor prognosis and their 1-year survival rate is only 25%. Until recently, systemic treatments with a positive impact on overall survival (OS) had remained elusive. In recent years, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) – approved several novel agents targeting the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway (vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib) – critical in cell division and proliferation of melanoma, and an immune checkpoint inhibitor (ipilimumab) directed against the cytotoxic T lymphocyte Antigen - (CTLA-4). Moreover, recent reports of clinical trials studying other immune checkpoint modulating agents will most likely result in their FDA approval within the next months. This review focuses on ipilimumab, its safety and efficacy, and future considerations. Ipilimumab has demonstrated a positive OS impact after a several-year follow-up. It is also recognized that due to its mechanism of action, the response patterns to ipilimumab can differ from those observed in patients following treatment with conventional cytotoxic agents and even the most recently approved BRAF inhibitors. Most patients (84.8%) experience drug-related adverse events (AEs) of any grade; most of these are mild to moderate and immune mediated. However, a minority of patients may also experience severe and life-threatening AEs. In clinical studies, AEs were managed according to guidelines that emphasized close clinical monitoring and early use of corticosteroids when appropriate. Preliminary results have taught us the potential greater toxicity when in combination with vemurafenib, and the greater antitumor efficacy when combined with nivolumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1), another immune checkpoint inhibitor. Future challenges include the optimization of dosing and toxicities when used as a single agent, and studying the safety and efficacy of

  14. De-Orbiting the International Space Station ISS: Safety Considerations and Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaschi, F.; Huertas, I.; Ortega, G.; Sgobba, T.; Laurel, C.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has proposed to its partners the de-orbiting of the International Space Station (ISS) around the year 2020. Technical plans on how to do it have been presented as long as the year 1999. The current situation of ISS claims for a possible extension of the date of 2020 but to all International Partners is clear that the de-orbiting operations need to be performed with safety as the main and central paradigm. The proposed paper evaluates several scenarios and options for the de- orbiting of ISS. The paper proposes trajectory design considerations, de- orbit strategies and the calculation of casualties and fatalities for some of those. The paper proposes as well some fragment disposal regions using the classic approach of disposing ISS on ground and compares it with the feasibility and cost with the approach of end of life vehicle recycling culture of the European Union. The paper computes and calculates the reliability of all options and establishes a trade-off between all of them. The paper provides a detailed mathematical model that is able to calculate casualty and fatality rates. The mathematical model has been programmed in the ASTOS software tool and the corresponding casualty and fatality curves have been computed for some considered options. The following options are studied, discussed, and traded- off: simple one-go complete disposal of ISS with controlled de-orbiting using a service module, complex partial disposal of ISS elements with controlled de-orbiting using a modified version of service module, same variation using a set of auxiliary vehicles, design of a new vehicle to dispose the ISS and finally the uncontrolled re-entry of the entire ISS. Further, the paper proposes some de-orbiting requirements, and mission design considerations for a successful end-of-mission closure.

  15. 75 FR 15687 - Safety and Security Equipment and Services Trade Mission to Brazil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ...: Best Sales Prospects--Public Security: Best Sales Prospects-- Private Security: Radio and... Software Cargo Tracking Systems Biometric Equipment (facial, Access Control fingerprint, and iris recognition) Systems Cameras and Associated Burglar Alarms Software GPS Systems Fire Sensors and Alarms...

  16. Treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Wolraich, Mark L; McGuinn, Laura; Doffing, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Despite a large body of evidence for both the validity of the diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the efficacy of its treatment with medication, there is an equally long history of controversy. This article focuses on presenting safety information for medications approved by the US FDA for the treatment of individuals with ADHD. Stimulant medications are generally safe and effective. The common adverse effects of stimulant medications, including appetite suppression and insomnia, are usually of mild severity and manageable without stopping the medication. The more severe adverse effects such as tics or bizarre behaviours occur with low frequency and usually resolve when the medication is stopped. The possible impact on growth requires careful monitoring. Several rare but potentially severe adverse effects including sudden cardiac death and cancer following long-term treatment have been reported; however, these effects have not been adequately demonstrated to be of significant concern at this time. Atomoxetine also has a mild adverse effect profile in terms of severity and frequency although the numbers of studies and years of clinical experience is considerably less with this drug than for the stimulant medications. When the risks are juxtaposed to the clear efficacy in significantly reducing dysfunctional symptoms of ADHD, benefit-risk analyses support the continued use of these pharmacological treatments for patients with ADHD.

  17. Report of an exploratory study: safety and liability considerations for photovoltaic modules/panels, Low Cost Solar Array Project

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, A.S.; Meeker, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Product safety and product liability considerations are explored for photovoltaic module/array devices. A general review of photovoltaic literature was made using computerized literature searches. A literature search was also made of relevant legal material as it applies to design. Recommendations are made to minimize or eliminate perceived hazards in manufacture and use of a photovoltaic module/array. (MHR)

  18. The Impact Of Occupational Hazards In Workplaces - Maintenance, A Main Target For Ensuring The Safety Of Working Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, Anca Elena; Buica, Georgeta; Darabont, Doru Costin; Beiu, Constantin

    2015-07-01

    For use of work equipment having the economic performance and the highest level of safety, it must be ensured that it complies with the conditions set by the manufacturer in terms of putting into service, use and maintenance operations, ensuring appropriate technical and environmental requirements, including appropriate measures and means of protection. The research aimed to identify and analyze the occupational hazards associated to maintenance operations, in terms of the history of the adjustments, maintenance, cleaning and repair, including the case that occur after the incidents, capital repairs and upgrades. The results of the research consisted in the development of recommendations on the effective management of maintenance activities of work equipment and a software model to enable an efficient management of maintenance, as a tool for occupational hazards in companies - premise for increasing the competitiveness of employers in the market economy.

  19. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall ensure the proper installation, operation, and maintenance of safety devices required by this... PSHL and an SDV immediately upon boarding each platform. (9) Pipeline pumps must comply with section...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall ensure the proper installation, operation, and maintenance of safety devices required by this... PSHL and an SDV immediately upon boarding each platform. (9) Pipeline pumps must comply with section...

  1. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall ensure the proper installation, operation, and maintenance of safety devices required by this... PSHL and an SDV immediately upon boarding each platform. (9) Pipeline pumps must comply with section...

  2. 78 FR 54209 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ..., reflective devices, and associated equipment to allow the license plate mounting surface on motorcycles to be... Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC) on March 14, 2005, requesting that the agency modify the license mounting... SAE Standard J587 and the requirements in the European Union which both allow motorcycle license...

  3. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL... automatic- and remote-emergency shut-in systems. (5) The Regional Supervisor may require that oil pipelines... block valve and an FSV. Bidirectional pipelines connected to a subsea tie-in shall be equipped with...

  4. Adaptive Driving Equipment: Selection and Major Considerations [and] Battery Powered Scooters and 3-Wheelers. Information Support Packets #1 and #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John H.

    Two brief guides offer suggestions for persons with physical disabilities who are considering the purchase of adaptive driving equipment, battery-powered scooters, or three wheelers. The first guide offers guidelines for individuals considering purchase of special hand controls or other modifications or a van lift to enhance their independence in…

  5. What's new in MR safety: the latest on the safe use of equipment in the magnetic resonance environment.

    PubMed

    2005-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) scanners present a unique set of safety risks for the healthcare facility. In the space surrounding an MR scanner, ferromagnetic objects can become deadly projectiles, device cables can become hot enough to cause burns, and medical equipment can cease to function properly. ECRI detailed these risks--and provided recommendations to help healthcare facilities minimize them--in a December 2001 Guidance Article. In this supplement to that article, we detail some recent MR safety developments and offer additional guidance. In particular, we describe changes in the terminology used to characterize the safety of devices in the MR environment, we outline new guidance on MR safe practices published by the American College of Radiology, and we review the safety issues that facilities need to be aware of when implementing 3-tesla (3 T) MR systems. We also present an updated Starter List of medical device models that have been designed for use in the MR environment. In addition, supplementary articles address the use of ferromagnetic detection systems and the selection of a fire extinguisher for use in the MR environment.

  6. Design considerations to enhance the safety of patient compartments in ambulance transporters.

    PubMed

    Byran, Eyal; Gilad, Issachar

    2012-01-01

    The safety of the interior of ambulances is dubious and, in the event of sudden impact during emergency transport, potentially perilous to patients they carry. The workplace ergonomics of the interior of the passenger cabin is lacking. This article discusses an improved ergonomic interior design based on study findings, observations and subjective perception. It suggests design aspects and safety concepts aimed at increasing the safety of patients and paramedic staff inside the ambulance as a mobile workstation.

  7. Interim safety equipment list for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, project W-320

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.C.

    1996-01-25

    The purpose of this supporting document is to provide safety classifications for systems, structures, and components of the Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) and to document the methodology used to develop these safety classifications. The WRSS requires two transfer lines, one to carry sluiced waste slurry to tank 241-AY-102 and the other to return supernatant to tank 241-C-106; pumps in each tank; sluicers to direct the supernatant stream inside tank 241-C-106; a slurry distributor in tank 241-AY-102; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning for tank 241-C-106; and instrumentation and control devices.

  8. Smart on-board diagnostic decision trees for quantitative aviation equipment and safety procedures validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ali H.; Markarian, Garik; Tarter, Alex; Kölle, Rainer

    2010-04-01

    The current trend in high-accuracy aircraft navigation systems is towards using data from one or more inertial navigation subsystem and one or more navigational reference subsystems. The enhancement in fault diagnosis and detection is achieved via computing the minimum mean square estimate of the aircraft states using, for instance, Kalman filter method. However, this enhancement might degrade if the cause of a subsystem fault has some effect on other subsystems that are calculating the same measurement. One instance of such case is the tragic incident of Air France Flight 447 in June, 2009 where message transmissions in the last moment before the crash indicated inconsistencies in measured airspeed as reported by Airbus. In this research, we propose the use of mathematical aircraft model to work out the current states of the airplane and in turn, using these states to validate the readings of the navigation equipment throughout smart diagnostic decision tree network. Various simulated equipment failures have been introduced in a controlled environment to proof the concept of operation. The results have showed successful detection of the failing equipment in all cases.

  9. 76 FR 23506 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards No. 108; Lamp, Reflective Devices and Associated Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... also asked why big rigs and boat and utility trailers need reduced constraints on styling for... asked ``how can a big rig clearance light that is only effective at auto eye level be seen and... circuitry is heated or moistened, and who's responsible for the safety implications when a big rig or...

  10. 76 FR 23254 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ...: This notice grants the petition for rulemaking submitted by the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC... Standard (FMVSS) No. 108 to allow motorcycles to mount license plates at an upward angle of up to 30... merits further consideration through the rulemaking process. \\1\\ Motorcycle Industry Council Petition for...

  11. Non-clinical models: validation, study design and statistical consideration in safety pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, M K; Towart, R; Authier, S; Gallacher, D J; Curtis, M J

    2010-01-01

    The current issue of the Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods (JPTM) focuses exclusively on safety pharmacology methods. This is the 7th year the Journal has published on this topic. Methods and models that specifically relate to methods relating to the assessment of the safety profile of a new chemical entity (NCE) prior to first in human (FIH) studies are described. Since the Journal started publishing on this topic there has been a major effort by safety pharmacologists, toxicologists and regulatory scientists within Industry (both large and small Pharma as well as Biotechnology companies) and also from Contract Research Organizations (CRO) to publish the surgical details of the non-clinical methods utilized but also provide important details related to standard and non-standard (or integrated) study models and designs. These details from core battery and secondary (or ancillary) drug safety assessment methods used in drug development programs have been the focus of these special issues and have been an attempt to provide validation of methods. Similarly, the safety pharmacology issues of the Journal provide the most relevant forum for scientists to present novel and modified methods with direct applicability to determination of drug safety-directly to the safety pharmacology scientific community. The content of the manuscripts in this issue includes the introduction of additional important surgical methods, novel data capture and data analysis methods, improved study design and effects of positive control compounds with known activity in the model.

  12. Engaging patients as safety partners: some considerations for ensuring a culturally and linguistically appropriate approach.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2009-04-01

    Engaging patients as 'safety partners' with health service providers to help identify and rectify preventable adverse events in health care is being increasingly accepted in the USA, Australia, and elsewhere as a promising strategy to improve patient safety outcomes. The implications of this trend for patients and families of minority cultural and language backgrounds have not, however, been comprehensively considered. In this article, attention is given to briefly exploring the notion of patient participation in health care and the problematic transposition of the concept into patient safety discourse. The importance of recognising and responding to the critical relationship between culture, language and patient safety outcomes, and the possible benefits and risks of engaging patients of minority ethnic backgrounds in safety partnership programs are explored. It is suggested that if patient safety engagement/partnership programs are to perform well in cross-cultural health care contexts, they need to be supported by research evidence and appropriately informed by the perspectives and experiences of patients and families/nominated carers from minority cultural and language backgrounds. They also need to be appropriately supported by culturally competent policies and practices across the entire health care system. The importance of robust internationally comparative research on this issue is highlighted.

  13. Safety and tolerability considerations in the use of sildenafil for children with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dodgen, Andrew L; Hill, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor approved for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in adults. Data from pediatric trials demonstrate a similar acute safety profile to the adult population but have raised concerns regarding the safety of long-term use in children. Interpretation of these trials remains controversial with major regulatory agencies differing in their recommendations – the US Food and Drug Administration recommends against the use of sildenafil for treatment of PAH in children, while the European Medicines Agency supports its use at “low doses”. Here, we review the available pediatric data regarding dosing, acute, and long-term safety and efficacy of sildenafil for the treatment of PAH in children. PMID:26719728

  14. Safety and tolerability considerations in the use of sildenafil for children with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dodgen, Andrew L; Hill, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor approved for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in adults. Data from pediatric trials demonstrate a similar acute safety profile to the adult population but have raised concerns regarding the safety of long-term use in children. Interpretation of these trials remains controversial with major regulatory agencies differing in their recommendations - the US Food and Drug Administration recommends against the use of sildenafil for treatment of PAH in children, while the European Medicines Agency supports its use at "low doses". Here, we review the available pediatric data regarding dosing, acute, and long-term safety and efficacy of sildenafil for the treatment of PAH in children.

  15. Climate considerations in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories.

    PubMed

    Näslund, Jens-Ove; Brandefelt, Jenny; Liljedahl, Lillemor Claesson

    2013-05-01

    For a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel planned in Sweden, the safety assessment covers up to 1 million years. Climate scenarios range from high-end global warming for the coming 100 000 years, through deep permafrost, to large ice sheets during glacial conditions. In contrast, in an existing repository for short-lived waste the activity decays to low levels within a few tens of thousands of years. The shorter assessment period, 100 000 years, requires more focus on climate development over the coming tens of thousands of years, including the earliest possibility for permafrost growth and freezing of the engineered system. The handling of climate and climate change in safety assessments must be tailor-made for each repository concept and waste type. However, due to the uncertain future climate development on these vast time scales, all safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories require a range of possible climate scenarios.

  16. Performance Requirements for Emergency Responder Interoperable and Compatible Electronic Safety Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Firefighters and other emergency response personnel are presented with an increasing array of technologies to improve their health and safety. This includes real-time bidirectional communication, navigation and positional information, data on physiological and metabolic functions, as well as data on their surrounding environment. The emerging challenge is to integrate these elements into a practical system, addressing such features as power, data transfer, and inter-element coordination and communication. In many respects, NASA has addressed these aspects in the context of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). The EVA environment shares many common attributes with that of emergency response scenarios. A similar situation exists in terms of the need for interoperability among the various system sub-elements. A brief overview is presented on the similarities and differences in these two applications, as well as the technical approach adopted by NASA in terms of system design philosophy.

  17. Equipping clinical leaders for system and service improvements in quality and safety: an Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Sandra G; Smyth, Anne; Balding, Cathy; McAlpine, Iain

    2016-04-01

    To develop clinical leadership among health professionals working in public sector organisations to improve their skills in ensuring high quality and safe health services. A longitudinal pre-post-intervention mixed methods study that included 60 health professionals working in one state in Australia. The program was successful in the development of clinical leaders. An interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral leadership development program involving health professionals from metropolitan, regional and rural areas can be successful in developing knowledge, skills and competencies among these health professionals in health service quality and safety. Health professionals can participate in a development program to enhance their clinical leadership skills. While this was a post-qualification course, targeting experienced health professionals, the learnings could be applied to pre-qualification education of health professionals. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  18. Managing NIF safety equipment in a high neutron and gamma radiation environment.

    PubMed

    Datte, Philip; Eckart, Mark; Jackson, Mark; Khater, Hesham; Manuel, Stacie; Newton, Mark

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility that supports the Inertial Confinement Fusion program. During the ignition experimental campaign, the NIF is expected to perform shots with varying fusion yield producing 14 MeV neutrons up to 20 MJ or 7.1 × 10(18) neutrons per shot and a maximum annual yield of 1,200 MJ. Several infrastructure support systems will be exposed to varying high yield shots over the facility's 30-y life span. In response to this potential exposure, analysis and testing of several facility safety systems have been conducted. A detailed MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) model has been developed for the NIF facility, and it includes most of the major structures inside the Target Bay. The model has been used in the simulation of expected neutron and gamma fluences throughout the Target Bay. Radiation susceptible components were identified and tested to fluences greater than 10(13) (n cm(-2)) for 14 MeV neutrons and γ-ray equivalent. The testing includes component irradiation using a 60Co gamma source and accelerator-based irradiation using 4- and 14- MeV neutron sources. The subsystem implementation in the facility is based on the fluence estimates after shielding and survivability guidelines derived from the dose maps and component tests results. This paper reports on the evaluation and implementation of mitigations for several infrastructure safety support systems, including video, oxygen monitoring, pressure monitors, water sensing systems, and access control interfaces found at the NIF.

  19. Temporal Considerations in Mission Safety Decision Making- An International Space Station Case Study Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herd, Andrew

    2010-09-01

    Operations on the International Space Station(ISS) shall ensure mission success whilst maintaining safety for the ISS crew, ISS and visiting vehicles(also known as Safety of Flight(SoF)). Prior to mission, within the mission development and preparation process operations products are defined to form a boundary around and assure mission success. Over the phases of the safety review process, undertaken within spaceflight hardware design, approaches such as failure tolerance are employed to appropriately control the inherent or induced hazards presented by the spaceflight hardware or its use. Prior to mission execution all nominal operations are certified as being safe -it follows then that only after the instance of “issues”, such as hardware anomalies, that operational deltas arise and need further safety(or risk) assessment to be brought to the appropriate approval authority. In some rare cases the need for a new safety assessment response arises due to a change in safety requirements. During a mission, the tools by which a new safety case is assessed by mission management includes concepts as “time to effect” and “time of exposure” and form part of the normal risk understanding and acceptance process. The ISS Mission Management Team(IMMT) shall assure that the presentable risks are acceptable, in terms the specific risk and the accumulated risk. “Equivalent safety” may be granted for noncompliant conditions that do not meet specific requirements in the exact manner specified; however, the hardware/system design, procedure, or configuration satisfies the intent of the requirement by achieving a comparable or higher degree of safety. Criteria for establishing an “equivalent safety” is based on: a. Use of alternative methods/controls; b. Utilization of procedures, protective devices, preflight verification activities, and crew experience base; c. Reduced time of exposure; d. Likelihood/probability of additional failures after loss of first control

  20. Financial Considerations for Health and Safety in the Australian Dairy Industry.

    PubMed

    Lower, Tony; Pollock, Kirrily

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the burden of fatal and workers' compensation-related injuries on the dairy sector in Australia and to assess current financial inputs for work health and safety actions. The first and second phases entailed a review of the financial costs associated with fatal (2001-2013) and workers' compensation cases (2008-2009 to 2012-2013). The third element was a case-study approach focusing on actual production and cost data from a small sample of dairy farms (n = 6) to ascertain an estimate for current financial inputs to work health and safety. The estimated financial impact was approximately AUD$12.4 million each year, comprising AUD$6.8 million for fatalities and AUD$5.6 million for compensable injuries. All sample businesses were investing in health and safety initiatives; however, this was modest and on average represented 0.4% of total expenditure (AUD$4,472) or safety by dairy farmers in Australia. Increased investment has the potential to not only minimize the burden of injury and costs to dairy farmers, but will also significantly reduce the devastating impacts that these incidents have on individuals, their families and communities.

