Science.gov

Sample records for safety performance measurement

  1. Traffic safety performance measures for states and federal agencies

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-08-01

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) have agreed on a minimum set of performance measures to be used by States and federal agencies in the development and implementation of beh...

  2. Deployment of a tool for measuring freeway safety performance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    This project updated and deployed a freeway safety performance measurement tool, building upon a previous project that developed the core methodology. The tool evaluates the cumulative risk over time of an accident or a particular kind of accident. T...

  3. The Exposure Index: Developing firefighter safety performance measures

    Treesearch

    Dave Calkin; John Phipps; Tom Holmes; Jon Rieck; Matt Thompson

    2011-01-01

    A cornerstone of effective institutional learning and accountability is the development, tracking, and analysis of informative performance measures. In a previous issue of Fire Management Today ("A New Look at Risk Management," Winter 2011), a series of articles highlighted the importance of organizational safety and risk management and the challenges of...

  4. Developing safety performance functions incorporating reliability-based risk measures.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shewkar El-Bassiouni; Sayed, Tarek

    2011-11-01

    Current geometric design guides provide deterministic standards where the safety margin of the design output is generally unknown and there is little knowledge of the safety implications of deviating from these standards. Several studies have advocated probabilistic geometric design where reliability analysis can be used to account for the uncertainty in the design parameters and to provide a risk measure of the implication of deviation from design standards. However, there is currently no link between measures of design reliability and the quantification of safety using collision frequency. The analysis presented in this paper attempts to bridge this gap by incorporating a reliability-based quantitative risk measure such as the probability of non-compliance (P(nc)) in safety performance functions (SPFs). Establishing this link will allow admitting reliability-based design into traditional benefit-cost analysis and should lead to a wider application of the reliability technique in road design. The present application is concerned with the design of horizontal curves, where the limit state function is defined in terms of the available (supply) and stopping (demand) sight distances. A comprehensive collision and geometric design database of two-lane rural highways is used to investigate the effect of the probability of non-compliance on safety. The reliability analysis was carried out using the First Order Reliability Method (FORM). Two Negative Binomial (NB) SPFs were developed to compare models with and without the reliability-based risk measures. It was found that models incorporating the P(nc) provided a better fit to the data set than the traditional (without risk) NB SPFs for total, injury and fatality (I+F) and property damage only (PDO) collisions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS): An Integrated Suite of Tools for Measuring Performance and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C.; Connor, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This is a report of work in progress. In it, I summarize the status of the research and development of the Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS) for managing, processing, and analyzing digital flight-recorded data, The objectives of the NASA-FAA APMS research project are to establish a sound scientific and technological basis for flight-data analysis, to define an open and flexible architecture for flight-data analysis systems, and to articulate guidelines for a standardized database structure on which to continue to build future flight-data-analysis extensions. APMS offers to the air transport community an open, voluntary standard for flight-data-analysis software; a standard that will help to ensure suitable functionality and data interchangeability among competing software programs. APMS will develop and document the methodologies, algorithms, and procedures for data management and analyses to enable users to easily interpret the implications regarding safety and efficiency of operations. APMS does not entail the implementation of a nationwide flight-data-collection system. It is intended to provide technical tools to ease the large-scale implementation of flight-data analyses at both the air-carrier and the national-airspace levels in support of their Flight Operations and Quality Assurance (FOQA) Programs and Advanced Qualifications Programs (AQP). APMS cannot meet its objectives unless it develops tools that go substantially beyond the capabilities of the current commercially available software and supporting analytic methods that are mainly designed to count special events. These existing capabilities, while of proven value, were created primarily with the needs-of aircrews in mind. APMS tools must serve the needs of the government and air carriers, as well as aircrews, to fully support the FOQA and AQP programs. They must be able to derive knowledge not only through the analysis of single flights (special-event detection), but also through

  6. Measuring Safety Performance: A Comparison of Whole, Partial, and Momentary Time-Sampling Recording Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvero, Alicia M.; Struss, Kristen; Rappaport, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Partial-interval (PIR), whole-interval (WIR), and momentary time sampling (MTS) estimates were compared against continuous measures of safety performance for three postural behaviors: feet, back, and shoulder position. Twenty-five samples of safety performance across five undergraduate students were scored using a second-by-second continuous…

  7. A primer on safety performance measures for the transportation planning process

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-09-01

    This Primer is a tool to help State and local practitioners, transportation planners, and decision-makers identify, select, and use safety performance measures as a part of the transportation planning process. The Primer draws from current literature...

  8. Exploring the state of health and safety management system performance measurement in mining organizations.

    PubMed

    Haas, Emily Joy; Yorio, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Complex arguments continue to be articulated regarding the theoretical foundation of health and safety management system (HSMS) performance measurement. The culmination of these efforts has begun to enhance a collective understanding. Despite this enhanced theoretical understanding, however, there are still continuing debates and little consensus. The goal of the current research effort was to empirically explore common methods to HSMS performance measurement in mining organizations. The purpose was to determine if value and insight could be added into the ongoing approaches of the best ways to engage in health and safety performance measurement. Nine site-level health and safety management professionals were provided with 133 practices corresponding to 20 HSMS elements, each fitting into the plan, do, check, act phases common to most HSMS. Participants were asked to supply detailed information as to how they (1) assess the performance of each practice in their organization, or (2) would assess each practice if it were an identified strategic imperative. Qualitative content analysis indicated that the approximately 1200 responses provided could be described and categorized into interventions , organizational performance , and worker performance . A discussion of how these categories relate to existing indicator frameworks is provided. The analysis also revealed divergence in two important measurement issues; (1) quantitative vs qualitative measurement and reporting; and (2) the primary use of objective or subjective metrics. In lieu of these findings we ultimately recommend a balanced measurement and reporting approach within the three metric categories and conclude with suggestions for future research.

  9. Exploring the state of health and safety management system performance measurement in mining organizations

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Emily Joy; Yorio, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Complex arguments continue to be articulated regarding the theoretical foundation of health and safety management system (HSMS) performance measurement. The culmination of these efforts has begun to enhance a collective understanding. Despite this enhanced theoretical understanding, however, there are still continuing debates and little consensus. The goal of the current research effort was to empirically explore common methods to HSMS performance measurement in mining organizations. The purpose was to determine if value and insight could be added into the ongoing approaches of the best ways to engage in health and safety performance measurement. Nine site-level health and safety management professionals were provided with 133 practices corresponding to 20 HSMS elements, each fitting into the plan, do, check, act phases common to most HSMS. Participants were asked to supply detailed information as to how they (1) assess the performance of each practice in their organization, or (2) would assess each practice if it were an identified strategic imperative. Qualitative content analysis indicated that the approximately 1200 responses provided could be described and categorized into interventions, organizational performance, and worker performance. A discussion of how these categories relate to existing indicator frameworks is provided. The analysis also revealed divergence in two important measurement issues; (1) quantitative vs qualitative measurement and reporting; and (2) the primary use of objective or subjective metrics. In lieu of these findings we ultimately recommend a balanced measurement and reporting approach within the three metric categories and conclude with suggestions for future research. PMID:26823642

  10. North Dakota Statewide Traffic Safety Survey, 2012 : Traffic Safety Performance Measures for State and Federal Agencies

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-09-01

    The United States trails other industrialized nations in several safety categories on public roadways. Traffic fatality risk, for example, is substantially higher than in other countries as found in Figure 1.1 (World Health Organization, 2009). Altho...

  11. North Dakota Statewide Traffic Safety Survey, 2011 : Traffic Safety Performance Measures for State and Federal Agencies

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-08-01

    The United States lags behind many other industrialized nations in its ability to ensure safety on public roadways as illustrated in Figure 1.1 (World Health Organization 2009). While progress has been made in reducing traffic deaths, the continued e...

  12. North Dakota Statewide Traffic Safety Survey, 2010 : Traffic Safety Performance Measures for State and Federal Agencies

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-01

    The United States lags behind many other industrialized nations in its ability to ensure safety on public roadways as illustrated in Figure 1.1 (World Health Organization 2009). While progress has been made in reducing traffic deaths, the continued e...

  13. Measuring cross-cultural patient safety: identifying barriers and developing performance indicators.

    PubMed

    Walker, Roger; St Pierre-Hansen, Natalie; Cromarty, Helen; Kelly, Len; Minty, Bryanne

    2010-01-01

    Medical errors and cultural errors threaten patient safety. We know that access to care, quality of care and clinical safety are all impacted by cultural issues. Numerous approaches to describing cultural barriers to patient safety have been developed, but these taxonomies do not provide a useful set of tools for defining the nature of the problem and consequently do not establish a sound base for problem solving. The Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre has implemented a cross-cultural patient safety (CCPS) model (Walker 2009). We developed an analytical CCPS framework within the organization, and in this article, we detail the validation process for our framework by way of a literature review and surveys of local and international healthcare professionals. We reinforce the position that while cultural competency may be defined by the service provider, cultural safety is defined by the client. In addition, we document the difficulties surrounding the measurement of cultural competence in terms of patient outcomes, which is an underdeveloped dimension of the field of patient safety. We continue to explore the correlation between organizational performance and measurable patient outcomes.

  14. Developing safety performance measures for roundabout applications in the state of Oregon.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-01

    This report documents the research effort to quantify the safety performance of roundabouts in the State of Oregon. : The primary goal of this research is to provide the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) with safety : performance functions (...

  15. Performance Measurement and Target-Setting in California's Safety Net Health Systems.

    PubMed

    Hemmat, Shirin; Schillinger, Dean; Lyles, Courtney; Ackerman, Sara; Gourley, Gato; Vittinghoff, Eric; Handley, Margaret; Sarkar, Urmimala

    Health policies encourage implementing quality measurement with performance targets. The 2010-2015 California Medicaid waiver mandated quality measurement and reporting. In 2013, California safety net hospitals participating in the waiver set a voluntary performance target (the 90th percentile for Medicare preferred provider organization plans) for mammography screening and cholesterol control in diabetes. They did not reach the target, and the difference-in-differences analysis suggested that there was no difference for mammography ( P = .39) and low-density lipoprotein control ( P = .11) performance compared to measures for which no statewide quality improvement initiative existed. California's Medicaid waiver was associated with improved performance on a number of metrics, but this performance was not attributable to target setting on specific health conditions. Performance may have improved because of secular trends or systems improvements related to waiver funding. Relying on condition-specific targets to measure performance may underestimate improvements and disadvantage certain health systems. Achieving ambitious targets likely requires sustained fiscal, management, and workforce investments.

  16. Resources on work zone safety and mobility performance monitoring and measurement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-01-01

    Work zone performance measures are metrics that help quantify how work zones impact travelers, residents, businesses, and workers. Some performance measures describe how an individual work zone impacts these audiences; other performance measures desc...

  17. Performance Measurement of Location Enabled e-Government Processes: A Use Case on Traffic Safety Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, D.; Vancauwenberghe, G.

    2016-12-01

    The European Union Location Framework (EULF), as part of the Interoperable Solutions for European Public Administrations (ISA) Programme of the EU (EC DG DIGIT), aims to enhance the interactions between governments, businesses and citizens by embedding location information into e-Government processes. The challenge remains to find scientific sound and at the same time practicable approaches to estimate or measure the impact of location enablement of e-Government processes on the performance of the processes. A method has been defined to estimate process performance in terms of variables describing the efficiency, effectiveness, as well as the quality of the output of the work processes. A series of use cases have been identified, corresponding to existing e-Government work processes in which location information could bring added value. In a first step, the processes are described by means of BPMN (Business Process Model and Notation) to better understand the process steps, the actors involved, the spatial data flows, as well as the required input and the generated output. In a second step the processes are assessed in terms of the (sub-optimal) use of location information and the potential enhancement of the process by better integrating location information and services. The process performance is measured ex ante (before using location enabled e-Government services) and ex-post (after the integration of such services) in order to estimate and measure the impact of location information. The paper describes the method for performance measurement and highlights how the method is applied to one use case, i.e. the process of traffic safety monitoring. The use case is analysed and assessed in terms of location enablement and its potential impact on process performance. The results of applying the methodology on the use case revealed that performance is highly impacted by factors such as the way location information is collected, managed and shared throughout the

  18. APMS: An Integrated Suite of Tools for Measuring Performance and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C.; Lynch, Robert E.; Connors, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of work in progress. In it, I summarize the status of the research and development of the Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS) for managing, processing, and analyzing digital flight-recorded data. The objectives of the NASA-FAA APMS research project are to establish a sound scientific and technological basis for flight-data analysis, to define an open and flexible architecture for flight-data-analysis systems, and to articulate guidelines for a standardized database structure on which to continue to build future flight-data-analysis extensions. APMS will offer to the air transport community an open, voluntary standard for flight-data-analysis software, a standard that will help to ensure suitable functionality, and data interchangeability, among competing software programs. APMS will develop and document the methodologies, algorithms, and procedures for data management and analyses to enable users to easily interpret the implications regarding safety and efficiency of operations. APMS does not entail the implementation of a nationwide flight-data-collection system. It is intended to provide technical tools to ease the large-scale implementation of flight-data analyses at both the air-carrier and the national-airspace levels in support of their Flight Operations and Quality Assurance (FOQA) Programs and Advanced Qualifications Programs (AQP). APMS cannot meet its objectives unless it develops tools that go substantially beyond the capabilities of the current commercially available software and supporting analytic methods that are mainly designed to count special events. These existing capabilities, while of proven value, were created primarily with the needs of air crews in mind. APMS tools must serve the needs of the government and air carriers, as well as air crews, to fully support the FOQA and AQP programs. They must be able to derive knowledge not only through the analysis of single flights (special-event detection), but through

  19. APMS: An Integrated Suite of Tools for Measuring Performance and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of work in progress. In it, I summarize the status of the research and development of the Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS) for managing, processing, and analyzing digital flight-recorded data. The objectives of the NASA-FAA APMS research project are to establish a sound scientific and technological basis for flight-data analysis, to define an open and flexible architecture for flight-data-analysis systems, and to articulate guidelines for a standardized database structure on which to continue to build future flight-data-analysis extensions . APMS will offer to the air transport community an open, voluntary standard for flight-data-analysis software, a standard that will help to ensure suitable functionality, and data interchangeability, among competing software programs. APMS will develop and document the methodologies, algorithms, and procedures for data management and analyses to enable users to easily interpret the implications regarding safety and efficiency of operations. APMS does not entail the implementation of a nationwide flight-data-collection system. It is intended to provide technical tools to ease the large-scale implementation of flight-data analyses at both the air-carrier and the national-airspace levels in support of their Flight Operations and Quality Assurance (FOQA) Programs and Advanced Qualifications Programs (AQP). APMS cannot meet its objectives unless it develops tools that go substantially beyond the capabilities of the current commercially available software and supporting analytic methods that are mainly designed to count special events. These existing capabilities, while of proven value, were created primarily with the needs of air crews in mind. APMS tools must serve the needs of the government and air carriers, as well as air crews, to fully support the FOQA and AQP programs. They must be able to derive knowledge not only through the analysis of single flights (special-event detection), but through

  20. A Microbial Assessment Scheme to measure microbial performance of Food Safety Management Systems.

    PubMed

    Jacxsens, L; Kussaga, J; Luning, P A; Van der Spiegel, M; Devlieghere, F; Uyttendaele, M

    2009-08-31

    A Food Safety Management System (FSMS) implemented in a food processing industry is based on Good Hygienic Practices (GHP), Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles and should address both food safety control and assurance activities in order to guarantee food safety. One of the most emerging challenges is to assess the performance of a present FSMS. The objective of this work is to explain the development of a Microbial Assessment Scheme (MAS) as a tool for a systematic analysis of microbial counts in order to assess the current microbial performance of an implemented FSMS. It is assumed that low numbers of microorganisms and small variations in microbial counts indicate an effective FSMS. The MAS is a procedure that defines the identification of critical sampling locations, the selection of microbiological parameters, the assessment of sampling frequency, the selection of sampling method and method of analysis, and finally data processing and interpretation. Based on the MAS assessment, microbial safety level profiles can be derived, indicating which microorganisms and to what extent they contribute to food safety for a specific food processing company. The MAS concept is illustrated with a case study in the pork processing industry, where ready-to-eat meat products are produced (cured, cooked ham and cured, dried bacon).

  1. Performance Measures in Neurosurgical Patient Care: Differing Applications of Patient Safety Indicators.

    PubMed

    Moghavem, Nuriel; McDonald, Kathryn; Ratliff, John K; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina

    2016-04-01

    Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) are administratively coded identifiers of potentially preventable adverse events. These indicators are used for multiple purposes, including benchmarking and quality improvement efforts. Baseline PSI evaluation in high-risk surgeries is fundamental to both purposes. Determine PSI rates and their impact on other outcomes in patients undergoing cranial neurosurgery compared with other surgeries. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) PSI software was used to flag adverse events and determine risk-adjusted rates (RAR). Regression models were built to assess the association between PSIs and important patient outcomes. We identified cranial neurosurgeries based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes in California, Florida, New York, Arkansas, and Mississippi State Inpatient Databases, AHRQ, 2010-2011. PSI development, 30-day all-cause readmission, length of stay, hospital costs, and inpatient mortality. A total of 48,424 neurosurgical patients were identified. Procedure indication was strongly associated with PSI development. The neurosurgical population had significantly higher RAR of most PSIs evaluated compared with other surgical patients. Development of a PSI was strongly associated with increased length of stay and hospital cost and, in certain PSIs, increased inpatient mortality and 30-day readmission. In this population-based study, certain accountability measures proposed for use as value-based payment modifiers show higher RAR in neurosurgery patients compared with other surgical patients and were subsequently associated with poor outcomes. Our results indicate that for quality improvement efforts, the current AHRQ risk-adjustment models should be viewed in clinically meaningful stratified subgroups: for profiling and pay-for-performance applications, additional factors should be included in the risk-adjustment models. Further evaluation of PSIs in additional high

  2. Safety performance functions.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-10-01

    This project developed safety performance functions for roadway segments and intersections for two-lane rural highways in : Pennsylvania. The statistical modeling methodology was consistent with that used in the first edition of the American : Associ...

  3. Safety performance factor.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Naray

    2008-01-01

    Workplace safety performance is computed using frequency rate (FR) and severity rate (SR). Only work time lost due to occupational incidents that need to be reported is counted. FR and SR are the 2 most important safety performance indicators that are applied universally; however, calculations differ from country to country. All injuries and time lost should be considered while calculating safety performance. The extent of severity does not matter as every incident is counted. So, a new factor has to be defined; it should be based on the hours or days lost due to each occupational incident, irrespective of its severity. The new safety performance factor is defined as the average human-hour unit lost due to occupational accidents/incidents, including fatalities, first-aid incidents, bruises and cuts. The formula is simple and easy to apply.

  4. Considering chance in quality and safety performance measures: an analysis of performance reports by boards in English NHS trusts.

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, Kelly Ann; Poots, Alan J; Carpio, Juan; Vlaev, Ivo; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Lilford, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Hospital board members are asked to consider large amounts of quality and safety data with a duty to act on signals of poor performance. However, in order to do so it is necessary to distinguish signals from noise (chance). This article investigates whether data in English National Health Service (NHS) acute care hospital board papers are presented in a way that helps board members consider the role of chance in their decisions. Thirty English NHS trusts were selected at random and their board papers retrieved. Charts depicting quality and safety were identified. Categorical discriminations were then performed to document the methods used to present quality and safety data in board papers, with particular attention given to whether and how the charts depicted the role of chance, that is, by including control lines or error bars. Thirty board papers, containing a total of 1488 charts, were sampled. Only 88 (6%) of these charts depicted the role of chance, and only 17 of the 30 board papers included any charts depicting the role of chance. Of the 88 charts that attempted to represent the role of chance, 16 included error bars and 72 included control lines. Only 6 (8%) of the 72 control charts indicated where the control lines had been set (eg, 2 vs 3 SDs). Hospital board members are expected to consider large amounts of information. Control charts can help board members distinguish signals from noise, but often boards are not using them. We discuss demand-side and supply-side barriers that could be overcome to increase use of control charts in healthcare. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Examining the Relationship of an All-Cause Harm Patient Safety Measure and Critical Performance Measures at the Frontline of Care.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Christine; Hauck, Loran D; Jones, Cason; Zaiback-Aldinger, Julie; Li, Michael; Classen, David

    2018-02-07

    In 2015, the Institute of Medicine Vital Signs report called for a new patient safety composite measure to lessen the reporting burden of patient harm. Before this report, two patient safety organizations had developed an electronic all-cause harm measurement system leveraging data from the electronic health record, which identified and grouped harms into five broad categories and consolidated them into one all-cause harm outcome measure. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between this all-cause harm patient safety measure and the following three performance measures important to overall hospital safety performance: safety culture, employee engagement, and patient experience. We studied the relationship between all-cause harm and three performance measures on eight inpatient care units at one hospital for 7 months. The findings demonstrated strong correlations between an all-cause harm measure and patient safety culture, employee engagement, and patient experience at the hospital unit level. Four safety culture domains showed significant negative correlations with all-cause harm at a P value of 0.05 or less. Six employee engagement domains were significantly negatively correlated with all-cause harm at a P value of 0.01 or less, and six of the ten patient experience measures were significantly correlated with all-cause harm at a P value of 0.05 or less. The results show that there is a strong relationship between all-cause harm and these performance measures indicating that when there is a positive patient safety culture, a more engaged employee, and a more satisfying patient experience, there may be less all-cause harm.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the

  6. Motor carrier safety performance profile.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the safety performance of carriers across all the individual segments in the industry. It includes summaries for both for-hire and private carriers in each segment and is drawn from measures that are collected as par...

  7. Nursing home safety: does financial performance matter?

    PubMed

    Oetjen, Reid M; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Darren; Carretta, Henry J

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between financial performance and selected safety measures of nursing homes in the State of Florida. We used descriptive analysis on a total sample of 1,197. Safety information was from the Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data of 2003 to 2005, while the financial performance measures were from the Medicare cost reports of 2002 to 2004. Finally, we examined the most frequently cited deficiencies as well as the relationship between financial performance and quality indicators. Nursing homes in the bottom quartile of financial performance perform poorly on most resident-safety measures of care; however, nursing homes in the top two financial categories also experienced a higher number of deficiencies. Nursing homes in the next to lowest quartile of financial performance category best perform on most of these safety measures. The results reinforce the need to monitor nursing home quality and resident safety in US nursing homes, especially among facilities with poor overall financial performance.

  8. Impact of reconstruction strategies on system performance measures : maximizing safety and mobility while minimizing life-cycle costs : final report, December 8, 2008.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-12-08

    The objective of this research is to develop a general methodological framework for planning and : evaluating the effectiveness of highway reconstruction strategies on the systems performance : measures, in particular safety, mobility, and the tot...

  9. Safety in bear country: protective measures and bullet performance at short range.

    Treesearch

    W.R. Meehan; J.F. Thilenius

    1983-01-01

    Bears are frequently encountered by people working in or enjoying the outdoors. Some government agencies have regulations concerning the firearms their personnel carry for protection against bears.Guidelines to prevent hazardous encounters with bears are presented, and the performance of commonly used weapons and ammunition is discussed. The ballistic...

  10. Evaluation of Pavement Safety Performance

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-02-01

    The intent of this study was to isolate the effects of various low-cost pavement treatments on roadway safety. This was a retrospective study of pavement safety performance, looking back at crash data before and after treatments were installed. Both ...

  11. Prospective safety performance evaluation on construction sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianguo; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Limao; Skibniewski, Miroslaw J; Wang, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) based approach for Prospective Safety Performance Evaluation (PSPE) on construction sites, with causal relationships and interactions between enablers and the goals of PSPE taken into account. According to a sample of 450 valid questionnaire surveys from 30 Chinese construction enterprises, a SEM model with 26 items included for PSPE in the context of Chinese construction industry is established and then verified through the goodness-of-fit test. Three typical types of construction enterprises, namely the state-owned enterprise, private enterprise and Sino-foreign joint venture, are selected as samples to measure the level of safety performance given the enterprise scale, ownership and business strategy are different. Results provide a full understanding of safety performance practice in the construction industry, and indicate that the level of overall safety performance situation on working sites is rated at least a level of III (Fair) or above. This phenomenon can be explained that the construction industry has gradually matured with the norms, and construction enterprises should improve the level of safety performance as not to be eliminated from the government-led construction industry. The differences existing in the safety performance practice regarding different construction enterprise categories are compared and analyzed according to evaluation results. This research provides insights into cause-effect relationships among safety performance factors and goals, which, in turn, can facilitate the improvement of high safety performance in the construction industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Defining and measuring patient safety.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Thompson, David A; Holzmueller, Christine G; Lubomski, Lisa H; Morlock, Laura L

    2005-01-01

    Despite the growing demand for improved safety in health care, debate remains regarding the magnitude of the problem and the degree to which harm is preventable. To a great extent, this debate stems from variation in the definition and methods for measuring safety, its "shadow" error, and the degree of preventability. This article reviews the definition of safety and error, discusses approaches to measuring safety, and provides a framework for investigating incidents that unveils how the systems under which care is delivered may contribute to adverse incidents.

  13. Implementing Safety Measures

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Required risk mitigation measures for soil fumigants protect handlers, applicators, and bystanders from pesticide exposure. Measures include buffer zones, sign posting, good agricultural practices, restricted use pesticide classification, and FMPs.

  14. Spaceport Performance Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, G. Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Spaceports have traditionally been characterized by performance measures associated with their site characteristics. Measures such as "Latitude" (proximity to the equator), "Azimuth" (range of available launch azimuths) and "Weather" (days of favorable weather) are commonly used to characterize a particular spaceport. However, other spaceport performance measures may now be of greater value. These measures can provide insight into areas of operational differences between competing spaceports and identify areas for improving the performance of spaceports. This paper suggests Figures of Merit (FOMs) for spaceport "Capacity" (number of potential launch opportunities per year and / or potential mass' to low earth orbit (LEO) per year); "Throughput" (actual mass to orbit per year compared to capacity); "Productivity" (labor effort hours per unit mass to orbit); "Energy Efficiency" (joules expended at spaceport per unit mass to orbit); "Carbon Footprint" tons CO2 per unit mass to orbit). Additional FOMS are investigated with regards to those areas of special interest to commercial launch operators, such as "Assignment Schedule" (days required for a binding assignment of a launch site from the spaceport); "Approval Schedule" (days to complete a range safety assessment leading to an approval or disapproval of a launch vehicle); "Affordability" (cost for a spaceport to assess a new launch vehicle); "Launch Affordability" (fixed range costs per launch); "Reconfigure Time" (hours to reconfigure the range from one vehicle's launch ready configuration to another vehicle's configuration); "Turn,Around Time" (minimum range hours required between launches of an identical type launch vehicle). Available or notional data is analyzed for the KSC/CCAFS area and other spaceports. Observations regarding progress over the past few decades are made. Areas where improvement are needed or indicated are suggested.

  15. [Performance and safety at work].

    PubMed

    Bentivegna, M

    2010-01-01

    The evaluative approach of occupational therapy, centred on the person, on an analysis of performance and an assessment of the work environment, can provide important information for planning interventions to increase safety at work. The reliability of work performance is influenced by many factors, some of which are not directly dependent on humans, such as those related to the environment, to materials, to spaces, to places and to the organization of work; others, however, are closely related to human behaviours. For this reason, for the purpose of ensuring prevention of all harmful events, the process of risk evaluation must also include an analysis of the role of human behaviour and functional capacity. In our daily clinical practice, we Occupational Therapists use work to promote the wellbeing and health of people by involving them in activities, with the knowledge that every occupation is perceived by an individual as something particularly personal and significant.

