Science.gov

Sample records for safety issue gsi

  1. Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 171 -- Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) failure from a loop subsequent to LOCA: Assessment of plant vulnerability and CDF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J.

    1998-03-01

    Generic Safety Issue 171 (GSI-171), Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) from a Loss Of Offsite Power (LOOP) subsequent to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), deals with an accident sequence in which a LOCA is followed by a LOOP. This issue was later broadened to include a LOOP followed by a LOCA. Plants are designed to handle a simultaneous LOCA and LOOP. In this paper, the authors address the unique issues that are involved i LOCA with delayed LOOP (LOCA/LOOP) and LOOP with delayed LOCA (LOOP/LOCA) accident sequences. LOCA/LOOP accidents are analyzed further by developing event-tree/fault-tree models to quantify their contributions to core-damage frequency (CDF) in a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor (PWR and a BWR). Engineering evaluation and judgments are used during quantification to estimate the unique conditions that arise in a LOCA/LOOP accident. The results show that the CDF contribution of such an accident can be a dominant contributor to plant risk, although BWRs are less vulnerable than PWRs.

  2. Aviation Safety Issues Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

    2009-01-01

    The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

  3. 76 FR 24925 - Solicitation for Public Comment on Potential Alternatives To Resolve Generic Safety Issue 191...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... informing the path forward to resolve Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 191, Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Sump... COMMISSION Solicitation for Public Comment on Potential Alternatives To Resolve Generic Safety Issue 191, Pressurized Water Reactor Sump Performance AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION:...

  4. Generic criticality safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    An independent group has been designated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (MMES) to internally review Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs) that describe containers for shipment of radioactive material. This group is called the Energy Systems Independent Review Group (ESIRG), reporting to the MMES Transportation Safety Manager as part of a central staff function. The ESIRG focus is Y-12 Plant packages, with additional review responsibilities for the Paducah Tiger UF{sub 6} overpack and 6M package. Review questions are posed directly to the SARP preparers. This paper addresses three generic issues that arose during the ESIRG criticality reviews: analysis tools, uncertainties in results, and resulting (finite) probability of criticality. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Module Safety Issues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2012-02-01

    Description of how to make PV modules so that they are less likely to turn into safety hazards. Making modules inherently safer with minimum additional cost is the preferred approach for PV. Safety starts with module design to ensure redundancy within the electrical circuitry to minimize open circuits and proper mounting instructions to prevent installation related ground faults. Module manufacturers must control the raw materials and processes to ensure that that every module is built like those qualified through the safety tests. This is the reason behind the QA task force effort to develop a 'Guideline for PV Module Manufacturing QA'. Periodic accelerated stress testing of production products is critical to validate the safety of the product. Combining safer PV modules with better systems designs is the ultimate goal. This should be especially true for PV arrays on buildings. Use of lower voltage dc circuits - AC modules, DC-DC converters. Use of arc detectors and interrupters to detect arcs and open the circuits to extinguish the arcs.

  6. Ground Safety Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    In the history of humankind, every space adventure, great or small, has begun on the ground. While this seems to be stating the obvious, mission and flight hardware designers who have overlooked this fact have paid a high price, either in loss or damage to the hardware pre-launch, or in mission failure or reduction. Designers may risk not only their flight hardware, but they may also risk their lives, their co-workers lives and even the general public by not heeding safety on the ground. Their eyes may be on the stars but their feet are on the ground! This discussion applies to all forms of flight hardware from the largest rockets to the smallest spare parts.

  7. Economic Issues on Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Adinolfi, Felice; Di Pasquale, Jorgelina; Capitanio, Fabian

    2016-01-18

    A globalised food trade, with a huge increase of the exchanged volume, extensive production and complex supply chains are contributing towards an increased number of microbiological food safety outbreaks. All of these factors are putting pressure on the stakeholders, either public or private, in terms of rule and control. In fact, this scenario could force manufacturers to be lenient towards food safety control intentionally, or unintentionally, and result in a major foodborne outbreak that causes health problems and economic loss. As a response to emerging calls for the adoption of a systemic approach to food safety, we try to identify and discuss the several related economics issue in this field. Based on an extensive analysis of academic and policy literatures on the economic effects of global environmental change at different stages of the food system, we highlight the main issues involving economists in the field of food safety. In the first part, we assessed the several approaches and problems related to the evaluation of food safety improvements, followed by an overview of drivers of food safety demand in the second part. The third section is devoted to discussing changes occurred at the institutional level in building and managing food safety policies. The last section summarises the main considerations aroused from the work.

  8. Economic Issues on Food Safety

    PubMed Central

    Adinolfi, Felice; Capitanio, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    A globalised food trade, with a huge increase of the exchanged volume, extensive production and complex supply chains are contributing towards an increased number of microbiological food safety outbreaks. All of these factors are putting pressure on the stakeholders, either public or private, in terms of rule and control. In fact, this scenario could force manufacturers to be lenient towards food safety control intentionally, or unintentionally, and result in a major foodborne outbreak that causes health problems and economic loss. As a response to emerging calls for the adoption of a systemic approach to food safety, we try to identify and discuss the several related economics issue in this field. Based on an extensive analysis of academic and policy literatures on the economic effects of global environmental change at different stages of the food system, we highlight the main issues involving economists in the field of food safety. In the first part, we assessed the several approaches and problems related to the evaluation of food safety improvements, followed by an overview of drivers of food safety demand in the second part. The third section is devoted to discussing changes occurred at the institutional level in building and managing food safety policies. The last section summarises the main considerations aroused from the work. PMID:27800432

  9. Maintenance as a safety issue.

    PubMed

    White, Jim

    2008-11-01

    Because safety is related to electrical power systems maintenance, it seems reasonable to assume there could be legal issues if maintenance is not performed. OSHA has not yet taken the stand that not performing maintenance as required by the manufacturer, NFPA 70B, or ANSI/NETA MTS-07 constitutes a willful violation. OSHA defines a willful citation as one where: "the employer knowingly commits with plain indifference to the law. The employer either knows that what he or she is doing constitutes a violation, or is aware that a hazardous condition existed and made no reasonable effort to eliminate it". However, NFPA 70E 2009 requires this maintenance, and OSHA has stated on its Web site that NFPA 70E is "a guide for meeting the requirements of the OSHA electrical regulations". In addition, federal courts have found that NFPA 70E is "standard industry practice." Once a company receives and accepts a willful citation, especially if received as the result of an accident investigation, its worker's compensation protection no longer shields it. One definition given by a trial attorney for a willful citation was that it is equal to negligent behavior. Be smart: Maintain that equipment and save yourself major problems, including unscheduled shutdowns and possible litigation.

  10. Five major NASA health and safety issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavert, Raymond B.

    2000-01-01

    The goal has been set to establish NASA as number one in safety in the nation. This includes Systems and Mission Safety as well as Occupational Safety for all NASA employees and contractors on and off the job. There are five major health and safety issues important in the pursuit of being number one and they are: (1) Radiation (2) Hearing (3) Habitability/Toxicology (4) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) (5) Stress. The issues have features of accumulated injury since NASA's future missions involve long time human presence in space i.e., International Space Station operations and Mars missions. The objective of this paper is to discuss these five issues in terms of controlling risks and enhancing health and safety. Safety metrics are discussed in terms of the overall goal of NASA to be number one in safety. .

  11. Electrosurgery: principles and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Odell, R C

    1995-09-01

    The use of monopolar electrosurgical energy has been the "gold standard" for the past 50 years. It has diverse capabilities, such as fulguration, precise vaporization, and coaptation of large vessels. Technologic advances in performance and safety have positioned this device as a useful tool in a surgeon's armamentarium. The adaptation of active electrode monitoring for stray energy as a result of insulation failure or capacitive coupling and the use of completely metal trocar cannulas will increase the confidence of the surgeon and the safety of his/ her patient. It is the author's opinion that its use will prove itself in laparoscopy. As with any surgical tool or energy source, education and skill are required. This introduction on the principal of the biophysics of electrical energy on tissue and the safety consideration is a start to further one's understanding of this surgical tool.

  12. Road safety issues for bus transport management.

    PubMed

    Cafiso, Salvatore; Di Graziano, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Giuseppina

    2013-11-01

    Because of the low percentage of crashes involving buses and the assumption that public transport improves road safety by reducing vehicular traffic, public interest in bus safety is not as great as that in the safety of other types of vehicles. It is possible that less attention is paid to the significance of crashes involving buses because the safety level of bus systems is considered to be adequate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions of bus managers with respect to safety issues and the potential effectiveness of various technologies in achieving higher safety standards. Bus managers were asked to give their opinions on safety issues related to drivers (training, skills, performance evaluation and behaviour), vehicles (maintenance and advanced devices) and roads (road and traffic safety issues) in response to a research survey. Kendall's algorithm was used to evaluate the level of concordance. The results showed that the majority of the proposed items were considered to have great potential for improving bus safety. The data indicated that in the experience of the participants, passenger unloading and pedestrians crossing near bus stops are the most dangerous actions with respect to vulnerable users. The final results of the investigation showed that start inhibition, automatic door opening, and the materials and internal architecture of buses were considered the items most strongly related to bus passenger safety. Brake assistance and vehicle monitoring systems were also considered to be very effective. With the exception of driver assistance systems for passenger and pedestrian safety, the perceptions of the importance of other driver assistance systems for vehicle monitoring and bus safety were not unanimous among the bus company managers who participated in this survey. The study results showed that the introduction of new technologies is perceived as an important factor in improving bus safety, but a better understanding

  13. MR safety issues particular to women.

    PubMed

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Litmanovich, Diana E

    2015-02-01

    Because of its lack of ionizing radiation, MR imaging is increasingly used for patients with cardiovascular disease, including young women. However, the risks related to the MR environment need to be acknowledged and prevented. For women, there are unique gender-related safety issues that are important to address in cardiovascular MR examinations. This article familiarizes radiologists with MR safety issues and current, evidence-based recommendations for specific situations such as pregnancy or lactation and imaging of women who have pelvic gynecologic devices such as intrauterine devices. Practical algorithms to minimize risk and increase MR safety for these women are suggested.

  14. Software safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-09-01

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems' use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems How can systems engineers and software engineers work together. to address the issues related to safety and reliability of computer systems This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  15. Safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-03-20

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems` use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT&T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict? What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems? What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems? How can systems engineers and software engineers work together to address the issues related safety and reliability of computer systems? This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and of upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  16. Safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-03-20

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems' use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems How can systems engineers and software engineers work together to address the issues related safety and reliability of computer systems This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and of upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  17. Software safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-09-01

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems` use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT&T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict? What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems? What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems? How can systems engineers and software engineers work together. to address the issues related to safety and reliability of computer systems? This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  18. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements; unresolved safety issues; generic safety issues; other multiplant action issues. Supplement 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, the NRC established a program for publishing an annual report on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was initially compiled and reported in three NUREG-series volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). The first annual supplement, which combined these volumes into a single report and presented updated information as of September 30, 1991, was published in December 1991. The second annual supplement, which provided updated information as of September 30, 1992, was published in December 1992. Supplement 2 also provided the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of other multiplant action (MPA) issues not related to TMI Action Plan requirements, USIs, or GSIs. This third annual NUREG report, Supplement 3, presents updated information as of September 30, 1993. This report gives a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, GSIs, and other MPAs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. Additionally, this report serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ``A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,`` which tracks safety issues until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees.

  19. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 29: Bolting degradation or failure in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.

    1991-09-01

    Generic Safety Issue (GSI)-29 deals with staff concerns about public risk due to degradation or failure of safety-related bolting in nuclear power plants. The issue was initiated in November 1982. Value-impact studies of a mandatory program on safety-related bolting for operating plants were inconclusive: therefore, additional regulatory requirements for operating plants could not be justified in accordance with provisions of 10 CFR 50.109. In addition, based on operating experience with bolting in both nuclear and conventional power plants, the actions already taken through bulletins, generic letters, and information notices, and the industry-proposed actions, the staff concluded that a sufficient technical basis exists for the resolution of GSI-29. The staff further concluded that leakage of bolted pressure joints is possible but catastrophic failure of a reactor coolant pressure boundary joint that will lead to significant accident sequences is highly unlikely. For future plants, it was concluded that a new Standard Review Plant section should be developed to codify existing bolting requirements and industry-developed initiatives. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  20. FAIR project at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kester, Oliver; Spiller, Peter; Stoecker, Horst

    FAIR -- the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe -- constructed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH in Darmstadt comprises an international centre of heavy ion accelerators that will drive heavy ion and antimatter research (FBTR, 2006). FAIR will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing a large variety of fore-front research in physics and applied science. FAIR will deliver antiproton and ion beams of unprecedented intensities and qualities. The main part of the FAIR facility is a sophisticated and cost efficient accelerator system, which delivers parallel beams to different experiments of the FAIR experimental collaborations -- APPA, NuSTAR, CBM and PANDA. The accelerated primary beams will then be employed to create new, often highly exotic particles in a series of parallel experimental programs. Experiments with exotic particles will explore fundamental processes which are expected to have taken place in the early phases and still happen in the on-going evolution of the Universe. These processes produced the basic constituents of matter and overall structure we observe today...

  1. Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane andPropane

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-08-20

    The hydrogen economy is not possible if the safety standards currently applied to liquid hydrogen and hydrogen gas by many laboratories are applied to devices that use either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary people without the special training. This report asks, 'How is hydrogen different from flammable gasses that are commonly being used all over the world?' This report compares the properties of hydrogen, methane and propane and how these properties may relate to safety when they are used in both the liquid and gaseous state. Through such an analysis, sensible safety standards for the large-scale (or even small-scale) use of liquid and gaseous hydrogen systems can be developed. This paper is meant to promote discussion of issues related to hydrogen safety so that engineers designing equipment can factor sensible safety standards into their designs.

  2. Safety issues of current analgesics: an update

    PubMed Central

    CAZACU, IRINA; MOGOSAN, CRISTINA; LOGHIN, FELICIA

    2015-01-01

    Pain represents a complex experience which can be approached by various medicines. Non-opioid and opioid analgesics are the most common drugs used to manage different types of pain. The increased attention nowadays to pain management entailed concomitantly more frequent adverse drug reactions (ADRs) related to analgesic use. Drug-drug interactions can be sometimes responsible for the adverse effects. However, a significant proportion of analgesic ADRs are preventable, which would avoid patient suffering. In order to draw the attention to analgesics risks and to minimize the negative consequences related to their use, the present review comprises a synthesis of the most important safety issues described in the scientific literature. It highlights the potential risks of the most frequently used analgesic medicines: non-opioid (paracetamol, metamizole, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and opioid analgesics. Even if there is a wide experience in their use, they continue to capture attention with safety concerns and with potential risks recently revealed. Acknowledging potential safety problems represents the first step for health professionals in assuring a safe and efficient analgesic treatment with minimum risks to patients. Taking into consideration all medical and environmental factors and carefully monitoring the patients are also essential in preventing and early detecting analgesic ADRs. PMID:26528060

  3. Safety issues with bisphosphonate therapy for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Ernest; Pazianas, Michael; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of bisphosphonates (BP) in improving BMD and reducing fracture risk. Various safety issues that were not noted in clinical trials have, however, now emerged with post-marketing surveillance and increasing clinical experience. The risk of atypical femoral fracture could increase with long-term use of BP, although absolute risk is very small, particularly when balanced against benefits. A drug holiday should be considered after 5 years of treatment for patients at low risk of fracture, although there is no official recommendation regarding this to guide clinicians. Osteonecrosis of the jaw from low-dose BP used for osteoporosis is very rare, and mainly a complication with high-dose i.v. BP used in oncology. The risk of atrial fibrillation too is negligible, and a definite link cannot be established between BP and oesophageal cancer. BP should be avoided in patients with severe renal impairment and during pregnancy and lactation because of limited safety data. Further epidemiological and clinical data are required to establish safety of BP in long-term users (>5 years) and provide evidence-based management.

  4. Dust Combustion Safety Issues for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety research task to identify the safety issues and phenomenology of metallic dust fires and explosions that are postulated for fusion experiments. There are a variety of metal dusts that are created by plasma erosion and disruptions within the plasma chamber, as well as normal industrial dusts generated in the more conventional equipment in the balance of plant. For fusion, in-vessel dusts are generally mixtures of several elements; that is, the constituent elements in alloys and the variety of elements used for in-vessel materials. For example, in-vessel dust could be composed of beryllium from a first wall coating, tungsten from a divertor plate, copper from a plasma heating antenna or diagnostic, and perhaps some iron and chromium from the steel vessel wall or titanium and vanadium from the vessel wall. Each of these elements has its own unique combustion characteristics, and mixtures of elements must be evaluated for the mixture’s combustion properties. Issues of particle size, dust temperature, and presence of other combustible materials (i.e., deuterium and tritium) also affect combustion in air. Combustion in other gases has also been investigated to determine if there are safety concerns with “inert” atmospheres, such as nitrogen. Several coolants have also been reviewed to determine if coolant breach into the plasma chamber would enhance the combustion threat; for example, in-vessel steam from a water coolant breach will react with metal dust. The results of this review are presented here.

  5. Health safety issues of synthetic food colorants.

    PubMed

    Amchova, Petra; Kotolova, Hana; Ruda-Kucerova, Jana

    2015-12-01

    Increasing attention has been recently paid to the toxicity of additives used in food. The European Parliament and the Council published the REGULATION (EC) No. 1333/2008 on food additives establishing that the toxicity of food additives evaluated before 20th January 2009 must be re-evaluated by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The aim of this review is to survey current knowledge specifically on the toxicity issues of synthetic food colorants using official reports published by the EFSA and other available studies published since the respective report. Synthetic colorants described are Tartrazine, Quinoline Yellow, Sunset Yellow, Azorubine, Ponceau 4R, Erythrosine, Allura Red, Patent Blue, Indigo Carmine, Brilliant Blue FCF, Green S, Brilliant Black and Brown HT. Moreover, a summary of evidence on possible detrimental effects of colorant mixes on children's behaviour is provided and future research directions are outlined.

  6. Emerging food safety issues: An EU perspective.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, John D G

    2016-05-01

    Safe food is the right of every citizen of the European Union (EU). A comprehensive and dynamic framework of food and feed safety legislation has been put in place and the EU's executive arm - the European Commission - is responsible for ensuring that the EU member states apply food law consistently. Similarly, the Commission plays an important role in ensuring that imported food meets the EU's stringent food safety standards. Consumer perceptions of unsafe food tend to focus on acute outbreaks of bacterial or viral origin. In recent years there have been a number of diverse food crises associated with fraudulent activity which may (e.g. melamine in dairy products in China) or may not (e.g. the horse meat scandal in the EU) represent a genuine food safety risk. Well publicized incidents of chronic exposure to chemical contamination in the EU (e.g. dioxins in meat and mycotoxins in nuts) have required robust coordinated policy responses from the Commission. Despite the decreasing incidence of non-compliant residues of veterinary medicinal products and banned substances in animal products, EU consumers are increasingly concerned about the use of such products in food-producing animals, including in the context of the build-up of antimicrobial resistance in animals and transfer to humans. The Commission plays a key role in coordination of the EU member states' responses to such incidents, in risk management, and in preparation for emerging issues. This paper focuses on how the EU as a whole has dealt with a number of food crises, and what can be learned from past incidents. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Strategy for resolution of the flammable gas safety issue

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-05-23

    This document provides a strategy for resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. It defines the key elements required for the following: Closing the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ); Providing the administrative basis for resolving the safety issue; Defining the data needed to support these activities; and Providing the technical and administrative path for removing tanks from the Watch List.

  8. Bicycle-Safety Education. Facts and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Kenneth D.

    Current information on bicycle-safety education is provided for persons engaged in the development, evaluation, or use of bicycle-safety education programs and materials. Following an introduction to bicycle safety, section II provides a brief description of what is known about the size and composition of the U.S. population of bicycles and…

  9. Professional Issues in System Safety Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, John; Thomas, Martyn; Redmill, Felix

    For many years the profession of system safety engineering has been emerging. This paper argues that the time has now come when it requires recognition, a voice, proper governance and leadership. System safety engineering is an amalgam of many disciplines, in particular, software engineering, safety engineering and management, and systems engineering, and this paper shows that system safety engineering must address the most difficult aspects of all of these. But professional matters extend beyond merely technical considerations, and the paper concludes by showing why there is the need for a new professional body.

  10. Cabin Safety Issues Related to Pre-Departure and Inflight Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) in a partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), participating carriers, and labor organizations. It is designed to improve the National Airspace System by collecting and studying reports detailing unsafe conditions and events in the aviation industry. Employees are able to report safety issues or concerns with confidentiality and without fear of discipline. Safety reports highlighting the human element in cabin safety issues and concerns.

  11. Nuclear data for criticality safety - current issues

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Jordan, W.C.; Wright, R.Q.

    1995-06-01

    Traditionally, nuclear data evaluations have been performed in support of the analysis and design of thermal and fast reactors. In general, the neutron spectra characteristic of the thermal and fast systems used for data testing are predominantly in the low- and high-energy range with a relatively small influence from the intermediate-energy range. In the area of nuclear criticality safety, nuclear systems arising from applications involving fissionable materials outside reactors can lead to situations very different from those most commonly found in reactor analysis and design. These systems are not limited to thermal or fast and may have significant influence from the intermediate energy range. The extension of the range of applicability of the nuclear data evaluation beyond thermal and fast systems is therefore needed to cover problems found in nuclear criticality safety. Before criticality safety calculations are performed, the bias and uncertainties of the codes and cross sections that are used must be determined. The most common sources of uncertainties, in general, are the calculational methodologies and the uncertainties related to the nuclear data, such as the microscopic cross sections, entering into the calculational procedure. The aim here is to focus on the evaluated nuclear data pertaining to applications in nuclear criticality safety.

  12. Nuclear power plant safety related pump issues

    SciTech Connect

    Colaccino, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper summarizes of a number of pump issues raised since the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing in 1994. General issues discussed include revision of NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, issuance of NRC Information Notice 95-08 on ultrasonic flow meter uncertainties, relief requests for tests that are determined by the licensee to be impractical, and items in the ASME OM-1995 Code, Subsection ISTB, for pumps. The paper also discusses current pump vibration issues encountered in relief requests and plant inspections - which include smooth running pumps, absolute vibration limits, and vertical centrifugal pump vibration measurement requirements. Two pump scope issues involving boiling water reactor waterlog and reactor core isolation cooling pumps are also discussed. Where appropriate, NRC guidance is discussed.

  13. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

    1999-10-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  14. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

    1999-09-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  15. Health care quality and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Becky Sutherland

    2006-05-01

    Our health-care system is burdened with high costs, health-care disparities, overtreatment, undertreatment, high error rates, and fraud and abuse. At the same time, the United States has achieved spectacular medical advances using the latest technology. As a result, health-care quality measurement, publicly reported patient safety and quality indicators, and evaluation of patients' experience of care are watchwords of a new era of accountability for health-care professionals and organizations. The health-care industry is subject to increasing regulation, private sector challenges, and public demand to make significant improvements in all three components of the quality triad: structure, process, and outcome. This article examines regulatory initiatives and industry trends pertaining to patient safety and quality measurement and concludes with specific suggestions for the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology.

  16. Airport ramp safety and crew performance issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Roy; Drew, Charles; Patten, Marcia; Matchette, Robert

    1995-01-01

    This study examined 182 ramp operations incident reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database, to determine which factors influence ramp operation incidents. It was found that incidents occurred more often during aircraft arrival operations than during departure operations; incidents occurred most often at the gate stop area, less so at the gate entry/exit areas, and least on the ramp fringe areas; and reporters cited fewer incidents when more ground crew were present. The authors offer suggestions for both airline management and flight crews to reduce the rate of ramp incidents.

  17. ISV safety, processing, and starter path issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, D K; Kindle, C H

    1991-04-01

    Numerous experiments and studies related to safety concerns in the in situ vitrification (ISV) process have been conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Topics of interest include (1) combustible inclusions, (2) sealed containers, (3) radiant heat surge, (4) electrical shock, (5) general risk analysis, and (6) Pu criticality. The data and analyses are those used for the initial ISV development and subsequent improvement; the majority was performed in 1987 or earlier. The purpose of this report is to document these analyses for reference purposes; knowledge gained more recently is, or will be, incorporated in other documents. 33 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  18. Gender issues on occupational safety and health.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Eugenio; Vona, Rosa; Monterosso, Davide; Giammarioli, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing proportion of women in the workforce raises a range of gender-related questions about the different effects of work-related risks on men and women. Few studies have characterized gender differences across occupations and industries, although at this time, the gender sensitive approach is starting to acquire relevance in the field of human preventive medicine. The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work has encouraged a policy of gender equality in all European member states. Italy has adopted European provisions with new specific legislation that integrates the previous laws and introduces the gender differences into the workplace. Despite the fact that gender equal legislation opportunities have been enacted in Italy, their application is delayed by some difficulties. This review examines some of these critical aspects.

  19. Influence Map Methodology for Evaluating Systemic Safety Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    "Raising the bar" in safety performance is a critical challenge for many organizations, including Kennedy Space Center. Contributing-factor taxonomies organize information about the reasons accidents occur and therefore are essential elements of accident investigations and safety reporting systems. Organizations must balance efforts to identify causes of specific accidents with efforts to evaluate systemic safety issues in order to become more proactive about improving safety. This project successfully addressed the following two problems: (1) methods and metrics to support the design of effective taxonomies are limited and (2) influence relationships among contributing factors are not explicitly modeled within a taxonomy.

  20. Safety Issues for HIFU Transducer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Gérard; Berriet, Rémi; Chapelon, Jean Yves; ter Haar, Gail; Lafon, Cyril; Le Baron, Olivier; Chupin, Laurent; Pichonnat, Fabrice; Lenormand, Jérôme

    2005-03-01

    In contrast with most ultrasound modalities for medical applications, (especially ultrasound imaging), High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) involves technologies and procedures which may present risk to the patient. These risks, resulting from the high power levels required for effective therapy, should be taken into account at the earliest stages in the design of a system dedicated to HIFU treatment. An understanding of these risks must thus be shared amongst the many players in the field of therapy using high power ultrasound. Moreover, since the number of applications of HIFU has increased appreciably over recent years and the technology is ready to move from the research to the industrial level, it is worth now considering solutions that should be put in place to guarantee the safety of the patient during HIFU treatment. This paper reports thoughts on this, identifies some risks to the patient that must be taken into consideration in the design of HIFU transducers, and proposes some solutions that could prevent the deleterious consequences of transducer misuse or failure. For the main risks identified, such as exceeding the desired acoustic power or poor control of tissue targeting, a description of transducer performance that could potentially result in problems is systematically sought. This allows proposals for precautions to be taken during operation to be made. Parameters which should be monitored to ensure safe use are also suggested. This type of approach, which should be undertaken for the different components of a therapeutic system, highlights the challenges that must be faced in the immediate future for the development and safe exploitation of HIFU systems. The necessity for standard definitions of the parameters to be checked or monitored during HIFU treatments is crucial in this approach, as is the availability of reliable dedicated measurement devices. Co-ordinated action on these topics in the HIFU community would contribute to the

  1. Food safety: current situation, unaddressed issues and the emerging priorities.

    PubMed

    Elmi, M

    2004-11-01

    This paper reviews the topic of food safety with reference to the Eastern Mediterranean Region. The differing views of food safety and the current situation with regard to ensuring food safety are presented. Also discussed are some of the unaddressed issues and challenges related to food safety. The new conditions that have arisen in the modern world which have facilitated the emergence of pathogens are presented, such as changes in animal husbandry, changes in international trade and travel, lifestyle and consumer changes. The urgent need for action in order to reduce the risk of microbiological and chemical foodborne diseases is emphasized. The food chain starts from farm and ends at fork; controlling this complex process requires an integrated approach and a responsible authority to oversee it in order to protect and promote food safety.

  2. Patient Safety and Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings: Issues, Solutions, and Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Kear, Tamara; Ulrich, Beth

    2015-01-01

    In order to assure patient safety, it is necessary to create positive patient safety cultures. This article presents the initial qualitative results from a national study, "Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings." Based on the responses of participants, themes were identified for both issues and potential solutions and best practices. Issue themes included underreporting of events and near misses, poor staffing ratios, long work hours, communication lapses, and training, infection control, and compliance. Potential solutions and best practice themes included non-punitive and transparent event reporting, fall reduction strategies, improved medication administration practices, and scheduled safety huddles and safety meetings. The results of this landmark study can be used to start conversations and spark education programs to improve patient safety culture in nephrology nurse practice settings.

  3. Understanding Current Safety Issues for Trajectory Based Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; Stewart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Increases in procedural complexity were investigated as a possible contributor to flight path deviations in airline operations. Understanding current operational issues and their causes must be embraced to maintain current safety standards while increasing future functionality. ASRS data and expert narratives were used to discover factors relating to pilot deviations. Our investigation pointed to ATC intervention, automation confusion, procedure design, and mixed equipment as primary issues. Future work will need to include objective data and mitigation strategies.

  4. Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, Ronald Armand

    2006-06-01

    Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

  5. Food Supply and Food Safety Issues in China

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hon-Ming; Remais, Justin; Fung, Ming-Chiu; Xu, Liqing; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Food supply and food safety are major global public health issues, and are particularly important in heavily populated countries such as China. Rapid industrialisation and modernisation in China are having profound effects on food supply and food safety. In this Review, we identified important factors limiting agricultural production in China, including conversion of agricultural land to other uses, freshwater deficits, and soil quality issues. Additionally, increased demand for some agricultural products is examined, particularly those needed to satisfy the increased consumption of animal products in the Chinese diet, which threatens to drive production towards crops used as animal feed. Major sources of food poisoning in China include pathogenic microorganisms, toxic animals and plants entering the food supply, and chemical contamination. Meanwhile, two growing food safety issues are illegal additives and contamination of the food supply by toxic industrial waste. China’s connections to global agricultural markets are also having important effects on food supply and food safety within the country. Although the Chinese Government has shown determination to reform laws, establish monitoring systems, and strengthen food safety regulation, weak links in implementation remain. PMID:23746904

  6. Food supply and food safety issues in China.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hon-Ming; Remais, Justin; Fung, Ming-Chiu; Xu, Liqing; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming

    2013-06-08

    Food supply and food safety are major global public health issues, and are particularly important in heavily populated countries such as China. Rapid industrialisation and modernisation in China are having profound effects on food supply and food safety. In this Review, we identified important factors limiting agricultural production in China, including conversion of agricultural land to other uses, freshwater deficits, and soil quality issues. Additionally, increased demand for some agricultural products is examined, particularly those needed to satisfy the increased consumption of animal products in the Chinese diet, which threatens to drive production towards crops used as animal feed. Major sources of food poisoning in China include pathogenic microorganisms, toxic animals and plants entering the food supply, and chemical contamination. Meanwhile, two growing food safety issues are illegal additives and contamination of the food supply by toxic industrial waste. China's connections to global agricultural markets are also having important effects on food supply and food safety within the country. Although the Chinese Government has shown determination to reform laws, establish monitoring systems, and strengthen food safety regulation, weak links in implementation remain.

  7. The new data acquisition system at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Essel, H.G.; Hoffmann, J.; Kurz, N.; Mayer, R.S.; Ott, W.; Schall, D.

    1996-02-01

    The new general purpose data acquisition system developed at GSI is currently installed at about 30 experiments at GSI and other sites. It is based on the LynxOS operating system. Several CPUs, i.e. GSI developed CAMAC computer boards, VME processor boards, and Aleph Event Builders, are connected by a memory mapped bus, i.e. a VSB or VME bus. It can be configured easily for various hardware setups and is highly optimized for fast trigger rates and data throughput. The first and successful experiment taking data with the system was the SHIP production run for elements 110 and 111.

  8. At Issue: Classroom Management and Safety, an Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pricer, Wayne F.

    2008-01-01

    In the wake of the horrific shootings at Virginia Tech and Northern Illinois University, many colleges and universities have begun to reexamine and reevaluate classroom management strategies and practices. Several institutions have taken additional steps to try to deal with the issue of physical safety in the classroom. This article presents an…

  9. Ecological Issues Related to Children's Health and Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Jerry; Kohler, Maxie

    2009-01-01

    Issues concerning the health and safety of children and youth occur at multiple levels. Bronfenbrenner (1995) proposed an ecological systems approach in which multiple systems interact to enhance or diminish children's development. The same systems are at work in health promotion. The authors present and review articles that reflect the multiple…

  10. Food Safety. Nourishing News. Volume 3, Issue 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Serving safe food is a critical responsibility for maintaining quality foodservice programs and healthy environments at schools and child care facilities. Child Nutrition Programs hopes you find this newsletter of assistance when reviewing the food safety program you have at each serving site. The articles contained in this issue are: (1) A…

  11. Internet Safety Issues for Adolescents and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buijs, Petra C. M.; Boot, Erik; Shugar, Andrea; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Bassett, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Research on Internet safety for adolescents has identified several important issues including unwanted exposure to sexual material and sexual solicitation. Methods: Although individuals with intellectual disabilities often have poor insight and judgment, and may therefore be at risk for Internet dangers, there is surprisingly little…

  12. Characterization strategy report for the organic safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.; Campbell, J.A.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes a logical approach to resolving potential safety issues resulting from the presence of organic components in hanford tank wastes. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to provide a pathway for quantifying organic safety issue risk. The scope of the report is limited to selected organics (i.e., solvents and complexants) that were added to the tanks and their degradation products. The greatest concern is the potential exothermic reactions that can occur between these components and oxidants, such as sodium nitrate, that are present in the waste tanks. The organic safety issue is described in a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure-event reaction processes in tank systems and phase domains (domains are regions of the tank that have similar contents) that are depicted with the SLD. Applying this approach to quantify risk requires knowing the composition and distribution of the organic and inorganic components to determine (1) how much energy the waste would release in the various domains, (2) the toxicity of the region associated with a disruptive event, and (3) the probability of an initiating reaction. Five different characterization options are described, each providing a different level of quality in calculating the risks involved with organic safety issues. Recommendations include processing existing data through the SLD to estimate risk, developing models needed to link more complex characterization information for the purpose of estimating risk, and examining correlations between the characterization approaches for optimizing information quality while minimizing cost in estimating risk.

  13. The FIRST experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleskac, R.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Finck, C.; Golosio, B.; Gallardo, M. I.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Piersanti, L.; Quesada, J. M.; Raciti, G.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.; Patera, V.

    2012-06-01

    The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at the SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt has been designed for the measurement of ion fragmentation cross-sections at different angles and energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in several fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The start of the scientific program of the FIRST experiment was on summer 2011 and was focused on the measurement of 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8 mm) graphite target. The detector is partly based on an already existing setup made of a dipole magnet (ALADiN), a time projection chamber (TP-MUSIC IV), a neutron detector (LAND) and a time of flight scintillator system (TOFWALL). This pre-existing setup has been integrated with newly designed detectors in the Interaction Region, around the carbon target placed in a sample changer. The new detectors are a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger scintillator system optimized for the detection of light fragments emitted at large angles. In this paper we review the experimental setup, then we present the simulation software, the data acquisition system and finally the trigger strategy of the experiment.

  14. Radiation safety issues related to radiolabeled antibodies. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D.E.; Baum, J.W.; Meinhold, C. B. )

    1991-03-01

    Techniques related to the use of radiolabeled antibodies in humans are reviewed and evaluated in this report. It is intended as an informational resource for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and NRC licensees. Descriptions of techniques and health and safety issues are provided. Principal methods for labeling antibodies are summarized to help identify related radiation safety problems in the preparation of dosages for administration to patients. The descriptions are derived from an extensive literature review and consultations with experts in the field. A glossary of terms and acronyms is also included. An assessment was made of the extent of the involvement of organizations (other than the NRC) with safety issues related to radiolabeled antibodies, in order to identify regulatory issues which require attention. Federal regulations and guides were also reviewed for their relevance. A few (but significant) differences between the use of common radiopharmaceuticals and radiolabeled antibodies were observed. The clearance rate of whole, radiolabeled immunoglobulin is somewhat slower than common radiopharmaceuticals, and new methods of administration are being used. New nuclides are being used or considered (e.g., Re-186 and At-211) for labeling antibodies. Some of these nuclides present new dosimetry, instrument calibration, and patient management problems. Subjects related to radiation safety that require additional research are identified. 149 refs., 3 figs., 20 tabs.

  15. Editorial: emerging issues in sociotechnical systems thinking and workplace safety

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Y. Ian; Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Dainoff, Marvin J.; Carayon, Pascale; Leveson, Nancy G.; Robertson, Michelle M.; Courtney, Theodore K.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of on-the-job accidents and fatalities and the harm of associated human suffering continue to present an important challenge for safety researchers and practitioners. While significant improvements have been achieved in recent decades, the workplace accident rate remains unacceptably high. This has spurred interest in the development of novel research approaches, with particular interest in the systemic influences of social/organisational and technological factors. In response, the Hopkinton Conference on Sociotechnical Systems and Safety was organised to assess the current state of knowledge in the area and to identify research priorities. Over the course of several months prior to the conference, leading international experts drafted collaborative, state-of-the-art reviews covering various aspects of sociotechnical systems and safety. These papers, presented in this special issue, cover topics ranging from the identification of key concepts and definitions to sociotechnical characteristics of safe and unsafe organisations. This paper provides an overview of the conference and introduces key themes and topics. Practitioner Summary: Sociotechnical approaches to workplace safety are intended to draw practitioners' attention to the critical influence that systemic social/organisational and technological factors exert on safety-relevant outcomes. This paper introduces major themes addressed in the Hopkinton Conference within the context of current workplace safety research and practice challenges. PMID:25819595

  16. Safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Greenwall, L

    2013-07-01

    In-office tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) has been practised in dentistry without significant safety concerns for more than a century. While few disputes exist regarding the efficacy of peroxide-based at-home whitening since its first introduction in 1989, its safety has been the cause of controversy and concern. This article reviews and discusses safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials, including biological properties and toxicology of H₂O₂, use of chlorine dioxide, safety studies on tooth whitening, and clinical considerations of its use. Data accumulated during the last two decades demonstrate that, when used properly, peroxide-based tooth whitening is safe and effective. The most commonly seen side effects are tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation, which are usually mild to moderate and transient. So far there is no evidence of significant health risks associated with tooth whitening; however, potential adverse effects can occur with inappropriate application, abuse, or the use of inappropriate whitening products. With the knowledge on peroxide-based whitening materials and the recognition of potential adverse effects associated with the procedure, dental professionals are able to formulate an effective and safe tooth whitening regimen for individual patients to achieve maximal benefits while minimising potential risks.

  17. Preventable Errors in Organ Transplantation: An Emerging Patient Safety Issue?

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Michael G.; Holl, Jane L.; Ladner, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Several widely publicized errors in transplantation including a death due ABO incompatibility, two HIV transmissions and two HCV transmissions have raised concerns about medical errors in organ transplantation. The root cause analysis of each of these events revealed preventable failures in the systems and processes of care as the underlying causes. In each event, no standardized system or redundant process was in place to mitigate the failures that led to the error. Additional system and process vulnerabilities such as poor clinician communication, erroneous data transcription and transmission were also identified. Organ transplantation, because it is highly complex, often stresses the systems and processes of care and, therefore, offers a unique opportunity to proactively identify vulnerabilities and potential failures. Initial steps have been taken to understand such issues through the OPTN/UNOS Operations and Safety Committee, the Disease Transmission Advisory Committee (DTAC), and the current A2ALL ancillary Safety Study. However, to effectively improve patient safety in organ transplantation, the development of a process for reporting of preventable errors that affords protection and the support of empiric research are critical. Further, the transplant community needs to embrace the implementation of evidence-based system and process improvements that will mitigate existing safety vulnerabilities. PMID:22703471

  18. Science and technology issues in spacecraft fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    1987-01-01

    The space station, a permanently-inhabited orbiting laboratory, places new demands on spacecraft fire safety. Long-duration missions may call for more-constrained fire controls, but the accessibility of the space station to a variety of users may call for less-restrictive measures. This paper discusses fire safety issues through a review of the state of the art and a presentation of key findings from a recent NASA Lewis Research Center Workshop. The subjects covered are the fundamental science of low-gravity combustion and the technology advances in fire detection, extinguishment, materials assessment, and atmosphere selection. Key concerns are for the adoption of a fire-safe atmosphere and the substitution for the effective but toxic extinguishant, halon 1301. The fire safety studies and reviews provide several recommendations for further action. One is the expanded research in combustion, sensors, and materials in the low-gravity environment of space. Another is the development of generalized fire-safety standards for spacecraft through cooperative endeavors with aerospace and outside Government and industry sources.

  19. 77 FR 14402 - Draft Guidance on Classifying Significant Postmarket Drug Safety Issues; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... ``Classifying Significant Postmarket Drug Safety Issues.'' This draft guidance describes FDA's current approach... ``Classifying Significant Postmarket Drug Safety Issues.'' This draft guidance describes CDER's current approach... Archiving, Reporting, and Regulatory Tracking System (DARRTS), a centralized data base that enables...

  20. Current issues and perspectives in food safety and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrand, G

    2015-12-01

    In this review, current issues and opportunities in food safety assessment are discussed. Food safety is considered an essential element inherent in global food security. Hazard characterization is pivotal within the continuum of risk assessment, but it may be conceived only within a very limited frame as a true alternative to risk assessment. Elucidation of the mode of action underlying a given hazard is vital to create a plausible basis for human toxicology evaluation. Risk assessment, to convey meaningful risk communication, must be based on appropriate and reliable consideration of both exposure and mode of action. New perspectives, provided by monitoring human exogenous and endogenous exposure biomarkers, are considered of great promise to support classical risk extrapolation from animal toxicology.

  1. Safety issues of dry fuel storage at RSWF

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.L.; Zahn, T.P.

    1995-02-01

    Safety issues associated with the dry storage of EBR-II spent fuel are presented and discussed. The containers for the fuel have been designed to prevent a leak of fission gases to the environment. The storage system has four barriers for the fission gases. These barriers are the fuel cladding, an inner container, an outer container, and the liner at the RSWF. Analysis has shown that the probability of a leak to the environment is much less than 10{sup {minus}6} per year, indicating that such an event is not considered credible. A drop accident, excessive thermal loads, criticality, and possible failure modes of the containers are also addressed.

  2. Aspartame. Review of safety issues. Council on Scientific Affairs.

    PubMed

    1985-07-19

    This report examines the safety issues related to the nutritive sweetener aspartame, including possible toxic effects of aspartame's component amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine, and its major decomposition products, methanol and diketopiperazine, and the potential synergistic effect of aspartame and dietary carbohydrate on brain neurochemicals. Available evidence suggests that consumption of aspartame by normal humans is safe and is not associated with serious adverse health effects. Individuals who need to control their phenylalanine intake should handle aspartame like any other source of phenylalanine.

  3. HTGR Dust Safety Issues and Needs for Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Paul W. Humrickhouse

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a summary of high temperature gas-cooled reactor dust safety issues. It draws upon a literature review and the proceedings of the Very High Temperature Reactor Dust Assessment Meeting held in Rockville, MD in March 2011 to identify and prioritize the phenomena and issues that characterize the effect of carbonaceous dust on high temperature reactor safety. It reflects the work and input of approximately 40 participants from the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Labs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, industry, academia, and international nuclear research organizations on the topics of dust generation and characterization, transport, fission product interactions, and chemical reactions. The meeting was organized by the Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project, with support from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Information gleaned from the report and related meetings will be used to enhance the fuel, graphite, and methods technical program plans that guide research and development under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. Based on meeting discussions and presentations, major research and development needs include: generating adsorption isotherms for fission products that display an affinity for dust, investigating the formation and properties of carbonaceous crust on the inside of high temperature reactor coolant pipes, and confirming the predominant source of dust as abrasion between fuel spheres and the fuel handling system.

  4. Status report on resolution of Waste Tank Safety Issues at the Hanford Site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dukelow, G.T.; Hanson, G.A.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide and update the status of activities supporting the resolution of waste tank safety issues and system deficiencies at the Hanford Site. This report provides: (1) background information on safety issues and system deficiencies; (2) a description of the Tank Waste Remediation System and the process for managing safety issues and system deficiencies; (3) changes in safety issue description, prioritization, and schedules; and (4) a summary of the status, plans, order of magnitude, cost, and schedule for resolving safety issues and system deficiencies.

  5. Safety and Regulatory Issues of the Thorium Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, Brian; Worrall, Andrew; Powers, Jeffrey; Bowman, Steve; Flanagan, George; Gehin, Jess

    2014-02-01

    Thorium has been widely considered an alternative to uranium fuel because of its relatively large natural abundance and its ability to breed fissile fuel (233U) from natural thorium (232Th). Possible scenarios for using thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle include use in different nuclear reactor types (light water, high temperature gas cooled, fast spectrum sodium, molten salt, etc.), advanced accelerator-driven systems, or even fission-fusion hybrid systems. The most likely near-term application of thorium in the United States is in currently operating light water reactors (LWRs). This use is primarily based on concepts that mix thorium with uranium (UO2 + ThO2), add fertile thorium (ThO2) fuel pins to LWR fuel assemblies, or use mixed plutonium and thorium (PuO2 + ThO2) fuel assemblies. The addition of thorium to currently operating LWRs would result in a number of different phenomenological impacts on the nuclear fuel. Thorium and its irradiation products have nuclear characteristics that are different from those of uranium. In addition, ThO2, alone or mixed with UO2 fuel, leads to different chemical and physical properties of the fuel. These aspects are key to reactor safety-related issues. The primary objectives of this report are to summarize historical, current, and proposed uses of thorium in nuclear reactors; provide some important properties of thorium fuel; perform qualitative and quantitative evaluations of both in-reactor and out-of-reactor safety issues and requirements specific to a thorium-based fuel cycle for current LWR reactor designs; and identify key knowledge gaps and technical issues that need to be addressed for the licensing of thorium LWR fuel in the United States.