  1. 78 FR 24211 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Container Labels and Carton Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Container Labels and Carton Labeling Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Labels and Carton Labeling Design to Minimize Medication Errors.'' The draft guidance focuses on safety aspects of the container label and carton labeling design for prescription drug and biological products...

  2. Safety and effectiveness considerations for clinical studies of visual prosthetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ethan D.

    2007-03-01

    With the advent of new designs of visual prostheses for the blind, FDA is faced with developing guidance for evaluating their engineering, safety and patient performance. Visual prostheses are considered significant risk medical devices, and their use in human clinical trials must be approved by FDA under an investigation device exemption (IDE). This paper contains a series of test topics and design issues that sponsors should consider in order to assess the safety and efficacy of their device. The IDE application includes a series of pre-clinical and clinical data sections. The pre-clinical section documents laboratory, animal and bench top performance tests of visual prostheses safety and reliability to support a human clinical trial. The materials used in constructing the implant should be biocompatible, sterile, corrosion resistant, and able to withstand any forces exerted on it during normal patient use. The clinical data section is composed of items related to patient-related evaluation of device performance. This section documents the implantation procedure, trial design, statistical analysis and how visual performance is assessed. Similar to cochlear implants, a visual prosthesis is expected to last in the body for many years, and good pre-clinical and clinical testing will help ensure its safety, durability and effectiveness.

  3. Two NextGen Air Safety Tools: An ADS-B Equipped UAV and a Wake Turbulence Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Ward A.

    Two air safety tools are developed in the context of the FAA's NextGen program. The first tool addresses the alarming increase in the frequency of near-collisions between manned and unmanned aircraft by equipping a common hobby class UAV with an ADS-B transponder that broadcasts its position, speed, heading and unique identification number to all local air traffic. The second tool estimates and outputs the location of dangerous wake vortex corridors in real time based on the ADS-B data collected and processed using a custom software package developed for this project. The TRansponder based Position Information System (TRAPIS) consists of data packet decoders, an aircraft database, Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the wake vortex extension application. Output from TRAPIS can be visualized in Google Earth and alleviates the problem of pilots being left to imagine where invisible wake vortex corridors are based solely on intuition or verbal warnings from ATC. The result of these two tools is the increased situational awareness, and hence safety, of human pilots in the National Airspace System (NAS).

  4. Secondary use of randomized controlled trials to evaluate drug safety: a review of methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Tarek A; Pinheiro, Simone P; Neyarapally, George A

    2011-10-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are often positioned at the top of evidence hierarchies. Meta-analyses of RCTs aim to integrate the state of knowledge on a given scientific question, particularly for rare drug-related outcomes. However, although RCTs are valuable tools in our armamentarium, they are rarely designed to evaluate drug safety and are thus susceptible to limitations that may hamper the ability of both RCTs and meta-analyses to fully characterize the safety profiles of drugs. Their potential limitations might be exacerbated in the study of rare outcomes, often encountered in drug safety assessment, when even minor deviations from the intended randomization could impact the stability of the risk estimates. This article considers the methodological caveats of both RCTs and meta-analyses of RCTs pertinent to the study of drug-related harms. It is intended to stimulate discussion about the impact of these caveats on interpreting findings of RCTs and meta-analyses for drug safety, which would foster more robust, critical evaluations, and thus enhance clinical and regulatory decision-making. Pertinent issues that can influence the interpretation of drug-related harms discussed in this article were based on authors' expertise and review of the literature. Investigators and clinicians should be cognizant of the potential limitations of the secondary use of RCTs and meta-analyses in the assessment of drug-related harms and, when applicable, should consider potential remedies to overcome these limitations. Only few practical examples are included in the article due to the fact that many of the discussed caveats are not examined and/or reported in many publications. In addition, the confidential nature of data reviewed at a regulatory agency forestalls an in depth discussion of examples pertaining to specific drugs. Furthermore, our ability to quantify the extent of encountering, or the actual impact of, the caveats addressed in this review on the RCTs findings

  5. Report of an exploratory study: Safety and liability considerations for photovoltaic modules/panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, A. S.; Meeker, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    An overview of legal issues as they apply to design, manufacture and use of photovoltaic module/array devices is provided and a methodology is suggested for use of the design stage of these products to minimize or eliminate perceived hazards. Questions are posed to stimulate consideration of this area.

  6. Health and Safety Considerations Associated with Sodium-Cooled Experimental Nuclear Fuel Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Carvo, Alan E.

    2015-04-01

    Between the mid-1970s and the mid-1980s Sandia National Laboratory constructed eleven experimental assemblies to simulate debris beds formed in a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. All but one of the assemblies were irradiated. The experimental assemblies were transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2007 and 2008 for storage, dismantlement, recovery of the uranium for reuse in the nuclear fuel cycle, and disposal of unneeded materials. This paper addresses the effort to dismantle the assemblies down to the primary containment vessel and repackage them for temporary storage until such time as equipment necessary for sodium separation is in place.

  7. [Earthquakes and healthcare. Considerations and proposals for improving seismic safety of hospitals].

    PubMed

    Polesani, L; Cocuzza, S; Nachiero, D

    2012-01-01

    The Italian territory faces a high seismic risk. Moreover the high vulnerability of health facilities increases the danger for the population. This study departs from an analysis of the state of conservation of the national hospitals and builds upon the data gathered on the recent earthquakes that have shaken Italy. Indeed, the study provides a bulk of preventive measures directed to improve seismic safety of both the national health system and the hospitals strategic value. The focus is mainly centered on emergency management aspects and the maintenance of the functionality of the medical services necessary to overcome the health crisis following an earthquake of high intensity. The research is conducted considering how these issues were addressed in foreign countries. In particular; California represents a central case study, since the high seismicity of the territory requires heavy investments to deal with the seismic safety of the hospitals.

  8. Safety considerations for wireless delivery of continuous power to implanted medical devices.

    PubMed

    Lucke, Lori; Bluvshtein, Vlad

    2014-01-01

    Wireless power systems for use with implants are referred to as transcutaneous energy transmission systems (TETS) and consist of an implanted secondary coil and an external primary coil along with supporting electronics. A TETS system could be used to power ventricular assist systems and eliminate driveline infections. There are both direct and indirect safety concerns that must be addressed when continuously transferring power through the skin. Direct safety concerns include thermal tissue damage caused by exposure to the electromagnetic fields, coil heating effects, and potential unwanted nerve stimulation. Indirect concerns are those caused by potential interference of the TETS system with other implanted devices. Wireless power systems are trending towards higher frequency operation. Understanding the limits for safe operation of a TETS system across a range of frequencies is important. A low frequency and a high frequency implementation are simulated to demonstrate the impact of this trend for a VAD application.

  9. Infant toxicology: state of the science and considerations in evaluation of safety.

    PubMed

    Neal-Kluever, April; Aungst, Jason; Gu, Yan; Hatwell, Karen; Muldoon-Jacobs, Kristi; Liem, Ayesha; Ogungbesan, Adejoke; Shackelford, Mary

    2014-08-01

    Differences in the physiology and biological susceptibilities of adults and infants have led to growing interest in safety evaluation methods for exposures from infant formula packaging. In addition to potential physiological differences, infants aged 0-6 months may consume a sole source of food, infant formula or breast milk, and consume higher amounts of food relative to body weight compared to adults. While the duration of the exposure is short compared to the expected lifespan of the individual, it occurs during a period of important developmental processes. The purpose of this document is to (1) review key biological and exposure elements that may impact the evaluation of safety for food contact products intended for use by infants, (2) summarize the current reproductive and developmental toxicity testing protocols available, and (3) identify potential data gaps concerning this period of development. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Safety and ergonomic considerations for an aging workforce in the US construction industry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang D

    2009-01-01

    The US construction workforce is aging as millions of baby boomers move toward retirement age. Older workers make a substantial contribution to construction in terms of skills and experience. However, construction is still one of the most physically demanding occupations, hence the health implications for older workers. Descriptions of injuries, illnesses and fatalities among older workers in the US construction industry from recent literature are presented along with the practical health and safety interventions that have been proposed including: ergonomic interventions, wellness programs, worksite housekeeping, training, and safety climate. Understanding the risks and hazards in specific industries could help identify training and intervention requirements to meet the challenges facing aging workers in these occupational groups.

  11. A NASA Approach to Safety Considerations for Electric Propulsion Aircraft Testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papathakis, Kurt V.; Sessions, Alaric M.; Burkhardt, Phillip A.; Ehmann, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Electric, hybrid-electric, and turbo-electric distributed propulsion technologies and concepts are beginning to gain traction in the aircraft design community, as they can provide improvements in operating costs, noise, fuel consumption, and emissions compared to conventional internal combustion or Brayton-cycle powered vehicles. NASA is building multiple demonstrators and testbeds to buy down airworthiness and flight safety risks for these new technologies, including X-57 Maxwell, HEIST, Airvolt, and NEAT.

  12. Breast milk sharing via the internet: the practice and health and safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Keim, Sarah A; McNamara, Kelly A; Jayadeva, Chenali M; Braun, Ashlea C; Dillon, Chelsea E; Geraghty, Sheela R

    2014-08-01

    To characterize the practice of breast milk sharing via the internet in the US and examine factors associated with participants' communication regarding potential health and safety risks. This cross-sectional study examined all original postings (n = 254) placed during 1 week in 2011 on four websites to facilitate the sharing of breast milk. Postings were characterized for intent and health and safety topics (i.e., selling vs. donating milk, hygiene/handling practices, infectious disease screening, diet/exercise habits, substance and pharmaceutical use, milk quality claims, price) communicated between milk providers and recipients. Approximately 69% of postings were providing milk and 31% were seeking milk; 47% included identifiers. Few provider postings reflected measures to potentially reduce risks to recipients: 20% mentioned using a healthy handling/hygiene practice, 11% offered specifics about infectious disease screening, 51% mentioned limiting/abstaining from 1+ substances. The presence of indications about handling/hygiene, diet/exercise, and abstaining from substances were strongly positively associated with each other (ORs 7.42-13.80), with the odds of selling (ORs 6.03-∞), and with making quality claims (ORs 3.14-13.54), but not with disease screening. One-fifth of recipients sought milk for a child with a medical condition or poor birth outcome. Most recipients (90%) did not specify any health and safety practices of a provider in their posting. Health behaviors and screening for diseases that may affect milk safety are not prominent topics in postings seeking to share milk. This lack of communication may exacerbate the health risks to recipient infants, especially infants at increased risk due to pre-existing health conditions.

  13. Federal and State Laws and Safety Considerations Relating to Fireworks in the United States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    antistatic clothing. Safety glasses must he worn, as well as rubber or suede gloves. 6. In order to minimize the risk of electrostatic discharge, materials...discharge from the operator. 8. The pyrotechnic mixtures should be stored in electrically conductive rubber containers. q. Some compositions have...toxicological hazards, such as organic dyes and chromic oxides which are suspected of being carcinogenic . Heavy metal ions of barium, mercury, and lead can

  14. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment to Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    D. P. Blanchard; R. W. Youngblood

    2014-06-01

    performance margin. The paper describes the resulting component types that were selected by Prevention Analysis and identifies the accident sequence characteristics that cause these component types to be important from an EQ and aging perspective (and, hence, worthwhile evaluating the extent of safety margin). In addition, component types not selected as needing significant margin from an EQ and aging perspective are discussed and an engineering rationale is developed justifying the lack of need to apply resources to demonstrating margin for these component types. This rationale is in terms of design features of the plant and operating characteristics that make these component types less important from an EQ and aging perspective. While the case study focuses on EQ and aging of equipment and cables located inside the containment of this PWR, the prevention analysis method is demonstrated to be an effective technique for identification of minimal collections of components that would be effective in managing safety for a variety of issues associated with aging and long-term operation of the fleet of plants.

  15. A Preliminary Report on the CO2 Laser for Lumbar Fusion: Safety, Efficacy and Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Villavicencio, Alan T; Burneikiene, Sigita; Babuska, Jason M; Nelson, Ewell L; Mason, Alexander; Rajpal, Sharad

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential technical advantages of the CO2 laser technology in mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) surgeries and report our preliminary clinical data on the safety and clinical outcomes. There is currently no literature discussing the recently redeveloped CO2 laser technology application for lumbar fusion. Safety and clinical outcomes were compared between two groups: 24 patients that underwent CO2 laser-assisted one-level TLIF surgeries and 30 patients that underwent standard one-level TLIF surgeries without the laser. There were no neural thermal injuries or other intraoperative laser-related complications encountered in this cohort of patients. At a mean follow-up of 17.4 months, significantly reduced lower back pain scores (P=0.013) were reported in the laser-assisted patient group compared to a standard fusion patient group. Lower extremity radicular pain intensity scores were similar in both groups. Laser-assisted TLIF surgeries showed a tendency (P = 0.07) of shorter operative times that was not statistically significant. Based on this preliminary clinical report, the safety of the CO2 laser device for lumbar fusion surgeries was assessed. There were no neural thermal injuries or other intraoperative laser-related complications encountered in this cohort of patients. Further investigation of CO2 laser-assisted lumbar fusion procedures is warranted in order to evaluate its effect on clinical outcomes.

  16. The Attenuation of Strike Acceleration with the Use of Safety Equipment in Tae Kwon Do

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjey

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study include: (1) Determination of the attenuation of strike acceleration that Tae Kwon Do sparring safety pads provide from kicks from Olympic style TKD fighters, (2) The sex and weight differentiation in acceleration achieved within the thorax model with the roundhouse kicks. Methods This prospective, observational study utilized 15 Olympic style fighters from an “elite” team kicking a water core heavy bag thorax model with roundhouse kicks. The model was fitted with a tri-axial accelerometer (GCDC, model X250-2) to measure g acceleration from strikes to the bag. The bag was kicked in three, 10 kick phases by all subjects: kicks without padding; kicks with hogu on heavy bag, and kicks with hogu and instep guards on feet. The g acceleration readings were recorded in all phases. Results Kolmogorov-Smirnov failed for all variables. There were 8 female subjects: median age 14 years, median weight 53.4 kg and 7 male subjects: median age 17 years, median weight 70.45 kg. The ANOVA on ranks of the acceleration from kicks against the bag achieved significance, P=0.001. Spearman rank order correlation between the weights of players and acceleration of strike against the hogu without and with insteps pads was significant, P=0.035/r=0.54 and P=0.018/r=0.59, respectively. Conclusion Heavier and male subjects tend to produce more force in strikes. Protective chest guard reduces acceleration to the thorax model, but the utility of instep guards is questionable. PMID:22375244

  17. Safety Planning for Military (SAFE MIL): rationale, design, and safety considerations of a randomized controlled trial to reduce suicide risk among psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Brown, Gregory K; Currier, Glenn W; Brenner, Lisa; Knox, Kerry L; Grammer, Geoffrey; Carreno-Ponce, Jaime T; Stanley, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Mental health related hospitalizations and suicide are both significant public health problems within the United States Department of Defense (DoD). To date, few evidence-based suicide prevention programs have been developed for delivery to military personnel and family members admitted for psychiatric inpatient care due to suicidal self-directed violence. This paper describes the rationale and detailed methodology for a study called Safety Planning for Military (SAFE MIL) which involves a randomized controlled trial (RCT) at the largest military treatment facility in the United States. The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of a brief, readily accessible, and personalized treatment called the Safety Planning Intervention (Stanley and Brown, 2012). Primary outcomes, measured by blinded assessors at one and six months following psychiatric discharge, include suicide ideation, suicide-related coping, and attitudes toward help seeking. Additionally, given the study's focus on a highly vulnerable patient population, a description of safety considerations for human subjects' participation is provided. Based on this research team's experience, the implementation of an infrastructure in support of RCT research within DoD settings and the processing of regulatory approvals for a clinical trial with high risk suicidal patients are expected to take up to 18-24 months. Recommendations for expediting the advancement of clinical trials research within the DoD are provided in order to maximize cost efficacy and minimize the research to practice gap. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Safety considerations in the design and operation of large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    The engineering and safety techniques used to assure the reliable and safe operation of large wind turbine generators utilizing the Mod 2 Wind Turbine System Program as an example is described. The techniques involve a careful definition of the wind turbine's natural and operating environments, use of proven structural design criteria and analysis techniques, an evaluation of potential failure modes and hazards, and use of a fail safe and redundant component engineering philosophy. The role of an effective quality assurance program, tailored to specific hardware criticality, and the checkout and validation program developed to assure system integrity are described.

  19. Safety considerations for patients with communication disorders in rehabilitation medicine settings.

    PubMed

    Cristian, Adrian; Giammarino, Claudia; Olds, Michael; Adams, Elizabeth; Moriarty, Christina; Ratner, Sabina; Mural, Shruti; Stobart, Eric C

    2012-05-01

    Communication barriers can pose a significant safety risk for patients. Individuals in a communication-vulnerable state are commonly seen in rehabilitation settings. These patients cannot adequately communicate their symptoms, wants, and needs to providers. Causes of communication barriers include neurologic impairments, such as stroke, cerebral palsy, and Parkinson disease, and language barriers. The ability of clinicians to adequately diagnose, treat, and monitor these patients is also hindered. This article identifies key communication barriers and strategies that clinicians can use to effectively communicate with these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Response time consideration for digitalized safety instrumentation applied to research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sang Hoon Bae; Young Seok Suh; Han Ju Cha

    2015-07-01

    A digitalized NMS (Neutron Measurement System) has a better performance than an analogue type in aspects of operating, maintenance and calibration. But some limitations in this system were found in the response time due to the inherent digital filtering time. The response time requirement as a kind of safety requirement is a significant factor that should be met. To satisfy the requirements, two approaches are herein suggested in a practical manner. Modifying conditions of the trip parameters and adjusting the testing methodology were applied to relieve the response time requirement. For a further enhanced and realistic response time, revised requirements for the response time of digitalized NMS are proposed in this paper. (authors)

  1. Towards A Comprehensive Consideration of Epistemic Questions in Software System Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. M.; Johnson, Chris W.

    2009-01-01

    For any software system upon which lives depend, the most important question one can ask about it is, 'How do we know the system is safe?' Despite the critical importance of this question, no widely accepted, generally applicable answer exists. Instead, debate continues to rage over the question, with theorists and practitioners quarrelling with each other and amongst themselves. This paper suggests a possible way forward towards quelling the quarrels, based on refining the critical safety question into additional questions, which may be more likely to have answers on which a consensus can be reached.