  16. Developing Effective Performance Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-14

    University When Performance Measurement Goes Bad Laziness Vanity Narcissism Too Many Pettiness Inanity 52 Developing Effective...Kasunic, October 14, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Narcissism Measuring performance from the organization’s point of view, rather than from

  17. Microbial Performance of Food Safety Control and Assurance Activities in a Fresh Produce Processing Sector Measured Using a Microbial Assessment Scheme and Statistical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Sawe, Chemutai Tonui; Onyango, Cecilia Moraa; Habib, I; Njagi, Edmund Njeru; Aerts, Marc; Molenberghs, Geert

    2017-01-01

    Current approaches such as inspections, audits, and end product testing cannot detect the distribution and dynamics of microbial contamination. Despite the implementation of current food safety management systems, foodborne outbreaks linked to fresh produce continue to be reported. A microbial assessment scheme and statistical modeling were used to systematically assess the microbial performance of core control and assurance activities in five Kenyan fresh produce processing and export companies. Generalized linear mixed models and correlated random-effects joint models for multivariate clustered data followed by empirical Bayes estimates enabled the analysis of the probability of contamination across critical sampling locations (CSLs) and factories as a random effect. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes were not detected in the final products. However, none of the processors attained the maximum safety level for environmental samples. Escherichia coli was detected in five of the six CSLs, including the final product. Among the processing-environment samples, the hand or glove swabs of personnel revealed a higher level of predicted contamination with E. coli , and 80% of the factories were E. coli positive at this CSL. End products showed higher predicted probabilities of having the lowest level of food safety compared with raw materials. The final products were E. coli positive despite the raw materials being E. coli negative for 60% of the processors. There was a higher probability of contamination with coliforms in water at the inlet than in the final rinse water. Four (80%) of the five assessed processors had poor to unacceptable counts of Enterobacteriaceae on processing surfaces. Personnel-, equipment-, and product-related hygiene measures to improve the performance of preventive and intervention measures are recommended.

  18. Passenger reactions to transit safety measures

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-10-01

    Safety and security are important considerations for the transit operator, but few empirical studies exist that measure the effectiveness of measures taken to improve transit safety on either actual crime (or other incident) data or transit passenger...

  19. Nuclear Enterprise Performance Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    xi I. Introduction ...WSA: Weapons Storage Area 1 I. Introduction Overview This paper discusses United States Air Force nuclear enterprise...sustainment systems. Keywords Performance measurement, process measurement, strategy, multicriteria decision- making, aggregation 1. Introduction Nuclear

  20. Synthesis of work-zone performance measures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this synthesis was to identify and summarize how agencies collect, analyze, and report different work-zone : traffic-performance measures, which include exposure, mobility, and safety measures. The researchers also examined comm...

  1. Safety performance functions incorporating design consistency variables.

    PubMed

    Montella, Alfonso; Imbriani, Lella Liana

    2015-01-01

    Highway design which ensures that successive elements are coordinated in such a way as to produce harmonious and homogeneous driver performances along the road is considered consistent and safe. On the other hand, an alignment which requires drivers to handle high speed gradients and does not meet drivers' expectancy is considered inconsistent and produces higher crash frequency. To increase the usefulness and the reliability of existing safety performance functions and contribute to solve inconsistencies of existing highways as well as inconsistencies arising in the design phase, we developed safety performance functions for rural motorways that incorporate design consistency measures. Since the design consistency variables were used only for curves, two different sets of models were fitted for tangents and curves. Models for the following crash characteristics were fitted: total, single-vehicle run-off-the-road, other single vehicle, multi vehicle, daytime, nighttime, non-rainy weather, rainy weather, dry pavement, wet pavement, property damage only, slight injury, and severe injury (including fatal). The design consistency parameters in this study are based on operating speed models developed through an instrumented vehicle equipped with a GPS continuous speed tracking from a field experiment conducted on the same motorway where the safety performance functions were fitted (motorway A16 in Italy). Study results show that geometric design consistency has a significant effect on safety of rural motorways. Previous studies on the relationship between geometric design consistency and crash frequency focused on two-lane rural highways since these highways have the higher crash rates and are generally characterized by considerable inconsistencies. Our study clearly highlights that the achievement of proper geometric design consistency is a key design element also on motorways because of the safety consequences of design inconsistencies. The design consistency measures

  2. Safety climate and attitude as evaluation measures of organizational safety.

    PubMed

    Isla Díaz, R; Díaz Cabrera, D

    1997-09-01

    The main aim of this research is to develop a set of evaluation measures for safety attitudes and safety climate. Specifically it is intended: (a) to test the instruments; (b) to identify the essential dimensions of the safety climate in the airport ground handling companies; (c) to assess the quality of the differences in the safety climate for each company and its relation to the accident rate; (d) to analyse the relationship between attitudes and safety climate; and (e) to evaluate the influences of situational and personal factors on both safety climate and attitude. The study sample consisted of 166 subjects from three airport companies. Specifically, this research was centered on ground handling departments. The factor analysis of the safety climate instrument resulted in six factors which explained 69.8% of the total variance. We found significant differences in safety attitudes and climate in relation to type of enterprise.

  3. Performance testing accountability measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, R.D.; Mitchell, W.G.; Spaletto, M.I.

    The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) provides assessment support to the DOE Operations Offices in the area of Material Control and Accountability (MC and A). During surveys of facilities, the Operations Offices have begun to request from NBL either assistance in providing materials for performance testing of accountability measurements or both materials and personnel to do performance testing. To meet these needs, NBL has developed measurement and measurement control performance test procedures and materials. The present NBL repertoire of performance tests include the following: (1) mass measurement performance testing procedures using calibrated and traceable test weights, (2) uranium elemental concentration (assay)more » measurement performance tests which use ampulated solutions of normal uranyl nitrate containing approximately 7 milligrams of uranium per gram of solution, and (3) uranium isotopic measurement performance tests which use ampulated uranyl nitrate solutions with enrichments ranging from 4% to 90% U-235. The preparation, characterization, and packaging of the uranium isotopic and assay performance test materials were done in cooperation with the NBL Safeguards Measurements Evaluation Program since these materials can be used for both purposes.« less

  4. The effect of safety initiatives on safety performance: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Hoonakker, Peter; Loushine, Todd; Carayon, Pascale; Kallman, James; Kapp, Andrew; Smith, Michael J

    2005-07-01

    Construction industry is one of the most dangerous industries, not only in the USA, but worldwide. In this longitudinal study we examined the effects of safety initiatives on the safety performance of construction companies. One of the measures commonly used in the USA to track a company's safety performance is the experience modification rate (EMR). The EMR is based on the company's safety records (injury claims) from the past three full years and is used to calculate the workers' compensation insurance premiums. In a longitudinal study, we studied the effects of safety efforts and initiatives on the EMR. The results show that safety initiatives and money spent on safety do improve safety performance, but only over time.

  5. Measures of rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, T Brett; Hopkins, Will G

    2012-04-01

    Accurate measures of performance are important for assessing competitive athletes in practi~al and research settings. We present here a review of rowing performance measures, focusing on the errors in these measures and the implications for testing rowers. The yardstick for assessing error in a performance measure is the random variation (typical or standard error of measurement) in an elite athlete's competitive performance from race to race: ∼1.0% for time in 2000 m rowing events. There has been little research interest in on-water time trials for assessing rowing performance, owing to logistic difficulties and environmental perturbations in performance time with such tests. Mobile ergometry via instrumented oars or rowlocks should reduce these problems, but the associated errors have not yet been reported. Measurement of boat speed to monitor on-water training performance is common; one device based on global positioning system (GPS) technology contributes negligible extra random error (0.2%) in speed measured over 2000 m, but extra error is substantial (1-10%) with other GPS devices or with an impeller, especially over shorter distances. The problems with on-water testing have led to widespread use of the Concept II rowing ergometer. The standard error of the estimate of on-water 2000 m time predicted by 2000 m ergometer performance was 2.6% and 7.2% in two studies, reflecting different effects of skill, body mass and environment in on-water versus ergometer performance. However, well trained rowers have a typical error in performance time of only ∼0.5% between repeated 2000 m time trials on this ergometer, so such trials are suitable for tracking changes in physiological performance and factors affecting it. Many researchers have used the 2000 m ergometer performance time as a criterion to identify other predictors of rowing performance. Standard errors of the estimate vary widely between studies even for the same predictor, but the lowest

  6. Human performance measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J.; Scow, J.

    1970-01-01

    Complex coordinator, consisting of operator control console, recorder, subject display panel, and limb controls, measures human performance by testing perceptual and motor skills. Device measures psychophysiological functions in drug and environmental studies, and is applicable to early detection of psychophysiological body changes.

  7. Measuring comparative hospital performance.

    PubMed

    Griffith, John R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Jelinek, Richard C

    2002-01-01

    Leading healthcare provider organizations now use a "balanced scorecard" of performance measures, expanding information reviewed at the governance level to include financial, customer, and internal performance information, as well as providing an opportunity to learn and grow to provide better strategic guidance. The approach, successfully used by other industries, uses competitor data and benchmarks to identify opportunities for improved mission achievement. This article evaluates one set of nine multidimensional hospital performance measures derived from Medicare reports (cash flow, asset turnover, mortality, complications, length of inpatient stay, cost per case, occupancy, change in occupancy, and percent of revenue from outpatient care). The study examines the content validity, reliability and sensitivity, validity of comparison, and independence and concludes that seven of the nine measures (all but the two occupancy measures) represent a potentially useful set for evaluating most U.S. hospitals. This set reflects correctable differences in performance between hospitals serving similar populations, that is, the measures reflect relative performance and identify opportunities to make the organization more successful.

  8. The performance measurement manifesto.

    PubMed

    Eccles, R G

    1991-01-01

    The leading indicators of business performance cannot be found in financial data alone. Quality, customer satisfaction, innovation, market share--metrics like these often reflect a company's economic condition and growth prospects better than its reported earnings do. Depending on an accounting department to reveal a company's future will leave it hopelessly mired in the past. More and more managers are changing their company's performance measurement systems to track nonfinancial measures and reinforce new competitive strategies. Five activities are essential: developing an information architecture; putting the technology in place to support this architecture; aligning bonuses and other incentives with the new system; drawing on outside resources; and designing an internal process to ensure the other four activities occur. New technologies and more sophisticated databases have made the change to nonfinancial performance measurement systems possible and economically feasible. Industry and trade associations, consulting firms, and public accounting firms that already have well-developed methods for assessing market share and other performance metrics can add to the revolution's momentum--as well as profit from the business opportunities it presents. Every company will have its own key measures and distinctive process for implementing the change. But making it happen will always require careful preparation, perseverance, and the conviction of the CEO that it must be carried through. When one leading company can demonstrate the long-term advantage of its superior performance on quality or innovation or any other nonfinancial measure, it will change the rules for all its rivals forever.

  9. Hospital safety climate surveys: measurement issues.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jeanette; Sarac, Cakil; Flin, Rhona

    2010-12-01

    Organizational safety culture relates to behavioural norms in the workplace and is usually assessed by safety climate surveys. These can be a diagnostic indicator on the state of safety in a hospital. This review examines recent studies using staff surveys of hospital safety climate, focussing on measurement issues. Four questionnaires (hospital survey on patient safety culture, safety attitudes questionnaire, patient safety climate in healthcare organizations, hospital safety climate scale), with acceptable psychometric properties, are now applied across countries and clinical settings. Comparisons for benchmarking must be made with caution in case of questionnaire modifications. Increasing attention is being paid to the unit and hospital level wherein distinct cultures may be located, as well as to associated measurement and study design issues. Predictive validity of safety climate is tested against safety behaviours/outcomes, with some relationships reported, although effects may be specific to professional groups/units. Few studies test the role of intervening variables that could influence the effect of climate on outcomes. Hospital climate studies are becoming a key component of healthcare safety management systems. Large datasets have established more reliable instruments that allow a more focussed investigation of the role of culture in the improvement and maintenance of staff's safety perceptions within units, as well as within hospitals.

  10. Benchmarking and Performance Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Town, J. Stephen

    This paper defines benchmarking and its relationship to quality management, describes a project which applied the technique in a library context, and explores the relationship between performance measurement and benchmarking. Numerous benchmarking methods contain similar elements: deciding what to benchmark; identifying partners; gathering…

  11. Measurement, testing, and safety technology: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Methods and techniques in the related areas of measurement, testing, and safety are presented. Measuring techniques and devices and testing methods and devices are described. Articles on equipment modifications or procedures are included. Patent information is presented.

  12. Surrogate safety measures from traffic simulation models

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    This project investigates the potential for deriving surrogate measures of safety from existing microscopic traffic simulation models for intersections. The process of computing the measures in the simulation, extracting the required data, and summar...

  13. Safety performance functions for freeway merge zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-12-01

    This report documents the results of a research project to support CDOT in the area of Safety : Performance Function (SPF) development. The project involved collecting data and developing SPFs for : ramp-freeway merge zones categorized as isolated, n...

  14. Evaluating Performance of Highway Safety Projects

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and document methods that the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) and Local Highway Technical Assistance Council (LHTAC) can use to evaluate the performance of safety projects that have been implemente...

  15. Assessment of statewide intersection safety performance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an analysis of the safety performance of Oregons intersections. Following a pilot : study, a database of 500 intersections randomly sampled from around the state of Oregon in both urban and rural : environment...

  16. 2009 National Safety Performance Function Summit

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-07-01

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) and the Illinois Center for Transportation (ICT) sponsored and : hosted the first National Safety Performance Function Summit on July 29 and 30, 2009, in Chicago, Illinois. The : goal of this summit wa...

  17. The Safety Performance of Passenger Carrier Drivers

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-12-01

    This paper examines the safety performance of passenger carrier drivers. Special emphasis is given to the motorcoach segment. A model that investigates the contribution of driver factors on the number of State-reportable crashes in which the driver w...

  18. Measuring safety climate in elderly homes.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Koon-Chuen; Chan, Charles C

    2012-02-01

    Provision of a valid and reliable safety climate dimension brings enormous benefits to the elderly home sector. The aim of the present study was to make use of the safety climate instrument developed by OSHC to measure the safety perceptions of employees in elderly homes such that the factor structure of the safety climate dimensions of elderly homes could be explored. In 2010, surveys by mustering on site method were administered in 27 elderly homes that had participated in the "Hong Kong Safe and Healthy Residential Care Home Accreditation Scheme" organized by the Occupational Safety and Health Council. Six hundred and fifty-one surveys were returned with a response rate of 54.3%. To examine the factor structure of safety climate dimensions in our study, an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using principal components analysis method was conducted to identify the underlying factors. The results of the modified seven-factor's safety climate structure extracted from 35 items better reflected the safety climate dimensions of elderly homes. The Cronbach alpha range for this study (0.655 to 0.851) indicated good internal consistency among the seven-factor structure. Responses from managerial level, supervisory and professional level, and front-line staff were analyzed to come up with the suggestion on effective ways of improving the safety culture of elderly homes. The overall results showed that managers generally gave positive responses in the factors evaluated, such as "management commitment and concern to safety," "perception of work risks and some contributory influences," "safety communication and awareness," and "safe working attitude and participation." Supervisors / professionals, and frontline level staff on the other hand, have less positive responses. The result of the lowest score in the factors - "perception of safety rules and procedures" underlined the importance of the relevance and practicability of safety rules and procedures. The modified OSHC

  19. Maintaining safety and high performance on shiftwork

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Folkard, S.; Wedderburn, A. I.

    1996-01-01

    This review of the shiftwork area focuses on aspects of safety and productivity. It discusses the situations in which shiftworker performance is critical, the types of problem that can develop and the reasons why shiftworker performance can be impaired. The review ends with a discnssion of the various advantages and disadvantages of several shift rotation systems, and of other possible solutions to the problem.

  20. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Hoffman

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection,more » an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits

  1. Engine performance with a hydrogenated safety fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Young, Alfred W

    1933-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the engine performance obtained with a hydrogenated safety fuel developed to eliminate fire hazard. The tests were made on a single-cylinder universal test engine at compression ratios of 5.0, 5.5, and 6.0. Most of the tests were made with a fuel-injection system, although one set of runs was made with a carburetor when using gasoline to establish comparative performance. The tests show that the b.m.e.p. obtained with safety fuel when using a fuel-injection system is slightly higher than that obtained with gasoline when using a carburetor, although the fuel consumption with safety fuel is higher. When the fuel-injection system is used with each fuel and with normal engine temperatures the b.m.e.p. with safety fuel is from 2 to 4 percent lower than with gasoline and the fuel consumption about 25 to 30 percent higher. However, a few tests at an engine coolant temperature of 250 F have shown a specific fuel consumption approximating that obtained with gasoline with only a slight reduction in power. The idling of the test engine was satisfactory with the safety fuel. Starting was difficult with a cold engine but could be readily accomplished when the jacket water was hot. It is believed that the use of the safety fuel would practically eliminate crash fires.

  2. Using Technical Performance Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Christopher J.; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Rhodes, Russel E.

    2011-01-01

    All programs have requirements. For these requirements to be met, there must be a means of measurement. A Technical Performance Measure (TPM) is defined to produce a measured quantity that can be compared to the requirement. In practice, the TPM is often expressed as a maximum or minimum and a goal. Example TPMs for a rocket program are: vacuum or sea level specific impulse (lsp), weight, reliability (often expressed as a failure rate), schedule, operability (turn-around time), design and development cost, production cost, and operating cost. Program status is evaluated by comparing the TPMs against specified values of the requirements. During the program many design decisions are made and most of them affect some or all of the TPMs. Often, the same design decision changes some TPMs favorably while affecting other TPMs unfavorably. The problem then becomes how to compare the effects of a design decision on different TPMs. How much failure rate is one second of specific impulse worth? How many days of schedule is one pound of weight worth? In other words, how to compare dissimilar quantities in order to trade and manage the TPMs to meet all requirements. One method that has been used successfully and has a mathematical basis is Utility Analysis. Utility Analysis enables quantitative comparison among dissimilar attributes. It uses a mathematical model that maps decision maker preferences over the tradeable range of each attribute. It is capable of modeling both independent and dependent attributes. Utility Analysis is well supported in the literature on Decision Theory. It has been used at Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne for internal programs and for contracted work such as the J-2X rocket engine program. This paper describes the construction of TPMs and describes Utility Analysis. It then discusses the use of TPMs in design trades and to manage margin during a program using Utility Analysis.

  3. Strategic Measures of Teacher Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milanowski, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Managing the human capital in education requires measuring teacher performance. To measure performance, administrators need to combine measures of practice with measures of outcomes, such as value-added measures, and three measurement systems are needed: classroom observations, performance assessments or work samples, and classroom walkthroughs.…

  4. Performance and Safety of Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Smart, M. C.; Whitcanack, L.; Surampudi, S.; Marsh, R.

    2001-01-01

    This report evaluates the performance and safety of Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) cells when used in batteries. Issues discussed include the cycle life, energy efficiency, tolerance to higher charge voltage, tolerance to extended tapered charge voltage, charge on cycling, specific energy, low temperature discharge, low temperature charge, various charge characteristics, storage characteristics, and more of Li-Ion cells.

  5. Freight performance measures : approach analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-05-01

    This report reviews the existing state of the art and also the state of the practice of freight performance measurement. Most performance measures at the state level have aimed at evaluating highway or transit infrastructure performance with an empha...

  6. Winter maintenance performance measure.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-01-01

    The Winter Performance Index is a method of quantifying winter storm events and the DOTs response to them. : It is a valuable tool for evaluating the States maintenance practices, performing post-storm analysis, training : maintenance personnel...

  7. Nurses critical to quality, safety, and now financial performance.

    PubMed

    Kohlbrenner, Janis; Whitelaw, George; Cannaday, Denise

    2011-03-01

    Preventable hospital errors are the accepted impetus to the establishment of quality measures and served as a catalyst for the ongoing evolution of healthcare reform. Nurses are crucial members of the hospital quality team, and their actions are integral to the hospital's quality performance. The authors explore some of the practical challenges created by quality performance standards, specifically around venous thromboembolism, and the contribution nurses can make, to patient safety, quality of care, and the institutions financial performance.

  8. Towards Measurement of Confidence in Safety Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen; Paim Ganesh J.; Habli, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Arguments in safety cases are predominantly qualitative. This is partly attributed to the lack of sufficient design and operational data necessary to measure the achievement of high-dependability targets, particularly for safety-critical functions implemented in software. The subjective nature of many forms of evidence, such as expert judgment and process maturity, also contributes to the overwhelming dependence on qualitative arguments. However, where data for quantitative measurements is systematically collected, quantitative arguments provide far more benefits over qualitative arguments, in assessing confidence in the safety case. In this paper, we propose a basis for developing and evaluating integrated qualitative and quantitative safety arguments based on the Goal Structuring Notation (GSN) and Bayesian Networks (BN). The approach we propose identifies structures within GSN-based arguments where uncertainties can be quantified. BN are then used to provide a means to reason about confidence in a probabilistic way. We illustrate our approach using a fragment of a safety case for an unmanned aerial system and conclude with some preliminary observations

  9. A National Estimate of Performance: Statewide Highway Safety Program Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    A nationwide systematic approach to assess the developments and achievements of highway safety activities was conducted to measure program outputs from 1969 through 1974 using key indicators of performance such as ratios and percentages. A sample of 10 states was selected with overall sample of 105 local jurisdictions which would provide estimated…

  10. Transit performance measures in California.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-04-01

    This research is the result of a California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) request to assess the most commonly : available transit performance measures in California. Caltrans wanted to understand performance measures and data used by : Metr...

  11. Measuring Reading Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, William E., Ed.; And Others

    Designed to provide solutions to some of the problems related to measuring reading behavior, this publication explores some of the problems of test selection and usage which confront educators. Contents include "Reading Testing for Reading Evaluation" by Walter R. Hill, "Reading Tests and the Disadvantaged" by Thomas J. Fitzgibbon, "What Is…

  12. Individual safety performance in the construction industry: development and validation of two short scales.

    PubMed

    DeArmond, Sarah; Smith, April E; Wilson, Christina L; Chen, Peter Y; Cigularov, Konstantin P

    2011-05-01

    In the current research a short measure of safety performance is developed for use in the construction industry and the relationships between different components of safety performance and safety outcomes (e.g., occupational injuries and work-related pain) are explored within the construction context. This research consists of two field studies. In the first, comprehensive measures of safety compliance and safety participation were shortened and modified to be appropriate for use in construction. Evidence of reliability and validity is provided. Both safety compliance and safety participation were negatively related to occupational injuries, yet these two correlations were not statistically different. In the second study, we investigated the relationships between these two components of safety performance and work-related pain frequency, in addition to replicating Study 1. Safety compliance had a stronger negative relationship with pain than safety participation. Implications for research are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement tools and outcome measures used in transitional patient safety; a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Melle, Marije A; van Stel, Henk F; Poldervaart, Judith M; de Wit, Niek J; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2018-01-01

    Patients are at risk for harm when treated simultaneously by healthcare providers from different healthcare organisations. To assess current practice and improvements of transitional patient safety, valid measurement tools are needed. To identify and appraise all measurement tools and outcomes that measure aspects of transitional patient safety, PubMed, Cinahl, Embase and Psychinfo were systematically searched. Two researchers performed the title and abstract and full-text selection. First, publications about validation of measurement tools were appraised for quality following COSMIN criteria. Second, we inventoried all measurement tools and outcome measures found in our search that assessed current transitional patient safety or the effect of interventions targeting transitional patient safety. The initial search yielded 8288 studies, of which 18 assessed validity of measurement tools of different aspects of transitional safety, and 191 assessed current transitional patient safety or effect of interventions. In the validated measurement tools, the overall quality of content and structural validity was acceptable; other COSMIN criteria, such as reliability, measurement error and responsiveness, were mostly poor or not reported. In our outcome inventory, the most frequently used validated outcome measure was the Care Transition Measure (n = 9). The most frequently used non-validated outcome measures were: medication discrepancies (n = 98), hospital readmissions (n = 55), adverse events (n = 34), emergency department visits (n = 33), (mental or physical) health status (n = 28), quality and timeliness of discharge summary, and patient satisfaction (n = 23). Although no validated measures exist that assess all aspects of transitional patient safety, we found validated measurement tools on specific aspects. Reporting of validity of transitional measurement tools was incomplete. Numerous outcome measures with unknown measurement properties are used in current studies on

  14. Performance measures for a dialysis setting.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji

    2018-03-01

    This study from Japan extracted performance measures for dialysis unit management and investigated their characteristics from professional views. Two surveys were conducted using self-administered questionnaires, in which dialysis managers/staff were asked to rate the usefulness of 44 performance indicators. A total of 255 managers and 2,097 staff responded. Eight performance measures were elicited from dialysis manager and staff responses: these were safety, operational efficiency, quality of working life, financial effectiveness, employee development, mortality, patient/employee satisfaction and patient-centred health care. These performance measures were almost compatible with those extracted in overall healthcare settings in a previous study. Internal reliability, content and construct validity of the performance measures for the dialysis setting were ensured to some extent. As a general trend, both dialysis managers and staff perceived performance measures as highly useful, especially for safety, mortality, operational efficiency and patient/employee satisfaction, but showed relatively low concerns for patient-centred health care and employee development. However, dialysis managers' usefulness perceptions were significantly higher than staff. Important guidelines for designing a holistic hospital/clinic management system were yielded. Performance measures must be balanced for outcomes and performance shaping factors (PSF); a common set of performance measures could be applied to all the healthcare settings, although performance indicators of each measure should be composed based on the application field and setting; in addition, sound causal relationships between PSF and outcome measures/indicators should be explored for further improvement. © 2017 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  15. Determining the causal relationships among balanced scorecard perspectives on school safety performance: case of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alolah, Turki; Stewart, Rodney A; Panuwatwanich, Kriengsak; Mohamed, Sherif

    2014-07-01

    In the public schools of many developing countries, numerous accidents and incidents occur because of poor safety regulations and management systems. To improve the educational environment in Saudi Arabia, the Ministry of Education seeks novel approaches to measure school safety performance in order to decrease incidents and accidents. The main objective of this research was to develop a systematic approach for measuring Saudi school safety performance using the balanced scorecard framework philosophy. The evolved third generation balanced scorecard framework is considered to be a suitable and robust framework that captures the system-wide leading and lagging indicators of business performance. The balanced scorecard architecture is ideal for adaptation to complex areas such as safety management where a holistic system evaluation is more effective than traditional compartmentalised approaches. In developing the safety performance balanced scorecard for Saudi schools, the conceptual framework was first developed and peer-reviewed by eighteen Saudi education experts. Next, 200 participants, including teachers, school executives, and Ministry of Education officers, were recruited to rate both the importance and the performance of 79 measurement items used in the framework. Exploratory factor analysis, followed by the confirmatory partial least squares method, was then conducted in order to operationalise the safety performance balanced scorecard, which encapsulates the following five salient perspectives: safety management and leadership; safety learning and training; safety policy, procedures and processes; workforce safety culture; and safety performance. Partial least squares based structural equation modelling was then conducted to reveal five significant relationships between perspectives, namely, safety management and leadership had a significant effect on safety learning and training and safety policy, procedures and processes, both safety learning and training

  16. Development of safety performance monitoring procedures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-02-01

    Highway safety is an ongoing concern to the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). As part of its : proactive commitment to improving highway safety, TxDOT is moving toward including quantitative safety : analyses earlier in the project developm...

  17. Electrochemical performance evaluations and safety investigations of pentafluoro(phenoxy)cyclotriphosphazene as a flame retardant electrolyte additive for application in lithium ion battery systems using a newly designed apparatus for improved self-extinguishing time measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagger, Tim; Lürenbaum, Constantin; Schappacher, Falko M.; Winter, Martin

    2017-02-01

    A modified self-extinguishing time (SET) device which enhances the reproducibility of the results is presented. Pentafluoro(phenoxy)cyclotriphosphazene (FPPN) is investigated as flame retardant electrolyte additive for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) in terms of thermal stability and electrochemical performance. SET measurements and adiabatic reaction calorimetry are applied to determine the flammability and the reactivity of a standard LIB electrolyte containing 5% FPPN. The results reveal that the additive-containing electrolyte is nonflammable for 10 s whereas the commercially available reference electrolyte inflames instantaneously after 1 s of ignition. The onset temperature of the safety enhanced electrolyte is delayed by ≈ 21 °C. Compatibility tests in half cells show that the electrolyte is reductively stable while the cyclic voltammogram indicates oxidative decomposition during the first cycle. Cycling experiments in full cells show improved cycling performance and rate capability, which can be attributed to cathode passivation during the first cycle. Post-mortem analysis of the electrolyte by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirms the presence of the additive in high amounts after 501 cycles which ensures enhanced safety of the electrolyte. The investigations present FPPN as stable electrolyte additive that improves the intrinsic safety of the electrolyte and its cycling performance at the same time.