  6. Safety in GPR prospecting: a rarely-considered issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Pajewski, Lara; Trela, Christiane; Carrick Utsi, Erica

    2016-04-01

    Safety issues (of people first of all, but also of the equipment and environment) are rarely considered in Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) prospecting and, more in general, in near-surface geophysical prospecting. As is right and fully understandable, the scientific community devotes greatest attention first of all to the theoretical and practical aspects of GPR technique, affecting the quality of attainable results, secondly to the efforts and costs needed to achieve them [1-2]. However, the (luckily) growing GPR market and range of applications make it worth giving serious consideration to safety issues, too. The existing manuals dealing with safety in geophysics are mainly concerned with applications requiring "deep" geophysical prospecting, for example the search for oilfields and other hydrocarbon resources [3]. Near-surface geophysics involves less dangers than deep geophysics, of course. Nevertheless, several accidents have already happened during GPR experimental campaigns. We have personally had critical experiences and collected reliable testimonies concerning occurred problems as mountain sicks, fractures of legs, stomach problems, allergic reactions, encounters with potentially-dangerous animals, and more. We have also noticed that much more attention is usually paid to safety issues during indoor experimental activities (in laboratory), rather than during outdoor fieldworks. For example, the Italian National research Council is conventioned with safety experts who hold periodical seminaries about safety aspects. Having taken part to some of them, to our experience we have never heard a "lecture" devoted to outdoor prospecting. Nowadays, any aspects associated to the use of the technologies should be considered. The increasing sensibility and sense of responsibility towards environmental matters impose GPR end-users to be careful not to damage the environment and also the cultural heritage. Near-surface prospecting should not compromise the flora and

  7. The role of aging in resolving the ferrocyanide safety issue

    SciTech Connect

    Babad, H.; Meacham, J.E.; Simpson, B.C.; Cash, R.J.

    1993-08-01

    A chemical process called aging, in which stored ferrocyanide waste could be dissolved and dispersed among waste tanks, or destroyed by radiolysis and hydrolysis, has been proposed at the Hanford Site. This paper summarizes the results of applied research, characterization, and modeling activities on Hanford Site ferrocyanide waste material that support the existence of a chemical aging mechanism. Test results from waste simulants and actual waste tank materials are presented and compared with theoretical estimates. Chemical and energetic behavior of the materials are the key indicators of destruction or dispersion. Screening experiments on vendor-prepared sodium nickel ferrocyanide and the initial results from core sampling support the concept that aging of ferrocyanide is taking place in the waste tanks at the Hanford Site. This report defines the concept of waste aging and explains the role that aging could play in resolving the Hanford Site ferrocyanide safety issue.

  8. Regulatory Issues Associated with Preharvest Food Safety: European Union Perspective.

    PubMed

    Alban, Lis

    2016-10-01

    Free movement of safe and wholesome food is an essential aspect of any society. This article contains an updated description of the regulatory issues associated with preharvest food safety within the European Union. Salmonella, Campylobacter, Trichinella, antimicrobial resistance, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy are dealt with in detail. Moreover, Cysticercus bovis/Taenia saginata, Toxoplasma, Yersinia, verotoxigenic/shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli, Listeria, and foodborne viruses are briefly covered. The article describes how the focus in the European Union is changing to involve a supply chain view with a focus on cost-effectiveness. The precautionary principle-as well as the use of private standards as an instrument to ensure compliance-is dealt with. In addition, actions in the pipeline are presented and discussed.

  9. Risks and issues in fire safety on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert

    1993-01-01

    A fire in the inhabited portion of a spacecraft is a greatly feared hazard, but fire protection in space operations is complicated by two factors. First, the spacecraft cabin is an enclosed volume, which limits the resources for fire fighting and the options for crew escape. Second, an orbiting spacecraft experiences a balance of forces, creating a near-zero-gravity (microgravity) environment that profoundly affects the characteristics of fire initiation, spread, and suppression. The current Shuttle Orbiter is protected by a fire-detection and suppression system whose requirements are derived of necessity from accepted terrestrial and aircraft standards. While experience has shown that Shuttle fire safety is adequate, designers recognize that improved systems to respond specifically to microgravity fire characteristics are highly desirable. Innovative technology is particularly advisable for the Space Station, a forthcoming space community with a complex configuration and long-duration orbital missions, in which the effectiveness of current fire-protection systems is unpredictable. The development of risk assessments to evaluate the probabilities and consequences of fire incidents in spacecraft are briefly reviewed. It further discusses the important unresolved issues and needs for improved fire safety in the Space Station, including those of material selection, spacecraft atmospheres, fire detection, fire suppression, and post-fire restoration.

  10. Risks and issues in fire safety on the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Robert

    1993-12-01

    A fire in the inhabited portion of a spacecraft is a greatly feared hazard, but fire protection in space operations is complicated by two factors. First, the spacecraft cabin is an enclosed volume, which limits the resources for fire fighting and the options for crew escape. Second, an orbiting spacecraft experiences a balance of forces, creating a near-zero-gravity (microgravity) environment that profoundly affects the characteristics of fire initiation, spread, and suppression. The current Shuttle Orbiter is protected by a fire-detection and suppression system whose requirements are derived of necessity from accepted terrestrial and aircraft standards. While experience has shown that Shuttle fire safety is adequate, designers recognize that improved systems to respond specifically to microgravity fire characteristics are highly desirable. Innovative technology is particularly advisable for the Space Station, a forthcoming space community with a complex configuration and long-duration orbital missions, in which the effectiveness of current fire-protection systems is unpredictable. The development of risk assessments to evaluate the probabilities and consequences of fire incidents in spacecraft are briefly reviewed. It further discusses the important unresolved issues and needs for improved fire safety in the Space Station, including those of material selection, spacecraft atmospheres, fire detection, fire suppression, and post-fire restoration.

  11. Silver nanoparticles: therapeutical uses, toxicity, and safety issues.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Carolina Alves; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Ingle, Avinash P; Gupta, Indarchand; Galdiero, Stefania; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Gade, Aniket; Rai, Mahendra

    2014-07-01

    The promises of nanotechnology have been realized to deliver the greatest scientific and technological advances in several areas. The biocidal activity of Metal nanoparticles in general and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) depends on several morphological and physicochemical characteristics of the particles. Many of the interactions of the AgNPs with the human body are still poorly understood; consequently, the most desirable characteristics for the AgNPs are not yet well established. Therefore, the development of nanoparticles with well-controlled morphological and physicochemical features for application in human body is still an active area of interdisciplinary research. Effects of the development of technology of nanostructured compounds seem to be so large and comprehensive that probably it will impact on all fields of science and technology. However, mechanisms of safety control in application, utilization, responsiveness, and disposal accumulation still need to be further studied in-depth to ensure that the advances provided by nanotechnology are real and liable to provide solid and consistent progress. This review aims to discuss AgNPs applied in biomedicine and as promising field for insertion and development of new compounds related to medical and pharmacy technology. The review also addresses drug delivery, toxicity issues, and the safety rules concerning biomedical applications of silver nanoparticles.

  12. Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues. UNO Aviation Monograph Series. UNOAI Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Brent, Ed.

    This document contains four papers concerning collegiate aviation research and education solutions to critical safety issues. "Panel Proposal Titled Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues for the Tim Forte Collegiate Aviation Safety Symposium" (Brent Bowen) presents proposals for panels on the…

  13. Superheavy Element Research at Tasca at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düllmann, Christoph E.

    2014-09-01

    Experiments on the synthesis of the heaviest elements are in the center of the current research program on superheavy elements at GSI Darmstadt. At the gas-filled recoil separator TASCA, search experiments for the new elements 119 and 120 have been performed in the reactions 50Ti + 249Bk and 50Ti + 249Cf, respectively, and the production of element 117 in the reaction 48Ca + 249Bk was studied. The experiments were performed successfully and the data are currently under analysis.

  14. Current Sports: Medicine Issues. Annual Safety Education Review--1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Timothy T., Ed.

    This document is a collection of papers whose theme is sports safety. Section one, "Government Interest in Sports Safety," includes an article on Washington, D.C.'s focus on sports safety. Section two, "Medical Aspects of Safety in Sports," includes articles regarding the medical basis of restriction from athletics, orthopaedic restrictions, and…

  15. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, A.S.; Fecht, B.A.; Powers, T.B.; Bickford, W.E.; Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Bian, S.H.; Daling, P.M.; Eschbach, E.J.; Allen, C.H.

    1986-07-01

    This is the fifth in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues (NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews et al. 1983). This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 23 issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information as of winter 1986, and two staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues.''

  16. An interagency space nuclear propulsion safety policy for SEI - Issues and discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, A. C.; Sawyer, J. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of Safety Functional Requirements. In addition, the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety topics include reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations. In this paper the emphasis is placed on the safety policy and the issues and considerations that are addressed by the NSPWG recommendations.

  17. Evolution of approaches to viral safety issues for biological products.

    PubMed

    Lubiniecki, Anthony S

    2011-01-01

    CONFERENCE PROCEEDING Proceedings of the PDA/FDA Adventitious Viruses in Biologics: Detection and Mitigation Strategies Workshop in Bethesda, MD, USA; December 1-3, 2010 Guest Editors: Arifa Khan (Bethesda, MD), Patricia Hughes (Bethesda, MD) and Michael Wiebe (San Francisco, CA) Approaches to viral safety issues for biological products have evolved during the past 50+ years. The first cell culture products (viral vaccines) relied largely on the use of in vitro and in vivo virus screening assays that were based upon infectivity of adventitious viral agents. The use of Cohn fractionation and pasteurization by manufacturers of plasma derivatives introduced the concepts that purification and treatment with physical and chemical agents could greatly reduce the risk of viral contamination of human albumin and immunoglobulin products. But the limitations of such approaches became clear for thermolabile products that were removed early in fractionation such as antihemophilic factors, which transmitted hepatitis viruses and HIV-1 to some product recipients. These successes and limitations were taken into account by the early developers of recombinant DNA (rDNA)-derived cell culture products and by regulatory agencies, leading to the utilization of cloning technology to reduce/eliminate contamination due to human viruses and purification technologies to physically remove and inactivate adventitious and endogenous viruses, along with cell banking and cell bank characterization for adventitious and endogenous viruses, viral screening of biological raw materials, and testing of cell culture harvests, to ensure virus safety. Later development and incorporation of nanofiltration technology in the manufacturing process provided additional assurance of viral clearance for safety of biotechnology products. These measures have proven very effective at preventing iatrogenic infection of recipients of biotechnology products; however, viral contamination of production cell cultures has

  18. A prioritization of generic safety issues. Supplement 21, Revision insertion instructions

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1996-12-31

    The report presents the safety priority ranking for generic safety issues related to nuclear power plants. The purpose of these rankings is to assist in the timely and efficient allocation of NRC resources for the resolution of those safety issues that have a significant potential for reducing risk. The safety priority rankings are HIGH, MEDIUM, LOW, and DROP, and have been assigned on the basis of risk significance estimates, the ratio of risk to costs and other impacts estimated to result if resolution of the safety issues were implemented, and the consideration of uncertainties and other quantitative or qualitative factors. To the extent practical, estimates are quantitative.

  19. Key Questions about School Safety: Critical Issues and Recommended Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Hill M.; Eaton-Walker, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Although school tragedies are not totally preventable, they will be far more preventable if schools develop a written school safety plan. Components should include legally mandated safety drills, regularly scheduled school safety audits and evaluations, a student apparel policy, a schoolwide discipline plan, and a closed campus. (MLH)

  20. JV Task - 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

    2009-03-30

    Continuing studies under these three funded projects - (JV Task 77 The Health Implications of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, JV Task 96 Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, and JV Task 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue) - were performed to determine the effects of different levels of dietary mercury and selenium on the growth and development of test animals, and related tissue analyses, to understand the protective benefits of dietary selenium in reference to low-level exposure to mercury. Maternal exposure to methylmercury from seafood has been found to cause neurodevelopmental harm in children. However, significant nutritional benefits will be lost if fish consumption is needlessly avoided. The results of these studies support the hypothesis that intracellular Se itself is the physiologically important biomolecule and that the harm of mercury toxicity arises when Hg abundance becomes great enough to bind a significant portion of intracellular Se in vulnerable tissues such as the brain. Formation of HgSe limits bioavailability of Se for synthesis of Se-dependent enzymes, particularly in brain tissues. When production of these enzymes is impaired, the loss of their numerous essential functions results in the signs and symptoms of Hg toxicity. The finding that one mole of Se protects against many moles of Hg indicates that its beneficial effect is not due to sequestration of mercury as HgSe but rather due to the biological activity of the Se. Therefore, the selenium content of seafoods must be considered along with their methylmercury contents in evaluating the effect of dietary exposure to mercury.

  1. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  2. Program plan for evaluation of the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank safety issue at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Borsheim, G.L.; Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    This document describes the background, priorities, strategy and logic, and task descriptions for the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank Safety Program. The Ferrocyanide Safety Program was established in 1990 to provide resolution of a major safety issue identified for 24 high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site.

  3. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 5

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    This is the sixth in a series of reports to document the development and use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose, and cost impacts of implementing potential resolutions to reactor safety issues (see NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews, et al., 1983). This report contains the results of issue-specific analyses for 34 generic issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information at the time the issues were examined and approximately 2 staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced as one consideration in NUREG-0933, A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues (Emrit, et al., 1983).

  4. Adult Learning in Health and Safety: Some Issues and Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O Fathaigh, Mairtin

    This document, which was developed for presentation at a seminar on adult learning and safety, examines approaches to occupational safety and health (OSH) learning/training in the workplace. Section 1 examines selected factors affecting adults' learning in workplace OSH programs. The principal dimensions along which individual adult learners will…

  5. Assessing Rural Coalitions That Address Safety and Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgus, Shari; Schwab, Charles; Shelley, Mack

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions can help national organizations meet their objectives. Farm Safety 4 Just Kids depends on coalitions of local people to deliver farm safety and health educational programs to children and their families. These coalitions are called chapters. An evaluation was developed to identify individual coalition's strengths and…

  6. Safety Issues at the DOE Test and Research Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report provides an assessment of safety issues at the Department of Energy (DOE) test and research reactors. Part A identifies six safety issues of the reactors. These issues include the safety design philosophy, the conduct of safety reviews, the performance of probabilistic risk assessments, the reliance on reactor operators, the fragmented…

  7. Environmental and safety issues of the fusion fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the environmental and safety concerns inherent in the development of fusion energy, and the current Department of Energy programs seeking to: (1) develop safe and reliable techniques for tritium control; (2) reduce the quantity of activation products produced; and (3) provide designs to limit the potential for accidents that could result in release of radioactive materials. Because of the inherent safety features of fusion and the early start that has been made in safety problem recognition and solution, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial power.

  8. 48 CFR 246.371 - Notification of potential safety issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... identified as critical safety items; (2) Systems and subsystems, assemblies, and subassemblies integral to a..., assemblies, subassemblies, and parts integral to a system. (b) Follow the procedures at PGI 246.371 for...

  9. 48 CFR 246.371 - Notification of potential safety issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... identified as critical safety items; (2) Systems and subsystems, assemblies, and subassemblies integral to a..., assemblies, subassemblies, and parts integral to a system. (b) Follow the procedures at PGI 246.371 for...

  10. 48 CFR 246.371 - Notification of potential safety issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... identified as critical safety items; (2) Systems and subsystems, assemblies, and subassemblies integral to a..., assemblies, subassemblies, and parts integral to a system. (b) Follow the procedures at PGI 246.371 for...

  11. Safety issues of botanicals and botanical preparations in functional foods.

    PubMed

    Kroes, R; Walker, R

    2004-05-20

    Although botanicals have played a role in the marketing of health products for ages, there is an increased interest today due to their perceived health benefits. Not only do consumers increasingly take charge of their health, but the scientific information and understanding of the beneficial health effects of bioactive substances in food, functional foods and food supplements have improved. Increasing use of these products has also led to concerns about their actual safety. Recorded cases of intoxications have triggered such concerns. The safety assessment of these substances is complicated by, amongst others, the variability of composition. Furthermore, consumption of such functional products is expected to produce physiological effects, which may lead to low margins of safety as the margin between exposure of such products and the safe level of intake are likely to be small. The safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations in food and food supplement should at least involve: the characterisation and quality of the material, its quality control; the intended use and consequent exposure; history of use and exposure; product comparison(s); toxicological information gathering; Risk characterisation/safety assessment. As a guidance tool, a decision tree approach is proposed to assist in determining the extent of data requirements based on the nature of the such product. This guidance tool in safety assessment was developed by an expert group of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), European Branch, and is currently in press. In this paper a summarised version of this tool is presented.

  12. The ASY-EOS Experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Chartier, M.; Cozma, M. D.; De Filippo, E.; Le Fèvre, A.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Kiš, M.; Kupny, S.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q.; Łukasik, J.; Marini, P.; Pawłowski, P.; Trautmann, W.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Baran, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bassini, R.; Benlliure, J.; Boiano, C.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Czech, B.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Greco, V.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Lombardo, I.; Lynch, W. G.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Pleskac, R.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reifarth, R.; Reisdorf, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.; Vigilante, M.; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2016-05-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons or light complex particles in reactions of heavy ions at pre-relativistic energies has been proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state at supra-saturation densities. In the ASY-EOS experiment at the GSI laboratory, flows of neutrons and light charged particles were measured for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon. Flow results obtained for the Au+Au system, in comparison with predictions of the UrQMD transport model, confirm the moderately soft to linear density dependence of the symmetry energy deduced from the earlier FOPI-LAND data.

  13. Vacuum arc ion source development at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Emig, H.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Ion beams produced by the Mevva ion source are well suited for the injection into a synchrotron accelerator due to the low repetition rate (0.2 ... 5 Hz, the higher repetition rate is for the optimization of the linear accelerator only) and the short pulse length (up to 0.5ms). From the beginning of the authors experience with the Mevva ion source at GSI they tried to improve the reliability of pulse-to-pulse reproducibility and to minimize the noise on the extracted ion beam. For accelerator application this is highly necessary, otherwise the accelerator tuning and optimization becomes very difficult or even impossible. Already the beam transport becomes difficult for a noisy beam, because space charge compensation can be destroyed (at least partially). Furthermore a noisy dc-beam results in some rf-buckets which might be even empty.

  14. Issues in School Bus Safety: Real or Red Herring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeds, Robin L.

    1999-01-01

    In many states, the greatest threat to safe student transportation is elimination of the school transportation program. Using public transit buses, large vans, smaller vehicles, or specialized equipment can cause major-issue headaches. False issues include controversies over seat belts, bus design, and optional "bells and whistles." (10…

  15. Safety issues with drug therapies for autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    McCracken, James T

    2005-01-01

    Although currently no medication has been approved to treat autism spectrum disorders, survey data show that community practitioners are prescribing a broad range of medication treatments, including, but not limited to, antidepressants, stimulants, antipsychotics, alpha agonists, and anticonvulsants. Patients with autism spectrum disorders are also taking alternative treatments, including herbal remedies, immunologic treatments, and vitamin therapies, which may themselves produce side effects and/or create drug interactions with traditional medications. Although short-term data on the efficacy and safety of commonly prescribed treatments for autism spectrum disorders are increasing, few data are currently available on long-term treatment for autism spectrum disorders, but available studies and clinical experience can offer preliminary recommendations on the safety of and monitoring needs for the medications currently used for these disorders. Monitoring the safety and tolerability of drugs used in patients with these disorders should minimize the burden of side effects and optimize treatment outcome.

  16. Consumer confidence in the safety of food and newspaper coverage of food safety issues: a longitudinal perspective.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Janneke; Van Trijp, Hans; Renes, Reint Jan; Frewer, Lynn J

    2010-01-01

    This study develops a longitudinal perspective on consumer confidence in the safety of food to explore if, how, and why consumer confidence changes over time. In the first study, a theory-based monitoring instrument for consumer confidence in the safety of food was developed and validated. The monitoring instrument assesses consumer confidence together with its determinants. Model and measurement invariance were validated rigorously before developments in consumer confidence in the safety of food and its determinants were investigated over time. The results from the longitudinal analysis show that across four waves of annual data collection (2003-2006), the framework was stable and that the relative importance of the determinants of confidence was, generally, constant over time. Some changes were observed regarding the mean ratings on the latent constructs. The second study explored how newspaper coverage of food safety related issues affects consumer confidence in the safety of food through subjective consumer recall of food safety incidents. The results show that the newspaper coverage on food safety issues is positively associated with consumer recall of food safety incidents, both in terms of intensity and recency of media coverage.

  17. Child Safety: It's No Accident. An Issue Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Div. for Children, Richmond.

    The three major causes of injury and mortality among children in the state of Virginia are, in order of frequency, automobile-related accidents, poison ingestion, and suicide. With respect to injuries sustained in automobile accidents, adults traveling with children by car must accept responsibility for the safety of child passengers. Acute…

  18. An overview of food safety issues relative to animal products.

    PubMed

    Baile, C A

    1990-06-01

    Presently, strategies for discovering new factors for enhancing animal productivity allow for greater assurance of food safety. A high degree of assurance of food safety is provided by the use of natural growth factors. This is especially true when these factors are proteins which, when ingested, are digested to inactive peptides and amino acids and are, in addition, inactive in human tissues. Knowing the mechanisms of activity of such factors also allows for the assurance that known mediators of the growth factors can also be shown to be inactivated by intestinal barriers. The design of nonpeptide molecules with highly selective activity will be possible with the large amount of progress expected in understanding the structure of the active components of natural molecules and the availability of specific receptor systems. Food safety concerns may be met by the demonstration that these molecules are inactive in comparable human receptor systems. These drug discovery strategies can ensure with a high degree of confidence the development of new productivity enhancers that meet food safety requirements.

  19. Safety issues of manipulator systems under computer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andary, James F.; Carter, Ruth C.; Halterman, Karen; Spidaliere, Peter D.; Tasevoli, Michael; Rad, Adrian L.

    1992-11-01

    Since 1986 NASA has been developing a telerobotic system as a part of the Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) Project at Goddard Space Flight Center. The project was formed to meet the national objectives of identifying and developing technologies for automation and robotics. The overall approach is to adapt current teleoperational and robotic technologies into a lightweight, dexterous telerobotic device that could operate efficiently and safely in space and that would evolve into an autonomous space robot. The concept behind this device is that it (1) operate in space, a much less structured and more hostile environment than industrial robots normally operate in and (2) perform varied dexterous tasks which increase in complexity with time. The design must also allow for growth and increased capabilities as new technologies become available. These top-level system goals significantly influenced system design, architecture, controls implementation, and manipulator packaging design. If the FTS is to be considered as a credible tool for work in space, its fundamental building blocks must be tested in space. An early development test flight (DTF-1) was conceived to fly as an attached payload on the Shuttle in order to validate the FTS hardware design. While the funding for the FTS was eliminated in September 1991, the DTF-1 system design has been completed with major flight hardware elements in different stages of fabrication and qualification. Safety was a design driver for the DTF-1. System safety engineering was implemented with the system safety requirements and design criteria established by NASA's National Space Transportation System (NSTS) Program and defined in the Safety Policy and Requirements for Payloads Using the Space Transportation System, NSTS, 1700.7B. Satisfying these safety requirements presented significant challenges to the system designers. In an effort to capture some of the knowledge gained from the program, this paper gives an overview of the DTF

  20. Safety issues and new rapid detection methods in traditional Chinese medicinal materials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Kong, Weijun; Yang, Meihua; Han, Jianping; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    The safety of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a major strategic issue that involves human health. With the continuous improvement in disease prevention and treatment, the export of TCM and its related products has increased dramatically in China. However, the frequent safety issues of Chinese medicine have become the ‘bottleneck’ impeding the modernization of TCM. It was proved that mycotoxins seriously affect TCM safety; the pesticide residues of TCM are a key problem in TCM international trade; adulterants have also been detected, which is related to market circulation. These three factors have greatly affected TCM safety. In this study, fast, highly effective, economically-feasible and accurate detection methods concerning TCM safety issues were reviewed, especially on the authenticity, mycotoxins and pesticide residues of medicinal materials. PMID:26579423

  1. A prioritization of generic safety issues. Supplement 19, Revision insertion instructions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The report presents the safety priority ranking for generic safety issues related to nuclear power plants. The purpose of these rankings is to assist in the timely and efficient allocation of NRC resources for the resolution of those safety issues that have a significant potential for reducing risk. The safety priority rankings are HIGH, MEDIUM, LOW, and DROP, and have been assigned on the basis of risk significance estimates, the ratio of risk to costs and other impacts estimated to result if resolution of the safety issues were implemented, and the consideration of uncertainties and other quantitative or qualitative factors. To the extent practical, estimates are quantitative. This document provides revisions and amendments to the report.

  2. U.S. Food System Working Conditions as an Issue of Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Megan L; Smith, Katherine C; Pollack, Keshia M; Neff, Roni A; Rutkow, Lainie

    2017-02-01

    Food workers' health and hygiene are common pathways to foodborne disease outbreaks. Improving food system jobs is important to food safety because working conditions impact workers' health, hygiene, and safe food handling. Stakeholders from key industries have advanced working conditions as an issue of public safety in the United States. Yet, for the food industry, stakeholder engagement with this topic is seemingly limited. To understand this lack of action, we interviewed key informants from organizations recognized for their agenda-setting role on food-worker issues. Findings suggest that participants recognize the work standards/food safety connection, yet perceived barriers limit adoption of a food safety frame, including more pressing priorities (e.g., occupational safety); poor fit with organizational strategies and mission; and questionable utility, including potential negative consequences. Using these findings, we consider how public health advocates may connect food working conditions to food and public safety and elevate it to the public policy agenda.

  3. Safety issues in robotic handling of nuclear weapon parts

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Wapman, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.

    1993-12-31

    Robotic systems are being developed by the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at Sandia National Laboratories to perform automated handling tasks with radioactive weapon parts. These systems will reduce the occupational radiation exposure to workers by automating operations that are currently performed manually. The robotic systems at Sandia incorporate several levels of mechanical, electrical, and software safety for handling hazardous materials. For example, tooling used by the robot to handle radioactive parts has been designed with mechanical features that allow the robot to release its payload only at designated locations in the robotic workspace. In addition, software processes check for expected and unexpected situations throughout the operations. Incorporation of features such as these provides multiple levels of safety for handling hazardous or valuable payloads with automated intelligent systems.

  4. International and NASA SSA and Safety of Flight Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas K,

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the international and NASA interests in Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and space debris as it affects space flight safety. The international interesrt has increased since the collision of the Iridium and Cosmos satellites in 2009. The United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) has commenced a multi-year effort to review the long-term sustainability of outer space activities.

  5. Etanercept in spondyloarthopathies. Part II: safety and pharmacoeconomic issues.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Salvatore; Palazzi, Carlo; Cantini, Fabrizio; Lubrano, Ennio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Mathieu, Alessandro; Salvarani, Carlo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Spadaro, Antonio; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2011-01-01

    Etanercept (ETN) and other anti-TNF-α agents have revolutionised the management of spondyloarthropathies (SpA). With the increasingly widespread and prolonged use of these drugs an assessment of their long-term safety is extremely important. An additional concern regarding biological agents is their higher costs compared with conventional drugs. We examined safety data regarding ETN from clinical reports, clinical trials, review articles, databases and registries. In addition, evidence was reviewed about the cost effectiveness of ETN in the treatment of patients with SpA. Our review suggests that ETN is well tolerated as long-term, continuous treatment of SpA with a favourable risk-benefit ratio maintained from 4 to 5 years. Diversity in structure and mode of action could explain some differences in the safety profile of ETN with respect to the other anti-TNF agents. In particular, ETN is less immunogenic and is less likely to induce tuberculosis re-activation than the other TNF-α antagonists. Although ETN is considerably more expensive than conventional therapy, it reduces direct and indirect costs associated to SpA by improving disease activity and quality of life. Recent pharmacoeconomic studies have demonstrated its cost-effectiveness in the treatment of SpA.

  6. High-heat tank safety issue resolution program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, O.S.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to provide a guide for selecting corrective actions that will mitigate and/or remediate the high-heat waste tank safety issue for single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This program plan also outlines the logic for selecting approaches and tasks to mitigate and resolve the high-heat safety issue. The identified safety issue for high-heat tank 241-C-106 involves the potential release of nuclear waste to the environment as the result of heat-induced structural damage to the tank`s concrete, if forced cooling is interrupted for extended periods. Currently, forced ventilation with added water to promote thermal conductivity and evaporation cooling is used to cool the waste. At this time, the only viable solution identified to resolve this safety issue is the removal of heat generating waste in the tank. This solution is being aggressively pursued as the permanent solution to this safety issue and also to support the present waste retrieval plan. Tank 241-C-106 has been selected as the first SST for retrieval. The program plan has three parts. The first part establishes program objectives and defines safety issues, drivers, and resolution criteria and strategy. The second part evaluates the high-heat safety issue and its mitigation and remediation methods and alternatives according to resolution logic. The third part identifies major tasks and alternatives for mitigation and resolution of the safety issue. Selected tasks and best-estimate schedules are also summarized in the program plan.

  7. Safety, Efficacy, and Legal Issues Related to Dietary Supplements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the effects of dietary supplements on collegiate and adult populations. Anabolic steroids, amphetamines, and other drugs have been used for decades to improve athletic performance. However, the legal issues and dangers associated with these drugs have resulted in reluctance by many athletes to use them. Because dietary…

  8. Microbiological food safety issues in Brazil: bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Bruna Carrer; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo; De Martinis, Elaine Cristina Pereira

    2013-03-01

    The globalization of food supply impacts patterns of foodborne disease outbreaks worldwide, and consumers are having increased concern about microbiological food safety. In this sense, the assessment of epidemiological data of foodborne diseases in different countries has not only local impact, but it can also be of general interest, especially in the case of major global producers and exporters of several agricultural food products, such as Brazil. In this review, the most common agents of foodborne illnesses registered in Brazil will be presented, compiled mainly from official databases made available to the public. In addition, some representative examples of studies on foodborne bacterial pathogens commonly found in Brazilian foods are provided.

  9. Conceptualizing a Genomics Software Institute (GSI).

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Catlett, Charlie; Desai, Narayan; Knight, Rob; White, Owen; Robbins, Robert; Sankaran, Rajesh; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Field, Dawn; Meyer, Folker

    2012-03-19

    Microbial ecology has been enhanced greatly by the ongoing 'omics revolution, bringing half the world's biomass and most of its biodiversity into analytical view for the first time; indeed, it feels almost like the invention of the microscope and the discovery of the new world at the same time. With major microbial ecology research efforts accumulating prodigious quantities of sequence, protein, and metabolite data, we are now poised to address environmental microbial research at macro scales, and to begin to characterize and understand the dimensions of microbial biodiversity on the planet. What is currently impeding progress is the need for a framework within which the research community can develop, exchange and discuss predictive ecosystem models that describe the biodiversity and functional interactions. Such a framework must encompass data and metadata transparency and interoperation; data and results validation, curation, and search; application programming interfaces for modeling and analysis tools; and human and technical processes and services necessary to ensure broad adoption. Here we discuss the need for focused community interaction to augment and deepen established community efforts, beginning with the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), to create a science-driven strategic plan for a Genomic Software Institute (GSI).

  10. Proton microscopy at GSI and FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Frank E; Mariam, Fesseha G; Golubev, A A; Turtikov, V I; Varentsov, D

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and facilities have been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international collaboration was formed to develop a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR (PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. These dynamic experiments will be driven with many energy sources including heavy ions, high explosives and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  11. Conceptualizing a Genomics Software Institute (GSI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Catlett, Charlie; Desai, Narayan; Knight, Rob; White, Owen; Robbins, Robert; Sankaran, Rajesh; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Field, Dawn; Meyer, Folker

    2012-01-01

    Microbial ecology has been enhanced greatly by the ongoing ‘omics revolution, bringing half the world's biomass and most of its biodiversity into analytical view for the first time; indeed, it feels almost like the invention of the microscope and the discovery of the new world at the same time. With major microbial ecology research efforts accumulating prodigious quantities of sequence, protein, and metabolite data, we are now poised to address environmental microbial research at macro scales, and to begin to characterize and understand the dimensions of microbial biodiversity on the planet. What is currently impeding progress is the need for a framework within which the research community can develop, exchange and discuss predictive ecosystem models that describe the biodiversity and functional interactions. Such a framework must encompass data and metadata transparency and interoperation; data and results validation, curation, and search; application programming interfaces for modeling and analysis tools; and human and technical processes and services necessary to ensure broad adoption. Here we discuss the need for focused community interaction to augment and deepen established community efforts, beginning with the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), to create a science-driven strategic plan for a Genomic Software Institute (GSI). PMID:22675605

  12. Preliminary Examination of Safety Issues on a University Campus: Personal Safety Practices, Beliefs & Attitudes of Female Faculty & Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Paula C.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2007-01-01

    University and college campuses are not immune to acts of violence. Unfortunately there is limited information regarding violence in the academic setting among women employees. As such, the purpose of this exploratory research was to examine issues that female faculty and staff members have about safety on and around campus, including concerns…

  13. Containment-emergency-sump performance. Technical findings related to Unresolved Safety Issue A-43. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report summarizes key technical findings related to the Unresolved Safety Issue A-43, Containment Emergency Sump Performance, and provides recommendations for resolution of attendant safety issues. The key safety questions relate to: (a) effects of insulation debris on sump performance; (b) sump hydraulic performance as determined by design features, submergence, and plant induced effects, and (c) recirculation pump performance wherein air and/or particulate ingestion can occur. The technical findings presented in this report provide information relevant to the design and performance evaluation of the containment emergency sump.

  14. Safety Issues at the Defense Production Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report provides an assessment of safety management, safety review, and safety methodology employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and private contractors. Chapter 1, "The DOE Safety Framework," examines safety objectives for production reactors and processes to implement the objectives. Chapter 2, "Technical Issues,"…

  15. A discussion of certain safety issues associated with the Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation mixing test

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This paper addresses certain safety issues associated with the Hanford Tank 241-SY 101 hydrogen mitigation mixing test. Specifically, the study, is concerned with the effect of pump shearing, jet mixing, and piling-up on the following areas: Gas generation; gas retention; gas release (immediate); gas release (long-term); and saltcake. The findings for each issue area of concern are addressed.

  16. An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-01-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

  17. An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-08-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

  18. Food safety issues and information needs: an online survey of public health inspectors.

    PubMed

    Pham, Mai T; Jones, Andria Q; Dewey, Catherine E; Sargeant, Jan M; Marshall, Barbara J

    2012-06-01

    In the study described in this article, the authors investigated the perceptions and needs of public health inspectors (PHIs) in the province of Ontario, Canada, with regard to food safety issues and information resources. A cross-sectional online survey of 239 Ontario PHIs was conducted between April and June 2009. Questions pertained to their perceptions of key food safety issues and foodborne pathogens, knowledge confidence, available resources, and resource needs. All respondents rated time-temperature abuse, inadequate hand washing, and cross contamination as important food safety issues. Salmonella, Campylobacter, and E. coli O157:H7 were pathogens reported to be of concern to 95% of respondents (221/233). Most respondents indicated that they were confident in their knowledge of food safety issues and foodborne pathogens, but wanted a central, online resource for food safety information and ongoing food safety education training for PHIs. The data from the authors' study can be used in the development of information resources targeted to the needs of PHIs involved in food safety.

  19. Use of feedback control to address flight safety issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Subhabrata

    This thesis addresses three control problems related to flight safety. The first problem relates to the scope of improvement in performance of conventional flight control laws. In particular, aircraft longitudinal axis control based on the Total Energy Control System (TECS) is studied. The research draws attention to a potentially sluggish and undesirable aircraft response when the engine dynamics is slow (typically the case). The proposed design method uses a theoretically well-developed modern design method based on Hinfinity optimization to improve the aircraft dynamic behavior in spite of slow engine characteristics. At the same time, the proposed design method achieves other desirable performance goals such as insensitivity to sensor noise and wind gust rejection: all addressed in one unified framework. The second problem is based on a system level analysis of control structure hierarchy for aircraft flight control. The objective of the analysis problem is to translate outer-loop stability and performance specifications into a comprehensive inner-loop metric. The prime motivation is to make the flight control design process more systematic and the system-integration reliable and independent of design methodology. The analysis problem is posed within the robust control analysis framework. Structured singular value techniques and free controller parameterization ideas are used to impose a hierarchical structure for flight control architecture. The third problem involves development and demonstration of a new reconfiguration strategy in the flight control architecture that has the potential of improving flight safety while keeping cost and complexity low. This research proposes a fault tolerant feature based on active robust reconfiguration. The fault tolerant control problem is formulated in the Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) design framework. A prime advantage of this approach is that the synthesis results in a single nonlinear controller (as opposed to a bank

  20. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the environmental restoration program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues on the environmental restoration process at US Department of Energy sites. PNL selected three remediation projects to study: (1) the 618-9 Burial Ground Expedited Removal Action at the Hanford Site, (2) the Chemical Consolidation Interim Response Action at the Weldon Spring Site, (3) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Removal Action and VOC-Arid Integration Demonstration at the Hanford Site. The first two case studies involve sites where a remediation activity has been complete. The third case study involves a remediation activity in its early stages of development. This study identifies OSH issues related to actual cleanup, time, documentation, training, and technology development. These issues need to be considered by DOE before making long-term planning efforts. Section 4.0 of this report describes recommendations for addressing these issues.

  1. Effects of gamma radiation on raspberries: safety and quality issues.

    PubMed

    Verde, S Cabo; Trigo, M J; Sousa, M B; Ferreira, A; Ramos, A C; Nunes, I; Junqueira, C; Melo, R; Santos, P M P; Botelho, M L

    2013-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing global demand from consumers for high-quality foods with major emphasis placed on quality and safety attributes. One of the main demands that consumers display is for minimally processed, high-nutrition/low-energy natural foods with no or minimal chemical preservatives. The nutritional value of raspberry fruit is widely recognized. In particular, red raspberries are known to demonstrate a strong antioxidant capacity that might prove beneficial to human health by preventing free radical-induced oxidative stress. However, food products that are consumed raw, are increasingly being recognized as important vehicles for transmission of human pathogens. Food irradiation is one of the few technologies that address both food quality and safety by virtue of its ability to control spoilage and foodborne pathogenic microorganisms without significantly affecting sensory or other organoleptic attributes of the food. Food irradiation is well established as a physical, nonthermal treatment (cold pasteurization) that processes foods at or nearly at ambient temperature in the final packaging, reducing the possibility of cross contamination until the food is actually used by the consumer. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of gamma radiation on raspberries in order to assess consequences of irradiation. Freshly packed raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) were irradiated in a (60)Co source at several doses (0.5, 1, or 1.5 kGy). Bioburden, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, physicochemical properties such as texture, color, pH, soluble solids content, and acidity, and sensorial parameters were assessed before and after irradiation and during storage time up to 14 d at 4°C. Characterization of raspberries microbiota showed an average bioburden value of 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/g and a diverse microbial population predominantly composed of two morphological types (gram-negative, oxidase-negative rods, 35%, and filamentous fungi, 41

  2. Clinical safety issues of measles, mumps and rubella vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, M. A.; Minor, P. D.; Schild, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    The clinical safety of measles and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines has been questioned in recent reports that propose a possible link between measles virus or measles vaccines and the occurrence of juvenile Crohn disease and autism. This article reviews the outcomes of several laboratory investigations which were carried out independently to identify the presence or absence of measles virus in the intestinal tissues derived from cases of inflammatory bowel disease. One research group reported the presence of measles virus particles and genomic RNA in inflammatory bowel disease tissues, but this could not be confirmed by other groups, despite use of techniques that are highly specific and sensitive for the detection of measles virus nucleic acid in clinical specimens down to the molecular level. Based on the published data reviewed here, it can be concluded that there is no direct association between measles virus or measles vaccines and the development of Crohn disease, a conclusion which is supported by most epidemiological findings. PMID:10743285

  3. Safety of nonblood plasma substitutes: less frequently discussed issues.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Joachim

    2010-06-01

    A variety of different fluids are promoted to correct hypovolaemia. Apart from the crystalloid versus colloid debate, there exists also a colloid versus colloid discussion as different protein (albumin) and nonprotein colloids (dextrans, gelatins, hydroxyethyl starch preparations) are available for this purpose. The different plasma substitutes largely differ with regard to their composition and their physicochemical properties. All currently used strategies for correcting hypovolaemia have their pros and cons. At present, there is an ongoing interest in the major problems associated with the use of plasma substitutes such as their influence on coagulation and kidney function. There are, however, also some less often addressed questions concerning the use of plasma substitutes that need to be answered. Although nonblood plasma substitutes are often administered worldwide, there is still uncertainty with regard to using them in pregnancy, effects on cross-matching and blood typing, mixing with other drugs, dose limitations, the risk of calcium-containing and potassium-containing solutions, the risk of producing itching, the influence on blood sugar level or whether warming can be done safely. Unfortunately, data to answer these very practical questions are limited or are even lacking for some plasma substitutes. To further increase safety in the treatment of the hypovolaemic patient, all possible problems must be discussed and contraindications of nonblood plasma substitutes must be clearly defined.

  4. Health and safety issues pertaining to genetically modified foods.

    PubMed

    Goodyear-Smith, F

    2001-08-01

    Genetic modification involves the insertion of genes from other organisms (within or between species) into host cells to select for desirable qualities. Potential benefits of GM foods include increased nutritional value; reduced allergenicity; pest and disease-resistance; and enhanced processing value. Possible detrimental outcomes include producing foods with novel toxins, allergens or reduced nutritional value, and development of antibiotic resistance or herbicide-resistant weeds. Benefits to individuals or populations need to be weighed against adverse health and environmental risks, and may differ between developing and Westernised countries. Whether testing and monitoring should exceed requirements for conventional foods is under debate. While not necessarily scientifically justifiable, consumer concerns have resulted in Australian and New Zealand requirements to label foods containing GM-produced proteins. Dissatisfied consumer advocacy groups are calling for all foods involving GM technology to be labelled, irrelevant of whether the final product contains novel protein. Goals to improve the quantity, quality and safety of foods are laudable; however, the primary aim of the bio-food industry is financial gain. GM foods may be as safe as conventional foods but public distrust runs high. It is important that discussion is informed by science and that claims of both benefits and risks are evidence-based, to ensure that the process is driven neither by the vested interest of the bio-technical multinational companies on the one hand, nor ill-informed public fears on the other.

  5. Radiation Safety Issues in High Altitude Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1995-01-01

    The development of a global economy makes the outlook for high speed commercial intercontinental flight feasible, and the development of various configurations operating from 20 to 30 km have been proposed. In addition to the still unresolved issues relating to current commercial operations (12-16 km), the higher dose rates associated with the higher operating altitudes makes il imperative that the uncertainties in the atmospheric radiation environment and the associated health risks be re-examined. Atmospheric radiation associated with the galactic cosmic rays forms a background level which may, under some circumstances, exceed newly recommended allowable exposure limits proposed on the basis of recent evaluations of the A -bomb survivor data (due to increased risk coefficients). These larger risk coefficients, within the context of the methodology for estimating exposure limits, are resulting in exceedingly low estimated allowable exposure limits which may impact even present day flight operations and was the reason for the CEC workshop in Luxembourg (1990). At higher operating altitudes, solar particles events can produce exposures many orders of magnitude above background levels and pose significant health risks to the most sensitive individuals (such as during pregnancy). In this case the appropriate quality factors are undefined, and some evidence exists which indicates that the quality factor for stochastic effects is a substantial underestimate.

  6. Pesticide exposure, safety issues, and risk assessment indicators.

    PubMed

    Damalas, Christos A; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G

    2011-05-01

    approved pesticides and the approval of the new compounds in the near future. Thus, new tools or techniques with greater reliability than those already existing are needed to predict the potential hazards of pesticides and thus contribute to reduction of the adverse effects on human health and the environment. On the other hand, the implementation of alternative cropping systems that are less dependent on pesticides, the development of new pesticides with novel modes of action and improved safety profiles, and the improvement of the already used pesticide formulations towards safer formulations (e.g., microcapsule suspensions) could reduce the adverse effects of farming and particularly the toxic effects of pesticides. In addition, the use of appropriate and well-maintained spraying equipment along with taking all precautions that are required in all stages of pesticide handling could minimize human exposure to pesticides and their potential adverse effects on the environment.

  7. Safety and security issues in developing and operating in intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this panel is to introduce the safety and security issues related to the development and operation of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) to Compass participants. Many of these issues need to be addressed by the system safety and computer security communities prior to the development and deployment of ITS. For example, how can information technology be applied in the context of a fully automated highway system (AHS) such that the safety, security, and performance of the system are not compromised? At present, the US and other countries are funding academia and industry to build prototype automated highway systems in which vehicles are controlled via drive-by-wire technology, with vehicles traveling at high speeds (in excess of 30 m/s) at close spacing (1 to 4 m). The potential impact of software errors or hardware errors on system safety and security are great.

  8. Key issues recently treated within the French-German safety approach

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, W.; Gros, G.

    1997-12-01

    The development of the common French-German safety approach for future PWRs started in 1992. The general approach was issued in May 1993. It was accomplished on three working levels: the technical safety organizations GRS (Gesellschaft for Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit) and IPSN (Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire) developed the technical basis, advisory groups GPR (Groupe Permanent charge des Reacteurs Nucleaires) and RSK (Reaktorsicherheitskom-mission) developed common recommendations, and the authorities BMU (Bundesministerium fuer Naturschutz, Umwelt und Reaktorsicherheit) and DSIN (Direction de la surete des Installations Nucleaires) issued the common safety approach. It contains safety objectives and general principles. The common approach has been presented at the ARS`94 Conference. Some important objectives and principles are briefly summarized in this paper, and the results of this work are described. 4 refs.