  2. Preparing for safety issues following drug approval: pre-approval risk management considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sharrar, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Risk management plans and risk minimization plans as well as postapproval commitment studies are based on risks identified pre-approval that need to be further characterized or minimized in the postmarketing environment. Although the implementation of these activities are conducted in the postapproval arena, the design of the plans and studies as well as the development of effective postapproval tools and mitigation strategies should be carried out pre-approval. The pre-approval period also provides the opportunity to fully understand the treatment population that is included in the clinical trial program and to determine how the target population for the drug after approval may differ from the clinical trial patient population. When regulators or sponsors have expressed concerns about safety issues identified during clinical development, the result may be a postapproval commitment in the form of a registry or an observational safety study or, in the US, a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) as a condition of approval. Specific examples are given for risk mitigation activities that can be conducted pre-approval. PMID:25114783

  3. Current status of regulating biotechnology-derived animals in Canada: animal health and food safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, H P S; Evans, B R

    2007-01-01

    Development of an effective regulatory system for genetically engineered animals and their products has been the subject of increasing discussion among researchers, industry and policy developers, as well as the public. Since transgenesis and cloning are relatively new scientific techniques, transgenic animals are 'novel' organisms for which there is limited information. The issues associated with the regulation of transgenic animals pertain to environmental impact, human food safety, animal health and welfare, trade and ethics. It is a challenge for the developers to prove the safety of the products of biotechnology-derived animals and also for regulators to regulate this increasingly powerful technology with limited background information. In principle, an effective regulatory sieve should permit safe products while forming a formidable barrier for those posing an unacceptable risk. Regulatory initiatives for biotechnology-derived animals and their products should be able to ensure high standards for human and animal health, a sound scientific basis for evaluation; transparency and public involvement, and maintenance of genetic diversity. This review proposes a regulatory regime that is based on scientific risk based assessment and approval of products or by-products of biotechnology-derived animals and its application in context to Canadian regulations.

  4. Major cultural-compatibility complex: considerations on cross-cultural dissemination of patient safety programmes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heon-Jae; Pham, Julius C; Kim, Minji; Engineer, Cyrus; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-07-01

    As the importance of patient safety has been broadly acknowledged, various improvement programmes have been developed. Many of the programmes with proven efficacy have been disseminated internationally. However, some of those attempts may encounter unexpected cross-cultural obstacles and may fail to harvest the expected success. Each country has different cultural background that has shaped the behavior of the constituents for centuries. It is crucial to take into account these cultural differences in effectively disseminating these programmes. As an organ transplantation requires tissue-compatibility between the donor and the recipient, there needs to be compatibility between the country where the program was originally developed and the nation implementing the program. Though no detailed guidelines exist to predict success, small-scale pilot tests can help evaluate whether a safety programme will work in a new cultural environment. Furthermore, a pilot programme helps reveal the source of potential conflict, so we can modify the original programme accordingly to better suit the culture to which it is to be applied. In addition to programme protocols, information about the cultural context of the disseminated programme should be conveyed during dissemination. Original programme designers should work closely with partnering countries to ensure that modifications do not jeopardise the original intention of the programme. By following this approach, we might limit barriers originating from cultural differences and increase the likelihood of success in cross-cultural dissemination.

  5. Diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis by culture: safety considerations, traditional methods, and susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Deanna A

    2007-09-01

    The recovery of Coccidioides spp. by culture and confirmation utilizing the AccuProbe nucleic acid hybridization method by GenProbe remain the definitive diagnostic method. Biosafety considerations from specimen collection through culture confirmation in the mycology laboratory are critical, as acquisition of coccidioidomycosis by laboratory workers is well documented. The designation of Coccidioides spp. as select agents of potential bioterrorism has mandated strict regulation of their transport and inventory. The genus appears generally susceptible, in vitro, although no defined breakpoints exist. Susceptibility testing may assist in documenting treatment failures.

  6. Safety parameter considerations of anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Mark P; Truong, Dennis; Brownlow, Milene L; Wagner, Jessica A; McKinley, R Andy; Bikson, Marom; Jankord, Ryan

    2017-08-01

    A commonly referenced transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) safety threshold derives from tDCS lesion studies in the rat and relies on electrode current density (and related electrode charge density) to support clinical guidelines. Concerns about the role of polarity (e.g. anodal tDCS), sub-lesion threshold injury (e.g. neuroinflammatory processes), and role of electrode montage across rodent and human studies support further investigation into animal models of tDCS safety. Thirty-two anesthetized rats received anodal tDCS between 0 and 5mA for 60min through one of three epicranial electrode montages. Tissue damage was evaluated using hemotoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, Iba-1 immunohistochemistry, and computational brain current density modeling. Brain lesion occurred after anodal tDCS at and above 0.5mA using a 25.0mm(2) electrode (electrode current density: 20.0A/m(2)). Lesion initially occurred using smaller 10.6mm(2) or 5.3mm(2) electrodes at 0.25mA (23.5A/m(2)) and 0.5mA (94.2A/m(2)), respectively. Histological damage was correlated with computational brain current density predictions. Changes in microglial phenotype occurred in higher stimulation groups. Lesions were observed using anodal tDCS at an electrode current density of 20.0A/m(2), which is below the previously reported safety threshold of 142.9A/m(2) using cathodal tDCS. The lesion area is not simply predicted by electrode current density (and so not by charge density as duration was fixed); rather computational modeling suggests average brain current density as a better predictor for anodal tDCS. Nonetheless, under the assumption that rodent epicranial stimulation is a hypersensitive model, an electrode current density of 20.0A/m(2) represents a conservative threshold for clinical tDCS, which typically uses an electrode current density of 2A/m(2) when electrodes are placed on the skin (resulting in a lower brain current density). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Preventing and Investigating Horse-Related Human Injury and Fatality in Work and Non-Work Equestrian Environments: A Consideration of the Workplace Health and Safety Framework.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Meredith; Thompson, Kirrilly

    2016-05-06

    It has been suggested that one in five riders will be injured due to a fall from a horse, resulting in severe head or torso injuries. Attempts to reduce injury have primarily focussed on low level risk controls, such as helmets. In comparison, risk mitigation in high risk workplaces and sports is directed at more effective and preventative controls like training, consultation, safe work procedures, fit for purpose equipment and regular Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) monitoring. However, there has been no systematic consideration of the risk-reduction benefits of applying a WHS framework to reducing horse-related risks in workplaces, let alone competition or leisure contexts. In this article, we discuss the different dimensions of risk during human-horse interaction: the risk itself, animal, human and environmental factors and their combinations thereof. We consider the potential of the WHS framework as a tool for reducing (a) situation-specific hazards, and (b) the risks inherent in and arising from human-horse interactions. Whilst most-if not all-horses are unpredictable, the majority of horse-related injuries should be treated as preventable. The article concludes with a practical application of WHS to prevent horse-related injury by discussing effective evidence-based guidelines and regulatory monitoring for equestrian sectors. It suggests that the WHS framework has significant potential not only to reduce the occurrence and likelihood of horse-related human accident and injury, but to enable systematic accident analysis and investigation of horse-related adverse events.

  8. Criticality safety considerations in the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, B. F.; McNair, G. W.; Heaberlin, S. W.

    1980-05-01

    Features of geologic disposal which hamper the demonstration that criticality cannot occur therein include possible changes of shape and form, intrusion of water as a neutron moderator, and selective leaching of spent fuel constituents. If the criticality safety of spent fuels disposal depends on burnup, independent measurements verifying the burnup should be performed prior to disposal. The status of nondestructive analysis method which might provide such verification is discussed. Calculations were performed to assess the potential for increasing the allowed size of a spent fuel disposal canister if potential water intrusion were limited by close packing the enclosed rods. Several factors were identified which severely limited the potential of this application. The theoretical limit of hexagonal close packing cannot be achieved due to fuel rod bowing. It is concluded the disposal canisters should be sized on the basis of assumed optimum moderation.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) derived vectors: safety considerations and controversy over therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano; Claudio, Pier Paolo; Tonini, Tiziana; Giordano, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The latest generation of lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 is one of the most efficient tools for gene transduction of mammalian cells. However, the possible employment of HIV-based vectors in clinical trials is a very controversial issue, mainly due to safety and ethical concerns. HIV-1 is a lethal pathogenic agent, which induces AIDS. Genetic vectors must derive either from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans, or that eventually just cause mild illnesses. Patients exposed to HIV-based vectors will test seropositive to certain components of HIV-1. In addition, there might be other possible adverse effects in patients that cannot be predicted, as many aspects of the pathogenesis of AIDS have not been completely understood yet. On these grounds, it seems necessary to improve the design of other lentiviral vectors, which derive from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans and are distantly related to primate retroviridae.

  10. Safety considerations for use of bone-targeted agents in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Joanne E; Pal, Sumanta Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Bisphosphonates were the first bone-directed therapies used to treat skeletal complications resulting from malignant bone disease. Reducing the incidence of skeletal complications has significantly improved patient quality of life. Intravenous bisphosphonates also have been evaluated as an adjunct treatment to minimize bone loss from cancer therapy. In these settings, there is a suggested improvement in cancer-associated outcomes, in addition to their bone-protective benefits. Denosumab is a fully human antibody to the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand. Recently reported data suggest that denosumab is efficacious in decreasing skeletal-related events, but the long-term safety of denosumab remains to be determined. The available data for the approved intravenous bisphosphonates, including zoledronic acid, as well as for other investigational bone-directed therapies is reviewed, with a focus on the incidence and management of treatment-associated side effects.

  11. Posttherapy radiation safety considerations in radiomicrosphere treatment with 90Y-microspheres.

    PubMed

    Gulec, Seza A; Siegel, Jeffry A

    2007-12-01

    Radiomicrosphere treatment involves the intrahepatic arterial administration of (90)Y-resin or (90)Y-glass microspheres. The microspheres are biocompatible, but not biodegradable, and little to no (90)Y leaches from the microspheres. Without any bioelimination, the beta-dose delivery is generally confined to the liver. Although U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements permit patients treated with these microspheres to be released without the need for dose determination or patient instructions, there are important radiation safety issues that need scientific clarification. We carefully evaluated the radiation exposure mechanisms, including the bremsstrahlung radiation doses to others, for a variety of lifestyle behaviors. Dose estimates were also made for several practical and theoretic situations involving the patient's gonads, an embryo or fetus, and a nursing infant. For the infant, we evaluated the potential beta-dose that might be introduced via breast milk ingestion. The bremsstrahlung component of the decay scheme of the pure beta-emitter (90)Y has traditionally been ignored in internal and external dose calculations. Because the production of in vivo bremsstrahlung with the high-energy pure beta-particle-emitting radionuclides used for therapeutic purposes is sufficient to permit external detection and imaging, we believe that the contribution of such radiation should be considered with regard to patient release; we therefore chose to evaluate this potential external radiation hazard. In all cases, the estimated doses were very small, indicating that no patient restrictions are required for radiation safety purposes after the release of a patient who has been treated with (90)Y-microspheres.

  12. Review of naloxone safety for opioid overdose: practical considerations for new technology and expanded public access

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Opioid overdose and mortality have increased at an alarming rate prompting new public health initiatives to reduce drug poisoning. One initiative is to expand access to the opioid antidote naloxone. Naloxone has a long history of safe and effective use by organized healthcare systems and providers in the treatment of opioid overdose by paramedics/emergency medicine technicians, emergency medicine physicians and anesthesiologists. The safety of naloxone in a prehospital setting administered by nonhealthcare professionals has not been formally established but will likely parallel medically supervised experiences. Naloxone dose and route of administration can produce variable intensity of potential adverse reactions and opioid withdrawal symptoms: intravenous administration and higher doses produce more adverse events and more severe withdrawal symptoms in those individuals who are opioid dependent. More serious adverse reactions after naloxone administration occur rarely and may be confounded by the effects of other co-intoxicants and the effects of prolonged hypoxia. One component of the new opioid harm reduction initiative is to expand naloxone access to high-risk individuals (addicts, abusers, or patients taking high-dose or extended-release opioids for pain) and their close family or household contacts. Patients or their close contacts receive a naloxone prescription to have the medication on their person or in the home for use during an emergency. Contacts are trained on overdose recognition, rescue breathing and administration of naloxone by intramuscular injection or nasal spraying of the injection prior to the arrival of emergency medical personnel. The safety profile of naloxone in traditional medical use must be considered in this new context of outpatient prescribing, dispensing and treatment of overdose prior to paramedic arrival. New naloxone delivery products are being developed for this prehospital application of naloxone in treatment of opioid

  13. Safety is Everyone's Responsibility in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanssmann, Charles O.

    1980-01-01

    Pinpoints common areas of neglect in considering science safety. Familiar hazards are discussed, with special consideration of improper chemical storage, old and unlabeled chemicals, and faulty circuits and equipment. An appendix lists basic safety rules and presents a checklist for general laboratory safety. (CS)

  14. Hazards, Safety and Design Considerations for Commercial Lithium-ion Cells and Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the features of the Lithium-ion batteries, particularly in reference to the hazards and safety of the battery. Some of the characteristics of the Lithium-ion cell are: Highest Energy Density of Rechargeable Battery Chemistries, No metallic lithium, Leading edge technology, Contains flammable electrolyte, Charge cut-off voltage is critical (overcharge can result in fire), Open circuit voltage higher than metallic lithium anode types with similar organic electrolytes. Intercalation is a process that places small ions in crystal lattice. Small ions (such as lithium, sodium, and the other alkali metals) can fit in the interstitial spaces in a graphite lattice. These metallic ions can go farther and force the graphitic planes apart to fit two, three, or more layers of metallic ions between the carbon sheets. Other features of the battery/cell are: The graphite is conductive, Very high energy density compared to NiMH or NiCd, Corrosion of aluminum occurs very quickly in the presence of air and electrolyte due to the formation of HF from LiPF6 and HF is highly corrosive. Slides showing the Intercalation/Deintercalation and the chemical reactions are shown along with the typical charge/discharge for a cylindrical cell. There are several graphs that review the hazards of the cells.

  15. Radiation safety considerations for the parasitic Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Iverson, R.H.; Keller, L.P.

    1996-11-01

    A low intensity electron beam parasitic to the operation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has been transported through the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) facility making secondary test beams available for users. Photons generated in collimation of the SLC electron and positron beams in the linac pass through a splitter magnet that deflects the primary beams away from the linac axis into the SLC beam lines. These photons are converted to electrons and positrons in a secondary production target located down beam on the linac axis. The secondary electrons are then transported through the FFTB beam line onto experimental detectors. The average power of the parasitic beam is very low, thus, it presents no hazards. However, various accident scenarios involving failure of the splitter magnet and the active protection devices could send much more powerful SLC beams (up to 90 kilo-watts) into this zero-degree secondary beam line. For the accident cases, the average power in the transmitted beam was calculated using the Monte Carlo programs EGS4 and TURTLE. Results from analysis of the radiation protection systems that assure safety during the parasitic operation are presented.

  16. Targeted inhibition of the FGF19-FGFR4 pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma; translational safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Howard R

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death and new therapies are urgently required to treat this disease. Recent data suggest that the FGF19-FGFR4 axis may be a key driver in certain forms of HCC, making the pathway an interesting, emerging molecular target for potential therapeutic intervention. A complication is that, outside of malignant disease, FGFR4 plays an important physiological role in the regulation of hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. FGF19 signalling via FGFR4 suppresses de novo BA production in the liver, tightly maintaining hepatic and systemic levels of these detergent-like molecules at a physiological threshold and preventing pathological complications of raised BA levels, such as cholestatic liver injury and bile acid diarrhoea. In some cases of HCC, the malignant disease causes bile duct obstruction, preventing BA secretion from the liver and resulting in cholestasis. Here, the role of FGFR4 signalling in both HCC and BA homoeostasis is discussed. The potential effects of therapeutic FGF19-FGFR4 inhibition on human hepatobiliary/gastrointestinal physiology are considered along with the potential safety implications of FGF19-FGFR4 blockade in patients with HCC.

  17. Safety and Cost Considerations during the Introduction Period of Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, A; Mitra, S; Decruze, B; Macdonald, R; Kirwan, J

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare the safety, efficacy, and direct cost during the introduction of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy within an enhanced recovery pathway. Methods. A 1 : 1 single centre retrospective case control study of 36 propensity matched pairs of patients receiving open or laparoscopic surgery for early cervical cancer. Results. There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of the two cohorts. Open surgery cohort had significantly higher intraoperative blood loss (189 versus 934 mL) and longer postoperative hospital stay (2.3 versus 4.1 days). Although no significant difference in the intraoperative or postoperative complications was found more urinary tract injuries were recorded in the laparoscopic cohort. Laparoscopic surgery had significantly longer duration (206 versus 159 minutes), lower lymph node harvest (12.6 versus 16.9), and slower bladder function recovery. The median direct hospital cost was £4850 for laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and £4400 for open surgery. Conclusions. Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy can be safely introduced in an enhanced recovery environment without significant increase in perioperative morbidity. The 10% higher direct hospital cost is not statistically significant and is expected to even out when indirect costs are included.

  18. Safety and Cost Considerations during the Introduction Period of Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Decruze, B.; Macdonald, R.; Kirwan, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare the safety, efficacy, and direct cost during the introduction of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy within an enhanced recovery pathway. Methods. A 1 : 1 single centre retrospective case control study of 36 propensity matched pairs of patients receiving open or laparoscopic surgery for early cervical cancer. Results. There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of the two cohorts. Open surgery cohort had significantly higher intraoperative blood loss (189 versus 934 mL) and longer postoperative hospital stay (2.3 versus 4.1 days). Although no significant difference in the intraoperative or postoperative complications was found more urinary tract injuries were recorded in the laparoscopic cohort. Laparoscopic surgery had significantly longer duration (206 versus 159 minutes), lower lymph node harvest (12.6 versus 16.9), and slower bladder function recovery. The median direct hospital cost was £4850 for laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and £4400 for open surgery. Conclusions. Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy can be safely introduced in an enhanced recovery environment without significant increase in perioperative morbidity. The 10% higher direct hospital cost is not statistically significant and is expected to even out when indirect costs are included. PMID:28167964

  19. EEG in non-clinical drug safety assessments: Current and emerging considerations.

    PubMed

    Authier, Simon; Delatte, Marcus S; Kallman, Mary-Jeanne; Stevens, Joanne; Markgraf, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) data in nonclinical species can play a critical role in the successful evaluation of a compound during drug development, particularly in the evaluation of seizure potential and for monitoring changes in sleep. Yet, while non-invasive electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring is commonly included in preclinical safety studies, pre-dose or post-dose EEG assessments are not. Industry practices as they relate to preclinical seizure liability and sleep assessments are not well characterized and the extent of preclinical EEG testing varies between organizations. In the current paper, we discuss the various aspects of preclinical EEG to characterize drug-induced seizure risk and sleep disturbances, as well as describe the use of these data in a regulatory context. An overview of EEG technology-its correct application and its limitations, as well as best practices for setting up the animal models is presented. Sleep and seizure detection are discussed in detail. A regulatory perspective on the use of EEG data is provided and, tying together the previous topics is a discussion of the translational aspects of EEG. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Iron release from the Lucky Iron Fish®: safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gavin R; Dewey, Cate E; Summerlee, Alastair Js

    2017-01-01

    The principal objective was to explore in greater detail safety issues with regard to the use of the Lucky Iron Fish® (fish) as a treatment for iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia in women in rural Cambodia. Experiments were done to determine: (1) purity of the iron in the fish by mass spectroscopy; (2) release of iron and contaminants released during boiling in water using inductive-ly-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy; (3) the impact of cooking time, acidity and number of fish in acidified water and two types of Khmer soups; and (4) drinkability of the water after boiling with different num-bers of fish. The fish is composed primarily of ferrous iron with less than 12% non-ferrous iron. Contaminants were either not detectable or levels were below the acceptable standards set by the World Health Organization. The length of time boiling the fish and the acidity of the water increased iron release but even with 5 fish boiled for 60 minutes, iron levels only approached levels where side effects are observed. Boiling one fish in water did not affect the perception of colour, smell or taste of the water but boiling in water with two or more fish resulted in the water being unpalatable which further limits the potential for iron toxicity from using the fish. The results suggest that the Lucky Iron Fish™ may be a safe treatment for iron deficiency.