  18. A road safety performance indicator for vehicle fleet compatibility.

    PubMed

    Christoph, Michiel; Vis, Martijn Alexander; Rackliff, Lucy; Stipdonk, Henk

    2013-11-01

    This paper discusses the development and the application of a safety performance indicator which measures the intrinsic safety of a country's vehicle fleet related to fleet composition. The indicator takes into account both the 'relative severity' of individual collisions between different vehicle types, and the share of those vehicle types within a country's fleet. The relative severity is a measure for the personal damage that can be expected from a collision between two vehicles of any type, relative to that of a collision between passenger cars. It is shown how this number can be calculated using vehicle mass only. A sensitivity analysis is performed to study the dependence of the indicator on parameter values and basic assumptions made. The indicator is easy to apply and satisfies the requirements for appropriate safety performance indicators. It was developed in such a way that it specifically scores the intrinsic safety of a fleet due to its composition, without being influenced by other factors, like helmet wearing. For the sake of simplicity, and since the required data is available throughout Europe, the indicator was applied to the relative share of three of the main vehicle types: passenger cars, heavy goods vehicles and motorcycles. Using the vehicle fleet data from 13EU Member States and Norway, the indicator was used to rank the countries' safety performance. The UK was found to perform best in terms of its fleet composition (value is 1.07), while Greece has the worst performance with the highest indicator value (1.41). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Computer systems performance measurement techniques.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-06-01

    Computer system performance measurement techniques, tools, and approaches are presented as a foundation for future recommendations regarding the instrumentation of the ARTS ATC data processing subsystem for purposes of measurement and evaluation.

  20. Assessment of nurses' performance related to control of some parasites acquired from fresh vegetables as a patient safety measure in a military hospital.

    PubMed

    Ahmed Saleh, Ahmed Megahed; El-Raouf Ali, Hisham Abd; Mohamed Ahmed, Salwa Abdalla; Mohamed, Naglaa Elsaid; Morsy, Tosson A

    2014-12-01

    Foodborne parasitic infection in the hospital constitutes a major health problem particularly for patients who are more vulnerable than healthy subjects to parasitic risks. Parasitic infection. represents an area of concern for advanced practice nurse. The work assessed the military nursing staff performance regarding the nosocomial food-borne parasitic infection control. Research design; A descriptive research design was used to identify knowledge, attitudes and practice of nurses related to nosocomial food-borne parasitic infection control measures. The study was conducted at a general military hospital. 50 nurses, the whole available number who covered the inclusion, criteria. DATA COLLECTION TOOLS: It included; (1): Structured interview sheet was constructed after reviewing the relevant literature to elicit information, it included two parts a) subjects' sociodemographic characteristics b) nurses' knowledge regarding nosocomial parasites infections. (2): RATING SCALE: to assess attitude of nursing staff towards nosocomial parasites infections and its prevention. (3): Obselrvational CHECKLIST: to assess the nurses' practice of self-protection and' control of nosocomial parasitic' infections control measures.. A statistically insignificant difference between knowledge levels about nosocomial parasites infection among military nurses. More than half of participant nurses had positive attitude towards nosoconijal parasite infection control and prevention without significant difference between all topics (P>0.056). That most participant nurses had unsatisfactory practice to infection control measures with significant lower score for procurement, storage and preparation of raw material followed by personal hygiene (P<0.05). Nurses in all roles and settings can demonstrate leadership in infection prevention. and control by using their knowledge, skill and judgment to initiate appropriate and immediate infection control procedures.

  1. A structural equation modelling approach examining the pathways between safety climate, behaviour performance and workplace slipping

    PubMed Central

    Swedler, David I; Verma, Santosh K; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Lombardi, David A; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Brennan, Melayne; Courtney, Theodore K

    2015-01-01

    Objective Safety climate has previously been associated with increasing safe workplace behaviours and decreasing occupational injuries. This study seeks to understand the structural relationship between employees’ perceptions of safety climate, performing a safety behaviour (ie, wearing slip-resistant shoes) and risk of slipping in the setting of limited-service restaurants. Methods At baseline, we surveyed 349 employees at 30 restaurants for their perceptions of their safety training and management commitment to safety as well as demographic data. Safety performance was identified as wearing slip-resistant shoes, as measured by direct observation by the study team. We then prospectively collected participants’ hours worked and number of slips weekly for the next 12 weeks. Using a confirmatory factor analysis, we modelled safety climate as a higher order factor composed of previously identified training and management commitment factors. Results The 349 study participants experienced 1075 slips during the 12-week follow-up. Confirmatory factor analysis supported modelling safety climate as a higher order factor composed of safety training and management commitment. In a structural equation model, safety climate indirectly affected prospective risk of slipping through safety performance, but no direct relationship between safety climate and slips was evident. Conclusions Results suggest that safety climate can reduce workplace slips through performance of a safety behaviour as well as suggesting a potential causal mechanism through which safety climate can reduce workplace injuries. Safety climate can be modelled as a higher order factor composed of safety training and management commitment. PMID:25710968

  2. Urban and suburban arterial safety performance functions : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-30

    This report documents findings from a comprehensive set of safety performance functions developed for the entire urban-suburban : arterial road segment system on the state highway system in Washington. Conventional urban suburban safety performance :...

  3. Comprehensive Safety Analysis 2010 Safety Measurement System (SMS) Methodology, Version 2.1 Revised December 2010

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-12-01

    This report documents the Safety Measurement System (SMS) methodology developed to support the Comprehensive Safety Analysis 2010 (CSA 2010) Initiative for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). The SMS is one of the major tools for...

  4. The carrier safety measurement system (CSMS) effectiveness test by behavior analysis and safety improvement categories (BASICs)

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-01-24

    The Carrier Safety Measurement System (CSMS) is the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administrations (FMCSA's) workload prioritization tool. This tool is used to identify carriers with potential safety issues so that they are subject to interventions ...

  5. Transportation safety data and analysis : Volume 1, Analyzing the effectiveness of safety measures using Bayesian methods.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-12-01

    Recent research suggests that traditional safety evaluation methods may be inadequate in accurately determining the effectiveness of roadway safety measures. In recent years, advanced statistical methods are being utilized in traffic safety studies t...

  6. Measuring safety climate in health care.

    PubMed

    Flin, R; Burns, C; Mearns, K; Yule, S; Robertson, E M

    2006-04-01

    To review quantitative studies of safety climate in health care to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaires designed to measure this construct. A systematic literature review was undertaken to study sample and questionnaire design characteristics (source, no of items, scale type), construct validity (content validity, factor structure and internal reliability, concurrent validity), within group agreement, and level of analysis. Twelve studies were examined. There was a lack of explicit theoretical underpinning for most questionnaires and some instruments did not report standard psychometric criteria. Where this information was available, several questionnaires appeared to have limitations. More consideration should be given to psychometric factors in the design of healthcare safety climate instruments, especially as these are beginning to be used in large scale surveys across healthcare organisations.

  7. Diagnostic colonoscopy: performance measurement study.

    PubMed

    Kuznets, Naomi

    2002-07-01

    This is the fifth of a series of best practices studies undertaken by the Performance Measurement Initiative (PMI), the centerpiece of the Institute for Quality Improvement (IQI), a not-for-profit quality improvement subsidiary of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) (Performance Measurement Initiative, 1999a, 1999b, 2000a, 2000b). The IQI was created to offer clinical performance measurement and improvement opportunities to ambulatory health care organizations and others interested in quality patient care. The purpose of the study was to provide opportunities to initiate clinical performance measurement on key processes and outcomes for this procedure and use this information for clinical quality improvement. This article provides performance measurement information on how organizations that have demonstrated and validated differences in clinical practice can have similar outcomes, but at a dramatically lower cost. The intent of the article is to provide organizations with alternatives in practice to provide a better value to their patients.

  8. Development of decision support tools to assess pedestrian and bicycle safety : development of safety performance functions : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-11-15

    While a number of studies have developed Safety Performance Functions (SPFs) for : motorized traffic, there has been a very limited focus on developing SPFs for non-motorized : traffic. Lack of exposure measures for pedestrians and bicyclists has bee...

  9. Measuring human performance on NASA's microgravity aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Randy B.; Whitmore, Mihriban

    1993-01-01

    Measuring human performance in a microgravity environment will aid in identifying the design requirements, human capabilities, safety, and productivity of future astronauts. The preliminary understanding of the microgravity effects on human performance can be achieved through evaluations conducted onboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft. These evaluations can be performed in relation to hardware performance, human-hardware interface, and hardware integration. Measuring human performance in the KC-135 simulated environment will contribute to the efforts of optimizing the human-machine interfaces for future and existing space vehicles. However, there are limitations, such as limited number of qualified subjects, unexpected hardware problems, and miscellaneous plane movements which must be taken into consideration. Examples for these evaluations, the results, and their implications are discussed in the paper.

  10. Initial empirical analysis of nuclear power plant organization and its effect on safety performance

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Osborn, R.N.

    This report contains an analysis of the relationship between selected aspects of organizational structure and the safety-related performance of nuclear power plants. The report starts by identifying and operationalizing certain key dimensions of organizational structure that may be expected to be related to plant safety performance. Next, indicators of plant safety performance are created by combining existing performance measures into more reliable indicators. Finally, the indicators of plant safety performance using correlational and discriminant analysis. The overall results show that plants with better developed coordination mechanisms, shorter vertical hierarchies, and a greater number of departments tend to perform more safely.

  11. Eight essentials of performance measurement.

    PubMed

    Moullin, Max

    2004-01-01

    A well-designed performance measurement system is vital for ensuring that organisations deliver cost-effective, high-quality services that meet the needs of service users. Without feedback on all important aspects and a system for ensuring that the organisation acts on that information, managers are struggling in the dark to improve services. However, performance measurement is not easy, particularly in health and public services where a wide range of stakeholders is involved. This article discusses what the author considers to be the eight essentials of performance measurement. Though described in the context of health and social care, they are important for organisations in all sectors.

  12. Safety self-efficacy and safety performance: potential antecedents and the moderation effect of standardization.

    PubMed

    Katz-Navon, Tal; Naveh, Eitan; Stern, Zvi

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest a new safety self-efficacy construct and to explore its antecedents and interaction with standardization to influence in-patient safety. The paper used a survey of 161 nurses using a self-administered questionnaire over a 14-day period in two large Israeli general hospitals. Nurses answered questions relating to four safety self-efficacy antecedents: enactive mastery experiences; managers as safety role models; verbal persuasion; and safety priority, that relate to the perceived level of standardization and safety self-efficacy. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the scale's construct validity. Regression models were used to test hypotheses regarding the antecedents and influence of safety self-efficacy. Results indicate that: managers as safety role models; distributing safety information; and priority given to safety, contributed to safety self-efficacy. Additionally, standardization moderated the effects of safety self-efficacy and patient safety such that safety self-efficacy was positively associated with patient safety when standardization was low rather than high. Hospital managers should be aware of individual motivations as safety self-efficacy when evaluating the potential influence of standardization on patient safety. Theoretically, the study introduces a new safety self-efficacy concept, and captures its antecedents and influence on safety performance. Also, the study suggests safety self-efficacy as a boundary condition for the influence of standardization on safety performance. Implementing standardization in healthcare is problematic because not all processes can be standardized. In this case, self-efficacy plays an important role in securing patient safety. Hence, safety self-efficacy may serve as a "substitute-for-standardization," by promoting staff behaviors that affect patient safety.

  13. Transportation planning performance measures : appendices.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-10-01

    The article is the appendices for Transportation Planning Performance Measures. : Oregon transportation plans, including the statewide Oregon Transportation Plan, and current regional transportation plans for the Portland, Salem, Eugene, and Medford ...

  14. Safety performance evaluation of converging chevron pavement markings : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to perform a detailed safety analysis of converging chevron : pavement markings, quantifying the potential safety benefits and developing an understanding of the : incident types addressed by the treatment, and (...

  15. Performance Measures, Benchmarking and Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Felicity

    This paper discusses performance measurement in university libraries, based on examples from the University of Wollongong (UoW) in Australia. The introduction highlights the integration of information literacy into the curriculum and the outcomes of a 1998 UoW student satisfaction survey. The first section considers performance indicators in…

  16. Transportation safety data and analysis : Volume 2, Calibration of the highway safety manual and development of new safety performance functions.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-03-01

    This report documents the calibration of the Highway Safety Manual (HSM) safety performance function (SPF) : for rural two-lane two-way roadway segments in Utah and the development of new models using negative : binomial and hierarchical Bayesian mod...

  17. Aluminum Data Measurements and Evaluation for Criticality Safety Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. C.; Guber, K. H.; Spencer, R. R.; Derrien, H.; Wright, R. Q.

    2002-12-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-2 motivated the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a comprehensive criticality safety program to maintain and to predict the criticality of systems throughout the DOE complex. To implement the response to the DNFSB Recommendation 93-2, a Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) was created including the following tasks: Critical Experiments, Criticality Benchmarks, Training, Analytical Methods, and Nuclear Data. The Nuclear Data portion of the NCSP consists of a variety of differential measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), data analysis and evaluation using the generalized least-squares fitting code SAMMY in the resolved, unresolved, and high energy ranges, and the development and benchmark testing of complete evaluations for a nuclide for inclusion into the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B). This paper outlines the work performed at ORNL to measure, evaluate, and test the nuclear data for aluminum for applications in criticality safety problems.

  18. Development of performance measures for non-motorized dynamics.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-12-27

    This report recommends performance measures for non-motorized (pedestrian and bicyclists) : traffic safety for Michigan cities. Based on the data collected from four Michigan cities, Ann : Arbor, East Lansing, Flint, and Grand Rapids, the research te...

  19. 33 CFR 6.14-1 - Safety measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety measures. 6.14-1 Section 6... Vessels in Port § 6.14-1 Safety measures. The Commandant, in order to achieve the purposes of this part, may prescribe such conditions and restrictions relating to the safety of waterfront facilities and...

  20. Performance of biometric quality measures.

    PubMed

    Grother, Patrick; Tabassi, Elham

    2007-04-01

    We document methods for the quantitative evaluation of systems that produce a scalar summary of a biometric sample's quality. We are motivated by a need to test claims that quality measures are predictive of matching performance. We regard a quality measurement algorithm as a black box that converts an input sample to an output scalar. We evaluate it by quantifying the association between those values and observed matching results. We advance detection error trade-off and error versus reject characteristics as metrics for the comparative evaluation of sample quality measurement algorithms. We proceed this with a definition of sample quality, a description of the operational use of quality measures. We emphasize the performance goal by including a procedure for annotating the samples of a reference corpus with quality values derived from empirical recognition scores.

  1. Benchmarking Global Food Safety Performances: The Era of Risk Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Valleé, Jean-Charles Le; Charlebois, Sylvain

    2015-10-01

    Food safety data segmentation and limitations hamper the world's ability to select, build up, monitor, and evaluate food safety performance. Currently, there is no metric that captures the entire food safety system, and performance data are not collected strategically on a global scale. Therefore, food safety benchmarking is essential not only to help monitor ongoing performance but also to inform continued food safety system design, adoption, and implementation toward more efficient and effective food safety preparedness, responsiveness, and accountability. This comparative study identifies and evaluates common elements among global food safety systems. It provides an overall world ranking of food safety performance for 17 Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries, illustrated by 10 indicators organized across three food safety risk governance domains: risk assessment (chemical risks, microbial risks, and national reporting on food consumption), risk management (national food safety capacities, food recalls, food traceability, and radionuclides standards), and risk communication (allergenic risks, labeling, and public trust). Results show all countries have very high food safety standards, but Canada and Ireland, followed by France, earned excellent grades relative to their peers. However, any subsequent global ranking study should consider the development of survey instruments to gather adequate and comparable national evidence on food safety.

  2. Safety performance for freeway weaving segments.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-09-01

    The intensive lane change maneuvers at weaving sections often result in safety and operational problems. : Various factors, including the design of ramp roadways, use of auxiliary lanes, and continuity of lanes will have : significant effects on the ...

  3. Use of safety management practices for improving project performance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Eddie W L; Kelly, Stephen; Ryan, Neal

    2015-01-01

    Although site safety has long been a key research topic in the construction field, there is a lack of literature studying safety management practices (SMPs). The current research, therefore, aims to test the effect of SMPs on project performance. An empirical study was conducted in Hong Kong and the data collected were analysed with multiple regression analysis. Results suggest that 3 of the 15 SMPs, which were 'safety committee at project/site level', 'written safety policy', and 'safety training scheme' explained the variance in project performance significantly. Discussion about the impact of these three SMPs on construction was provided. Assuring safe construction should be an integral part of a construction project plan.

  4. Note on evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure to motivate safety competition.

    PubMed

    Han, Sangjin

    2016-01-01

    Road infrastructures are usually developed and maintained by governments or public sectors. There is no competitor in the market of their jurisdiction. This monopolic feature discourages road authorities from improving the level of safety with proactive motivation. This study suggests how to apply a principle of competition for roads, in particular by means of performance evaluation. It first discusses why road infrastructure has been slow in safety oriented development and management in respect of its business model. Then it suggests some practical ways of how to promote road safety between road authorities, particularly by evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure. These are summarized as decision of safety performance indicators, classification of spatial boundaries, data collection, evaluation, and reporting. Some consideration points are also discussed to make safety performance evaluation on road infrastructure lead to better road safety management.

  5. 76 FR 70653 - Performance Measurement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... Regulations as follows: PART 3055--SERVICE PERFORMANCE AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION REPORTING 0 1. The authority... entered into the National Customer Management System (NCMS). NCMS manages SFS inventory, general ledger, order history, and customer accounts. A measurement ends when the order is logically closed out in the...

  6. Job Demands-Control-Support model and employee safety performance.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nick; Stride, Chris B; Carter, Angela J; McCaughey, Deirdre; Carroll, Anthony E

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether work characteristics (job demands, job control, social support) comprising Karasek and Theorell's (1990) Job Demands-Control-Support framework predict employee safety performance (safety compliance and safety participation; Neal and Griffin, 2006). We used cross-sectional data of self-reported work characteristics and employee safety performance from 280 healthcare staff (doctors, nurses, and administrative staff) from Emergency Departments of seven hospitals in the United Kingdom. We analyzed these data using a structural equation model that simultaneously regressed safety compliance and safety participation on the main effects of each of the aforementioned work characteristics, their two-way interactions, and the three-way interaction among them, while controlling for demographic, occupational, and organizational characteristics. Social support was positively related to safety compliance, and both job control and the two-way interaction between job control and social support were positively related to safety participation. How work design is related to employee safety performance remains an important area for research and provides insight into how organizations can improve workplace safety. The current findings emphasize the importance of the co-worker in promoting both safety compliance and safety participation. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Economic evaluation of occupational safety preventive measures in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Delfina G; Arezes, Pedro M; Afonso, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    When an organization performs an integrated analysis of risks through its Occupational Health and Safety Management System, several steps are suggested to address the implications of the identified risks. Namely, the organization should make a detailed analysis of the monetary impact for the organization of each of the preventive measures considered. However, it is also important to perform an analysis of the impact of each measure on society (externalities). The aim of this paper is to present a case study related to the application of the proposed economic evaluation methodology. An analysis of the work accidents in a hospital has been made. Three of the major types of accidents have been selected: needle stings, falls and excessive strain. Following the risk assessment, some preventive measures have been designed. Subsequently, the Benefit/Cost ratio (B/C) of these measures has been calculated, both in financial terms (from the organization's perspective) and in economic terms (including the benefits for the worker and for the Society). While the financial ratio is only advantageous in some cases, when the externalities are taken into account, the B/C ratio increases significantly. It is important to consider external benefits to make decisions concerning the implementation of preventive measures in Occupational Health and Safety projects.

  8. Scalable Performance Measurement and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gamblin, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Concurrency levels in large-scale, distributed-memory supercomputers are rising exponentially. Modern machines may contain 100,000 or more microprocessor cores, and the largest of these, IBM's Blue Gene/L, contains over 200,000 cores. Future systems are expected to support millions of concurrent tasks. In this dissertation, we focus on efficient techniques for measuring and analyzing the performance of applications running on very large parallel machines. Tuning the performance of large-scale applications can be a subtle and time-consuming task because application developers must measure and interpret data from many independent processes. While the volume of the raw data scales linearly with the number ofmore » tasks in the running system, the number of tasks is growing exponentially, and data for even small systems quickly becomes unmanageable. Transporting performance data from so many processes over a network can perturb application performance and make measurements inaccurate, and storing such data would require a prohibitive amount of space. Moreover, even if it were stored, analyzing the data would be extremely time-consuming. In this dissertation, we present novel methods for reducing performance data volume. The first draws on multi-scale wavelet techniques from signal processing to compress systemwide, time-varying load-balance data. The second uses statistical sampling to select a small subset of running processes to generate low-volume traces. A third approach combines sampling and wavelet compression to stratify performance data adaptively at run-time and to reduce further the cost of sampled tracing. We have integrated these approaches into Libra, a toolset for scalable load-balance analysis. We present Libra and show how it can be used to analyze data from large scientific applications scalably.« less

  9. Measuring and improving patient safety through health information technology: The Health IT Safety Framework

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep

    2016-01-01

    Health information technology (health IT) has potential to improve patient safety but its implementation and use has led to unintended consequences and new safety concerns. A key challenge to improving safety in health IT-enabled healthcare systems is to develop valid, feasible strategies to measure safety concerns at the intersection of health IT and patient safety. In response to the fundamental conceptual and methodological gaps related to both defining and measuring health IT-related patient safety, we propose a new framework, the Health IT Safety (HITS) measurement framework, to provide a conceptual foundation for health IT-related patient safety measurement, monitoring, and improvement. The HITS framework follows both Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and sociotechnical approaches and calls for new measures and measurement activities to address safety concerns in three related domains: 1) concerns that are unique and specific to technology (e.g., to address unsafe health IT related to unavailable or malfunctioning hardware or software); 2) concerns created by the failure to use health IT appropriately or by misuse of health IT (e.g. to reduce nuisance alerts in the electronic health record (EHR)), and 3) the use of health IT to monitor risks, health care processes and outcomes and identify potential safety concerns before they can harm patients (e.g. use EHR-based algorithms to identify patients at risk for medication errors or care delays). The framework proposes to integrate both retrospective and prospective measurement of HIT safety with an organization's existing clinical risk management and safety programs. It aims to facilitate organizational learning, comprehensive 360 degree assessment of HIT safety that includes vendor involvement, refinement of measurement tools and strategies, and shared responsibility to identify problems and implement solutions. A long term framework goal is to enable rigorous measurement that helps achieve the safety

  10. Measures to Improve Diagnostic Safety in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hardeep; Graber, Mark L; Hofer, Timothy P

    2016-10-20

    Timely and accurate diagnosis is foundational to good clinical practice and an essential first step to achieving optimal patient outcomes. However, a recent Institute of Medicine report concluded that most of us will experience at least one diagnostic error in our lifetime. The report argues for efforts to improve the reliability of the diagnostic process through better measurement of diagnostic performance. The diagnostic process is a dynamic team-based activity that involves uncertainty, plays out over time, and requires effective communication and collaboration among multiple clinicians, diagnostic services, and the patient. Thus, it poses special challenges for measurement. In this paper, we discuss how the need to develop measures to improve diagnostic performance could move forward at a time when the scientific foundation needed to inform measurement is still evolving. We highlight challenges and opportunities for developing potential measures of "diagnostic safety" related to clinical diagnostic errors and associated preventable diagnostic harm. In doing so, we propose a starter set of measurement concepts for initial consideration that seem reasonably related to diagnostic safety and call for these to be studied and further refined. This would enable safe diagnosis to become an organizational priority and facilitate quality improvement. Health-care systems should consider measurement and evaluation of diagnostic performance as essential to timely and accurate diagnosis and to the reduction of preventable diagnostic harm.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  11. Measures to Improve Diagnostic Safety in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep; Graber, Mark L; Hofer, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    Timely and accurate diagnosis is foundational to good clinical practice and an essential first step to achieving optimal patient outcomes. However, a recent Institute of Medicine report concluded that most of us will experience at least one diagnostic error in our lifetime. The report argues for efforts to improve the reliability of the diagnostic process through better measurement of diagnostic performance. The diagnostic process is a dynamic team-based activity that involves uncertainty, plays out over time, and requires effective communication and collaboration among multiple clinicians, diagnostic services, and the patient. Thus, it poses special challenges for measurement. In this paper, we discuss how the need to develop measures to improve diagnostic performance could move forward at a time when the scientific foundation needed to inform measurement is still evolving. We highlight challenges and opportunities for developing potential measures of “diagnostic safety” related to clinical diagnostic errors and associated preventable diagnostic harm. In doing so, we propose a starter set of measurement concepts for initial consideration that seem reasonably related to diagnostic safety, and call for these to be studied and further refined. This would enable safe diagnosis to become an organizational priority and facilitate quality improvement. Health care systems should consider measurement and evaluation of diagnostic performance as essential to timely and accurate diagnosis and to the reduction of preventable diagnostic harm. PMID:27768655

  12. Defining and Measuring Safety Climate: A Review of the Construction Industry Literature.

    PubMed

    Schwatka, Natalie V; Hecker, Steven; Goldenhar, Linda M

    2016-06-01

    Safety climate measurements can be used to proactively assess an organization's effectiveness in identifying and remediating work-related hazards, thereby reducing or preventing work-related ill health and injury. This review article focuses on construction-specific articles that developed and/or measured safety climate, assessed safety climate's relationship with other safety and health performance indicators, and/or used safety climate measures to evaluate interventions targeting one or more indicators of safety climate. Fifty-six articles met our inclusion criteria, 80% of which were published after 2008. Our findings demonstrate that researchers commonly defined safety climate as perception based, but the object of those perceptions varies widely. Within the wide range of indicators used to measure safety climate, safety policies, procedures, and practices were the most common, followed by general management commitment to safety. The most frequently used indicators should and do reflect that the prevention of work-related ill health and injury depends on both organizational and employee actions. Safety climate scores were commonly compared between groups (e.g. management and workers, different trades), and often correlated with subjective measures of safety behavior rather than measures of ill health or objective safety and health outcomes. Despite the observed limitations of current research, safety climate has been promised as a useful feature of research and practice activities to prevent work-related ill health and injury. Safety climate survey data can reveal gaps between management and employee perceptions, or between espoused and enacted policies, and trigger communication and action to narrow those gaps. The validation of safety climate with safety and health performance data offers the potential for using safety climate measures as a leading indicator of performance. We discuss these findings in relation to the related concept of safety culture and

  13. Modeling the Relationship between Safety Climate and Safety Performance in a Developing Construction Industry: A Cross-Cultural Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Hafiz; Chan, Albert P C; Utama, Wahyudi P; Gao, Ran; Zafar, Irfan

    2017-03-28

    This study attempts to validate a safety performance (SP) measurement model in the cross-cultural setting of a developing country. In addition, it highlights the variations in investigating the relationship between safety climate (SC) factors and SP indicators. The data were collected from forty under-construction multi-storey building projects in Pakistan. Based on the results of exploratory factor analysis, a SP measurement model was hypothesized. It was tested and validated by conducting confirmatory factor analysis on calibration and validation sub-samples respectively. The study confirmed the significant positive impact of SC on safety compliance and safety participation , and negative impact on number of self-reported accidents/injuries . However, number of near-misses could not be retained in the final SP model because it attained a lower standardized path coefficient value. Moreover, instead of safety participation , safety compliance established a stronger impact on SP. The study uncovered safety enforcement and promotion as a novel SC factor, whereas safety rules and work practices was identified as the most neglected factor. The study contributed to the body of knowledge by unveiling the deviations in existing dimensions of SC and SP. The refined model is expected to concisely measure the SP in the Pakistani construction industry, however, caution must be exercised while generalizing the study results to other developing countries.

  14. Modeling the Relationship between Safety Climate and Safety Performance in a Developing Construction Industry: A Cross-Cultural Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Zahoor, Hafiz; Chan, Albert P. C.; Utama, Wahyudi P.; Gao, Ran; Zafar, Irfan

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to validate a safety performance (SP) measurement model in the cross-cultural setting of a developing country. In addition, it highlights the variations in investigating the relationship between safety climate (SC) factors and SP indicators. The data were collected from forty under-construction multi-storey building projects in Pakistan. Based on the results of exploratory factor analysis, a SP measurement model was hypothesized. It was tested and validated by conducting confirmatory factor analysis on calibration and validation sub-samples respectively. The study confirmed the significant positive impact of SC on safety compliance and safety participation, and negative impact on number of self-reported accidents/injuries. However, number of near-misses could not be retained in the final SP model because it attained a lower standardized path coefficient value. Moreover, instead of safety participation, safety compliance established a stronger impact on SP. The study uncovered safety enforcement and promotion as a novel SC factor, whereas safety rules and work practices was identified as the most neglected factor. The study contributed to the body of knowledge by unveiling the deviations in existing dimensions of SC and SP. The refined model is expected to concisely measure the SP in the Pakistani construction industry, however, caution must be exercised while generalizing the study results to other developing countries. PMID:28350366

  15. University building safety index measurement using risk and implementation matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A.; Arumsari, F.; Maryani, A.