  9. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  10. Progress on resolution of major surety issues. [Safety, environmental protection, safeguards, reliability, quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, C.R.; Boudreau, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the major surety issues (safety, environmental protection, sageguards, reliability, quality assurance) that have been identified during Phase I of the SP-100 Program and the progress that has been made in analyzing the most important of these issues in the context of the conceptual design effort. These issues have been identified as inadvertent criticality, toxic material release and dispersion, radiation exposure following end-of-life reentry, potential diversion of special nuclear material, failure to achieve end-of-life neutronic shutdown, and structural predictability for end-of-life re-entry or boost. Because of the complexity of these issues, a simplified conservative approach was taken during Phase I. Progress on these issues has been mainly in the area of increased understanding of the issues, identification of design features to resolve the issues, and quantitative evaluations of the surety characteristics of the various design concepts.

  11. Measuring Safety Levels in Playgrounds Using Environment Assessment Scales: The Issue of Playground Safety in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botsoglou, Kafenia; Hrisikou, Spyridoula; Kakana, Domna Mika

    2011-01-01

    Playgrounds beget an unrivalled context which, through play activity, can foster children's growth. The foremost function of all playgrounds is to provide for safety. In the present study, our primary focus is to determine the degree of adequacy as far as playground equipment is concerned, including estimates of imminent dangers and the level of…

  12. Issues in Software System Safety: Polly Ann Smith Co. versus Ned I. Ludd

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. Michael

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a work of fiction, but it is fiction with a very real purpose: to stimulate careful thought and friendly discussion about some questions for which thought is often careless and discussion is often unfriendly. To accomplish this purpose, the paper creates a fictional legal case. The most important issue in this fictional case is whether certain proffered expert testimony about software engineering for safety critical systems should be admitted. Resolving this issue requires deciding the extent to which current practices and research in software engineering, especially for safety-critical systems, can rightly be considered based on knowledge, rather than opinion.

  13. Prisoner reentry: a public health or public safety issue for social work practice?

    PubMed

    Patterson, George T

    2013-01-01

    A significant literature identifies the policy, economic, health, and social challenges that confront released prisoners. This literature also describes the public health and public safety risks associated with prisoner reentry, provides recommendations for improving the reentry process, and describes the effectiveness of prison-based programs on recidivism rates. Public health and public safety risks are particularly significant in communities where large numbers of prisoners are released and few evidence-based services exist. The purpose of this article is to describe the public health and public safety risks that released prisoners experience when they reenter communities, and to discuss the social justice issues relevant for social work practice.

  14. 49 CFR 385.407 - What conditions must a motor carrier satisfy for FMCSA to issue a safety permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FMCSA to issue a safety permit? 385.407 Section 385.407 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... What conditions must a motor carrier satisfy for FMCSA to issue a safety permit? (a) Motor carrier... procedures that are equivalent to the procedures in subpart A of this part; and (2) FMCSA will not issue...

  15. Balancing Student Privacy, Campus Security, and Public Safety: Issues for Campus Leaders. Perspectives, Winter 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Lesley

    2008-01-01

    The complex issues of promoting student mental health, privacy and public safety, and the balance among them, weigh on the minds of institutional leaders, educational policymakers, and local, state and federal officials. American campuses have a proud history of intellectual freedom, openness and public accessibility to their communities. However,…

  16. An Analysis of the Safety Issues Involving Local School Children as Pedestrians. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducote, Kenneth J.

    The New Orleans Public Schools' Department of Planning has been concerned with school children as pedestrians for the past five years. The safety issues include the streets, the drivers, and the children. First, the streets contribute to the hazard because many major streets traverse residential areas; many streets serve as major commuter…

  17. State Legislative Developments on Campus Sexual Violence: Issues in the Context of Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Andrew; Sponsler, Brian A.; Fulton, Mary

    2015-01-01

    NASPA--Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education and Education Commission of the States (ECS) have partnered to address legislative developments and offer considerations for leaders in higher education and policy on two top-level safety issues facing the higher education community: campus sexual violence and guns on campus. The first in a…

  18. Fire and worker health and safety: an introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard; Levenstein, Charles

    2015-02-01

    One century ago, the landmark fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City claimed the lives of 146 garment workers and helped spur the adoption of fire safety measures and laws targeting dangerous working conditions. Since that time, continuing advances have been made to address the threat of fire-in workplace fire safety practices and regulations, in training and safety requirements for firefighters and first responders, and in hazard communication laws that enhance disaster planning and response. Recent high profile events, including the West, Texas fertilizer plant explosion, derailments of fuel cargo trains, and garment factory fires in Bangladesh, have brought renewed attention to fire as a workplace health and safety issue and to the unevenness of safety standards and regulatory enforcement, in the United States as well as internationally. In this article, we provide an overview of fire as a workplace health and safety hazard and an introduction to the essays included in this special issue of New Solutions on fire and work.

  19. Key issues of the common French-German safety approach for future PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, W.; Rohde, J.; Gros, G.; Queniart, D.

    1996-07-01

    The development of the common French-German safety approach started in 1992 after a preparatory phase of about 2 years. It was accomplished on three working levels: the technical safety organizations GRS (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit) and IPSN (institute de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire) developed the technical basis, advisory groups GPR (Groupe Permanent charge des Reacteurs Nucleaires) and RSK (Reaktorsicherheitskommission) developed common recommendations, and the authorities BMU (Bundesministerium fuer Naturschutz, Umwelt und Reaktorsicherheit) and DSIN (Direction de la Surete des Installations Nucleaires) issued the common safety approach. The general common safety approach issued in May 1993 contains safety objectives, general principles and already some technical principles. Important objectives are to reduce the annual probability of core melt, to exclude large early releases and to mitigate low pressure core melt sequences so that the associated maximum conceivable release would necessitate only very limited protective measures in area and in time. Based on this general safety approach, more detailed recommendations have been developed in 1994. A selection of the detailed recommendations is presented in the full paper. These recommendations are applicable to the EPR project for which the basic design is now underway.

  20. Tritium management in a fusion reactor--safety, handling and economical issues--

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2009-02-19

    In order to establish a D-T fusion reactor as an energy source, it is not enough to have a DT burning plasma, and economical conversion of fusion energy to electricity and/or heat, a large enough margin of tritium breeding and tritium safety must be simultaneously achieved. In particular, handling of huge amount of tritium needs significant efforts to ensure that the radiation dose of radiological workers and of the public is below the limits specified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In this paper, after the introduction of tritium as a fuel of DT reactors and as a radioisotope of hydrogen, tritium safety issues in fuel cycle and blanket systems are summarized. In particular, in-vessel tritium inventory, the most important and uncertain tritium safety issue, is discussed in detail.

  1. Current Status of Health and Safety Issues of Sodium/Metal Chloride (Zebra) Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Trickett, D.

    1998-12-15

    This report addresses environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues associated with sodium/ metal chloride batteries, in general, although most references to specific cell or battery types refer to units developed or being developed under the Zebra trademark. The report focuses on issues pertinent to sodium/metal chloride batteries and their constituent components; however, the fact that some ''issues'' arise from interaction between electric vehicle (EV) and battery design compels occasional discussion amid the context of EV vehicle design and operation. This approach has been chosen to provide a reasonably comprehensive account of the topic from a cell technology perspective and an applications perspective.

  2. 76 FR 58846 - Final Interim Staff Guidance: Review of Evaluation To Address Gas Accumulation Issues in Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Final Interim Staff Guidance: Review of Evaluation To Address Gas Accumulation Issues in Safety.... Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff is issuing its Final Interim Staff Guidance (ISG)...

  3. Head-up displays and their automotive application: an overview of human factors issues affecting safety.

    PubMed

    Ward, N J; Parkes, A

    1994-12-01

    In response to the recent innovations to use head-up displays (HUDs) in vehicles, this paper discusses the relevant human factors issues arising from this display format and the potential safety implications. A review is made of the relevant HUD literature, primarily from the aviation field. The primary issues for automotive HUDs relevant to system performance and safety in the driving task involve interference from background scene complexity, system novelty, user perceptual style, cognitive disruption, and perceptual tunnelling. Basic research is necessary to investigate the extent of these issues as well as to resolve fundamental design specifications (e.g. HUD size, shape, placement, information content). It is suggested that the introduction of HUDs into vehicles be carefully considered. This will necessitate not only the reconsideration what constitutes an in-vehicle display, but also what constitutes the information to be conveyed.

  4. The environmental, health, and safety issues of acoustical materials: A strategy for finding, using, and evaluating information effectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischel, Marsha S.

    2005-09-01

    Concern over the safety of our indoor environments has increased in recent years. The definition of safety has also evolved to include not just life safety issues such as fire, but issues such as mold growth, toxins, the emission of volatile organic compounds, seismic concerns, and ergonomic issues. Consequently, the understanding of product safety has become increasingly more complex. Simultaneously, there has been an explosion in the number of products available to specifiers, due largely to access to the World Wide Web by international manufacturers of all sizes. Some of these manufacturers may be unable to test all aspects of product safety, or simply may be unaware of safety regulations. Specifiers can no longer assume a product is inherently safe and must do their own evaluations of product safety attributes. This paper will lay out a basic methodology for finding, using, and evaluating environmental, health, and safety information on acoustical products in an effective manner.

  5. Resolution of thermal-hydraulic safety and licensing issues for the system 80+{sup {trademark}} design

    SciTech Connect

    Carpentino, S.E.; Ritterbusch, S.E.; Schneider, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    The System 80+{sup {trademark}} Standard Design is an evolutionary Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) with a generating capacity of 3931 MWt (1350 MWe). The Final Design Approval (FDA) for this design was issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in July 1994. The design certification by the NRC is anticipated by the end of 1995 or early 1996. NRC review of the System 80+ design has involved several new safety issues never before addressed in a regulatory atmosphere. In addition, conformance with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) required that the System 80+ plant address nuclear industry concerns with regard to design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. A large number of these issues/concerns deals with previously unresolved generic thermal-hydraulic safety issues and severe accident prevention and mitigation. This paper discusses the thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations performed for the System 80+ design to resolve safety and licensing issues relevant to both the Nuclear Stream Supply System (NSSS) and containment designs. For the NSSS design, the Safety Depressurization System mitigation capability and resolution of the boron dilution concern are described. Examples of containment design issues dealing with containment shell strength, robustness of the reactor cavity walls and hydrogen mixing under severe accident conditions are also provided. Finally, the overall approach used in the application of NRC`s new (NUREG-1465) radiological source term for System 80+ evaluation is described. The robustness of the System 80+ containment design to withstand severe accident consequences was demonstrated through detailed thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations. This advanced design to shown to meet NRC severe accident policy goals and ALWR URD requirements without any special design features and unnecessary costs.

  6. Analysis of governmental Web sites on food safety issues: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Young; Almanza, Barbara A

    2006-10-01

    Despite a growing concern over food safety issues, as well as a growing dependence on the Internet as a source of information, little research has been done to examine the presence and relevance of food safety-related information on Web sites. The study reported here conducted Web site analysis in order to examine the current operational status of governmental Web sites on food safety issues. The study also evaluated Web site usability, especially information dimensionalities such as utility, currency, and relevance of content, from the perspective of the English-speaking consumer. Results showed that out of 192 World Health Organization members, 111 countries operated governmental Web sites that provide information about food safety issues. Among 171 searchable Web sites from the 111 countries, 123 Web sites (71.9 percent) were accessible, and 81 of those 123 (65.9 percent) were available in English. The majority of Web sites offered search engine tools and related links for more information, but their availability and utility was limited. In terms of content, 69.9 percent of Web sites offered information on foodborne-disease outbreaks, compared with 31.5 percent that had travel- and health-related information.

  7. Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven: Evaluating the Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knodell, Claire; Fleming, Bonnie

    2009-05-01

    Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven seeks to empower the girls of today to shape the science of tomorrow. Funded by the NSF and Yale University and held at Yale, this program was designed to motivate, empower, and interest middle school girls in developing the skills required to pursue a career in science during a day-long investigation of the session's featured topic in science. Yale students and female professors act as mentors and guide younger girls through an environment for understanding and exploring various disciplines of science through hands-on activities in a laboratory setting. GSI strives to close the gap between males and females one action-packed Saturday at a time. This paper evaluates the success of the program. Student participant evaluations over the past 2 years coupled with student testimony and GSI coordinator, instructors', and volunteers' interviews allowed for an analysis of GSI's ability to inspire girls to pursue careers in science. The data indicates that a majority of girls who attended the program were more inclined to continue their study of science. The positive results are detailed in the following paper which points to the hands-on activities and enthusiasm of instructors as integral to the program's success.

  8. Spin physics with anti-protons at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiora, Marco

    2005-10-26

    New insights on the nucleon structure can be obtained by means of the new p-barbeams, possibly polarised, foreseen at GSI; experimental asymmetries in Drell-Yan processes are a powerful tool to directly access transversity h1(x) without its convolution with fragmentation functions. Spin asymmetries in hyperon production and nucleonic form factors are discussed as well.

  9. One-Day Conference on School Safety & Security and Fair Dismissals Issues (Dayton, Ohio, June 24, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Law Association, Dayton, OH.

    This booklet contains five chapters relating to issues in school safety and security, and fair dismissals: (1) "Ohio Legislation and Federal and State Decisions" (Richard J. Dickinson). Items of deliberation include financial matters, school safety issues, administrator and teacher contract matters, Title IX liability, school prayer, drug testing…

  10. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D; Hammel, C J; Mark, J

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

  11. Assessment of the food safety issues related to genetically modified foods.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H A; Kleter, G A; Noteborn, H P; Kok, E J

    2001-09-01

    International consensus has been reached on the principles regarding evaluation of the food safety of genetically modified plants. The concept of substantial equivalence has been developed as part of a safety evaluation framework, based on the idea that existing foods can serve as a basis for comparing the properties of genetically modified foods with the appropriate counterpart. Application of the concept is not a safety assessment per se, but helps to identify similarities and differences between the existing food and the new product, which are then subject to further toxicological investigation. Substantial equivalence is a starting point in the safety evaluation, rather than an endpoint of the assessment. Consensus on practical application of the principle should be further elaborated. Experiences with the safety testing of newly inserted proteins and of whole genetically modified foods are reviewed, and limitations of current test methodologies are discussed. The development and validation of new profiling methods such as DNA microarray technology, proteomics, and metabolomics for the identification and characterization of unintended effects, which may occur as a result of the genetic modification, is recommended. The assessment of the allergenicity of newly inserted proteins and of marker genes is discussed. An issue that will gain importance in the near future is that of post-marketing surveillance of the foods derived from genetically modified crops. It is concluded, among others that, that application of the principle of substantial equivalence has proven adequate, and that no alternative adequate safety assessment strategies are available.

  12. Resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-48, Hydrogen control measures and effects of hydrogen burns on safety equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, C.M.; Soffer, L.

    1989-09-01

    Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-48 arose as a result of the large amount of hydrogen generated and burned within containment during the Three Mile Island accident. This issue covers hydrogen control measures for recoverable degraded-core accidents for all boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and those pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) with ice-condenser containments. The Commission and the nuclear industry have sponsored extensive research in this area, which has led to significant revision of the Commission's hydrogen control regulations, given in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50 (10 CFR 50), Section 50.44. BWRs having Mark I and II containments are presently required to operate with inerted containment atmospheres that effectively prevent hydrogen combustion. BWRs with Mark III containments and PWRs with ice-condenser containments are now required to be equipped with hydrogen control systems to protect containment integrity and safety systems inside containment. Industry has chosen to use hydrogen igniter systems to burn hydrogen produced in a controlled fashion to prevent damage. An independent review by a Committee of the National Research Council concluded that, for most accident scenarios, current regulatory requirements make it highly unlikely that hydrogen detonation would be the cause of containment failure. On the basis of the extensive research effort conducted and current regulatory requirements, including their implementation, the staff concludes that no new regulatory guidance on hydrogen control for recoverable degraded-core accidents for these types of plants is necessary and that USI A-48 is resolved.

  13. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 3

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.; Bickford, W.E.; Counts, C.A.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Powers, T.B.; Weakley, S.A.

    1985-09-01

    This supplemental report is the fourth in a series that document and use methods developed to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues. The initial report in this series was published by Andrews et al. in 1983 as NUREG/CR-2800. This supplement consists of two parts describing separate research efforts: (1) an alternative human factors methodology approach, and (2) a prioritization of the NRC's Human Factors Program Plan. The alternative human factors methodology approach may be used in specific future cases in which the methods identified in the initial report (NUREG/CR-2800) may not adequately assess the proper impact for resolution of new safety issues. The alternative methodology included in this supplement is entitled ''Methodology for Estimating the Public Risk Reduction Affected by Human Factors Improvement.'' The prioritization section of this report is entitled ''Prioritization of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Human Factors Program Plan.''

  14. Road safety in a globalised and more sustainable world: current issues and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stijn; Risser, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Although many countries have had considerable success in reducing traffic injuries over recent decades, there are still some fundamental problems in this area. At the same time, there is increasing focus on road safety research and policy development in the context of globalisation, sustainability, liveability and health. This special section presents a selection of papers that were presented at the annual ICTCT workshop held on the 8th and 9th of November 2012 in Hasselt, Belgium, and accepted for publication in Accident Analysis and Prevention following the journal's reviewing procedure. The aim of the ICTCT workshop was to analyse road safety facts, data and visions for the future in the wider context of current issues and future challenges in road safety.

  15. Worker health and safety and climate change in the Americas: issues and research needs.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Max; Rodríguez-Guzmán, Julietta; Watson, Joanna; van Wendel de Joode, Berna; Mergler, Donna; da Silva, Agnes Soares

    2016-09-01

    SYNOPSIS This report summarizes and discusses current knowledge on the impact that climate change can have on occupational safety and health (OSH), with a particular focus on the Americas. Worker safety and health issues are presented on topics related to specific stressors (e.g., temperature extremes), climate associated impacts (e.g., ice melt in the Arctic), and a health condition associated with climate change (chronic kidney disease of non-traditional etiology). The article discusses research needs, including hazards, surveillance, and risk assessment activities to better characterize and understand how OSH may be associated with climate change events. Also discussed are the actions that OSH professionals can take to ensure worker health and safety in the face of climate change.

  16. Energy resources law: Update on environmental and health and safety regulatory issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, T.R.; Porter, J.M.; Hannapel, J.S.; Panzik, S.

    1993-12-31

    This article provides an update on several environmental and health and safety issues that impact the development, management, and use of energy resources. Specifically, regulatory developments involving waste management activities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), including threshold issues such as the definition of waste under RCRA (i.e., the mixture and derived-from rules), are included in this article. In addition, new regulations on used oil recycling management standards and land disposal restriction for hazardous debris also are summarized. An update on the regulatory developments under the Clean Air Act Amendments, such as nonattainment, mobile sources, hazardous air pollutants, acid rain, operating permits, and enforcement is provided. This article also includes a summary of developments in occupational health and safety, such as Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) enforcement initiatives; new regulations on bloodborne pathogens and progress safety management; recent court decisions on preemption of state standards, air contaminants rulemaking, and disclosure of self-audits; and legislative reforms. The regulatory developments discussed in this article illustrate how the development, management, and use of energy resources are impacted, as compliance with expanding regulatory controls continues to represent an increasing percentage of facilities` operating budgets and as civil and criminal enforcement efforts are accelerated. 102 refs.

  17. The challenges for global harmonisation of food safety norms and regulations: issues for India.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jamuna

    2014-08-01

    Safe and adequate food is a human right, safety being a prime quality attribute without which food is unfit for consumption. Food safety regulations are framed to exercise control over all types of food produced, processed and sold so that the customer is assured that the food consumed will not cause any harm. From the Indian perspective, global harmonisation of food regulations is needed to improve food and nutrition security, the food trade and delivery of safe ready-to-eat (RTE) foods at all places and at all times. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) put forward to transform developing societies incorporate many food safety issues. The success of the MDGs, including that of poverty reduction, will in part depend on an effective reduction of food-borne diseases, particularly among the vulnerable group, which includes women and children. Food- and water-borne illnesses can be a serious health hazard, being responsible for high incidences of morbidity and mortality across all age groups of people. Global harmonisation of food regulations would assist in facilitating food trade within and outside India through better compliance, ensuring the safety of RTE catered foods, as well as addressing issues related to the environment. At the same time, regulations need to be optimum, as overregulation may have undue negative effects on the food trade.

  18. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the Environmental Restoration Program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.C.

    1994-08-01

    Since the 1940s, US Department of Energy (DOE) sites have been used for nuclear materials processing and production, warhead testing, and weapons research and development. These activities have resulted in extensive environmental contamination. DOE has established a goal to cleanup and restore the groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water at its facilities across the nation. To achieve this goal, many workers will be needed to conduct the cleanup. These workers will need training and will be required to follow occupational safety and health (OSH) regulations and guidelines. Compliance with the OSH regulations and guidelines will have an anomous influence on the schedule, money, and technology needed for environmental restoration. Therefore, one area that must be considered in the early stages of long-term planning is the impact of OSH issues on the environmental restoration process. The DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigate the impact of these issues on the environmental restoration process.

  19. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed.

  20. An examination of some safety issues among commercial motorcyclists in Nigeria: a case study.

    PubMed

    Arosanyin, Godwin Tunde; Olowosulu, Adekunle Taiwo; Oyeyemi, Gafar Matanmi

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of road crashes and injuries among motorcyclists in Nigeria requires a system inquiry into some safety issues at pre-crash, crash and post-crash stages to guide action plans. This paper examines safety issues such as age restriction, motorcycle engine capacity, highway code awareness, licence holding, helmet usage, crash involvement, rescue and payment for treatment among commercial motorcyclists. The primary data derived from a structured questionnaire administered to 334 commercial motorcyclists in Samaru, Zaria were analysed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression technique. There was total compliance with age restriction and motorcycle engine capacity. About 41.8% of the operators were not aware of the existence of the highway code. The odds of licence holding increased with highway code awareness, education with above senior secondary as the reference category and earnings. The odds of crash involvement decreased with highway code awareness, earnings and mode of operation. About 84% of the motorcyclists did not use crash helmet, in spite of being aware of the benefit, and 65.4% of motorcycle crashes was found to be with other road users. The promotion of safety among motorcyclists therefore requires strict traffic law enforcement and modification of road design to segregate traffic and protect pedestrians.

  1. The growing use of herbal medicines: issues relating to adverse reactions and challenges in monitoring safety

    PubMed Central

    Ekor, Martins

    2014-01-01

    The use of herbal medicinal products and supplements has increased tremendously over the past three decades with not less than 80% of people worldwide relying on them for some part of primary healthcare. Although therapies involving these agents have shown promising potential with the efficacy of a good number of herbal products clearly established, many of them remain untested and their use are either poorly monitored or not even monitored at all. The consequence of this is an inadequate knowledge of their mode of action, potential adverse reactions, contraindications, and interactions with existing orthodox pharmaceuticals and functional foods to promote both safe and rational use of these agents. Since safety continues to be a major issue with the use of herbal remedies, it becomes imperative, therefore, that relevant regulatory authorities put in place appropriate measures to protect public health by ensuring that all herbal medicines are safe and of suitable quality. This review discusses toxicity-related issues and major safety concerns arising from the use of herbal medicinal products and also highlights some important challenges associated with effective monitoring of their safety. PMID:24454289

  2. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J

    1992-11-01

    This report is the last of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues that may affect the commercial-scale use of sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles. The reports are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers the in-vehicle safety issues of electric vehicles powered by Na/S batteries. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, and private industry. It has three major goals: (1) to identify the unique hazards associated with electric vehicle (EV) use; (2) to describe the existing standards, regulations, and guidelines that are or could be applicable to these hazards; and (3) to discuss the adequacy of the existing requirements in addressing the safety concerns of EVs.

  3. An integrated data acquisition and analysis system at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Essel, H.G.; Hoffmann, J.; Richter, M.; Sohlbach, H.; Spreng )

    1989-10-01

    GOOSY, the GSI data acquisition and analysis system has been extended to handle experimental set-ups and data from heavy-ion experiments at high energies. A new front-end system has been designed and built. It is a VME based multi-processor system connected to CAMAC and FASTBUS via standard VSB. This system allows pre-analysis and filtering of the raw data. The architecture of the system is presented and a status report is given in this paper.

  4. Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven Curriculum and Educational Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Sheena; Fleming, Bonnie

    2009-05-01

    Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven is a program which aims at encouraging middle school girls to pursue careers in science. To accomplish this goal, each day at GSI features a different area of science; ``the material world,'' ``the chemical world,'' and ``the electromagnetic world'' are examples of the sessions held during the past two years. Every session features a short explanation of the science topic given by a volunteer and a variety of hands-on activities, which allow the girls to experiment with and absorb the concepts presented in the short presentations. Activities are selected based on their ability to visualize the concepts under study. The education philosophy of GSI is that if the students have the opportunity to perform science experiments themselves, rather than just watching others do it, and enjoy performing these experiments, then the students will be more confident in their ability to succeed in a scientific field. Thus, in addition to encouraging girls to learn as much science as they can, the volunteers work to ensure that the girls enjoy the program as well. By giving the girls the opportunity to explore science in a fun and exciting way, the girls begin to see themselves as capable of becoming scientists and are more inclined to pursue science in the future.

  5. Environmental, health and safety issues related to commercializing CuInSe{sub 2}-based photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Eberspacher, C.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowtiz, P.D.

    1996-07-01

    Photovoltaics technology is rapidly evolving towards a new generation of low-cost thin film technologies. One of the most promising materials in this new generation is copper indium selenide (CuInSe{sub 2} or CIS). As with any new material, successful commercialization of CIS photovoltaic (PV) technology will require attention to environmental, health and safety issues, including consideration of the sources, usage, and end-of-product-life disposal and/or recycling of the constituent materials. This work focuses on three specific environmental, health and safety (EH and S) issues related to CIS PV: (1) economics are analyzed to determine their impact on materials use and re-use; (2) Federal and California State environmental disposal and waste handling regulations are analyzed to evaluate their impact on PV module manufacturing and end-of-life module handling; and (3) the logistics and economics of product recycling and waste disposal by industries with comparable EH and S issues are examined to quantify the corresponding options available for handling, disposing of and/or recycling manufacturing by-products and end-of-life modules.

  6. Patient safety and interprofessional education: A report of key issues from two interprofessional workshops.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Elizabeth S; Gray, Richard; Price, Kim

    2017-03-01

    This article presents the outcomes of two workshops which explored historical and recent issues on patient safety that directly relate to leaders in the interprofessional field. The article considers the impact of flattened team-based structures where collaborative working constantly considers safe patient-centred high-quality care. These issues are mainly rooted in changes within a UK context, but the historical case studies present situations which could enlighten and enliven discussions of patient safety in an international context. The article was sparked by discussion of recurrent themes in healthcare that have undermined the abilities of medical practitioners to adequately manage hazard in clinical care settings throughout modern history. Examining the issues that confront healthcare practitioners and care workers in their dealings with patients and clients, such as the aged or the severely disabled, can reveal commonalities across global healthcare settings, in the past and present, that provide a useful tool in facilitating the goals of interprofessional education (IPE). The potential of IPE has links to both how professionals respond together to care situations and involve the general public in shared health understandings. The outcomes focus on how to ensure ministrations where optimal team-based collaborative care is recognised and constantly sought. We conclude that IPE has much to offer in this arena and more evidence of impact here is well worth pursuing.

  7. Potential safety issues and other factors that may affect the introduction and uptake of rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aliabadi, N; Tate, J E; Parashar, U D

    2016-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have demonstrated significant impact in reducing the burden of morbidity and mortality from childhood diarrhoea in countries that have implemented routine vaccination to date. Despite this success, in many countries, rotavirus vaccine coverage remains lower than that of other routine childhood vaccines. Several issues may potentially affect vaccine uptake, namely safety concerns related to intussusception with consequent age restrictions on rotavirus vaccination, contamination with porcine circovirus, vaccine-derived reassortant strains and hospitalization in newborn nurseries at time of administration of live oral rotavirus vaccine. In addition to these safety concerns, other factors may also affect uptake, including lower vaccine efficacy in the developing world, potential emergence of strains escaping from vaccine protection resulting in lower overall impact of a vaccination programme and sustainable vaccine financing. Although further work is needed to address some of these concerns, global policy bodies have reaffirmed that the benefits of rotavirus vaccination outweigh the risks, and vaccine use is recommended globally.

  8. Including safety-net providers in integrated delivery systems: issues and options for policymakers.

    PubMed

    Witgert, Katherine; Hess, Catherine

    2012-08-01

    Health care reform legislation has spurred efforts to develop integrated health care delivery systems that seek to coordinate the continuum of health services. These systems may be of particular benefit to patients who face barriers to accessing care or have multiple health conditions. But it remains to be seen how safety-net providers, including community health centers and public hospitals--which have long experience in caring for these vulnerable populations--will be included in integrated delivery systems. This issue brief explores key considerations for incorporating safety-net providers into integrated delivery systems and discusses the roles of state and federal agencies in sup­porting and testing models of integrated care delivery. The authors conclude that the most important principles in creating integrated delivery systems for vulnerable populations are: (1) an emphasis on primary care; (2) coordination of all care, including behavioral, social, and public health services; and (3) accountability for population health outcomes.

  9. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium ion electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L.J.; Ring, S.; Hammel, C.J.

    1995-09-01

    The lithium ion system considered in this report uses lithium intercalation compounds as both positive and negative electrodes and has an organic liquid electrolyte. Oxides of nickel, cobalt, and manganese are used in the positive electrode, and carbon is used in the negative electrode. This report presents health and safety issues, environmental issues, and shipping requirements for lithium ion electric vehicle (EV) batteries. A lithium-based electrochemical system can, in theory, achieve higher energy density than systems using other elements. The lithium ion system is less reactive and more reliable than present lithium metal systems and has possible performance advantages over some lithium solid polymer electrolyte batteries. However, the possibility of electrolyte spills could be a disadvantage of a liquid electrolyte system compared to a solid electrolyte. The lithium ion system is a developing technology, so there is some uncertainty regarding which materials will be used in an EV-sized battery. This report reviews the materials presented in the open literature within the context of health and safety issues, considering intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of material hazards, and safety testing. Some possible lithium ion battery materials are toxic, carcinogenic, or could undergo chemical reactions that produce hazardous heat or gases. Toxic materials include lithium compounds, nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and dimethoxyethane. Carcinogenic materials include nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and (possibly) cobalt compounds, copper, and polypropylene. Lithiated negative electrode materials could be reactive. However, because information about the exact compounds that will be used in future batteries is proprietary, ongoing research will determine which specific hazards will apply.

  10. Capillary electrophoresis for the analysis of contaminants in emerging food safety issues and food traceability.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2010-07-01

    This review presents an overview of the applicability of CE in the analysis of chemical and biological contaminants involved in emerging food safety issues. Additionally, CE-based genetic analyzers' usefulness as a unique tool in food traceability verification systems was presented. First, analytical approaches for the determination of melamine and specific food allergens in different foods were discussed. Second, natural toxin analysis by CE was updated from the last review reported in 2008. Finally, the analysis of prion proteins associated with the "mad cow" crises and the application of CE-based genetic analyzers for meat traceability were summarized.

  11. Final Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-12-15

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Though the meeting was prompted initially by suspected issues related to the treatment of surface roughness inherent in the SRS meteorological dataset and its treatment in the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System Version 2 (MACCS2), various topical areas were discussed that are relevant to performing safety assessments at SRS; this final report addresses these topical areas.

  12. Prioritization of environmental, safety, and health issues at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mubayi, V.; Lehner, J.; Lin, C.C.; Conrad, C.; Pratt, W.T.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes short-term and long-term enhancements to the existing prioritization system at BNL which are being carried out under the Management Systems Improvement Program in response to DOE`s Integrated Safety Management System Evaluation of BNL. The enhancements focus on: inclusion of stakeholder (public, elected officials, and media) perceptions; achievement and maintenance of full compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, ordinances regulations, and codes; devotion of special attention to unique risk factors; and integration of ES and H and Infrastructure issues within one prioritization model.

  13. Time-related degradation, a key issue in nuclear plant safety evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L.L.; Bustard, L.D.; Clough, R.L.; Gillen, K.T.

    1982-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a number of programs under NRC sponsorship which deal with safety-related equipment qualification issues, including the important aspect of aging. Among these is the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program which was probably the first to devote significant effort towards aging research and was one of the primary motivators leading to the Workshop. The thrust of the QTE aging efforts has been on elastomeric materials, typically used in electrical cables, seals, gaskets, and the like; currently, efforts are being pursued on plant ambient environments measurements, aging of electronics, and aging of motors. A brief status report is presented in this paper.

  14. Role of text mining in early identification of potential drug safety issues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Hu, Yong; Tang, Buzhou

    2014-01-01

    Drugs are an important part of today's medicine, designed to treat, control, and prevent diseases; however, besides their therapeutic effects, drugs may also cause adverse effects that range from cosmetic to severe morbidity and mortality. To identify these potential drug safety issues early, surveillance must be conducted for each drug throughout its life cycle, from drug development to different phases of clinical trials, and continued after market approval. A major aim of pharmacovigilance is to identify the potential drug-event associations that may be novel in nature, severity, and/or frequency. Currently, the state-of-the-art approach for signal detection is through automated procedures by analyzing vast quantities of data for clinical knowledge. There exists a variety of resources for the task, and many of them are textual data that require text analytics and natural language processing to derive high-quality information. This chapter focuses on the utilization of text mining techniques in identifying potential safety issues of drugs from textual sources such as biomedical literature, consumer posts in social media, and narrative electronic medical records.

  15. Current global and Korean issues in radiation safety of nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed

    Song, H C

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the management of patient doses in medical imaging has evolved as concern about radiation exposure has increased. Efforts and techniques to reduce radiation doses are focussed not only on the basis of patient safety, but also on the fundamentals of justification and optimisation in cooperation with international organisations such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the World Health Organization. The Image Gently campaign in children and Image Wisely campaign in adults to lower radiation doses have been initiated in the USA. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine paediatric dosage card, North American consensus guidelines, and Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative have recommended the activities of radiopharmaceuticals that should be administered in children. Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), developed predominantly in Europe, may be an important tool to manage patient doses. In Korea, overexposure to radiation, even from the use of medical imaging, has become a public issue, particularly since the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. As a result, the Korean Nuclear Safety and Security Commission revised the technical standards for radiation safety management in medical fields. In parallel, DRLs for nuclear medicine procedures have been collected on a nationwide scale. Notice of total effective dose from positron emission tomography-computed tomography for cancer screening has been mandatory since mid-November 2014.

  16. Health, safety and environmental issues relating to cadmium usage in photovoltaic energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. ); Zweibel, K. )

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the current technology base and hazards associated with two promising thin-film photovoltaic cells that contain cadmium compounds -- cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}). More specifically, this paper summarizes the toxicological information on cadmium (Cd) compounds; evaluates potential health, safety and environmental hazards associated with cadmium usage in the photovoltaics industry; describes regulatory requirements associated with the use, handling and disposal of cadmium compounds; and lists management options to permit the safe and continued use of these materials. Handling of cadmium in photovoltaic production can present hazards to health, safety and the environment. Prior recognition of these hazards can allow device manufacturers and regulators to implement appropriate and readily available hazard management strategies. Hazards associated with product use (i.e., array fires) and disposal remain controversial and partially unresolved. The most likely effects that could be expected would be those associated with chronic low-level exposures to cadmium wastes. Because of the general immobility of the cadmium present in these devices and availability of environmental and biomonitoring protocols, chronic hazards can be monitored, and remediated if necessary. Nevertheless, concern about cadmium hazards should continue to be emphasized to ensure that health, safety and environmental issues are properly managed. At the same time, the potential role that these systems can play in ameliorating some important health and environmental hazards related to other energy systems should not be ignored. 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Summary of tank information relating salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Caley, S.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Active use of these SSTs was phased out completely by November 1980, and the first step toward final disposal of the waste in the SSTs is interim stabilization, which involves removing essentially all of the drainable liquid from the tank. Stabilization can be achieved administratively, by jet pumping to remove drainable interstitial liquid, or by supernatant pumping. To date, 116 tanks have been declared interim stabilized; 44 SSTs have had drainable liquid removed by salt well jet pumping. Of the 149 SSTs, 19 are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because the waste in these tanks is known or suspected, in all but one case, to generate and retain mixtures of flammable gases, including; hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Salt well pumping to remove the drainable interstitial liquid from these SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. The scope of this work is to collect and summarize information, primarily tank data and observations, that relate salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues. While the waste within FGWL SSTs is suspected offering flammable gases, the effect of salt well pumping on the waste behavior is not well understood. This study is being conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the Flammable Gas Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Understanding the historical tank behavior during and following salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

  18. A discussion of certain safety issues associated with the Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation mixing test. Letter report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This paper addresses certain safety issues associated with the Hanford Tank 241-SY 101 hydrogen mitigation mixing test. Specifically, the study, is concerned with the effect of pump shearing, jet mixing, and piling-up on the following areas: Gas generation; gas retention; gas release (immediate); gas release (long-term); and saltcake. The findings for each issue area of concern are addressed.

  19. Assimilation of GPM GMI Rainfall Product with WRF GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international mission to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide. The GPM built on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) legacy, while the core observatory will extend the observations to higher latitudes. The GPM observations can help advance our understanding of precipitation microphysics and storm structures. Launched on February 27th, 2014, the GPM core observatory is carrying advanced instruments that can be used to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world. Therefore, the use of GPM data in numerical modeling work is a new area and will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The goal of this research is to examine the methodology of assimilation of the GPM retrieved products. The data assimilation system used in this study is the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed by the Development Testbed Center (DTC). The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this research explores regional assimilation of the GPM products with case studies. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on the assimilation of the GPM product 2AGPROFGMI, the retrieved Microwave Imager (GMI) rainfall rate data for initializing a real convective storm. WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast of precipitation fields and processes. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to other GPM products. Further details of the methodology of data assimilation, preliminary result and test on the impact of GPM data and the

  20. Assimilation of Dual-Polarimetric Radar Observations with WRF GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Fehnel, Traci; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Dual-polarimetric (dual-pol) radar typically transmits both horizontally and vertically polarized radio wave pulses. From the two different reflected power returns, more accurate estimate of liquid and solid cloud and precipitation can be provided. The upgrade of the traditional NWS WSR-88D radar to include dual-pol capabilities will soon be completed for the entire NEXRAD network. Therefore, the use of dual-pol radar network will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The assimilation of dual-pol radar data is especially challenging as few guidelines have been provided by previous research. It is our goal to examine how to best use dual-pol radar data to improve forecast of severe storm and forecast initialization. In recent years, the Development Testbed Center (DTC) has released the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) DA system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this study explores regional assimilation of the dual-pol radar variables from the WSR-88D radars for real case storms. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on incorporating the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and radial velocity (VR) data for initializing convective storms, with a significant focus being on an improved representation of hydrometeor fields. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to dual-pol variables. Beyond the dual-pol variable assimilation procedure developing within a GSI framework, highresolution (=1 km) WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast

  1. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L J; Hammel, C J

    1997-04-01

    Electrochemical capacitors are a candidate for traction power assists in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Other advanced automotive applications, while not the primary focus of current development efforts, are also possible. These include load leveling high-energy batteries, power conditioning electronics, electrically hated catalysts, electric power steering, and engine starter power. Higher power and longer cycle life are expected for electrochemical capacitors than for batteries. Evaluation of environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) issues of electrochemical capacitors is an essential part of the development and commercialization of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicles. This report provides an initial EH and S assessment. This report presents electrochemical capacitor electrochemistry, materials selection, intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of those hazards, environmental requirements, pollution control options, and shipping requirements. Most of the information available for this assessment pertains to commercial devices intended for application outside the advanced vehicle market and to experiment or prototype devices. Electrochemical capacitors for power assists in HEVs are not produced commercially now. Therefore, materials for advanced vehicle electrochemical capacitors may change, and so would the corresponding EH and S issues. Although changes are possible, this report describes issues for likely electrochemical capacitor designs.

  2. Critical Issues in Sensor Science To Aid Food and Water Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Farahi, R. H.; Passian, A.; Tetard, L.; Thundat, T.

    2012-06-26

    The stability of food and water supplies is widely recognized as a global issue of fundamental importance. Sensor development for food and water safety by nonconventional assays continues to overcome technological challenges. The delicate balance between attaining adequate limits of detection, chemical fingerprinting of the target species, dealing with the complex food matrix, and operating in difficult environments are still the focus of current efforts. While the traditional pursuit of robust recognition methods remains important, emerging engineered nanomaterials and nanotechnology promise better sensor performance but also bring about new challenges. Both advanced receptor-based sensors and emerging non-receptor-based physical sensors are evaluated for their critical challenges toward out-of-laboratory applications.

  3. Critical issues in sensor science to aid food and water safety.

    PubMed

    Farahi, R H; Passian, A; Tetard, L; Thundat, T

    2012-06-26

    The stability of food and water supplies is widely recognized as a global issue of fundamental importance. Sensor development for food and water safety by nonconventional assays continues to overcome technological challenges. The delicate balance between attaining adequate limits of detection, chemical fingerprinting of the target species, dealing with the complex food matrix, and operating in difficult environments are still the focus of current efforts. While the traditional pursuit of robust recognition methods remains important, emerging engineered nanomaterials and nanotechnology promise better sensor performance but also bring about new challenges. Both advanced receptor-based sensors and emerging non-receptor-based physical sensors are evaluated for their critical challenges toward out-of-laboratory applications.

  4. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D; Hammel, C J

    1995-02-01

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EVs). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  5. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbus, D.; Hammel, C. J.

    1995-02-01

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EV's). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  6. Chemical food safety issues in the United States: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Lauren S

    2009-09-23

    Considerable advances have been made over the past century in the understanding of the chemical hazards in food and ways for assessing and managing these risks. At the turn of the 20th century, many Americans were exposed to foods adulterated with toxic compounds. In the 1920s the increasing use of insecticides led to concerns of chronic ingestion of heavy metals such as lead and arsenic from residues remaining on crops. By the 1930s, a variety of agrochemicals were commonly used, and food additives were becoming common in processed foods. During the 1940s and 1950s advances were made in toxicology, and more systematic approaches were adopted for evaluating the safety of chemical contaminants in food. Modern gas chromatography and liquid chromatography, both invented in the 1950s and 1960s, were responsible for progress in detecting, quantifying, and assessing the risk of food contaminants and adulterants. In recent decades, chemical food safety issues that have been the center of media attention include the presence of natural toxins, processing-produced toxins (e.g., acrylamide, heterocyclic aromatic amines, and furan), food allergens, heavy metals (e.g., lead, arsenic, mercury, cadmium), industrial chemicals (e.g., benzene, perchlorate), contaminants from packaging materials, and unconventional contaminants (melamine) in food and feed. Due to the global nature of the food supply and advances in analytical capabilities, chemical contaminants will continue to be an area of concern for regulatory agencies, the food industry, and consumers in the future.

  7. Thermoregulatory models of safety-for-flight issues for space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisacane, V. L.; Kuznetz, L. H.; Logan, J. S.; Clark, J. B.; Wissler, E. H.

    2006-10-01

    This study investigates the use of a mathematical model for thermoregulation as a tool in safety-of-flight issues and proposed solutions for mission operations of the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. Specifically, this study assesses the effects of elevated cabin temperature and metabolic loads on astronauts wearing the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) and the Liquid Cooled Ventilation Garment (LCVG). The 225-node Wissler model is validated by comparison with two ground-based human subject tests, firefighters, and surrogate astronauts under anomalous conditions that show good agreement. Subsequent simulations indicate that the performance of the ACES/LCVG is marginal. Increases in either workload or cabin temperature from the nominal will increase rectal temperature, stored heat load, heart rate, and sweating leading to possible deficits in the ability of the astronauts to perform cognitive and motor tasks that could affect the safety of the mission, especially the safe landing of the Shuttle. Specific relationships are given between cabin temperature and metabolic rate that define the threshold for decreased manual dexterity and loss of tracking skills. Model results indicate that the most effective mitigation strategy would be to decrease the LCVG inlet temperature. Methods of accomplishing this are also proposed.

  8. Hanford Site organic waste tanks: History, waste properties, and scientific issues. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Schulz, W.W.; Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Eight Hanford single-shell waste tanks are included on a safety watch list because they are thought to contain significant concentrations of various organic chemical. Potential dangers associated with the waste in these tanks include exothermic reaction, combustion, and release of hazardous vapors. In all eight tanks the measured waste temperatures are in the range 16 to 46{degree}C, far below the 250 to 380{degree}C temperatures necessary for onset of rapid exothermic reactions and initiation of deflagration. Investigation of the possibility of vapor release from Tank C-103 has been elevated to a top safety priority. There is a need to obtain an adequate number of truly representative vapor samples and for highly sensitive and capable methods and instruments to analyze these samples. Remaining scientific issues include: an understanding of the behavior and reaction of organic compounds in existing underground tank environments knowledge of the types and amounts of organic compounds in the tanks knowledge of selected physical and chemical properties of organic compounds source, composition, quality, and properties of the presently unidentified volatile organic compound(s) apparently evolving from Tank C-103.