  1. PRB coal safety design considerations for new greenfield plants: an EPCC's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.H.

    2007-11-15

    The article reviews the design and safety aspects to consider in a new greenfield Powder River Basin (PRB) coal-fired power plant such as the 200 MW TS Power Plant (TSPP) in Nevada that Fluor is working on as an engineering, procurement and construction contractor (EPCC). PRB coals can become fragmented and form coal dust that is highly volatile and easily self-ignited. Coal handling systems incorporate features to minimise dust, such as totally enclosed chute works, 'spoon drops' to reduce impact turbulence, and overflow hoods. Conveyors have extended skirtboards and tight clearances between the wear plates and the belts. Storage piles are designed to have high compaction to deprive oxygen and dust suppression monitor hydrants to minimise dust and assist in compaction. The coal silo filling bay is designed to minimise dust once the coal is crushed, and attention is paid to cleaning and lighting. The silos are designed to ensure mass flow to the feeder and incorporate a carbon monoxide monitor and an F-500 fire suppressant. 3 photos.

  2. Preventing and Investigating Horse-Related Human Injury and Fatality in Work and Non-Work Equestrian Environments: A Consideration of the Workplace Health and Safety Framework

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Meredith; Thompson, Kirrilly

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Attempts to reduce horse-related injuries and fatalities to humans have mostly focused on personal protective equipment like helmets. In organizational contexts, such technical interventions are considered secondary to reducing the frequency and severity of accidents. In this article, we describe the Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) framework that has been associated with reduced risks in industries and organisations. We consider how such a framework could be used to reduce horse-related risks in workplaces, as well as non-work equestrian competition and leisure environments. In this article, we propose that the simplicity and concepts of the WHS framework can provide risk mitigation benefits to both work and non-work equine identities. Abstract It has been suggested that one in five riders will be injured due to a fall from a horse, resulting in severe head or torso injuries. Attempts to reduce injury have primarily focussed on low level risk controls, such as helmets. In comparison, risk mitigation in high risk workplaces and sports is directed at more effective and preventative controls like training, consultation, safe work procedures, fit for purpose equipment and regular Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) monitoring. However, there has been no systematic consideration of the risk-reduction benefits of applying a WHS framework to reducing horse-related risks in workplaces, let alone competition or leisure contexts. In this article, we discuss the different dimensions of risk during human–horse interaction: the risk itself, animal, human and environmental factors and their combinations thereof. We consider the potential of the WHS framework as a tool for reducing (a) situation-specific hazards, and (b) the risks inherent in and arising from human–horse interactions. Whilst most—if not all—horses are unpredictable, the majority of horse-related injuries should be treated as preventable. The article concludes with a practical application of

  3. Safety and Certification Considerations for Expanding the Use of UAS in Precision Agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Neogi, Natasha A.; Vertstynen, Harry A.

    2016-01-01

    The agricultural community is actively engaged in adopting new technologies such as unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) to help assess the condition of crops and develop appropriate treatment plans. In the United States, agricultural use of UAS has largely been limited to small UAS, generally weighing less than 55 lb and operating within the line of sight of a remote pilot. A variety of small UAS are being used to monitor and map crops, while only a few are being used to apply agricultural inputs based on the results of remote sensing. Larger UAS with substantial payload capacity could provide an option for site-specific application of agricultural inputs in a timely fashion, without substantive damage to the crops or soil. A recent study by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigated certification requirements needed to enable the use of larger UAS to support the precision agriculture industry. This paper provides a brief introduction to aircraft certification relevant to agricultural UAS, an overview of and results from the NASA study, and a discussion of how those results might affect the precision agriculture community. Specific topics of interest include business model considerations for unmanned aerial applicators and a comparison with current means of variable rate application. The intent of the paper is to inform the precision agriculture community of evolving technologies that will enable broader use of unmanned vehicles to reduce costs, reduce environmental impacts, and enhance yield, especially for specialty crops that are grown on small to medium size farms.

  4. New versus established drugs in venous thromboprophylaxis: efficacy and safety considerations related to timing of administration.

    PubMed

    Tribout, Bruno; Colin-Mercier, Florence

    2007-01-01

    European surgeons generally administer thromboprophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) at high doses 12 hours preoperatively in response to findings that surgery-related deep-vein thrombosis typically originates at the time of major orthopedic surgery or shortly afterwards. North American surgeons, in contrast, generally administer LMWHs at an almost 50% higher dose than that given in Europe 12-24 hours postoperatively, even though both pre- and postoperative administration are considered suitable in current guidelines. This review therefore examines how close to major orthopedic surgery thromboprophylaxis is administered, and the subsequent effect of timing on clinically relevant efficacy and safety parameters. The trials examined involve fondaparinux sodium (fondaparinux) and (xi)melagatran, in comparison with the established LMWHs enoxaparin sodium (enoxaparin) and dalteparin. In key trials, fondaparinux reduced the risk of asymptomatic and clinical venous thromboembolism (VTE) by 55% compared with enoxaparin, at the expense of a 1.6-fold higher risk of bleeding. While the studies were not designed to compare efficacy endpoints based on clinical outcomes, no significant difference was demonstrated for symptomatic VTE. The fact that the enoxaparin regimen was started at the upper limits of its recommended initiation timeframe may have significantly influenced the results of comparative studies, given that several meta-analyses found that the timing of LMWH initiation significantly influenced its effectiveness on asymptomatic VTE and major bleedings. Compared with once-daily LMWH in European trials, early postoperative doses/regimens of twice-daily (xi)melagatran did not increase severe bleeding and was significantly less effective at preventing asymptomatic total VTE in patients who had undergone total hip-replacement surgery. When used according to the 'knife-to-skin' protocol, the melagatran regimen was superior to enoxaparin in preventing major

  5. Surgical considerations and safety of cochlear implantation in otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Cevizci, Rasit; Dilci, Alper; Celenk, Fatih; Karamert, Recep; Bayazit, Yildirim

    2017-07-26

    To evaluate the effects of otitis media with effusion on surgical parameters, patient safety, perioperative and postoperative complications. Total 890 children who underwent cochlear implantation between 2006 and 2015 were included. The ages ranged from 12 months to 63 months (mean: 32 months). The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of otitis media with effusion; otitis media with effusion group and non-otitis media group. Of 890 children, 105 had otitis media with effusion prior to surgery. In non-otitis media with group, there were 785 children. The average duration of surgery was 60min (ranged from 28 to 75min) in non-otitis media group, and 90min (ranged from 50 to 135min) in otitis media with effusion group (p<0.05). Granulation tissue and edematous middle ear and mastoid mucosa were observed in all cases of otitis media with effusion during the surgery. There was no significant difference between the complications of groups with or without otitis media with effusion (p>0.05). In 5 of 105 patients, there was a ventilation tube inserted before cochlear implantation, which did not change the outcome of implantation. There is no need for surgical treatment for otitis media with effusion before implantation since otitis media with effusion does not increase the risks associated with cochlear implantation. Operation duration is longer in the presence of otitis media with effusion. However, otitis media with effusion leads to intraoperative difficulties like longer operation duration, bleeding, visualization of the round window membrane, cleansing the middle ear granulations as well as mastoid and petrous air cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunoadsorption (IAS) as a rescue therapy in SLE: considerations on safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Stummvoll, Georg H; Aringer, Martin; Jansen, Martin; Smolen, Josef S; Derfler, Kurt; Graninger, Winfried B

    2004-11-30

    In SLE, extracorporeal procedures aiming at reduction of immunoglobulin (Ig) and immune complexes (IC) are used as a rescue therapy. Plasma exchange (PE) has not been proven overall effective in SLE, and long-term treatment in particular has been associated with severe bacterial and viral infections. Immunoadsorption (IAS), in contrast, selectively removes Ig and IC and may thus be safer. We therefore investigated the rate of infections in SLE patients who were undergoing long-term IAS. 16 SLE patients were treated with > or = 10 courses of IAS, and nine patients with highly active disease received pulse cyclophosphamide (IVCP) therapy in parallel. We retrospectively analysed the records of all these patients for the occurrence of infections. Patients receiving IAS therapy plus IVCP were compared with 25 patients with similarly active disease treated with standard IVCP therapy within the same observation period. Patients receiving IAS without additional IVCP were compared with patients with similarly moderate disease activity receiving neither IAS nor IVCP. No potentially life-threatening viral infection occurred in IAS-treated patients and episodes of herpes zoster were equally distributed. No severe infection was observed during IAS without concomittant cyclophosphamide. As expected, more patients with highly active disease receiving IVCP experienced infections than those with less active disease (16 of 34 [47%] vs. 2 of 22 [9%], p < 0.04). On comparing the two groups with highly active disease, infections were similar (IAS+IVCP: 3 of 9 patients [33%], IVCP only: 5 of 25 [20%]), but one patient receiving IAS+IVCP died of septicaemia. Disease activity significantly decreased in both groups treated with IAS. IAS has an acceptable safety profile with regard to severe infections and appears safe with regard to severe viral disease. Highly active disease and IVCP therapy increase the risk of severe infections in SLE.

  7. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your...

  8. Technical Basis for Environmental Qualification of Microprocessor-Based Safety-Related Equipment in Nuclear Power Plants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    welding equipment, contact arcing, switching on heavy inductive loads, or spurious emissions from other electronic equipment. An electric equipment fire...1985, pp. 901-905. 14. M. Murtuza et. al, "Flux Penetration and Pressure Cooker Fail Mechanism in Plastic IC Packages," Proc. 36th Electronic

  9. Evaluation of Daptomycin Exposure and Efficacy and Safety Endpoints To Support Risk-versus-Benefit Considerations.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, Sujata M; Ambrose, Paul G; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Rubino, Christopher M; Drusano, George L

    2015-12-28

    The choice of an antimicrobial agent must balance optimization of efficacy endpoints with the minimization of safety events. The risk versus benefit of daptomycin for patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with or without infective endocarditis receiving daptomycin at 6, 8, and 10 mg/kg of body weight/day was assessed. The relationships between the area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h (AUC)/MIC ratio and both clinical response and time to decreased susceptibility were evaluated using data from patients with such infections who received daptomycin at 6 mg/kg/day. Using these relationships, plus the previously identified relationship between the minimum concentration and an elevation in the creatine phosphokinase (CPK) concentration (CPK elevation) (S. M. Bhavnani, C. M. Rubino, P. G. Ambrose, and G. L. Drusano, Clin Infect Dis 50:1568-1574, 2010) and Monte Carlo simulation, the probability of each outcome by MIC for daptomycin at 6, 8, and 10 mg/kg/day was calculated. The function for exposure-response relationships for clinical response (P = 0.06) and time to decreased susceptibility (P = 0.01) resembled U and inverted U shapes, respectively. Multivariable analyses demonstrated AUC/MIC ratio, creatinine clearance, albumin concentration, and disease category to be predictors of clinical response. The results of simulations failed to demonstrate large improvements in the probabilities of clinical success among cohorts of simulated patients defined by the above-described predictive factors or the probability of decreased susceptibility at 30 days when the daptomycin dose was increased from 6 to 10 mg/kg/day. The probability of CPK elevation increased from 0.073 to 0.156 over this dose range. These data can be used to inform risk-versus-benefit decisions for daptomycin dose selection in patients with S. aureus bacteremia with or without infective endocarditis. The risk of CPK elevation, which is reversible, should be weighed in the context of the

  10. Inhaled corticosteroids in children with asthma: pharmacologic determinants of safety and efficacy and other clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Gulliver, Tanya; Morton, Ronald; Eid, Nemr

    2007-01-01

    The role of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in the treatment of childhood asthma has been well established. An ideal corticosteroid should demonstrate high pulmonary deposition and residency time, in addition to a low systemic bioavailability and rapid systemic clearance. The lung depositions of the ICS have been compared, with beclomethasone (beclometasone)-hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) and ciclesonide showing the highest lung deposition. Lung deposition is influenced by not only the inhalation device and type of propellant (HFA or chlorofluorocarbon), but also by whether the aerosol is a solution or suspension, and the particle size of the respirable fraction. Pulmonary residency time increases when budesonide and des-ciclesonide undergo reversible fatty acid esterification. The bioavailability of the drug depends on the oral bioavailable fraction and the amount absorbed directly from the pulmonary vasculature. The clearance rate of des-ciclesonide is very high (228 L/h), increasing its safety profile by utilizing extra-hepatic clearance mechanisms. Both des-ciclesonide and mometasone have a high protein binding fraction (98-99%). The volume of distribution (Vd) is proportional to the lipophilicity of the drug, with the Vd of fluticasone being 332L compared with 183L for budesonide. Increasing the Vd will also increase the elimination half-life of a drug. The pharmacodynamics of ICS depend on both the receptor binding affinity and the dose-response curve. Among the ICS, fluticasone and mometasone have the highest receptor binding affinity (1800 and 2200, respectively), followed by budesonide at 935 (relative to dexamethasone = 100). Compared with other nonsteroid asthma medications (long-acting beta-agonists, theophylline, and montelukast) ICS have proven superiority in improving lung function, symptom-free days, and inflammatory markers. One study suggests that early intervention with ICS reduces the loss in lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) over 3

  11. Minimum Equipment Lists, Flight Rules and ... Past, Present and Future of Safety Pre-Determined Decisions for Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herd, A.; Wolff, M.

    2012-01-01

    Extended mission operations, such as human spaceflight to Mars provide an opportunity for take current human exploration beyond Low Earth Orbit, such as the operations undertaken on the International Space Station (ISS). This opportunity also presents a challenge in terms of extending what we currently understand as "remote operations" performed on ISS, offering learning beyond that gained from the successful moon- lander expeditions. As such there is a need to assess how the existing operations concept of ground support teams directing (and supporting) on-orbit ISS operations can be applied in the extended mission concept. The current mission support concept involves three interacting operations products - a short term plan, crew procedures and flight rules. Flight rules (for ISS operations) currently provide overall planning, engineering and operations constraints (including those derived from a safety perspective) in the form of a rule book. This paper will focus specifically on flight rules, and describe the current use of them, and assess the future role of flight rules to support exploration, including the deployment of decision support tools (DSTs) to ensure flight rule compliancy for missions with minimal ground support. Taking consideration of the historical development of pre-planned decisions, and their manifestation within the operations environment, combined with the extended remoteness of human exploration missions, we will propose a future development of this product and a platform on which it could be presented.

  12. Twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 3, structural and seismic engineering, primary systems integrity, equipment operability and aging, ECCS strainer blockage research and regulatory issues

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1996-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty- Third Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23-25, 1995. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. This document, Volume 3, presents topics in Structural & Seismic Engineering, Primary Systems Integrity, Equipment Operability and Aging, and ECCS Strainer Blockage Research & Regulatory Issues. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  13. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your Application for...

  14. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your Application for...

  15. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your Application for...

  16. 30 CFR 250.807 - Additional requirements for subsurface safety valves and related equipment installed in high...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... valves and related equipment installed in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. 250.807... pressure high temperature (HPHT) environments. (a) If you plan to install SSSVs and related equipment in an HPHT environment, you must submit detailed information with your Application for Permit to Drill (APD...

  17. Safety Considerations for Medical Staff and Patients Who Fly Over Water in a Helicopter for Work or Recreation.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Christopher J; MacDonald, Conor V

    2017-04-01

    Around 25% of people involved in a helicopter accident in water do not survive. From time to time, physicians and their medical staff are required to fly over water in a helicopter to attend one or more seriously ill patients. Many will have had little or no experience of the issues involved if the helicopter has an accident in the water. Also as Family Practitioners, Aeromedical Examiners, and Flight Surgeons, they are asked to provide advice to patients, travel agents, and airline booking agents about whether an overwater helicopter flight is advisable or not. From 50 yr of helicopter accident evidence in the scientific literature, government agency reports, and statistics from the military safety centers and the offshore oil industry, the critical hazards involved and risks to medical staff and their patients have been identified. Patients most at risk are those who suffer from cardiovascular or respiratory disease, have physical disabilities, have a very large body size, and anyone who is a non-swimmer. Medical staff are at risk if they are not familiar with the procedure for escape from a flooded inverted cabin and difficulties after escape from the fuselage with life jackets, life rafts, and sometimes the necessity to swim ashore. With 50 yr of hindsight, many of the deaths were preventable, and many lives can be saved if a series of very simple mental and physical preventive actions are taken by anyone stepping on to a helicopter that flies over water.Brooks CJ, MacDonald CV. Safety considerations for medical staff and patients who fly over water in a helicopter for work or recreation. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):413-417.

  18. Difficulty Using Smart Pump Logs to Recreate a Patient Safety Event: Case Study and Considerations for Pump Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Ibey, Andrew A M; Andrews, Derek; Ferreira, Barb

    2016-12-01

    The authors present a case in which a physical anomaly with an infusion pump resulted in an unforeseen fault that the nurse's attempts to resolve unknowingly exacerbated. This case study presents the first report in the literature to detail the difficulty in recreating a patient safety event using smart pump logs, support server continuous quality improvement (CQI) data, and the drug order entry system to elucidate the clinical scenario. A 75-year-old male patient presented to a major teaching hospital and was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with a massive gastrointestinal bleed and myocardial infarction, then stabilized. One of the patient's pumps alarmed "communication error" on the display. The display gave no explicit instructions about how to resolve the issue, and resolution was not intuitive. Attempts to clear the alarm failed, so the module was disconnected to reprogram the infusion, causing an interruption in the dopamine. Over the course of approximately 2 min of troubleshooting, the patient's blood pressure decreased from 109/50 to 60/30, with a rapid pulse change from a consistent 95 up to 115 and subsequently 135 beats per minute. A cardiac arrest ensued and a code blue was called. All cardiac drugs, including the dopamine, were suspended during the code. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed and the patient survived the code. Post-code, the dopamine and epinephrine were restarted, and the norepinephrine was discontinued. The patient's condition remained very unstable. Pump logs and the server database were queried to locate relevant equipment. It was concluded that dirty contacts on the inter-unit interface (IUI) connectors between the PC unit (PCU) and the modules caused the alarm message "communication error" to appear on the PCU display. Learning yielded a nursing practice alert to clarify how a nurse should resolve a "communication error", and appropriate cleaning protocols were promptly implemented. The investigation found smart

  19. Improving eye safety in citrus harvest crews through the acceptance of personal protective equipment, community-based participatory research, social marketing, and community health workers.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Aguilar, J Antonio; Monaghan, Paul F; Bryant, Carol A; Esposito, Andrew; Wade, Mark; Ruiz, Omar; McDermott, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    For the last 10 years, the Partnership for Citrus Workers Health (PCWH) has been an evidence-based intervention program that promotes the adoption of protective eye safety equipment among Spanish-speaking farmworkers of Florida. At the root of this program is the systematic use of community-based preventive marketing (CBPM) and the training of community health workers (CHWs) among citrus harvester using popular education. CBPM is a model that combines the organizational system of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and the strategies of social marketing. This particular program relied on formative research data using a mixed-methods approach and a multilevel stakeholder analysis that allowed for rapid dissemination, effective increase of personal protective equipment (PPE) usage, and a subsequent impact on adoptive workers and companies. Focus groups, face-to-face interviews, surveys, participant observation, Greco-Latin square, and quasi-experimental tests were implemented. A 20-hour popular education training produced CHWs that translated results of the formative research to potential adopters and also provided first aid skills for eye injuries. Reduction of injuries is not limited to the use of safety glasses, but also to the adoption of timely intervention and regular eye hygiene. Limitations include adoption in only large companies, rapid decline of eye safety glasses without consistent intervention, technological limitations of glasses, and thorough cost-benefit analysis.