    2018-04-01

    Many high rise building constructed in several universities in Indonesia. The high-rise building management must provide the safety planning and proper safety equipment in each part of the building. Unfortunately, most of the university in Indonesia have not been applying safety policy yet and less awareness on treating safety facilities. Several fire accidents in university showed that some significant risk should be managed by the building management. This research developed a framework for measuring the high rise building safety index in university The framework is not only assessed the risk magnitude but also designed modular building safety checklist for measuring the safety implementation level. The safety checklist has been developed for 8 types of the university rooms, i.e.: office, classroom, 4 type of laboratories, canteen, and library. University building safety index determined using risk-implementation matrix by measuring the risk magnitude and assessing the safety implementation level. Building Safety Index measurement has been applied in 4 high rise buildings in ITS Campus. The building assessment showed that the rectorate building in secure condition and chemical department building in beware condition. While the library and administration center building was in less secure condition.

  16. Comparing the performance of residential fire sprinklers with other life-safety technologies.

    PubMed

    Butry, David T

    2012-09-01

    Residential fire sprinklers have long proven themselves as life-safety technologies to the fire service community. Yet, about 1% of all one- and two-family dwelling fires occur in homes protected by sprinklers. It has been argued that measured sprinkler performance has ignored factors confounding the relationship between sprinkler use and performance. In this analysis, sprinkler performance is measured by comparing 'like' structure fires, while conditioning on smoke detection technology and neighborhood housing and socioeconomic conditions, using propensity score matching. Results show that residential fire sprinklers protect occupant and firefighter health and safety, and are comparable to other life-safety technologies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Opcode counting for performance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L; Walkup, Robert E

    2013-10-29

    Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

  18. Opcode counting for performance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L.; Walkup, Robert E.

    2015-08-11

    Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

  19. Opcode counting for performance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L.; Walkup, Robert E.

    2016-10-18

    Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

  20. Opcode counting for performance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L.; Walkup, Robert E.

    Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions ofmore » the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.« less

  1. Understanding performance measures of reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Thomas A.; Adeloye, Adebayo J.; Zhou, Sen-Lin

    2006-06-01

    This paper examines 10 reservoir performance metrics including time and volume based reliability, several measures of resilience and vulnerability, drought risk index and sustainability. Both historical and stochastically generated streamflows are considered as inflows to a range of hypothetical storage on four rivers—Earn river in the United Kingdom, Hatchie river in the United States, Richmond river in Australia and the Vis river in South Africa. The monthly stochastic sequences were generated applying an autoregressive lag one model to Box-Cox transformed annual streamflows incorporating parameter uncertainty by the Stedinger-Taylor method and the annual flows disaggregated by the method of fragments.

  2. Predicting performance and safety based on driver fatigue.

    PubMed

    Mollicone, Daniel; Kan, Kevin; Mott, Chris; Bartels, Rachel; Bruneau, Steve; van Wollen, Matthew; Sparrow, Amy R; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2018-04-02

    Fatigue causes decrements in vigilant attention and reaction time and is a major safety hazard in the trucking industry. There is a need to quantify the relationship between driver fatigue and safety in terms of operationally relevant measures. Hard-braking events are a suitable measure for this purpose as they are relatively easily observed and are correlated with collisions and near-crashes. We developed an analytic approach that predicts driver fatigue based on a biomathematical model and then estimates hard-braking events as a function of predicted fatigue, controlling for time of day to account for systematic variations in exposure (traffic density). The analysis used de-identified data from a previously published, naturalistic field study of 106 U.S. commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers. Data analyzed included drivers' official duty logs, sleep patterns measured around the clock using wrist actigraphy, and continuous recording of vehicle data to capture hard-braking events. The curve relating predicted fatigue to hard-braking events showed that the frequency of hard-braking events increased as predicted fatigue levels worsened. For each increment on the fatigue scale, the frequency of hard-braking events increased by 7.8%. The results provide proof of concept for a novel approach that predicts fatigue based on drivers' sleep patterns and estimates driving performance in terms of an operational metric related to safety. The approach can be translated to practice by CMV operators to achieve a fatigue risk profile specific to their own settings, in order to support data-driven decisions about fatigue countermeasures that cost-effectively deliver quantifiable operational benefits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Safety incentive and penalty provisions in Indian construction projects and their impact on safety performance.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Abid; Jha, Kumar Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Safety incentive and penalty (I/P) provisions in construction contracts are one of the most common forms of I/P. Contradictory opinions on the effectiveness of these provisions have been expressed in the literature. Statistics on safety provisions were collected from 32 construction projects, which include both types of contracts - those with safety I/P provisions and those without them. Although inclusion of safety I/P provisions in contracts helps in improving the overall safety performance in construction projects, further scope for improvement still exists. Literature review and structured personal interviews, coupled with a survey based on preliminary questionnaire, revealed that successful formulation and implementation of such provisions are dependent on 25 attributes which need the attention of both clients and contractors. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted to evaluate these attributes. The six factors extracted by carrying out factor analysis are: incentive distribution method, proper labour training, special attention to risky situations, role of safety committee and sub-contractors, specialised works and safety equipments, and right form of I/P. If taken care of, these attributes have the potential to improve the safety performance in construction projects. The results would be useful to clients and contractors in implementing the safety I/P provisions and thereby improving safety performance.

  4. Applying importance-performance analysis to patient safety culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yii-Ching; Wu, Hsin-Hung; Hsieh, Wan-Lin; Weng, Shao-Jen; Hsieh, Liang-Po; Huang, Chih-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    The Sexton et al.'s (2006) safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) has been widely used to assess staff's attitudes towards patient safety in healthcare organizations. However, to date there have been few studies that discuss the perceptions of patient safety both from hospital staff and upper management. The purpose of this paper is to improve and to develop better strategies regarding patient safety in healthcare organizations. The Chinese version of SAQ based on the Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation is used to evaluate the perceptions of hospital staff. The current study then lies in applying importance-performance analysis technique to identify the major strengths and weaknesses of the safety culture. The results show that teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, stress recognition and working conditions are major strengths and should be maintained in order to provide a better patient safety culture. On the contrary, perceptions of management and hospital handoffs and transitions are important weaknesses and should be improved immediately. Research limitations/implications - The research is restricted in generalizability. The assessment of hospital staff in patient safety culture is physicians and registered nurses. It would be interesting to further evaluate other staff's (e.g. technicians, pharmacists and others) opinions regarding patient safety culture in the hospital. Few studies have clearly evaluated the perceptions of healthcare organization management regarding patient safety culture. Healthcare managers enable to take more effective actions to improve the level of patient safety by investigating key characteristics (either strengths or weaknesses) that healthcare organizations should focus on.

  5. Interactions of environmental and safety measures for sustainable road transportation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    This study examined interactions of environmental and safety measures for road : transportation. The results showed that a vast majority of the examined measures support : both policy objectives and thereby contribute effectively to sustainable trans...

  6. Performance and Safety Characteristics in Ice-Climbing Equipment Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, W. Tom

    This study sought to determine whether Alaskan ice climbers place more emphasis on performance characteristics or on safety characteristics when selecting their various ice-climbing equipment. A survey distributed to members of the Alaska Alpine Club and the Alaska Alpine Rescue Group was developed to contain responses related to both safety and…

  7. An examination of public school safety measures across geographic settings.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Andrea J; Owens, Emiel W; Song, Holim

    2009-01-01

    Violence at a school can have a negative impact on the health of students, teachers, administrators, and others associated with the school and surrounding community. The use of weapons in school buildings or on school grounds accounts for the majority of violent deaths, particularly among males. This national trend suggests the need for a more concerted effort to improve safety and prevent violence. This article reports the use of 13 safety measures in US public schools in 4 geographic regions (Northeast, Midwest, South, and West) and 3 community settings (urban, suburban, and rural). Data representing 16,000 schools reported in the Educational Longitudinal Survey of 2002-2004 were analyzed. Data were self-reported by school administrators. Of the various safety measures assessed, fire alarms and extinguishers were consistently reported regardless of the geographic region or community setting of the school. Other than measures for fire safety, schools throughout the country routinely used exterior light and student lockers as safety measures. There was a significant difference by geographic region and community setting in the use of safety measures that required specific personnel, namely a security guard and an adult to direct a guest to sign in. Recognizing the patterns of violence at public high schools, administrators working with students, other school personnel, and community partners may consider more combinations of the safety measures within their institutions together with local resources and services to improve safety and reduce violence.

  8. Quantifying Safety Performance of Driveways on State Highways

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-01

    This report documents a research effort to quantify the safety performance of driveways in the State of Oregon. In : particular, this research effort focuses on driveways located adjacent to principal arterial state highways with urban or : rural des...

  9. Michigan urban trunkline segments safety performance functions (SPFs) : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-07-01

    This study involves the development of safety performance functions (SPFs) for urban and suburban trunkline segments in the : state of Michigan. Extensive databases were developed through the integration of traffic crash information, traffic volumes,...

  10. Safety performance functions for ramp terminals at diamond interchanges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-07-01

    This report documents two efforts to support CDOT in the area of Safety Performance Function (SPF) : development. The first involved the data collection and development of SPFs for five categories of ramp : terminals at diamond interchanges. For each...

  11. Evaluating the performance and safety effectiveness of roundabouts.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the performance and safety effectiveness of roundabouts within the State of Michigan. The study began with the identification of roundabouts within Michigan. This was followed by collecting data on the geometri...

  12. Evaluating the performance and safety effectiveness of roundabouts : appendix.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the performance and safety effectiveness of roundabouts within the State of Michigan. The study began with the identification of roundabouts within Michigan. This was followed by collecting data on the geometri...

  13. Two-lane rural highways safety performance functions.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-05-01

    This report documents findings from a comprehensive set of safety performance functions developed for the entire : state two-lane rural highway system in Washington. The findings indicate that random parameter models and : heterogeneous negative bino...

  14. Lessons learned from measuring safety culture: an Australian case study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Suellen; Chiarella, Mary; Homer, Caroline S E

    2010-10-01

    adverse events in maternity care are relatively common but often avoidable. International patient safety strategies advocate measuring safety culture as a strategy to improve patient safety. Evidence suggests it is necessary to fully understand the safety culture of an organisation to make improvements to patient safety. this paper reports a case study examining the safety culture in one maternity service in Australia and considers the benefits of using surveys and interviews to understand safety culture as an approach to identify possible strategies to improve patient safety in this setting. the study took place in one maternity service in two public hospitals in NSW, Australia. Concurrently, both hospitals were undergoing an organisational restructure which was part of a major health reform agenda. The priorities of the reform included improving the quality of care and patient safety; and, creating a more efficient health system by reducing administration inefficiencies and duplication. a descriptive case study using three approaches: the safety culture was identified to warrant improvement across all six safety culture domains. There was reduced infrastructure and capacity to support incident management activities required to improve safety, which was influenced by instability from the organisational restructure. There was a perceived lack of leadership at all levels to drive safety and quality and improving the safety culture was neither a key priority nor was it valued by the organisation. the safety culture was complex as was undertaking this study. We were unable to achieve a desired 60% response rate highlighting the limitations of using safety culture surveys in isolation as a strategy to improve safety culture. Qualitative interviews provided greater insight into the factors influencing the safety culture. The findings of this study provide evidence of the benefits of including qualitative methods with quantitative surveys when examining safety culture

  15. Occupational safety of different industrial sectors in Khartoum State, Sudan. Part 1: Safety performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Gehan R; El-Marakby, Fadia A; H Deign El-Nor, Yasser; Nofal, Faten H; Zakaria, Adel M

    2012-12-01

    Safety performance evaluation enables decision makers improve safety acts. In Sudan, accident records, statistics, and safety performance were not evaluated before maintenance of accident records became mandatory in 2005. This study aimed at evaluating and comparing safety performance by accident records among different cities and industrial sectors in Khartoum state, Sudan, during the period from 2005 to 2007. This was a retrospective study, the sample in which represented all industrial enterprises in Khartoum state employing 50 workers or more. All industrial accident records of the Ministry of Manpower and Health and those of different enterprises during the period from 2005 to 2007 were reviewed. The safety performance indicators used within this study were the frequency-severity index (FSI) and fatal and disabling accident frequency rates (DAFR). In Khartoum city, the FSI [0.10 (0.17)] was lower than that in Bahari [0.11 (0.21)] and Omdurman [0.84 (0.34)]. It was the maximum in the chemical sector [0.33 (0.64)] and minimum in the metallurgic sector [0.09 (0.19)]. The highest DAFR was observed in Omdurman [5.6 (3.5)] and in the chemical sector [2.5 (4.0)]. The fatal accident frequency rate in the mechanical and electrical engineering industry was the highest [0.0 (0.69)]. Male workers who were older, divorced, and had lower levels of education had the lowest safety performance indicators. The safety performance of the industrial enterprises in Khartoum city was the best. The safety performance in the chemical sector was the worst with regard to FSI and DAFR. The age, sex, and educational level of injured workers greatly affect safety performance.

  16. Performance of Compiler-Assisted Memory Safety Checking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    software developer has in mind a particular object to which the pointer should point, the intended referent. A memory access error occurs when an ac...Performance of Compiler-Assisted Memory Safety Checking David Keaton Robert C. Seacord August 2014 TECHNICAL NOTE CMU/SEI-2014-TN...based memory safety checking tool and the performance that can be achieved with two such tools whose source code is freely available. The note then

  17. Urban transport safety assessment in akure based on corresponding performance indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oye, Adedamola; Aderinlewo, Olufikayo; Croope, Silvana

    2013-03-01

    The level of safety of the transportation system in Akure, Nigeria was assessed by identifying the associated road safety problems and developing the corresponding safety performance indicators. These indicators were analysed with respect to accidents that occurred within the city from the year 2005 to 2009 based on the corresponding attributable risk measures. The results of the analysis showed the state of existing safety programs in Akure town. Six safety performance indicators were identified namely alcohol and drug use, excessive speeds, protection system (use of seat belts and helmets), use of day time running lights, state of vehicles (passive safety) and road condition. These indicators were used to determine the percentage of injury accidents as follows: 83.33% and 86.36% for years 2005 and 2006 respectively, 81.46% for year 2007 while years 2008 and 2009 had 82.86% and 78.12% injury accidents respectively.

  18. Key performance outcomes of patient safety curricula: root cause analysis, failure mode and effects analysis, and structured communications skills.

    PubMed

    Fassett, William E

    2011-10-10

    As colleges and schools of pharmacy develop core courses related to patient safety, course-level outcomes will need to include both knowledge and performance measures. Three key performance outcomes for patient safety coursework, measured at the course level, are the ability to perform root cause analyses and healthcare failure mode effects analyses, and the ability to generate effective safety communications using structured formats such as the Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation (SBAR) situational briefing model. Each of these skills is widely used in patient safety work and competence in their use is essential for a pharmacist's ability to contribute as a member of a patient safety team.

  19. Performance measurement for information systems: Industry perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Yoes, Cissy; Hamilton, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Performance measurement has become a focal topic for information systems (IS) organizations. Historically, IS performance measures have dealt with the efficiency of the data processing function. Today, the function of most IS organizations goes beyond simple data processing. To understand how IS organizations have developed meaningful performance measures that reflect their objectives and activities, industry perspectives on IS performance measurement was studied. The objectives of the study were to understand the state of the practice in IS performance techniques for IS performance measurement; to gather approaches and measures of actual performance measures used in industry; and to report patterns, trends, and lessons learned about performance measurement to NASA/JSC. Examples of how some of the most forward looking companies are shaping their IS processes through measurement is provided. Thoughts on the presence of a life-cycle to performance measures development and a suggested taxonomy for performance measurements are included in the appendices.

  20. Understanding patient safety performance and educational needs using the 'Safety-II' approach for complex systems.

    PubMed

    McNab, Duncan; Bowie, Paul; Morrison, Jill; Ross, Alastair

    2016-11-01

    Participation in projects to improve patient safety is a key component of general practice (GP) specialty training, appraisal and revalidation. Patient safety training priorities for GPs at all career stages are described in the Royal College of General Practitioners' curriculum. Current methods that are taught and employed to improve safety often use a 'find-and-fix' approach to identify components of a system (including humans) where performance could be improved. However, the complex interactions and inter-dependence between components in healthcare systems mean that cause and effect are not always linked in a predictable manner. The Safety-II approach has been proposed as a new way to understand how safety is achieved in complex systems that may improve quality and safety initiatives and enhance GP and trainee curriculum coverage. Safety-II aims to maximise the number of events with a successful outcome by exploring everyday work. Work-as-done often differs from work-as-imagined in protocols and guidelines and various ways to achieve success, dependent on work conditions, may be possible. Traditional approaches to improve the quality and safety of care often aim to constrain variability but understanding and managing variability may be a more beneficial approach. The application of a Safety-II approach to incident investigation, quality improvement projects, prospective analysis of risk in systems and performance indicators may offer improved insight into system performance leading to more effective change. The way forward may be to combine the Safety-II approach with 'traditional' methods to enhance patient safety training, outcomes and curriculum coverage.

  1. Road safety measures : a catalogue of estimates of effect : summary

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-04-01

    This report contains a catalogue of estimates of the effects on road safety of selected road safety measures. The report is intended to be used as a reference manual in drafting the national transport plan for Norway for the term 2006-2015.

  2. Measuring and improving patient safety through health information technology: The Health IT Safety Framework.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2016-04-01

    Health information technology (health IT) has potential to improve patient safety but its implementation and use has led to unintended consequences and new safety concerns. A key challenge to improving safety in health IT-enabled healthcare systems is to develop valid, feasible strategies to measure safety concerns at the intersection of health IT and patient safety. In response to the fundamental conceptual and methodological gaps related to both defining and measuring health IT-related patient safety, we propose a new framework, the Health IT Safety (HITS) measurement framework, to provide a conceptual foundation for health IT-related patient safety measurement, monitoring, and improvement. The HITS framework follows both Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and sociotechnical approaches and calls for new measures and measurement activities to address safety concerns in three related domains: 1) concerns that are unique and specific to technology (e.g., to address unsafe health IT related to unavailable or malfunctioning hardware or software); 2) concerns created by the failure to use health IT appropriately or by misuse of health IT (e.g. to reduce nuisance alerts in the electronic health record (EHR)), and 3) the use of health IT to monitor risks, health care processes and outcomes and identify potential safety concerns before they can harm patients (e.g. use EHR-based algorithms to identify patients at risk for medication errors or care delays). The framework proposes to integrate both retrospective and prospective measurement of HIT safety with an organization's existing clinical risk management and safety programs. It aims to facilitate organizational learning, comprehensive 360 degree assessment of HIT safety that includes vendor involvement, refinement of measurement tools and strategies, and shared responsibility to identify problems and implement solutions. A long term framework goal is to enable rigorous measurement that helps achieve the safety

  3. Understanding the relationship between safety investment and safety performance of construction projects through agent-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Miaojia; Cheung, Clara Man; Li, Heng; Hsu, Shu-Chien

    2016-09-01

    The construction industry in Hong Kong increased its safety investment by 300% in the past two decades; however, its accident rate has plateaued to around 50% for one decade. Against this backdrop, researchers have found inconclusive results on the causal relationship between safety investment and safety performance. Using agent-based modeling, this study takes an unconventional bottom-up approach to study safety performance on a construction site as an outcome of a complex system defined by interactions among a worksite, individual construction workers, and different safety investments. Instead of focusing on finding the absolute relationship between safety investment and safety performance, this study contributes to providing a practical framework to investigate how different safety investments interacting with different parameters such as human and environmental factors could affect safety performance. As a result, we could identify cost-effective safety investments under different construction scenarios for delivering optimal safety performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Air traffic control specialist performance measurement database.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-06-01

    The Air Traffic Control Specialist (ATCS) Performance Measurement Database is a compilation of performance measures and : measurement techniques that researchers have used. It may be applicable to other human factor research related to air traffic co...

  5. 33 CFR 6.14-1 - Safety measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., may prescribe such conditions and restrictions relating to the safety of waterfront facilities and... of, and fire-prevention measures for, such vessels and waterfront facilities. [EO 10277, 16 FR 7541...

  6. 33 CFR 6.14-1 - Safety measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., may prescribe such conditions and restrictions relating to the safety of waterfront facilities and... of, and fire-prevention measures for, such vessels and waterfront facilities. [EO 10277, 16 FR 7541...

  7. 33 CFR 6.14-1 - Safety measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., may prescribe such conditions and restrictions relating to the safety of waterfront facilities and... of, and fire-prevention measures for, such vessels and waterfront facilities. [EO 10277, 16 FR 7541...

  8. 33 CFR 6.14-1 - Safety measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., may prescribe such conditions and restrictions relating to the safety of waterfront facilities and... of, and fire-prevention measures for, such vessels and waterfront facilities. [EO 10277, 16 FR 7541...

  9. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement: intervention model fiscal year 2009.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), in cooperation with the researcher, has developed an analytic model to measure the effectiveness of roadside inspections and traffic enforcements in terms of crashes avoided, injuries avoided, ...

  10. Sun safety measures among construction workers in Britain.

    PubMed

    Madgwick, P; Houdmont, J; Randall, R

    2011-09-01

    Relative to other occupational groups in Britain, construction workers have a high incidence of skin cancer attributable to sun exposure. The importance of sun safety measures to minimize the risk of skin cancer is recognized in the literature; however, little is known about the factors associated with their use by construction workers. Knowledge in this area could help inform interventions to encourage sun safety behaviour within the sector. To investigate socio-demographic and occupational characteristics associated with the use of sun safety measures among construction workers in Britain. Data collection was by means of a self-administered questionnaire, which was sent to 360 construction workers. Information collected included socio-demographic and occupational characteristics and the use of sun safety measures. Participants worked outdoors for an average of 6.6 h/day. Three specific sun safety measures were used by the majority of respondents. Logistic regression analyses showed that certain socio-demographic and occupational factors were associated with the use of sun safety measures. In particular, receipt of sun safety training was positively associated with the wearing of long sleeved, loose fitting tops and trousers (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.02-2.80) and sunglasses (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.10-3.13). The results highlight the importance of employer-led sun safety interventions in the British construction industry. Interventions that take account of demographic and occupational characteristics are likely to have a positive impact in terms of improving workers' use of sun safety measures.

  11. Development of a safety decision-making scenario to measure worker safety in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Mosher, G A; Keren, N; Freeman, S A; Hurburgh, C R

    2014-04-01

    Human factors play an important role in the management of occupational safety, especially in high-hazard workplaces such as commercial grain-handling facilities. Employee decision-making patterns represent an essential component of the safety system within a work environment. This research describes the process used to create a safety decision-making scenario to measure the process that grain-handling employees used to make choices in a safety-related work task. A sample of 160 employees completed safety decision-making simulations based on a hypothetical but realistic scenario in a grain-handling environment. Their choices and the information they used to make their choices were recorded. Although the employees emphasized safety information in their decision-making process, not all of their choices were safe choices. Factors influencing their choices are discussed, and implications for industry, management, and workers are shared.

  12. A Study on Performance and Safety Tests of Electrosurgical Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Golpaygani, A.; Movahedi, M.M.; Reza, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Modern medicine employs a wide variety of instruments with different physiological effects and measurements. Periodic verifications are routinely used in legal metrology for industrial measuring instruments. The correct operation of electrosurgical generators is essential to ensure patient’s safety and management of the risks associated with the use of high and low frequency electrical currents on human body. Material and Methods: The metrological reliability of 20 electrosurgical equipment in six hospitals (3 private and 3 public) was evaluated in one of the provinces of Iran according to international and national standards. Results: The achieved results show that HF leakage current of ground-referenced generators are more than isolated generators and the power analysis of only eight units delivered acceptable output values and the precision in the output power measurements was low. Conclusion: Results indicate a need for new and severe regulations on periodic performance verifications and medical equipment quality control program especially in high risk instruments. It is also necessary to provide training courses for operating staff in the field of meterology in medicine to be acquianted with critical parameters to get accuracy results with operation room equipment. PMID:27853725

  13. A Study on Performance and Safety Tests of Electrosurgical Equipment.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli Golpaygani, A; Movahedi, M M; Reza, M

    2016-09-01

    Modern medicine employs a wide variety of instruments with different physiological effects and measurements. Periodic verifications are routinely used in legal metrology for industrial measuring instruments. The correct operation of electrosurgical generators is essential to ensure patient's safety and management of the risks associated with the use of high and low frequency electrical currents on human body. The metrological reliability of 20 electrosurgical equipment in six hospitals (3 private and 3 public) was evaluated in one of the provinces of Iran according to international and national standards. The achieved results show that HF leakage current of ground-referenced generators are more than isolated generators and the power analysis of only eight units delivered acceptable output values and the precision in the output power measurements was low. Results indicate a need for new and severe regulations on periodic performance verifications and medical equipment quality control program especially in high risk instruments. It is also necessary to provide training courses for operating staff in the field of meterology in medicine to be acquianted with critical parameters to get accuracy results with operation room equipment.

  14. Data driven performance measures for effective management of complex transportation networks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-02-01

    This research aims to explore performance measures quantified based on different transportation data sources. It examined the major : performance measures that can help describe both traffic operations and safety conditions. The available data source...

  15. 20 CFR 638.302 - Performance measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Performance measurement. 638.302 Section 638... § 638.302 Performance measurement. The Job Corps Director shall establish a national performance measurement system for centers and other program components which shall include annual performance standards...

  16. 20 CFR 638.302 - Performance measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Performance measurement. 638.302 Section 638... § 638.302 Performance measurement. The Job Corps Director shall establish a national performance measurement system for centers and other program components which shall include annual performance standards...

  17. Examining Operational Measures of Performance: Performance Measures Matrix

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    Equipment Mechanic ( 454X1 ); Precision Measuring Equipment Laboratory Specialist (324X0); and Aircrew Life Support Specialist (I122X0). The result is a...454X0 Aerospace Propulsion Specialist (Engines), 455X2 Communication and Navigation System Specialist, 454X1 Aerospace Ground Equipment Mechanic (AGE

  18. Mobility and reliability performance measurement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    This project grew out of the fact that mobility was identified early on as one of the key performance focus areas of NCDOTs : strategic transformation effort. The Transformation Management Team (TMT) established a TMT Mobility Workstream Team : in...

  19. Staying silent about safety issues: Conceptualizing and measuring safety silence motives.

    PubMed

    Manapragada, Archana; Bruk-Lee, Valentina

    2016-06-01

    Communication between employees and supervisors about safety-related issues is an important component of a safe workplace. When supervisors receive information from employees about safety issues, they may gain otherwise-missed opportunities to correct these issues and/or prevent negative safety outcomes. A series of three studies were conducted to identify various safety silence motives, which describe the reasons that employees do not speak up to supervisors about safety-related issues witnessed in the workplace, and to develop a tool to assess these motives. Results suggest that employees stay silent about safety issues based on perceptions of altering relationships with others (relationship-based), perceptions of the organizational climate (climate-based), the assessment of the safety issue (issue-based), or characteristics of the job (job-based). We developed a 17-item measure to assess these four motives, and initial evidence was found for the construct and incremental validity of the safety silence motives measure in a sample of nurses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Is there agreement between worker self and supervisor assessment of worker safety performance? An examination in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Nini; Griffin, Mark A; Wang, Xueqing; Liu, Xing; Wang, Dan

    2018-06-01

    Individual safety performance (behavior) critically influences safety outcomes in high-risk workplaces. Compared to the study of generic work performance on different measurements, few studies have investigated different measurements of safety performance, typically relying on employees' self-reflection of their safety behavior. This research aims to address this limitation by including worker self-reflection and other (i.e., supervisor) assessment of two worker safety performance dimensions, safety compliance and safety participation. A sample of 105 workers and 17 supervisors in 17 groups in the Chinese construction industry participated in this study. Comparisons were made between worker compliance and participation in each measurement, and between workers' and supervisors' assessment of workers' compliance and participation. Multilevel modeling was adopted to test the moderating effects on the worker self-reflection and supervisor-assessment relationship by group safety climate and the work experience of supervisors. Higher levels of safety compliance than participation were found for self-reflection and supervisor assessment. The discrepancy between the two measurements in each safety performance dimension was significant. The work experience of supervisors attenuated the discrepancy between self- and supervisor-assessment of compliance. Contrary to our expectations, the moderating effect of group safety climate was not supported. The discrepancy between worker self- and supervisor-assessment of worker safety performance, thus, suggests the importance of including alternative measurements of safety performance in addition to self-reflection. Lower levels of participation behavior in both raters suggest more research on the motivators of participatory behavior. Practical applications The discrepancy between different raters can lead to negative reactions of ratees, suggesting that managers should be aware of that difference. Assigning experienced supervisors as

  1. Performance measures for rural transportation systems : guidebook.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-06-01

    This Performance Measures for Rural Transportation Systems Guidebook provides a : standardized and supportable performance measurement process that can be applied to : transportation systems in rural areas. The guidance included in this guidebook was...