  9. Cost saving and safety issues in the Billings Area of the Western Area Power Administration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-11

    This report concerns possible cost savings that would result from a proposed transfer of power-dispatch functions from Fort Peck, Montana to Jamestown, North Dakota, in the Billings Area of the Western Area Power Administration (the Power Administration) and related issues concerning the reliability of service and the safety of personnel in the operation of the Billings Area of the Power Administration. Each of the three requests to the Inspector General (IG) raised the following questions: (1) Will the proposed transfer of the power dispatch function result in cost savings. (2) Will any detriment to the Power Administration's service to its Montana customers result from the transfer. (3) Will the safety of people who work on the electrical power systems in Montana be jeopardized by the transfer. IG recommended: (a) that the Power Administration reevaluate the adequacy of the plan to staff the Jamestown facility with a sufficient number of experienced power dispatchers familiar with the Montana power distribution system, and (b) that the Power Administration strictly enforce its published procedures for training, testing, and certifying operations and maintenance personnel.

  10. Survey of commercial Rhodiola products revealed species diversity and potential safety issues

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Tianyi; Li, Xiaojin; Yao, Hui; Lin, Yulin; Ma, Xiaochong; Cheng, Ruiyang; Song, Jingyuan; Ni, Lianghong; Fan, Congzhao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    The adulteration of herbal products is a threat to consumer safety. Here we surveyed the species composition of commercial Rhodiola products using DNA barcoding as a supervisory method. A Rhodiola dietary supplement DNA barcode database was successfully constructed using 82 voucher samples from 10 Rhodiola species. Based on the DNA barcoding standard operating procedure (SOP), we used this database to identify 100 Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma decoction piece samples that were purchased from drug stores and hospitals. The results showed that only 36 decoction piece sequences (40%) were authentic R. crenulata, which is recorded in Chinese Pharmacopeia, whereas the other samples were all adulterants and may indicate a potential safety issue. Among the adulterants, 35 sequences (38.9%) were authenticated as R. serrata, nine sequences (10%) were authenticated as R. rosea, which is documented in the United States Pharmacopeia, and the remaining samples were authenticated as other three Rhodiola species. This result indicates decoction pieces that are available in the market have complex origins and DNA barcoding is a convenient tool for market supervision. PMID:25661009

  11. Preparing for safety issues following drug approval: pre-approval risk management considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sharrar, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Risk management plans and risk minimization plans as well as postapproval commitment studies are based on risks identified pre-approval that need to be further characterized or minimized in the postmarketing environment. Although the implementation of these activities are conducted in the postapproval arena, the design of the plans and studies as well as the development of effective postapproval tools and mitigation strategies should be carried out pre-approval. The pre-approval period also provides the opportunity to fully understand the treatment population that is included in the clinical trial program and to determine how the target population for the drug after approval may differ from the clinical trial patient population. When regulators or sponsors have expressed concerns about safety issues identified during clinical development, the result may be a postapproval commitment in the form of a registry or an observational safety study or, in the US, a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) as a condition of approval. Specific examples are given for risk mitigation activities that can be conducted pre-approval. PMID:25114783

  12. SARNET: Integrating Severe Accident Research in Europe - Safety Issues in the Source Term Area

    SciTech Connect

    Haste, T.; Giordano, P.; Micaelli, J.-C.; Herranz, L.

    2006-07-01

    SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) is a Network of Excellence of the EU 6. Framework Programme that integrates in a sustainable manner the research capabilities of about fifty European organisations to resolve important remaining uncertainties and safety issues concerning existing and future nuclear plant, especially water-cooled reactors, under hypothetical severe accident conditions. It emphasises integrating activities, spreading of excellence (including knowledge transfer) and jointly-executed research. This paper summarises the main results obtained at the middle of the current 4-year term, highlighting those concerning radioactive release to the environment. Integration is pursued through different methods: the ASTEC integral computer code for severe accident modelling, development of PSA level 2 methods, a means for definition, updating and resolution of safety issues, and development of a web database for storing experimental results. These activities are helped by an evolving Advanced Communication Tool, easing communication amongst partners. Concerning spreading of excellence, educational courses covering severe accident analysis methodology and level 2 PSA have been organised for early 2006. A text book on Severe Accident Phenomenology is being written. A mobility programme for students and young researchers has started. Results are disseminated mainly through open conference proceedings, with journal publications planned. The 1. European Review Meeting on Severe Accidents in November 2005 covered SARNET activities during its first 18 months. Jointly executed research activities concern key issues grouped in the Corium, Containment and Source Term areas. In Source Term, behaviour of the highly radio-toxic ruthenium under oxidising conditions, including air ingress, is investigated. Models are proposed for fuel and ruthenium oxidation. Experiments on transport of oxide ruthenium species are performed. Reactor scenario studies assist in defining

  13. Professional and interprofessional differences in electronic health records use and recognition of safety issues in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Knewton K; Stephenson, Laurel S; Mulanax, Ashley; Bierman, Jesse; Mcgrath, Karess; Scholl, Gretchen; McDougal, Adrienne; Bearden, David T; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A

    2016-09-01

    During interprofessional intensive care unit (ICU) rounds each member of the interprofessional team is responsible for gathering and interpreting information from the electronic health records (EHR) to facilitate effective team decision-making. This study was conducted to determine how each professional group reviews EHR data in preparation for rounds and their ability to identify patient safety issues. Twenty-five physicians, 29 nurses, and 20 pharmacists participated. Individual participants were given verbal and written sign-out and then asked to review a simulated record in our institution's EHR, which contained 14 patient safety items. After reviewing the chart, subjects presented the patient and the number of safety items recognised was recorded. About 40%, 30%, and 26% of safety issues were recognised by physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, respectively (p = 0.0006) and no item recognised 100% of the time. There was little overlap between the three groups with only 50% of items predicted to be recognised 100% of the time by the team. Differential recognition was associated with marked differences in EHR use, with only 3/152 EHR screens utilised by all three groups and the majority of screens used exclusively only by one group. There were significant and non-overlapping differences in individual profession recognition of patient safety issues in the EHR. Preferential identification of safety issues by certain professional groups may be attributed to differences in EHR use. Future studies will be needed to determine if shared decision-making during rounds can improve recognition of safety issues.

  14. Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1980-02-01

    Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

  15. TRB for HADES and FAIR experiments at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, I.; Schrader, C.; Stroeble, H.; Stroth, J.; Tarantrola, A.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Korcyl, K.; Krzemień, W.; Palka, M.; Salabura, P.; TrȨBACZ, R.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.

    2008-06-01

    TRB module is a multi-purpose Trigger and Readout Board with on-board DAQ functionality developed for the upgrade of the HADES experiment. It contains single computer chip (Etrax) running Linux and the 100 Mbit/s Ethernet interface. It has been orginally designed as the 128-channel Time to Digital Converter based on the HPTDC chip from CERN. The new version of TRB contains 2 Gbit/s optical link and interface connector (15 Gbit/s) implementing the add-on card concept and making the board more flexible. Moreover, FPGA chip (Xilinx, Virtex 4 LX 40) and TigerSharc DSP provide new computing resources which can be used to run on-line analysis algorithms. The TRB is proposed as a prototype of base readout module for the planned detector systems PANDA and CBM at the future FAIR facility at GSI-Darmstadt.

  16. Human factors and safety issues associated with actinide retrieval from spent light water reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.

    1992-08-01

    A major problem in environmental restoration and waste management is the disposition of used fuel assemblies from the many light water reactors in the United States, which present a radiation hazard to those whose job is to dispose of them, with a similar threat to the general environment associated with long-term storage in fuel repositories around the country. Actinides resident in the fuel pins as a result of their use in reactor cores constitute a significant component of this hazard. Recently, the Department of Energy has initiated an Actinide Recycle Program to study the feasibility of using pyrochemical (molten salt) processes to recover actinides from the spent fuel assemblies of commercial reactors. This project concerns the application of robotics technology to the operation and maintenance functions of a plant whose objective is to recover actinides from spent fuel assemblies, and to dispose of the resulting hardware and chemical components from this process. Such a procedure involves a number of safety and human factors issues. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of robotics and artificial intelligence to facilitate accomplishment of the program goals while maintaining the safety of the humans doing the work and the integrity of the environment. This project will result in a graphic simulation on a Silicon Graphics workstation as a proof of principle demonstration of the feasibility of using robotics along with an intelligent operator interface. A major component of the operator-system interface is a hybrid artificial intelligence system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which combines artificial neural networks and an expert system into a hybrid, self-improving computer-based system interface. 10 refs.

  17. Human factors and safety issues associated with actinide retrieval from spent light water reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    A major problem in environmental restoration and waste management is the disposition of used fuel assemblies from the many light water reactors in the United States, which present a radiation hazard to those whose job is to dispose of them, with a similar threat to the general environment associated with long-term storage in fuel repositories around the country. Actinides resident in the fuel pins as a result of their use in reactor cores constitute a significant component of this hazard. Recently, the Department of Energy has initiated an Actinide Recycle Program to study the feasibility of using pyrochemical (molten salt) processes to recover actinides from the spent fuel assemblies of commercial reactors. This project concerns the application of robotics technology to the operation and maintenance functions of a plant whose objective is to recover actinides from spent fuel assemblies, and to dispose of the resulting hardware and chemical components from this process. Such a procedure involves a number of safety and human factors issues. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of robotics and artificial intelligence to facilitate accomplishment of the program goals while maintaining the safety of the humans doing the work and the integrity of the environment. This project will result in a graphic simulation on a Silicon Graphics workstation as a proof of principle demonstration of the feasibility of using robotics along with an intelligent operator interface. A major component of the operator-system interface is a hybrid artificial intelligence system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which combines artificial neural networks and an expert system into a hybrid, self-improving computer-based system interface. 10 refs.

  18. A regional hybrid GSI/ETKF data assimilation scheme for the WRF/ARW model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizzi, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    A regional hybrid GSI/ETKF data assimilation scheme for the WRF/ARW model Arthur P. Mizzi National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, CO 80307 303-497-8987 mizzi@ucar.edu Recently, there has been increased interest in hybrid variational data assimilation due to its ability to improve numerical weather forecast accuracy by incorporating ensemble error information into the data assimilation process (Buehner, 2010a, b; Wang 2010). In this paper, we introduce a GSI/ETKF regional hybrid (Mizzi, 2011). The GSI/ETKF regional hybrid uses a modified version of NOAA/EMC's GSI global hybrid (Wang, 2010) for the ensemble mean analysis and an ETKF (Bishop, et. al., 2001) to update the ensemble perturbations. We tested the GSI/ETKF regional hybrid by applying it to cycling experiments with WRF/ARW on a coarse-resolution domain covering the continental United States (CONUS) that: (i) compared different ETKF schemes, and (ii) reduced and held the number of ETKF observations constant. The results from those experiments showed that: (i) the ETKF scheme requiring the least amount of inflation provided the lowest 12-hr forecast RMSEs (ii) holding the number of ETKF observations constant removed the oscillation in the posterior ETKF ensemble spread noted by Bowler et al., (2008), and (iii) reducing the number of ETKF observations lowered the 12-hr forecast RMSEs. Presently, we are extending this work to a comparison of the GSI/ETKF regional hybrid with a GSI/LETKF regional hybrid based on the LETKF of Ott, et. al., (2004) and a GSI/EnKF regional hybrid based on the DART EnKF (Anderson et. al., 2009). Generally, the GSI/LETKF and GSI/EnKF schemes require less ensemble spread inflation compared to the GSI/ETKF scheme. Consequently, we expect the GSI/LETKF and GSI/EnKF schemes to provide lower 12-hr forecast RMSEs compared to the GSI/ETKF results. Our preliminary results are consistent with that supposition.

  19. Safety and security issues relating to low capacity storage of AN-based fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Marlair, Guy; Kordek, Marie-Astrid

    2005-08-31

    Motivated by both the Toulouse explosion, and a series of recent unexpected handling and storage accidents in well-developed countries, the safety issues associated with the storage of fertilizer grades of ammonium nitrate (AN) are considered with a focus on low storage capacity premises. Such facilities are numerous and, in large agricultural countries, include thousands of end-users and hundreds of small distributors. The strong oxidative (sometimes explosive) properties of products containing significant amounts of AN have led to a long history of major accidents including mass explosions in large storage units and pre 1950s, to mass explosions in ships. A major breakthrough in safety was achieved in the 1950s, with the promotion - amongst other improvements - of better anti-caking agents. Although modern AN fertilizers complying with current standards are not considered as explosive material per se, the latent risk of accidental detonation under specific conditions remains a real issue, and from a scientific point of view, cannot be completely ruled out-as dramatically demonstrated by the Toulouse disaster in France. The new insight provided here is derived from: (1) a literature review on hazardous properties of AN and AN-based fertilizers; (2) a review of accidents focusing more particularly on the reporting of recent new cases involving relatively small quantities of previously 'thought safe' products; (3) an examination of both the relevant regulatory framework and the level of hazard control achieved; (4) appropriate discussions of the economical, technical and organizational factors that could lead to some underestimation of the risk compared to large scale storage facilities. In terms of research requirements, the complex potential scenario 'mass explosion following a fire' requires further attention, as does the role and properties of molten ammonium nitrate, which could be the precursor for such an event to occur. Beyond research needs, reinforced

  20. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 1, Cell and battery safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ohi, J M

    1992-09-01

    This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD&D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH&S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

  1. What Do Arizonans Think About Crime, Safety, and Trust? AZ Views. Volume 1, Issue 3, October 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison Institute for Public Policy, Arizona State University, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report presents data from the Arizona Indicators Panel, a statewide representative sample of Arizonans conducted in May and July 2008. Most survey respondents named crime and public safety as among the top issues their officials should address, and nearly half said they thought crime was getting worse. Yet, despite strong concerns about…

  2. [Immunological blood transfusion safety and selection of red blood cells issued from hospital blood banks].

    PubMed

    Py, J-Y

    2010-12-01

    Allogeneic red blood cells transfusion is always an immunological challenge and the choice of the blood products is crucial for the patient safety. But this choice may be hampered by the quality or the quantity of the available supply. In the end, the lack of transfusion may be more harmful than transfusion. The balance between patients' needs and blood centres supplying is always delicate. The conditions are not the same for all blood groups. Things are easier for the KEL1 phenotype, where the supply must ensure only 92.5% of KEL: -1 red blood cells instead of the 91% expected. More complicated is the situation for group O red blood cells with 47 versus 43%. But the major problem concerns RH: -1 red blood cells, for which the needs reach 20.1 versus 15%. These challenges require a lot of efforts from blood centres staffs to influence blood donors' recruitment and appointments. A justified and carefully selected blood products issuing may be of great help, especially for group O RH: -1 red blood cells. Therefore, hospital blood banks must have ad hoc procedures and a trained staff to put them into practice.

  3. Assessment of enriched uranium storage safety issues at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This document is an assessment of the technical safety issues pertaining to the storage of EU at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The purpose of the assessment is to serve as the basis for defining the technical standards for storage of EU at Y-12. A formal assessment of the Y-12 materials acceptance criteria for EU is currently being conducted by a task force cochaired by B. G. Eddy of DOE Oak Ridge Operations and S. 0. Cox of Y-12 Defense Programs. The mission of this technical assessment for storage is obviously dependent on results of the acceptance assessment. Clearly, the two efforts require coordination to avoid inconsistencies. In addition, both these Assessments must be consistent with the Environmental Assessment for EU storage at Y-12.1 Both the Storage Assessment and the Criteria for Acceptance must take cognizance of the fact that a portion of the EU to be submitted for storage in the future is expected to be derived from foreign sources and to include previously irradiated uranium containing significant levels of transuranics, radioactive daughter products, and unstable uranium isotopes that do not occur in the EU stream of the DOE weapons complex. National security considerations may dictate that these materials be accepted despite the fact that they fail to conform to the Acceptance Criteria. This document will attempt to address the complexities inherent in this situation.

  4. Xylitol: a review on bioproduction, application, health benefits, and related safety issues.

    PubMed

    Ur-Rehman, Salim; Mushtaq, Zarina; Zahoor, Tahir; Jamil, Amir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Xylitol is a pentahydroxy sugar-alcohol which exists in a very low quantity in fruits and vegetables (plums, strawberries, cauliflower, and pumpkin). On commercial scale, xylitol can be produced by chemical and biotechnological processes. Chemical production is costly and extensive in purification steps. However, biotechnological method utilizes agricultural and forestry wastes which offer the possibilities of economic production of xylitol by reducing required energy. The precursor xylose is produced from agricultural biomass by chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis and can be converted to xylitol primarily by yeast strain. Hydrolysis under acidic condition is the more commonly used practice influenced by various process parameters. Various fermentation process inhibitors are produced during chemical hydrolysis that reduce xylitol production, a detoxification step is, therefore, necessary. Biotechnological xylitol production is an integral process of microbial species belonging to Candida genus which is influenced by various process parameters such as pH, temperature, time, nitrogen source, and yeast extract level. Xylitol has application and potential for food and pharmaceutical industries. It is a functional sweetener as it has prebiotic effects which can reduce blood glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol level. This review describes recent research developments related to bioproduction of xylitol from agricultural wastes, application, health, and safety issues.

  5. Reactor safety issues resolved by the 2D/3D Program. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Damerell, P.S.; Simons, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The 2D/3D Program studied multidimensional thermal-hydraulics in a PWR core and primary system during the end-of-blowdown and post-blowdown phases of a large-break LOCA (LBLOCA), and during selected small-break LOCA (SBLOCA) transients. The program included tests at the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF), and the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), and computer analyses using TRAC. Tests at CCTF investigated core thermal-hydraulics and overall system behavior while tests at SCTF concentrated on multidimensional core thermal-hydraulics. The UPTF tests investigated two-phase flow behavior in the downcomer, upper plenum, tie plate region, and primary loops. TRAC analyses evaluated thermal-hydraulic behavior throughout the primary system in tests as well as in PWRs. This report summarizes the test and analysis results in each of the main areas where improved information was obtained in the 2D/3D Program. The discussion is organized in terms of the reactor safety issues investigated.

  6. Knowledge and Attitudes towards Handling Eggs in the Home: An Unexplored Food Safety Issue?

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, Harriet; Clarke, Beverley; Ross, Kirstin

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne illness is a global public health issue, with food handling in the home identified as an underestimated source. In Australia, there has been a significant increase in the incidence of salmonellosis with the majority of outbreaks linked to eggs. This study investigated Australian eggs consumer attitudes, behaviours and risk perceptions associated with the handling of raw eggs in the home. It was identified that 67% of participants chose free range eggs, 11% kept poultry, 7% did not have any preference, 7% cage eggs, 4% barn eggs, 2% organic eggs and 1% pasteurized eggs. The majority of participants (91%) reported they stored eggs in the fridge. It was identified that there is an underestimation of “risky behaviour” associated with the consumption of raw eggs in the home, as 84% of participants indicated that they did not consume raw eggs, but subsequently 86% indicated that they had eaten mixture/batter containing raw eggs. Participants’ responses relating to food safety were also examined in relation to their profession and gender. Safer food handling practices were identified by Environmental Health Officers (EHO) and Food handlers compared to all other professions (p < 0.05). However, the gender of participants did not significantly affect (p > 0.05) their responses. PMID:28067811

  7. Epistemic uncertainty in the ranking and categorization of probabilistic safety assessment model elements: issues and findings.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Emanuele

    2008-08-01

    In this work, we study the effect of epistemic uncertainty in the ranking and categorization of elements of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) models. We show that, while in a deterministic setting a PSA element belongs to a given category univocally, in the presence of epistemic uncertainty, a PSA element belongs to a given category only with a certain probability. We propose an approach to estimate these probabilities, showing that their knowledge allows to appreciate "the sensitivity of component categorizations to uncertainties in the parameter values" (U.S. NRC Regulatory Guide 1.174). We investigate the meaning and utilization of an assignment method based on the expected value of importance measures. We discuss the problem of evaluating changes in quality assurance, maintenance activities prioritization, etc. in the presence of epistemic uncertainty. We show that the inclusion of epistemic uncertainly in the evaluation makes it necessary to evaluate changes through their effect on PSA model parameters. We propose a categorization of parameters based on the Fussell-Vesely and differential importance (DIM) measures. In addition, issues in the calculation of the expected value of the joint importance measure are present when evaluating changes affecting groups of components. We illustrate that the problem can be solved using DIM. A numerical application to a case study concludes the work.

  8. Health and safety of students in vocational training in Quebec: a gender issue?

    PubMed

    Chatigny, Céline; Riel, Jessica; Nadon, Livann

    2012-01-01

    Health and safety issues in a vocational training center were explored in this study. Several sources and methods were used: group interviews with students in traditionally female [F] and male [M] trades, i.e. hairdressing (7 F) and automated systems electromechanics (8 M, 1 F); self-administered questionnaires on injuries sustained at the school; observations of activities in these programs; and analysis of ministerial documents. Findings indicate that the partially divergent ways that OHS is addressed in these programs cannot be explained only by the specific characteristics of the two trades. Some aspects put female students in hairdressing at a disadvantage: status accorded to OHS in the study programs, learning activities, and conditions for learning and managing prevention and injuries. The discussion focuses on a gender-differentiated analysis, the importance of improving the way OHS is addressed in the programs, in particular, those primarily involving female students, and the need to pursue research. In addition, the results from individual interviews with women (5 F) training for non-traditional trades lead to discussion on the interrelated effects of sex-based gender and professional gender.

  9. Positive visual phenomena in space: A scientific case and a safety issue in space travel.

    PubMed

    Sannita, Walter G; Narici, Livio; Picozza, Piergiorgio

    2006-07-01

    Most astronauts on Apollo, Skylab, and MIR reported 'flashes of light' occurring in different shapes and apparently moving across the visual field, in the absence of auditory, somatosensory, or olfactory abnormal percepts. A temporal correlation with heavy nuclei or protons has been documented in space and comparable phosphenes were observed by volunteers whose eyes were exposed to accelerated heavy ions at intensities below the threshold for Cerenkov visible radiation. An interaction between heavy ions and the retina was suggested. However, the biophysics of heavy ions or protons action remains undefined, the effects on photoreceptors and neuroretina have not been differentiated, and some direct action on the visual cortex never ruled out. Phosphenes are common in migraine and are known to occur also in response to the electrical stimulation of ganglion cells (in retinas without photoreceptors), optic pathways or visual cortex, with mechanisms that bypass the chemically gated channels. Intrinsic photosensitive ganglion cells exist in the retina of teleost fish and mammals. In the hypothesis of a peculiar sensitivity to subatomic particles of the visual system, phosphenes due to the activation of processes by-passing the photoreceptors would raise questions about human safety in space. The issue is particularly relevant with experiments of increasing duration being now operative in the International Space Station (ISS) and with plans of space travel outside the geomagnetic shield. Research is in progress both in the ISS and on animal models, in the framework of the NASA/ESA actions to improve the astronauts' health in space.

  10. Community Service and User Support for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) Data Assimilation and Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Hu, M.; Stark, D.; Newman, K.; Zhou, C.; Derber, J.; Lueken, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system is a unified variational data assimilation and analysis system for both global and regional applications. It is currently used as a data assimilation system by various operational centers, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) (e.g., Global Forecasting System (GFS), North American Mesoscale (NAM) system, the Hurricane WRF (HWRF), and the RAPid Refresh (RAP) system), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Model), and the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). This analysis system is also used to generate certain analysis products, such as output from NOAA's GFS reanalysis and the Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA) (e.g., 2m temperature, 10m winds gust, surface pressure and surface visibility). GSI can also be used to generate analyses for climate studies (e.g., ozone and sea surface temperature (SST) analyses) or assimilate non-'traditional' fields (e.g., aerosol data assimilation) for air quality studies (e.g., dust storms). Lately, an effort was initiated to use GSI for data assimilation throughout the entire atmosphere. One example of such an effort is the development of a data assimilation system for the Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) at NCEP. Over the past few years, GSI has been transitioned to a community resource through a joint effort led by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), in collaboration with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) and other GSI partners. The DTC is a distributed facility with a goal of serving as a bridge between the research and operational communities by transitioning the operational capability to a community resource and committing the contributions from the research community to the operational repository. The DTC has hosted four Community GSI tutorials and released five versions of the community GSI system with a corresponding User's Guide

  11. Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: Shared right-of-way safety issues. Final report, July 1991-July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hadden, J.; Kerr, D.; Lewalski, W.; Ball, C.

    1992-09-01

    One of the most important issues in the debate over the viability in the United States of high-speed guided ground transportation (HSGGT) systems, which include magnetic levitation (maglev) and high-speed rail (HSR), is the feasibility of using existing right-of-ways (ROWs). A major potential benefit of shared ROWs would be the substantial amount of time and money saved by minimizing the acquisition of new real estate. In fact, the ROW issue may be the most critical factor for assessing the cost-effectiveness of HSGGT. A methodology for assessing the safety risks associated with shared ROWs for high-speed guided ground transportation has been developed and applied. The first task in assessing the safety of shared ROWs involved characterizing a baseline HSGGT system. Features of existing HSGGT system corridors, as well as those of other potential ROW users, were considered in defining a baseline system for the study. The primary safety issues associated with shared ROWs were then evaluated for the baseline system. The baseline system defined for the study is a 645 km (400 mile) long, 7 million passengers/year HSGGT network, of which as much as 50 percent could be shared ROW with any single other user (roadways, railroads, waterways, pipelines, or transmission lines).

  12. Recent Super Heavy Element Experiments at GSI-SHIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyer, M.; Hofmann, S.; Heinz, S.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Ackermann, D.; Antalic, S.; Barth, W.; Burkhard, H. G.; Comas, V. F.; Dahl, L.; Eberhardt, K.; Henderson, R.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Kenneally, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Kratz, J. V.; Lang, R.; Leino, M.; Lommel, B.; Moody, K.; Munzenberg, G.

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of element 116 (Lv) in fusion-evaporation reactions of a 48Ca beam with 248Cm targets was studied at the velocity filter SHIP of GSI in Darmstadt. At excitation energies of the compound nuclei of 40.9 MeV, four decay chains were measured, which were assigned to the isotope 292Lv, and one chain, which was assigned to 293Lv. Measured cross-sections of (3.4 + 2.7 -1.6) pb and (0.9 + 2.1 -0.7) pb, respectively, and decay data of the chains agree with data measured previously at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in Dubna. We measured the velocity spectra of the 116 isotopes and transfer products which reveal the reaction type underlying the synthesis of the nuclei. The experience gained in this experiment will serve as a basis for future experiments to study still heavier elements at the velocity filter SHIP. Searches for element 120 in fusion-evaporation reactions of a 54Cr beam with 248Cm targets were studied later at SHIP and progress in the analysis will be discussed. The synthesis of element 116 (Lv) in fusion-evaporation reactions of a 48Ca beam with 248Cm targets was studied at the velocity filter SHIP of GSI in Darmstadt. At excitation energies of the compound nuclei of 40.9 MeV, four decay chains were measured, which were assigned to the isotope 292Lv, and one chain, which was assigned to 293Lv. Measured cross-sections of (3.4 + 2.7 -1.6) pb and (0.9 + 2.1 -0.7) pb, respectively, and decay data of the chains agree with data measured previously at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in Dubna. We measured the velocity spectra of the 116 isotopes and transfer products which reveal the reaction type underlying the synthesis of the nuclei. The experience gained in this experiment will serve as a basis for future experiments to study still heavier elements at the velocity filter SHIP. Searches for element 120 in fusion-evaporation reactions of a 54Cr beam with 248Cm targets were studied later at SHIP and progress in the analysis will be

  13. Pantex Plant final safety analysis report, Zone 4 magazines. Staging or interim storage for nuclear weapons and components: Issue D

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains a detailed description and evaluation of the significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) issues associated with the operations of the Pantex Plant modified-Richmond and steel arch construction (SAC) magazines in Zone 4. It provides (1) an overall description of the magazines, the Pantex Plant, and its surroundings; (2) a systematic evaluations of the hazards that could occur as a result of the operations performed in these magazines; (3) descriptions and analyses of the adequacy of the measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards; and (4) analyses of potential accidents and their associated risks.

  14. Legal issues of the environmental safety regulation in the sphere of nanotechnology in Russian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokrylova, Ekaterina A.

    2013-04-01

    development and application of nanoproducts, inspite of fact, that these relationships have a significant financial segment. Thus, according to the Federal Act from December 13, 2010 "About federal budget for 2011 year and the period of 2012 and 2013 years" the expenses for realisation of program "The infrastructure development of nano industry in Russian Federation for 2008-2011" were 250 milliard of Russian rubbles. The profound analyses of the current legal systems has demonstrated that nowadays the main legal regulation in nano sphere consist of some range of frame documents (accentuated by the author). Thereby, one of the most dynamic and developed field of innovative activities in Russian Federation - nanotechnology - is left out of environmental and legal area of protection and that is might lead to the raising level of ecological risks at the stage of creation and application nano products to the environment and humans' health. During the analyses of annual norms of the Report OECD "Nano technologies: the Environment, health and safety" the conclusion is following - 2010 Russia has an extremely low degree of conceptual realization of the program in the sphere of forming the policy connected with nanotechnology and its impact on the environment and also a lack of implementations of norms into the national legal systems in terms of the assessment criteria of nano safety EHS (Environmental, Health and Safety) and ELSI (Ethical, Legal and Social Issues). To the great regret, there is no independent and precise legal act about the ways to creat and apply nano products with the certain definitions and principles and, more importantly, with the level of legal obligations and responsibility. This gap is not possible to fill by just altering and editing the existed legal acts due to the lack of the state Russian regulation. Thus, one of the most dynamic fields of innovative activities - nano technologies - is practically out of the regulation. It might lead to an increase of

  15. Electrophysiological effects of 12C on patients undergoing heavy ions therapy at GSI: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannita, W. G.; Narici, L.; Debus, J.; Carozzo, S.; Saturno, M.; Schardt, D.; Schulz-Ertner, D.

    Phosphenes light flashes observed in space have been attributed to heavy ions interfering with the retina photoreceptors However their generating mechanisms are still undefined and neurons of the retina and non-ocular visual structures are as sensitive to ionizing agents as retinal photoreceptors Multiple sources are therefore possible that could question safety in manned space travel Patients undergoing 12C ion therapy of skull tumors also involving the anterior optic pathway often report phosphenes similar to those described by astronauts and volunteers in accelerator experiments In a pilot study their occurrence either within each beam pulse or shortly after it in case of very short pulses correlated with the beam position and local dose deposited near the optic nerve or eye during irradiation Further research is in progress at the GSI Biophysics facilities in Darmstadt FRG Purposes of the study are 1- to identify electrophysiological cortical concomitants of phosphenes 2- to correlate phosphenes with irradiated portions of the anterior visual pathways and with known basic mechanisms of vision and 3- to obtain information to be used in the understanding of phosphenes observed in space We will present preliminary results from the first measurements

  16. 48 CFR 252.246-7003 - Notification of Potential Safety Issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the surrounding circumstances, supports a reasonable belief that an event has occurred or will occur... have a safety impact. Safety impact means the occurrence of death, permanent total disability... impact for systems, or subsystems, assemblies, subassemblies, or parts integral to a system, acquired...

  17. Organization and Representation of Patient Safety Data: Current Status and Issues around Generalizability and Scalability

    PubMed Central

    Boxwala, Aziz A.; Dierks, Meghan; Keenan, Maura; Jackson, Susan; Hanscom, Robert; Bates, David W.; Sato, Luke

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports have identified medical errors as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among patients. A variety of approaches have been implemented to identify errors and their causes. These approaches include retrospective reporting and investigation of errors and adverse events and prospective analyses for identifying hazardous situations. The above approaches, along with other sources, contribute to data that are used to analyze patient safety risks. A variety of data structures and terminologies have been created to represent the information contained in these sources of patient safety data. Whereas many representations may be well suited to the particular safety application for which they were developed, such application-specific and often organization-specific representations limit the sharability of patient safety data. The result is that aggregation and comparison of safety data across organizations, practice domains, and applications is difficult at best. A common reference data model and a broadly applicable terminology for patient safety data are needed to aggregate safety data at the regional and national level and conduct large-scale studies of patient safety risks and interventions. PMID:15298992

  18. Concept Paper on Health and Safety Issues in Day Care. Final Manuscript.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizzo, Peggy; Aronson, Susan S.

    This report discusses the existence and prevention of major health and safety risks for children in day care and makes recommendations for the Federal Interagency Day Care requirements (FIDCR) concerning health and safety. Section I describes varying concepts of risk related to probability and to possibility of adverse events, and discusses…

  19. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 4, In-vehicle safety

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.

    1992-11-01

    This report is the last of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues that may affect the commercial-scale use of sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles. The reports are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers the in-vehicle safety issues of electric vehicles powered by Na/S batteries. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, and private industry. It has three major goals: (1) to identify the unique hazards associated with electric vehicle (EV) use; (2) to describe the existing standards, regulations, and guidelines that are or could be applicable to these hazards; and (3) to discuss the adequacy of the existing requirements in addressing the safety concerns of EVs.

  20. Occupational safety issues in residential construction surveyed in Wisconsin, United States.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang D; Carlson, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Residential construction is a high-risk industry in the U.S. due to the exposure to work-related safety hazards and fall injuries. This study aimed to examine the safety training and safe work practices of construction workers within the small residential construction industry. In order to achieve the study objectives, a survey was designed and sent to approximately 200 Wisconsin based residential construction contractors. About one third of the respondents stated that they did not have any form of safety programs. The study indicated that the most common types of work-related injuries in residential construction were slips/trips/falls and cuts/lacerations. The survey findings also suggested that the residential construction contractors needed to increase the utilization of fall protection safety equipment. Further education and subject matter expert training could provide benefits to improve occupational safety and health of the small business workforce in the residential construction industry.

  1. Occupational Safety Issues in Residential Construction Surveyed in Wisconsin, United States

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, Sang D.; CARLSON, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Residential construction is a high-risk industry in the U.S. due to the exposure to work-related safety hazards and fall injuries. This study aimed to examine the safety training and safe work practices of construction workers within the small residential construction industry. In order to achieve the study objectives, a survey was designed and sent to approximately 200 Wisconsin based residential construction contractors. About one third of the respondents stated that they did not have any form of safety programs. The study indicated that the most common types of work-related injuries in residential construction were slips/trips/falls and cuts/lacerations. The survey findings also suggested that the residential construction contractors needed to increase the utilization of fall protection safety equipment. Further education and subject matter expert training could provide benefits to improve occupational safety and health of the small business workforce in the residential construction industry. PMID:25016947

  2. In Practice: Weaving the Campus Safety Net by Integrating Student Health Issues into the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Todd A.; Riley, Joan B.

    2009-01-01

    Georgetown University has developed an innovative approach to addressing student health and wellness issues through curriculum infusion--a collaborative pedagogy that introduces real-life health issues faced by college students into their academic courses.

  3. Gsy, a novel glucansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides, mediates the formation of cell aggregates in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Minghui; Han, Jin; Xu, Xiaofen; Liu, Lianliang; Gao, Caixia; Zheng, Huajun; Chen, Yunxia; Tao, Yimin; Zhou, Hu; Li, Yunfei; Wu, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides is a member of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with wide applications in the food and medical industries. Species in the genus Leuconostoc are catalase-negative and generally regarded as facultative anaerobic or aerotolerant organisms. Despite their extensive use in industry, certain issues concerning the aerobic life of L. mesenteroides, e.g., the mechanism involved in the tolerance to oxygen, remain to be addressed. In this manuscript, a survival strategy employed by L. mesenteroides BD3749 in response to oxidative stress was elucidated. BD3749 cells cultivated in medium with sucrose available synthesized large amounts of exopolysaccharides, mostly consisting of insoluble EPS. When BD3749 cells were challenged with oxidative stress, the amount of insoluble EPS was greatly enhanced. The synthesized EPSs reduced the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bacterial cells and improved their survival during chronic oxidative stress. Another study showed that Gsy, a novel glucansucrase in the GH70 family that is induced by sucrose and up-regulated following exposure to oxygen, was responsible for the synthesis of insoluble EPS. Gsy was subsequently demonstrated to play pivotal roles in the formation of aggregates to alleviate the detrimental effects on BD3749 cells exerted by oxygen. PMID:27924943

  4. Radio Frequency Radiation of Millimeter Wave Length: An Evaluation of Potential Occupational Safety Issues Relating to Surface Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    not efficiently remove heat that is deposited internally. A primary avenue of heat removal is blood flow in the retina. Other than conduction...SAFETY ISSUES RELATING TO SURFACE HEATING Kathy L. Ryan,*i John A. D’Andrea,+ James R. Jauchern,* and Patrick A. Mason** Abstract-Currently, technology...more and more systems come on line and are used in everyday applications, the possibility of inadvertent exposure of person- nel to MMWs increases

  5. Environmental, health, and safety issues of fuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoric acid fuel-cell buses

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, S

    1994-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase I of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase III. After completing Phase II, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase HI) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase III study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

  6. TITLE: Environmental, health, and safety issues offuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoricacid fuel-cell buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Shan

    1994-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase 1 of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase 3. After completing Phase 2, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase H1) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase 3 study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

  7. Editors' Preface to Special Issue on Drinking Water Safety, Security, and Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recognizing these needs, researchers from Zhejiang University (China), the US EPA and the University of Alberta (Canada) organized the “International Conference on Drinking Water Safety, Security and Sustainability” in October 2011 in Hangzhou, China. The conference was attended...

  8. Tokamak dust in ITER -- Safety issues and R and D supporting dust limits

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.A.; Petti, D.A.; Carmack, W.J.; Gorman, S.V.

    1998-07-01

    Tokamak dust is an important contributor to the source term in ITER safety analyses. In this paper the authors present results of R and D at the INEEL to characterize tokamak dust, and which has been used to set safety limits on dust for ITER. They present the results of analysis of particulate collected from three operating tokamaks: DIII-D at General Atomics, TFTR at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and Alcator C-MOD at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and analysis of particulate produced in SIRENS, a disruption simulator at North Carolina State University. Analyses done include characterization of particulate to produce particle size distributions, chemical analysis, and measurement of effective surface area. The safety limits on dust in ITER have evolved during the EDA as more data have become available. The safety limits specified in NSSR-2 envelope the majority of the data, and provide conservatism to account for the uncertainty in extrapolation of the data to ITER.

  9. An investigation and analysis of safety issues in Polish small construction plants

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The construction industry is a booming sector of the Polish economy; however, it is stigmatised by a lower classification due to high occupational risks and an unsatisfactory state of occupational safety. Safety on construction sites is compromised by small construction firms which dominate the market and have high accident rates. This article presents the results of studies (using a checklist) conducted in small Polish construction companies in terms of selected aspects of safety, such as co-operation with the general contractor, occupational health and safety documents, occupational risk assessment, organization of work, protective gear and general work equipment. The mentioned studies and analyses provided the grounds to establish the main directions of preventive measures decreasing occupational risk in small construction companies, e.g., an increase in engagement of investors and general contractors, improvement of occupational health and safety (OSH) documents, an increase in efficiency of construction site managers, better stability of employment and removal of opposing objectives between economic strategy and work safety. PMID:26694002

  10. An investigation and analysis of safety issues in Polish small construction plants.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The construction industry is a booming sector of the Polish economy; however, it is stigmatised by a lower classification due to high occupational risks and an unsatisfactory state of occupational safety. Safety on construction sites is compromised by small construction firms which dominate the market and have high accident rates. This article presents the results of studies (using a checklist) conducted in small Polish construction companies in terms of selected aspects of safety, such as co-operation with the general contractor, occupational health and safety documents, occupational risk assessment, organization of work, protective gear and general work equipment. The mentioned studies and analyses provided the grounds to establish the main directions of preventive measures decreasing occupational risk in small construction companies, e.g., an increase in engagement of investors and general contractors, improvement of occupational health and safety (OSH) documents, an increase in efficiency of construction site managers, better stability of employment and removal of opposing objectives between economic strategy and work safety.

  11. Workplace health and safety issues among community nurses: a study regarding the impact on providing care to rural consumers

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Daniel; Lê, Quynh; Nguyen, Uyen; Hoang, Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the study was to investigate the types of workplace health and safety issues rural community nurses encounter and the impact these issues have on providing care to rural consumers. Methods The study undertook a narrative inquiry underpinned by a phenomenological approach. Community nursing staff who worked exclusively in rural areas and employed in a permanent capacity were contacted among 13 of the 16 consenting healthcare services. All community nurses who expressed a desire to participate were interviewed. Data were collected using semistructured interviews with 15 community nurses in rural and remote communities. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview data. Results The role, function and structures of community nursing services varied greatly from site to site and were developed and centred on meeting the needs of individual communities. In addition, a number of workplace health and safety challenges were identified and were centred on the geographical, physical and organisational environment that community nurses work across. The workplace health and safety challenges within these environments included driving large distances between client’s homes and their office which lead to working in isolation for long periods and without adequate communication. In addition, other issues included encountering, managing and developing strategies to deal with poor client and carer behaviour; working within and negotiating working environments such as the poor condition of patient homes and clients smoking; navigating animals in the workplace; vertical and horizontal violence; and issues around workload, burnout and work-related stress. Conclusions Many nurses achieved good outcomes to meet the needs of rural community health consumers. Managers were vital to ensure that service objectives were met. Despite the positive outcomes, many processes were considered unsafe by community nurses. It was identified that greater training and

  12. Long-term care: nursing home quality and safety--2005. End of Year Issue Brief.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Rachel; Bercaw, Lawren

    2005-12-31

    In 2002, the Government Accountability Office reported that more than 1.7 million senior citizens resided in over 17,000 nursing homes across the United States. A 2003 Administration on Aging report predicted that number would increase dramatically as the "baby-boom" generation ages. Accordingly, legislators and nursing home administrators have striven to develop facilities that provide safe, high-quality eldercare to the nations' growing senior population. The Health Policy Tracking Service (HPTS) published a study in January--2005 Health Care Priorities Report--that depicts state lawmakers' concern for nursing home quality and safety. To policymakers, nursing home quality and safety is a very high priority, second only to Medicaid. The HPTS survey also indicated that 38 states planned to address senior facility safety in 2005 by adopting more stringent employee background checks, higher staffing standards and strict licensure requirements

  13. Environment, health and safety issues for sources used in MOVPE growth of compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenai-Khatkhate, Deodatta V.; Goyette, Randall J.; DiCarlo, Ronald L., Jr.; Dripps, Gregory

    2004-12-01

    As metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) is becoming well-established production technology, there are equally growing concerns associated with its bearing on personnel and community safety, environmental impact and maximum quantities of hazardous materials permissible in the device fabrication operations. Safety as well as responsible environmental care has always been of paramount importance in the MOVPE-based crystal growth of compound semiconductors. In this paper, we present the findings from workplace exposure monitoring studies on conventional MOVPE sources such as trimethylgallium, triethylgallium, trimethylantimony and diethylzinc. Also reviewed are the environmental, health and safety hazard aspects for metalorganic sources of routine elements, and the means to minimize the risks (i.e., engineering controls) involved while using these MOVPE sources.

  14. Criticality safety issues in the disposition of BN-350 spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R. W.; Klann, R. T.; Koltyshev, S. M.; Krechetov, S.

    2000-02-28

    A criticality safety analysis has been performed as part of the BN-350 spent fuel disposition project being conducted jointly by the DOE and Kazakhstan. The Kazakhstan regulations are reasonably consistent with those of the DOE. The high enrichment and severe undermoderation of this fast reactor fuel has significant criticality safety consequences. A detailed modeling approach was used that showed some configurations to be safe that otherwise would be rejected. Reasonable requirements for design and operations were needed, and with them, all operations were found to be safe.

  15. Regulatory aspects of oncology drug safety evaluation: Past practice, current issues, and the challenge of new drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeldt, Hans; Kropp, Timothy; Benson, Kimberly; Ricci, M. Stacey; McGuinn, W. David; Verbois, S. Leigh

    2010-03-01

    The drug development of new anti-cancer agents is streamlined in response to the urgency of bringing effective drugs to market for patients with limited life expectancy. FDA's regulation of oncology drugs has evolved from the practices set forth in Arnold Lehman's seminal work published in the 1950s through the current drafting of a new International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) safety guidance for anti-cancer drug nonclinical evaluations. The ICH combines the efforts of the regulatory authorities of Europe, Japan, and the United States and the pharmaceutical industry from these three regions to streamline the scientific and technical aspects of drug development. The recent development of new oncology drug classes with novel mechanisms of action has improved survival rates for some cancers but also brings new challenges for safety evaluation. Here we present the legacy of Lehman and colleagues in the context of past and present oncology drug development practices and focus on some of the current issues at the center of an evolving harmonization process that will generate a new safety guidance for oncology drugs, ICH S9. The purpose of this new guidance will be to facilitate oncology drug development on a global scale by standardizing regional safety requirements.