  20. Results of an Analysis of Field Studies of the Intrinsic Dynamic Characteristics Important for the Safety of Nuclear Power Plant Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaznovsky, A. P. Kasiyanov, K. G.; Ryasnyj, S. I.

    2015-01-15

    A classification of the equipment important for the safety of nuclear power plants is proposed in terms of its dynamic behavior under seismic loading. An extended bank of data from dynamic tests over the entire range of thermal and mechanical equipment in generating units with VVER-1000 and RBMK-1000 reactors is analyzed. Results are presented from a study of the statistical behavior of the distribution of vibrational frequencies and damping decrements with the “small perturbation” factor that affects the measured damping decrements taken into account. A need to adjust the regulatory specifications for choosing the values of the damping decrements with specified inertial loads on equipment owing to seismic effects during design calculations is identified. Minimum values of the decrements are determined and proposed for all types of equipment as functions of the directions and natural vibration frequencies of the dynamic interactions to be adopted as conservative standard values in the absence of actual experimental data in the course of design studies of seismic resistance.

  1. Home Safe Home: Appliances, Tools, and Small Equipment. Proceed with Caution: Consumer Safety in the Home, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Consumer and Commercial Affairs, Regina.

    Many accidents in the home are caused by faulty, defective or improperly designed tools, appliances, and equipment. Government, non-governmental organizations, and industries cooperate to develop and implement standards for the safe design and manufacture of consumer products. This booklet provides information to help consumers select products,…

  2. Home Safe Home: Appliances, Tools, and Small Equipment. Proceed with Caution: Consumer Safety in the Home, III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Consumer and Commercial Affairs, Regina.

    Many accidents in the home are caused by faulty, defective or improperly designed tools, appliances, and equipment. Government, non-governmental organizations, and industries cooperate to develop and implement standards for the safe design and manufacture of consumer products. This booklet provides information to help consumers select products,…

  3. Safety and Health Evaluation - Command, Control Communication, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance, and Electronic Warfare Equipment. Change 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-25

    hazards. Examples include mounting bracket, rack , and fixture adequacy; routing and size of cabling, power sufficiency and circuit protection to include...79. Where pins or latches are applied during equipment stowage , transportation or maintenance to secure moveable components (such as motorized

  4. Association between workplace and housing conditions and use of pesticide safety practices and personal protective equipment among North Carolina farmworkers in 2010.

    PubMed

    Levesque, D L; Arif, A A; Shen, J

    2012-04-01

    There are inconsistencies about the effects of farmworker housing and workplace conditions and use of self-protective behavior practices and personal protective equipment (PPE). To investigate the association between workplace and housing conditions and farmworker use of pesticide safety practices and PPE. This study was conducted in 4 counties in North Carolina, USA, from July to October, 2010, during the agricultural growing season. Farmworkers working in agriculture aged 18 to 62 (n = 187) were administered a structured questionnaire to collect self-reported measures on housing and workplace conditions. Use of pesticide safety and PPE were examined by asking questions about wearing gloves, wearing socks, and wearing a hat. Chi-square and multiple logistic regression analyses were used for statistical analyses. Farmworkers reporting availability of enough hot and cold water for bathing and doing laundry were 13.6 times more likely to use pesticide safety practices (adjusted OR: 13.6, 95% CI: 1.4-135.4), whereas, those who reported that soap for handwashing was always or usually available while doing agricultural work were 7.8 times more likely to use pesticide safety practices (adjusted OR: 7.8, 95% CI: 3.3-18.5). Farmworkers that reported access to water to wash their hands with while performing agricultural work were more likely to use PPE (adjusted OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.3-9.2). Some migrant farmworker labor camps are not supplying acceptable housing conditions such as 1 handwashing sink per 6 people (n = 10, 5.4%). Use of pesticide safety practices and PPE is greater when farmers provide decontamination supplies. Improvement of housing and workplace conditions are crucial to increase use of pesticide safety practices and PPE.

  5. Considerations when collecting coal dust

    SciTech Connect

    Olechiw, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    There are several applications in the handling of coal in which capturing coal dust is important. They are in pulverizing operations at belt conveyor transfer points and pneumatic conveying receivers. In each case the processing and handling of coal generates considerable dust which is suspended in the air. Health and safety, environmental considerations and good housekeeping practices dictate that the suspended coal dust be captured, contained and transferred for re-use or disposal. It is no longer acceptable practice to expose operating personnel to breathing dust (OSSA regulations). In addition particulate emissions are being more closely regulated both in total mass and particle size (PM-10 legislation). In general dusty environments reduce the efficiency of operating equipment by fouling bearings and rollers, increasing friction, clogging air filters and increasing wear and tear on equipment and energy costs. Of paramount concern is the fact that spontaneous combustion can occur where coal dust accumulates on horizontal surfaces.

  6. [Prevention of medical device-related adverse events in hospitals: Specifying the recommendations of the German Coalition for Patient Safety (APS) for users and operators of anaesthesia equipment].

    PubMed

    Bohnet-Joschko, Sabine; Zippel, Claus; Siebert, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    The use and organisation of medical technology has an important role to play for patient and user safety in anaesthesia. Specification of the recommendations of the German Coalition for Patient Safety (APS) for users and operators of anaesthesia equipment, explore opportunities and challenges for the safe use and organisation of anaesthesia devices. We conducted a literature search in Medline/PubMed for studies dealing with the APS recommendations for the prevention of medical device-related risks in the context of anaesthesia. In addition, we performed an internet search for reports and recommendations focusing on the use and organisation of medical devices in anaesthesia. Identified studies were grouped and assigned to the recommendations. The division into users and operators was maintained. Instruction and training in anaesthesia machines is sometimes of minor importance. Failure to perform functional testing seems to be a common cause of critical incidents in anaesthesia. There is a potential for reporting to the federal authority. Starting points for the safe operation of anaesthetic devices can be identified, in particular, at the interface of staff, organisation, and (anaesthesia) technology. The APS recommendations provide valuable information on promoting the safe use of medical devices and organisation in anaesthesia. The focus will be on risks relating to the application as well as on principles and materials for the safe operation of anaesthesia equipment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of...

  8. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of this...

  9. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of this...

  10. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of this...

  11. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of this...

  12. Should ICSI be the treatment of choice for all cases of in-vitro conception? Considerations of fertilization and embryo development, cost effectiveness and safety.

    PubMed

    Ola, B; Afnan, M; Sharif, K; Papaioannou, S; Hammadieh, N; Barratt, C L

    2001-12-01

    There is now considerable discussion whether intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) should be used in all cases of IVF. A critical and balanced view of the current literature is presented. The difficult question is how to identify men with apparently normal semen who are likely to fail to achieve a pregnancy using IVF. In conclusion, from both the safety and scientific viewpoint, ICSI should only be used in cases where success at IVF is regarded as unlikely.

  13. Nuclear safety considerations in the conceptual design of a fast reactor for space electric power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, T.-M.; Koenig, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Some nuclear safety aspects of a 3.2 mWt heat pipe cooled fast reactor with out-of-core thermionic converters are discussed. Safety related characteristics of the design including a thin layer of B4C surrounding the core, the use of heat pipes and BeO reflector assembly, the elimination of fuel element bowing, etc., are highlighted. Potential supercriticality hazards and countermeasures are considered. Impacts of some safety guidelines of space transportation system are also briefly discussed, since the currently developing space shuttle would be used as the primary launch vehicle for the nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft.

  14. Picture This... Safety, Dignity, and Voice-Ethical Research with Children: Practical Considerations for the Reflexive Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Shanon K.; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne

    2013-01-01

    While engaged in a research project involving the use of visual methods with children, the authors discovered that there are many ethical considerations beyond what could have been predicted at the outset. Some of these considerations are important with respect to research with children in general, while others arise more particularly when using…

  15. Injury Surveillance and Safety Considerations for Large-Format Lead-Acid Batteries Used in Mining Applications.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Miguel Angel; Novak, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Large lead-acid batteries are predominantly used throughout the mining industry to power haulage, utility, and personnel-carrier vehicles. Without proper operation and maintenance, the use of these batteries can introduce mechanical and electrical hazards, particularly in the confined, and potentially dangerous, environment of an underground coal mine. A review of the Mine Safety and Health Administration accident/illness/injury database reveals that a significant number of injuries occur during the maintenance and repair of lead-acid batteries. These injuries include burns from electrical arcing and acid exposure, as well as strained muscles and crushed hands. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health investigated the design and implementation of these batteries to identify safety interventions that can mitigate these inherent hazards. This paper promotes practical design modifications, such as reducing the size and weight of battery assembly lids in conjunction with lift assists, as well as using five-pole cable connectors to improve safety.

  16. Injury Surveillance and Safety Considerations for Large-Format Lead-Acid Batteries Used in Mining Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Miguel Angel; Novak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Large lead-acid batteries are predominantly used throughout the mining industry to power haulage, utility, and personnel-carrier vehicles. Without proper operation and maintenance, the use of these batteries can introduce mechanical and electrical hazards, particularly in the confined, and potentially dangerous, environment of an underground coal mine. A review of the Mine Safety and Health Administration accident/illness/injury database reveals that a significant number of injuries occur during the maintenance and repair of lead-acid batteries. These injuries include burns from electrical arcing and acid exposure, as well as strained muscles and crushed hands. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health investigated the design and implementation of these batteries to identify safety interventions that can mitigate these inherent hazards. This paper promotes practical design modifications, such as reducing the size and weight of battery assembly lids in conjunction with lift assists, as well as using five-pole cable connectors to improve safety. PMID:27784953

  17. Safety of high speed ground transportation systems. High speed passenger trains in freight railroad corridors: Operations and safety considerations. Final report, September 1993-April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ullman, K.B.; Bing, A.J.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of a study into some operations and technical issues likely to be encountered when planning for high-speed rail passenger service on corridors that presently carry freight or commuter traffic. The study starts with a review of corridors designated under Section 1010 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991, a potential future high-speed corridors. After a review of signal, train control and braking systems presently used in the United States and elsewhere, the study provides analyses of the safety and operations impacts of introducing high-speed rail service on the hypothetical corridor. The safety analysis established a safety performance target based on present intercity rail safety performance, and reviewed the need for and benefits from safety improvements for high speed operation. The operations analysis concentrated on the impacts on track capacity and train delays of introducing a high-speed rail service on three hypothetical existing corridors with different track layouts and signal systems.

  18. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    D. Blanchard; R. Youngblood

    2012-04-01

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  19. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    R. Youngblood; D. Blanchard

    2011-09-01

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  20. Safety assessment considerations for food and feed derived from plants with genetic modifications that modulate endogenous gene expression and pathways.

    PubMed

    Kier, Larry D; Petrick, Jay S

    2008-08-01

    The current globally recognized comparative food and feed safety assessment paradigm for biotechnology-derived crops is a robust and comprehensive approach for evaluating the safety of both the inserted gene product and the resulting crop. Incorporating many basic concepts from food safety, toxicology, nutrition, molecular biology, and plant breeding, this approach has been used effectively by scientists and regulatory agencies for 10-15 years. Current and future challenges in agriculture include the need for improved yields, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and improved nutrition. The next generation of biotechnology-derived crops may utilize regulatory proteins, such as transcription factors that modulate gene expression and/or endogenous plant pathways. In this review, we discuss the applicability of the current safety assessment paradigm to biotechnology-derived crops developed using modifications involving regulatory proteins. The growing literature describing the molecular biology underlying plant domestication and conventional breeding demonstrates the naturally occurring genetic variation found in plants, including significant variation in the classes, expression, and activity of regulatory proteins. Specific examples of plant modifications involving insertion or altered expression of regulatory proteins are discussed as illustrative case studies supporting the conclusion that the current comparative safety assessment process is appropriate for these types of biotechnology-developed crops.

  1. A study of passive safety features by utilizing intra-subassembly-equipped self-actuated shutdown mechanism for future large fast breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Uto, N.; Niwa, H.; Ieda, Y.; Satoh, K.

    1996-08-01

    Passive prevention of core disruptive accidents (CDAs) is desired in terms of enhancement of safety for future fast breeder reactors. In addition, mitigation of CDA`s consequences should be required because mitigation measures have a potential of applying to all accidents, while prevention measures are prepared for specific accident initiators. In this paper, the Intra-Subassembly-equipped Self-Actuated Shutdown System (IS-SASS) , which is considered effective on passive prevention and mitigation of CDAs, is described. The IS-SASS is introduced in a fuel subassembly and consists of absorber materials at the top of the active core and an inner duct through which molten fuel can be excluded out of the core. The determination of the appropriate number of the IS-SASS units, their arrangement in the core and their suitable structure are found to be suited to prevention and mitigation of CDAs for liquid metal-cooled large fast breeder reactors.

  2. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Cryogenic and Safety Considerations for Moving the South End Cap Calorimeter to the Sidewalk

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1996-09-25

    The south end cap calorimeter (ECS) will need to be moved off of the detector platform to allow for the installation of new central tracking components. This engineering note documents the cryogenic and safety issues associated with the planned move. Because of the difficulty involved in building a temporary vent line out of the building, we plan to vent the ECS condenser flow, 6 scfm N2 into the assembly hall atmosphere. Information contained herein proves that this is safe even for failure/relief conditions. The details regarding the cryogenic and safety aspects of the ECS move have been thought out and planned. The cryogenic operation of the ECS calorimeter will be limited to maintaining it's pressure by keeping it cold and isolated while it is in it's temporary position off the platform. The 4 gph liquid nitrogen flow required for this operation is easily absorbed into the DZero assembly building atmosphere without any safety concerns. Emergency or failure scenarios have been addressed on a conservative basis and also pose little threat. Other safety features built into the system such as the liquid nitrogen excess flow switch, vent line liquid sensor, and monitored ODH heads provide additional assurance that an unexpected hazard would be identified and contained.

  3. Administrative and private searches for smoking articles conducted pursuant to the federal mine safety and health act: Constitutional considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D.J.; McCambley, M.E.

    1995-11-01

    Searches conducted to detect the presence of smoking articles are required to fulfill the legitimate, administrative objectives that underlie the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. Consequently, such searches may be conducted by government mine safety enforcement officials without benefit of either a warrant based upon probable cause or an administrative warrant. The authority to conduct warrantless administrative searches on mine property is limited by FMSHA, however, and MSHA must either comply with the administrative substitutes for a warrant set forth in that Act or obtain an administrative warrant before entering onto a mine-operator`s property for purposes of conducting a search for smoking articles. Once mine safety enforcement officials properly gain entry onto mine property, no further warrants are required to conduct searches of individual miners. Miners who choose to work in underground mines are put on notice, by the FMSHA, MSHA regulations, and the training they receive, that they will be subject to searches for smoking articles. Thus, miners have no reasonable expectation that they will be free from the type of pat-down and personal effects searches used to detect the presence of smoking articles. The Fourth amendment is simply not implicated by such searches. This is true even though the legislative scheme designed to enhance mine safety imposes criminal as well as civil penalties on miners found with smoking articles.

  4. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  5. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  6. Diagnostic radiology in the tropics: technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; McLean, Ian Donald

    2011-11-01

    An estimated two thirds of the world's population is currently without access to diagnostic radiology services, and most of them live in resource-limited tropical regions with harsh environments. Most patients are diagnosed and treated in poorly equipped government-funded hospitals and clinics that have insufficiently trained staff and are barely operational. Any available imaging equipment is likely to be functioning suboptimally and be poorly maintained. The root of the problem is usually a lack of know-how and a quality culture, combined with insufficient basic equipment and infrastructure. Radiological imaging is an essential aspect of primary care and used in the critical diagnosis and management of trauma, tuberculosis, pneumonia, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, cancer, and other respiratory and abdominal diseases. Considerations such as quality management and infrastructure, personnel, equipment, and radiation protection and safety are important to ensure the proper functioning and rational use of a diagnostic radiology facility in the tropics.

  7. Genetic modification of hematopoietic cells using retroviral and lentiviral vectors: safety considerations for vector design and delivery into target cells.

    PubMed

    Dropulic, Boro

    2005-07-01

    The recent development of leukemia in three patients following retroviral vector gene transfer in hematopoietic stem cells, resulting in the death of one patient, has raised safety concerns for the use of integrating gene transfer vectors for human gene therapy. This review discusses these serious adverse events from the perspective of whether restrictions on vector design and vector-modified target cells are warranted at this time. A case is made against presently establishing specific restrictions for vector design and transduced cells; rather, their safety should be ascertained by empiric evaluation in appropriate preclinical models on a case-by-case basis. Such preclinical data, coupled with proper informed patient consent and a risk-benefit ratio analysis, provide the best available prospective evaluation of gene transfer vectors prior to their translation into the clinic.

  8. Nuclear safety considerations for the design of a shuttle launched 500 to 2000 watt isotope Brayton power system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garate, J. A.; Gorland, S. H.

    1973-01-01

    An extensive study was conducted to evaluate the safety requirements for the design of a heat source assembly for use in a shuttle launched, isotope Brayton electric power system for the 500-W(e) to 2 kWe range. The assembly is a self-contained package which supplies heat to a power conversion system. A typical mission profile for a shuttle launched, earth orbital mission was assumed. Critical mission accidents were identified and evaluated to determine their impact upon the design of the Heat Source Assembly. Earth-orbital decay reentry analyses were performed to demonstrate survivability of the heat source. Safety design requirements were developed to ensure survivability under credible accident conditions including loss of the power conversion system in orbit.

  9. Safety, ethical considerations, and application guidelines for the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation in clinical practice and research☆

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Simone; Hallett, Mark; Rossini, Paolo M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a consensus conference, which took place in Certosa di Pontignano, Siena (Italy) on March 7–9, 2008, intended to update the previous safety guidelines for the application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in research and clinical settings. Over the past decade the scientific and medical community has had the opportunity to evaluate the safety record of research studies and clinical applications of TMS and repetitive TMS (rTMS). In these years the number of applications of conventional TMS has grown impressively, new paradigms of stimulation have been developed (e.g., patterned repetitive TMS) and technical advances have led to new device designs and to the real-time integration of TMS with electroencephalography (EEG), positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thousands of healthy subjects and patients with various neurological and psychiatric diseases have undergone TMS allowing a better assessment of relative risks. The occurrence of seizures (i.e., the most serious TMS-related acute adverse effect) has been extremely rare, with most of the few new cases receiving rTMS exceeding previous guidelines, often in patients under treatment with drugs which potentially lower the seizure threshold. The present updated guidelines review issues of risk and safety of conventional TMS protocols, address the undesired effects and risks of emerging TMS interventions, the applications of TMS in patients with implanted electrodes in the central nervous system, and safety aspects of TMS in neuroimaging environments. We cover recommended limits of stimulation parameters and other important precautions, monitoring of subjects, expertise of the rTMS team, and ethical issues. While all the recommendations here are expert based, they utilize published data to the extent possible. PMID:19833552

  10. Considerations for assessing the potential effects of antidiabetes drugs on cardiac ventricular repolarization: A report from the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Heller, Simon; Darpö, Börje; Mitchell, Malcolm I; Linnebjerg, Helle; Leishman, Derek J; Mehrotra, Nitin; Zhu, Hao; Koerner, John; Fiszman, Mónica L; Balakrishnan, Suchitra; Xiao, Shen; Todaro, Thomas G; Hensley, Ingrid; Guth, Brian D; Michelson, Eric L; Sager, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Thorough QT studies conducted according to the International Council on Harmonisation E14 guideline are required for new nonantiarrhythmic drugs to assess the potential to prolong ventricular repolarization. Special considerations may be needed for conducting such studies with antidiabetes drugs as changes in blood glucose and other physiologic parameters affected by antidiabetes drugs may prolong the QT interval and thus confound QT/corrected QT assessments. This review discusses potential mechanisms for QT/corrected QT interval prolongation with antidiabetes drugs and offers practical considerations for assessing antidiabetes drugs in thorough QT studies. This article represents collaborative discussions among key stakeholders from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies participating in the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium. It does not represent regulatory policy.