  2. Measuring the performance of livability programs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-07-01

    This report analyzes the performance measurement processes adopted by five large livability programs throughout the United States. It compares and contrasts these programs by examining existing research in performance measurement methods. The ...

  3. Louisiana Airport System Plan : measures of performance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1992-07-01

    This report applies measures of performance to gauge the extent to which the airport system achieves its goals and objectives by the implementation of the Airport System Plan. Measures of Performance are expressed as percentages of the given demograp...

  4. Macroergonomic analysis and design for improved safety and quality performance.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, B M

    1999-01-01

    Macroergonomics, which emerged historically after sociotechnical systems theory, quality management, and ergonomics, is presented as the basis for a needed integrative methodology. A macroergonomics methodology was presented in some detail to demonstrate how aspects of microergonomics, total quality management (TQM), and sociotechnical systems (STS) can be triangulated in a common approach. In the context of this methodology, quality and safety were presented as 2 of several important performance criteria. To demonstrate aspects of the methodology, 2 case studies were summarized with safety and quality performance results where available. The first case manipulated both personnel and technical factors to achieve a "safety culture" at a nuclear site. The concept of safety culture is defined in INSAG-4 (International Atomic Energy Agency, 1991). as "that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance." The second case described a tire manufacturing intervention to improve quality (as defined by Sink and Tuttle, 1989) through joint consideration of technical and social factors. It was suggested that macroergonomics can yield greater performance than can be achieved through ergonomic intervention alone. Whereas case studies help to make the case, more rigorous formative and summative research is needed to refine and validate the proposed methodology respectively.

  5. Defining and Measuring Psychomotor Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autio, Ossi

    2007-01-01

    Psychomotor performance is fundamental to human existence. It is important in many real world activities and nowadays psychomotor tests are used in several fields of industry, army, and medical sciences in employee selection. This article tries to define psychomotor activity by introducing some psychomotor theories. Furthermore the…

  6. Stochastic targeted (STAR) glycemic control: design, safety, and performance.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alicia; Le Compte, Aaron; Tan, Chia-Siong; Ward, Logan; Steel, James; Pretty, Christopher G; Penning, Sophie; Suhaimi, Fatanah; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to achieve consistently. STAR (Stochastic TARgeted) is a flexible, model-based TGC approach that directly accounts for intra- and interpatient variability with a stochastically derived maximum 5% risk of blood glucose (BG) below 72 mg/dl. This research assesses the safety, efficacy, and clinical burden of a STAR TGC controller modulating both insulin and nutrition inputs in virtual and clinical pilot trials. Clinically validated virtual trials using data from 370 patients in the SPRINT (Specialized Relative Insulin and Nutrition Titration) study were used to design the STAR protocol and test its safety, performance, and required clinical effort prior to clinical pilot trials. Insulin and nutrition interventions were given every 1-3 h as chosen by the nurse to allow them to manage workload. Interventions were designed to maximize the overlap of the model-predicted (5-95(th) percentile) range of BG outcomes with the 72-117 mg/dl band and thus provide a maximum 5% risk of BG <72 mg/dl. Interventions were calculated using clinically validated computer models of human metabolism and its variability in critical illness. Carbohydrate intake (all sources) was selected to maximize intake up to 100% of the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine (ACCP/SCCM) goal (25 kg/kcal/h). Insulin doses were limited (8 U/h maximum), with limited increases based on current rate (0.5-2.0 U/h). Initial clinical pilot trials involved 3 patients covering ~450 h. Approval was granted by the Upper South A Regional Ethics Committee. Virtual trials indicate that STAR provides similar glycemic control performance to SPRINT with 2-3 h (maximum) measurement intervals. Time in the 72-126 mg/dl and 72-145 mg/dl bands was equivalent for all controllers, indicating that glycemic outcome differences between protocols were only shifted in this range. Safety from hypoglycemia was improved. Importantly

  7. Safety Management Status among Nurses Handling Anticancer Drugs: Nurse Awareness and Performance Following Safety Regulations.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyeong Weon; Lee, Bo-Young; Kwon, Myung Soon; Jang, Ji-Hye

    2015-01-01

    This study identified the actual conditions for safe anticancer drug management among nurses and the relationship between level of awareness and performance of anticancer drug safety regulations in terms of preparation, administration, and disposal. The respondents were 236 nurses working with chemotherapy in wards and outpatient clinics in five hospitals in and near Seoul. Safety regulations provided for the anticancer drug the Occupational Safety Health Administration (OSHA, 1999), as modified for an earlier study, were used. The results showed that the level of awareness and performance on the anticancer drug safety regulations indicate their preparation (3.38±0.55, 2.38±0.98), administration (3.52±0.46, 3.17±0.70), general handling and disposal (3.33±0.54, 2.42±0.90) on a scale 0 to 5. Also, there were significant differences in job positions, work experience, type of preparation, and continuing education and a positive relationship between the level of awareness and nursing performance. Thus, nurses should receive continuing education on the handling of anticancer drugs to improve the level of performance following safety regulations.

  8. Evaluating Models of Human Performance: Safety-Critical Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is part of panel discussion on Evaluating Models of Human Performance. The purpose of this panel is to discuss the increasing use of models in the world today and specifically focus on how to describe and evaluate models of human performance. My presentation will focus on discussions of generating distributions of performance, and the evaluation of different strategies for humans performing tasks with mixed initiative (Human-Automation) systems. I will also discuss issues with how to provide Human Performance modeling data to support decisions on acceptability and tradeoffs in the design of safety critical systems. I will conclude with challenges for the future.

  9. Benchmarking road safety performance: Identifying a meaningful reference (best-in-class).

    PubMed

    Chen, Faan; Wu, Jiaorong; Chen, Xiaohong; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Di

    2016-01-01

    For road safety improvement, comparing and benchmarking performance are widely advocated as the emerging and preferred approaches. However, there is currently no universally agreed upon approach for the process of road safety benchmarking, and performing the practice successfully is by no means easy. This is especially true for the two core activities of which: (1) developing a set of road safety performance indicators (SPIs) and combining them into a composite index; and (2) identifying a meaningful reference (best-in-class), one which has already obtained outstanding road safety practices. To this end, a scientific technique that can combine the multi-dimensional safety performance indicators (SPIs) into an overall index, and subsequently can identify the 'best-in-class' is urgently required. In this paper, the Entropy-embedded RSR (Rank-sum ratio), an innovative, scientific and systematic methodology is investigated with the aim of conducting the above two core tasks in an integrative and concise procedure, more specifically in a 'one-stop' way. Using a combination of results from other methods (e.g. the SUNflower approach) and other measures (e.g. Human Development Index) as a relevant reference, a given set of European countries are robustly ranked and grouped into several classes based on the composite Road Safety Index. Within each class the 'best-in-class' is then identified. By benchmarking road safety performance, the results serve to promote best practice, encourage the adoption of successful road safety strategies and measures and, more importantly, inspire the kind of political leadership needed to create a road transport system that maximizes safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety measures for prevention of PCB accidents.

    PubMed Central

    Pajari, J

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to clarify the most common measures available for the fire and electrical engineer in the prevention of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) hazards. It points out the risks and the potential for making large risks involved in the use of transformers and capacitors more manageable. The focus in solving the PCB problem is on priority. This should be reflected in the agenda of the workshop: it should discuss not only transformers and capacitors as such, but deal more with questions concerning waste disposal, getting correct information to people on substances containing PCBs and on the proper and nonpanicky handling of such substances. The PCB issue does not lend itself to any black and white solution. Instead, a number of different aspects have to be taken into account. Any solutions arrived at are therefore always compromises between risk evaluation and cost effectiveness. Reduction of PCB risks does not have to result, for example, in an increase in fire risks. It is preferable to move step by step and avoid making irretractable decisions. Alternatives available for replacing PCB-filled devices or the widely used method of refilling PCB-filled transformers with silicone oils are not discussed. Refilling is not dealt with because its capacity to reduce the fire risk sufficiently in locations where these transformers are usually found in northern Europe is not known with certainty. PMID:3928364

  11. [Classification of laser irradiation and safety measures].

    PubMed

    Takac, S; Stojanović, S

    1998-01-01

    The use of lasers in medicine and especially surgery is rapidly expanding in many disciplines from clinical laboratory to the office practice and operating room. It is essential that users of this powerful tool have knowledge of their potential hazards and the measures to protect patients and personnel against injuries or undesired effects. Below, we have included information about the way lasers are classified; the development of protective standards; the current status of protection standards that apply to lasers, especially those used in medicine/surgery; the specific kinds of hazards associated with medical/surgical applications; and the measures by which hazards have been controlled. Since laser technology is still a young field, it is likely that problems unknown at present will occur and methodologies for controlling hazards will evolve. The American National Standards Committee produced the first consensus standard Z136.1 in 1973. The Standard was revised in 1976 to accommodate differences in biological effects for different wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The ANSI Standard has been revised again in 1980, and currently (1984) there are two additional standards in preparation, Z136.2 and 136.3, which treat the safe use of light-emitting diodes and the safe use of lasers in the health care environment, respectively. Most surgical and medical lasers are Class III or IV. Some lasers have a Class IV therapy level beam plus a Class I or II alignment beam. When using lasers, it is possible to generate incandescence or fluorescence in an irradiated object. This can occur even with protective eyewear, because the correlated radiations are usually of a different wavelength. Generally, this should not be a problem when beams are directed at biological material. However, hazard could be caused by lasers designed to produce fluorescence. Control of correlative radiation in a laser system is required in the federal regulations. Hazards of lasers may be grouped as

  12. Deriving and Validating a Road Safety Performance Indicator for Vehicle Fleet Passive Safety

    PubMed Central

    Page, Marianne; Rackliff, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    Road safety performance indicators (RSPI) are policy tools which describe the extent of insecure operational safety conditions within traffic systems. This study describes the production of an RSPI which represents the presence within a country’s vehicle fleet, of vehicles that may not effectively protect an occupant in a collision. This work is highly original, as it uses the entire vehicle database of European Union Member States in order to estimate the average level of passive safety offered by the entire fleet in each country. The EuroNCAP safety ratings and vehicle age of each vehicle in each fleet have been obtained to calculate the RSPI. The methodology used could be adopted as an international standard. PMID:16968645

  13. Performance and safety of holmium: YAG laser optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Bodo E; Glickman, Randolph D; Stallman, Kenneth J; Maswadi, Saher; Chew, Ben H; Beiko, Darren T; Denstedt, John D; Teichman, Joel M H

    2005-11-01

    Lower-pole ureteronephroscopy requires transmission of holmium:YAG energy along a deflected fiber. Current ureteroscopes are capable of high degrees of deflection, which may stress laser fibers beyond safe limits during lower-pole use. We hypothesized that optical fiber and safety measures differ among manufacturers. Small (200-273-microm) and medium-diameter (300-400-microm) Ho:YAG fibers were tested in a straight and 180 degrees bent configuration. Energy transmission was measured by an energy detector. Fiber durability was assessed by firing the laser in sequentially tighter bending diameters. The fibers were bent to 180 degrees with a diameter of 6 cm and run at 200- to 4000-mJ pulse energy to determine the minimum energy required to fracture the fiber. The bending diameter was decreased by 1-cm increments and testing repeated until a bending diameter of 1 cm was reached. The maximum deflection of the ACMI DUR-8E ureteroscope with each fiber in the working channel was recorded. The flow rate through the working channel of the DUR-8E was measured for each fiber. The mean energy transmission differed among fibers (P < 0.001). The Lumenis SL 200 and the InnovaQuartz 400 were the best small and medium-diameter fibers, respectively, in resisting thermal breakdown (P < 0.01). The Dornier Lightguide Super 200 fractured repeatedly at a bend diameter of 2 cm and with the lowest energy (200 mJ). The other small fibers fractured only at a bend diameter of 1 cm. The Sharplan 200 and InnovaQuartz Sureflex 273T were the most flexible fibers, the Lumenis SL 365 the least. The flow rate was inversely proportional to four times the power of the diameter of the fiber. Optical performance and safety differ among fibers. Fibers transmit various amounts of energy to their cladding when bent. During lower-pole nephroscopy with the fiber deflected, there is a risk of fiber fracture from thermal breakdown and laser-energy transmission to the endoscope. Some available laser fibers

  14. A Study on Performance and Safety Tests of Defibrillator Equipment.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli Golpaygani, A; Movahedi, M M; Reza, M

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, more than 10,000 different types of medical devices can be found in hospitals. This way, medical electrical equipment is being employed in a wide variety of fields in medical sciences with different physiological effects and measurements. Hospitals and medical centers must ensure that their critical medical devices are safe, accurate, reliable and operational at the required level of performance. Defibrillators are critical resuscitation devices. The use of reliable defibirillators has led to more effective treatments and improved patient safety through better control and management of complications during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). The metrological reliability of twenty frequent use, manual defibrillators in use ten hospitals (4 private and 6 public) in one of the provinces of Iran according to international and national standards was evaluated. Quantitative analysis of control and instrument accuracy showed the amount of the obtained results in many units are critical which had less value over the standard limitations especially in devices with poor battery. For the accuracy of delivered energy analysis, only twelve units delivered acceptable output values and the precision in the output energy measurements especialy in weak battry condition, after activation of discharge alarm, were low. Obtained results indicate a need for new and severe regulations on periodic performance verifications and medical equipment quality control program especially for high risk instruments. It is also necessary to provide training courses on the fundumentals of operation and performane parameters for medical staff in the field of meterology in medicine and how one can get good accuracy results especially in high risk medical devices.

  15. A Study on Performance and Safety Tests of Defibrillator Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Golpaygani, A.; Movahedi, M.M.; Reza, M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, more than 10,000 different types of medical devices can be found in hospitals. This way, medical electrical equipment is being employed in a wide variety of fields in medical sciences with different physiological effects and measurements. Hospitals and medical centers must ensure that their critical medical devices are safe, accurate, reliable and operational at the required level of performance. Defibrillators are critical resuscitation devices. The use of reliable defibirillators has led to more effective treatments and improved patient safety through better control and management of complications during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Materials and Methods: The metrological reliability of twenty frequent use, manual defibrillators in use ten hospitals (4 private and 6 public) in one of the provinces of Iran according to international and national standards was evaluated. Results: Quantitative analysis of control and instrument accuracy showed the amount of the obtained results in many units are critical which had less value over the standard limitations especially in devices with poor battery. For the accuracy of delivered energy analysis, only twelve units delivered acceptable output values and the precision in the output energy measurements especialy in weak battry condition, after activation of discharge alarm, were low. Conclusion: Obtained results indicate a need for new and severe regulations on periodic performance verifications and medical equipment quality control program especially for high risk instruments. It is also necessary to provide training courses on the fundumentals of operation and performane parameters for medical staff in the field of meterology in medicine and how one can get good accuracy results especially in high risk medical devices. PMID:29445716

  16. Development of safety performance functions for North Carolina.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-06

    "The objective of this effort is to develop safety performance functions (SPFs) for different types of facilities in North Carolina : and illustrate how they can be used to improve the decision making process. The prediction models in Part C of the H...

  17. Safety Performance of Airborne Separation: Preliminary Baseline Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Wing, David J.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2007-01-01

    The Safety Performance of Airborne Separation (SPAS) study is a suite of Monte Carlo simulation experiments designed to analyze and quantify safety behavior of airborne separation. This paper presents results of preliminary baseline testing. The preliminary baseline scenario is designed to be very challenging, consisting of randomized routes in generic high-density airspace in which all aircraft are constrained to the same flight level. Sustained traffic density is varied from approximately 3 to 15 aircraft per 10,000 square miles, approximating up to about 5 times today s traffic density in a typical sector. Research at high traffic densities and at multiple flight levels are planned within the next two years. Basic safety metrics for aircraft separation are collected and analyzed. During the progression of experiments, various errors, uncertainties, delays, and other variables potentially impacting system safety will be incrementally introduced to analyze the effect on safety of the individual factors as well as their interaction and collective effect. In this paper we report the results of the first experiment that addresses the preliminary baseline condition tested over a range of traffic densities. Early results at five times the typical traffic density in today s NAS indicate that, under the assumptions of this study, airborne separation can be safely performed. In addition, we report on initial observations from an exploration of four additional factors tested at a single traffic density: broadcast surveillance signal interference, extent of intent sharing, pilot delay, and wind prediction error.

  18. Crew fatigue safety performance indicators for fatigue risk management systems.

    PubMed

    Gander, Philippa H; Mangie, Jim; Van Den Berg, Margo J; Smith, A Alexander T; Mulrine, Hannah M; Signal, T Leigh

    2014-02-01

    Implementation of Fatigue Risk Management Systems (FRMS) is gaining momentum; however, agreed safety performance indicators (SPIs) are lacking. This paper proposes an initial set of SPIs based on measures of crewmember sleep, performance, and subjective fatigue and sleepiness, together with methods for interpreting them. Data were included from 133 landing crewmembers on 2 long-range and 3 ultra-long-range trips (4-person crews, 3 airlines, 220 flights). Studies had airline, labor, and regulatory support, and underwent independent ethical review. SPIs evaluated preflight and at top of descent (TOD) were: total sleep in the prior 24 h and time awake at duty start and at TOD (actigraphy); subjective sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale) and fatigue (Samn-Perelli scale); and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance. Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric ANOVA with post hoc tests was used to identify significant differences between flights for each SPI. Visual and preliminary quantitative comparisons of SPIs between flights were made using box plots and bar graphs. Statistical analyses identified significant differences between flights across a range of SPls. In an FRMS, crew fatigue SPIs are envisaged as a decision aid alongside operational SPIs, which need to reflect the relevant causes of fatigue in different operations. We advocate comparing multiple SPIs between flights rather than defining safe/unsafe thresholds on individual SPIs. More comprehensive data sets are needed to identify the operational and biological factors contributing to the differences between flights reported here. Global sharing of an agreed core set of SPIs would greatly facilitate implementation and improvement of FRMS.

  19. Safety and operational performance evaluation of four types of exit ramps on Florida's freeways (final report).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-12-01

    This project mainly focuses on exit ramp performance analysis of safety and operations. In addition, issues of advance guide sign for exit ramp are also mentioned. : Safety analysis evaluates safety performances of different exit ramps used in Florid...

  20. Research Frontiers in Public Sector Performance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhonghua, Cai; Ye, Wang

    In "New Public Management" era, performance measurement has been widely used in managerial practices of public sectors. From the content and features of performance measurement, this paper aims to explore inspirations on Chinese public sector performance measurement, which based on a review of prior literatures including influencial factors, methods and indicators of public sector performance evaluation. In the end, arguments are presented in this paper pointed out the direction of future researches in this field.

  1. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Safety Inhibit Timeline Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dion, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Observatory is a joint mission under the partnership by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Japan. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has the lead management responsibility for NASA on GPM. The GPM program will measure precipitation on a global basis with sufficient quality, Earth coverage, and sampling to improve prediction of the Earth's climate, weather, and specific components of the global water cycle. As part of the development process, NASA built the spacecraft (built in-house at GSFC) and provided one instrument (GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) developed by Ball Aerospace) JAXA provided the launch vehicle (H2-A by MHI) and provided one instrument (Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) developed by NTSpace). Each instrument developer provided a safety assessment which was incorporated into the NASA GPM Safety Hazard Assessment. Inhibit design was reviewed for hazardous subsystems which included the High Gain Antenna System (HGAS) deployment, solar array deployment, transmitter turn on, propulsion system release, GMI deployment, and DPR radar turn on. The safety inhibits for these listed hazards are controlled by software. GPM developed a "pathfinder" approach for reviewing software that controls the electrical inhibits. This is one of the first GSFC in-house programs that extensively used software controls. The GPM safety team developed a methodology to document software safety as part of the standard hazard report. As part of this process a new tool "safety inhibit time line" was created for management of inhibits and their controls during spacecraft buildup and testing during 1& Tat GSFC and at the Range in Japan. In addition to understanding inhibits and controls during 1& T the tool allows the safety analyst to better communicate with others the changes in inhibit states with each phase of hardware and software testing. The tool was very

  2. Road safety performance indicators for the interurban road network.

    PubMed

    Yannis, George; Weijermars, Wendy; Gitelman, Victoria; Vis, Martijn; Chaziris, Antonis; Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Azevedo, Carlos Lima

    2013-11-01

    Various road safety performance indicators (SPIs) have been proposed for different road safety research areas, mainly as regards driver behaviour (e.g. seat belt use, alcohol, drugs, etc.) and vehicles (e.g. passive safety); however, no SPIs for the road network and design have been developed. The objective of this research is the development of an SPI for the road network, to be used as a benchmark for cross-region comparisons. The developed SPI essentially makes a comparison of the existing road network to the theoretically required one, defined as one which meets some minimum requirements with respect to road safety. This paper presents a theoretical concept for the determination of this SPI as well as a translation of this theory into a practical method. Also, the method is applied in a number of pilot countries namely the Netherlands, Portugal, Greece and Israel. The results show that the SPI could be efficiently calculated in all countries, despite some differences in the data sources. In general, the calculated overall SPI scores were realistic and ranged from 81 to 94%, with the exception of Greece where the SPI was relatively lower (67%). However, the SPI should be considered as a first attempt to determine the safety level of the road network. The proposed method has some limitations and could be further improved. The paper presents directions for further research to further develop the SPI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 2 CFR 200.301 - Performance measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Performance measurement. 200.301 Section 200... § 200.301 Performance measurement. The Federal awarding agency must require the recipient to use OMB-approved governmentwide standard information collections when providing financial and performance...

  4. Health Plan Performance Measurement within Medicare Subvention.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    the causes of poor performance (Siren & Laffel, 1996). Although outcomes measures such as nosocomial infection rates, admission rates for select...defined. Traditional outcomes measures include infection rates, morbidity, and mortality. The problem with these traditional measures is... Maternal /Child Care Indicators Nursing Staffing Indicators Outcome Indicators Technical Outcomes Plan Performance Stability of Health Plan

  5. APMS: An Integrated Set of Tools for Measuring Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C.; Reynard, William D. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    This is a report of work in progress. In it, I summarize the status of the research and development of the Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS) for managing, processing, and analyzing digital flight-recorded data. The objectives of the NASA-FAA APMS research project are to establish a sound scientific and technological basis for flight-data analysis, to define an open and flexible architecture for flight-data-analysis systems, and to articulate guidelines for a standardized database structure on which to continue to build future flight-data-analysis extensions. APMS will offer to the air transport community an open, voluntary standard for flight-data-analysis software, a standard that will help to ensure suitable functionality, and data interchangeability, among competing software programs. APMS will develop and document the methodologies, algorithms, and procedures for data management and analyses to enable users to easily interpret the implications regarding safety and efficiency of operations. APMS does not entail the implementation of a nationwide flight-data-collection system. It is intended to provide technical tools to ease the large-scale implementation of flight-data analyses at both the air-carrier and the national-airspace levels in support of their Flight Operations and Quality Assurance (FOQA) Programs and Advanced Qualifications Programs (AQP). APMS cannot meet its objectives unless it develops tools that go substantially beyond the capabilities of the current commercially available software and supporting analytic methods that are mainly designed to count special events. These existing capabilities, while of proven value, were created primarily with the needs of air crews in mind. APMS tools must serve the needs of the government and air carriers, as well as air crews, to fully support the FOQA and AQP programs. They must be able to derive knowledge not only through the analysis of single flights (special-event detection), but through

  6. The Role of Leadership in Safety Performance and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravello, Halina E.

    Employee injury rates in U.S. land-based operations in the energy industry are 2 to 3 times higher relative to other regions in the world. Although a rich literature exists on drivers of safety performance, no previous studies investigated factors influencing this elevated rate. Leadership has been identified as a key contributor to safety outcomes and this grounded theory study drew upon the full range leadership model, situational leadership, and leader-member exchange theories for the conceptual framework. Leadership aspects influencing safety performance were investigated through guided interviews of 27 study participants; data analyses included open and axial coding, and constant comparisons identified higher-level categories. Selective coding integrated categories into the theoretical framework that developed the idealized, transformational leader traits motivating safe behaviors of leading by example, expressing care and concern for employees' well-being, celebrating successes, and communicating the importance of safety (other elements included visibility and commitment). Employee and supervisor participants reported similar views on the idealized leader traits, but low levels of these qualities may be driving elevated injury rates. Identifying these key elements provides the foundation to creating strategies and action plans enabling energy sector companies to prevent employee injuries and fatalities in an industry where tens of thousands of employees are subjected to significant hazards and elevated risks. Creating safer workplaces for U.S. employees by enhancing leaders' skills, building knowledge, and improving behaviors will improve the employees' and their families' lives by reducing the pain and suffering resulting from injuries and fatalities.

  7. Low-cost safety measures at signalized intersections.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to: a) identify intersections with a high number of crashes involving a driver disregarding the traffic signal, b) identify types of low-cost safety measures which may be used as a countermeasure for red light runnin...

  8. Measuring Distribution Performance? Benchmarking Warrants Your Attention

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, Sean J; Alvarez, Paul

    Identifying, designing, and measuring performance metrics is critical to securing customer value, but can be a difficult task. This article examines the use of benchmarks based on publicly available performance data to set challenging, yet fair, metrics and targets.

  9. Alternative performance measures for evaluating congestion.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of the work performed under the project Alternative Performance Measures for Evaluating : Congestion. The study first outlines existing approaches to looking at congestion. It then builds on the previous work in the...

  10. Exploratory data project : freight resiliency performance measures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-03-01

    Exploratory Data Project: Freight Resiliency Performance Measures. (2009-10) FHWA's Office of Freight Management : and Operations, through a partnership with the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI), established a Freight : Performance M...

  11. Research notes : transportation planning performance measures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-06-01

    Performance measurement can be defined as an assessment of progress toward goals. In transportation planning a good measure is clearly defined, is acceptable to stakeholders, allows for economical data collection and analysis, shows how well th...

  12. Development of performance measurement for freight transportation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-09-01

    In this project, the researchers built a set of performance measures that are unified, user-oriented, scalable, systematic, effective, and : calculable for intermodal freight management and developed methodologies to calculate and use the measures. :...

  13. Trucking in Georgia : freight performance measures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-11-16

    This report provides a review of the recent literature on the development of truck freight performance measures, : and specifically measures that can assist the Georgia Department of Transportation in assessing, and in tracking : from year to year, h...

  14. Safety performance functions for intersections : final report, December 2009.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-12-01

    Road safety management activities include screening the network for sites with a potential for safety improvement (Network : Screening), diagnosing safety problems at specific sites, and evaluating the safety effectiveness of implemented : countermea...