  16. Relational Safety and Liberating Training Spaces: An Application with a Focus on Sexual Orientation Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Pilar; Rankin, Pressley, IV

    2008-01-01

    This article describes and discusses a teaching case of a clinical training situation involving a gay marriage and family therapy student working with a same-sex affectional couple. The conceptual pillars of this teaching case, relational safety and liberating spaces, are advanced as illustrations of how the student developed his voice in the…

  17. Framework for Continuous Assessment and Improvement of Occupational Health and Safety Issues in Construction Companies

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Shahram; Ghasemi, Fakhradin; Mohammadfam, Iraj; Soleimani, Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    Background Construction industry is among the most hazardous industries, and needs a comprehensive and simple-to-administer tool to continuously assess and promote its health and safety performance. Methods Through the study of various standard systems (mainly Health, Safety, and Environment Management System; Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series 180001; and British Standard, occupational health and safety management systems-Guide 8800), seven main elements were determined for the desired framework, and then, by reviewing literature, factors affecting these main elements were determined. The relative importance of each element and its related factors was calculated at organizational and project levels. The provided framework was then implemented in three construction companies, and results were compared together. Results The results of the study show that the relative importance of the main elements and their related factors differ between organizational and project levels: leadership and commitment are the most important elements at the organization level, whereas risk assessment and management are most important at the project level. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the framework is easy to administer, and by interpreting the results, the main factors leading to the present condition of companies can be determined. PMID:25379325

  18. Safety improvement issues for mission aborts of future space transportation systems.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, M; Wächter, M; Sachs, G

    2006-01-01

    Two-stage winged space access vehicles consisting of a carrier stage with airbreathing turbo/ram jet engines and a rocket propelled orbital stage which may significantly reduce space transport costs and have additional advantages offer a great potential for mission safety improvements. Formulating the nominal mission and abort scenarios caused by engine malfunctions as an optimal control problem allows full exploitation of safety capabilities. The shaping of the nominal mission has a significant impact on the prospective safety. For this purpose, most relevant mission aborts are considered together with the nominal mission, treating them as an optimization problem of branched trajectories where the branching point is not fixed. The applied procedure yields a safety improved nominal trajectory, showing the feasibility of the included mission aborts with minimum payload penalty. The other mission aborts can be separately treated, with the initial condition given by the state of the nominal trajectory at the time when a failure occurs. A mission abort plan is set up, covering all emergency scenarios.

  19. Preliminary Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-09-19

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Several issues were presented at the meeting for discussion. This is a short summary that is organized in accordance with the primary issues discussed, which is not necessarily a chronological record. Issues include: SRS Meteorological Data and its Use in MACCS2; Deposition Velocities for Particles; Deposition Velocities for Tritium; MACCS2 Dispersion Coefficients; Use of Low Surface Roughness in Open Areas; Adequacy of Meteorological Tower and Instrumentation; Displacement Height; and Validity of MACCS2 Calculations at Close-in Distances. A longer report will be issued at a later date that expands upon these topics and recommendations.

  20. 75 FR 14243 - Pipeline Safety: Girth Weld Quality Issues Due to Improper Transitioning, Misalignment, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Improper Transitioning, Misalignment, and Welding Practices of Large Diameter Line Pipe AGENCY: Pipeline... girth weld failures due to welding quality issues. Misalignment during welding of large diameter line... bevel and wall thickness transitions, and other improper welding practices that occurred...

  1. WNA's worldwide overview on front-end nuclear fuel cycle growth and health, safety and environmental issues.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pierre, Sylvain; Kidd, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the WNA's worldwide nuclear industry overview on the anticipated growth of the front-end nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining to conversion and enrichment, and on the related key health, safety, and environmental (HSE) issues and challenges. It also puts an emphasis on uranium mining in new producing countries with insufficiently developed regulatory regimes that pose greater HSE concerns. It introduces the new WNA policy on uranium mining: Sustaining Global Best Practices in Uranium Mining and Processing-Principles for Managing Radiation, Health and Safety and the Environment, which is an outgrowth of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) cooperation project that closely involved industry and governmental experts in uranium mining from around the world.

  2. Rock Mass Characterization by High-Resolution Sonic and GSI Borehole Logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, F.; Sapigni, M.; Crosta, G. B.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the relationships between the in situ P-wave velocity (Vp) of rock masses, measured by borehole acoustic logging, and their Geological Strength Index (GSI), to support a reliable assessment of equivalent continuum rock mass properties at depth. We quantified both Vp and GSI in three deep boreholes drilled in a crystalline core complex of the central Italian Alps. The boreholes were driven up to 400 m in depth and provided high-quality drill cores in gneiss, schist and metasedimentary rocks with variable lithology. Geological and geomechanical logging was carried out for over 800 m of cores, and acoustic logging was performed for more than 600 m of borehole length. High-resolution core logging in terms of GSI was obtained using an original quantitative approach. Candidate empirical correlation functions linking Vp and GSI were tested by a two-step statistical analysis of the experimental dataset, including outlier removal and nonlinear regression analysis. We propose a sigmoid Vp-GSI equation valid over a depth range between 100 and 400 m. This accounts for extremely variable lithological, weathering and rock mass damage conditions, complementing existing shallow-depth approaches and showing potential for practical applications in different engineering settings.

  3. Applications of Advanced Nondestructive Measurement Techniques to Address Safety of Flight Issues on NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nondestructive measurement techniques are critical for ensuring the reliability and safety of NASA spacecraft. Techniques such as infrared thermography, THz imaging, X-ray computed tomography and backscatter X-ray are used to detect indications of damage in spacecraft components and structures. Additionally, sensor and measurement systems are integrated into spacecraft to provide structural health monitoring to detect damaging events that occur during flight such as debris impacts during launch and assent or from micrometeoroid and orbital debris, or excessive loading due to anomalous flight conditions. A number of examples will be provided of how these nondestructive measurement techniques have been applied to resolve safety critical inspection concerns for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and a variety of launch vehicles and unmanned spacecraft.

  4. Safety Issues of HG and PB as IFE Target Materials: Radiological Versus Chemical Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Cadwallader, L C; Moir, R W; Rio, G. D; Sanz, J

    2002-11-11

    We have performed a safety assessment of mercury and lead as possible hohlraum materials for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) targets, including for the first time a comparative analysis of the radiological and toxicological consequences of an accidental release. In order to calculate accident doses to the public, we have distinguished between accidents at the target fabrication facility and accidents at other areas of the power plant. Regarding the chemical toxicity assessment, we have used the USDOE regulations to determine the maximum allowable release in order to protect the public from adverse health effects. Opposite to common belief, it has been found that the chemical safety requirements for these materials appear to be more stringent than the concentrations that would result in an acceptable radiological dose.

  5. Interconnected but underprotected? Parents' methods and motivations for information seeking on digital safety issues.

    PubMed

    Davis, Vauna

    2012-12-01

    Parents need information and skills to meet the demands of mediating connected technology in their homes. Parents' methods and motivations for learning to protect children from digital risks were reported through a survey. This study explores relationships between information seeking, parents' concerns, risks children have experienced, and access to connected devices, in addition to the use and satisfaction of various digital safety resources. Three types of information-seeking behavior were identified: (a) protective information seeking, to protect children from being confronted with harmful content; (b) problem-solving information seeking, to help children who have been negatively affected by connected technology; and (c) attentive learning, by attending to media resources passively encountered on this topic. Friends and family are the dominant source of digital safety information, followed by presentations and the Internet. Parents' top concerns for their children using connected technology were accidental exposure to pornography, and sexual content in Internet-based entertainment. Higher numbers of risks experienced by children were positively associated with parents' problem-solving information seeking and level of attentive learning. Parents who were more concerned exhibited more problem-solving information seeking; but despite the high level of concern for children's safety online, 65 percent of parents seek information on this subject less than twice per year. Children have access to a mean of five connected devices at home; a higher number of devices was correlated with increased risks experienced by children, but was not associated with increased concern or information seeking from parents.

  6. Plant extracts for the control of bacterial growth: efficacy, stability and safety issues for food application.

    PubMed

    Negi, Pradeep Singh

    2012-05-01

    The microbial safety of foods continues to be a major concern to consumers, regulatory agencies and food industries throughout the world. Many food preservation strategies have been used traditionally for the control of microbial spoilage in foods but the contamination of food and spoilage by microorganisms is a problem yet to be controlled adequately. Although synthetic antimicrobials are approved in many countries, the recent trend has been for use of natural preservatives, which necessitates the exploration of alternative sources of safe, effective and acceptable natural preservatives. Plants contain innumerable constituents and are valuable sources of new and biologically active molecules possessing antimicrobial properties. Plants extracts either as standardized extracts or as a source of pure compounds provide unlimited opportunities for control of microbial growth owing to their chemical diversity. Many plant extracts possess antimicrobial activity against a range of bacteria, yeast and molds, but the variations in quality and quantity of their bioactive constituents is the major detriments in their food use. Further, phytochemicals added to foods may be lost by various processing techniques. Several plant extracts or purified compounds intended for food use have been consumed by humans for thousands of years, but typical toxicological information is not available for them. Although international guidelines exist for the safety evaluation of food additives, owing to problems in standardization of plant extracts, typical toxicological values have not been assigned to them. Development of cost effective isolation procedures that yield standardized extracts as well as safety and toxicology evaluation of these antimicrobials requires a deeper investigation.

  7. Quality and Safety in Orthopaedics: Learning and Teaching at the Same Time: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin P; Armstrong, April D; Hutzler, Lorraine; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-11-04

    Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them.The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, "never events," and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow.Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety.Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety.

  8. Occupational health and safety issues affecting young workers: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Laberge, Marie; Ledoux, Elise

    2011-01-01

    Many overview articles, reports, book chapters and literature reviews have examined the health and safety of young workers. These sources discuss the relationships between the work conditions of young workers and the various indicators of accidents and occupational diseases. Breslin et al. [12,13] conducted two literature reviews of quantitative studies to determine which factors best predicted work accidents and occupational disorders in young people. The present article proposes a review of young people's occupational health and safety (OHS) factors (e.g., demographic, individual, professional, organizational, temporal and operational factors) in both qualitative and quantitative studies. Five types of problems were analyzed in greater depth, namely MSD symptoms, respiratory, allergy and toxicological problems, mental health and well-being, alcohol and drug consumption, and fatigue. This review likewise examines related dimensions that allow us to adopt a more global perspective on this subject by considering such elements as young people's values, their knowledge and attitudes, safety practices in companies, the safe integration of young people, and rehabilitation. A total of 189 scientific articles were selected on the basis of certain criteria. These articles came from refereed OHS journals published between 1994 and 2005.

  9. Potential safety issues in the use of the hormone melatonin in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kennaway, David J

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland during the night in response to light/dark information received by the retina and its integration by the suprachiasmatic nucleus. When administered to selected populations of adults, in particular those displaying delayed sleep phase disorder, melatonin may advance the time of sleep onset. It is, however, being increasingly prescribed for children with sleep disorders despite the fact that (i) it is not registered for use in children anywhere in the world; (ii) it has not undergone the formal safety testing expected for a new drug, especially long-term safety in children; (iii) it is known to have profound effects on the reproductive systems of rodents, sheep and primates, as well as effects on the cardiovascular, immune and metabolic systems; and (iv) there is the potential for important interactions with drugs sometimes prescribed for children. In this review, I discuss properties of melatonin outside its ability to alter sleep timing that have been widely ignored but which raise questions about the safety of its use in infants and adolescents.

  10. Don't Let Legal Issues Put You in Hot Water! A Safety and Liability Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkle, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Providing a safe classroom and laboratory environment should be the first priority of any career-technical and technology/engineering education instructor. Doing so not only increases the opportunity for student learning, but it also keeps instructors "out of hot water" with respect to legal issues of liability. In today's litigious…

  11. Safety issues when using carbamide peroxide to bleach vital teeth--a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dadoun, Maurice P; Bartlett, David W

    2003-03-01

    Hydrogen Peroxide is used to bleach discoloured teeth but since its introduction in the late nineteenth century there have been concerns about its safety and efficacy. This paper reviews the literature on hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide and assesses if these products can be recommended for clinical use. The authors used a Medline search to find the literature for review and from these the findings were divided into laboratory, animal and human studies. In conclusion no dental treatment is without risk but from the evidence it seems that bleaching teeth is comparatively safe.

  12. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-T-110 push mode samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-05-15

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-110. Push mode core segments were removed from risers 2 and 6 between January 29, 1997, and February 7, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-110 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO.

  13. Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermo-mechanics Issues for Design and Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Potirniche, Gabriel; Cogliati, Joshua; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-07-08

    An experimental and computational study, consisting of modeling and simulation (M&S), of key thermal-mechanical issues affecting the design and safety of pebble-bed (PB) reactors was conducted. The objective was to broaden understanding and experimentally validate thermal-mechanic phenomena of nuclear grade graphite, specifically, spheres in frictional contact as anticipated in the bed under reactor relevant pressures and temperatures. The contact generates graphite dust particulates that can subsequently be transported into the flowing gaseous coolent. Under postulated depressurization transients and with the potential for leaked fission products to be adsorbed onto graphite 'dust', there is the potential for fission products to escape from the primary volume. This is a design safety concern. Furthermore, earlier safety assessment identified the distinct possibility for the dispersed dust to combust in contact with air if sufficient conditions are met. Both of these phenomena were noted as important to design review and containing uncertainty to warrant study. The team designed and conducted two separate effects tests to study and benchmark the potential dust-generation rate, as well as study the conditions under which a dust explosion may occure in a standardized, instrumented explosion chamber.

  14. Recent advances and safety issues of transgenic plant-derived vaccines.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng-jun; Guo, Bin; Huo, Yan-lin; Guan, Zheng-ping; Dai, Jia-kun; Wei, Ya-hui

    2013-04-01

    Transgenic plant-derived vaccines comprise a new type of bioreactor that combines plant genetic engineering technology with an organism's immunological response. This combination can be considered as a bioreactor that is produced by introducing foreign genes into plants that elicit special immunogenicity when introduced into animals or human beings. In comparison with traditional vaccines, plant vaccines have some significant advantages, such as low cost, greater safety, and greater effectiveness. In a number of recent studies, antigen-specific proteins have been successfully expressed in various plant tissues and have even been tested in animals and human beings. Therefore, edible vaccines of transgenic plants have a bright future. This review begins with a discussion of the immune mechanism and expression systems for transgenic plant vaccines. Then, current advances in different transgenic plant vaccines will be analyzed, including vaccines against pathogenic viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotic parasites. In view of the low expression levels for antigens in plants, high-level expression strategies of foreign protein in transgenic plants are recommended. Finally, the existing safety problems in transgenic plant vaccines were put forward will be discussed along with a number of appropriate solutions that will hopefully lead to future clinical application of edible plant vaccines.

  15. Medical liability, safety and confidentiality in maritime telemedicine--the MERMAID position on issues of importance.

    PubMed

    Ladas, P; Giatagatzidis, P; Anogianakis, G; Maglavera, S

    1997-01-01

    Telemedicine dates to the days of "wireless telegraphy". As an "extraordinary" arrangement for medical services delivered at time of need, telemedicine has thus far escaped the developments that have taken place over the last 50 years in the areas of medical liability, safety and confidentiality. Today, however, telemedicine is also used to increase quality and cost effectiveness of healthcare provision. This trend is set by the U.S. where the U.S. federal government funds telemedicine at an annual rate of more than $100 million i.e., at a rate 30 times or more than what the EU does while state and local agency support and private business investment in telemedicine is 3 to 4 times larger than that of the U.S. federal government. In this respect it must be stressed that technology tends to satisfy the relevant demand for telecommunications. Telemedicine is used in diverse areas such as pathology, surgery, physical therapy, and psychiatry. It is expected to revolutionise health care in the coming decade and, therefore, it will certainly take into account requirements for medical liability, safety and confidentiality in the same way as traditional "establishment" medicine does.

  16. Safety issues of space liquid-helium and solid-cryogen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    2002-05-01

    Safety of hardware and personnel is a major concern in space programs. Space cryogenic systems are particularly prone to risk because of their complexity and because of the potential for overpressurization resulting from blockage of vent paths during the integration and test process. A number of space flight programs with liquid-helium and solid-cryogen systems have had incidents which resulted in risk or actual damage to flight hardware, or in risk to personnel. Since such incidents typically occur late in the development cycle, costs due to delays are extremely high. A second major of area of risk is the use of cooling loops in solid cryogen systems. When cooling is performed, the cryogen contracts and cryogen from warmer locations vaporizes and is deposited in the voids. This can lead to rupture of tankage and plumbing. Risk reduction measures include two-fault tolerant design, systematic use of burst disks and relief valves, careful analysis of possible risks, detailed and well-reviewed procedures and redundancy of critical systems, such as valves and valve drive circuitry. We will discuss the design and operation of space cryogenics systems from a safety point of view. We will also describe a number of incidents, their causes, the corrective steps taken and lessons learned.

  17. Technical support for the Ukrainian State Committee for Nuclear Radiation Safety on specific waste issues

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    The government of Ukraine, a now-independent former member of the Soviet Union, has asked the United States to assist its State Committee for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SCNRS) in improving its regulatory control in technical fields for which it has responsibility. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is providing this assistance in several areas, including management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. Radioactive wastes resulting from nuclear power plant operation, maintenance, and decommissioning must be stored and ultimately disposed of appropriately. In addition, radioactive residue from radioisotopes used in various industrial and medical applications must be managed. The objective of this program is to provide the Ukrainian SCNRS with the information it needs to establish regulatory control over uranium mining and milling activities in the Zheltye Vody (Yellow Waters) area and radioactive waste disposal in the Pripyat (Chernobyl) area among others. The author of this report, head of the Environmental Technology Section, Health Sciences Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, accompanied NRC staff to Ukraine to meet with SCNRS staff and visit sites in question. The report highlights problems at the sites visited and recommends license conditions that SCNRS can require to enhance safety of handling mining and milling wastes. The author`s responsibility was specifically for the visit to Zheltye Vody and the mining and milling waste sites associated with that facility. An itinerary for the Zheltye Vody portion of the trip is included as Appendix A.

  18. Health, safety and environmental issues relating to cadmium usage in photovoltaic energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. ); Zweibel, K. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the current technology base and hazards associated with two promising thin-film photovoltaic cells that contain cadmium compounds--cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium deselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}). More specifically, this paper summarized the toxicological information on cadmium (Cd) compounds;evaluates potential health, safety and environmental hazards associated with cadmium usage in the photovoltaics industry; describes regulatory requirements associated with the use, handling and disposal of cadmium compounds; and lists management options to permit the safe and continued use of these materials. Handling of cadmium in photovoltaic production can present hazards to health, safety and the environment. Prior recognition of these hazards can allow device manufacturers and regulators to implement appropriate and readily available hazard management strategies. Hazards associated with product use (i.e., array fires) and disposal remain controversial and partially unresolved. The most likely effects that could be expected would be those associated with chronic low-level exposures to cadmium wastes. Because of the general immobility of the cadmium present in these devices and availability of environmental and biomonitoring protocols, chronic hazards can be monitored, and remediated if necessary. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Vectra GSI, Inc. low-level waste melter testing Phase 1 test report

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, G.E.; Wilson, C.N.

    1996-02-21

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Vectra GSI, Inc. was one of seven vendors selected for Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW that were completed during fiscal year 1995. The attached report prepared by Vectra GSI, Inc. describes results of melter testing using slurry feed and dried feeds. Results of feed drying and prereaction tests using a fluid bed calciner and rotary dryer also are described.

  20. HANFORD PLUTONIUM FINISHG PLAN (PFP) COMPLETES PLUTONIUM STABILIZATION KEY SAFETY ISSUES CLOSED

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-02-24

    A long and intense effort to stabilize and repackage nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium-bearing leftovers from defense production and nuclear experiments concluded successfully in February, bringing universal congratulations to the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The victorious stabilization and packaging endeavor at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), managed and operated by prime contractor Fluor Hanford, Inc., finished ahead of all milestones in Hanford's cleanup agreement with regulators, and before deadlines set by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), a part of the federal Executive Branch that oversees special nuclear materials. The PFP stabilization and packaging project also completed under budget for its four-year tenure, and has been nominated for a DOE Secretarial Award. It won the Project of the Year Award in the local chapter competition of the Project Management Institute, and is being considered for awards at the regional and national level.

  1. Health and safety issues pertaining to dental photographic mirrors and cheek and lip retractors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claire

    2002-06-01

    This paper investigates the health and safety implications of using photographic dental mirrors and cheek retractors for photography of the intra-oral cavity. Medical photographers have moral and ethical responsibilities, and therefore should be aware of the diseases they are likely to encounter, and the possibility of cross infection when using these instruments. Although autoclaving is the safest way to remove infectious micro-organisms from contaminated instruments, that this may not be a practical method for small departments who only occasionally use these instruments. The alternative approach is to cold-sterilize the instruments using a chlorine- or alcohol-based disinfectant. The author provides information and guidelines for those who photograph the intra-oral cavity occasionally.

  2. Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

  3. Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1998-02-01

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

  4. Reentry safety for the Topaz II Space Reactor: Issues and analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, L.W.; Trost, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the reentry safety analyses conducted for the TOPAZ II Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). Scoping calculations were performed on the reentry aerothermal breakup and ground footprint of reactor core debris. The calculations were used to assess the risks associated with radiologically cold reentry accidents and to determine if constraints should be placed on the core configuration for such accidents. Three risk factors were considered: inadvertent criticality upon reentry impact, atmospheric dispersal of U-235 fuel, and the Special Nuclear Material Safeguards risks. Results indicate that the risks associated with cold reentry are very low regardless of the core configuration. Core configuration constraints were therefore not established for radiologically cold reentry accidents.

  5. Using in-depth investigations to identify transportation safety issues for wheelchair-seated occupants of motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lawrence W; Klinich, Kathleen D; Moore, Jamie L; MacWilliams, Joel B

    2010-04-01

    In-depth investigations of motor-vehicle crashes involve detailed inspection, measurement, and photodocumentation of vehicle exterior and interior damage, evidence of belt-restraint use, and evidence of occupant contacts with the vehicle interior. Results of in-depth investigations thereby provide the most objective way to identify current and emerging injury problems and issues in occupant safety and crash protection, and provide important feedback on the real-world performance of the latest restraint-system and vehicle crashworthiness technologies. To provide an objective understanding of real-world transportation safety issues for wheelchair-seated travelers, the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) has been conducting and assembling data from in-depth investigations of motor-vehicle crashes and non-crash adverse moving-vehicle incidents, such as emergency vehicle braking, turning, and swerving, in which there was at least one vehicle occupant sitting in a wheelchair. The results of 39 investigations involving 42 wheelchair-seated occupants have been assembled and entered into a wheelchair-occupant crash/injury database. In addition, a biomechanical analysis of each case has been performed to identify key safety issues for wheelchair-seated travelers. The wheelchairs of 34 of the 42 occupants who were seated in wheelchairs while traveling in motor vehicles were effectively secured by either a four-point, strap-type tiedown system or a docking securement device, and all but one of these properly secured wheelchairs remained in place during the crash or non-collision event. However, 30 of the 42 occupants were improperly restrained, either because of non-use or incomplete use of available belt restraints, or because the belt restraints were improperly positioned on the occupant's body. Twenty-six of the 42 occupants sustained significant injuries and 10 of these occupants died as a direct result of injuries sustained, or from

  6. Aspartame, low-calorie sweeteners and disease: regulatory safety and epidemiological issues.

    PubMed

    Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L; Bosetti, Cristina; Gallus, Silvano; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    Aspartame is a synthetic sweetener that has been used safely in food for more than 30 years. Its safety has been evaluated by various regulatory agencies in accordance with procedures internationally recognized, and decisions have been revised and updated regularly. The present review summarizes the most relevant conclusions of epidemiological studies concerning the use of low-calorie sweeteners (mainly aspartame), published between January 1990 and November 2012. In the Nurses' Health study and the Health Professionals Followup study some excess risk of Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma was found in men but not in women; no association was found with leukemia. In the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, there was no association between aspartame and haematopoietic neoplasms. US case-control studies of brain and haematopoietic neoplasms also showed no association. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and case-control studies from California showed no association with pancreatic cancer, and a case-control study from Denmark found no relation with breast cancer risk. Italian case-control studies conducted in 1991-2008 reported no consistent association for cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, digestive tract, breast, endometrium, ovary, prostate, and kidney. Low calorie sweeteners were not consistently related to vascular events and preterm deliveries.

  7. Isolation of Enterobacter sakazakii from ass' milk in Sicily: case report, safety and legal issues.

    PubMed

    Conte, F; Passantino, A

    2008-07-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii (Es) infections are likely to involve newborns and infants, causing meningitis and necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis. Contamination of infant formulae milk during factory production or bottle preparation is implicated. Es has been isolated from environmental sources and from food other than infant formula and milk powder, but why it is associated only with the consumption of infant formulae, is unclear. According to Regulation (EC) No. 2073/2005 on the microbiological criteria for foodstuffs, Es is considered a microorganisms of greatest concern in infant formulae and follow-on formulae. Es is included between "safety criteria". The isolation of two strains of Es from 50 samples of ass' milk in Sicily is described. The antibiotic resistance profile of the isolates revealed a multiple resistance profile, including fluoroquinolones, commonly used to treat the infections. The authors underline the importance of survey because in Italy ass' milk is considered one of the solutions for infants suffering from hypersensitivity to milk protein of some animal species. There is scarce information about the ecology and the uncertainty concerning the source of infection in the children and adults; the authors are concerned that ass' milk could become a high-risk food.

  8. Is formocresol obsolete? A fresh look at the evidence concerning safety issues.

    PubMed

    Milnes, Alan R

    2008-07-01

    Concern has been expressed about the safety of formocresol use in pediatric dentistry. Formaldehyde, a primary component in formocresol, is a hazardous substance and is considered a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Health Canada, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Humans inhale and ingest formaldehyde daily, however, and produce formaldehyde during cellular metabolism. The human body is physiologically equipped to handle formaldehyde through multiple conversion pathways. The resultant single carbon atom released during metabolism is deposited in the "1-carbon pool," which, in turn, is used for the biosynthesis of macromolecules including DNA and RNA. Reevaluation of earlier research that examined potential health risks associated with formaldehyde exposure has shown that this research was based on flawed assumptions, which resulted in erroneous conclusions. The purpose of this review was to examine more recent research about formaldehyde metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and carcinogenicity. These results indicated that formaldehyde is probably not a potent human carcinogen under low exposure conditions. Extrapolation of these research results to pediatric dentistry suggests an inconsequential risk associated with formaldehyde use in pediatric pulp therapy.

  9. Is formocresol obsolete? A fresh look at the evidence concerning safety issues.

    PubMed

    Milnes, Alan R

    2008-01-01

    Concern has been expressed about the safety of formocresol use in pediatric dentistry Formaldehyde, a primary component in formocresol, is a hazardous substance and is considered a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Health Canada, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Humans inhale and ingest formaldehyde daily however, and produce formaldehyde during cellular metabolism. The human body is physiologically equipped to handle formaldehyde through multiple conversion pathways. The resultant single carbon atom released during metabolism is deposited in the "1-carbon pool," which, in turn, is used for the biosynthesis of macromolecules including DNA and RNA. Reevaluation of earlier research that examined potential health risks associated with formaldehyde exposure has shown that this research was based on flawed assumptions, which resulted in erroneous conclusions. The purpose of this review was to examine more recent research about formaldehyde metabolism, phormacokinetics, and corcinogenicity. These results indicated that formaldehyde is probably not a potent human carcinogen under low exposure conditions. Extrapolation of these research results to pediatric dentistry suggests an inconsequential risk associated with formaldehyde use in pediatric pulp therapy/

  10. [Spanish drivers' beliefs about speed. Speeding is a major issue of road safety].

    PubMed

    Montoro González, Luis; Roca Ruiz, Javier; Lucas-Alba, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Extending and updating our knowledge concerning drivers' motivational and cognitive processes is of essential importance if we are to apply policies with long-lasting effects. This study presents data from a representative national survey analyzing the Spanish drivers' beliefs about speed, the risks of speeding, the degree of violation of speed-limits and the reasons for speeding. Results indicate that Spanish drivers rate speeding as a serious offence, yet not among the most dangerous ones. All in all, they claim to comply mostly with the speed limits. However, some interesting violation patterns emerge: observance is lower for generic speed limits according to road type (vs. specific limits shown by certain road signs), and particularly in motorways (vs. single carriageways and urban areas). Risk perception and reasons for speeding emerge as the main factors predicting the levels of speed violations reported. Results suggest that any effective intervention strategy should consider such factors, namely the link between speed, road safety, and drivers' specific reasons for speeding.

  11. Issues and challenges for pedestrian active safety systems based on real world accidents.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Hédi; Serre, Thierry; Masson, Catherine; Anderson, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze real crashes involving pedestrians in order to evaluate the potential effectiveness of autonomous emergency braking systems (AEB) in pedestrian protection. A sample of 100 real accident cases were reconstructed providing a comprehensive set of data describing the interaction between the vehicle, the environment and the pedestrian all along the scenario of the accident. A generic AEB system based on a camera sensor for pedestrian detection was modeled in order to identify the functionality of its different attributes in the timeline of each crash scenario. These attributes were assessed to determine their impact on pedestrian safety. The influence of the detection and the activation of the AEB system were explored by varying the field of view (FOV) of the sensor and the level of deceleration. A FOV of 35° was estimated to be required to detect and react to the majority of crash scenarios. For the reaction of a system (from hazard detection to triggering the brakes), between 0.5 and 1s appears necessary.

  12. Estimates of the collision symmetry planes in HADES experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, A. S.; Selyuzhenkov, I.

    2017-01-01

    Estimate of the collision symmetry planes is a crucial part of the anisotropic flow analysis in heavy-ion collisions. HADES experiment at GSI has different possibilities for symmetry plane estimation. In this letter different methods of the symmetry plane resolution calculation are compared and the differences are explained in terms of non-flow contribution.

  13. 49 CFR 385.407 - What conditions must a motor carrier satisfy for FMCSA to issue a safety permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Safety Permits § 385.407..., under the Safety Fitness Procedures of this part, or the State in which the motor carrier has its principal place of business, if the State has adopted and implemented safety fitness procedures that...

  14. Development of neuroleptic agents: pharmacogenetics and current safety issues of regulatory concern.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi

    2002-12-01

    The development of safe and effective new drug treatments for schizophrenia poses a challenging task. This class of drugs is known to be associated with a wide range of serious and troublesome safety problems that include neurological, cardiac, endocrine, and metabolic side effects. Many of these drugs have a narrow therapeutic index and generate metabolites that often have their own unique pharmacological profile different from the parent compound. These features make it imperative that the optimal dose schedules for neuroleptic drugs are carefully characterized. Many of these drugs are metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes, which show genetic polymorphism and a bi modal distribution within the population, A significant subset of the population cannot eliminate these drugs as effectively as the majority. This brings an added dimension of complexity in characterizing the dose and individualizing therapy. Many neuroleptic agents are proarrhythmic with an adverse effect on cardiac repolarization. They are prone to prolonging the QT interval and inducing torsade de pointes. Given the potentially fatal outcome of this ventricular tachyarrhythmia, drug development programs need to ensure that the proarrhythmic potential of any new neuroleptic agent is thoroughly explored and its proarrhythmic risk characterized. The clinical use of many of these drugs is further troubled by their high potential for drug-drug interactions. These too need to be adequately investigated during development The approval and the labeling of a new neuroleptic agent require a careful regulatory assessment of its risk/benefit ratio in comparison with the available alternatives. Their safe and effective use in routine clinical practice depends on careful attention to prescribing information, especially the contraindications, precautions, and patient-monitoring requirements.

  15. A decade of plant proteomics and mass spectrometry: translation of technical advancements to food security and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Pedreschi, Romina; Carpentier, Sebastien; Wang, Tai; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Kohli, Ajay; Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser; Bykova, Natalia V; Rampitsch, Christof; Zolla, Lello; Rafudeen, Mohamed Suhail; Cramer, Rainer; Bindschedler, Laurence Veronique; Tsakirpaloglou, Nikolaos; Ndimba, Roya Janeen; Farrant, Jill M; Renaut, Jenny; Job, Dominique; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Rakwal, Randeep

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous progress in plant proteomics driven by mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has been made since 2000 when few proteomics reports were published and plant proteomics was in its infancy. These achievements include the refinement of existing techniques and the search for new techniques to address food security, safety, and health issues. It is projected that in 2050, the world's population will reach 9-12 billion people demanding a food production increase of 34-70% (FAO, 2009) from today's food production. Provision of food in a sustainable and environmentally committed manner for such a demand without threatening natural resources, requires that agricultural production increases significantly and that postharvest handling and food manufacturing systems become more efficient requiring lower energy expenditure, a decrease in postharvest losses, less waste generation and food with longer shelf life. There is also a need to look for alternative protein sources to animal based (i.e., plant based) to be able to fulfill the increase in protein demands by 2050. Thus, plant biology has a critical role to play as a science capable of addressing such challenges. In this review, we discuss proteomics especially MS, as a platform, being utilized in plant biology research for the past 10 years having the potential to expedite the process of understanding plant biology for human benefits. The increasing application of proteomics technologies in food security, analysis, and safety is emphasized in this review. But, we are aware that no unique approach/technology is capable to address the global food issues. Proteomics-generated information/resources must be integrated and correlated with other omics-based approaches, information, and conventional programs to ensure sufficient food and resources for human development now and in the future.

  16. Polymeric enhancers of mucosal epithelia permeability: synthesis, transepithelial penetration-enhancing properties, mechanism of action, safety issues.

    PubMed

    Di Colo, Giacomo; Zambito, Ylenia; Zaino, Chiara

    2008-05-01

    Transmucosal drug administration across nasal, buccal, and ocular mucosae is noninvasive, eliminates hepatic first-pass metabolism and harsh environmental conditions, allows rapid onset, and further, mucosal surfaces are readily accessible. Generally, however, hydrophilic drugs, such as peptides and proteins, are poorly permeable across the epithelium, which results in insufficient bioavailability. Therefore, reversible modifications of epithelial barrier structure by permeation enhancers are required. Low molecular weight enhancers generally have physicochemical characteristics favoring their own absorption, whereas polymeric enhancers are not absorbed, and this minimizes the risk of systemic toxicity. The above considerations have warranted the present survey of the studies on polymeric transmucosal penetration-enhancers that have appeared in the literature during the last decade. Studies on intestinal permeation enhancers are also reviewed as they give information on the mechanism of action and safety of polymers. The synthesis and characterization of polymers, their effectiveness in enhancing the absorption of different drugs across different epithelium types, their mechanism of action and structure-efficacy relationship, and the relevant safety issues are reviewed. The active polymers are classified into: polycations (chitosan and its quaternary ammonium derivatives, poly-L-arginine (poly-L-Arg), aminated gelatin), polyanions (N-carboxymethyl chitosan, poly(acrylic acid)), and thiolated polymers (carboxymethyl cellulose-cysteine, polycarbophil (PCP)-cysteine, chitosan-thiobutylamidine, chitosan-thioglycolic acid, chitosan-glutathione conjugates).

  17. Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Devonian shale

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and examine potential public health and safety issues and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Devonian age shale. This document will serve as background data and information for planners within the government to assist in development of our new energy technologies in a timely and environmentally sound manner. This report describes the resource and the DOE eastern gas shales project in Section 2. Section 3 describes the new and developing recovery technologies associated with Devonian shale. An assessment of the environment, health and safety impacts associated with a typical fields is presented in Section 4. The typical field for this assessment occupies ten square miles and is developed on a 40-acre spacing (that is, there is a well in each 40-acre grid). This field thus has a total of 160 wells. Finally, Section 5 presents the conclusions and recommendations. A reference list is provided to give a greater plant. Based on the estimated plant cost and the various cases of operating income, an economic analysis was performed employing a profitability index criterion of discounted cash flow to determine an interest rate of return on the plant investment.

  18. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D.

    1992-09-01

    Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

  19. Occupational fatigue and other health and safety issues for young Australian workers: an exploratory mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Jessica Louise; Clarkson, Larissa; Rainbird, Sophia; Etherton, Hayley; Blewett, Verna

    2015-01-01

    Youth are vulnerable to sleep loss and fatigue due to biological, social and psychological factors. However, there are few studies addressing the risk that sleep loss and fatigue pose for youth in the workplace. The aim of this study was to explore work health and safety (WHS) issues for young workers and develop strategies and solutions for improved WHS outcomes, with a focus on issues related to fatigue, using a mixed-method, multi-stage approach. Participants either completed a survey (n=212) or took part in focus groups (n=115) addressing WHS for young workers, or attended a Future Inquiry Workshop (n=29) where strategies for improving youth WHS were developed. Fatigue was identified as a significant problem by the majority of young workers and was associated with unpredictable working time arrangements, precarious employment, high workload, working overtime and limited ability to self-advocate. Participants identified six key areas for action to improve WHS outcomes for young workers; 1) develop expertise, 2) give young workers a voice, 3) improve education and training, 4) build stakeholder engagement, 5) increase employer awareness of WHS responsibilities and, 6) improve processes for employers to manage and monitor WHS outcomes. The application of these directives to fatigue is discussed.

  20. Decision making under uncertainty: An investigation into the application of formal decision-making methods to safety issue decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M P

    1992-12-01

    As part of the NRC-sponsored program to study the implications of Generic Issue 57, Effects of Fire Protection System Actuation on Safety-Related Equipment,'' a subtask was performed to evaluate the applicability of formal decision analysis methods to generic issues cost/benefit-type decisions and to apply these methods to the GI-57 results. In this report, the numerical results obtained from the analysis of three plants (two PWRs and one BWR) as developed in the technical resolution program for GI-57 were studied. For each plant, these results included a calculation of the person-REM averted due to various accident scenarios and various proposed modifications to mitigate the accident scenarios identified. These results were recomputed to break out the benefit in terms of contributions due to random event scenarios, fire event scenarios, and seismic event scenarios. Furthermore, the benefits associated with risk (in terms of person-REM) averted from earthquakes at three different seismic ground motion levels were separately considered. Given this data, formal decision methodologies involving decision trees, value functions, and utility functions were applied to this basic data. It is shown that the formal decision methodology can be applied at several different levels. Examples are given in which the decision between several retrofits is changed from that resulting from a simple cost/benefit-ratio criterion by virtue of the decision-makinger's expressed (and assumed) preferences.

  1. For a Real Increase in the Military Platforms Safety, as a Consequence of the Transition to Insensitive Munitions: A Complex Issue Which Requires Intrinsic Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    FOR A REAL INCREASE IN THE MILITARY PLATFORMS SAFETY, AS A CONSEQUENCE OF THE TRANSITION TO INSENSITIVE MUNITIONS: A complex issue which requires...33.1.64.99.12.34. Fax : 33.1.64.99.15.95 ABSTRACT The transition to Insensitive Munitions ( IM ) is a need coming from the necessity of increasing the...safety of weapon platforms which are going to carry, to store or to use munitions. This transition to IM must then bring solutions to the requirements

  2. Assessing farm tractor incidents and awareness levels of operators for tractor safety issues in the Hatay province of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Keskin, S Görücü; Keskin, M; Soysal, Y

    2012-04-01

    Studies and statistical data on safety issues related to farm tractors and machinery are very limited in developing countries, including Turkey. This study was carried out to investigate tractor-related incidents in the Hatay province, located in the mid-south of Turkey. A questionnaire was conducted with 107 tractor operators using face-to-face interviews. Data were evaluated according to the incident type, machinery involved, and mechanism of injury or fatality. A total of 101 incidents were reported by 77 of the 107 respondents. Most of the incidents were due to tractor rollovers (65.4%), 14.8% of the incidents were due to entanglement of body parts in moving machinery, and 12.9% involved crashing into other vehicles or obstacles. The leading cause of the incidents was personal mistakes (60.4%). Fatalities resulted from 25.7% of the incidents, while 45.5% of the incidents caused non-fatal injuries. Only 5.6% of the tractors had a ROPS-enclosed cab. The percentage of ROPS-equipped tractors was 19.6%, while 41.3% of the tractors had a shade cover and 33.6% had no protective structure. Only one of the respondents used a seatbelt, although 44.9% of them stated that seatbelts should be used. It was also found that only 13.5% of the operators had training in work safety, while 95.1% stated that incidents might be reduced if people were trained. Development of appropriate policies and training programs are needed for safer operation of agricultural machinery to reduce injuries and fatalities due to farm accidents.

  3. Inhaled pulmonary vasodilators for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn: safety issues relating to drug administration and delivery devices

    PubMed Central

    Cosa, Nathan; Costa, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) aims to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance while maintaining systemic vascular resistance. Selective pulmonary vasodilation may be achieved by targeting pulmonary-specific pathways or by delivering vasodilators directly to the lungs. Abrupt withdrawal of a pulmonary vasodilator can cause rebound pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, use of consistent delivery systems that allow for careful monitoring of drug delivery is important. This manuscript reviews published studies of inhaled vasodilators used for treatment of PPHN and provides an overview of safety issues associated with drug delivery and delivery devices as they relate to the risk of rebound pulmonary hypertension. Off-label use of aerosolized prostacyclins and an aerosolized prostaglandin in neonates with PPHN has been reported; however, evidence from large randomized clinical trials is lacking. The amount of a given dose of aerosolized drug that is actually delivered to the lungs is often unknown, and the actual amount of drug deposited in the lungs can be affected by several factors, including patient size, nebulizer used, and placement of the nebulizer within the breathing circuit. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is the only pulmonary vasodilator approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of PPHN. The iNO delivery device, INOmax DSIR®IR, is designed to constantly monitor NO, NO2, and O2 deliveries and is equipped with audible and visual alarms to alert providers of abrupt discontinuation and incorrect drug concentration. Other safety features of this device include two independent backup delivery systems, a backup drug cylinder, a battery that provides up to 6 hours of uninterrupted medication delivery, and 27 alarms that monitor delivery, dosage, and system functions. The ability of the drug delivery device to provide safe, consistent dosing is important to consider when selecting a pulmonary vasodilator. PMID

  4. Digital geological information delivery in the Geological Survey of Ireland (GSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Mary

    2014-05-01

    Digital information is delivered though a web portal with other spatial data from the Department of Communications Energy and Natural Resources. Individual viewers specific to major GSI topics can be access for a central web page on the GSI website. Most data is available to download from our data download site the Interactive Web Data Delivery System (IWDDS) which is interactively linked to our main viewers. More recent viewers include 3D viewers able to show the topography of a selected area, as well as dynamic legends for some layers and the ability to choose from a selection of basemaps and choose the transparency of each basemap. The hardware infrastructure for web delivery is based on virtual server technology and SAN technology, this maximises uptime and ease of administration as well as providing a flexible scaling of architecture as the need arises.

  5. Assimilation of NUCAPS Retrieved Profiles in GSI for Unique Forecasting Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily Beth; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Blankenship, Clay

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral IR profiles can be assimilated in GSI as a separate observation other than radiosondes with only changes to tables in the fix directory. Assimilation of profiles does produce changes to analysis fields and evidenced by: Innovations larger than +/-2.0 K are present and represent where individual profiles impact the final temperature analysis.The updated temperature analysis is colder behind the cold front and warmer in the warm sector. The updated moisture analysis is modified more in the low levels and tends to be drier than the original model background Analysis of model output shows: Differences relative to 13-km RAP analyses are smaller when profiles are assimilated with NUCAPS errors. CAPE is under-forecasted when assimilating NUCAPS profiles, which could be problematic for severe weather forecasting Refining the assimilation technique to incorporate an error covariance matrix and creating a separate GSI module to assimilate satellite profiles may improve results.

  6. Mechanism of 'GSI oscillations' in electron capture by highly charged hydrogen-like atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Krainov, V. P.

    2012-07-15

    We suggest a qualitative explanation of oscillations in electron capture decays of hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions observed recently in an ion experimental storage ring (ESR) of Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) mbH, Darmstadt, Germany. This explanation is based on the electron multiphoton Rabi oscillations between two Zeeman states of the hyperfine ground level with the total angular momentum F = 1/2. The Zeeman splitting is produced by a constant magnetic field in the ESR. Transitions between these states are produced by the second, sufficiently strong alternating magnetic field that approximates realistic fields in the GSI ESR. The Zeeman splitting amounts to only about 10{sup -5} eV. This allows explaining the observed quantum beats with the period 7 s.

  7. Real-time Aerosol Forecasting over North America using RAP-Chem and the GSI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    RAP-Chem is an implementation of WRF-Chem meteorology-chemistry model that is run daily at NOAA/ESRL over continental domain for air-quality forecasting. The chemical forecasts are combined with observations of species using three-dimensional variational data assimilation procedure implemented in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). In the presentation we detail the method of the assimilation and show verification statistics of the model performance.

  8. Superheavy Element Studies with TASCA at GSI: Spectroscopy of Element 115 Decay Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Dirk

    Experimental campaigns on investigations of the superheavy elements 115, 117, 119, and 120 were conducted 2011 and 2012 at the gas-filled "TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus" (TASCA) at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany. Nuclear structure implications of first-ever α-photon coincidence spectroscopy on element 115 and its daughters obtained with the TASISpec set-up are discussed, likewise possible connections between decay chains associated with elements 115 and 117.

  9. Nuclear astrophysics experiments with stored, highly-charged ions at FRS-ESR at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2010-08-12

    At the FRS-ESR complex of GSI a nuclear physics program with exotic nuclei has been established in last 18 years, which also addresses key questions and nuclear properties relevant in nuclear astrophysics. The paper summarizes production of exotic nuclei, lifetime studies of highly-charged ions, direct mass measurements and reactions at internal targets. A few comments on the analysis of two-body weak decays are given.

  10. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Radiances from hyperspectral sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are routinely assimilated both globally and regionally in operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system. However, only thinned, cloud-free radiances from a 281-channel subset are used, so the overall percentage of these observations that are assimilated is somewhere on the order of 5%. Cloud checks are performed within GSI to determine which channels peak above cloud top; inaccuracies may lead to less assimilated radiances or introduction of biases from cloud-contaminated radiances.Relatively large footprint from AIRS may not optimally represent small-scale cloud features that might be better resolved by higher-resolution imagers like the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Objective of this project is to "swap" the MODIS-derived cloud top pressure (CTP) for that designated by the AIRS-only quality control within GSI to test the hypothesis that better representation of cloud features will result in higher assimilated radiance yields and improved forecasts.