  11. 29 CFR 1926.952 - Mechanical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Power Transmission and Distribution § 1926.952... equipment that are not covered with insulating protective equipment. (c) Cranes and other lifting equipment...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.952 - Mechanical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Power Transmission and Distribution § 1926.952... equipment that are not covered with insulating protective equipment. (c) Cranes and other lifting equipment...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.952 - Mechanical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Power Transmission and Distribution § 1926.952... equipment that are not covered with insulating protective equipment. (c) Cranes and other lifting equipment...

  14. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  15. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  16. Effect of Aripiprazole Lauroxil on Metabolic and Endocrine Profiles and Related Safety Considerations Among Patients With Acute Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Henry A; Newcomer, John W; Risinger, Robert; Du, Yangchun; Zummo, Jacqueline; Bose, Anjana; Stankovic, Srdjan; Silverman, Bernard L; Ehrich, Elliot W

    2016-11-01

    Aripiprazole lauroxil, a long-acting injectable antipsychotic, demonstrated safety and efficacy in treating symptoms of schizophrenia in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Because the metabolic profile of antipsychotics is an important safety feature, the effects of aripiprazole lauroxil on body weight, endocrine and metabolic profiles, and safety were examined in a secondary analysis. Patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR criteria) were randomly assigned to aripiprazole lauroxil 441 mg, aripiprazole lauroxil 882 mg, or placebo intramuscularly once monthly between December 2011 and March 2014. Changes in body weight, body mass index, fasting blood glucose and serum lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and prolactin over 12 weeks were assessed. The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) was evaluated. Among 622 randomized patients, no clinically relevant changes from baseline to week 12 were observed for any serum lipid, lipoprotein, plasma glucose, or HbA1c value with placebo or either dose of aripiprazole lauroxil. Both doses of aripiprazole lauroxil were associated with reductions in mean prolactin levels, whereas placebo treatment was not. The mean (standard deviation) change from baseline for body weight was 0.74 (3.9) kg, 0.86 (3.7) kg, and 0.01 (3.6) kg for aripiprazole lauroxil 441 mg, aripiprazole lauroxil 882 mg, and placebo groups, respectively. AEs related to metabolic parameters were reported in 2.4%, 1.4%, and 2.4% of patients in the aripiprazole lauroxil 441 mg, aripiprazole lauroxil 882 mg, and placebo groups, respectively. Aripiprazole lauroxil was well tolerated, with a low-risk metabolic profile relative to published data for other antipsychotics. Changes similar to those observed with placebo were observed in the aripiprazole lauroxil groups for metabolic parameters, with modest weight gain in the active treatment groups over the 12-week course. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01469039.

  17. Long-term safety of tiotropium delivered by Respimat® SoftMist™ Inhaler: patient selection and special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ching Kuo; Say, Gui Quan; Geake, James B

    2016-01-01

    Tiotropium bromide is a long-acting inhaled muscarinic antagonist used in patients with chronic respiratory disease. It has been available since 2002 as a single-dose dry powder formulation via the HandiHaler® dry powder inhaler (DPI) device, and since 2007 as the Respimat® SoftMist™ Inhaler (SMI). The latter is a novel method of medication delivery that utilizes a multidose aqueous solution to deliver the drug as a fine mist. Potential benefits include more efficient drug deposition throughout the respiratory tract, reduced systemic exposure, and greater ease of use and patient satisfaction compared with the use of HandiHaler DPI. Although tiotropium bromide delivered via the HandiHaler DPI has been clearly shown to improve lung function, dyspnea, and quality of life and to reduce exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there is accumulating evidence regarding the use of tiotropium HandiHaler in other respiratory diseases characterized by airflow limitation, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Developed more recently, tiotropium delivered via the Respimat SMI appears to have a similar efficacy and safety profile to the HandiHaler DPI, and early data raising the possibility of safety concerns with its use in COPD have been refuted by more recent evidence. The benefits over the HandiHaler DPI, however, remain unclear. This paper will review the evidence for tiotropium delivered via the Respimat SMI inhaler, in particular as an alternative to the HandiHaler DPI, and will focus on the safety profile for each of the chronic lung diseases in which it has been trialed, as well as an approach to appropriate patient selection. PMID:27703365

  18. Safety Considerations with the Use of Corticosteroids and Biologic Therapies in Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Cross, Raymond K

    2017-10-01

    The risk of corticosteroid-associated adverse events can limit the use of systemic corticosteroids. Oral, topically acting, second-generation corticosteroids that deliver drug to the site of inflammation, and biologic therapies, are effective treatment alternatives. The aim of this review was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of topically acting corticosteroids and biologic therapies versus oral systemic corticosteroids for ulcerative colitis (UC). The PubMed database was searched for clinical and observational trials, systematic reviews, and case reports/series published between January 1950 and September 30, 2016. Search terms used included "corticosteroids," "beclomethasone dipropionate," "budesonide," "infliximab," "adalimumab," "golimumab," and "vedolizumab" in combination with "ulcerative colitis" or "inflammatory bowel disease." A total of 582 studies were identified from PubMed searches. Only 1 direct comparative trial for oral topically acting corticosteroids and systemic corticosteroids was available, and no comparative trials versus biologic therapies were identified. In patients with mild-to-moderate UC, short-term (4-8 wk) oral beclomethasone dipropionate or oral budesonide multimatrix system demonstrated safety profiles comparable with placebo with few corticosteroid-related adverse events reported. Based on long-term data in patients with moderate-to-severe UC, biologics have a generally tolerable adverse event profile, although infections, infusion reactions, and autoimmune disorders were frequently reported. Second-generation corticosteroids, beclomethasone dipropionate and budesonide multimatrix system, exhibited a favorable safety profile in patients with mild-to-moderate UC. For biologics, which are only indicated in moderate-to-severe UC, additional studies are needed to further ascertain the benefit to risk profile of these agents in patients with mild-to-moderate disease (see Video Abstract, Supplemental Digital Content, http

  19. Long-term safety of tiotropium delivered by Respimat(®) SoftMist™ Inhaler: patient selection and special considerations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ching Kuo; Say, Gui Quan; Geake, James B

    2016-01-01

    Tiotropium bromide is a long-acting inhaled muscarinic antagonist used in patients with chronic respiratory disease. It has been available since 2002 as a single-dose dry powder formulation via the HandiHaler(®) dry powder inhaler (DPI) device, and since 2007 as the Respimat(®) SoftMist™ Inhaler (SMI). The latter is a novel method of medication delivery that utilizes a multidose aqueous solution to deliver the drug as a fine mist. Potential benefits include more efficient drug deposition throughout the respiratory tract, reduced systemic exposure, and greater ease of use and patient satisfaction compared with the use of HandiHaler DPI. Although tiotropium bromide delivered via the HandiHaler DPI has been clearly shown to improve lung function, dyspnea, and quality of life and to reduce exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there is accumulating evidence regarding the use of tiotropium HandiHaler in other respiratory diseases characterized by airflow limitation, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Developed more recently, tiotropium delivered via the Respimat SMI appears to have a similar efficacy and safety profile to the HandiHaler DPI, and early data raising the possibility of safety concerns with its use in COPD have been refuted by more recent evidence. The benefits over the HandiHaler DPI, however, remain unclear. This paper will review the evidence for tiotropium delivered via the Respimat SMI inhaler, in particular as an alternative to the HandiHaler DPI, and will focus on the safety profile for each of the chronic lung diseases in which it has been trialed, as well as an approach to appropriate patient selection.

  20. Selecting an Architecture for a Safety-Critical Distributed Computer System with Power, Weight and Cost Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2014-01-01

    This report presents an example of the application of multi-criteria decision analysis to the selection of an architecture for a safety-critical distributed computer system. The design problem includes constraints on minimum system availability and integrity, and the decision is based on the optimal balance of power, weight and cost. The analysis process includes the generation of alternative architectures, evaluation of individual decision criteria, and the selection of an alternative based on overall value. In this example presented here, iterative application of the quantitative evaluation process made it possible to deliberately generate an alternative architecture that is superior to all others regardless of the relative importance of cost.

  1. Steam-explosion safety considerations for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.

    1990-02-01

    This report provides a perspective on steam-explosion safety and design issues for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A historical background along with a description of experiments and analytical work performed to date has been provided. Preliminary analyses (for the ANS) have been conducted to evaluate steam-explosion pressure- pulse loadings, the effects of reactor coolant system (RCS) overpressurization, and slug energetics. The method used for pressure-pulse magnitude evaluation was benchmarked with previous calculations, an aluminum-water steam-explosion experiment, and test reactor steam explosion data with good agreement. Predicted pressure-pulse magnitudes evaluated were found to be several orders of magnitude lower than corresponding values evaluated by correlating available energies with shock-wave pressures from equivalent chemical detonations. The preliminary best estimate, as well as conservative estimates for RCS volume-pressurization failure and slug energetics for RCS volume-pressurization failure and slug energetics, indicated that (1) steam explosions in the ANS have significant damage potential, and (2) steam-explosion issues must be considered during the design phase of the ANS Project. Recommendations are made for efficiently addressing this important safety and design issue. 38 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Consideration of interaction between nanoparticles and food components for the safety assessment of nanoparticles following oral exposure: A review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Li, Juan; Liu, Fang; Li, Xiyue; Jiang, Qin; Cheng, Shanshan; Gu, Yuxiu

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used in food, and the toxicity of NPs following oral exposure should be carefully assessed to ensure the safety. Indeed, a number of studies have shown that oral exposure to NPs, especially solid NPs, may induce toxicological responses both in vivo and in vitro. However, most of the toxicological studies only used NPs for oral exposure, and the potential interaction between NPs and food components in real life was ignored. In this review, we summarized the relevant studies and suggested that the interaction between NPs and food components may exist by that 1) NPs directly affect nutrients absorption through disruption of microvilli or alteration in expression of nutrient transporter genes; 2) food components directly affect NP absorption through physico-chemical modification; 3) the presence of food components affect oxidative stress induced by NPs. All of these interactions may eventually enhance or reduce the toxicological responses induced by NPs following oral exposure. Studies only using NPs for oral exposure may therefore lead to misinterpretation and underestimation/overestimation of toxicity of NPs, and it is necessary to assess the synergistic effects of NPs in a complex system when considering the safety of NPs used in food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Specialty pharmacies and other restricted drug distribution systems: financial and safety considerations for patients and health-system pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Kirschenbaum, Bonnie E

    2009-12-15

    To discuss the role of restricted drug distribution systems in the implementation of risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS), health-system pharmacists' concerns associated with the use of specialty pharmacies and other restricted drug distribution systems, reimbursement policies for high-cost specialty drugs, supply chain models for traditional and specialty drugs, and emerging trends in the management of and reimbursement for specialty pharmaceuticals. Restricted drug distribution systems established by pharmaceutical manufacturers, specialty pharmacies, or other specialty suppliers may be a component of REMS, which are required by the Food and Drug Administration for the management of known or potential serious risks from certain drugs. Concerns of health-system pharmacists using specialty suppliers include access to pharmaceuticals, operational challenges, product integrity, financial implications, continuity of care, and patient safety. An ambulatory care patient taking a specialty drug product from home to a hospital outpatient clinic or inpatient setting for administration, a practice known as "brown bagging," raises concerns about product integrity and institutional liability. An institution's finances, tolerance for liability, and ability to skillfully manage the processes involved often determine its choice between an approach that prohibits brown bagging but is costly and one that permits the practice under certain conditions and is less costly. The recent shift from a traditional supply chain model to a specialty pharmacy supply chain model for high-cost pharmaceuticals has the potential to increase pharmaceutical costs for health systems. A dialogue is needed between health-system pharmacists and group purchasing organizations to address the latter's role in mitigating the financial implications of this change and to help clarify the safety issues. Some health plans have shifted part of the cost of expensive drugs to patients by establishing a

  4. Farm Health and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... jobs in the United States. Farms have many health and safety hazards, including Chemicals and pesticides Machinery, ... equipment can also reduce accidents. Occupational Safety and Health Administration

  5. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7002 Equipment defects. Equipment defects affecting safety shall be corrected...

  6. 49 CFR 195.262 - Pumping equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provided in each pump station: (1) Safety devices that prevent overpressuring of pumping equipment... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  7. 49 CFR 195.262 - Pumping equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provided in each pump station: (1) Safety devices that prevent overpressuring of pumping equipment... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  8. 49 CFR 195.262 - Pumping equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provided in each pump station: (1) Safety devices that prevent overpressuring of pumping equipment... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  9. 49 CFR 195.262 - Pumping equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provided in each pump station: (1) Safety devices that prevent overpressuring of pumping equipment... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  10. 49 CFR 195.262 - Pumping equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provided in each pump station: (1) Safety devices that prevent overpressuring of pumping equipment... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  11. Fast reactor safety program. Progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The goal of the DOE LMFBR Safety Program is to provide a technology base fully responsive to safety considerations in the design, evaluation, licensing, and economic optimization of LMFBRs for electrical power generation. A strategy is presented that divides safety technology development into seven program elements, which have been used as the basis for the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for the Program. These elements include four lines of assurance (LOAs) involving core-related safety considerations, an element supporting non-core-related plant safety considerations, a safety R and D integration element, and an element for the development of test facilities and equipment to be used in Program experiments: LOA-1 (prevent accidents); LOA-2 (limit core damage); LOA-3 (maintain containment integrity); LOA-4 (attenuate radiological consequences); plant considerations; R and D integration; and facility development.

  12. The Influence of Friction Between Football Helmet and Jersey Materials on Force: A Consideration for Sport Safety.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anthony M; Claiborne, Tina L; Thompson, Gregory B; Todaro, Stacey

    2016-09-01

    The pocketing effect of helmet padding helps to dissipate forces experienced by the head, but if the player's helmet remains stationary in an opponent's shoulder pads, the compressive force on the cervical spine may increase. To (1) measure the coefficient of static friction between different football helmet finishes and football jersey fabrics and (2) calculate the potential amount of force on a player's helmet due to the amount of friction present. Cross-sectional study. Laboratory. Helmets with different finishes and different football jersey fabrics. The coefficient of friction was determined for 2 helmet samples (glossy and matte), 3 football jerseys (collegiate, high school, and youth), and 3 types of jersey numbers (silkscreened, sublimated, and stitched on) using the TAPPI T 815 standard method. These measurements determined which helmet-to-helmet, helmet-to-jersey number, and helmet-to-jersey material combination resulted in the least amount of static friction. The glossy helmet versus glossy helmet combination produced a greater amount of static friction than the other 2 helmet combinations (P = .013). The glossy helmet versus collegiate jersey combination produced a greater amount of static friction than the other helmet-to-jersey material combinations (P < .01). The glossy helmet versus silkscreened numbers combination produced a greater amount of static friction than the other helmet-to-jersey number combinations (P < .01). The force of static friction experienced during collisions can be clinically relevant. Conditions with higher coefficients of static friction result in greater forces. In this study, the highest coefficient of friction (glossy helmet versus silkscreened number) could increase the forces on the player's helmet by 3553.88 N when compared with other helmet-to-jersey combinations. Our results indicate that the makeup of helmet and uniform materials may affect sport safety.

  13. The Influence of Friction Between Football Helmet and Jersey Materials on Force: A Consideration for Sport Safety

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Anthony M.; Claiborne, Tina L.; Thompson, Gregory B.; Todaro, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    helmet and uniform materials may affect sport safety. PMID:27824251

  14. New Equipment for Mine Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    While planning for the space shuttle, Bendix Corporation with the help of Johnson Space Center expanded the anthropometric data base for aerospace and nonaerospace use in clothing, workplace, etc. The result was the Anthropometric Source Book which was later utilized by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in designing advanced mining systems. The book was particularly valuable in the design of a remote cab used in mining.

  15. Internal short circuit and accelerated rate calorimetry tests of lithium-ion cells: Considerations for methane-air intrinsic safety and explosion proof/flameproof protection methods

    PubMed Central

    Dubaniewicz, Thomas H.; DuCarme, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) studied the potential for lithium-ion cell thermal runaway from an internal short circuit in equipment for use in underground coal mines. In this third phase of the study, researchers compared plastic wedge crush-induced internal short circuit tests of selected lithium-ion cells within methane (CH4)-air mixtures with accelerated rate calorimetry tests of similar cells. Plastic wedge crush test results with metal oxide lithium-ion cells extracted from intrinsically safe evaluated equipment were mixed, with one cell model igniting the chamber atmosphere while another cell model did not. The two cells models exhibited different internal short circuit behaviors. A lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) cell model was tolerant to crush-induced internal short circuits within CH4-air, tested under manufacturer recommended charging conditions. Accelerating rate calorimetry tests with similar cells within a nitrogen purged 353-mL chamber produced ignitions that exceeded explosion proof and flameproof enclosure minimum internal pressure design criteria. Ignition pressures within a 20-L chamber with 6.5% CH4-air were relatively low, with much larger head space volume and less adiabatic test conditions. The literature indicates that sizeable lithium thionyl chloride (LiSOCl2) primary (non rechargeable) cell ignitions can be especially violent and toxic. Because ignition of an explosive atmosphere is expected within explosion proof or flameproof enclosures, there is a need to consider the potential for an internal explosive atmosphere ignition in combination with a lithium or lithium-ion battery thermal runaway process, and the resulting effects on the enclosure. PMID:27695201

  16. Internal short circuit and accelerated rate calorimetry tests of lithium-ion cells: Considerations for methane-air intrinsic safety and explosion proof/flameproof protection methods.

    PubMed

    Dubaniewicz, Thomas H; DuCarme, Joseph P

    2016-09-01

    Researchers with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) studied the potential for lithium-ion cell thermal runaway from an internal short circuit in equipment for use in underground coal mines. In this third phase of the study, researchers compared plastic wedge crush-induced internal short circuit tests of selected lithium-ion cells within methane (CH4)-air mixtures with accelerated rate calorimetry tests of similar cells. Plastic wedge crush test results with metal oxide lithium-ion cells extracted from intrinsically safe evaluated equipment were mixed, with one cell model igniting the chamber atmosphere while another cell model did not. The two cells models exhibited different internal short circuit behaviors. A lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) cell model was tolerant to crush-induced internal short circuits within CH4-air, tested under manufacturer recommended charging conditions. Accelerating rate calorimetry tests with similar cells within a nitrogen purged 353-mL chamber produced ignitions that exceeded explosion proof and flameproof enclosure minimum internal pressure design criteria. Ignition pressures within a 20-L chamber with 6.5% CH4-air were relatively low, with much larger head space volume and less adiabatic test conditions. The literature indicates that sizeable lithium thionyl chloride (LiSOCl2) primary (non rechargeable) cell ignitions can be especially violent and toxic. Because ignition of an explosive atmosphere is expected within explosion proof or flameproof enclosures, there is a need to consider the potential for an internal explosive atmosphere ignition in combination with a lithium or lithium-ion battery thermal runaway process, and the resulting effects on the enclosure.