  15. Developing integrated benchmarks for DOE performance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, Jr. H.C.

    1992-09-30

    The objectives of this task were to describe and evaluate selected existing sources of information on occupational safety and health with emphasis on hazard and exposure assessment, abatement, training, reporting, and control identifying for exposure and outcome in preparation for developing DOE performance benchmarks. Existing resources and methodologies were assessed for their potential use as practical performance benchmarks. Strengths and limitations of current data resources were identified. Guidelines were outlined for developing new or improved performance factors, which then could become the basis for selecting performance benchmarks. Data bases for non-DOE comparison populations were identified so that DOE performance couldmore » be assessed relative to non-DOE occupational and industrial groups. Systems approaches were described which can be used to link hazards and exposure, event occurrence, and adverse outcome factors, as needed to generate valid, reliable, and predictive performance benchmarks. Data bases were identified which contain information relevant to one or more performance assessment categories . A list of 72 potential performance benchmarks was prepared to illustrate the kinds of information that can be produced through a benchmark development program. Current information resources which may be used to develop potential performance benchmarks are limited. There is need to develop an occupational safety and health information and data system in DOE, which is capable of incorporating demonstrated and documented performance benchmarks prior to, or concurrent with the development of hardware and software. A key to the success of this systems approach is rigorous development and demonstration of performance benchmark equivalents to users of such data before system hardware and software commitments are institutionalized.« less

  16. Development of indicators for measuring outcomes of water safety plans

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Gabriella; Oswald, William E.; Hubbard, Brian; Medlin, Elizabeth; Gelting, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Water safety plans (WSPs) are endorsed by the World Health Organization as the most effective method of protecting a water supply. With the increase in WSPs worldwide, several valuable resources have been developed to assist practitioners in the implementation of WSPs, yet there is still a need for a practical and standardized method of evaluating WSP effectiveness. In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a conceptual framework for the evaluation of WSPs, presenting four key outcomes of the WSP process: institutional, operational, financial and policy change. In this paper, we seek to operationalize this conceptual framework by providing a set of simple and practical indicators for assessing WSP outcomes. Using CDC’s WSP framework as a foundation and incorporating various existing performance monitoring indicators for water utilities, we developed a set of approximately 25 indicators of institutional, operational, financial and policy change within the WSP context. These outcome indicators hold great potential for the continued implementation and expansion of WSPs worldwide. Having a defined framework for evaluating a WSP’s effectiveness, along with a set of measurable indicators by which to carry out that evaluation, will help implementers assess key WSP outcomes internally, as well as benchmark their progress against other WSPs in their region and globally. PMID:26361540

  17. The relationship between safety net activities and hospital financial performance

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During the 1990's hospitals in the U.S were faced with cost containment charges, which may have disproportionately impacted hospitals that serve poor patients. The purposes of this paper are to study the impact of safety net activities on total profit margins and operating expenditures, and to trace these relationships over the 1990s for all U.S urban hospitals, controlling for hospital and market characteristics. Methods The primary data source used for this analysis is the Annual Survey of Hospitals from the American Hospital Association and Medicare Hospital Cost Reports for years 1990-1999. Ordinary least square, hospital fixed effects, and two-stage least square analyses were performed for years 1990-1999. Logged total profit margin and operating expenditure were the dependent variables. The safety net activities are the socioeconomic status of the population in the hospital serving area, and Medicaid intensity. In some specifications, we also included uncompensated care burden. Results We found little evidence of negative effects of safety net activities on total margin. However, hospitals serving a low socioeconomic population had lower expenditure raising concerns for the quality of the services provided. Conclusions Despite potentially negative policy and market changes during the 1990s, safety net activities do not appear to have imperiled the survival of hospitals. There may, however, be concerns about the long-term quality of the services for hospitals serving low socioeconomic population. PMID:20074367

  18. Safety and performance enhancement circuit for primary explosive detonators

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Ronald W [Tracy, CA

    2006-04-04

    A safety and performance enhancement arrangement for primary explosive detonators. This arrangement involves a circuit containing an energy storage capacitor and preset self-trigger to protect the primary explosive detonator from electrostatic discharge (ESD). The circuit does not discharge into the detonator until a sufficient level of charge is acquired on the capacitor. The circuit parameters are designed so that normal ESD environments cannot charge the protection circuit to a level to achieve discharge. When functioned, the performance of the detonator is also improved because of the close coupling of the stored energy.

  19. An Ethnostatistical Analysis of Performance Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winiecki, Donald J.

    2008-01-01

    Within the fields of human performance technology (HPT), human resources management (HRM), and management in general, performance measurement is not only foundational but considered necessary at all phases in the process of HPT. In HPT in particular, there is substantial advice literature on what measurement is, why it is essential, and (at a…

  20. A Critique of Health System Performance Measurement.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Health system performance measurement is a ubiquitous phenomenon. Many authors have identified multiple methodological and substantive problems with performance measurement practices. Despite the validity of these criticisms and their cross-national character, the practice of health system performance measurement persists. Theodore Marmor suggests that performance measurement invokes an "incantatory response" wrapped within "linguistic muddle." In this article, I expand upon Marmor's insights using Pierre Bourdieu's theoretical framework to suggest that, far from an aberration, the "linguistic muddle" identified by Marmor is an indicator of a broad struggle about the representation and classification of public health services as a public good. I present a case study of performance measurement from Alberta, Canada, examining how this representational struggle occurs and what the stakes are. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Does hospital financial performance measure up?

    PubMed

    Cleverley, W O; Harvey, R K

    1992-05-01

    Comparisons are continuously being made between the financial performance, products and services, of the healthcare industry and those of non-healthcare industries. Several useful measures of financial performance--profitability, liquidity, financial risk, asset management and replacement, and debt capacity, are used by the authors to compare the financial performance of the hospital industry with that of the industrial, transportation and utility sectors. Hospitals exhibit weaknesses in several areas. Goals are suggested for each measure to bring hospitals closer to competitive levels.

  2. Lung Function Measurements in Rodents in Safety Pharmacology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hoymann, Heinz Gerd

    2012-01-01

    The ICH guideline S7A requires safety pharmacology tests including measurements of pulmonary function. In the first step – as part of the “core battery” – lung function tests in conscious animals are requested. If potential adverse effects raise concern for human safety, these should be explored in a second step as a “follow-up study”. For these two stages of safety pharmacology testing, both non-invasive and invasive techniques are needed which should be as precise and reliable as possible. A short overview of typical in vivo measurement techniques is given, their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and out of these the non-invasive head-out body plethysmography and the invasive but repeatable body plethysmography in orotracheally intubated rodents are presented in detail. For validation purposes the changes in the respective parameters such as tidal midexpiratory flow (EF50) or lung resistance have been recorded in the same animals in typical bronchoconstriction models and compared. In addition, the technique of head-out body plethysmography has been shown to be useful to measure lung function in juvenile rats starting from day two of age. This allows safety pharmacology testing and toxicological studies in juvenile animals as a model for the young developing organism as requested by the regulatory authorities (e.g., EMEA Guideline 1/2008). It is concluded that both invasive and non-invasive pulmonary function tests are capable of detecting effects and alterations on the respiratory system with different selectivity and area of operation. The use of both techniques in a large number of studies in mice and rats in the last years have demonstrated that they provide useful and reliable information on pulmonary mechanics in safety pharmacology and toxicology testing, in investigations of respiratory disorders, and in pharmacological efficacy studies. PMID:22973226

  3. Performance Measures for Student Success, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community College System, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Performance Measures for Student Success Report is the North Carolina Community College System's major accountability document. This annual performance report is based on data compiled from the previous year and serves to inform colleges and the public on the performance of North Carolina's 58 community colleges. In 2010, President Scott Ralls…

  4. Performance Measures for Student Success, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community College System, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Performance Measures for Student Success Report is the North Carolina Community College System's major accountability document. This annual performance report is based on data compiled from the previous year and serves to inform colleges and the public on the performance of North Carolina's 58 community colleges. In 2010, President Scott Ralls…

  5. Performance Measures for Student Success, 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community College System, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Performance Measures for Student Success Report is the North Carolina Community College System's major accountability document. This annual performance report is based on data compiled from the previous year and serves to inform colleges and the public on the performance of our 58 community colleges. In 1993, the State Board of Community…

  6. MEASUREMENT: ACCOUNTING FOR RELIABILITY IN PERFORMANCE ESTIMATES.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Brian; Sutter, Robert; Burroughs, Thomas; Dunagan, W Claiborne

    2014-01-01

    When evaluating physician performance measures, physician leaders are faced with the quandary of determining whether departures from expected physician performance measurements represent a true signal or random error. This uncertainty impedes the physician leader's ability and confidence to take appropriate performance improvement actions based on physician performance measurements. Incorporating reliability adjustment into physician performance measurement is a valuable way of reducing the impact of random error in the measurements, such as those caused by small sample sizes. Consequently, the physician executive has more confidence that the results represent true performance and is positioned to make better physician performance improvement decisions. Applying reliability adjustment to physician-level performance data is relatively new. As others have noted previously, it's important to keep in mind that reliability adjustment adds significant complexity to the production, interpretation and utilization of results. Furthermore, the methods explored in this case study only scratch the surface of the range of available Bayesian methods that can be used for reliability adjustment; further study is needed to test and compare these methods in practice and to examine important extensions for handling specialty-specific concerns (e.g., average case volumes, which have been shown to be important in cardiac surgery outcomes). Moreover, it's important to note that the provider group average as a basis for shrinkage is one of several possible choices that could be employed in practice and deserves further exploration in future research. With these caveats, our results demonstrate that incorporating reliability adjustment into physician performance measurements is feasible and can notably reduce the incidence of "real" signals relative to what one would expect to see using more traditional approaches. A physician leader who is interested in catalyzing performance improvement

  7. Multilevel Safety Climate and Safety Performance in the Construction Industry: Development and Validation of a Top-Down Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ran; Chan, Albert P.C.; Utama, Wahyudi P.; Zahoor, Hafiz

    2016-01-01

    The character of construction projects exposes front-line workers to dangers and accidents. Safety climate has been confirmed to be a predictor of safety performance in the construction industry. This study aims to explore the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between multilevel safety climate and safety performance. An integrated model was developed to study how particular safety climate factors of one level affect those of other levels, and then affect safety performance from the top down. A questionnaire survey was administered on six construction sites in Vietnam. A total of 1030 valid questionnaires were collected from this survey. Approximately half of the data were used to conduct exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and the remaining data were submitted to structural equation modeling (SEM). Top management commitment (TMC) and supervisors’ expectation (SE) were identified as factors to represent organizational safety climate (OSC) and supervisor safety climate (SSC), respectively, and coworkers’ caring and communication (CCC) and coworkers’ role models (CRM) were identified as factors to denote coworker safety climate (CSC). SEM results show that OSC factor is positively related to SSC factor and CSC factors significantly. SSC factor could partially mediate the relationship between OSC factor and CSC factors, as well as the relationship between OSC factor and safety performance. CSC factors partially mediate the relationship between OSC factor and safety performance, and the relationship between SSC factor and safety performance. The findings imply that a positive safety culture should be established both at the organizational level and the group level. Efforts from all top management, supervisors, and coworkers should be provided to improve safety performance in the construction industry. PMID:27834823

  8. Multilevel Safety Climate and Safety Performance in the Construction Industry: Development and Validation of a Top-Down Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ran; Chan, Albert P C; Utama, Wahyudi P; Zahoor, Hafiz

    2016-11-08

    The character of construction projects exposes front-line workers to dangers and accidents. Safety climate has been confirmed to be a predictor of safety performance in the construction industry. This study aims to explore the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between multilevel safety climate and safety performance. An integrated model was developed to study how particular safety climate factors of one level affect those of other levels, and then affect safety performance from the top down. A questionnaire survey was administered on six construction sites in Vietnam. A total of 1030 valid questionnaires were collected from this survey. Approximately half of the data were used to conduct exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and the remaining data were submitted to structural equation modeling (SEM). Top management commitment (TMC) and supervisors' expectation (SE) were identified as factors to represent organizational safety climate (OSC) and supervisor safety climate (SSC), respectively, and coworkers' caring and communication (CCC) and coworkers' role models (CRM) were identified as factors to denote coworker safety climate (CSC). SEM results show that OSC factor is positively related to SSC factor and CSC factors significantly. SSC factor could partially mediate the relationship between OSC factor and CSC factors, as well as the relationship between OSC factor and safety performance. CSC factors partially mediate the relationship between OSC factor and safety performance, and the relationship between SSC factor and safety performance. The findings imply that a positive safety culture should be established both at the organizational level and the group level. Efforts from all top management, supervisors, and coworkers should be provided to improve safety performance in the construction industry.

  9. Advanced Engineering Technology for Measuring Performance.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Drew N; D'Angelo, Anne-Lise D; Law, Katherine E; Pugh, Carla M

    2015-08-01

    The demand for competency-based assessments in surgical training is growing. Use of advanced engineering technology for clinical skills assessment allows for objective measures of hands-on performance. Clinical performance can be assessed in several ways via quantification of an assessee's hand movements (motion tracking), direction of visual attention (eye tracking), levels of stress (physiologic marker measurements), and location and pressure of palpation (force measurements). Innovations in video recording technology and qualitative analysis tools allow for a combination of observer- and technology-based assessments. Overall the goal is to create better assessments of surgical performance with robust validity evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Food safety security: a new concept for enhancing food safety measures.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Venkatesh; Elmadfa, Ibrahim

    2012-06-01

    The food safety security (FSS) concept is perceived as an early warning system for minimizing food safety (FS) breaches, and it functions in conjunction with existing FS measures. Essentially, the function of FS and FSS measures can be visualized in two parts: (i) the FS preventive measures as actions taken at the stem level, and (ii) the FSS interventions as actions taken at the root level, to enhance the impact of the implemented safety steps. In practice, along with FS, FSS also draws its support from (i) legislative directives and regulatory measures for enforcing verifiable, timely, and effective compliance; (ii) measurement systems in place for sustained quality assurance; and (iii) shared responsibility to ensure cohesion among all the stakeholders namely, policy makers, regulators, food producers, processors and distributors, and consumers. However, the functional framework of FSS differs from that of FS by way of: (i) retooling the vulnerable segments of the preventive features of existing FS measures; (ii) fine-tuning response systems to efficiently preempt the FS breaches; (iii) building a long-term nutrient and toxicant surveillance network based on validated measurement systems functioning in real time; (iv) focusing on crisp, clear, and correct communication that resonates among all the stakeholders; and (v) developing inter-disciplinary human resources to meet ever-increasing FS challenges. Important determinants of FSS include: (i) strengthening international dialogue for refining regulatory reforms and addressing emerging risks; (ii) developing innovative and strategic action points for intervention {in addition to Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) procedures]; and (iii) introducing additional science-based tools such as metrology-based measurement systems.

  11. Benchmarking: your performance measurement and improvement tool.

    PubMed

    Senn, G F

    2000-01-01

    Many respected professional healthcare organizations and societies today are seeking to establish data-driven performance measurement strategies such as benchmarking. Clinicians are, however, resistant to "benchmarking" that is based on financial data alone, concerned that it may be adverse to the patients' best interests. Benchmarking of clinical procedures that uses physician's codes such as Current Procedural Terminology (CPTs) has greater credibility with practitioners. Better Performers, organizations that can perform procedures successfully at lower cost and in less time, become the "benchmark" against which other organizations can measure themselves. The Better Performers' strategies can be adopted by other facilities to save time or money while maintaining quality patient care.

  12. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  13. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : Roadside Intervention Effectiveness Model FY 2012, [analysis brief].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-02-01

    Roadside Inspection and Traffic Enforcement are two of : the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administrations : (FMCSAs) key safety programs. The Roadside : Inspection Program consists of roadside inspections : performed by qualified safety inspect...

  14. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : Roadside Intervention Effectiveness Model, fiscal year 2010 : [analysis brief].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-11-01

    Two of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administrations (FMCSAs) key safety programs are the Roadside Inspection and Traffic Enforcement programs. The Roadside Inspection program consists of roadside inspections performed by qualified safety in...

  15. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : roadside intervention effectiveness model FY 2011 : [analysis brief].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-06-01

    Roadside Inspection and Traffic Enforcement are two of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administrations (FMCSAs) key safety programs. The Roadside Inspection program consists of roadside inspections performed by qualified safety inspectors. The...

  16. Telerobotic system performance measurement - Motivation and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondraske, George V.; Khoury, George J.

    1992-01-01

    A systems performance-based strategy for modeling and conducting experiments relevant to the design and performance characterization of telerobotic systems is described. A developmental testbed consisting of a distributed telerobotics network and initial efforts to implement the strategy described is presented. Consideration is given to the general systems performance theory (GSPT) to tackle human performance problems as a basis for: measurement of overall telerobotic system (TRS) performance; task decomposition; development of a generic TRS model; and the characterization of performance of subsystems comprising the generic model. GSPT employs a resource construct to model performance and resource economic principles to govern the interface of systems to tasks. It provides a comprehensive modeling/measurement strategy applicable to complex systems including both human and artificial components. Application is presented within the framework of a distributed telerobotics network as a testbed. Insight into the design of test protocols which elicit application-independent data is described.

  17. Road weather management performance measures : a way to measure achievement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-04-01

    This flyer describes the Road Weather Management Performance Measures that will help the Road Weather Management Program (RWMP) maximize the use of available road weather information and technologies; expand road weather research and development effo...

  18. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : carrier intervention effectiveness Model, version 1.1, analysis brief.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-11-01

    The Carrier Intervention Effectiveness Model (CIEM) provides the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) with a tool for measuring the safety benefits of carrier interventions conducted under the Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) e...

  19. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : carrier intervention effectiveness model, version 1.0 : [analysis brief].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-01-01

    The Carrier Intervention Effectiveness Model (CIEM) : provides the Federal Motor Carrier Safety : Administration (FMCSA) with a tool for measuring : the safety benefits of carrier interventions conducted : under the Compliance, Safety, Accountability...

  20. Research performance measures and program evaluation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-10-01

    The Iowa Department of Transportation hosted a Peer Exchange on October 8-9, 2003. The : purpose of this exchange was to give research managers from several state departments of : transportation the opportunity to discuss research performance measure...

  1. Performance measures for metropolitan planning organizations.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-04-01

    Performance measurement is a topic of increasing importance to transportation agencies, as issues with : funding shortfalls and concerns about transportation system efficiency lead to a shift in how transportation : decision making is carried out. In...

  2. Performance measurement: A tool for program control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    Performance measurement is a management tool for planning, monitoring, and controlling as aspects of program and project management--cost, schedule, and technical requirements. It is a means (concept and approach) to a desired end (effective program planning and control). To reach the desired end, however, performance measurement must be applied and used appropriately, with full knowledge and recognition of its power and of its limitations--what it can and cannot do for the project manager. What is the potential of this management tool? What does performance measurement do that a traditional plan vs. actual technique cannot do? Performance measurement provides an improvement over the customary comparison of how much money was spent (actual cost) vs. how much was planned to be spent based on a schedule of activities (work planned). This commonly used plan vs. actual comparison does not allow one to know from the numerical data if the actual cost incurred was for work intended to be done.

  3. [Supply services at health facilities: measuring performance].

    PubMed

    Dacosta Claro, I

    2001-01-01

    Performance measurement, in their different meanings--either balance scorecard or outputs measurement--have become an essential tool in today's organizations (World-Class organizations) to improve service quality and reduce costs. This paper presents a performance measurement system for the hospital supply chain. The system is organized in different levels and groups of indicators in order to show a hierarchical, coherent and integrated vision of the processes. Thus, supply services performance is measured according to (1) financial aspects, (2) customers satisfaction aspects and (3) internal aspects of the processes performed. Since the informational needs of the managers vary within the administrative structure, the performance measurement system is defined in three hierarchical levels. Firstly, the whole supply chain, with the different interrelation of activities. Secondly, the three main processes of the chain--physical management of products, purchasing and negotiation processes and the local storage units. And finally, the performance measurement of each activity involved. The system and the indicators have been evaluated with the participation of 17 health services of Quebec (Canada), however, and due to the similarities of the operation, could be equally implemented in Spanish hospitals.

  4. ASUPT Automated Objective Performance Measurement System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waag, Wayne L.; And Others

    To realize its full research potential, a need exists for the development of an automated objective pilot performance evaluation system for use in the Advanced Simulation in Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT) facility. The present report documents the approach taken for the development of performance measures and also presents data collected…

  5. Work zone performance measures pilot test.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-01

    Currently, a well-defined and validated set of metrics to use in monitoring work zone performance do not : exist. This pilot test was conducted to assist state DOTs in identifying what work zone performance : measures can and should be targeted, what...

  6. Performance and evaluation of small construction safety training simulations.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, S M; Kidd, P S; Parshall, M B; Struttmann, T W

    2003-06-01

    Back- and fall-related injuries occur frequently in construction and are costly in terms of workers' compensation claims and lost productivity. Interventions are needed that address the susceptibility to these injuries. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a safety training intervention for small construction companies (performance and evaluation of these simulation exercises, not their effectiveness in preventing injuries. The intervention consisted of six latent-image narrative simulation exercises targeted at prevention of back- or fall-related injuries, which emphasized both the economic impact of injuries and the benefits of individual and organizational prevention strategies. Participants included owner-operators, supervisors and employees. Analyses were completed to determine participant scores on the intervention along with their perceptions of the quality, realism and applicability of the training. Mean pooled performance scores (percentage correct) were 83.3% [standard deviation (SD) = 8.9, n = 143] for three back simulations and 85.2% (SD = 8.9, n = 159) for three fall-related simulations. Mean total evaluation scores (percentage of maximum) were 83.1% (SD = 11.6) and 85.5% (SD = 11.7) for the back and fall simulations, respectively. Quality and realism evaluation scores were significantly higher than scores for applicability to work. Simulations were well received as safety training exercises. Given the heterogeneous work classifications found in small construction companies, it may be preferable to target safety intervention content to specific trades rather than aim for generality across trades.

  7. Safety of pediatric percutaneous liver biopsy performed by interventional radiologists.

    PubMed

    Potter, Carol; Hogan, Mark J; Henry-Kendjorsky, Katherine; Balint, Jane; Barnard, John A

    2011-08-01

    National data suggest that pediatric percutaneous liver biopsy is increasingly being performed by interventional radiologists rather than pediatric gastroenterologists. The objective of the present report is to describe the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous liver biopsy performed by interventional radiologists in a large cohort of children and to compare the results with the existing literature on biopsies performed by pediatric gastroenterologists. The medical records of 249 children undergoing ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy by interventional radiologists were reviewed for adverse events and success of obtaining tissue. Two hundred ninety-four biopsies were reviewed. There were no deaths. There were 2 instances of a 2-g or greater drop in hemoglobin following biopsy, neither of which was associated with clinical signs of hemorrhage. A small, asymptomatic pneumothorax quickly resolved without treatment. One patient developed Klebsiella sepsis 48  hours after biopsy. In all but 1 case, an adequate sample size was obtained. This low incidence of adverse events compares favorably with existing published reports of morbidity and mortality following percutaneous liver biopsy performed by pediatric gastroenterologists. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy performed by experienced pediatric interventional radiologists in a children's hospital setting is as safe and effective as biopsy performed by pediatric gastroenterologists.

  8. Measures of Searcher Performance: A Psychometric Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of medical students that was conducted to evaluate measures of performance on factual searches of INQUIRER, a full-text database in microbiology. Measures relating to recall, precision, search term overlap, and efficiency are discussed; reliability and construct validity are considered; and implications for future research are…

  9. PERFORMING QUALITY FLOW MEASUREMENTS AT MINE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate flow measurement data is vital to research, monitoring, and remediation efforts at mining sites. This guidebook has been prepared to provide a summary of information relating to the performance of low measurements, and how this information can be applied at mining sites....

  10. A simple graphical method for measuring inherent safety.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J P; Edwards, David W

    2003-11-14

    Inherently safer design (ISD) concepts have been with us for over two decades since their elaboration by Kletz [Chem. Ind. 9 (1978) 124]. Interest has really taken off globally since the early nineties after several major mishaps occurred during the eighties (Bhopal, Mexico city, Piper-alfa, Philips Petroleum, to name a few). Academic and industrial research personnel have been actively involved into devising inherently safer ways of production. The regulatory bodies have also shown deep interest since ISD makes the production safer and hence their tasks easier. Research funding has also been forthcoming for new developments as well as for demonstration projects.A natural question that arises is as to how to measure ISD characteristics of a process? Several researchers have worked on this [Trans. IChemE, Process Safety Environ. Protect. B 71 (4) (1993) 252; Inherent safety in process plant design, Ph.D. Thesis, VTT Publication Number 384, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland, 1999; Proceedings of the Mary Kay O'Connor Process Safety Center Symposium, 2001, p. 509]. Many of the proposed methods are very elegant, yet too involved for easy adoption by the industry which is scared of yet another safety analysis regime. In a recent survey [Trans. IChemE, Process Safety Environ. Prog. B 80 (2002) 115], companies desired a rather simple method to measure ISD. Simplification is also an important characteristic of ISD. It is therefore desirable to have a simple ISD measurement procedure. The ISD measurement procedure proposed in this paper can be used to differentiate between two or more processes for the same end product. The salient steps are: Consider each of the important parameters affecting the safety (e.g., temperature, pressure, toxicity, flammability, etc.) and the range of possible values these parameters can have for all the process routes under consideration for an end product. Plot these values for each step in each process route and compare. No

  11. Measuring performance in virtual reality phacoemulsification surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per; Laurell, Carl-Gustaf; Simawi, Wamidh; Skarman, Eva; Nordh, Leif; Nordqvist, Per

    2008-02-01

    We have developed a virtual reality (VR) simulator for phacoemulsification surgery. The current work aimed at developing a relative performance index that characterizes the performance of an individual trainee. We recorded measurements of 28 response variables during three iterated surgical sessions in 9 experienced cataract surgeons, separately for the sculpting phase and the evacuation phase of phacoemulsification surgery and compared their outcome to that of a reference group of naive trainees. We defined an individual overall performance index, an individual class specific performance index and an individual variable specific performance index. We found that on an average the experienced surgeons performed at a lower level than a reference group of naive trainees but that this was particularly attributed to a few surgeons. When their overall performance index was further analyzed as class specific performance index and variable specific performance index it was found that the low level performance was attributed to a behavior that is acceptable for an experienced surgeon but not for a naive trainee. It was concluded that relative performance indices should use a reference group that corresponds to the measured individual since the definition of optimal surgery may vary among trainee groups depending on their level of experience.

  12. Reconsidering the measurement of ancillary service performance.

    PubMed

    Griffin, D T; Rauscher, J A

    1987-08-01

    Prospective payment reimbursement systems have forced hospitals to review their costs more carefully. The result of the increased emphasis on costs is that many hospitals use costs, rather than margin, to judge the performance of ancillary services. However, arbitrary selection of performance measures for ancillary services can result in managerial decisions contrary to hospital objectives. Managerial accounting systems provide models which assist in the development of performance measures for ancillary services. Selection of appropriate performance measures provides managers with the incentive to pursue goals congruent with those of the hospital overall. This article reviews the design and implementation of managerial accounting systems, and considers the impact of prospective payment systems and proposed changes in capital reimbursement on this process.

  13. Improving competitiveness through performance-measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L J; Lockamy, A

    2001-12-01

    Parallels exist between the competitive pressures felt by U.S. manufacturers over the past 30 years and those experienced by healthcare providers today. Increasing market deregulation, changing government policies, and growing consumerism have altered the healthcare arena. Responding to similar pressures, manufacturers adopted a strategic orientation driven by customer needs and expectations that led them to achieve high performance levels and surpass their competition. The adoption of integrated performance-measurement systems was instrumental in these firms' success. An integrated performance-measurement model for healthcare organizations can help to blend the organization's strategy with the demands of the contemporary healthcare environment. Performance-measurement systems encourage healthcare organizations to focus on their mission and vision by aligning their strategic objectives and resource-allocation decisions with customer requirements.

  14. Emergency medical services key performance measurement in Asian cities.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nik Hisamuddin; Tanaka, Hideharu; Shin, Sang Do; Ng, Yih Yng; Piyasuwankul, Thammapad; Lin, Chih-Hao; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2015-01-01

    One of the key principles in the recommended standards is that emergency medical service (EMS) providers should continuously monitor the quality and safety of their services. This requires service providers to implement performance monitoring using appropriate and relevant measures including key performance indicators. In Asia, EMS systems are at different developmental phases and maturity. This will create difficultly in benchmarking or assessing the quality of EMS performance across the region. An attempt was made to compare the EMS performance index based on the structure, process, and outcome analysis. The data was collected from the Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcome Study (PAROS) data among few Asian cities, namely, Tokyo, Osaka, Singapore, Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur, Taipei, and Seoul. The parameters of inclusions were broadly divided into structure, process, and outcome measurements. The data was collected by the site investigators from each city and keyed into the electronic web-based data form which is secured strictly by username and passwords. Generally, there seems to be a more uniformity for EMS performance parameters among the more developed EMS systems. The major problem with the EMS agencies in the cities of developing countries like Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur is inadequate or unavailable data pertaining to EMS performance. There is non-uniformity in the EMS performance measurement across the Asian cities. This creates difficulty for EMS performance index comparison and benchmarking. Hopefully, in the future, collaborative efforts such as the PAROS networking group will further enhance the standardization in EMS performance reporting across the region.