  11. Neutron dose measurements with the GSI ball at high-energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, G; Gutermuth, F; Kozlova, E; Radon, T; Schuetz, R

    2007-01-01

    A moderator-type neutron monitor containing pairs of TLD 600/700 elements (Harshaw) modified with the addition of a lead layer (GSI ball) for the measurement of the ambient dose equivalent from neutrons at medium- and high-energy accelerators, is introduced in this work. Measurements were performed with the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) ball as well as with conventional polyethylene (PE) spheres at the high-energy accelerator SPS at European Organization for Nuclear Research [CERN (CERF)] and in Cave A of the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS at GSI. The measured dose values are compared with dose values derived from calculated neutron spectra folded with dose conversion coefficients. The estimated reading of the spheres calculated by means of the response functions and the neutron spectra is also included in the comparison. The analysis of the measurements shows that the PE/Pb sphere gives an improved estimate on the ambient dose equivalent of the neutron radiation transmitted through shielding of medium- and high-energy accelerators.

  12. Development and Implementation of Dynamic Scripts to Execute Cycled WRF/GSI Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily; Li, Quanli; Watson, Leela

    2014-01-01

    Automating the coupling of data assimilation (DA) and modeling systems is a unique challenge in the numerical weather prediction (NWP) research community. In recent years, the Development Testbed Center (DTC) has released well-documented tools such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) DA system that can be easily downloaded, installed, and run by researchers on their local systems. However, developing a coupled system in which the various preprocessing, DA, model, and postprocessing capabilities are all integrated can be labor-intensive if one has little experience with any of these individual systems. Additionally, operational modeling entities generally have specific coupling methodologies that can take time to understand and develop code to implement properly. To better enable collaborating researchers to perform modeling and DA experiments with GSI, the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a set of Perl scripts that couple GSI and WRF in a cycling methodology consistent with the use of real-time, regional observation data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Environmental Modeling Center (EMC). Because Perl is open source, the code can be easily downloaded and executed regardless of the user's native shell environment. This paper will provide a description of this open-source code and descriptions of a number of the use cases that have been performed by SPoRT collaborators using the scripts on different computing systems.

  13. Comment on 'Time modulation of K-shell electron capture decay rates of H-like heavy ions at GSI experiments.'

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2010-04-16

    A Comment on the Letter by A.N. Ivanov and P. Kienle, Physical Review Letters volume 103, Issue 6, 062502 (2009). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EX}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d {sup EC}}{approx}0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  14. Spectroscopy of η'-nucleus bound states at GSI and FAIR — very preliminary results and future prospects —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Friedrich, S.; Geissel, H.; Gellanki, J.; Guo, C.; Gutz, E.; Haettner, E.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Higashi, Y.; Hirenzaki, S.; Hornung, C.; Igarashi, Y.; Ikeno, N.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Jido, D.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Knoebel, R.; Kurz, N.; Metag, V.; Mukha, I.; Nagae, T.; Nagahiro, H.; Nanova, M.; Nishi, T.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rappold, C.; Reiter, M. P.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Sun, B.; Suzuki, K.; Szarka, I.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Weick, H.; Widmann, E.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.; Yamakami, H.; Zhao, J.

    2015-08-01

    The possible existence of η'-nucleus bound states has been put forward through theoretical and experimental studies. It is strongly related to the η' mass at finite density, which is expected to be reduced because of the interplay between the U A (1) anomaly and partial restoration of chiral symmetry. The investigation of the C( p, d) reaction at GSI and FAIR, as well as an overview of the experimental program at GSI and future plans at FAIR are discussed.

  15. GRI workshop on LNG vehicle technology, economics, and safety issues: Focus-group recommendations summary. Topical report, April 29 and 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-07

    GRI organized and conducted the Workshop on LNG Vehicle Technology, Economics, and Safety Issues on April 29 and 30, 1992, in Houston, Texas. The workshop included various presentations, a tour of Houston Metro (LNG bus project) facilities, and focus group discussions. The report documents the recommendations generated by the focus group. There were five separate focus groups with an average of ten members each. They met for 2-1/2 hours to discuss LNG vehicle issues and evolve recommendations for GRI R and D. Fifty-three recommendations were generated and prioritized (through voting) by the focus groups. The report consolidates these recommendations. Recommendations relative to the LNG fuel composition issue received the most votes, followed by consolidated recommendations pertaining to gas venting elimination, safety codes, and odorants or leak detectors. Component development recommendations (in order of votes) included the refueling nozzle, fuel level gage, refueling pump and meter, vehicle pump/regulator/vaporizer, and vehicle tank.

  16. A regional GSI-based EnKF system for the Rapid Refresh configuration: Tests for Satellite Radiance Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kefeng; Xue, Ming

    2015-04-01

    A regional ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation (EnKF) system based on the NCEP operational Grid-point Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system has been established for the target Rapid Refresh (RAP) applications. The EnKF system borrows the data processing and observation operators from the GSI system, and pre-calculates observation priors using the GSI. The filter is based on the serial ensemble square-root Kalman filter (EnSRF) and updates both the state vector and observation priors and its distributed memory parallelization is carried out at the state vector level. In this study, the impact of satellite radiance including AMSU, AIRS, MHS and HIRS within the established EnKF-RAP framework was examined. Testing is performed at the ~40 km grid spacing, and its performance is compared to the GSI system which uses three dimensional variation method. The performance is evaluated in terms of short-range (up to 18 hours) forecast errors verified again soundings. The assimilation of AMSU-A data improved the forecast accuracy for all the verified variables especially for the wind components; the assimilation of AIRS data greatly improved the forecast accuracy of relative humidity; when all the radiance data were assimilated, the forecast is the best. The forecast started from EnKF analysis is consistently better than from GSI analysis though the relative improvement is smaller than GSI. In additional, the configurations like bias correction and thinning for radiance assimilation within ENKF-RAP will be presented and discussed.

  17. Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Conference: Using a Revised Morbidity and Mortality Format to Focus on Systems-Based Patient Safety Issues in a VA Hospital: Design and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Wendy H; Ledford, Judith; Cooper, Jacqueline; Lloyd, Melissa G; Moore, Timothy; Harji, Farzana; Twitty, Vivian; Brooks, Annette; Oliver, Rosalinda C; Goff, James M

    2016-01-01

    The Veterans Healthcare Administration (VA) has embraced patient safety and quality improvement in the quest to improve care for veterans. The New Mexico VA Health Care System introduced a new morbidity and mortality conference, called the Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Conference (IQIC), using patient case presentations to focus on underlying systems in the clinical care environment. The revised conference design also effectively teaches the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core requirements for resident education. A formal process was established for case selection, presentation, systems issue identification, tracking, and follow-up. The IQIC has enabled the identification of more than 20 system issues at the study institution. Outcome data show lasting improvement in system issues that were addressed by this mechanism. The VA IQIC is an effective method to both identify and correct systems issues that affect patient care and is an effective method for teaching residents the 6 ACGME requirements for residency education.

  18. Possible role of glutamine synthetase of the prokaryotic type (GSI-like) in nitrogen signaling in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana S; Seabra, Ana R; Leitão, José N; Carvalho, Helena G

    2015-11-01

    Genes containing domains related to glutamine synthetase of the prokaryotic type (GSI-like) are widespread in higher plants, but their function is currently unknown. To gain insights into the possible role of GSI-like proteins, we characterized the GSI-like gene family of Medicago truncatula and investigated the functionality of the encoded proteins. M. truncatula contains two-expressed GSI-like genes, MtGSIa and MtGSIb, encoding polypeptides of 454 and 453 amino acids, respectively. Heterologous complementation assays of a bacterial glnA mutant indicate that the proteins are not catalytically functional for glutamine synthesis. Gene expression was investigated by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis in different organs of the plant and under different nitrogen (N) regimes, revealing that both genes are preferentially expressed in roots and root nodules, and that their expression is influenced by the N-status of the plant. Analysis of transgenic plants expressing MtGSI-like-promoter-gusA fusion, indicate that the two genes are strongly expressed in the root pericycle, and interestingly, the expression is enhanced at the sites of nodule emergence being particularly strong in specific cells located in front of the protoxylem poles. Taken together, the results presented here support a role of GSI-like proteins in N sensing and/or signaling, probably operating at the interface between perception of the N-status and the developmental processes underlying both root nodule and lateral root formation. This study indicates that GSI-like genes may represent a novel class of molecular players of the N-mediated signaling events.

  19. Food Safety Education Using an Interactive Multimedia Kiosk in a WIC Setting: Correlates of Client Satisfaction and Practical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Newman, Frederick L.; Huffman, Fatma G.; Dixon, Zisca

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess acceptability of food safety education delivered by interactive multimedia (IMM) in a Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children Program (WIC) clinic. Methods: Female clients or caregivers (n = 176) completed the food-handling survey; then an IMM food safety education program on a computer kiosk.…

  20. Study of she at GSI - Status and Perspectives for the Next Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessberger, F. P.

    2011-03-01

    An extensive program on synthesis of superheavy elements (SHE) and investigating their nuclear structure as well as their chemical properties has been performed at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI during the past three decades. Highlights of this research program were the identification of the new elements with atomic numbers Z = 107-112, detailed nuclear structure investigations and discovery of new K isomers in the transfermium region, first chemical characterization of element 108 (hassium) and identification of the deformed doubly magic nucleus 270Hs. Part of the latest results are presented and discussed. Current and prospected upgrades of the facility and the experimental set-ups are presented.

  1. The symmetry energy at suprasaturation density and the ASY-EOS experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippo, E.; Russotto, P.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Basrak, Z.; Benlliure, J.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Caesar, C.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Cozma, M. D.; Czech, B.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Kiš, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kupny, S.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Le Fèvre, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q. F.; Lombardo, I.; Łukasik, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Marini, P.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pawłowski, P.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reviol, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Sarantites, D. G.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trautmann, W.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.; Vigilante, M.; Wang, Yongjia; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Winkelbauer, J.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2017-03-01

    The ASY-EOS experiment at GSI laboratory measured the direct and elliptic flow of neutrons and light charged particles in the reaction 197Au+197 Au at 400 A MeV incident energy. The ratio of elliptic flow of neutrons with respect to that of the light charged particles was used as main experimental observable to probe the density dependence of the symmetry energy term of the nuclear equation of state. Results, obtained by comparison of the experimental data with the UrQMD model predictions, strongly support a moderately soft to linear density dependence of the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities below 2ρ0.

  2. The EXL experiment at FAIR and plans with the ESR at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.

    2011-10-28

    In this contribution, the physics program of the EXL experiment at FAIR-NuSTAR along with its experimental setup will be briefly outlined. This experiment aims to study the structure and the dynamics of radioactive nuclei which collide with light ions in inverse kinematics. On the way to the final measurements, several measurements have been proposed at the existing ESR at GSI with the purpose of understanding the detection systems for EXL and obtaining the first physics results in this type of experiments in a storage ring.

  3. Production of high current proton beams using complex H-rich molecules at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Adonin, A. Barth, W.; Heymach, F.; Hollinger, R.; Vormann, H.; Yakushev, A.

    2016-02-15

    In this contribution, the concept of production of intense proton beams using molecular heavy ion beams from an ion source is described, as well as the indisputable advantages of this technique for operation of the GSI linear accelerator. The results of experimental investigations, including mass-spectra analysis and beam emittance measurements, with different ion beams (CH{sub 3}{sup +},C{sub 2}H{sub 4}{sup +},C{sub 3}H{sub 7}{sup +}) using various gaseous and liquid substances (methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, and iodoethane) at the ion source are summarized. Further steps to improve the ion source and injector performance with molecular beams are depicted.

  4. A Case Study of Environmental, Health and Safety Issues Involving the Burlington, Massachusetts Public School System. "Tips, Suggestions, and Resources for Investigating and Resolving EHS Issues in Schools."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresser, Todd H.

    An investigation was initiated concerning the environmental health within the Burlington, Massachusetts public school system to determine what specific environmental hazards were present and determine ways of eliminating them. This report presents 20 case studies that detail the environmental health issues involved, the approaches taken in…

  5. Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: methane from coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, L.J.; Cowan, C.E.; Riedel, E.F.

    1980-07-01

    Potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from the recovery of gas from coalbeds are identified and examined. The technology of methane recovery is described and economic and legal barriers to production are discussed. (ACR)

  6. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Previously, it has been shown that cloud top designation associated with quality control procedures within the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system used operationally by a number of Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) partners may not provide the best representation of cloud top pressure (CTP). Because this designated CTP determines which channels are cloud-free and, thus, available for assimilation, ensuring the most accurate representation of this value is imperative to obtaining the greatest impact from satellite radiances. This paper examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing analysis increments and numerical forecasts generated using operational techniques with a research technique that swaps CTP from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the value of CTP calculated from the radiances within GSI.

  7. Performance of upstream interaction region detectors for the FIRST experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Anelli, M.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Finck, C.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le F{èvre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.

    2012-02-01

    The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at GSI has been designed to study carbon fragmentation, measuring 12C double differential cross sections (∂2σ/∂θ∂E) for different beam energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/u. The experimental setup integrates newly designed detectors in the, so called, Interaction Region around the graphite target. The Interaction Region upstream detectors are a 250 μm thick scintillator and a drift chamber optimized for a precise measurement of the ions interaction time and position on the target. In this article we review the design of the upstream detectors along with the preliminary results of the data taking performed on August 2011 with 400 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at GSI. Detectors performances will be reviewed and compared to those obtained during preliminary tests, performed with 500 MeV electrons (at the BTF facility in the INFN Frascati Laboratories) and 80 MeV/u protons and carbon ions (at the INFN LNS Laboratories in Catania).

  8. Characterization of complex rock masses by combined borehole GSI and sonic logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapigni, Michele; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2015-04-01

    Reliable assessment of the strength and hydraulic properties of rock masses at depth is key to a number of geological, engineering and geohazard applications, including tunnelling, reservoir characterization and slope stability analysis. Rock mass investigations usually exploit direct geomechanical core logging and indirect geophysical techniques. A cost-effective and reliable characterisation of rock mass quality by direct investigation is often hampered by extremely variable lithological and structural conditions. On the other hand, available indirect methods correlating rock mass properties with geophysical investigation results apply to near-surface (upper few tens of meters in depth) and rely on rock mass descriptors poorly suitable for complex rocks (including deformed, weathered, or damaged rocks). Thus, there is a need to set up: 1) robust and versatile approaches to quantify (direct) rock mass descriptors suitable for complex geological conditions from drillcores; 2) statistically-sound relationships between such descriptors and rock mass properties obtained by (indirect) geophysical methods. We focus on the analysis of relationships between sonic P-wave velocity and rock mass quality described by the Geological Strength Index (GSI), both quantified in deep boreholes. The GSI is a suitable descriptor of rock mass structure and weathering, suitable for application to nearly all kind of rock types and geological conditions. We used site investigation data gathered to design a 9.2 km long headrace tunnel in a crystalline core complex of the central italian Alps. We analysed three boreholes up to 400 m deep in gneiss and meta-sedimentary rocks (including gypsum-anhydrite, marbles, decomposed carbonates) from which high quality HQ drillcores were extracted, allowing high-resolution geological and geomechanical logging. In the same boreholes, geophysical logging was performed using a "full-wave" sonic tool (transmitter operating at 27 kHz, receivers recording up

  9. Towards detailed knowledge of atomic nuclei—the past, present and future of nuclear structure investigations at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerl, J.; Gorska, M.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    2016-10-01

    Selected experimental nuclear structure physics results are presented which have been obtained at GSI since the mid 70ties employing the UNILAC and the SIS/FRS accelerator facility. It is shown how stable heavy-ion beams as well as radioactive isotope beams of this facility together with state-of-the-art instrumentation produced many discoveries and led to a multitude of important results covering many aspects of nuclear structure. Finally, we discuss the future directions of nuclear structure research at GSI with the FAIR/NUSTAR project.

  10. [Topical issues of biological safety under current conditions. Part 3. Scientific provision for the national regulation of the biological safety framework in its broad interpretation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Smolensky, V Yu; Ezhlova, E B; Demina, Yu V; Toporkov, V P; Toporkov, A V; Lyapin, M N; Kutyrev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Consequent of investigation concerned with biological safety (BS) framework development in its broad interpretation, reflected in the Russian Federation State Acts, identified have been conceptual entity parameters of the up-to-date broad interpretation of BS, which have formed a part of the developed by the authors system for surveillance (prophylaxis, localization, indication, identification, and diagnostics) and control (prophylaxis, localization, and response/elimination) over the emergency situations of biological (sanitary-epidemiological) character. The System functionality is activated through supplying the content with information data which are concerned with monitoring and control of specific internal and external threats in the sphere of BS provision fixed in the Supplement 2 of the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005), and with the previously characterized nomenclature of hazardous biological factors. The system is designed as a network-based research-and-practice tool for evaluation of the situation in the sphere of BS provision, as well as assessment of efficacy of management decision making as regards BS control and proper State policy implementation. Most of the system elements either directly or indirectly relate to the scope of activities conducted by Federal Service for Surveillance in the Sphere of Consumers Rights Protection and Human Welfare, being substantial argument for allocating coordination functions in the sphere of BS provision to this government agency and consistent with its function as the State Coordinator on IHR (2005). The data collected serve as materials to Draft Federal Law "Concerning biological safety provision of the population".

  11. An Examination of Internet Filtering and Safety Policy Trends and Issues in South Carolina's K-12 Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicks, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    School districts have implemented filtering and safety policies in response to legislative and social mandates to protect students from the proliferation of objectionable online content. Subject related literature suggests these policies are more restrictive than legal mandates require and are adversely affecting information access and…

  12. Lognormal Assimilation of Water Vapor in a WRF-GSI Cycled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S. J.; Kliewer, A.; Jones, A. S.; Forsythe, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have shown the viability of both detecting a lognormally-distributed signal for water vapor mixing ratio and the improved quality of satellite retrievals in a 1DVAR mixed lognormal-Gaussian assimilation scheme over a Gaussian-only system. This mixed scheme is incorporated into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) assimilation scheme with the goal of improving forecasts from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model in a cycled system. Results are presented of the impact of treating water vapor as a lognormal random variable. Included in the analysis are: 1) the evolution of Tropical Storm Chris from 2006, and 2) an analysis of a "Pineapple Express" water vapor event from 2005 where a lognormal signal has been previously detected.

  13. Status of high current ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Gutermuth, B.; Heymach, F.; Krichbaum, H.; Leible, K.-D.; Ochs, K.; Schäffer, P.; Schäffer, S.; Spädtke, P.; Stork, M.; Wesp, A.; Mayr, R.

    2008-02-01

    Vacuum arc ion sources, Penning ion sources, and filament driven multicusp ion sources are used for the production of high current ion beams of a variety of metallic and gaseous ions at the GSI accelerator facility. For accelerator operation, the ion sources have to provide a stable beam over a long period of time with an energy of 2.2keV/u and a maximum mass over charge ratio of 65. The status of beam time operation at the high current injector is presented here giving an outline on important ion source data, such as ion beam current, ion beam spectrum, transversal emittance, life time, duty factor, and transmission along the low energy beam transport section.

  14. Status of high current ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Gutermuth, B.; Heymach, F.; Krichbaum, H.; Leible, K.-D.; Ochs, K.; Schaeffer, P.; Schaeffer, S.; Spaedtke, P.; Stork, M.; Wesp, A.; Mayr, R.

    2008-02-15

    Vacuum arc ion sources, Penning ion sources, and filament driven multicusp ion sources are used for the production of high current ion beams of a variety of metallic and gaseous ions at the GSI accelerator facility. For accelerator operation, the ion sources have to provide a stable beam over a long period of time with an energy of 2.2 keV/u and a maximum mass over charge ratio of 65. The status of beam time operation at the high current injector is presented here giving an outline on important ion source data, such as ion beam current, ion beam spectrum, transversal emittance, life time, duty factor, and transmission along the low energy beam transport section.

  15. Metallic magnetic calorimeters for high precision QED tests at GSI/FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pies, C.; Pabinger, A.; Kempf, S.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Enss, C.

    2009-12-01

    The quantum electrodynamics belongs to the best tested and established theories in modern physics. However, the evaluation of high order processes, as necessary in the presence of large electric fields, is still demanding. Of particular interest in this field is the Lamb shift of highly charged, hydrogen-like ions, as the theoretically claimed error bars start to be smaller than the experimental ones. We recently started to develop a 1×8 detector array for high resolution x-ray spectroscopy of hydrogen-like Uranium at the GSI/FAIR. The detectors are designed to have an energy resolution below 30 eV in the relevant energy range up to 100 keV. We discuss the considerations that lead to our present detector design, as well as the present micro-fabrication techniques.

  16. Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, at the GSI site

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, Guenther

    2006-11-17

    FAIR is a new large-scale particle accelerator facility to be built at the GSI site in Germany. The research pursued at FAIR will cover a wide range of topics in nuclear and hadron physics, as well as high density plasma physics, atomic and antimatter physics, and applications in condensed matter physics and biology. The working horse of FAIR will be a 1.1km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300Tm synchrotrons, which will be used to produce high intensity secondary beams of short-lived radioactive ions or antiprotons. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver heavy ion and antiproton beams of unprecedented quality. Large experimental facilities are presently being designed by the NUSTAR, PANDA, PAX, CBM, SPARC, FLAIR, HEDgeHOB and BIOMAT collaborations.

  17. Experimental Evidence of the 90° Stop Band in the GSI UNILAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groening, L.; Barth, W.; Bayer, W.; Clemente, G.; Dahl, L.; Forck, P.; Gerhard, P.; Hofmann, I.; Kaiser, M. S.; Maier, M.; Mickat, S.; Milosic, T.; Jeon, D.; Uriot, D.

    2009-06-01

    In a particle accelerator with a periodic structure beam space charge force may excite resonant beam emittance growth if the particle’s transverse phase advance approaches 90°. A recent simulation study with the PARMILA code [D. Jeon , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. BeamsPRABFM1098-4402 12, 054204 (2009)]10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.054204 has shown the feasibility of measuring the stop band of this fourth order resonance in the GSI Universal Linear Accelerator UNILAC and proposed its experimental verification, which is reported here. Measurements of transverse phase space distributions behind a periodically focusing structure reveal a fourfold symmetry characteristic of fourth order resonances as well as a resonance stop band above σ0=90° per focusing cell. These experimental findings agree with results from three different beam dynamics simulation codes, i.e., DYNAMION, PARMILA, and TRACEWIN.

  18. The ASY-EOS experiment at GSI: investigating symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Chartier, M.; Cozma, M. D.; De Filippo, E.; Le Fèvre, A.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Kiš, M.; Kupny, S.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q.; Łukasik, J.; Marini, P.; Pawłowski, P.; Santoro, S.; Trautmann, W.; Veselsky, M.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Baran, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bassini, R.; Benlliure, J.; Boiano, C.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Czech, B.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Greco, V.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Lombardo, I.; Lynch, W. G.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Pleskac, R.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reifarth, R.; Reisdorf, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2014-03-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons or light complex particles in reactions of heavy-ions at pre-relativistic energies has been proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state at supra-saturation densities. The results obtained from the existing FOPI/LAND data for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon in comparison with the UrQMD model simulations favoured a moderately soft symmetry term, but suffer from a considerable statistical uncertainty. These results have been confirmed by an independent analysis based on the Tübingen QMD simulations. In order to obtain an improved data set for Au+Au collisions and to extend the study to other systems, a new experiment was carried out at the GSI laboratory by the ASY-EOS collaboration. The present status of the data analysis is reported

  19. Measurement of the coupling impedances of the kickers in the SIS and ESR at GSI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blell, U.

    1997-05-01

    At high particle intensities coherent transverse beam oscillations may be excited due to the coupling of the beam to individual accelerators structures. The characteristic values to describe these beam instabilities are the longitudinal- and transverse coupling impedances. One reason for this beam instability is the inductive interaction between the beam and the kicker magnets. The type of the magnet, e.g. window-frame magnet or C-magnet, and its external electrical network are the most important quantities to identify the coupling impedances below the cut-off frequency of the beam pipe. For the kicker modules in the SIS and ESR accelerators at GSI the mathematical basis, theory and measured results will be presented.

  20. Is the GSI anomaly due to neutrino oscillations? A real time perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jun; Boyanovsky, Daniel; Hutasoit, Jimmy A.; Holman, Richard

    2010-08-15

    We study a model for the 'GSI anomaly' in which we obtain the time evolution of the population of parent and daughter particles directly in real time, considering explicitly the quantum entanglement between the daughter particle and neutrino mass eigenstates in the two-body decay. We confirm that the decay rate of the parent particle and the growth rate of the daughter particle do not feature a time modulation from interference of neutrino mass eigenstates. The lack of interference is a consequence of the orthogonality of the mass eigenstates. This result also follows from the density matrix obtained by tracing out the unobserved neutrino states. We confirm this result by providing a complementary explanation based on Cutkosky rules applied to the Feynman diagram that describes the self energy of the parent particle.

  1. Transversity Measurement with Polarized Proton and Antiproton Interactions at Gsi:. the Pax Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalpiaz, P. F.

    2006-02-01

    It has recently been suggested by the PAX collaboration that collisions of transversely polarized protons and antiprotons at the GSI-FAIR can be used to determine the nucleon's transversity densities from measurements of the double-spin asymmetry for the Drell-Yan process. The theoretical expectations for this observable are in the 0.3-0.4 range at the FAIR-HESR enrgies. PAX therefore proposes to build a polarized antiproton stored beam suitable for this measurament. Polarized antiprotons will be produced by spin filtering with an internal polarized gas target in a storage ring. The design and performance of the accelerator setup, and of the the detector will be briefly outlined.

  2. Experiments on the interaction of heavy ions with dense plasma at GSI-Darmstadt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöckl, C.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Geißel, M.; Roth, M.; Wetzler, H.; Seelig, W.; Iwase, O.; Spiller, P.; Bock, R.; Süß, W.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    One of the main objectives of the experimental plasma physics activities at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) are the interaction processes of heavy ions with dense ionized matter. Gas-discharge plasma targets were used for energy loss and charge state measurements in a regime of electron density and temperature up to 10 19 cm -3 and 20 eV, respectively. An improved model of the charge exchange processes in fully ionized hydrogen plasma, taking into account multiple excited electronic configurations which subsequently ionize, has removed the discrepancies of previous theoretical descriptions. The energy loss of the ion beam in partially ionized plasmas such as argon was found to agree very well with our simple theoretical model based on the modified Bethe-Bloch theory. A new setup with a 100 J/5 GW Nd-glass laser now provides access to density ranges up to 10 21 cm -3 and temperatures of up to 100 eV. First results of interaction experiments with laser-produced plasma are presented. To fully exploit the experimental possibilities of the new laser-plasma setup both improved charge state detection systems and better plasma diagnostics are indispensable. Present developments and future possibilities in these fields are presented. This paper summarizes the following contributions: Interaction of heavy-ion beams with laser plasma by C. Stöckl et al. Energy Loss of Heavy Ions in a laser-produced plasma by M. Roth et al. Charge state measurements of heavy ions passing a laser produced plasma with high time resolution by W. Süß et al. Plasma diagnostics for laser-produced plasma by O. Iwase et al. Future possibilities of plasma diagnostics at GSI by M. Geißel et al.

  3. Some Implications of the Three Mile Island Accident for LMFBR Safety and Licensing: The Design Basis Issue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    usually leads to a construction license. The PSAR, along with support- ing documentation, a set of technical specifications, a preoperational test...IV. LICENSING AND SAFETY OF LMFBRs The recent experience with licensing an LMFBR has been limited to the Fast Flux Test Facility ( FFTF ) in...Washington state and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) in Tennessee. FFTF is unique because it is a test facility constructed on federal land and as

  4. Contested Issues of Efficacy and Safety between Transnational Formulation Regimes of Tibetan Medicines in China and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Schrempf, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan medicines are key material objects for medical treatment and have become part of a global trend of ‘pharmaceuticalisation’, playing increasingly important political and socio-economic roles in an ‘alternative modernity’. As I argue in this paper, they also have become key ‘sites of contestation’ between different epistemic values and styles of practice related to efficacy and safety that are reproduced in and through specific formulation regimes. Based on my multisited ethnography of production, prescription, and use practices of Tibetan medicines in China and Europe, this paper conceptualises three distinct formulation regimes, offering a heuristic model for transnational comparison—a classical, an industrialised or reformulated, and a polyherbal regime. The first two are the major orientations while the polyherbal is a conjoint hybrid with either the classical or the industrialised formulation regime. Globalised national drug safety regulations legalise and confer legitimacy to industrialised Tibetan formulas that follow biomedically defined efficacy, safety, and disease categories, while classical formulas produced by private physicians or small-scale cottage pharmacies are increasingly marginalised as producing ‘unsafe’ and at times illegal medicines, and need to find new ways for adapting and circulating their formulas. PMID:27885323

  5. Deep Sequencing of Plant and Animal DNA Contained within Traditional Chinese Medicines Reveals Legality Issues and Health Safety Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Coghlan, Megan L.; Haile, James; Houston, Jayne; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Moolhuijzen, Paula; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Bunce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been practiced for thousands of years, but only within the last few decades has its use become more widespread outside of Asia. Concerns continue to be raised about the efficacy, legality, and safety of many popular complementary alternative medicines, including TCMs. Ingredients of some TCMs are known to include derivatives of endangered, trade-restricted species of plants and animals, and therefore contravene the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) legislation. Chromatographic studies have detected the presence of heavy metals and plant toxins within some TCMs, and there are numerous cases of adverse reactions. It is in the interests of both biodiversity conservation and public safety that techniques are developed to screen medicinals like TCMs. Targeting both the p-loop region of the plastid trnL gene and the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene, over 49,000 amplicon sequence reads were generated from 15 TCM samples presented in the form of powders, tablets, capsules, bile flakes, and herbal teas. Here we show that second-generation, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA represents an effective means to genetically audit organic ingredients within complex TCMs. Comparison of DNA sequence data to reference databases revealed the presence of 68 different plant families and included genera, such as Ephedra and Asarum, that are potentially toxic. Similarly, animal families were identified that include genera that are classified as vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered, including Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) and Saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica). Bovidae, Cervidae, and Bufonidae DNA were also detected in many of the TCM samples and were rarely declared on the product packaging. This study demonstrates that deep sequencing via HTS is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed TCM products and will assist in monitoring their legality and safety especially when

  6. Deep sequencing of plant and animal DNA contained within traditional Chinese medicines reveals legality issues and health safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Coghlan, Megan L; Haile, James; Houston, Jayne; Murray, Dáithí C; White, Nicole E; Moolhuijzen, Paula; Bellgard, Matthew I; Bunce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been practiced for thousands of years, but only within the last few decades has its use become more widespread outside of Asia. Concerns continue to be raised about the efficacy, legality, and safety of many popular complementary alternative medicines, including TCMs. Ingredients of some TCMs are known to include derivatives of endangered, trade-restricted species of plants and animals, and therefore contravene the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) legislation. Chromatographic studies have detected the presence of heavy metals and plant toxins within some TCMs, and there are numerous cases of adverse reactions. It is in the interests of both biodiversity conservation and public safety that techniques are developed to screen medicinals like TCMs. Targeting both the p-loop region of the plastid trnL gene and the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene, over 49,000 amplicon sequence reads were generated from 15 TCM samples presented in the form of powders, tablets, capsules, bile flakes, and herbal teas. Here we show that second-generation, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA represents an effective means to genetically audit organic ingredients within complex TCMs. Comparison of DNA sequence data to reference databases revealed the presence of 68 different plant families and included genera, such as Ephedra and Asarum, that are potentially toxic. Similarly, animal families were identified that include genera that are classified as vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered, including Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) and Saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica). Bovidae, Cervidae, and Bufonidae DNA were also detected in many of the TCM samples and were rarely declared on the product packaging. This study demonstrates that deep sequencing via HTS is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed TCM products and will assist in monitoring their legality and safety especially when

  7. Are There Potential Safety Issues Concerning the Safe Usage of Electronic Personal Tracking Devices? The Experience of a Multi-sport Elite Club.

    PubMed

    Medina, Daniel; Pons, Eduard; Gomez, Antonio; Guitart, Marc; Martin, Andres; Vazquez-Guerrero, Jairo; Camenforte, Ismael; Carles, Berta; Font, Roger

    2017-01-04

    Despite approval of the use of electronic personal tracking devices (EPTD) during competition by the International Football Association Board (IFAB), other team sport organizations and leagues have banned its use due to "safety concerns", with no evidence to support this assertion. The aim of the current brief report is to provide empirical evidence to support the wide-spread usage across all sports by examining safety issues concerning the use of EPTD in a multi-team sports club. A total of 5 outdoor football teams (first team, second team, under 19, under 18 and first team female) and 3 indoor multi-sport (basketball, futsal and handball) teams have been monitored; accounting for a total of 63.734 training hours and 12.748 game hours. A questionnaire was sent to all fitness coaches involved and the clinical history was reviewed for every medical issue reported. Six minor chest contusions were recorded in female football goalkeepers wearing the frontal chest trap (3,17 episodes per 1000 training hours). During training, three episodes of minor skin abrasion affecting the thoracic area due to wearing vests too tight were recorded in U-19 football team (0,21 episodes per 1000 hours) and two episodes in U-18 (0,39 per 1000 hours). It must be noted that none of these episodes resulted in lost days of training or games, neither required medical assistance. In conclusion, empirical evidence confirms EPTD is a safe technology to use across team sports.

  8. Thermal overload protection for electric motors on safety-related motor-operated valves: Generic Issue II. E. 6. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rothberg, O.

    1988-06-01

    NRC regulatory positions, as stated in Regulatory Guide 1.106, Revision 1, have been identified by the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) as potential contributors to valve motor burnout. AEOD is particularly concerned about the allowed policy of bypassing thermal overload devices during normal or accident conditions. Regulatory Guide 1.106 favors compromising the function of thermal overload devices in favor of completing the safety-related action of valves. The purpose of this study was to determine if the guidance contained in Regulatory Guide 1.106 is appropriate and, if not, to recommend the necessary changes. This report describes thermal overload devices commonly used to protect safety-related valve operator motors. The regulatory guidelines stated in Regulatory Guide 1.106 along with the limitations of thermal overload protection are discussed. Supplements and alternatives to thermal overload protection are also described. Findings and conclusions of several AEOD reports are discussed. Information obtained from the standard review plan, standard technical specifications, technical specifications from representative plants, and several papers are cited.

  9. Pharmacovigilance as a tool for safety and monitoring: a review of general issues and the specific challenges with end-stage renal failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Dalia; Marrón, Belén; Ehrlich, Jay; Rutherford, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is instrumental in helping to ensure patient safety for both newly released drugs and those that are well established in the market. However, while pharmacovigilance procedures are strictly regulated in the clinical trial setting, post-marketing adverse event reporting is not well implemented or enforced. As such, the underreporting of adverse events, in relation to drugs that are on the market, is estimated to be in the region of 90%. The identification of drug safety issues in patients with complex diseases and extensive comorbidities is therefore particularly challenging. Dialysis patients – those with end-stage renal disease and often other comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease – are a population with significant treatment challenges. Patients receive dialysis using complex medical devices (eg, a peritoneal dialysis home cycler) and also receive a range of pharmaceutical agents as part of dialysis itself (eg, peritoneal dialysis solutions). Many of the pharmaceutical agents used to treat these patients have been developed in populations without these complications and, therefore, an extensive knowledge of potential problems and contraindications in the dialysis population is lacking. It is important that the nephrology community understands the concept of pharmacovigilance – the pharmacologic science relating to the detection, assessment, understanding, and prevention of adverse effects, particularly long-term and short-term side effects, of medicines. Health care professionals (HCPs) and providers, pharmaceutical companies, global regulatory agencies, and the patients themselves all play unique and critical roles in this process. This review defines the science of pharmacovigilance and the process of adverse event reporting, highlights the new directions that pharmacovigilance has taken, and provides insight for HCPs managing dialysis patients into the important role that they play in helping to shape

  10. Assessment of costs and benefits associated with resolution of Generic Safety Issue 143 -- Availability of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning and chilled water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Marler, J.E.; Vo, T.V.; Phan, H.K.; Friley, J.R.

    1995-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory, under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, has conducted an assessment of the values (benefits) and impacts (costs) associated with potential resolutions to Generic Issue 143--``Availability of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Chilled Water Systems.`` The key objectives of the study were to (a) identify vulnerabilities related to failures of HVAC, chilled water, and room-cooling systems, (b) develop estimates of room heatup rates and safety-related equipment vulnerabilities following losses of HVAC/room-cooler systems, (c) develop estimates of the core damage frequencies and public risks associated with failures of these systems, (d) develop proposed resolution strategies to this generic issue, and (e) perform a value/impact analysis of the proposed resolutions. Detailed probabilistic risk assessments for four representative plants form the basis for the core damage frequency and public risk calculations. Internally initiated core damage sequences as well as external event were considered. Three proposed resolution strategies were developed for this safety issue, and it was determined that all three were not cost effective. Additional evaluations were performed to develop ``generic`` insights on potential design-related vulnerabilities and potential high-frequency (>10{sup {minus}4}/reactor-yr) accident sequences that involve failures of HVAC/room-cooling functions. It was concluded that, although high-frequency accident sequences may exist at some plants, these sequences are plant-specific in nature or have been resolved through hardware and/or operational changes. The plant-specific individual plant examinations appear to be an effective vehicle for identification and resolution of these plant-specific anomalies and hardware configurations.

  11. Study of certain tether safety issues. Continuation of investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Grossi, M. D.; Arnold, D.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of long tethers (10-100 km) in space are addressed under two failure situations with potential safety impact: instantaneous jamming of the reel controlling the tether during deployment and cutting of the tether due to a meteor strike or other similar phenomena. Dual and multiple mass point models were used in the SAO SKYHOOK program to determine this behavior. The results of the program runs were verified analytically or by comparison with previously verified results. The study included the effects of tether damping and air drag where appropriate. Most runs were done with the tether system undamped since we believe this best represents the true behavior of the tether. Means for controlling undesirable behavior of the tether, such as viscous dampers in the subsatellite, were also studied.

  12. The Impact of Green Stormwater Infrastructure Installation on Surrounding Health and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Low, Sarah C.; Henning, Jason; Branas, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the health and safety effects of urban green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) installments. Methods. We conducted a difference-in-differences analysis of the effects of GSI installments on health (e.g., blood pressure, cholesterol and stress levels) and safety (e.g., felonies, nuisance and property crimes, narcotics crimes) outcomes from 2000 to 2012 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We used mixed-effects regression models to compare differences in pre- and posttreatment measures of outcomes for treatment sites (n = 52) and randomly chosen, matched control sites (n = 186) within multiple geographic extents surrounding GSI sites. Results. Regression-adjusted models showed consistent and statistically significant reductions in narcotics possession (18%–27% less) within 16th-mile, quarter-mile, half-mile (P < .001), and eighth-mile (P < .01) distances from treatment sites and at the census tract level (P < .01). Narcotics manufacture and burglaries were also significantly reduced at multiple scales. Nonsignificant reductions in homicides, assaults, thefts, public drunkenness, and narcotics sales were associated with GSI installation in at least 1 geographic extent. Conclusions. Health and safety considerations should be included in future assessments of GSI programs. Subsequent studies should assess mechanisms of this association. PMID:25602887

  13. Development and application of the Safe Performance Index as a risk-based methodology for identifying major hazard-related safety issues in underground coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinilakodi, Harisha

    The underground coal mining industry has been under constant watch due to the high risk involved in its activities, and scrutiny increased because of the disasters that occurred in 2006-07. In the aftermath of the incidents, the U.S. Congress passed the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006 (MINER Act), which strengthened the existing regulations and mandated new laws to address the various issues related to a safe working environment in the mines. Risk analysis in any form should be done on a regular basis to tackle the possibility of unwanted major hazard-related events such as explosions, outbursts, airbursts, inundations, spontaneous combustion, and roof fall instabilities. One of the responses by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 2007 involved a new pattern of violations (POV) process to target mines with a poor safety performance, specifically to improve their safety. However, the 2010 disaster (worst in 40 years) gave an impression that the collective effort of the industry, federal/state agencies, and researchers to achieve the goal of zero fatalities and serious injuries has gone awry. The Safe Performance Index (SPI) methodology developed in this research is a straight-forward, effective, transparent, and reproducible approach that can help in identifying and addressing some of the existing issues while targeting (poor safety performance) mines which need help. It combines three injury and three citation measures that are scaled to have an equal mean (5.0) in a balanced way with proportionate weighting factors (0.05, 0.15, 0.30) and overall normalizing factor (15) into a mine safety performance evaluation tool. It can be used to assess the relative safety-related risk of mines, including by mine-size category. Using 2008 and 2009 data, comparisons were made of SPI-associated, normalized safety performance measures across mine-size categories, with emphasis on small-mine safety performance as compared to large- and

  14. MEASURED AND CALCULATED LOSSES IN A MODEL DIPOLE FOR GSI'S HEAVY ION SYNCHROTRON.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER,P.; ANERELLA,M.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.K.; JOSHI,P.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; ET AL.

    2003-06-15

    The new heavy ion synchrotron facility proposed by GSI will have two superconducting magnet rings in the same tunnel, with rigidities of 300T{center_dot}m and 10OT{center_dot}m. Fast ramp times are needed. These can cause problems of ac loss and field distortion in the magnets. For the high energy ring, a lm model dipole magnet has been built, based on the RHIC dipole design. This magnet was tested under boiling liquid helium in a vertical dewar. The quench current showed very little dependence on ramp rate. The ac losses, measured by an electrical method, were fitted to straight line plots of loss/cycle versus ramp rate, thereby separating the eddy current and hysteresis components. These results were compared with calculated values, using parameters which had previously been measured on short samples of cable. Reasonably good agreement between theory and experiment was found, although the measured hysteresis loss is higher than expected in ramps to the highest field levels.

  15. Status report on ECR ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinschert, K.; Bossler, J.; Schennach, S.; Schulte, H.

    1998-02-01

    The Caprice electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source of the high charge state injector (HLI) as standard injection line for the UNILAC at GSI is now in permanent operation during all beam time periods of a year. So the ECR test stand which is equipped with the same version of Caprice mainly has to be used for preparatory work. Ion beams of a great variety of elements are demanded covering beam time periods of up to six weeks. Besides the stable and reliable operation with diverse gases the application of our high-temperature oven has become a standard method for all solid materials attaining a vapor pressure of 10-3 mbar between 800 and 1500 °C. It has been operated not only with pure metal samples but also with especially produced isotopic zinc oxide samples providing a stable beam of 68Zn10+ ions. Alternatively a low-temperature evaporator was constructed for high vapor pressure materials and was used for the production of Se and Zn ions. Experiences gained with the oven and evaporator method will be reported and results will be summarized. In order to investigate and improve ion extraction and beam transport through the low energy beam line under conditions equivalent to the HLI a new ECR injector setup is being built which is equipped with an identical analyzing system. The basic concept of the new setup is described.

  16. The Darmstadt Antiproton Project (PANDA) at the High Energy Storage Ring at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Klaus J.

    2002-11-20

    Recently GSI presented the plans for a major new international research facility. A key feature of this new facility will be the delivery of intense, high-quality secondary beams which embody the production of antiprotons. For the antiproton beams a 50 Tm storage ring is planned, including electron and stochastic cooling, will be able to handle antiproton beams in the momentum range from 1.5 up to 15 GeV/c. The design luminosity is 2 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The PANDA Experiment will take place at an internal target and will cover the aspects of the structure of hadrons and the properties of hadronic matter in the corresponding energy range. The main topics to be addressed are: Spectroscopy of charmonium; Search for charmed hybrids and glueballs; Interaction of open and hidden charm with nucleons and nuclei; Single and double hypernuclei; Open charm spectroscopy; CP-Violation in the charm sector; Deeply Virtual Comptom Scattering, etc. The major part of the experimental program will make use of a general purpose detector PANDA. The concept of this detector is presented.

  17. Results of the ASY-EOS experiment at GSI: The symmetry energy at suprasaturation density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Gannon, S.; Kupny, S.; Lasko, P.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Basrak, Z.; Benlliure, J.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Caesar, C.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Cozma, M. D.; Czech, B.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Gašparić, I.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Kiš, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Le Fèvre, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q. F.; Lombardo, I.; Łukasik, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Marini, P.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pawłowski, P.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reviol, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Sarantites, D. G.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trautmann, W.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.; Vigilante, M.; Wang, Yongjia; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Winkelbauer, J.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2016-09-01

    Directed and elliptic flows of neutrons and light-charged particles were measured for the reaction 197Au+197Au at 400 MeV/nucleon incident energy within the ASY-EOS experimental campaign at the GSI laboratory. The detection system consisted of the Large Area Neutron Detector (LAND), combined with parts of the CHIMERA multidetector, the ALADIN Time-of-flight Wall, and the Washington University Microball detector. The latter three arrays were used for the event characterization and reaction-plane reconstruction. In addition, an array of triple telescopes, KRATTA was used for complementary measurements of the isotopic composition and flows of light-charged particles. From the comparison of the elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to charged particles with UrQMD predictions, a value γ =0.72 ±0.19 is obtained for the power-law coefficient describing the density dependence of the potential part in the parametrization of the symmetry energy. It represents a new and more stringent constraint for the regime of suprasaturation density and confirms, with a considerably smaller uncertainty, the moderately soft to linear density dependence deduced from the earlier FOPI-LAND data. The densities probed are shown to reach beyond twice saturation.

  18. Production and Decay of Element 114 Isotopes with the BGS (LBNL) and TASCA (GSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Jacklyn

    2010-11-01

    During the last 10 years, the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) group has published numerous reports of the production and decay of superheavy elements (SHE) with Z=112-118 in ^48Ca irradiations of actinide targets. Recently the production of element 114 in the ^242Pu(^48Ca,3-4n) reaction was verified at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). Later experiments at the BGS successfully extended the region of known SHE nuclides along the neutron-deficient side using the ^242Pu(^48Ca,5n)^285114 reaction. Almost concurrently with the BGS, the TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fúr Schwerionenforschung investigated the ^244Pu(^48Ca,3-4n) reaction and observed cross sections on the order of 10 pb for the production of element 114 when the more neutron-rich ^244Pu target was used. An alpha-decay branch in ^281Ds was also discovered, leading to the new nucleus ^277Hs. Cross sections, decay modes and decay properties all agree with those published by the DGFRS group. Implications of these results on the field of heavy elements will be discussed.