  17. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  18. Hydrogen and Fuel Cells for IT Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Jennifer

    2016-03-09

    With the increased push for carbon-free and sustainable data centers, data center operators are increasingly looking to renewable energy as a means to approach carbon-free status and be more sustainable. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a world leader in hydrogen research and already has an elaborate hydrogen infrastructure in place at the Golden, Colorado, state-of-the-art data center and facility. This presentation will discuss hydrogen generation, storage considerations, and safety issues as they relate to hydrogen delivery to fuel cells powering IT equipment.

  19. [Equipping the bacteriological laboratories of a tuberculosis service as the most important element of assurance of the quality and safety of their work].

    PubMed

    Sevast'ianova, E V; Martynova, L P; Barilo, V N; Golyshevskaia, V I; Shul'gina, M V

    2009-01-01

    By taking into account the present requirements for the equipping of the laboratories, the authors have drawn up the minimum standard list of equipment, as well as a list of additional equipment for the specialized bacteriological laboratory of a tuberculosis-controlling institution, which performs microbiological studies for the diagnosis and control of chemotherapy for tuberculosis. The specifications and characteristics of the baric types of equipment used to fit out the laboratories under the present conditions are described. Equipping the laboratories in accordance with the draw-up lists is shown to ensure a qualitative, effective, and safe work. Recommendations on how to supply the laboratories with equipment, to make the optimal choice, and to use consumables for tests are given.

  20. Payload safety requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheller, J.

    1979-01-01

    Space Shuttle payload safety requirements are summarized. Consideration is given to NASA objectives on STS payloads, payload safety documents, STS payload safety management, safety implementation possibilities, the hazard control procedure, and significant technical requirements.

  1. Occupational safety considerations with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clewell, Harvey J., III; Mcdougal, James N.; George, Marilyn E.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrazine is a reducing agent that is most commonly used as a propellant and as an oxygen scavenger in boilers. Hydrazine is extremely irritating and has been demonstrated to produce both acute and chronic toxicity. As a result, the established permissible inhalation exposure limits are very low, and respiration protection is required whenever vapors are present. Liquid hydrazine penetrates the skin and produces a chemical burn; therefore, some protective measures must also be taken to protect the skin from liquid contact. Often, however, a cumbersome, whole-body protective suit is worn to protect against skin contact with vapor as well. To what extent it is actually necessary to protect skin from vapor penetration had not previously been demonstrated. In an attempt to answer this question, we conducted a study with rats to compare the dermal penetration of hydrazine vapor with inhalation. Pharmacokinetic modeling was used to compare body burdens resulting from these different routes of exposure. The analysis concluded that the vapor concentration during a skin-only exposure would have to be at least 200 times higher than that during inhalation to achieve the same body burden. This type of estimation illustrates the use of predictive toxicology in occupational exposures.

  2. 30 CFR 57.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7002 Equipment defects. Equipment defects affecting...

  3. Work safety climate and safety practices among immigrant Latino residential construction workers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Mills, Thomas; Marín, Antonio J; Summers, Phillip; Quandt, Sara A; Rushing, Julia; Lang, Wei; Grzywacz, Joseph G

    2012-08-01

    Latino residential construction workers experience high rates of occupational fatality and injury. Work safety climate is an especially important consideration for improving the safety of these immigrant workers. This analysis describes work safety climate among Latino residential construction workers, delineates differences in work safety climate by personal and employment characteristics, and determines associations of work safety climate with specific work safety behaviors. Data are from a cross-sectional survey of 119 Latino residential framers, roofers, and general construction workers in western North Carolina; 90 of these participants also provided longitudinal daily diary data for up to 21 days using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system. Measures included the Perceived Safety Climate Scale, and daily reports of five individual and five collective safety practices. Work safety climate was mixed among workers, with roofers (19.9) having lower levels than framers (24.3) or general construction workers (24.3). Days reported for several individual (glove-related risks, not doing something known to be unsafe) and collective safety practices (attended daily safety meeting, not needing to use damaged equipment, not seeing coworker create an unsafe situation) were positively associated with work safety climate. Work safety climate predicts subsequent safety behaviors among Latino residential construction workers, with differences by trade being particularly important. Interventions are needed to improve safety training for employers as well as workers. Further research should expand the number of workers and trades involved in analyses of work safety climate. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. RADIATION SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE USE OF 223RaCl2 DE IN MEN WITH CASTRATION-RESISTANT PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Williamson, Matthew J.; Humm, John; O’Donoghue, Joseph; Ghani, Rashid; Awadallah, Robert; Carrasquillo, Jorge; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Aksnes, Anne-Kirsti; Biggin, Colin; Reinton, Vigdis; Morris, Michael; St Germain, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with late stage castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) develop bone metastases that often result in significant bone pain. Therapeutic palliation strategies can delay or prevent skeletal complications and may prolong survival. An alpha-particle based therapy, radium-223 dichloride (223RaCl2), has been developed that delivers highly localized effects in target areas and likely reduces toxicity to adjacent healthy tissue, particularly bone marrow. Radiation safety aspects were evaluated for a single comprehensive cancer center clinical phase 1, open-label, single ascending-dose study for three cohorts at 50, 100, or 200 kBq kg−1 body weight. Ten patients received administrations, and six patients completed the study with 1 y follow-up. Dose rates from patients administered 223Ra dichloride were typically less than 2 μSv h−1 MBq−1 on contact and averaged 0.02 μSv h−1 MBq−1 at 1 m immediately following administration. Removal was primarily by fecal excretion, and whole body effective half-lives were highly dependent upon fecal compartment transfer, ranging from 2.5–11.4 d. Radium-223 is safe and straightforward to administer using conventional nuclear medicine equipment. For this clinical study, few radiation protection limitations were recommended post-therapy based on facility evaluations. Specific precautions are dependent on local regulatory authority guidance. Subsequent studies have demonstrated significantly improved overall survival and very low toxicity, suggesting that 223Ra may provide a new standard of care for patients with CRPC and bone metastases. PMID:24562070

  5. Safety of plant-made pharmaceuticals: product development and regulatory considerations based on case studies of two autologous human cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tusé, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Guidelines issued by regulatory agencies for the development of plant-made pharmaceutical (PMP) products provide criteria for product manufacturing and characterization, safety determination, containment and mitigation of environmental risks. Features of plant-made products do not always enable an easy fit within the criteria subscribed to by regulators. The unconventional nature of plant-based manufacturing processes and peculiarities of plant biology relative to that of traditional biological production systems have led to special considerations in the regulatory scrutiny of PMP. Presented in this review are case studies of two plant-made autologous (patient-specific) cancer vaccines, the nature of which introduced challenges to conventional and standardized development and preclinical evaluation routes. The rationale presented to FDA by the sponsors of each vaccine to build consensus and obtain variances to existing guidelines is discussed. While development of many plant-made biologics can be accomplished within the existing regulatory framework, the development of specialized products can be defended with rational arguments based on strong science.

  6. Joint NASA/USAF Airborne Field Mill Program - Operation and safety considerations during flights of a Lear 28 airplane in adverse weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Bruce D.; Phillips, Michael R.; Maier, Launa M.

    1992-01-01

    A NASA Langley Research Center Learjet 28 research airplane was flown in various adverse weather conditions in the vicinity of the NASA Kennedy Space Center from 1990-1992 to measure airborne electric fields during the Joint NASA/USAF Airborne Field Mill Program. The objective of this program was to characterize the electrical activity in various weather phenomena common to the NASA-Kennedy area in order to refine Launch Commit Criteria for natural and triggered lightning. The purpose of the program was to safely relax the existing launch commit criteria, thereby increasing launch availability and reducing the chance for weather holds and delays. This paper discusses the operational conduct of the flight test, including environmental/safety considerations, aircraft instrumentation and modification, test limitations, flight procedures, and the procedures and responsibilities of the personnel in the ground station. Airborne field mill data were collected for all the Launch Commit Criteria during two summer and two winter deployments. These data are now being analyzed.

  7. Workplace Safety and Health Topics: Safety & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Equipment Design in Mining Ergonomic Interventions in the Building, Repair, and Dismantling of Ships Eye Safety Fall Injuries Prevention Green, Safe, and Healthy Jobs - Prevention through Design Hierarchy ...

  8. Manned space flight nuclear system safety. Volume 5: Nuclear System safety guidelines. Part 1: Space base nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design and operations guidelines and requirements developed in the study of space base nuclear system safety are presented. Guidelines and requirements are presented for the space base subsystems, nuclear hardware (reactor, isotope sources, dynamic generator equipment), experiments, interfacing vehicles, ground support systems, range safety and facilities. Cross indices and references are provided which relate guidelines to each other, and to substantiating data in other volumes. The guidelines are intended for the implementation of nuclear safety related design and operational considerations in future space programs.

  9. Heavy Equipment Mechanic. Instructor Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laborn J.; And Others

    This manual is intended to assist heavy equipment instructors in teaching the latest concepts and functions of heavy equipment. It includes 7 sections and 27 instructional units. Sections (and units) are: orientation (shop safety and first aid, hand tools and miscellaneous tools, measuring, basic rigging and hoisting), engines (basic engine…

  10. Heavy Equipment Mechanic. Instructor Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laborn J.; And Others

    This manual is intended to assist heavy equipment instructors in teaching the latest concepts and functions of heavy equipment. It includes 7 sections and 27 instructional units. Sections (and units) are: orientation (shop safety and first aid, hand tools and miscellaneous tools, measuring, basic rigging and hoisting), engines (basic engine…

  11. Buyer's Guide to Playground Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Guides child care centers when investing in outdoor play structures and playground equipment with advice provided by manufacturers and dealers. Details six factors to consider, including appropriateness, construction, installation, safety, support, and experience. Contains a playground equipment manufacturers and dealers directory that includes…

  12. AORN Ergonomic Tool 6: lifting and carrying supplies and equipment in the perioperative setting.

    PubMed

    Waters, Thomas; Baptiste, Andrea; Short, Manon; Plante-Mallon, Lori; Nelson, Audrey

    2011-08-01

    Perioperative team members often are required to lift and carry heavy supplies and equipment into and around the OR; this includes lifting equipment such as hand tables, fluoroscopy boards, stirrups, Wilson frames, irrigation containers for lithotripsy, and heavy instrument pans. Lifting heavy objects creates considerable risk for musculoskeletal injuries to the back and shoulders. AORN Ergonomic Tool 6: Lifting and Carrying Supplies and Equipment in the Perioperative Setting can help caregivers evaluate lifting and carrying tasks and take measures to protect themselves from injury. Caregivers can use the revised National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health lifting equation to assess whether a specific lifting task can be performed safely. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. 49 CFR 374.313 - Equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PASSENGER CARRIER REGULATIONS Adequacy of Intercity Motor Common Carrier Passenger Service § 374.313 Equipment. (a) Temperature control. A...

  14. 49 CFR 374.313 - Equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PASSENGER CARRIER REGULATIONS Adequacy of Intercity Motor Common Carrier Passenger Service § 374.313 Equipment. (a) Temperature control. A...

  15. 49 CFR 374.313 - Equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PASSENGER CARRIER REGULATIONS Adequacy of Intercity Motor Common Carrier Passenger Service § 374.313 Equipment. (a) Temperature control. A...

  16. School Bus Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroup, Karen Bruner; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Equipment to allow safe transportation of disabled children is reviewed. Such equipment includes infant car seats, child safety seats, safety vests, and accommodations for children in casts and/or braces. Five principles for evaluation and selection of safe seating options are given as are safety rules and information on standards and resources.…

  17. School Bus Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroup, Karen Bruner; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Equipment to allow safe transportation of disabled children is reviewed. Such equipment includes infant car seats, child safety seats, safety vests, and accommodations for children in casts and/or braces. Five principles for evaluation and selection of safe seating options are given as are safety rules and information on standards and resources.…

  18. Standards for material handling and facilities equipment proofload testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonn, S. P.

    1970-01-01

    Document provides information on verifying the safety of material handling and facilities equipment /MH/FE/, ranging from monorail systems to ladders and non-powered mobile equipment. Seven catagories of MH/FE equipment are defined.

  19. 76 FR 62894 - Following Procedures When Going Between Rolling Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Following Procedures When Going Between Rolling Equipment AGENCY: Federal... of following procedures when going ] between rolling equipment. This safety advisory contains various... who, in the course of their work, place themselves between rolling equipment. The railroad...

  20. 30 CFR 77.507 - Electric equipment; switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric equipment; switches. 77.507 Section 77.507 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Electrical Equipment-General § 77.507 Electric equipment; switches. All electric equipment shall be provided...

  1. 30 CFR 77.507 - Electric equipment; switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric equipment; switches. 77.507 Section 77.507 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Electrical Equipment-General § 77.507 Electric equipment; switches. All electric equipment shall be provided...

  2. 30 CFR 77.507 - Electric equipment; switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric equipment; switches. 77.507 Section 77.507 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Electrical Equipment-General § 77.507 Electric equipment; switches. All electric equipment shall be...

  3. 30 CFR 77.507 - Electric equipment; switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric equipment; switches. 77.507 Section 77.507 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Electrical Equipment-General § 77.507 Electric equipment; switches. All electric equipment shall be...

  4. 30 CFR 77.507 - Electric equipment; switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric equipment; switches. 77.507 Section 77.507 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Electrical Equipment-General § 77.507 Electric equipment; switches. All electric equipment shall be...

  5. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  6. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  7. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  8. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  9. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  10. Advanced missions safety. Volume 3: Appendices. Part 2: Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, M. G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Supporting documentation pertaining to the hazards of transporting experimental equipment on the Earth Orbit Shuttle is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) experiment and hardware definition, (2) hazard analysis, (3) preventive measure assessment, (4) preventive measures statements, (5) remedial measure assessment, and (6) experiment interaction safety considerations.

  11. Medical equipment management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binseng; Furst, Emanuel; Cohen, Ted; Keil, Ode R; Ridgway, Malcolm; Stiefel, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Clinical engineering professionals need to continually review and improve their management strategies in order to keep up with improvements in equipment technology, as well as with increasing expectations of health care organizations. In the last 20 years, management strategies have evolved from the initial obsession with electrical safety to flexible criteria that fit the individual institution's needs. Few hospitals, however, are taking full advantage of the paradigm shift offered by the evolution of joint Commission standards. The focus should be on risks caused by equipment failure, rather than on equipment with highest maintenance demands. Furthermore, it is not enough to consider risks posed by individual pieces of equipment to individual patients. It is critical to anticipate the impact of an equipment failure on larger groups of patients, especially when dealing with one of a kind, sophisticated pieces of equipment that are required to provide timely and accurate diagnoses for immediate therapeutic decisions or surgical interventions. A strategy for incorporating multiple criteria to formulate appropriate management strategies is provided in this article.

  12. Management methodology for pressure equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bletchly, P. J.

    Pressure equipment constitutes a significant investment in capital and a major proportion of potential high-risk plant in many operations and this is particularly so in an alumina refinery. In many jurisdictions pressure equipment is also subject to statutory regulation that imposes obligations on Owners of the equipment with respect to workplace safety. Most modern technical standards and industry codes of practice employ a risk-based approach to support better decision making with respect to pressure equipment. For a management system to be effective it must demonstrate that risk is being managed within acceptable limits.

  13. Electrical safety during transplantation.

    PubMed

    Amicucci, G L; Di Lollo, L; Fiamingo, F; Mazzocchi, V; Platania, G; Ranieri, D; Razzano, R; Camin, G; Sebastiani, G; Gentile, P

    2010-01-01

    Technologic innovations enable management of medical equipment and power supply systems, with improvements that can affect the technical aspects, economics, and quality of medical service. Herein are outlined some technical guidelines, proposed by Istituto Superiore per la Prevenzione e la Sicurezza del Lavoro, for increasing the effectiveness of the power supply system and the safety of patients and surgeons in the operating room, with particular focus on transplantation. The dependence of diagnoses and therapies on operation of the electrical equipment can potentially cause great risk to patients. Moreover, it is possible that faulty electrical equipment could produce current that may flow through the patient. Because patients are particularly vulnerable when their natural protection is considerably decreased, as during transplantation or other surgery, power supply systems must operate with a high degree of reliability and quality to prevent risk, and must be designed to reduce hazards from direct and indirect contact. Reliability of the power supply system is closely related to the quality of the project, choice of materials, and management of the system (eg, quality and frequency of servicing). Among the proposed guidelines, other than normal referencing, are (1) adoption of a monitoring system to improve the quality of the electrical parameters in the operating room, (2) institution of emergency procedures for management of electrical faults, (3) a procedure for management of fires in the operating room, (4) and maintenance interventions and inspections of medical devices to maintain minimal requirements of safety and performance.

  14. Study on lockout procedures for the safety of workers intervening on equipment in the municipal sector in Québec.

    PubMed

    Chinniah, Yuvin; Burlet-Vienney, Damien

    2013-01-01

    In Québec, workers intervening in hazardous zones of machines, equipment and processes during maintenance, repairs and unjamming activities have to apply lockout procedures. Lockout procedures involve shutting down the equipment, isolating it, applying individual locks, releasing residual energies and verifying the absence of energies. Lockout has mostly been linked to industrial sectors. However, the municipal sector also faces challenges when it comes to controlling hazardous energies. The objectives of this research are to study serious accidents linked to our subject, study the application of lockout in different municipalities in Québec, identify the specificities for the municipal sector and propose some means to support the application of lockout. We will show that lockout procedures are required in different locations in municipalities and that they are currently being implemented in the municipal sector in Québec. Moreover, we propose a model which aims at facilitating the implementation of lockout procedures in the municipal sector.

  15. 29 CFR 1910.263 - Bakery equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bakery equipment. 1910.263 Section 1910.263 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Special Industries § 1910.263 Bakery equipment. (a)...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.263 - Bakery equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bakery equipment. 1910.263 Section 1910.263 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Special Industries § 1910.263 Bakery equipment. (a)...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.263 - Bakery equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bakery equipment. 1910.263 Section 1910.263 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Special Industries § 1910.263 Bakery equipment. (a)...

  18. 47 CFR 80.1103 - Equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment authorization. 80.1103 Section 80.1103 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements...

  19. 47 CFR 80.1103 - Equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equipment authorization. 80.1103 Section 80.1103 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1090 - Equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1926.1090 Section 1926.1090 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Equipment Procedures and Requirements §...

  1. Safety of School Playground Equipment. Report of the Department of Education to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia. House Document No. 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State General Assembly, Richmond. House.

    Findings of a Virginia study to determine if a need exists for statewide standards to ensure the safety of school playgrounds are presented in this document. Data were derived from a literature review, document analysis, and two statewide surveys: one to all school division superintendents (75); and one to the principals of 54 elementary schools.…

  2. Safety in Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents 12 amendments to the second edition of Safety in Science Laboratories. Covers topics such as regular inspection of equipment, wearing safety glasses, dating stock chemicals, and safe use of chemicals. (MA)

  3. Load Bearing Equipment for Bone and Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Griffith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise on ISS has proven effective in maintaining bone mineral density and muscle mass. Exploration missions require exercise with similar high loads using equipment with less mass and volume and greater safety and reliability than resistance exercise equipment used on ISS (iRED, ARED, FWED). Load Bearing Equipment (LBE) uses each exercising person to create and control the load to the partner.