  15. Using lagging and leading indicators for the evaluation of occupational safety and health performance in industry.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of occupational safety and health (OSH) management is closely related to the development of OSH performance measurement, which should include OSH outcomes (e.g., occupational accidents), OSH inputs (including working conditions) and OSH-related activities. The indicators used to measure the OSH outcomes are often called lagging indicators, and the indicators of inputs and OSH activities are leading indicators. A study was conducted in 60 companies in order to determine what kinds of indicators were used for OSH performance measurement by companies with different levels of OSH performance. The results reveal that the indicators most commonly used in all of the companies are those related to ensuring compliance with the statutory requirements. At the same time, the leading indicators are much more often adopted in companies with a higher performance level. These companies also much more often monitor on a regular basis the indicators adopted for the evaluation of their OSH performance.

  16. Using lagging and leading indicators for the evaluation of occupational safety and health performance in industry

    PubMed Central

    Pawłowska, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of occupational safety and health (OSH) management is closely related to the development of OSH performance measurement, which should include OSH outcomes (e.g., occupational accidents), OSH inputs (including working conditions) and OSH-related activities. The indicators used to measure the OSH outcomes are often called lagging indicators, and the indicators of inputs and OSH activities are leading indicators. A study was conducted in 60 companies in order to determine what kinds of indicators were used for OSH performance measurement by companies with different levels of OSH performance. The results reveal that the indicators most commonly used in all of the companies are those related to ensuring compliance with the statutory requirements. At the same time, the leading indicators are much more often adopted in companies with a higher performance level. These companies also much more often monitor on a regular basis the indicators adopted for the evaluation of their OSH performance. PMID:26647949

  17. Measuring safety culture in the ambulatory setting: the safety attitudes questionnaire--ambulatory version.

    PubMed

    Modak, Isitri; Sexton, J Bryan; Lux, Thomas R; Helmreich, Robert L; Thomas, Eric J

    2007-01-01

    Provider attitudes about issues pertinent to patient safety may be related to errors and adverse events. We know of no instruments that measure safety-related attitudes in the outpatient setting. To adapt the safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) to the outpatient setting and compare attitudes among different types of providers in the outpatient setting. We modified the SAQ to create a 62-item SAQ-ambulatory version (SAQ-A). Patient care staff in a multispecialty, academic practice rated their agreement with the items using a 5-point Likert scale. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to determine reliability of scale scores. Differences in SAQ-A scores between providers were assessed using ANOVA. Of the 409 staff, 282 (69%) returned surveys. One hundred ninety (46%) surveys were included in the analyses. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.68 to 0.86 for the scales: teamwork climate, safety climate, perceptions of management, job satisfaction, working conditions, and stress recognition. Physicians had the least favorable attitudes about perceptions of management while managers had the most favorable attitudes (mean scores: 50.4 +/- 22.5 vs 72.5 +/- 19.6, P < 0.05; percent with positive attitudes 18% vs 70%, respectively). Nurses had the most positive stress recognition scores (mean score 66.0 +/- 24.0). All providers had similar attitudes toward teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, and working conditions. The SAQ-A is a reliable tool for eliciting provider attitudes about the ambulatory work setting. Attitudes relevant to medical error may differ among provider types and reflect behavior and clinic operations that could be improved.

  18. Predictive models of safety based on audit findings: Part 2: Measurement of model validity.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Lin; Drury, Colin; Wu, Changxu; Paquet, Victor

    2013-07-01

    Part 1 of this study sequence developed a human factors/ergonomics (HF/E) based classification system (termed HFACS-MA) for safety audit findings and proved its measurement reliability. In Part 2, we used the human error categories of HFACS-MA as predictors of future safety performance. Audit records and monthly safety incident reports from two airlines submitted to their regulatory authority were available for analysis, covering over 6.5 years. Two participants derived consensus results of HF/E errors from the audit reports using HFACS-MA. We adopted Neural Network and Poisson regression methods to establish nonlinear and linear prediction models respectively. These models were tested for the validity of prediction of the safety data, and only Neural Network method resulted in substantially significant predictive ability for each airline. Alternative predictions from counting of audit findings and from time sequence of safety data produced some significant results, but of much smaller magnitude than HFACS-MA. The use of HF/E analysis of audit findings provided proactive predictors of future safety performance in the aviation maintenance field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Rail height effects on safety performance of Midwest Guardrail System.

    PubMed

    Asadollahi Pajouh, Mojdeh; Julin, Ramen D; Stolle, Cody S; Reid, John D; Faller, Ronald K

    2018-02-17

    Guardrail heights play a crucial role in the way that errant vehicles interact with roadside barriers. Low rail heights increase the propensity of vehicle rollover and override, whereas excessively tall rails promote underride. Further, rail mounting heights and post embedment depths may be altered by variations in roadside terrain. An increased guardrail height may be desirable to accommodate construction tolerances, soil erosion, frost heave, and future roadway overlays. This study aimed to investigate and identify a maximum safe installation height for the Midwest Guardrail System that would be robust and remain crashworthy before and after pavement overlays. A research investigation was performed to evaluate the safety performance of increased mounting heights for the standard 787-mm (31-in.)-tall Midwest Guardrail System (MGS) through crash testing and computer simulation. Two full-scale crash tests with small passenger cars were performed on the MGS with top-rail mounting heights of 864 and 914 mm (34 and 36 in.). Test results were then used to calibrate computer simulation models. In the first test, a small car impacted the MGS with 864-mm (34-in.) rail height at 102 km/h (63.6 mph) and 25.0° and was successfully redirected. In the second test, another small car impacted the MGS with a 914-mm (36-in.) rail height at 103 km/h (64.1 mph) and 25.6° and was successful. Both system heights satisfied the Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH) Test Level 3 (TL-3) evaluation criteria. Test results were then used to calibrate computer simulation models. A mounting height of 36 in. was determined to be the maximum guardrail height that would safely contain and redirect small car vehicles. Simulations confirmed that taller guardrail heights (i.e., 37 in.) would likely result in small car underride. In addition, simulation results indicated that passenger vehicle models were successfully contained by the 34- and 36-in.-tall MGS installed on approach slopes

  20. Public acceptability of highway safety countermeasures : volume IV, pedestrian measures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-06-01

    This volume is part of a larger study providing information about public attitudes : towards proposed highway safety countermeasures in three program areas: alcohol : and drugs, unsafe driving behaviors, and pedestrian safety. Pedestrian safety : cou...

  1. Driver performance measurement and analysis system (DPMAS). Volume 1, Description and operations manual

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1976-08-01

    A prototype driver performance measurement and analysis system (DPMAS) has been developed for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). This system includes a completely instrumented 1974 Chevrolet Impala capable of digitally record...

  2. Speed-measuring device performance specifications : across-the-road radar module

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-10-01

    This document contains the across-the-road radar speed-measuring device performance specifications developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) through a Cooperative Agreement with the International Association of Chiefs of...

  3. Safety and clinical performance of acoustic reflex tests.

    PubMed

    Hunter, L L; Ries, D T; Schlauch, R S; Levine, S C; Ward, W D

    1999-12-01

    Safety and effectiveness of acoustic reflex tests are important issues because these tests are widely applied to screen for retrocochlear pathology. Previous studies have reported moderately high sensitivity and specificity for detection of acoustic neuroma. However, there have been reports of possible iatrogenic hearing loss resulting from acoustic reflex threshold (ART) and decay (ARD) tests. This study assessed safety and clinical performance of ART tests for detection of acoustic neuroma. We report a case in which ARD testing resulted in a significant bilateral permanent threshold shift. This case was the impetus for us to investigate the clinical utility of ART and ARD tests. We analyzed sensitivity and specificity of ART, as well as asymmetry in pure-tone thresholds (PTT) for detection of acoustic neuroma in 56 tumor and 108 non-tumor ears. Sensitivity and specificity were higher for PTT asymmetry than for ART. Ipsilateral ART at 1000 Hz had poor sensitivity and specificity for detection of acoustic neuroma, and involves some potential risk to residual hearing for presentation levels higher than 115 dB SPL. Approximately half of the acoustic neuroma group had ipsilateral ARTs that would require administration of ARD tests at levels exceeding 115 dB SPL. Therefore, we conclude that PTT asymmetry is a more effective test for detection of acoustic neuroma, and involves no risk to residual hearing. Future studies of contralateral reflex threshold and ARD in combination with PTT asymmetry are recommended.

  4. Strategies for improving safety performance in construction firms.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Luis Fernando; Acuña, Diego; Diethelm, Sven; Pellicer, Eugenio

    2016-09-01

    Over the years many prevention management practices have been implemented to prevent and mitigate accidents at the construction site. However, there is little evidence of the effectiveness of individual or combined practices used by companies to manage occupational health and safety issues. The authors selected a sample of 1180 construction firms and 221 individual practices applied in these companies to analyze their effectiveness reducing injury rates over a period of four years in Chile. Different methods were used to study this massive database including: visual analyses of graphical information, statistical analyses and classification techniques. Results showed that practices related to safety incentives and rewards are the most effective from the accident rate viewpoint, even though they are seldom used by companies; on the other hand, practices related to accidents and incidents investigation had a slight negative impact on the accident rate because they are frequently used as a reactive measure. In general, the higher the percentage of prevention practices implemented in a strategy, the lower the accident rate. However, the analysis of the combined effect of prevention practices indicated that the choice of the right combination of practices was more important than just the number of practices implemented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Dread Factor: How Hazards and Safety Training Influence Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Michael J.; Salvador, Rommel O.; Smith-Crowe, Kristin; Chan-Serafin, Suzanne; Smith, Alexis; Sonesh, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of hypotheses derived from social and experiential learning theories, we meta-analytically investigated how safety training and workplace hazards impact the development of safety knowledge and safety performance. The results were consistent with an expected interaction between the level of engagement of safety training and hazardous…

  6. Performance and Safety Tests on Samsung 18650 Li-ion Cells: Two Cell Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Yi; Jeevarajan, Judith; Rehm, Raymond; Bragg, Bobby; Zhang, Wenlin

    2002-01-01

    In order to meet the applications for space shuttle in future, two types of Samsung cells, with capacity 1800 mAh and 2000 mAh, have been investigated. The studies focused on: (1) Performance tests: completed 250 cycles at various combinations of charge/discharge C rates and discharge capacity measurements at various temperatures; and (2) Safety tests: overcharge and overdischarge, heat abuse, short circuit, internal and external short, and vibration, vacuum, and drop tests

  7. Performance measures for transform data coding.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearl, J.; Andrews, H. C.; Pratt, W. K.

    1972-01-01

    This paper develops performance criteria for evaluating transform data coding schemes under computational constraints. Computational constraints that conform with the proposed basis-restricted model give rise to suboptimal coding efficiency characterized by a rate-distortion relation R(D) similar in form to the theoretical rate-distortion function. Numerical examples of this performance measure are presented for Fourier, Walsh, Haar, and Karhunen-Loeve transforms.

  8. Experimental Performance of a Frequency Measurement Circuit.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    STANDARDS 1963-A NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California N O In DTISEL ECTE. APR 26 1985 THESIS EXPERIMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF A FREQUENCY MEASUREMENT...CIRCUIT by CO George H. Eastwood December 198𔃾 Thesis Advisor: G. A. Myers * Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. * 85 4 2 105...ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Experimental Performance of a Master’s Thesis

  9. Hydrograph matching method for measuring model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, John

    2011-09-01

    SummaryDespite all the progress made over the years on developing automatic methods for analysing hydrographs and measuring the performance of rainfall-runoff models, automatic methods cannot yet match the power and flexibility of the human eye and brain. Very simple approaches are therefore being developed that mimic the way hydrologists inspect and interpret hydrographs, including the way that patterns are recognised, links are made by eye, and hydrological responses and errors are studied and remembered. In this paper, a dynamic programming algorithm originally designed for use in data mining is customised for use with hydrographs. It generates sets of "rays" that are analogous to the visual links made by the hydrologist's eye when linking features or times in one hydrograph to the corresponding features or times in another hydrograph. One outcome from this work is a new family of performance measures called "visual" performance measures. These can measure differences in amplitude and timing, including the timing errors between simulated and observed hydrographs in model calibration. To demonstrate this, two visual performance measures, one based on the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency and the other on the mean absolute error, are used in a total of 34 split-sample calibration-validation tests for two rainfall-runoff models applied to the Hodder catchment, northwest England. The customised algorithm, called the Hydrograph Matching Algorithm, is very simple to apply; it is given in a few lines of pseudocode.

  10. An empirical Bayes safety evaluation of tram/streetcar signal and lane priority measures in Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Naznin, Farhana; Currie, Graham; Sarvi, Majid; Logan, David

    2016-01-01

    Streetcars/tram systems are growing worldwide, and many are given priority to increase speed and reliability performance in mixed traffic conditions. Research related to the road safety impact of tram priority is limited. This study explores the road safety impacts of tram priority measures including lane and intersection/signal priority measures. A before-after crash study was conducted using the empirical Bayes (EB) method to provide more accurate crash impact estimates by accounting for wider crash trends and regression to the mean effects. Before-after crash data for 29 intersections with tram signal priority and 23 arterials with tram lane priority in Melbourne, Australia, were analyzed to evaluate the road safety impact of tram priority. The EB before-after analysis results indicated a statistically significant adjusted crash reduction rate of 16.4% after implementation of tram priority measures. Signal priority measures were found to reduce crashes by 13.9% and lane priority by 19.4%. A disaggregate level simple before-after analysis indicated reductions in total and serious crashes as well as vehicle-, pedestrian-, and motorcycle-involved crashes. In addition, reductions in on-path crashes, pedestrian-involved crashes, and collisions among vehicles moving in the same and opposite directions and all other specific crash types were found after tram priority implementation. Results suggest that streetcar/tram priority measures result in safety benefits for all road users, including vehicles, pedestrians, and cyclists. Policy implications and areas for future research are discussed.

  11. Environmental Health Practice: Statistically Based Performance Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Enander, Richard T.; Gagnon, Ronald N.; Hanumara, R. Choudary; Park, Eugene; Armstrong, Thomas; Gute, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. State environmental and health protection agencies have traditionally relied on a facility-by-facility inspection-enforcement paradigm to achieve compliance with government regulations. We evaluated the effectiveness of a new approach that uses a self-certification random sampling design. Methods. Comprehensive environmental and occupational health data from a 3-year statewide industry self-certification initiative were collected from representative automotive refinishing facilities located in Rhode Island. Statistical comparisons between baseline and postintervention data facilitated a quantitative evaluation of statewide performance. Results. The analysis of field data collected from 82 randomly selected automotive refinishing facilities showed statistically significant improvements (P<.05, Fisher exact test) in 4 major performance categories: occupational health and safety, air pollution control, hazardous waste management, and wastewater discharge. Statistical significance was also shown when a modified Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons was performed. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the new self-certification approach to environmental and worker protection is effective and can be used as an adjunct to further enhance state and federal enforcement programs. PMID:17267709

  12. 78 FR 76391 - Proposed Enhancements to the Motor Carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS) Public Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ...-0392] Proposed Enhancements to the Motor Carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS) Public Web Site AGENCY... proposed enhancements to the display of information on the Agency's Safety Measurement System (SMS) public Web site. On December 6, 2013, Advocates [[Page 76392

  13. Application of data mining in performance measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Michael F. S.; Chung, Walter W.; Wong, Tai Sun

    2001-10-01

    This paper proposes a structured framework for exploiting data mining application for performance measures. The context is set in an airline company is illustrated for the use of such framework. The framework takes in consideration of how a knowledge worker interacts with performance information at the enterprise level to support them to make informed decision in managing the effectiveness of operations. A case study of applying data mining technology for performance data in an airline company is illustrated. The use of performance measures is specifically applied to assist in the aircraft delay management process. The increasingly dispersed and complex operations of airline operation put much strain on the part of knowledge worker in using search, acquiring and analyzing information to manage performance. One major problem faced with knowledge workers is the identification of root causes of performance deficiency. The large amount of factors involved in the analyze the root causes can be time consuming and the objective of applying data mining technology is to reduce the time and resources needed for such process. The increasing market competition for better performance management in various industries gives rises to need of the intelligent use of data. Because of this, the framework proposed here is very much generalizable to industries such as manufacturing. It could assist knowledge workers who are constantly looking for ways to improve operation effectiveness through new initiatives and the effort is required to be quickly done to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace.

  14. Validating a driving simulator using surrogate safety measures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuedong; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Radwan, Essam; Wang, Xuesong; Chilakapati, Praveen

    2008-01-01

    Traffic crash statistics and previous research have shown an increased risk of traffic crashes at signalized intersections. How to diagnose safety problems and develop effective countermeasures to reduce crash rate at intersections is a key task for traffic engineers and researchers. This study aims at investigating whether the driving simulator can be used as a valid tool to assess traffic safety at signalized intersections. In support of the research objective, this simulator validity study was conducted from two perspectives, a traffic parameter (speed) and a safety parameter (crash history). A signalized intersection with as many important features (including roadway geometries, traffic control devices, intersection surroundings, and buildings) was replicated into a high-fidelity driving simulator. A driving simulator experiment with eight scenarios at the intersection were conducted to determine if the subjects' speed behavior and traffic risk patterns in the driving simulator were similar to what were found at the real intersection. The experiment results showed that speed data observed from the field and in the simulator experiment both follow normal distributions and have equal means for each intersection approach, which validated the driving simulator in absolute terms. Furthermore, this study used an innovative approach of using surrogate safety measures from the simulator to contrast with the crash analysis for the field data. The simulator experiment results indicated that compared to the right-turn lane with the low rear-end crash history record (2 crashes), subjects showed a series of more risky behaviors at the right-turn lane with the high rear-end crash history record (16 crashes), including higher deceleration rate (1.80+/-1.20 m/s(2) versus 0.80+/-0.65 m/s(2)), higher non-stop right-turn rate on red (81.67% versus 57.63%), higher right-turn speed as stop line (18.38+/-8.90 km/h versus 14.68+/-6.04 km/h), shorter following distance (30

  15. New paradigms for measuring clinical performance using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Jonathan P; Fowles, Jinnet B; Chan, Kitty S

    2012-06-01

    Measures of provider success are the centerpiece of quality improvement and pay-for-performance programs around the globe. In most nations, these measures are derived from administrative records, paper charts and consumer surveys; increasingly, electronic patient record systems are also being used. We use the term 'e-QMs' to describe quality measures that are based on data found within electronic health records and other related health information technology (HIT). We offer a framework or typology for e-QMs and describe opportunities and impediments associated with the transition from old to new If public and private systems of care are to effectively use HIT to support and evaluate health-care system quality and safety, the quality measurement field must embrace new paradigms and strategically address a series of technical, conceptual and practical challenges.

  16. Evaluating the Performance of the NASA LaRC CMF Motion Base Safety Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupton, Lawrence E.; Bryant, Richard B., Jr.; Carrelli, David J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the initial measured performance results of the previously documented NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) motion base hardware safety devices. These safety systems are required to prevent excessive accelerations that could injure personnel and damage simulator cockpits or the motion base structure. Excessive accelerations may be caused by erroneous commands or hardware failures driving an actuator to the end of its travel at high velocity, stepping a servo valve, or instantly reversing servo direction. Such commands may result from single order failures of electrical or hydraulic components within the control system itself, or from aggressive or improper cueing commands from the host simulation computer. The safety systems must mitigate these high acceleration events while minimizing the negative performance impacts. The system accomplishes this by controlling the rate of change of valve signals to limit excessive commanded accelerations. It also aids hydraulic cushion performance by limiting valve command authority as the actuator approaches its end of travel. The design takes advantage of inherent motion base hydraulic characteristics to implement all safety features using hardware only solutions.

  17. Performance Measurement in Helicopter Training and Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prophet, Wallace W.

    For almost 15 years, HumRRO Division No. 6 has conducted an active research program on techniques for measuring the flight performance of helicopter trainees and pilots. This program addressed both the elemental aspects of flying (i.e., maneuvers) and the mission- or goal-oriented aspects. A variety of approaches has been investigated, with the…

  18. Demystifying Results-Based Performance Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorjani, Hamid

    Many evaluators are convinced that Results-based Performance Measurement (RBPM) is an effective tool to improve service delivery and cost effectiveness in both public and private sectors. Successful RBPM requires self-directed and cross-functional work teams and the supporting infrastructure to make it work. There are many misconceptions and…

  19. Tools for Measuring and Improving Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurow, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains the need for meaningful performance measures in libraries and the Total Quality Management (TQM) approach to data collection. Five tools representing different stages of a TQM inquiry are covered (i.e., the Shewhart Cycle, flowcharts, cause-and-effect diagrams, Pareto charts, and control charts), and benchmarking is addressed. (Contains…

  20. Measuring Performance with Library Automated Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OFarrell, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the capability of three library automated systems to generate some of the datasets necessary to form the ISO (International Standards Organization) standard on performance measurement within libraries, based on research in Liverpool John Moores University (United Kingdom). Concludes that the systems are weak in generating the…

  1. Improved perceptual-motor performance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. F., Jr.; Reilly, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Battery of tests determines the primary dimensions of perceptual-motor performance. Eighteen basic measures range from simple tests to sophisticated electronic devices. Improved system has one unit for the subject containing test display and response elements, and one for the experimenter where test setups, programming, and scoring are accomplished.

  2. The five traps of performance measurement.

    PubMed

    Likierman, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Evaluating a company's performance often entails wading through a thicket of numbers produced by a few simple metrics, writes the author, and senior executives leave measurement to those whose specialty is spreadsheets. To take ownership of performance assessment, those executives should find qualitative, forward-looking measures that will help them avoid five common traps: Measuring against yourself. Find data from outside the company, and reward relative, rather than absolute, performance. Enterprise Rent-A-Car uses a service quality index to measure customers' repeat purchase intentions. Looking backward. Use measures that lead rather than lag the profits in your business. Humana, a health insurer, found that the sickest 10% of its patients account for 80% of its costs; now it offers customers incentives for early screening. Putting your faith in numbers. The soft drinks company Britvic evaluates its executive coaching program not by trying to assign it an ROI number but by tracking participants' careers for a year. Gaming your metrics. The law firm Clifford Chance replaced its single, easy-to-game metric of billable hours with seven criteria on which to base bonuses. Sticking to your numbers too long. Be precise about what you want to assess and explicit about what metrics are assessing it. Such clarity would have helped investors interpret the AAA ratings involved in the financial meltdown. Really good assessment will combine finance managers' relative independence with line managers' expertise.

  3. Directivity measurements of the violin during performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Jean-François; Migneron, Jean-Gabriel

    2005-04-01

    Many studies have shown that directivity of musical instruments is significant for the perceived sound within the hall and for performer's ease of hearing each other. The directivity patterns explain in part the differences between many common or special orchestral stage plots. Measurements of the violin's directivity have been performed using an acoustical intensimetry procedure. The precise directivity characteristics of isolated tones have been compared with the mean directivity resulting from performance of four extracts chosen among the orchestral repertoire. Results, which were measured in both horizontal and vertical planes, show interesting differences between the average directivity of each test. They lead to links with few important distinctions in the traditional violin's positions inside the orchestra.

  4. Performance Evaluation of Phasor Measurement Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Kasztenny, Bogdan; Madani, Vahid

    2008-07-20

    After two decades of phasor network deployment, phasor measurements are now available at many major substations and power plants. The North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (NASPI), supported by both the US Department of Energy and the North American Electricity Reliability Council (NERC), provides a forum to facilitate the efforts in phasor technology in North America. Phasor applications have been explored and some are in today’s utility practice. IEEE C37.118 Standard is a milestone in standardizing phasor measurements and defining performance requirements. To comply with IEEE C37.118 and to better understand the impact of phasor quality on applications, the NASPI Performance andmore » Standards Task Team (PSTT) initiated and accomplished the development of two important documents to address characterization of PMUs and instrumentation channels, which leverage prior work (esp. in WECC) and international experience. This paper summarizes the accomplished PSTT work and presents the methods for phasor measurement evaluation.« less

  5. 25 CFR 170.142 - How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Highway Safety Functions § 170.142 How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects? There are two...

  6. 25 CFR 170.142 - How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Highway Safety Functions § 170.142 How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects? There are two...

  7. 25 CFR 170.142 - How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Highway Safety Functions § 170.142 How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects? There are two...

  8. 25 CFR 170.142 - How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Highway Safety Functions § 170.142 How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects? There are two...

  9. 25 CFR 170.142 - How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Highway Safety Functions § 170.142 How can tribes obtain funds to perform highway safety projects? There are two...

  10. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is formore » inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.« less

  11. Evaluation of the in-service safety performance of safety-shape and vertical concrete barriers.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-16

    Roadside concrete barriers have been widely used to protect errant motorists from hitting : roadside hazards or obstacles. Two concrete barrier profiles, vertical and safety-shape, have been used : for this purpose. The safety-shape profile has been ...

  12. Health and Safety Guide for Home Performance Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Chris; Walker, Iain S.

    2012-02-15

    This report is intended to provide home performance contractor trainers with a resource to keep both their workers and home residents safe and healthy. This document is an attempt to describe what we currently believe is safe, what we believe is unsafe, and what we’re unsure about. It is intended to identify health and safety issues and provide historical context and current understanding of both risks and mitigation strategies. In addition, it provides links to more in-depth resources for each issue. When we tighten the thermal envelope of a house to improve comfort and reduce energy use, we have tomore » be sure that we are not compromising the indoor air quality of the home. This means identifying and mitigating or eliminating pollution sources before and after you make changes to the home. These sources can include materials and finishes in the home, exhaust gasses from combustion appliances, soil gasses such as radon, and moisture from a bathroom, kitchen, or unvented clothes dryer. Our first responsibility is to do no harm — this applies both to our clients and to our employees. Currently, there are many new products that are widely used but whose health effects are not well understood. Our in ability to have perfect information means the directive to do no harm can be difficult to obey. Each home is a little bit different, and in the face of a situation you’ve never encountered, it’s important to have a solid grasp of the fundamental concepts of building science when the hard and fast rules don’t apply . The home performance industry is gaining momentum, and has the potential to expand greatly as energy costs continue to rise. It is imperative that we remain vigilant about protecting the health and safety of our workers and our customers. It only takes a few news stories about a family that got sick after their home was tightened by a home performance contractor to scare off potential customers and taint the reputation of the entire industry

  13. NASA Space Technology Can Improve Soldier Health, Performance and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of NASA Life Sciences research is '... to enable a permanent human presence in space.' To meet this goal, NASA is creating alternative protocols designed to evaluate and test countermeasures that will account for and correct the environmental effects of space flight on crewmembers health, safety, and operational performance. NASA investigators have previously evaluated the effects of long-duration space flight on physiology and performance of cosmonauts aboard the MIR space station. They also initiated tests of a countermeasure, Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) designed to prevent and/or correct adverse effects, i.e., facilitate adaptation to space and re-adaptation to Earth. AFTE is a six-hour physiological training program that has proven to be a highly efficient and effective method for enabling people to monitor and voluntarily control a range of their own physiological responses, thereby minimizing adverse reactions to environmental stress. However, because of limited opportunities to test this technology with space flight crews, it is essential to find operational or 'real world' environments in which to validate the efficacy of this approach.

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Insulin Glargine 300 U/mL Versus Insulin Glargine 100 U/mL in High-Risk and Low-Risk Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Stratified Using Common Clinical Performance Measures.

    PubMed

    Lingvay, Ildiko; Chao, Jason; Dalal, Mehul R; Meneghini, Luigi F

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether previously reported reductions in hypoglycemia associated with insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) compared with insulin glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) are impacted by patient risk category in type 2 diabetes (T2D), clinical performance measures based on the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) were applied to patient-level data from the EDITION 2 and EDITION 3 clinical trials that compared Gla-300 and Gla-100. In this post hoc analysis, patients were stratified as low risk (LR) if patients were <65 years old with no comorbidities derived from HEDIS (HbA1c target <7.0% [53 mmol/mol]), or as high risk (HR) if patients were either ≥65 years old or had one or more HEDIS-defined comorbidities (HbA1c target <8.0% [64 mmol/mol]). Primary endpoint was a composite of patients achieving HbA1c target without confirmed or severe hypoglycemia over 6 months in the different treatment groups in each of the EDITION trials. There was a statistically nonsignificant trend of more patients treated with Gla-300 achieving the composite endpoint compared with Gla-100 in both the LR and HR patient cohorts, regardless of prior insulin experience. A similar trend was observed for the composite endpoint of HbA1c target without nocturnal hypoglycemia. There is a consistent, nonsignificant trend suggesting that Gla-300 might reduce the burden of hypoglycemia compared with Gla-100 in patients with T2D irrespective of whether they are classed as LR or HR based on age- and National Committee for Quality Assurance Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set-derived comorbidities.