  19. Lab Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Sandra S.

    1991-01-01

    In response to the Texas Hazardous Communication Act (THCA) of 1986 which raised many new health and liability issues regarding students in science laboratories, a laboratory safety survey was generated for use in evaluating laboratory safety. This article contains the easy-to-use survey. (ZWH)

  20. Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.C.

    2002-11-14

    This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less

  1. Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

    2001-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today.

  2. Management of radiological safety--lessons learnt and issues arising from the decommissioning of Berkeley power station.

    PubMed

    Spooner, K

    1999-06-01

    Berkeley Power Station was a world leader when in June 1962 it became the UK's first commercial nuclear power station to produce electricity for the National Grid. Berkeley then stood at the leading edge of nuclear technology. After 27 years of successful operation and the supply of nearly 40 billion units of electricity, Berkeley ceased generation in March 1989. Just as it was at start-up, Berkeley is continuing to lead the way as the UK's first commercial nuclear power station to be decommissioned. A three-stage decommissioning process is under way to safely dismantle the plant and eventually return the site to its original 'green field' state. Stage 1 of this process is well advanced. To set the scene, and for general interest, this paper first provides some background to the development of the decommissioning strategy and a brief summary of the progress to date. Recognising the specific interest of the reader, the paper then focuses on the radiological aspects of the work carried out, specifically the hazards, the risk assessment process and the ALARP performance. Finally, and in some detail, the paper reports on the important lessons learnt and discusses one of the issues arising.

  3. Deliver us from evil? The temptation, realities, and neuroethico-legal issues of employing assessment neurotechnologies in public safety initiatives.

    PubMed

    Giordano, James; Kulkarni, Anvita; Farwell, James

    2014-02-01

    In light of the recent events of terrorism and publicized cases of mass slayings and serial killings, there have been calls from the public and policy-makers alike for neuroscience and neurotechnology (neuroS/T) to be employed to intervene in ways that define and assess, if not prevent, such wanton acts of aggression and violence. Ongoing advancements in assessment neuroS/T have enabled heretofore unparalleled capabilities to evaluate the structure and function of the brain, yet each and all are constrained by certain technical and practical limitations. In this paper, we present an overview of the capabilities and constraints of current assessment neuroS/T, address neuro-ethical and legal issues fostered by the use and potential misuse of these approaches, and discuss how neuroethics may inform science and the law to guide right and sound applications of neuroS/T to "deliver us from evil" while not being led into temptations of ampliative claims and inapt use.

  4. Current Status of the Development of a Transportable and Compact VLBI System by NICT and GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, Atsutoshi; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kurihara, Shinobu; Miura, Yuji; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; Tanimoto, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    MARBLE (Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometer for Baseline Length Evaluation) is under development by NICT and GSI. The main part of MARBLE is a transportable VLBI system with a compact antenna. The aim of this system is to provide precise baseline length over about 10 km for calibrating baselines. The calibration baselines are used to check and validate surveying instruments such as GPS receiver and EDM (Electro-optical Distance Meter). It is necessary to examine the calibration baselines regularly to keep the quality of the validation. The VLBI technique can examine and evaluate the calibration baselines. On the other hand, the following roles are expected of a compact VLBI antenna in the VLBI2010 project. In order to achieve the challenging measurement precision of VLBI2010, it is well known that it is necessary to deal with the problem of thermal and gravitational deformation of the antenna. One promising approach may be connected-element interferometry between a compact antenna and a VLBI2010 antenna. By measuring repeatedly the baseline between the small stable antenna and the VLBI2010 antenna, the deformation of the primary antenna can be measured and the thermal and gravitational models of the primary antenna will be able to be constructed. We made two prototypes of a transportable and compact VLBI system from 2007 to 2009. We performed VLBI experiments using theses prototypes and got a baseline length between the two prototypes. The formal error of the measured baseline length was 2.7 mm. We expect that the baseline length error will be reduced by using a high-speed A/D sampler.

  5. Using the WTO/TBT enquiry point to monitor tendencies in the regulation of environment, health, and safety issues affecting the chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Pio Borges Menezes, Rodrigo; Maria de Souza Antunes, Adelaide

    2005-04-01

    The growing importance of technical regulation affecting the use and sale of chemical products is a topic of interest not only for the chemical industry, but also for governments, nongovernmental organizations, consumers, and interested communities. The results of such regulation on behalf of the environment, health and safety of individuals, as well as its economic effects on industrial activity, are well understood in the United States and recently in the European Union. In less developed countries, however, the general level of public understanding of these issues is still minimal. It is common knowledge that the so-called "regulatory asymmetry" between countries at different levels of development contributes to the establishment of technical barriers to trade. Such asymmetries, however, also have other impacts: the displacement of polluting industrial sectors to countries which have less demanding regulations, the concentration of unsafe and harmful environmental conditions in certain parts of the globe, and the competitive disadvantage for industries located in countries where control is more rigid. This study analyses information on a wide range of technical regulations issued by World Trade Organization (WTO) members, and focuses on those regulations that affect the chemical industry. This information is available through the WTO Enquiry Points, organizations created in each country to administrate the Technical Barriers to Trade Agreement (TBT). This article consists of an analysis of 4,301 notifications of technical regulations by WTO member states in the 7-year period following the establishment of the WTO in 1995. Starting from this mass of information, 585 notifications that affect the circulation or use of chemical products were isolated. Of this group, 71% refer to only 15 countries. This group of notifications was further classified according to their motivation (the environment, health, safety), by the type of product affected (medications, fuels

  6. Quality and safety issues highlighted by patients in the handling of laboratory test results by general practices–a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In general practice internationally, many care teams handle large numbers of laboratory test results relating to patients in their care. Related research about safety issues is limited with most of the focus on this workload from secondary care and in North American settings. Little has been published in relation to primary health care in the UK and wider Europe. This study aimed to explore experiences and perceptions of patients with regards to the handling of test results by general practices. Methods A qualitative research approach was used with patients. The setting was west of Scotland general practices from one National Health Service territorial board area. Patients were purposively sampled from practice held lists of patients who received a number of laboratory tests because of chronic medical problems or surveillance of high risk medicines. Focus groups were held and were audio-recorded. Tapes were transcribed and subjected to qualitative analysis. Transcripts were coded and codes merged into themes by two of the researchers. Results 19 participants from four medical practices took part in four focus groups. The main themes identified were: 1. Patients lacked awareness of the results handling process in their practice. 2. Patients usually did not contact their practice for test results, unless they considered themselves to be ill. 3. Patients were concerned about the appropriateness of administrators being involved in results handling. 4. Patients were concerned about breaches of confidentiality when administrators were involved in results handling. 5. Patients valued the use of dedicated results handling staff. 6. Patients welcomed the use of technology to alert them to results being available, and valued the ability to choose how this happened. Conclusions The study confirms the quality and safety of care problems associated with results handling systems and adds to our knowledge of the issues that impact in these areas. Practices need to be

  7. Hand Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ...

  8. NASA SPoRT Modeling and Data Assimilation Research and Transition Activities Using WRF, LIS and GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Blankenship, Clay B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    weather research and forecasting ===== The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has numerous modeling and data assimilation (DA) activities in which the WRF model is a key component. SPoRT generates realtime, research satellite products from the MODIS and VIIRS instruments, making the data available to NOAA/NWS partners running the WRF/EMS, including: (1) 2-km northwestern-hemispheric SST composite, (2) daily, MODIS green vegetation fraction (GVF) over CONUS, and (3) NASA Land Information System (LIS) runs of the Noah LSM over the southeastern CONUS. Each of these datasets have been utilized by specific SPoRT partners in local EMS model runs, with select offices evaluating the impacts using a set of automated scripts developed by SPoRT that manage data acquisition and run the NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package. SPoRT is engaged in DA research with the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) and Ensemble Kalman Filter in LIS for soil moisture DA. Ongoing DA projects using GSI include comparing the impacts of assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances versus retrieved profiles, and an analysis of extra-tropical cyclones with intense non-convective winds. As part of its Early Adopter activities for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, SPoRT is conducting bias correction and soil moisture DA within LIS to improve simulations using the NASA Unified-WRF (NU-WRF) for both the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity and upcoming SMAP mission data. SPoRT has also incorporated real-time global GVF data into LIS and WRF from the VIIRS product being developed by NOAA/NESDIS. This poster will highlight the research and transition activities SPoRT conducts using WRF, NU-WRF, EMS, LIS, and GSI.

  9. Safety issues for infrared thermographers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, John R., Jr.

    2001-03-01

    Thermographers are often at risk when inspecting electrical systems. While electrocution is always a hazard, a far greater danger is injury associated with accidental exposure to an arc flash explosion. Because of the potential for serious injury, and because of new government regulations, more and more companies are now taking steps to prevent arc flash injury and to minimize damage if and when it does occur. In this paper, which would not have been possible without the able assistance of Lowry Eads, global resource for infrared thermography in Dupont, I will discuss why arc flash explosions happen and what damage they can do; I will also show how thermographers can both reduce their risk of being exposed to one and, if they are exposed, their injury from the explosion.

  10. [Important issues of biological safety].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G

    2007-01-01

    The problem of biological security raises alarm due to the real growth of biological threats. Biological security includes a wide scope of problems, the solution of which becomes a part of national security as a necessary condition for the constant development of the country. A number of pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus, exotic Ebola and Lassa viruses causing hemorrhagic fever,rotaviruses causing acute intestinal diseases, etc. were first discovered in the last century. Terrorist actions committed in the USA in 2001 using the anthrax pathogen made the problem of biological danger even more important. In Russian Federation, biological threats are counteracted through the united state policy being a part of general state security policy. The biological Security legislation of Russian Federation is chiefly based on the 1992 Federal Law on Security. On the basis of cumulated experience, the President of Russia ratified Basics of Russian Federation's State Policy for Chemical and Biological Security for the Period through 2010 and Beyond on 4 December, 2003. The document determines the main directions and stages of the state development in the area of chemical and biological security. The Federal target program Russian Federation's National Program for Chemical and Biological Security is being developed, and its development is to be completed soon in order to perfect the national system for biological security and fulfill Basics of Russian Federation's State Policy for Chemical and Biological Security for the Period through 2010 and Beyond, ratified by the President. The new global strategy for control over infectious diseases, presented in the materials of Saint Petersburg summit of the Group of Eight, as well as the substantive part of its elements in Sanitary International Standards, are to a large degree an acknowledgement of the Russian Federation's experience and the algorithm for fighting extremely dangerous infections. This Russia's experience has resulted in the following global achievements: smallpox elimination in the USSR (1936); the USSR's suggestions on the program of smallpox elimination in the world and 2 billion doses of the vaccine transferred to the possession of the WHO (since 1958); the global elimination of the disease (1980); effective control over avian influenza at the epizootic stage, recognized internationally at Beijing International Congress, 17-18 January, 2006.

  11. Animal Drug Safety FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Frequently Asked Questions Animal Drug Safety Frequently Asked Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... issues? Additional Information I gave my dog a drug and he got sick. How do I report ...

  12. Time Modulation of the K-Shell Electron Capture Decay Rates of H-like Heavy Ions at GSI Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kienle, P.

    2009-08-07

    According to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EC}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d}{sup EC}approx0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  13. Art Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Advocating that Canadian art programs should use and model environmentally safe practices, the articles in this journal focus on issues of safe practices in art education. Articles are: (1) "What is WHMIS?"; (2) "Safety Precautions for Specific Art Processes"; (3) "Toxic Substances"; (4) "Using Clay, Glazes, and…

  14. Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, Steven David; Marshall, Frances Mc Clellan; Stromberg, Howard Merion; Grant, Gary Michael

    1999-06-01

    Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEELs lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

  15. Data-flow coupling and data-acquisition triggers for the PreSPEC-AGATA campaign at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralet, D.; Pietri, S.; Aubert, Y.; Bellato, M.; Bortolato, D.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Dosme, N.; Gadea, A.; Gerl, J.; Golubev, P.; Grave, X.; Johansson, H. T.; Karkour, N.; Korichi, A.; Kurz, N.; Lafay, X.; Legay, E.; Linget, D.; Pietralla, N.; Rudolph, D.; Schaffner, H.; Stezowski, O.; Travers, B.; Wieland, O.

    2015-06-01

    The PreSPEC setup for high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy using radioactive ion beams was employed for experimental campaigns in 2012 and 2014. The setup consisted of the state of the art Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) and the High Energy γ deteCTOR (HECTOR+) positioned around a secondary target at the final focal plane of the GSI FRagment Separator (FRS) to perform in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy of exotic nuclei. The Lund York Cologne CAlorimeter (LYCCA) was used to identify the reaction products. In this paper we report on the trigger scheme used during the campaigns. The data-flow coupling between the Multi-Branch System (MBS) based Data AcQuisition (DAQ) used for FRS-LYCCA and the "Nouvelle Acquisition temps Réel Version 1.2 Avec Linux" (NARVAL) based acquisition system used for AGATA are also described.

  16. Strange meson-baryon interaction in hot and dense medium: recent progress for a road to GSI/FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, D.; Tolos, L.; Aichelin, J.; Bratkovskaya, E.

    2016-01-01

    We report recent results on the dynamics of strange hadrons in two-body reactions relevant for near-threshold production in heavy-ion collisions at GSI/FAIR and NICA-Dubna. In particular, K¯N scattering in hot and dense nuclear matter is studied within a chiral unitary framework in coupled channels, setting up the starting point for implementations in microscopic off-shell transport approaches. We focus on the calculation of transition rates with special attention to the excitation of hyperon resonances and isospin effects. Additionally, we explore “unconventional” strangeness generation by meson-meson and meson-baryon interactions in connection with recent HADES observations of deep sub-threshold Φ and Ξ production.

  17. A new data acquisition system for Schottky signals in atomic physics experiments at GSI's and FAIR's storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trageser, C.; Brandau, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Müller, A.; Nolden, F.; Sanjari, S.; Stöhlker, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new continuous and broadband data acquisition system for measurements of Schottky-signals of ions revolving in a storage ring has been implemented. This set-up is capable of recording the radio frequency (RF) signal of the ions that circulate in the storage ring with a sustained acquisition rate of more than 3.5× {10}7 IQ-samples per second. This allows several harmonics of the full momentum acceptance of a storage ring to be measured at the same time. The RF signal analyzer modules are complemented by further electronic modules such as counters, precision clocks and synchronization modules that facilitate a seamless integration with main experimental data acquisitions for atomic and nuclear physics. In this contribution, the setup and first results from a test run at the experimental storage ring at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, are presented.

  18. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor IX (GSI) Impairs Concomitant Activation of Notch and wnt-beta-catenin Pathways in CD44(+) Gastric Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Barat, Samarpita; Chen, Xi; Cuong Bui, Khac; Bozko, Przemyslaw; Götze, Julian; Christgen, Matthias; Krech, Till; Malek, Nisar P; Plentz, Ruben R

    2017-02-03

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are associated with tumor resistance and are characterized in gastric cancer (GC). Studies have indicated that Notch and wnt-beta-catenin pathways are crucial for CSC development. Using CD44(+) CSCs, we investigated the role of these pathways in GC carcinogenesis. We performed cell proliferation, wound healing, invasion, tumorsphere, and apoptosis assays. Immunoblot analysis of downstream signaling targets of Notch and wnt-beta-catenin were tested after gamma-secretase inhibitor IX (GSI) treatment. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) were used to determine CD44 and Hairy enhancer of split-1 (Hes1) expression in human GC tissues. CD44(+) CSCs were subcutaneously injected into NMR-nu/nu mice and treated with vehicle or GSI. GC patients with expression of CD44 and Hes1 showed overall reduced survival. CD44(+) CSCs showed high expression of Hes1. GSI treatment showed effective inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, invasion, tumor sphere formation of CD44(+) CSCs, and induced apoptosis. Importanly, Notch1 was found to be important in mediating a crosstalk between Notch and wnt-beta-catenin in CD44(+) CSCs. Our study highlights a crosstalk between Notch and wnt-beta-catenin in gastric CD44(+) CSCs. Expression of CD44 and Hes1 is associated with patient overall survival. GSI could be an alternative drug to treat GC. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  19. The development of a naturalistic data collection system to perform critical incident analysis: an investigation of safety and fatigue issues in long-haul trucking.

    PubMed

    Dingus, Thomas A; Neale, Vicki L; Klauer, Sheila G; Petersen, Andrew D; Carroll, Robert J

    2006-11-01

    Traditionally, both epidemiological and empirical methods have been used to assess driving safety. This paper describes an alternative, hybrid, naturalistic approach to data collection that shares advantages with each traditional approach. Though this naturalistic approach draws on elements of several safety techniques that have been developed in the past, including the Hazard Analysis Technique, instrumented vehicle studies, and fleet studies of driving safety interventions, it has a number of unique elements. Sophisticated instrumented vehicles collected over 400,000 km of commercial vehicle data to address the long-haul trucking application described in this paper. The development of this data collection and analysis method and data collection instrumentation has resulted in a set of valuable tools to advance the current state-of-the-practice in driving safety assessment. An application of this unique approach to a study of long-haul truck driver performance, behavior, and fatigue is described herein.

  20. Workplace Health and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet is one of six texts from a workplace literacy curriculum designed to assist learners in facing the increased demands of the workplace. It is a short guide to workplace health and safety issues, laws, and regulations, especially in Massachusetts. Topics covered include the following: (1) safety issues--workplace ergonomics, the…

  1. Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    This report covers the general issues involved in nuclear safety research and points out the areas needing detailed consideration. Topics included are: (1) "Principles of Nuclear Safety Research" (examining who should fund, who should conduct, and who should set the agenda for nuclear safety research); (2) "Elements of a Future…

  2. School Safety Audit Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMary, Jo Lynne; Owens, Marsha; Ramnarain, A. K. Vijay

    The 1997 Virginia General Assembly passed legislation directing school boards to require all schools to conduct safety audits. This audit is designed to assess the safety conditions in each public school to: (1) identify and, if necessary, develop solutions for physical safety concerns, including building security issues; and (2) identify and…

  3. Thermal reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

  4. Emerging issues in improving food and physical activity environments: strategies for addressing land use, transportation, and safety in 3 California-wide initiatives.

    PubMed

    Aboelata, Manal J; Navarro, Amanda M

    2010-11-01

    Mounting research has suggested linkages between neighborhood safety, community design, and transportation patterns and eating and activity behaviors and health outcomes. On the basis of a review of evaluation findings from 3 multisite healthy eating and activity initiatives in California, we provide an overview of 3 community process strategies-engaging local advocates, linking safety to health, and collaborating with local government officials-that may be associated with the successful development and implementation of long-term community-improvement efforts and should be explored further.

  5. Space engine safety system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A rocket engine safety system is designed to initiate control procedures which will minimize damage to the engine and vehicle or test stand in the event of an engine failure. This report describes the features and the implementation issues associated with rocket engine safety systems. Specific concerns of safety systems applied to a space-based engine and long duration space missions are discussed. Examples of safety system features and architectures are given from recent safety monitoring investigations conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Engine and for future liquid rocket engines. Also, a general design and implementation process for rocket engine safety systems is presented.

  6. Teenager Views on Issues Related to Traffic Safety Education and the Licensing of Teenage Drivers: Results of a Statewide Opinion Survey on Washington Teenage Drivers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Gary J.; Kinch, Robert

    In Washington, the existence of driver education programs is being threatened by tough economic times. To determine the opinions of teenage drivers about their traffic safety education (TSE) experience, the process of learning to drive, and the licensing of 16- and 17-year-olds, 10 percent of TSE students (N=1,070) were surveyed. Further data were…

  7. Comparison of rates of safety issues and reporting of trial outcomes for medical devices approved in the European Union and United States: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Thomas J; Sokolov, Elisaveta; Franklin, Jessica M; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate safety alerts and recalls, publication of key trial outcomes, and subsequent US approval of high profile medical devices introduced in the European Union. Design Cohort study. Setting Novel cardiovascular, orthopedic, and neurologic devices approved in the EU through Conformité Européenne marking between 2005 and 2010. Data sources Public and commercial databases searched up to January 2016 for press releases and announcements of approvals; public Food and Drug Administration and European regulatory authority databases for US approvals and safety alerts and recalls; and Medline, Embase, and Web of Science for peer reviewed publications. Main outcome measures We categorized the novelty of the devices in the study sample as a “major innovation” or an “other change,” and extracted descriptive data about the devices and information on any safety alerts and withdrawals. Linear regression models examined factors associated with differential EU and US approvals. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate factors associated with safety alerts and recalls and the publication of trial outcomes for devices categorized as major innovations. Models controlled for time, therapeutic category, regulatory pathway, size of sponsoring company, and indicator variables for devices approved first in the EU and devices approved only in the EU. Results 67% (206/309) of devices identified were approved in both the US and the EU, of which 63% (129/206) were approved first in the EU. The unadjusted rate of safety alerts and recalls for devices approved first in the EU was 27% (62/232) compared with 14% (11/77) for devices approved first in the US. The adjusted hazard ratio for safety alerts and recalls was 2.9 (95% confidence interval 1.4 to 6.2) for devices approved first in the EU. The results of pivotal trials were published for 49% (37/75) of devices categorized as major innovations, with an overall publication rate of 37% five

  8. Safety: System Safety Engineering and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Review system safety status and issues during each milestone decision review ( MDR ) of new or improved Army Acquisition Executive (AAE)-managed systems...under research, development, or modification. (3) Review system safety status and issues during each MDR of new or improved DISC4-managed systems. (4) Act...for acceptance in all MDR packages and forward to the appropriate decision level. Institute risk management procedures as described in appendix B and

  9. X-ray spectroscopy of warm and hot electron components in the CAPRICE source plasma at EIS testbench at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Celona, L.; Maimone, F.; Maeder, J.; Castro, G.; Romano, F. P.; Musumarra, A.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C.; Torrisi, G.; Neri, L.; Gammino, S.; Tinschert, K.; Spaedtke, K. P.; Rossbach, J.; Lang, R.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to detect X radiation emitted by the plasma of the CAPRICE source - operating at GSI, Darmstadt - has been carried out. Two different detectors (a SDD - Silicon Drift Detector and a HpGe - hyper-pure Germanium detector) have been used to characterize the warm (2-30 keV) and hot (30-500 keV) electrons in the plasma, collecting the emission intensity and the energy spectra for different pumping wave frequencies and then correlating them with the CSD of the extracted beam measured by means of a bending magnet. A plasma emissivity model has been used to extract the plasma density along the cone of sight of the SDD and HpGe detectors, which have been placed beyond specific collimators developed on purpose. Results show that the tuning of the pumping frequency considerably modifies the plasma density especially in the warm electron population domain, which is the component responsible for ionization processes: a strong variation of the plasma density near axis region has been detected. Potential correlations with the charge state distribution in the plasma are explored.

  10. Summary of the HypHI Phase 0 experiment and future plans with FRS at GSI (FAIR Phase 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, T. R.; Rappold, C.; Bertini, O.; Bianchin, S.; Bozkurt, V.; Geissel, H.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kim, E.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.; Minami, S.; Nakajima, D.; Nociforo, C.; Özel-Tashenov, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Scheidenberger, C.; Yoshida, K.

    2016-10-01

    Results of the HypHI Phase 0 experiment with the reaction of 6Li+12C at 2 A GeV are summarised. Invariant mass distributions as well as the lifetime measurements for 3ΛH and 4ΛH are discussed. The lifetime values for both the hypernuclei are respectively observed to be 183+42-32 ps and 140+48-33 ps, being significantly shorter than those of the Λ-hyperon. Statistical analyses of existing lifetime data for 3ΛH up to 2014 confirm a significantly short lifetime of 3ΛH, which is not explained by present models. Observed hypernuclear production cross section values for 3ΛH and 4ΛH are also summarised. In addition, observed signals for the final states of d +π- and t +π- are discussed. All the discussions on the results of the HypHI Phase 0 experiment in this article are based on [1-4]. We also present a new proposed experiment with the FRS (FRagment Separator) at GSI (FAIR Phase 0) to improve the precision of the hypernuclear spectroscopy with peripheral heavy ion induced reactions.

  11. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  12. Medicolegal issues and ergogenic aids: trade, tragedy, and public safety, the example of ephedra and the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act.

    PubMed

    Phillips, George C

    2004-08-01

    On February 6, 2004, the US Food and Drug Administration banned dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids (ephedra) pending Congressional review. The ban culminates a 7-year regulatory process, the first of its kind under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA). This paper reviews that process, and the governing rules of DSHEA, within the contexts of modern science and the history of food and drug legislation. The example of ephedra reflects a longstanding conflict between trade and safety and suggests inherent weaknesses within DSHEA that place the public at risk.

  13. Health and Safety Issues for Travelers Attending the World Cup and Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil, 2014 to 2016

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Joanna; Sotir, Mark J.; Cunningham, Timothy J.; Harvey, Kira A.; Virginia Lee, C.; Stoney, Rhett J.; Gershman, Mark D.; Brunette, Gary W.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Travelers from around the globe will attend the 2014 Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil. Travelers to these mass gathering events may be exposed to a range of health risks, including a variety of infectious diseases. Most travelers who become ill will present to their primary care physicians, and thus it is important that clinicians are aware of the risks their patients encountered. OBJECTIVE To highlight health and safety concerns for people traveling to these events in Brazil so that health care practitioners can better prepare travelers before they travel and more effectively diagnose and treat travelers after they return. EVIDENCE REVIEW We reviewed both peer-reviewed and gray literature to identify health outcomes associated with travel to Brazil and mass gatherings. Thirteen specific infectious diseases are described in terms of signs, symptoms, and treatment. Relevant safety and security concerns are also discussed. FINDINGS Travelers to Brazil for mass gathering events face unique health risks associated with their travel. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Travelers should consult a health care practitioner 4 to 6 weeks before travel to Brazil and seek up-to-date information regarding their specific itineraries. For the most up-to-date information, health care practitioners can visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Travelers’ Health website (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel) or review CDC’s Yellow Book online (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/yellowbook-home-2014). PMID:24887552

  14. Low-cost densification of permanent GPS networks for natural hazard mitigation: First tests on GSI's GEONET network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizos, Chris; Han, Shaowei; Ge, Linlin; Chen, Horng-Yue; Hatanaka, Yuki; Abe, Kaoru

    2000-10-01

    Researchers from The University of New South Wales (UNSW), Australia, and from the Geographical Survey Institute (GSI), Japan, have commenced a joint project to develop, deploy and test an innovative hardware/software system design for an automatic, continuously-operated ground deformation monitoring system based on low-cost GPS receiver technology. Conventional continuously-operated GPS (CGPS) networks, such as the one established in Japan by GSI to precisely measure earth surface movement, are very expensive. The high cost being primarily due to the fact that dual-frequency receivers are used. Japan's nationwide GEONET network is the world's largest, numbering nearly 1000 receiver stations, with an average station spacing of the order of 30 km. In order to densify such CGPS networks (important when high spatial resolution for the monitoring of the deformation phenomenon is required), and to promote the use of the CGPS technique in lesser developed countries, a significantly cheaper system architecture is needed. The proposed design is an integrated, dual-mode network consisting of low-cost, single-frequency GPS receivers across the area of interest, surrounded by a sparser network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. Initial tests of data collected at selected stations in the GEONET network have already shown that through enhanced data processing algorithms a CGPS network containing both single-frequency and dual-frequency receivers would be able to deliver better than centimetre level accuracies, at considerably lower cost than present systems based exclusively on dual-frequency instrumentation. This paper reports the results of the first field test of this new CGPS system design, in the Tsukuba area of Japan, in August 1999. The test network consisted of: (a) several stations of the GEONET network surrounding (b) an inner network of four single-frequency Canadian Marconi GPS receivers installed by UNSW researchers. The data from both the GEONET and the UNSW

  15. Principles of safety pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, M K; Authier, S; Curtis, M J

    2008-08-01

    Safety Pharmacology is a rapidly developing discipline that uses the basic principles of pharmacology in a regulatory-driven process to generate data to inform risk/benefit assessment. The aim of Safety Pharmacology is to characterize the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) relationship of a drug's adverse effects using continuously evolving methodology. Unlike toxicology, Safety Pharmacology includes within its remit a regulatory requirement to predict the risk of rare lethal events. This gives Safety Pharmacology its unique character. The key issues for Safety Pharmacology are detection of an adverse effect liability, projection of the data into safety margin calculation and finally clinical safety monitoring. This article sets out to explain the drivers for Safety Pharmacology so that the wider pharmacology community is better placed to understand the discipline. It concludes with a summary of principles that may help inform future resolution of unmet needs (especially establishing model validation for accurate risk assessment). Subsequent articles in this issue of the journal address specific aspects of Safety Pharmacology to explore the issues of model choice, the burden of proof and to highlight areas of intensive activity (such as testing for drug-induced rare event liability, and the challenge of testing the safety of so-called biologics (antibodies, gene therapy and so on.).

  16. TWRS safety program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, L.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    Management of Nuclear Safety, Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, and Fire Protection programs, functions, and field support resources for Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) has, until recently, been centralized in TWRS Safety, under the Emergency, Safety, and Quality organization. Industrial hygiene technician services were also provided to support operational needs related to safety basis compliance. Due to WHC decentralization of safety and reengineering efforts in West Tank Farms, staffing and safety responsibilities have been transferred to the facilities. Under the new structure, safety personnel for TWRS are assigned directly to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and a core Safety Group in TWRS Engineering. The Characterization Project Operations (CPO) safety organization will remain in tact as it currently exists. Personnel assigned to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and CPO will perform facility-specific or project-specific duties and provide field implementation of programs. Those assigned to the core group will focus on activities having a TWRS-wide or programmatic focus. Hanford-wide activities will be the responsibility of the Safety Center of Expertise. In order to ensure an effective and consistent safety program for TWRS under the new organization program functions, goals, organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and path forward must be clearly established. The purpose of the TWRS Safety Program Plan is to define the overall safety program, responsibilities, relationships, and communication linkages for safety personnel under the new structure. In addition, issues associated with reorganization transition are addressed, including training, project ownership, records management, and dissemination of equipment. For the purpose of this document ``TWRS Safety`` refers to all safety professionals and technicians (Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, Fire Protection, and Nuclear Safety) within the TWRS organization, regardless of their

  17. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Safety criteria for ferrocyanide watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, A.K.; Meacham, J.E.; Barney, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a technical basis for closing the ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) at the Hanford Site. Three work efforts were performed in developing this technical basis. The efforts described herein are: 1. The formulation of criteria for ranking the relative safety of waste in each ferrocyanide tank. 2. The current classification of tanks into safety categories by comparing available information on tank contents with the safety criteria; 3. The identification of additional information required to resolve the ferrocyanide safety issue.

  18. Soy and other legumes: 'Bean' around a long time but are they the 'superfoods' of the millennium and what are the safety issues for their constituent phytoestrogens?

    PubMed

    Setchell, K D; Radd, S

    2000-09-01

    The recognition that legumes and, in particular, soybeans provide not only an excellent source of vegetable protein but also contain appreciable amounts of a number of phytoprotectants has increased general awareness of their potential nutritional and health properties. Since the discovery that soybeans are one of the richest dietary sources of bioavailable phytoestrogens, this legume has been elevated to the forefront of clinical nutritional research. These natural 'selective oestrogen receptor modulators' have been shown to be bioactive. The recent approval by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for a health claim for soy protein reducing risk for heart disease by its effects on lowering cholesterol levels has led to the increased awareness of the health benefits of soy protein. However, the presence of high levels of phytoestrogens in soybeans has also led to concerns over the potential safety of soy foods. This review will focus on the cardioprotective benefits of legumes and discuss the hypothetical concerns regarding the constituent phytoestrogens.

  19. Biology Laboratory Safety Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that schools prepare or adapt a biosafety manual, and that instructors develop a list of safety procedures applicable to their own lab and distribute it to each student. In this way, safety issues will be brought to each student's attention. This document is an example of such a manual. It contains…

  20. Citing reports of alarm-related deaths, the Joint Commission issues a sentinel event alert for hospitals to improve medical device alarm safety.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    As medical devices become more widely used in hospitals, there is evidence that providers are becoming overwhelmed by the alarms that emanate from these machines. Experts link the problem with 566 alarm-related deaths reported in an FDA database between January 2005 and June 2010, and 80 alarm-related deaths reported in The Joint Commission's (TJC) own sentinel event database between January 2009 and June 2012. The ED is among the hospital sites where the adverse events reported to TJC most often occurred. Providers in some hospital units have to deal with thousands of alarm signals every day, and an estimated 85% to 95% of these alerts don't require any intervention, according to TJC. Experts say with so much noise and so many false alarms, clinicians can become desensitized to the medical-device alarms. The types of alarms that administrators should be most concerned about in the ED are dysrhythmia alarms on heart monitors, oxygen saturation alarms, and signals that a patient has a low respiratory rate. Experts urge hospitals to develop cross-disciplinary teams to address alarm safety on an ongoing basis, and to assemble action plans for improvement that contain baseline metrics that can be used to chart progress.

  1. 49 CFR 190.239 - Safety orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY PIPELINE SAFETY PROGRAMS AND RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Enforcement Specific Relief § 190.239 Safety orders. (a) When may PHMSA issue a safety order?...

  2. 49 CFR 190.239 - Safety orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY PIPELINE SAFETY PROGRAMS AND RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Enforcement Specific Relief § 190.239 Safety orders. (a) When may PHMSA issue a safety order?...

  3. DNA-DSB in CHO-K1 cells induced by heavy-ions: Break rejoining and residual damage (GSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taucher-Scholz, G.; Heilmann, J.; Becher, G.; Kraft, G.

    1994-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB's) are the critical lesions involved in cellular effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, the evaluation of DSB induction in mammalian cells after heavy ion irradiation is an essential task for the assessment of high-LET radiation risk in space. Of particular interest has been the question of how the biological efficiency for the cellular inactivation endpoint relates to the initial lesions (DSBs) at varying LETs. For cell killing, an increased Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) has been determined for highLET radiation around 100-200 keV/mu m. At higher LET, the RBE's decrease again to values below one for the very heavy particles. At GSI, DSB-induction was measured in CHO-K1 cells following irradiation with accelerated particles covering a wide LET range. The electrophoretic elution of fragmented DNA out of agarose plugs in a constant electrical field was applied for the detection of DSB's. The fraction of DNA retained was determined considering the relative intensities of ethidium bromide fluorescence in the well and in the gel lane. Dose-effect curves were established, from which the RBE for DSB induction was calculated at a fraction of 0.7 of DNA retained In summary, these rejoining studies are in line with an enhanced severity of the DNA DSB's at higher LET's, resulting in a decreased repairability of the induced lesions. However, no information concerning the fidelity of strand breaks rejoining is provided in these studies. To assess correct rejoining of DNA fragments an experimental system involving individual DNA hybridization bands has been set up. In preliminary experiments Sal I generated DNA fragments of 0.9 Mbp were irradiated with xrays and incubated for repair However, restitution of the original signals was not observed, probably due to the high radiation dose necessary for breakage of a fragment of this size. A banding pattern with NotI hybridization signals in a higher MW range (3Mbp) has been obtained by varying

  4. Assessment of safety and interference issues of radio frequency identification devices in 0.3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, M; Dhanasekaran, R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate two issues regarding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including device functionality and image artifacts for the presence of radio frequency identification devices (RFID) in association with 0.3 Tesla at 12.7 MHz MRI and computed tomography (CT) scanning. Fifteen samples of RFID tags with two different sizes (wristband and ID card types) were tested. The tags were exposed to several MR-imaging conditions during MRI examination and X-rays of CT scan. Throughout the test, the tags were oriented in three different directions (axial, coronal, and sagittal) relative to MRI system in order to cover all possible situations with respect to the patient undergoing MRI and CT scanning, wearing a RFID tag on wrist. We observed that the tags did not sustain physical damage with their functionality remaining unaffected even after MRI and CT scanning, and there was no alternation in previously stored data as well. In addition, no evidence of either signal loss or artifact was seen in the acquired MR and CT images. Therefore, we can conclude that the use of this passive RFID tag is safe for a patient undergoing MRI at 0.3 T/12.7 MHz and CT Scanning.

  5. Accessing baryon to meson transition distribution amplitudes in meson production in association with a high invariant mass lepton pair at GSI-FAIR with P¯ANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansberg, J. P.; Pire, B.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K.; Szymanowski, L.

    2012-12-01

    Nucleon-antinucleon annihilation into a near backward- (or forward-) produced meson and a high invariant mass lepton pair admits a factorized description in terms of antinucleon (or nucleon) distribution amplitudes and nucleon-to-meson (or antinucleon-to-meson) transition distribution amplitudes. We estimate the cross section of backward (and forward) pion and η-meson production in association with a high invariant mass lepton pair for the kinematical conditions of GSI-FAIR. The cross sections are found to be large enough to be measured with the P¯ANDA detector. Interesting phenomenological applications of the approach are thus expected.

  6. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 2, Battery recycling and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D

    1992-09-01

    Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

  7. Lift truck safety review

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

  8. JPRS Report Proliferation Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    Britain are also involved in the project to improve the [Transmitted via KYODO] safety and design of the reactor used at the plant. Finnish specialists...information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical , and biological weapons, including delivery systems and...Ministry Official Missile Control, Korea [ZHONGGUO XINWEN SHE] .................................. 3 Spokesman Denies Export of Reactor to Syria [RENMIN

  9. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Taieb, Julien; Chatillon, Audrey; Bélier, Gilbert; Boutoux, Guillaume; Ebran, Adeline; Gorbinet, Thomas; Grente, Lucie; Laurent, Benoit; Pellereau, Eric; Alvarez-Pol, Héctor; Audouin, Laurent; Aumann, Thomas; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Casarejos, Enrique; Cortina Gil, Dolores; Caamaño, Manuel; Farget, Fanny; Fernández Domínguez, Beatriz; Heinz, Andreas; Jurado, Beatriz; Kelić-Heil, Aleksandra; Kurz, Nikolaus; Nociforo, Chiara; Paradela, Carlos; Pietri, Stéphane; Ramos, Diego; Rodríguez-Sànchez, Jose-Luis; Rodríguez-Tajes, Carme; Rossi, Dominic; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Simon, Haik; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Vargas, Jossitt; Voss, Bernd; Weick, Helmut

    2015-12-01

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism.

  10. ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This issue of the Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" promotes emergency exercises as an effective way to validate school safety plans. Simulations of emergency situations, or emergency exercises, are integral to a sound school safety plan. They offer opportunities for district and schools to…

  11. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-06-27

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

  12. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  13. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQs about Vaccine Safety Research Publications HDM Reports ISO Scientific Agenda Ensuring Safety History Understanding Side Effects ... Datalink Publications Emergency Preparedness Vaccine Safety Partners About ISO File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  14. School Bus Safety Issues. Hearing on Examining Defective Handrails Which Have Been Found on School Buses across the Country, the Need for a School Bus Specific Commercial Drivers' License, and the Use of Public Transportation by Students, of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate. One Hundred Fourth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    The hearing was held to examine the following student-transportation safety issues: defective handrails on school buses; the need for a school-bus specific-commercial driver's license; and the use of public transportation by students. Senator Mike DeWine presided over the hearing. The document contains testimonies and prepared statements of…

  15. Safety issues for hydrogen-powered vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ringland, J.T.

    1994-03-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy of overlayers, interfaces, and buried regions of semiconductors has seen a rapid growth in recent years. The characteristics of the annihilation gamma rays depend strongly on the local environment of the annihilation sites, and can be used to probe defect concentrations in a range inaccessible to conventional defect probes. Some of the recent success of the technique in examining low concentrations of point defects in technologically important Si-based structures is discussed.

  16. Imitation Firearms a Real Safety Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Catherine A.; Hurst, Marianne D.

    2004-01-01

    This article reports how fake firearms have become a growing problem for schools. These sophisticated look-alikes have caused a spate of incidents involving students at campuses and school-sponsored events. In Utah, two students were suspended from the Uintah High School pending an investigation after they were caught with look-alike pistols at a…

  17. Safety Issues in Controlling Bed Bugs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Prevent pesticide misuse by always following label directions carefully. For example don't use a pesticide indoors that is labeled for outdoor use, prepare treatment area as instructed, and look for an EPA registration number.

  18. Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Muscle/Bone Disorders Health Care Heart Disease Manufacturing Personal Protective Equipment Reproductive Health Respiratory Diseases Sales Serious ... Cancer Ergonomics and Muscle/Bone Disorders Heart Disease Personal Protective Equipment Reproductive Health Respiratory Diseases Serious Injury ...

  19. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Child Passenger Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... the Issue Related Pages February 2014 43% Motor vehicle deaths among children age 12 and under decreased ...

  1. Understanding Clinical Alarm Safety.

    PubMed

    Lukasewicz, Carol L; Mattox, Elizabeth Andersson

    2015-08-01

    Patient safety organizations and health care accreditation agencies recognize the significance of clinical alarm hazards. The Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, a nonprofit organization focused on development and use of safe and effective medical equipment, identifies alarm management as a major issue for health care organizations. ECRI Institute, a nonprofit organization that researches approaches for improving patient safety and quality of care, identifies alarm hazards as the most significant of the "Top Ten Health Technology Hazards" for 2014. A new Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal focusing on clinical alarm safety contains new requirements for accredited hospitals to be fully implemented by 2016. Through a fictional unfolding case study, this article reviews selected contributing factors to clinical alarm hazards present in inpatient, high-acuity settings. Understanding these factors improves contributions by nurses to clinical alarm safety practice.

  2. β-decay and β-delayed Neutron Emission Measurements at GSI-FRS Beyond N=126, for r-process Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Cortès, G.; Taín, J.L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ameil, F.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Bowry, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Davinson, T.; and others

    2014-06-15

    New measurements of very exotic nuclei in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126 have been performed at the GSI facility with the fragment separator (FRS). The aim of the experiment is to determine half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission branching ratios of isotopes of Hg, Tl and Pb in this region. This contribution summarizes final counting statistics for identification and for implantation, as well as the present status of the data analysis of the half-lives. In summary, isotopes of Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn and Fr were clearly identified and several of them ({sup 208-211}Hg, {sup 211-215}Tl, {sup 214-218}Pb) were implanted with enough statistics to determine their half-lives. About half of them are expected to be neutron emitters, in such cases it will become possible to obtain the neutron emission probabilities, Pn.

  3. Upgrading the GSI beamline microscope with a confocal fluorescence lifetime scanner to monitor charged particle induced chromatin decondensation in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Elham; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Durante, Marco; Jakob, Burkhard

    2015-12-01

    We report the upgrade of the GSI beamline microscope coupled to the linear accelerator UNILAC by a confocal FLIM scanner utilizing time correlated single photon counting technique (TCSPC). The system can now be used to address the radiation induced chromatin decondensation in more detail and with higher sensitivity compared to intensity based methods. This decondensation of heterochromatic areas is one of the early DNA damage responses observed after charged particle irradiation and might facilitate the further processing of the induced lesions. We describe here the establishment of different DNA dyes as chromatin compaction probes usable for quantification of the DNA condensation status in living cells utilizing lifetime imaging. In addition, we find an evidence of heterochromatic chromatin decondensation in ion irradiated murine chromocenters detected after subsequent fixation using FLIM measurements.

  4. Effects of Kamdhenu Ark and Active Immunization by Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Conjugate (GnRH-BSA) on Gonadosomatic Indices (GSI) and Sperm Parameters in Male Mus musculus

    PubMed Central

    Ganaie, Javid Ahmad; Gautam, Varsha; Shrivastava, Vinoy Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background Active immunization against GnRH decreases the secretion of gonadotropins and causes cessation of gonadal function, thereby, inducing infertility. Based on the immunoenhancing activity of Kamdhenu ark (distilled cow urine), this study was performed to evaluate its effects on the gonadosomatic indices (GSI) and sperm parameters in male mice receiving a GnRH contraceptive vaccine. Methods Sixty adult male mice of Parke's strain were divided into three groups of twenty. Group I served as the controls, while group II was immunized by GnRH-BSA conjugate (50/0.2/35 µg/ml/g BW) by four intraperitoneal injections at different intervals on days 1, 30, 60 and 90. However, group III was supplemented daily by oral Kamdhenu ark (100 ppm) along with GnRH-BSA immunizations. The animals were sacrificed after 30, 60, 90 and 120 days and their testis and epididymis were dissected out weighed and semen analysis was performed. Results GSI values, sperm motility, sperm count and sperm morphology in male Mus musculus were decreased significantly in all the experimental groups as compared to the control group (p<0.01). Kamdhenu ark significantly enhanced the effect of GnRH vaccine on the aforesaid parameters especially in 90 and 120 days treated groups (p<0.05). Conclusion The changes witnessed in sperm parameters suggested that the GnRH-BSA immunization suppressed the activities of gonadotropins and testosterone directly through hypothalamo-hypophysial-gonadal axis and indirectly by acting on the testes which may modulate the sperm morphology, sperm count and motility. However, Kamdhenu ark seems to have enhanced these effects because of its immune-modulatory properties too. PMID:23926493

  5. Measurement of the fluence response of the GSI neutron ball dosemeter in the energy range from thermal to 19 MeV.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, G; Kozlova, E; Gutermuth, F; Radon, T; Schütz, R; Nolte, R; Böttger, R

    2007-01-01

    At high-energy particle accelerators, area monitoring needs to be performed in a wide range of neutron energies. In principle, neutrons occur from thermal energies up to the energy of the accelerated ions, which is for the present GSI (Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung) accelerator facility approximately 1-2 GeV per nucleon. There are no passive dosemeters available, which are designed for the use at high-energy accelerators. At GSI, a neutron dosemeter was developed, which is suitable for the measurement of high-energy neutron radiation by the insertion of a lead layer around Thermoluminescence (TL) detection elements (pairs of TL 600/700) at the centre of the dosemeter. The design of the sphere was derived from the construction of the extended range rem-counters for the measurement of ambient dose equivalent H(10). In this work, the dosemeter fluence response was measured in the quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields of the accelerator facility of the PTB in Braunschweig and in the thermal neutron field of the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 in Geesthacht. For the accelerator measurements, the reactions (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be, (3)H(p,n)(3)He and (2)H(d,n)(3)He were used to produce neutron fields with energy peaks between 144 keV and 19 MeV. The measured fluence responses are 27% too low for thermal energies and show an agreement with approximately 14% for the accelerator produced neutron fields related to the computed fluence responses (MCNP, FLUKA calculations). The measured as well as the computed fluence responses of the dosemeter are compared with the corresponding conversion coefficients.