  4. 46 CFR 197.346 - Diver's equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diver's equipment. 197.346 Section 197.346 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.346 Diver's equipment. (a) Each diver...

  5. 47 CFR 80.1103 - Equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements... certificated in accordance with 47 CFR part 2 specifically for GMDSS use, except for equipment used in the... 2 specifically for GMDSS use. The technical parameters of the equipment must conform to the...

  6. 47 CFR 80.1103 - Equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements... certificated in accordance with 47 CFR part 2 specifically for GMDSS use, except for equipment used in the... 2 specifically for GMDSS use. The technical parameters of the equipment must conform to the...

  7. 47 CFR 80.1103 - Equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements... certificated in accordance with 47 CFR part 2 specifically for GMDSS use, except for equipment used in the... 2 specifically for GMDSS use. The technical parameters of the equipment must conform to the...

  8. 33 CFR 175.135 - Existing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing equipment. 175.135 Section 175.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.135 Existing equipment....

  9. Consideration of the FQPA Safety Factor and Other Uncertainty Factors in Cumulative Risk Assessment of Chemicals Sharing a Common Mechanism of Toxicity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guidance document provides OPP's current thinking on application of the provision in FFDCA about an additional safety factor for the protection of infants and children in the context of cumulative risk assessments.

  10. Improving Safety through Human Factors Engineering.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Bettina; Hochman, Mary G

    2015-10-01

    Human factors engineering (HFE) focuses on the design and analysis of interactive systems that involve people, technical equipment, and work environment. HFE is informed by knowledge of human characteristics. It complements existing patient safety efforts by specifically taking into consideration that, as humans, frontline staff will inevitably make mistakes. Therefore, the systems with which they interact should be designed for the anticipation and mitigation of human errors. The goal of HFE is to optimize the interaction of humans with their work environment and technical equipment to maximize safety and efficiency. Special safeguards include usability testing, standardization of processes, and use of checklists and forcing functions. However, the effectiveness of the safety program and resiliency of the organization depend on timely reporting of all safety events independent of patient harm, including perceived potential risks, bad outcomes that occur even when proper protocols have been followed, and episodes of "improvisation" when formal guidelines are found not to exist. Therefore, an institution must adopt a robust culture of safety, where the focus is shifted from blaming individuals for errors to preventing future errors, and where barriers to speaking up-including barriers introduced by steep authority gradients-are minimized. This requires creation of formal guidelines to address safety concerns, establishment of unified teams with open communication and shared responsibility for patient safety, and education of managers and senior physicians to perceive the reporting of safety concerns as a benefit rather than a threat. © RSNA, 2015.

  11. Missouri Elementary Science Safety Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemons, Judith L.

    The purpose of this safety manual is to provide a resource to help manage and minimize potential risks in science classrooms where students spend up to 60% of instructional time engaged in hands-on activities. Information on general laboratory safety, science equipment safety, safety with plants, safety with animals, safety with chemicals, field…

  12. Missouri Elementary Science Safety Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemons, Judith L.

    The purpose of this safety manual is to provide a resource to help manage and minimize potential risks in science classrooms where students spend up to 60% of instructional time engaged in hands-on activities. Information on general laboratory safety, science equipment safety, safety with plants, safety with animals, safety with chemicals, field…

  13. Improve filtration for optimum equipment reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    The introduction 20 years ago of the American Petroleum Institute Standard API-614 as a purchase specification for lubrication, shaft sealing and control oil systems, had a considerable impact and did much to improve system reliability at that time. Today, however, these recommendations regarding filter rating and flushing cleanliness are outdated. Much research in the tribology field correlates clearance size particulate contamination with accelerated component wear, fatigue and performance degradation. Some of these studies demonstrate that by decreasing the population of clearance size particulate in lubrication oils, component life increases exponentially. Knowing the dynamic clearances of a piece of machinery makes it possible, using the ISO 4406 Cleanliness Code, to determine what cleanliness level will minimize contamination-related component wear/fatigue and thus help optimize machinery performance and reliability. Data obtained by the author through random sampling of rotating equipment lube and seal oil systems indicate that the API-614 standard, as it pertains to filtration and flushing, is insufficient to ensure that particulate contamination is maintained to within the levels necessary to achieve optimum equipment reliability and safety, without increasing operating cost. Adopting and practicing the guidelines presented should result in the following benefits: (1) the frequency of bearing, oil pump, mechanical seal, fluid coupling, gearbox and hydraulic control valve failures would be minimized; (2) the mean time between planned maintenance (MTBPM) would be increased. The result will be a substantial increase in safety and cost savings to the operator.

  14. Solar Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  15. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  16. Telescope Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Renaissance Telescope for high resolution and visual astronomy has five 82-degree Field Tele-Vue Nagler Eyepieces, some of the accessories that contribute to high image quality. Telescopes and eyepieces are representative of a family of optical equipment manufactured by Tele-Vue Optics, Inc.

  17. Safety First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Darryl

    2011-01-01

    Ned Miller does not take security lightly. As director of campus safety and emergency management at the Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC), any threat requires serious consideration. As community college administrators adopt a more proactive approach to campus safety, many institutions are experimenting with emerging technologies, including…

  18. Safety First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Darryl

    2011-01-01

    Ned Miller does not take security lightly. As director of campus safety and emergency management at the Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC), any threat requires serious consideration. As community college administrators adopt a more proactive approach to campus safety, many institutions are experimenting with emerging technologies, including…

  19. Independent criticality safety evaluation of deposits in cooler equipment in Building K-31 at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report provides an independent assessment of nuclear criticality issues associated with uranium deposits in the West and East Coolers for the 6A Booster Station in Building K-31 at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. This assessment investigates the applicability of the initial assumptions used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) and evaluates criticality calculations previously completed by Energy Systems. The calculations were independently verified. Each component was evaluated for its ability to satisfy requirements for subcriticality and meet the double contingency principle. Facility walk downs, detailed neutronics analysis, and fault tree analysis (FTA) were performed. The facility walk downs provided a better understanding of the building condition and status, equipment configuration, and uranium deposit locations. The detailed neutronics analysis focused on system geometry and moderation levels applicable to the individual components. The FTA considered the annual rate of occurrence for the events identified as potential causes of criticality issues. This report also examines the advantages of using this type of evaluation to assess the removal process for additional components and equipment.

  20. Effect of free distribution of safety equipment on usage among motorcycle-taxi drivers in Tanzania--A cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Steven A; Pallangyo, Anthony J; Reddy, Elizabeth A; Maro, Venance; Pence, Brian W; Lynch, Catherine; Turner, Elizabeth L; Egger, Joseph R; Thielman, Nathan M

    2014-11-01

    Deaths due to road traffic injuries, particularly motorcycle crashes, have increased rapidly in many African nations and context-specific strategies to improve preventative behaviours are needed. Although adhering to conspicuity measures by wearing reflective safety vests is a highly effective crash prevention strategy and mandated by law among motorcycle-taxi drivers in some African countries, actual use is currently low. We aimed to test whether eliminating cost-barriers through the provision of free reflective, fluorescent motorcycle safety vests would lead to increased utilisation among a high-risk population of motorcycle-taxi drivers in Tanzania. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted among 180 motorcycle-taxi drivers. Participants randomised to the intervention arm (90) received free, reflective, fluorescent vests; participants randomised to the control arm (90) did not receive free vests. Participants' use of reflective vests was then observed on city streets over a three month period and differential uptake was estimated using mixed-effects logistic regression. Baseline use of reflective vests was 3.3% in both arms. Seventy-nine drivers in the intervention arm and 82 drivers in the control arm were observed during follow-up. The average proportion of observations during which motorcycle drivers were using a reflective vest was 9.5% in the intervention arm, compared to 2.0% in the control arm (odds ratio: 5.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-26.9, p-value: 0.04). Although distribution of free reflective vests led to a statistically significant increase in vest usage, the absolute increase was modest. Additional strategies beyond removing economic barriers are important to augment adherence to road safety behaviours for injury prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Free Distribution of Safety Equipment on Usage among Motorcycle-Taxi Drivers in Tanzania—A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Steven A.; Pallangyo, Anthony J.; Reddy, Elizabeth A.; Maro, Venance; Pence, Brian W.; Lynch, Catherine; Turner, Elizabeth L.; Egger, Joseph R.; Thielman, Nathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Deaths due to road traffic injuries, particularly motorcycle crashes, have increased rapidly in many African nations and context-specific strategies to improve preventative behaviors are needed. Although adhering to conspicuity measures by wearing reflective safety vests is a highly effective crash prevention strategy and mandated by law among motorcycle-taxi drivers in some African countries, actual use is currently low. We aimed to test whether eliminating cost-barriers through the provision of free reflective, fluorescent motorcycle safety vests would lead to increased utilization among a high-risk population of motorcycle-taxi drivers in Tanzania. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted among 180 motorcycle-taxi drivers. Participants randomised to the intervention arm (90) received free, reflective, fluorescent vests; participants randomised to the control arm (90) did not receive free vests. Participants’ use of reflective vests was then observed on city streets over a three month period and differential uptake was estimated using mixed-effects logistic regression. Results Baseline use of reflective vests was 3.3% in both arms. Seventy-nine drivers in the intervention arm and 82 drivers in the control arm were observed during follow-up. The average proportion of observations during which motorcycle drivers were using a reflective vest was 9.5% in the intervention arm, compared to 2.0% in the control arm (odds ratio: 5.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-26.9, p-value: 0.04). Conclusion Although distribution of free reflective vests led to a statistically significant increase in vest usage, the absolute increase was modest. Additional strategies beyond removing economic barriers are important to augment adherence to road safety behaviors for injury prevention. PMID:24861418

  2. Efficacy and Safety of a Citrate-Based Protocol for Sustained Low-Efficiency Dialysis in AKI Using Standard Dialysis Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Regolisti, Giuseppe; Cademartiri, Carola; Cabassi, Aderville; Picetti, Edoardo; Barbagallo, Maria; Gherli, Tiziano; Castellano, Giuseppe; Morabito, Santo; Maggiore, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives A simple anticoagulation protocol was developed for sustained low-efficiency dialysis (SLED) in patients with AKI, based on the use of anticoagulant citrate dextrose solution formulation A (ACD-A) and standard dialysis equipment. Patients’ blood recalcification was obtained from calcium backtransport from dialysis fluid. Design, setting, participants, & measurements All patients treated with SLED (8- to 12-hour sessions) for AKI in four intensive care units of a university hospital were studied over a 30-month period, from May 1, 2008 to September 30, 2010. SLED interruptions and their causes, hemorrhagic complications, as well as coagulation parameters, ionized calcium, and blood citrate levels were recorded. Results This study examined 807 SLED sessions in 116 patients (mean age of 69.7 years [SD 12.1]; mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 23.8 [4.6]). Major bleeding was observed in six patients (5.2% or 0.4 episodes/100 person-days follow-up while patients were on SLED treatment). Citrate accumulation never occurred, even in patients with liver dysfunction. Intravenous calcium for ionized hypocalcemia (< 3.6 mg/dl or < 0.9 mmol/L) was needed in 28 sessions (3.4%); in 8 of these 28 sessions (28.6%), low ionized calcium was already present before SLED start. In 92.6% of treatments, SLED was completed within the scheduled time (median 8 hours). Interruptions of SLED by impending/irreversible clotting were recorded in 19 sessions (2.4%). Blood return was complete in 98% of the cases. In-hospital mortality was 45 of 116 patients (38.8%). Conclusions This study protocol affords efficacious and safe anticoagulation of the SLED circuit, avoiding citrate accumulation and, in most patients, systematic calcium supplementation; it can be implemented with commercial citrate solutions, standard dialysis equipment, on-line produced dialysis fluid, and minimal laboratory monitoring. PMID:23990164

  3. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  4. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  5. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  6. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  7. Compressed-Air Energy Storage: Preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Volume 7: Environmental, safety, and licensing considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-07-01

    The behavior and suitability of aquifers as compressed-air energy storage (CAFS) sites was studied. The probability, severity, and recommended control measures for the environmental and safety impacts that could result from the construction and operation of a CAES facility are described. The permits and approvals that would be required and the time estimated for their acquisition are also described.

  8. Fire safety. Explosion safety - Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratov, Anatolii Nikolaevich

    The physicochemical principles underlying combustion and explosion processes are examined, and the main fire and explosion safety characteristics of materials are reviewed with particular reference to the ignition limits of combustible mixtures, the minimal oxygen content that constitutes an explosion hazard, and the flash point and ignition temperatures. Fire-fighting and explosion suppression methods and equipment are described. The discussion also covers the efficiency of fire prevention measures and safety engineering in fire fighting.

  9. 29 CFR 1910.334 - Use of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices § 1910.334 Use of equipment. (a) Portable electric equipment. This paragraph applies to the use of cord- and plug-connected... in a manner which will not cause damage. Flexible electric cords connected to equipment may not be...

  10. 30 CFR 75.523 - Electric face equipment; deenergization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric face equipment; deenergization. 75.523... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.523 Electric face equipment; deenergization. An authorized representative of the Secretary may require in any...

  11. 30 CFR 75.523 - Electric face equipment; deenergization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric face equipment; deenergization. 75.523... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.523 Electric face equipment; deenergization. An authorized representative of the Secretary may require in any...

  12. Simultaneous electroencephalography-functional MRI at 3 T: an analysis of safety risks imposed by performing anatomical reference scans with the EEG equipment in place.

    PubMed

    Nöth, Ulrike; Laufs, Helmut; Stoermer, Robert; Deichmann, Ralf

    2012-03-01

    To describe heating effects to be expected in simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when deviating from the EEG manufacturer's instructions; to test which anatomical MRI sequences have a sufficiently low specific absorption rate (SAR) to be performed with the EEG equipment in place; and to suggest precautions to reduce the risk of heating. Heating was determined in vivo below eight EEG electrodes, using both head and body coil transmission and sequences covering the whole range of SAR values. Head transmit coil: temperature increases were below 2.2°C for low SAR sequences, but reached 4.6°C (one subject, clavicle) for high SAR sequences; the equilibrium temperature T(eq) remained below 39°C. Body transmit coil: temperature increases were higher and more frequent over subjects and electrodes, with values below 2.6°C for low SAR sequences, reaching 6.9°C for high SAR sequences (T8 electrode) with T(eq) exceeding a critical level of 40°C. Anatomical imaging should be based on T1-weighted sequences (FLASH, MPRAGE, MDEFT) with an SAR below values for functional MRI sequences based on gradient echo planar imaging. Anatomical sequences with a high SAR can pose a significant risk, which is reduced by using head coil transmission. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Theoretical and experimental fundamentals of designing promising technological equipment to improve efficiency and environmental safety of highly viscous oil recovery from deep oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyev, V. A.; Nazarov, V. P.; Zhuravlev, V. Y.; Zhuykov, D. A.; Kubrikov, M. V.; Klokotov, Y. N.

    2016-12-01

    The development of new technological equipment for the implementation of highly effective methods of recovering highly viscous oil from deep reservoirs is an important scientific and technical challenge. Thermal recovery methods are promising approaches to solving the problem. It is necessary to carry out theoretical and experimental research aimed at developing oil-well tubing (OWT) with composite heatinsulating coatings on the basis of basalt and glass fibers. We used the method of finite element analysis in Nastran software, which implements complex scientific and engineering calculations, including the calculation of the stress-strain state of mechanical systems, the solution of problems of heat transfer, the study of nonlinear static, the dynamic transient analysis of frequency characteristics, etc. As a result, we obtained a mathematical model of thermal conductivity which describes the steady-state temperature and changes in the fibrous highly porous material with the heat loss by Stefan-Boltzmann's radiation. It has been performed for the first time using the method of computer modeling in Nastran software environments. The results give grounds for further implementation of the real design of the OWT when implementing thermal methods for increasing the rates of oil production and mitigating environmental impacts.

  14. Farm Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    In production of tractor and a line of farm vehicles, Deere and Company used a COSMIC computer program called FEATS for Finite Element Analysis of Thermal Stress in computer analysis of diesel engine pistons, connecting rods and rocker arms. Company reports that use of FEATS afforded considerable savings and improved analytical accuracies, process efficiencies and product reliability.

  15. Chemistry laboratory safety manual available

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsbrock, R. G.

    1968-01-01

    Chemistry laboratory safety manual outlines safe practices for handling hazardous chemicals and chemistry laboratory equipment. Included are discussions of chemical hazards relating to fire, health, explosion, safety equipment and procedures for certain laboratory techniques and manipulations involving glassware, vacuum equipment, acids, bases, and volatile solvents.

  16. Rescue Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Lifeshear cutter, a rescue tool for freeing accident victims from wreckage, was developed under the Clinton Administration's Technology Reinvestment Program. Prior cutting equipment was cumbersome and expensive; the new cutter is 50 percent lighter and 70 percent cheaper. The cutter is pyrotechnically-actuated, using a miniature version of the power cartridges used for separation devices on the Space Shuttle and other NASA spacecraft. Hi-Shear Technology Corporation developed the cutter with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and input from the City of Torrance (California) Fire Department.

  17. 9 CFR 590.502 - Equipment and utensils; PCB-containing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment and utensils; PCB-containing equipment. 590.502 Section 590.502 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.502 Equipment and utensils; PCB...

  18. Ethical considerations and proposed guidelines for the use of radio frequency identification: especially concerning its use for promoting public safety and national security.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Amber McKee; Labay, Vladimir

    2006-04-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is quickly growing in its applications. A variety of uses for the technology are beginning to be developed, including chips which can be used in identification cards, in individual items, and for human applications, allowing a chip to be embedded under the skin. Such chips could provide numerous benefits ranging from day-to-day convenience to the increased ability of the federal government to adequately ensure the safety of its citizens. However, there are also valid concerns about the potential of this technology to infringe on privacy, creating fears of a surveillance society. These are concerns that must be addressed quickly, with sensitivity to individual interests and societal welfare, allowing humanity to reap the benefits of convenience and safety without paying an unacceptable price in the loss of privacy.

  19. High-altitude-nuclear electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment simulation public health and safety considerations. Technical report, 1 Oct 89-31 May 91

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K.

    1992-03-01

    The existence of electromagnetic fields external to the working volumes of high-altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment simulators has raised both environmental and public-health concerns regarding the safety of HEMP environment simulator operations. This report contains a review of what HEMP is, what its effects on defense systems are, and why and how HEMP environment simulation testing is conducted. The state of present knowledge concerning the external simulator fields and their possible effects on biological and electronic systems is summarized. Research initiatives are identified to aid in answering the most important questions regarding the continued environmental safety of HEMP simulator operations. These initiatives are intended to support (1) development of options for modification and/or relocation of HEMP environment simulator facilities and (2) determination of safe exposure levels for biological and electronic systems. Recommendations for specific DoD actions are given.

  20. [Future perspectives for equipment maintenance and servicing].

    PubMed

    Frankenberger, H

    1987-03-01

    Based on the Equipment Safety Law, the Medical Technical Regulations in force since 1 January 1986, and the German Standard DIN 13252: "Inhalational anesthetic Apparatus--requirements for safety and testing", a maintenance system for medical equipment is presented. The maintenance system comprises the check of the equipment by the user before clinical use, maintenance procedures when the equipment is in daily clinical use (maintenance system I), inspection of the equipment at fixed intervals (maintenance system II), and the repair of the equipment should it break down (maintenance system III). Possibilities and perspectives for rationalizing test procedures by means of test simulators are shown. The initial or repeated instruction on medical equipment with life-supporting functions can be performed more systematically when appropriately designed test simulators are used.