  6. 75 FR 67450 - Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management Implementation Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management... of Pipeline Safety Representatives (NAPSR) on the implementation of pipeline control room management. The workshop is intended to foster an understanding of the Control Room Management Rule issued...

  7. U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Boating Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Product Assurance Branch Boating Safety Circulars Beacon Alerts Marine Safety Alerts Multimedia PSA's Image Library News Videos ... National Nonprofit Organization Funding Opportunity Application Deadline Announced MARINE SAFETY ALERT ISSUED FOR INFLATABLE LIFE JACKETS MARINE ...

  8. Ethical issues in psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    McHenry, L

    2006-07-01

    The marketing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the psychopharmacological industry presents a serious moral problem for the corporate model of medicine. In this paper I examine ethical issues relating to the efficacy and safety of these drugs. Pharmaceutical companies have a moral obligation to disclose all information in their possession bearing on the true risks and benefits of their drugs. Only then can patients make fully informed decisions about their treatment.

  9. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Safety in the Analytical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Galen W.

    1990-01-01

    Safety issues specifically related to the analytical laboratory are discussed including hazardous reagents, transferring samples, cleaning apparatus, eye protection, and equipment damage. Special attention is given to techniques which not only endanger the technician but also endanger expensive equipment. (CW)

  10. Safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    1995-01-01

    We are engaged in a research program in safety-critical computing that is based on two case studies. We use these case studies to provide application-specific details of the various research issues, and as targets for evaluation of research ideas. The first case study is the Magnetic Stereotaxis System (MSS), an investigational device for performing human neurosurgery being developed in a joint effort between the Department of Physics at the University of Virginia and the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Iowa. The system operates by manipulating a small permanent magnet (known as a 'seed') within the brain using an externally applied magnetic field. By varying the magnitude and gradient of the external magnetic field, the seed can be moved along a non-linear path and positioned at a site requiring therapy, e.g., a tumor. The magnetic field required for movement through brain tissue is extremely high, and is generated by a set of six superconducting magnets located in a housing surrounding the patient's head. The system uses two X-ray cameras positioned at right angles to detect in real time the locations of the seed and of X-ray opaque markers affixed to the patient's skull. the X-ray images are used to locate the objects of interest in a canonical frame of reference. the second case study is the University of Virginia Research Nuclear Reactor (UVAR). It is a 2 MW thermal, concrete-walled pool reactor. The system operates using 20 to 25 plate-type fuel assemblies placed on a rectangular grid plate. There are three scramable safety rods, and one non-scramable regulating rod that can be put in automatic mode. It was originally constructed in 1959 as a 1 MW system, and it was upgraded to 2 MW in 1973. Though only a research reactor rather than a power reactor, the issues raised are significant and can be related to the problems faced by full-scale reactor systems.

  11. Planning for Campus Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    From natural disasters to criminal violence, facilities officers are often called on to address campus safety and security issues beyond their usual responsibilities. Their experiences in coping with unanticipated events have produced a catalogue of lessons learned that can help them and their peers at other institutions who might face the same…

  12. Alcohol and Traffic Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickman, Frances Baker, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Seven papers discuss current issues and applied social research concerning alcohol traffic safety. Prevention, policy input, methodology, planning strategies, anti-drinking/driving programs, social-programmatic orientations of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, Kansas Driving Under the Influence Law, New Jersey Driving While Impaired Programs,…

  13. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Data acquired on the actual flight experience with the various subsystems are assessed. These subsystems include: flight control and performance, structural integrity, orbiter landing gear, lithium batteries, EVA and prebreathing, and main engines. Improvements for routine operations are recommended. Policy issues for operations and flight safety for aircraft operations are discussed.

  14. Auditing Schools for Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric,

    2000-01-01

    Explores the issues involved in conducting effective safety audits for educational facilities. Areas covered include auditing for site characteristics, access control, lighting, building exterior, door types and locking mechanisms, key control, alarm system controls, security monitors, and vision panels in the doors. (GR)

  15. Fire Safety in Extraterrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Despite rigorous fire-safety policies and practices, fire incidents are possible during lunar and Martian missions. Fire behavior and hence preventive and responsive safety actions in the missions are strongly influenced by the low-gravity environments in flight and on the planetary surfaces. This paper reviews the understanding and key issues of fire safety in the missions, stressing flame spread, fire detection, suppression, and combustion performance of propellants produced from Martian resources.

  16. Issues Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sando, Joe S.

    A program for teaching techniques of critical thinking on issues concerning American Indians was developed for students at Albuquerque Indian School. It was designed to include not only the students but also their families with learning activities that required consultation in search of answers or understanding. The first issue presented sought to…

  17. Auto Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids by following simple safety measures and by teaching some basic rules. Importance of Child Safety Seats ... your child correctly — a small child in a large seat may not be the best option. Models ...

  18. Water Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Water Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Water Safety A A ... best measure of protection. previous continue Making Kids Water Wise It's important to teach your kids proper ...

  19. Water Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Water Safety KidsHealth > For Teens > Water Safety A A ... tied to alcohol use. previous continue At the Water Park OK, so you do more splashing than ...

  20. Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... the safety of fish caught in your local lakes, rivers, and coastal areas. Advisories may recommend that ... Charts Picky Eating Physical Activity Food Safety Resources Kids Students Adults Families Professionals Multiple Languages MyPlate, MyWins ...

  1. Water Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Water Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Water Safety Print A ... best measure of protection. previous continue Making Kids Water Wise It's important to teach your kids proper ...

  2. Water Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Water Safety KidsHealth > For Teens > Water Safety Print A ... tied to alcohol use. previous continue At the Water Park OK, so you do more splashing than ...

  3. 20 CFR 725.463 - Issues to be resolved at hearing; new issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER PART C OF TITLE IV OF THE FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT, AS AMENDED Hearings § 725.463 Issues to be resolved... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Issues to be resolved at hearing; new...

  4. 20 CFR 725.463 - Issues to be resolved at hearing; new issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER PART C OF TITLE IV OF THE FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT, AS AMENDED Hearings § 725.463 Issues to be resolved at... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issues to be resolved at hearing; new...

  5. Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Safety policies, procedures, and related information are presented in this manual to assist school personnel in a continuing program of accident prevention. Chapter 1 discusses safety education and accident prevention in general. Chapter 2 covers traffic regulations relating to school safety patrols, school bus transportation, bicycles, and…

  6. Emerging Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Denise

    1988-01-01

    Youth services programs and cholesterol in children's diets, two topics that may emerge as issues in schools and school districts in the near future, are addressed. Resources for further information are listed. (CB)

  7. Moving forward with safety culture.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Radiation safety and protection of people are shared goals of the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A positive safety culture contributes to achieving radiation safety and protection of people, which are important to both the HPS and the NRC. Through unprecedented collaboration and engagement with diverse stakeholders, the NRC and the stakeholders developed a Safety Culture Policy Statement. The policy statement defines safety culture and describes the traits of a positive safety culture. Consideration of both safety and security issues and the interface of safety and security are underlying principles that support the policy. Examination of significant events, both within the nuclear industry and in society at large, illustrates how weaknesses in these traits can contribute to the occurrence and consequences of safety incidents, including serious injury and loss of life. With the policy statement in place, the NRC is moving forward with outreach and education about safety culture. Health physicists and other radiation safety specialists play an essential role in enhancing safety culture.

  8. Schoolyard Ponds: Safety and Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danks, Sharon Gamson

    2001-01-01

    Engaging, attractive schoolyard ponds provide habitat for wildlife and hold great educational promise. Reviews water safety and liability issues including mud, stagnant pond water that serves as mosquito breeding grounds, and drowning. Offers ideas for creatively addressing those issues through site planning, shallow water depth, signage and…

  9. Shared safety management

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, L.; Stumpf, C.

    1995-11-01

    In the past 18 months, American Ref-Fuel, a Houston-based waste-to-energy company, has had three of its plants designated as Star facilities under the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) administered by OSHA. The VPP Star participants are a select group of facilities that have designed and implemented exemplary health and safety programs. They must show performance consistent with the VPP goal of aligning labor, management and OSHA into a cooperative relationship. Having a safe work environment has always been one of the core culture issues at American Ref-Fuel. They have learned the best way to maintain excellence is to listen to how each employee is affected in daily activities by safety issues and take actions to constantly reinforce the message that safety concerns never fall on deaf ears. The VPP process encourages identification of potential safety problems before they occur. The program promotes ongoing integration of safety into all facility activities, with the overall objective of eliminating employee injuries and improving plant performance; two important considerations for plant owners and facility managers searching for new tools to improve their overall bottom line.

  10. The decays of three top contributors to the reactor ve high-energy spectrum, 92Rb, 96gsY, and 142Cs, studied with total absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasco, Bertis; MTAS Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We report total absorption spectroscopy measurements of 92Rb, 96gsY, and 142Cs β decays, which are the most important contributors to the high energy ve spectral shape in nuclear reactors. The measurements were performed with the NaI(Tl) based Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS). MTAS was constructed specifically to measure improved β-decay feeding patterns from neutron-rich nuclei, because it is difficult to measure β-decay feeding intensities with high energy precision γ-ray measurements due to the low efficiency of high precision detectors. Besides the impact to the high energy ve spectral shape in nuclear reactors, there are several other important applications of improved measurements of β-decay feeding patterns by total absorption spectroscopy; improve understanding of elemental abundances in the universe, help with stockpile stewardship, contribute to understanding of underlying nuclear structure, and improve measurements of decay heat. We will demonstrate some of the techniques for analyzing MTAS γ-decay data. This research was also sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Physics, U. S. Department of Energy under Contracts DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FG02-96ER40983, DE-FG02-96ER40978, and by the Polish National Science Center under Contract UMO-2013/08/T/ST2/00624.

  11. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on a... the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft....

  12. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on a... the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft....

  13. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on... insure the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft....

  14. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on... insure the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft....

  15. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on a... the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft....

  16. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  17. Total safety management: An approach to improving safety culture

    SciTech Connect

    Blush, S.M. )

    1993-01-01

    A little over 4 yr ago, Admiral James D. Watkins became Secretary of Energy. President Bush, who had appointed him, informed Watkins that his principal task would be to clean up the nuclear weapons complex and put the US Department of Energy (DOE) back in the business of producing tritium for the nation's nuclear deterrent. Watkins recognized that in order to achieve these objectives, he would have to substantially improve the DOE's safety culture. Safety culture is a relatively new term. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) used it in a 1986 report on the root causes of the Chernobyl nuclear accident. In 1990, the IAEA's International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group issued a document focusing directly on safety culture. It provides guidelines to the international nuclear community for measuring the effectiveness of safety culture in nuclear organizations. Safety culture has two principal aspects: an organizational framework conducive to safety and the necessary organizational and individual attitudes that promote safety. These obviously go hand in hand. An organization must create the right framework to foster the right attitudes, but individuals must have the right attitudes to create the organizational framework that will support a good safety culture. The difficulty in developing such a synergistic relationship suggests that achieving and sustaining a strong safety culture is not easy, particularly in an organization whose safety culture is in serious disrepair.

  18. Aviation Safety Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Scott; Yackovetsky, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Simulation Model is a software tool that enables users to configure a terrain, a flight path, and an aircraft and simulate the aircraft's flight along the path. The simulation monitors the aircraft's proximity to terrain obstructions, and reports when the aircraft violates accepted minimum distances from an obstruction. This model design facilitates future enhancements to address other flight safety issues, particularly air and runway traffic scenarios. This report shows the user how to build a simulation scenario and run it. It also explains the model's output.

  19. Global Food Safety-International Consumers' Rights?

    PubMed

    Hussain, Malik Altaf

    2013-10-11

    Your submissions to this Special Issue "Food Microbiology and Safety" of Foods-a new open access journal-are welcome. We understand there are no foodborne illness-free zones in the world. Therefore, a proper understanding of foodborne pathogens and the factors that impact their growth, survival and pathogenesis would equip us with tools to ensure global food safety. This Special Issue publishes articles on different aspects of food microbiology and safety. [...].

  20. Safety system status monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  1. ERCMExpress, Volume 2, Issue 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This issue of ERCMExpress presents food safety and food defense for schools. Many schools and school districts across the country have established emergency management plans; however, these plans are often not comprehensive, practiced regularly or written in collaboration with the local community. It is recommended that schools adopt a…

  2. Legal Issues Surrounding Safe Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Reed B.

    This handbook provides an overview of legal issues pertaining to the safety of public schools. Following the introduction, chapter 2 describes the governance model and philosophy on which American education is based. Court decisions and federal and state legislation that mandate the right to a safe school are discussed in chapter 3. The fourth…

  3. Spaceport Hawaii - Environmental issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, T.B. )

    1992-03-01

    The geographical, economic, and infrastructural factors of the Island of Hawaii make this island an ideal site for a privately owned and operated commercial launching facility for launching small- to medium-sized payloads into both equatorial and polar orbits. This paper describes the preparation of an environmental impact statement, which was initiated as a prelude to the eventual construction and operation of the commercial launching facility on the Island of Hawaii and which follows the Hawaii State law and the National Environmental Policy Act. The issues discussed are the regional characteristics of the Island of Hawaii, the candidate launch vehicles, the flight safety considerations, the spaceport development issues, and the potential impact of the future spaceport on the Mauna Kea Observatory on the Island of Hawaii.

  4. Unaddressed Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochester, J. Martin

    2005-01-01

    Walter Parker's January article, "Teaching Against Idiocy," raises important and fascinating issues relating to the proper role and function of the K-12 social studies classroom. Although J. Martin Rochester, the author of this article, agrees with his basic premise that schools obviously have an obligation to help promote citizenship education,…

  5. Faculty Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Martin

    Patterns that emerged from reviewing syllabi for courses on faculty issues are discussed, and four sample syllabi are presented. Few doctoral programs in higher education administration were identified that devote an entire course to the subject of American college and university faculty. For four courses that did devote an entire course to the…

  6. Medication safety.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W

    2008-03-01

    Patient safety is a state of mind, not a technology. The technologies used in the medical setting represent tools that must be properly designed, used well, and assessed on an on-going basis. Moreover, in all settings, building a culture of safety is pivotal for improving safety, and many nontechnologic approaches, such as medication reconciliation and teaching patients about their medications, are also essential. This article addresses the topic of medication safety and examines specific strategies being used to decrease the incidence of medication errors across various clinical settings.

  7. 75 FR 57537 - Sunshine Act; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ...:30 a.m. Briefing on Alternative Risk Metrics for New Light Water Reactors (Public Meeting) (Contact... Generic Safety Issue (GSI)--191, Assessment of Debris Accumulation on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)...

  8. Nuclear safety policy working group recommendations on nuclear propulsion safety for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Albert C.; Lee, James H.; Mcculloch, William H.; Sawyer, J. Charles, Jr.; Bari, Robert A.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Hardy, Alva C.; Niederauer, George F.; Remp, Kerry; Rice, John W.

    1993-01-01

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program. These recommendations, which are contained in this report, should facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG has recommended a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the SEI nuclear propulsion safety program. In addition, the NSPWG has reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. These recommendations should be useful for the development of the program's top-level requirements for safety functions (referred to as Safety Functional Requirements). The safety requirements and guidelines address the following topics: reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations.

  9. Environmental Issues are Controversial Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, Mary Allaire

    The extensive social-scientific interest and continuing relevance of environmental study assure its immediate and long-range importance in the social studies. But the crisis atmosphere surrounding this issue threatens a thoughtful, systematic approach to the subject, and poses the danger of a careless rush to activity. As social studies educators,…

  10. Lightning safety of animals.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Chandima

    2012-11-01

    This paper addresses a concurrent multidisciplinary problem: animal safety against lightning hazards. In regions where lightning is prevalent, either seasonally or throughout the year, a considerable number of wild, captive and tame animals are injured due to lightning generated effects. The paper discusses all possible injury mechanisms, focusing mainly on animals with commercial value. A large number of cases from several countries have been analyzed. Economically and practically viable engineering solutions are proposed to address the issues related to the lightning threats discussed.

  11. Theoretical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-04-01

    The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

  12. Solidifying Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Solidifying Safety: NASA s new safety organization spools up, as the 1SS program grapples with long-term risk. 2. Earth to Orbit O'Keefe telling skeptical lawmakers Orbital Space Plan (OSP) will cover exploration vision. China's rapid pace.

  13. Safety Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halligan, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Colleges across the country are rising to the task by implementing safety programs, response strategies, and technologies intended to create a secure environment for teachers and students. Whether it is preparing and responding to a natural disaster, health emergency, or act of violence, more schools are making campus safety a top priority. At…

  14. Safety First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Darryl

    2011-01-01

    Ned Miller does not take security lightly. As director of campus safety and emergency management at the Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC), any threat requires serious consideration. As community college administrators adopt a more proactive approach to campus safety, many institutions are experimenting with emerging technologies, including…

  15. Safety study - oversight of rail rapid-transit safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-23

    Annually, about 1.8 billion passengers ride on the rail rapid transit systems operating in the United States. Although this form of transportation is generally safe, the potential exists for a substantial loss of life in the event of a collision, derailment, fire, or other emergency. The safety study examines the adequacy of current oversight of rail rapid transit safety. The safety issues discussed are the effectiveness of current oversight activities exercised by the States in which rail rapid transit systems are operating; the preciseness of rail rapid transit accident/injury data; and the Federal Government's role in the oversight of rail rapid transit safety. Recommendations concerning these issues were made to the Department of Transportation, the Urban Mass Transportation Administration, the District of Columbia, and States in which rail rapid transit systems are currently operating.

  16. Food safety knowledge retention study.

    PubMed

    Hislop, Nyall; Shaw, Keara

    2009-02-01

    Foodborne illness in Canada is an ongoing burden for public health and the economy. Many foodborne illnesses result from improper food handling practices. If food handlers had a greater knowledge of what causes foodborne illness, perhaps these illnesses would have less of an impact on society. This study gave researchers the opportunity to examine the current food safety knowledge of food handlers by using a standardized questionnaire. Questionnaires were distributed by environmental health officers to food handlers working in the food service industry during on-site inspections, and responses were used to evaluate immediate knowledge of key food safety issues. Both certified and noncertified food handlers were evaluated. Information also was collected on the number of years since food safety certification was achieved and the number of years experience noncertified food handlers had in the food service industry. Results indicated that certified food handlers had a greater knowledge of food safety information than did noncertified food handlers. The highest failure rates were observed among noncertified food handlers with more than 10 years of experience and less than 1 year of experience. The results support the need for mandatory food safety certification for workers in the food service industry and for recertification at least every 10 years. Although the study was not sufficiently rigorous to evaluate existing food safety courses, data collected provided valuable insight into what issues should be emphasized in existing food safety courses and which should be targeted by future food safety initiatives.

  17. Introduction to Preharvest Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Torrence, Mary E

    2016-10-01

    This introductory article provides an overview of preharvest food safety activities and initiatives for the past 15 years. The section on traditional areas of preharvest food safety focuses on significant scientific advancements that are a culmination of collaborative efforts (both public health and agriculture) and significant research results. The highlighted advancements provide the foundation for exploring future preharvest areas and for improving and focusing on more specific intervention/control/prevention strategies. Examples include Escherichia coli and cattle, Salmonella and Campylobacter in poultry, and interventions and prevention and control programs. The section on "nontraditional" preharvest food safety areas brings attention to potential emerging food safety issues and to future food safety research directions. These include organic production, the FDA's Produce Rule (water and manure), genomic sequencing, antimicrobial resistance, and performance metrics. The concluding section emphasizes important themes such as strategic planning, coordination, epidemiology, and the need for understanding food safety production as a continuum. Food safety research, whether at the pre- or postharvest level, will continue to be a fascinating complex web of foodborne pathogens, risk factors, and scientific and policy interactions. Food safety priorities and research must continue to evolve with emerging global issues, emerging technologies, and methods but remain grounded in a multidisciplinary, collaborative, and systematic approach.

  18. Food safety.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea; Teuber, Suzanne S; Keen, Carl L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-10-01

    affects the development of the central nervous system and the male reproductive organs. Genetically modified foods present new challenges to regulatory agencies around the world because consumer fears that the possible health risks of these foods have not been allayed. An emerging threat to food safety possibly comes from the increasing use of nanomaterials, which are already used in packaging materials, even though their toxicity remains largely unexplored. Numerous scientific groups have underscored the importance of addressing this issue and developing the necessary tools for doing so. Governmental agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration and other agencies in the USA and their counterparts in other nations have the increasingly difficult task of monitoring the food supply for these chemicals and determining the human health risks associated with exposure to these substances. The approach taken until recently focused on one chemical at a time and one exposure route (oral, inhalational, dermal) at a time. It is increasingly recognized, however, that many of the numerous chemicals we are exposed to everyday are ubiquitous, resulting in exposure from food, water, air, dust, and soil. In addition, many of these chemicals act on the same target tissue by similar mechanisms. "Mixture toxicology" is a rapidly growing science that addresses the complex interactions between chemicals and investigates the effects of cumulative exposure to such "common mechanism groups" of chemicals. It is to be hoped that this results in a deeper understanding of the risks we face from multiple concurrent exposures and makes our food supply safer.

  19. 77 FR 27776 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... and funding cycles pertaining to research issues in occupational safety and health, and allied areas... focused research projects, which will lead to improvements in the delivery of occupational safety...

  20. Safety of Department of Energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.E.

    1994-12-31

    In keeping with the enhancement of environmental, safety, and health programs which has occurred in DOE over the past six years, a Safety Order, DOE Order 5480.25, {open_quotes}Safety of Accelertor Facilities,{close_quotes} was issued on November 3, 1992. This order applies to all DOE-owned accelerators capable of creating a radiation area except for commercial radiation-generating equipment. It is the intent of the Order to provide a level of safety comparable to that required of reactors and nuclear processing facilities, without imposing the rigidity of the DOE Nuclear Facility Safety Orders. Key requirements for each facility are: (1) a hazard classification approved by DOE; (2) a design-stage safety review of new large facilities; (3) readiness reviews before commissioning and before routine operation; (4) a safety envelope specifying limits for operation; (5) a Safety Assessment Document; and (6) a documented training program. This Order does not supersede other DOE safety requirements.

  1. Aspartame: review of safety.

    PubMed

    Butchko, Harriett H; Stargel, W Wayne; Comer, C Phil; Mayhew, Dale A; Benninger, Christian; Blackburn, George L; de Sonneville, Leo M J; Geha, Raif S; Hertelendy, Zsolt; Koestner, Adalbert; Leon, Arthur S; Liepa, George U; McMartin, Kenneth E; Mendenhall, Charles L; Munro, Ian C; Novotny, Edward J; Renwick, Andrew G; Schiffman, Susan S; Schomer, Donald L; Shaywitz, Bennett A; Spiers, Paul A; Tephly, Thomas R; Thomas, John A; Trefz, Friedrich K

    2002-04-01

    Over 20 years have elapsed since aspartame was approved by regulatory agencies as a sweetener and flavor enhancer. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic constituents was established through extensive toxicology studies in laboratory animals, using much greater doses than people could possibly consume. Its safety was further confirmed through studies in several human subpopulations, including healthy infants, children, adolescents, and adults; obese individuals; diabetics; lactating women; and individuals heterozygous (PKUH) for the genetic disease phenylketonuria (PKU) who have a decreased ability to metabolize the essential amino acid, phenylalanine. Several scientific issues continued to be raised after approval, largely as a concern for theoretical toxicity from its metabolic components--the amino acids, aspartate and phenylalanine, and methanol--even though dietary exposure to these components is much greater than from aspartame. Nonetheless, additional research, including evaluations of possible associations between aspartame and headaches, seizures, behavior, cognition, and mood as well as allergic-type reactions and use by potentially sensitive subpopulations, has continued after approval. These findings are reviewed here. The safety testing of aspartame has gone well beyond that required to evaluate the safety of a food additive. When all the research on aspartame, including evaluations in both the premarketing and postmarketing periods, is examined as a whole, it is clear that aspartame is safe, and there are no unresolved questions regarding its safety under conditions of intended use.

  2. A Geospatial Mixed Methods Approach to Assessing Campus Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Lisle S.; Fifolt, Matthew; Beck, Heidi; Su, Wei; Kerbawy, Shatomi; Wakelee, Jessica; Nassel, Ariann

    2013-01-01

    Background: While there is no panacea for alleviating campus safety concerns, safety experts agree that one of the key components to an effective campus security plan is monitoring the environment. Despite previous attempts to measure campus safety, quantifying perceptions of fear, safety, and risk remains a challenging issue. Since perceptions of…

  3. Software safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    Software safety and its relationship to other qualities are discussed. It is shown that standard reliability and fault tolerance techniques will not solve the safety problem for the present. A new attitude requires: looking at what you do NOT want software to do along with what you want it to do; and assuming things will go wrong. New procedures and changes to entire software development process are necessary: special software safety analysis techniques are needed; and design techniques, especially eliminating complexity, can be very helpful.

  4. New Automated System Available for Reporting Safety Concerns | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A new system has been developed for reporting safety issues in the workplace. The Environment, Health, and Safety’s (EHS’) Safety Inspection and Issue Management System (SIIMS) is an online resource where any employee can report a problem or issue, said Siobhan Tierney, program manager at EHS.

  5. NASA's Software Safety Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    requirements. This allows the projects leeway to meet these requirements in many forms that best suit a particular project's needs and safety risk. In other words, it tells the project what to do, not how to do it. This update also incorporated advances in the state of the practice of software safety from academia and private industry. It addresses some of the more common issues now facing software developers in the NASA environment such as the use of Commercial-Off-the-Shelf Software (COTS), Modified OTS (MOTS), Government OTS (GOTS), and reused software. A team from across NASA developed the update and it has had both NASA-wide internal reviews by software engineering, quality, safety, and project management. It has also had expert external review. This presentation and paper will discuss the new NASA Software Safety Standard, its organization, and key features. It will start with a brief discussion of some NASA mission failures and incidents that had software as one of their root causes. It will then give a brief overview of the NASA Software Safety Process. This will include an overview of the key personnel responsibilities and functions that must be performed for safety-critical software.

  6. INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JA JR

    2009-01-16

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

  7. Implementation of the INEEL safety analyst training standard

    SciTech Connect

    E. E. Hochhalter

    2000-04-28

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) safety analysis units at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are in the process of implementing the recently issued INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107). Safety analyst training and qualifications are integral to the development and maintenance of core safety analysis capabilities. The INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107) was developed directly from EFCOG Training Subgroup draft safety analyst training plan template, but has been adapted to the needs and requirements of the INEEL safety analysis community. The implementation of this Safety Analyst Training Standard is part of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Implementation currently underway at the INEEL. The objective of this paper is to discuss (1) the INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard, (2) the development of the safety analyst individual training plans, (3) the implementation issues encountered during this initial phase of implementation, (4) the solutions developed, and (5) the implementation activities remaining to be completed.

  8. Implementation of the INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Hochhalter, E Eugene

    2000-05-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) safety analysis units at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are in the process of implementing the recently issued INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107). Safety analyst training and qualifications are integral to the development and maintenance of core safety analysis capabilities. The INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107) was developed directly from EFCOG Training Subgroup draft safety analyst training plan template, but has been adapted to the needs and requirements of the INEEL safety analysis community. The implementation of this Safety Analyst Training Standard is part of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Implementation currently underway at the INEEL. The objective of this paper is to discuss (1) the INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard, (2) the development of the safety analyst individual training plans, (3) the implementation issues encountered during this initial phase of implementation, (4) the solutions developed, and (5) the implementation activities remaining to be completed.

  9. New elements produced at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Sigurd

    1998-12-21

    In two series of experiments at SHIP, six new elements (Z=107-112) were synthesized via fusion reactions using lead or bismuth targets and 1n-deexcitation channels. The isotopes were unambiguously identified by means of {alpha}-{alpha} correlations. Not fission, but alpha decay is the dominant decay mode. Cross-sections decrease by two orders of magnitude from bohrium (Z=107) to element 112, for which a cross-section of 1 pb was measured. Based on our results, it is likely that the production of isotopes of element 114 close to the island of spherical SuperHeavy Elements (SHE) could be achieved by fusion reactions using {sup 208}Pb targets. Systematic studies of the reaction cross-sections indicate that the transfer of nucleons is an important process for the initiation of fusion. The data allow for the fixing of a narrow energy window for the production of SHE using 1n-emission channels. The likelihood of broadening the energy window by investigation of radiative capture reactions, use of neutron deficient projectile isotopes and use of actinide targets is discussed.

  10. Sun Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Buttons and Badges Stay Informed Cancer Home Sun Safety Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in ...

  11. Pipeline issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisley, Joe T.

    1990-01-01

    The declining pool of graduates, the lack of rigorous preparation in science and mathematics, and the declining interest in science and engineering careers at the precollege level promises a shortage of technically educated personnel at the college level for industry, government, and the universities in the next several decades. The educational process, which starts out with a large number of students at the elementary level, but with an ever smaller number preparing for science and engineering at each more advanced educational level, is in a state of crisis. These pipeline issues, so called because the educational process is likened to a series of ever smaller constrictions in a pipe, were examined in a workshop at the Space Grant Conference and a summary of the presentations and the results of the discussion, and the conclusions of the workshop participants are reported.

  12. Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, S.M.

    1994-12-30

    The report provides a summation of the status of safety issues associated with interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs (organic, ferrocyanide, and flammable gas), as extracted from recent safety analyses, including the Tank Farms Accelerated Safety Analysis efforts.

  13. 76 FR 40820 - Pipeline Safety; Enforcement Proceedings Involving an Informal Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 190 Pipeline Safety; Enforcement Proceedings Involving an Informal Hearing AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA); DOT. ACTION: General policy statement; informal hearing process. SUMMARY: PHMSA is issuing...

  14. System safety education focused on flight safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, E.

    1971-01-01

    The measures necessary for achieving higher levels of system safety are analyzed with an eye toward maintaining the combat capability of the Air Force. Several education courses were provided for personnel involved in safety management. Data include: (1) Flight Safety Officer Course, (2) Advanced Safety Program Management, (3) Fundamentals of System Safety, and (4) Quantitative Methods of Safety Analysis.

  15. Fire safety. Explosion safety - Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratov, Anatolii Nikolaevich

    The physicochemical principles underlying combustion and explosion processes are examined, and the main fire and explosion safety characteristics of materials are reviewed with particular reference to the ignition limits of combustible mixtures, the minimal oxygen content that constitutes an explosion hazard, and the flash point and ignition temperatures. Fire-fighting and explosion suppression methods and equipment are described. The discussion also covers the efficiency of fire prevention measures and safety engineering in fire fighting.

  16. Product Engineering Class in the Software Safety Risk Taxonomy for Building Safety-Critical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Janice; Victor, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    When software safety requirements are imposed on legacy safety-critical systems, retrospective safety cases need to be formulated as part of recertifying the systems for further use and risks must be documented and managed to give confidence for reusing the systems. The SEJ Software Development Risk Taxonomy [4] focuses on general software development issues. It does not, however, cover all the safety risks. The Software Safety Risk Taxonomy [8] was developed which provides a construct for eliciting and categorizing software safety risks in a straightforward manner. In this paper, we present extended work on the taxonomy for safety that incorporates the additional issues inherent in the development and maintenance of safety-critical systems with software. An instrument called a Software Safety Risk Taxonomy Based Questionnaire (TBQ) is generated containing questions addressing each safety attribute in the Software Safety Risk Taxonomy. Software safety risks are surfaced using the new TBQ and then analyzed. In this paper we give the definitions for the specialized Product Engineering Class within the Software Safety Risk Taxonomy. At the end of the paper, we present the tool known as the 'Legacy Systems Risk Database Tool' that is used to collect and analyze the data required to show traceability to a particular safety standard

  17. Technical Safety Requirements for the Annular Core Research Reactor Faility (ACRRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Boldt, K.R.; McCrory, F.M.; Morris, F.M.; Talley, D.G.

    1998-09-01

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) document is prepared and issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements. The bases for the TSR are established in the ACRRF Safety Analysis Report issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The TSR identifies the operational conditions, boundaries, and administrative controls for the safe operation of the facility.

  18. Monitoring product safety in the postmarketing environment.

    PubMed

    Sharrar, Robert G; Dieck, Gretchen S

    2013-10-01

    The safety profile of a medicinal product may change in the postmarketing environment. Safety issues not identified in clinical development may be seen and need to be evaluated. Methods of evaluating spontaneous adverse experience reports and identifying new safety risks include a review of individual reports, a review of a frequency distribution of a list of the adverse experiences, the development and analysis of a case series, and various ways of examining the database for signals of disproportionality, which may suggest a possible association. Regulatory agencies monitor product safety through a variety of mechanisms including signal detection of the adverse experience safety reports in databases and by requiring and monitoring risk management plans, periodic safety update reports and postauthorization safety studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration is working with public, academic and private entities to develop methods for using large electronic databases to actively monitor product safety. Important identified risks will have to be evaluated through observational studies and registries.

  19. First Aid and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... First-Aid Kit Food Safety for Your Family Gun Safety Halloween Candy Hints Household Safety Checklists Household ... Climbing, and Grabbing Household Safety: Preventing Injuries From Firearms Household Safety: Preventing Injuries in the Crib Household ...

  20. Child passenger safety.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Dennis R

    2011-04-01

    Despite significant reductions in the number of children killed in motor vehicle crashes over the past decade, crashes continue to be the leading cause of death for children 4 years and older. Therefore, the American Academy of Pediatrics continues to recommend inclusion of child passenger safety anticipatory guidance at every health-supervision visit. This technical report provides a summary of the evidence in support of 5 recommendations for best practices to optimize safety in passenger vehicles for children from birth through adolescence that all pediatricians should know and promote in their routine practice. These recommendations are presented in the revised policy statement on child passenger safety in the form of an algorithm that is intended to facilitate their implementation by pediatricians with their patients and families. The algorithm is designed to cover the majority of situations that pediatricians will encounter in practice. In addition, a summary of evidence on a number of additional issues that affect the safety of children in motor vehicles, including the proper use and installation of child restraints, exposure to air bags, travel in pickup trucks, children left in or around vehicles, and the importance of restraint laws, is provided. Finally, this technical report provides pediatricians with a number of resources for additional information to use when providing anticipatory guidance to families.

  1. Safety Assessment of Probiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Boyle, Robert J.; Margolles, Abelardo; Frias, Rafael; Gueimonde, Miguel

    Viable microbes have been a natural part of human diet throughout the history of mankind. Today, different fermented foods and other foods containing live microbes are consumed around the world, including industrialized countries, where the diet has become increasingly sterile during the last decades. By definition, probiotics are viable microbes with documented beneficial effects on host health. Probiotics have an excellent safety record, both in humans and in animals. Despite the wide and continuously increasing consumption of probiotics, adverse events related to probiotic use are extremely rare. Many popular probiotic strains such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria can be considered as components of normal healthy intestinal microbiota, and thus are not thought to pose a risk for the host health - in contrast, beneficial effects on health are commonly reported. Nevertheless, the safety of probiotics is an important issue, in particular in the case of new potential probiotics which do not have a long history of safe use, and of probiotics belonging to species for which general assumption of safety cannot be made. Furthermore, safety of probiotics in high-risk populations such as critically ill patients and immunocompromized subjects deserves particular attention, as virtually all reported cases of bacteremia and fungemia associated with probiotic use, involve subjects with underlying diseases, compromised immune system or compromised intestinal integrity.

  2. Radioactive waste storage issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Daniel E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  3. Resolution of the Task A-11 reactor-vessel materials-toughness safety issue. Part I. Main report. Part II. Staff responses to public comments, and Appendices A and B. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.

    1982-10-01

    This report provides the NRC position with respect to the reactor pressure vessel safety analysis required according to the rules given in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 (10 CFR). An analysis is required whenever neutron irradiation reduces the Charpy V-notch upper shelf energy level in the vessel steel to 50 ft-lb or less. Task A-11 was needed because the available engineering methodology for such an analysis utilized linear elastic fracture mechanics principles, which could not fully account for the plastic deformation or stable crack extension expected at upper shelf temperatures. The Task A-11 goal was to develop an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methodology, applicable to the beltline region of a pressurized water reactor vessel, which could be used in the required safety analysis. The goal was achieved with the help of a team of recognized experts. Part I of this volume contains the For Comment NUREG-0744, originally published in September 1981 and edited to accommodate comments from the public and the NRC staff. Edited segments are noted by vertical marginal lines. Part II of this volume contains the staff's responses to, and resolution of, the public comments received.

  4. 78 FR 69745 - Safety and Security Plans for Class 3 Hazardous Materials Transported by Rail

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ..., to address the safety and security issues identified in FRA's Emergency Order No. 28 and the August 7... of hazardous materials by rail (78 FR 42998); the referral of safety issues related to EO 28 and the... required risk assessments, to address the safety and security issues identified in EO 28 and the...

  5. 78 FR 33836 - CPSC Safety Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... toy standard, navigating compliance issues, and the fast track recall program. The Safety Academy is...; (Panel 2) CPSC Processes continued, including Fast Track and Section 15; and (Panel 3) Flammable...

  6. School Violence and Safety in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, Michael J.; Morrison, Gale M.

    1994-01-01

    Introduces miniseries on school violence and safety by discussing prevalence of school violence and school violence findings. Presents methodological caveats in interpreting school violence data and examines issues of crime victimization, fighting and assaults, weapons, and homicide. (NB)

  7. Bibliography for computer security, integrity, and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bown, Rodney L.

    1991-01-01

    A bibliography of computer security, integrity, and safety issues is given. The bibliography is divided into the following sections: recent national publications; books; journal, magazine articles, and miscellaneous reports; conferences, proceedings, and tutorials; and government documents and contractor reports.

  8. Glue Guns: Aiming for Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    While glue guns are very useful, there are safety issues. Regardless of the temperature setting, glue guns can burn skin. The teacher should demonstrate and supervise the use of glue guns and have a plan should a student get burned. There should be an initial first aid protocol in place, followed by a visit to the school nurse. An accident report…

  9. Safety Precautions in Fiber Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Marcia

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses the potential hazards of working with fibers, dyes, and wax in textile art projects: bacteria, dust, poisons, allergies, and fumes. Safety precautions for working with dyes are listed. This article is one of seven in this issue on fiber arts. (SJL)

  10. Safety First!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longfield, Judith

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how a hands-on chemistry investigation provided her the inspiration to develop an effective safety lesson for her third grade chemistry class. She began the lesson by demonstrating the use of pH indicator paper to show that ordinary household (white) vinegar was an acid. With the students, she wondered aloud…

  11. Home Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Pune (October 2015) Preventing accidental injuries to children in India. Video Changing the News with Neal McDonough: Fire Safety Together, we can change the news by learning simple, effective ways to prevent injuries to children due to fire. Infographic Escuche el Bip Donde ...

  12. Safety Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoot, James L.; Bartkowiak, Elaine T.

    1994-01-01

    Lists 72 organizations and programs that deal with child safety, grouped by the following categories: (1) general; (2) general violence; (3) gun violence; (4) media violence; (5) drugs and alcohol; (6) child abuse and at-risk children; (7) parenting programs; (8) community service programs; (9) leadership programs; (10) peer counseling; (11)…

  13. Nuclear safety for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dix, Terry E.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a study to identify potential hazards arising from nuclear reactor power systems for use on the lunar and Martian surfaces, related safety issues, and resolutions of such issues by system design changes, operating procedures, and other means are presented. All safety aspects of nuclear reactor power systems from prelaunch ground handling to eventual disposal were examined consistent with the level of detail for SP-100 reactor design at the 1988 System Design Review and for launch vehicle and space transport vehicle designs and mission descriptions as defined in the 90-day Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) study. Information from previous aerospace nuclear safety studies was used where appropriate. Safety requirements for the SP-100 space nuclear reactor system were compiled. Mission profiles were defined with emphasis on activities after low earth orbit insertion. Accident scenarios were then qualitatively defined for each mission phase. Safety issues were identified for all mission phases with the aid of simplified event trees. Safety issue resolution approaches of the SP-100 program were compiled. Resolution approaches for those safety issues not covered by the SP-100 program were identified. Additionally, the resolution approaches of the SP-100 program were examined in light of the moon and Mars missions.

  14. Environmental issues in China

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, P.S.

    1991-10-01

    Global concern about the environment is increasing, and the People's Republic of China (PRC) is not immune from such concerns. The Chinese face issues similar to those of many other developing nations. The US Department of Energy is particularly interested in national and world pollution issues, especially those that may infringe on other countries' economic growth and development. The DOE is also interested in any opportunities that might exist for US technical assistance and equipment in combating environmental problems. Our studies of articles in the China Daily, and English-language daily newspaper published by the Chinese government, show that population, pollution, and energy are major concerns of the Chinese Communist Party. Thus this report emphasizes the official Chinese government view. Supporting data were also obtained from other sources. Regardless of the severity of their various environmental problems, the Chinese will only try to remedy those problems with the greatest negative effects on its developing economy. They will be looking for foreign assistance, financial and informational, to help implement solutions. With the Chinese government seeking assistance, the United States has an opportunity to export basic technical information, especially in the areas of pollution control and monitoring, oil exploration methods, oil drilling technology, water and sewage treatment procedures, hazardous waste and nuclear waste handling techniques, and nuclear power plant safety procedures. In those areas the US has expertise and extensive technical experience, and by exporting the technologies the US would benefit both economically and politically. 59 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Pilot education and safety awareness programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, M.; Reynard, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Guidelines necessary for the implementation of safety awareness programs for commuter airlines are discussed. A safety office can be viewed as fulfilling either an education and training function or a quality assurance function. Issues such as management structure, motivation, and cost limitations are discussed.

  16. Transportation of Children: Ensuring Occupant Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Nick

    2004-01-01

    The two riskiest things to do with children is open the door to the playground and open the door to buses and vans. Experience proves that when serious injuries occur, they will happen in one of these two places. While the great debate over the safety of buses versus vans has now been settled, the issue regarding occupant safety is on fire in most…

  17. Food Safety Education Using Music Parodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Carl K.; Fraser, Angela M.; Gleason, Jeanne B.; Hovey, Susan K.; McCurdy, Sandra M.; Snider, O. Sue

    2009-01-01

    Musical parodies of contemporary songs with their lyrics altered to address current food safety issues were incorporated into a variety of food safety educational programs and the effectiveness of the music was evaluated by semiquantitative and qualitative measures. Audiences receiving the music-enriched curricula included school foodservice…

  18. Microbial food safety - modeling and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial food safety is a key issue for the food processing industry, and enhancing food safety is everyone’s responsibility from food producers to consumers. Financial losses to the economy due to foodborne illness are in the billions of dollars, annually. Foodborne illness can be caused by patho...

  19. Vaccine safety.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M

    2003-11-01

    Rates of reported adverse events are remarkably low. VAERS identifies an adverse event rate approximating 11.4 reports per 100,000 vaccine doses. Approximately 15% of these reports represent SAEs, but less than 2% involve death; in most cases, reviews have shown no causal relation between the events and the vaccine. Across the spectrum of vaccines in use (including those directed against influenza and hepatitis B virus), many claims of adverse events regarding vaccines represent typical reactions to vaccinations. These reactions can be thought of as foreign-body reactions and predominate among the inactivated vaccines. In controlled studies, the adverse event rates that occur with vaccination resemble those that occur with placebo injections. Typical reactions associated with live viral and bacterial vaccines, such as MMR and varicella vaccines, may resemble attenuated forms of the disease for which the vaccine is directed. Other claims against vaccines represent chance-coincidence or misunderstood data; further studies of claims have vindicated the overall safety of the vaccines in most cases. Two documented safety concerns with vaccines, however, have demonstrated that vaccines (like other biologics and pharmacologic) can result in harm (eg, rotavirus and OPV vaccines). The denouement with these vaccines indicates the broad postmarketing data collection and evaluation that extends efforts made with prelicensure study to balance the benefits from vaccination with the risk for harm. Overall, measures including prelicensure study and postlicensure surveillance, such as VAERS, the Vaccine Safety Datalink Project, and the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment Centers, have resulted in an exceptional safety profile for the vaccines in use.

  20. Integrated Safety Analysis Tiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Carla; McNairy, Lisa; Wetherholt, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Commercial partnerships and organizational constraints, combined with complex systems, may lead to division of hazard analysis across organizations. This division could cause important hazards to be overlooked, causes to be missed, controls for a hazard to be incomplete, or verifications to be inefficient. Each organization s team must understand at least one level beyond the interface sufficiently enough to comprehend integrated hazards. This paper will discuss various ways to properly divide analysis among organizations. The Ares I launch vehicle integrated safety analyses effort will be utilized to illustrate an approach that addresses the key issues and concerns arising from multiple analysis responsibilities.