  15. Microgravity effects on standardized cognitive performance measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiflett, Samuel G.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment, selected to fly on the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) Spacelab mission, is to determine the effects of microgravity upon the cognitive skills which are critical to successful performance of many tasks on board the Space Shuttle. Six tests from the Unified Tri-service Cognitive Performance Assessment Battery (UTC-PAB) will be administered to the Mission Specialists to fulfill the goals of this experiment. These tests are based upon current theoretical models of human performance and the hypothesized effects of microgravity. The principle objective is the identification of the effects of microgravity upon specific information processing skills affecting performance from those of fatigue and shifts in work/rest cycles. Multiple measures of both short and long term fatigue will be obtained and used as a major independent variable for the analysis of these performance data. Scientific supporting studies will determine optimum practice and performance testing schedules for the astronauts. The same tests will be used post-flight to collect data on the recovery of any cognitive performance impairment compared with pre-flight, baseline levels.

  16. Measuring surgical performance: A risky game?

    PubMed

    Kiernan, F; Rahman, F

    2015-08-01

    Interest in performance measurement has been driven by increased demand for better indicators of hospital quality of care. This is due in part to policy makers wishing to benchmark standards of care and implement quality improvements, and also by an increased demand for transparency and accountability. We describe the role of performance measurement, which is not only about quality improvement, but also serves as a guide in allocating resources within health systems, and between health, education, and social welfare systems. As hospital based healthcare is responsible for the most cost within the healthcare system, and treats the most severely ill of patients, it is no surprise that performance measurement has focused attention on hospital based care, and in particular on surgery, as an important means of improving quality and accountability. We are particularly concerned about the choice of mortality as an outcome measure in surgery, as this choice assumes that all mortality in surgery is preventable. In reality, as a low quality indicator of care it risks both gaming, and cream-skimming, unless accurate risk adjustment exists. Further concerns relate to the public reporting of this outcome measure. As mortality rates are an imperfect measure of quality, the reputation of individual surgeons will be threatened by the public release of this data. Significant effort should be made to communicate the results to the public in an appropriate manner. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coming up short on nonfinancial performance measurement.

    PubMed

    Ittner, Christopher D; Larcker, David F

    2003-11-01

    Companies in increasing numbers are measuring customer loyalty, employee satisfaction, and other nonfinancial areas of performance that they believe affect profitability. But they've failed to relate these measures to their strategic goals or establish a connection between activities undertaken and financial outcomes achieved. Failure to make such connections has led many companies to misdirect their investments and reward ineffective managers. Extensive field research now shows that businesses make some common mistakes when choosing, analyzing, and acting on their nonfinancial measures. Among these mistakes: They set the wrong performance targets because they focus too much on short-term financial results, and they use metrics that lack strong statistical validity and reliability. As a result, the companies can't demonstrate that improvements in nonfinancial measures actually affect their financial results. The authors lay out a series of steps that will allow companies to realize the genuine promise of nonfinancial performance measures. First, develop a model that proposes a causal relationship between the chosen nonfinancial drivers of strategic success and specific outcomes. Next, take careful inventory of all the data within your company. Then use established statistical methods for validating the assumed relationships and continue to test the model as market conditions evolve. Finally, base action plans on analysis of your findings, and determine whether those plans and their investments actually produce the desired results. Nonfinancial measures will offer little guidance unless you use a process for choosing and analyzing them that relies on sophisticated quantitative and qualitative inquiries into the factors actually contributing to economic results.

  18. Methods for identifying high collision concentrations for identifying potential safety improvements : development of advanced type 2 safety performance functions.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-30

    This research developed advanced type 2 safety performance functions (SPF) for roadway segments, intersections and ramps on the entire Caltrans network. The advanced type 2 SPFs included geometrics, traffic volume and hierarchical random effects, whi...

  19. Choice and Change of Measures in Performance-Measurement Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    associated costs . 3 Discussions of many current accounting and performance-measurement issues can be...change: an exploratory study. Accounting , Organizations, and Society, 24(3), 189-204. Adimando, C., Butler, R., Malley, S ., Ravid, S . A., Shepro, R...impact of contextual and process factors on the evaluation of activity-based costing systems. Accounting , Organizations and Society, 24, 525-559. Antle

  20. Using Performance Measures to Allocate Consumable Funding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    The Air Force is now using the Customer Oriented Leveling Technique (COLT) to determine levels for consumable items at its bases. COLT is an...Overview • COLT is a system to set AF retail stock levels for DLA-managed consumable parts to minimize expected customer wait time (ECWT) • COLT...changed please list both.) Original title on 712 A/B: Using Performance Measures to Allocate Consumable Funding If the title was revised

  1. Measurement-based reliability/performability models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsueh, Mei-Chen

    1987-01-01

    Measurement-based models based on real error-data collected on a multiprocessor system are described. Model development from the raw error-data to the estimation of cumulative reward is also described. A workload/reliability model is developed based on low-level error and resource usage data collected on an IBM 3081 system during its normal operation in order to evaluate the resource usage/error/recovery process in a large mainframe system. Thus, both normal and erroneous behavior of the system are modeled. The results provide an understanding of the different types of errors and recovery processes. The measured data show that the holding times in key operational and error states are not simple exponentials and that a semi-Markov process is necessary to model the system behavior. A sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate the significance of using a semi-Markov process, as opposed to a Markov process, to model the measured system.

  2. Advanced Ceramics Property and Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael; Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the what, how, how not, and why for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committees inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of all of the standards in one volume.

  3. The dread factor: how hazards and safety training influence learning and performance.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael J; Salvador, Rommel O; Smith-Crowe, Kristin; Chan-Serafin, Suzanne; Smith, Alexis; Sonesh, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of hypotheses derived from social and experiential learning theories, we meta-analytically investigated how safety training and workplace hazards impact the development of safety knowledge and safety performance. The results were consistent with an expected interaction between the level of engagement of safety training and hazardous event/exposure severity in the promotion of safety knowledge and performance. For safety knowledge and safety performance, highly engaging training was considerably more effective than less engaging training when hazardous event/exposure severity was high, whereas highly and less engaging training had comparable levels of effectiveness when hazardous event/exposure severity was low. Implications of these findings for theory testing and incorporating information on objective risk into workplace safety research and practice are discussed.

  4. Obtaining Valid Safety Data for Software Safety Measurement and Process Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor r.; Zelkowitz, Marvin V.; Layman, Lucas; Dangle, Kathleen; Diep, Madeline

    2010-01-01

    We report on a preliminary case study to examine software safety risk in the early design phase of the NASA Constellation spaceflight program. Our goal is to provide NASA quality assurance managers with information regarding the ongoing state of software safety across the program. We examined 154 hazard reports created during the preliminary design phase of three major flight hardware systems within the Constellation program. Our purpose was two-fold: 1) to quantify the relative importance of software with respect to system safety; and 2) to identify potential risks due to incorrect application of the safety process, deficiencies in the safety process, or the lack of a defined process. One early outcome of this work was to show that there are structural deficiencies in collecting valid safety data that make software safety different from hardware safety. In our conclusions we present some of these deficiencies.

  5. Hydrogen Safety Sensor Performance and Use Gap Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, William J; Burgess, Robert M; Schmidt, Kara

    Hydrogen sensors are recognized as an important technology for facilitating the safe implementation of hydrogen as an alternative fuel, and there are numerous reports of a sensor alarm successfully preventing a potentially serious event. However, gaps in sensor metrological specifications, as well as in their performance for some applications, exist.The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technology Office published a short list of critical gaps in the 2007 and 2012 multiyear project plans; more detailed gap analyses were independently performed by the JRC and NREL. There have been, however, some significant advances in sensor technologies since these assessments, includingmore » the commercial availability of hydrogen sensors with fast response times (t90 less than 1 s, which had been an elusive DOE target since 2007), improved robustness to chemical poisons, improved selectivity, and improved lifetime and stability. These improvements, however, have not been universal and typically pertain to select platforms or models. Moreover, as hydrogen markets grow and new applications are being explored, more demands will be imposed on sensor performance. The hydrogen sensor laboratories at NREL and JRC are currently updating the hydrogen safety sensor gap analysis through direct interaction with international stakeholders in the hydrogen community, especially end-users. NREL and the JRC are currently organizing a series of workshops (in Europe and the U.S.) with sensor developers, end-users, and other stakeholders in 2017 to identify technology gaps and to develop a path forward to address them. One workshop is scheduled for May 10 in Brussels, Belgium at the Headquarters of the Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking. A second workshop is planned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, CO, USA. This presentation will review improvements in sensor technologies in the past 5 to 10 years, identify gaps in sensor performance and use requirements, and

  6. Integrating health and safety in the workplace: how closely aligning health and safety strategies can yield measurable benefits.

    PubMed

    Loeppke, Ronald R; Hohn, Todd; Baase, Catherine; Bunn, William B; Burton, Wayne N; Eisenberg, Barry S; Ennis, Trish; Fabius, Raymond; Hawkins, R Jack; Hudson, T Warner; Hymel, Pamela A; Konicki, Doris; Larson, Paul; McLellan, Robert K; Roberts, Mark A; Usrey, Cary; Wallace, Joseph A; Yarborough, Charles M; Siuba, Justina

    2015-05-01

    To better understand how integrating health and safety strategies in the workplace has evolved and establish a replicable, scalable framework for advancing the concept with a system of health and safety metrics, modeled after the Dow Jones Sustainability Index. Seven leading national and international programs aimed at creating a culture of health and safety in the workplace were compared and contrasted. A list of forty variables was selected, making it clear there is a wide variety of approaches to integration of health and safety in the workplace. Depending on how well developed the culture of health and safety is within a company, there are unique routes to operationalize and institutionalize the integration of health and safety strategies to achieve measurable benefits to enhance the overall health and well-being of workers, their families, and the community.

  7. Transformational leadership and safety performance among nurses: the mediating role of knowledge-related job characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Ilse; Vlerick, Peter

    2014-03-01

    To report the impact of transformational leadership on two dimensions of nurses' safety performance (i.e. safety compliance and safety participation) and to study the mediating role of knowledge-related job characteristics in this relationship. Safety performance refers to the behaviours that employees exhibit to adhere to safety guidelines and to promote health and safety at their workplace. Nurses' safety performance is a major challenge for healthcare settings, urging the need to identify the key determinants and psychological mechanisms that influence it. A cross-sectional survey study. The study was carried out in September 2010 in a large Belgian hospital. We used self-administered questionnaires; 152 nurses participated. The hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression analyses. In line with our first hypothesis, the results show that transformational leadership exerted a significant positive impact on both dimensions of nurses' safety performance. This positive relation was mediated by knowledge-related job characteristics, supporting our second hypothesis. Head nurses' transformational leadership can enhance nurses' compliance with and participation in safety. Furthermore, transformational head nurses are able to influence the perception that their nurses have about the kind and amount of knowledge in their job, which can also lead to increases in both dimensions of nurses' safety performance. This study therefore demonstrates the key impact that transformational head nurses have, both directly and indirectly, on the safety performance of their nurses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Understanding the relationship between safety culture dimensions and safety performance of construction projects through partial least square method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latief, Yusuf; Machfudiyanto, Rossy A.; Arifuddin, Rosmariani; Yogiswara, Yoko

    2017-03-01

    Based on the data, 32% of accidental cases in Indonesia occurs on constructional sectors. It is supported by the data from Public Work and Housing Department that 27.43% of the implementation level of Safety Management System policy at construction companies in Indonesia remains unsafe categories. Moreover, there are dimensions of occupational safety culture formed including leadership, behavior, strategy, policy, process, people, safety cost, value and contract system. The aim of this study is to determine the model of an effective safety culture and know the relationship between dimensions in construction industry. The method used in this research was questionnaire survey which was distributed to the sample of construction companies either in a national private one in Indonesia. The result of this research is supposed to be able to illustrate the development of the relationship among occupational safety culture dimensions which have influences to the performances of constructional companies in Indonesia.

  9. Improving health, safety and energy efficiency in New Zealand through measuring and applying basic housing standards.

    PubMed

    Gillespie-Bennett, Julie; Keall, Michael; Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Baker, Michael G

    2013-08-02

    Substandard housing is a problem in New Zealand. Historically there has been little recognition of the important aspects of housing quality that affect people's health and safety. In this viewpoint article we outline the importance of assessing these factors as an essential step to improving the health and safety of New Zealanders and household energy efficiency. A practical risk assessment tool adapted to New Zealand conditions, the Healthy Housing Index (HHI), measures the physical characteristics of houses that affect the health and safety of the occupants. This instrument is also the only tool that has been validated against health and safety outcomes and reported in the international peer-reviewed literature. The HHI provides a framework on which a housing warrant of fitness (WOF) can be based. The HHI inspection takes about one hour to conduct and is performed by a trained building inspector. To maximise the effectiveness of this housing quality assessment we envisage the output having two parts. The first would be a pass/fail WOF assessment showing whether or not the house meets basic health, safety and energy efficiency standards. The second component would rate each main assessment area (health, safety and energy efficiency), potentially on a five-point scale. This WOF system would establish a good minimum standard for rental accommodation as well encouraging improved housing performance over time. In this article we argue that the HHI is an important, validated, housing assessment tool that will improve housing quality, leading to better health of the occupants, reduced home injuries, and greater energy efficiency. If required, this tool could be extended to also cover resilience to natural hazards, broader aspects of sustainability, and the suitability of the dwelling for occupants with particular needs.

  10. Effect of occupational safety measures on micronucleus frequency in semiconductor workers.

    PubMed

    Winker, Robert; Roos, Gerhard; Pilger, Alexander; Rüdiger, Hugo W

    2008-02-01

    To examine whether semiconductor workers exposed to complex mixtures of chemical waste show an increase in genotoxic effects, and, if so, whether occupational safety measures protect these workers. To assess chemical exposure in the workplace, air monitoring of boron trifluoride and boron trichloride was performed and urinary concentrations of fluoride were measured. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus test on isolated lymphocytes was used for the detection of genotoxic effects. Two series of monitoring have been performed in order to assess the effect of implemented protection measures. We found a significantly higher mean frequency of micronuclei in exposed workers than in controls, whereas air monitoring and measurement of urinary fluoride failed to detect chemical exposure of these workers. Twelve years after implementation of protective measures, the mean level of micronuclei in exposed individuals was found to be as low as those from controls. These findings indicate that exposed workers in the semiconductor industry may have an increased risk of genotoxic effects from complex mixtures of chemical waste products. The decline of the mean level of micronuclei in exposed workers down to the base level of controls after implementation of protective measures points to the significance of adequate safety standards to protect against chromosomal damage in semiconductor personnel.

  11. Work support, psychological well-being and safety performance among nurses in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kenchi C K

    2018-02-06

    This study investigated the mediating role of psychological well-being between work support and safety performance of 314 Hong Kong nurses, using self-reported questionnaires. Results showed that psychological well-being mediated the effects of work support on safety performance. The findings illustrate that work support was an important element to improve psychological well-being. This could generate better safety performance of the nurses. Implications and limitations are discussed.

  12. 75 FR 63345 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Increased Safety Measures for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... with a wide range of experts in state and Federal governments, academic institutions, and industry and... measures and performance-based standards recommended in the Safety Measures Report will be analyzed for... government, academic institutions, and industry and advocacy organizations. In addition, draft...

  13. Are measurements of patient safety culture and adverse events valid and reliable? Results from a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Farup, Per G

    2015-05-02

    The association between measurements of the patient safety culture and the "true" patient safety has been insufficiently documented, and the validity of the tools used for the measurements has been questioned. This study explored associations between the patient safety culture and adverse events, and evaluated the validity of the tools. In 2008/2009, a survey on patient safety culture was performed with Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) in two medical departments in two geographically separated hospitals of Innlandet Hospital Trust. Later, a retrospective analysis of adverse events during the same period was performed with the Global Trigger Tool (GTT). The safety culture and adverse events were compared between the departments. 185 employees participated in the study, and 272 patient records were analysed. The HSOPSC scores were lower and adverse events less prevalent in department 1 than in department 2. In departments 1 and 2 the mean HSOPSC scores (SD) were at the unit level 3.62 (0.42) and 3.90 (0.37) (p < 0.001), and at the hospital level 3.35 (1.53) and 3.67 (0.53) (ns, p = 0.19) respectively. The proportion of records with adverse events were 10/135 (7%) and 28/137 (20%) (p = 0.003) respectively. There was an inverse association between the patient safety culture and adverse events. Until the criterion validity of the tools for measuring patient safety culture and tracking of adverse events have been further evaluated, measurement of patient safety culture could not be used as a proxy for the "true" safety.

  14. 33 CFR 165.1319 - Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1319 Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance... Federal Register. (b) Location. The following is a safety zone: All waters of Lake Washington encompassed...

  15. 41 CFR 102-80.130 - Who must perform the equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who must perform the equivalent level of safety analysis? 102-80.130 Section 102-80.130 Public Contracts and Property Management...

  16. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety and...

  17. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety and...

  18. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety and...

  19. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety and...

  20. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety and...

  1. Measuring and improving performance in incident management.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-03-01

    Traffic incidents account for about 25 percent of traffic congestion and delay. Clearing incidents rapidly is crucial in : minimizing congestion, reducing secondary crashes and improving safety for both emergency responders and : travelers. Especiall...

  2. Performance measures for arterial traffic signal systems.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-05-01

    This project was conducted to investigate new concepts, new tools and emerging technologies directed at enhancing traffic operations and safety on signalized urban arterials that operate under saturated conditions. McFarland Boulevard, a six-lane urb...

  3. Federal motor carrier safety administration safety 2010 strategy and performance planning : project description

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-12-01

    The Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act (MCSIA) of 1999, Pub. L. 106-159, created the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) in January 2000. Section 104 of the Act requires the Secretary to develop a long-term strategy for improving co...

  4. 76 FR 20070 - Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation... application. Background: NASTAR applied for, and received, a safety approval for the ability of its Space... approval are applicant developed per 14 CFR 414.19 (a)(4). NASTAR's [[Page 20071

  5. A performance improvement plan to increase nurse adherence to use of medication safety software.

    PubMed

    Gavriloff, Carrie

    2012-08-01

    Nurses can protect patients receiving intravenous (IV) medication by using medication safety software to program "smart" pumps to administer IV medications. After a patient safety event identified inconsistent use of medication safety software by nurses, a performance improvement team implemented the Deming Cycle performance improvement methodology. The combined use of improved direct care nurse communication, programming strategies, staff education, medication safety champions, adherence monitoring, and technology acquisition resulted in a statistically significant (p < .001) increase in nurse adherence to using medication safety software from 28% to above 85%, exceeding national benchmark adherence rates (Cohen, Cooke, Husch & Woodley, 2007; Carefusion, 2011). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microbiological performance of a food safety management system in a food service operation.

    PubMed

    Lahou, E; Jacxsens, L; Daelman, J; Van Landeghem, F; Uyttendaele, M

    2012-04-01

    The microbiological performance of a food safety management system in a food service operation was measured using a microbiological assessment scheme as a vertical sampling plan throughout the production process, from raw materials to final product. The assessment scheme can give insight into the microbiological contamination and the variability of a production process and pinpoint bottlenecks in the food safety management system. Three production processes were evaluated: a high-risk sandwich production process (involving raw meat preparation), a medium-risk hot meal production process (starting from undercooked raw materials), and a low-risk hot meal production process (reheating in a bag). Microbial quality parameters, hygiene indicators, and relevant pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Bacillus cereus, and Escherichia coli O157) were in accordance with legal criteria and/or microbiological guidelines, suggesting that the food safety management system was effective. High levels of total aerobic bacteria (>3.9 log CFU/50 cm(2)) were noted occasionally on gloves of food handlers and on food contact surfaces, especially in high contamination areas (e.g., during handling of raw material, preparation room). Core control activities such as hand hygiene of personnel and cleaning and disinfection (especially in highly contaminated areas) were considered points of attention. The present sampling plan was used to produce an overall microbiological profile (snapshot) to validate the food safety management system in place.

  7. Use of portable ladders - field observations and self-reported safety performance in the cable TV industry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Brunette, Christopher; Lee, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Portable ladders incidents remain a major cause of falls from heights. This study reported field observations of environments, work conditions and safety behaviour involving portable ladders and their correlations with self-reported safety performance. Seventy-five professional installers of a company in the cable and other pay TV industry were observed for 320 ladder usages at their worksites. The participants also filled out a questionnaire to measure self-reported safety performance. Proper setup on slippery surfaces, correct method for ladder inclination setup and ladder secured at the bottom had the lowest compliance with best practices and training guidelines. The observation compliance score was found to have significant correlation with straight ladder inclined angle (Pearson's r = 0.23, p < 0.0002) and employees' self-reported safety participation (r = 0.29, p < 0.01). The results provide a broad perspective on employees' safety compliance and identify areas for improving safety behaviours. Practitioner Summary: A checklist was used while observing professional installers of a cable company for portable ladder usage at their worksites. Items that had the lowest compliance with best practices and training guidelines were identified. The results provide a broad perspective on employees' safety compliance and identify areas for improving safety behaviours.

  8. Measuring the performance of maintenance service outsourcing.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Antonio Miguel; Rincon, Adriana Maria Rios; Haugan, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this paper are (1) to identify the characteristics of maintenance service providers that directly impact maintenance service quality, using 18 independent covariables; (2) to quantify the change in risk these covariables present to service quality, measured in terms of equipment turnaround time (TAT). A survey was applied to every maintenance service provider (n = 19) for characterization purposes. The equipment inventory was characterized, and the TAT variable recorded and monitored for every work order of each service provider (N = 1,025). Finally, the research team conducted a statistical analysis to accomplish the research objectives. The results of this study offer strong empirical evidence that the most influential variables affecting the quality of maintenance service performance are the following: type of maintenance, availability of spare parts in the country, user training, technological complexity of the equipment, distance between the company and the hospital, and the number of maintenance visits performed by the company. The strength of the results obtained by the Cox model built are supported by the measure of the Rp,e(2) = 0.57 with a value of Rp,e= 0.75. Thus, the model explained 57% of the variation in equipment TAT, with moderate high positive correlation between the dependent variable (TAT) and independent variables.

  9. Evaluation of emergency department performance – a systematic review on recommended performance and quality-in-care measures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluation of emergency department (ED) performance remains a difficult task due to the lack of consensus on performance measures that reflects high quality, efficiency, and sustainability. Aim To describe, map, and critically evaluate which performance measures that the published literature regard as being most relevant in assessing overall ED performance. Methods Following the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic literature review of review articles reporting accentuated ED performance measures was conducted in the databases of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Study eligibility criteria includes: 1) the main purpose was to discuss, analyse, or promote performance measures best reflecting ED performance, 2) the article was a review article, and 3) the article reported macro-level performance measures, thus reflecting an overall departmental performance level. Results A number of articles addresses this study’s objective (n = 14 of 46 unique hits). Time intervals and patient-related measures were dominant in the identified performance measures in review articles from US, UK, Sweden and Canada. Length of stay (LOS), time between patient arrival to initial clinical assessment, and time between patient arrivals to admission were highlighted by the majority of articles. Concurrently, “patients left without being seen” (LWBS), unplanned re-attendance within a maximum of 72 hours, mortality/morbidity, and number of unintended incidents were the most highlighted performance measures that related directly to the patient. Performance measures related to employees were only stated in two of the 14 included articles. Conclusions A total of 55 ED performance measures were identified. ED time intervals were the most recommended performance measures followed by patient centeredness and safety performance measures. ED employee related performance measures were rarely mentioned in the investigated literature. The study’s results allow for advancement

  10. Evaluation of emergency department performance - a systematic review on recommended performance and quality-in-care measures.

    PubMed

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter; Forberg, Jakob Lundager

    2013-08-09

    Evaluation of emergency department (ED) performance remains a difficult task due to the lack of consensus on performance measures that reflects high quality, efficiency, and sustainability. To describe, map, and critically evaluate which performance measures that the published literature regard as being most relevant in assessing overall ED performance. Following the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic literature review of review articles reporting accentuated ED performance measures was conducted in the databases of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Study eligibility criteria includes: 1) the main purpose was to discuss, analyse, or promote performance measures best reflecting ED performance, 2) the article was a review article, and 3) the article reported macro-level performance measures, thus reflecting an overall departmental performance level. A number of articles addresses this study's objective (n = 14 of 46 unique hits). Time intervals and patient-related measures were dominant in the identified performance measures in review articles from US, UK, Sweden and Canada. Length of stay (LOS), time between patient arrival to initial clinical assessment, and time between patient arrivals to admission were highlighted by the majority of articles. Concurrently, "patients left without being seen" (LWBS), unplanned re-attendance within a maximum of 72 hours, mortality/morbidity, and number of unintended incidents were the most highlighted performance measures that related directly to the patient. Performance measures related to employees were only stated in two of the 14 included articles. A total of 55 ED performance measures were identified. ED time intervals were the most recommended performance measures followed by patient centeredness and safety performance measures. ED employee related performance measures were rarely mentioned in the investigated literature. The study's results allow for advancement towards improved performance measurement and

  11. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Polzin, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Discharge current, terminal voltage, and mass bit measurements are performed on a coaxial gallium electromagnetic thruster at discharge currents in the range of 7-23 kA. It is found that the mass bit varies quadratically with the discharge current which yields a constant exhaust velocity of 20 km/s. Increasing the electrode radius ratio of the thruster from to 2.6 to 3.4 increases the thruster efficiency from 21% to 30%. When operating with a central gallium anode, macroparticles are ejected at all energy levels tested. A central gallium cathode ejects macroparticles when the current density exceeds 3.7 10(exp 8) A/square m . A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in the discharge, as well as annular electrode species at higher energy levels. Axial Langmuir triple probe measurements yield electron temperatures in the range of 0.8-3.8 eV and electron densities in the range of 8 x 10(exp )20 to 1.6 x 10(exp 21) m(exp -3) . Triple probe measurements suggest an exhaust plume with a divergence angle of 9 , and a completely doubly ionized plasma at the ablating thruster cathode.

  12. Identifying the most significant indicators of the total road safety performance index.

    PubMed

    Tešić, Milan; Hermans, Elke; Lipovac, Krsto; Pešić, Dalibor

    2018-04-01

    The review of the national and international literature dealing with the assessment of the road safety level has shown great efforts of the authors who tried to define the methodology for calculating the composite road safety index on a territory (region, state, etc.). The procedure for obtaining a road safety composite index of an area has been largely harmonized. The question that has not been fully resolved yet concerns the selection of indicators. There is a wide range of road safety indicators used to show a road safety situation on a territory. Road safety performance index (RSPI) obtained on the basis of a larger number of safety performance indicators (SPIs) enable decision makers to more precisely define the earlier goal- oriented actions. However, recording a broader comprehensive set of SPIs helps identify the strengths and weaknesses of a country's road safety system. Providing high quality national and international databases that would include comparable SPIs seems to be difficult since a larger number of countries dispose of a small number of identical indicators available for use. Therefore, there is a need for calculating a road safety performance index with a limited number of indicators (RSPI ln n ) which will provide a comparison of a sufficient quality, of as many countries as possible. The application of the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method and correlative analysis has helped to check if the RSPI ln n is likely to be of sufficient quality. A strong correlation between the RSPI ln n and the RSPI has been identified using the proposed methodology. Based on this, the most contributing indicators and methodologies for gradual monitoring of SPIs, have been defined for each country analyzed. The indicator monitoring phases in the analyzed countries have been defined in the following way: Phase 1- the indicators relating to alcohol, speed and protective systems; Phase 2- the indicators relating to roads and Phase 3- the indicators relating to

  13. Senate examines measures to improve nuclear safety following Japan disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    One year after Japan suffered a devastating magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the resulting tsunami and nuclear disaster, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has taken a number of measures to try to ensure that nuclear plants in the United States are safe from natural hazards. At a U.S. Senate hearing on 15 March, NRC chair Gregory Jaczko announced that the commission had issued three key orders and several requests for information on 12 March that plant licensees must follow, and that NRC also plans to take additional actions. However, the commission is not moving quickly enough in some areas, such as ensuring that all plants are safe from seismic hazards, including those in areas with low seismic activity, according to Jaczko's testimony before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works (EPW) and the Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety. The 12 March orders require licensees to have strategies to maintain or restore core cooling, containment, and spent-fuel pool cooling capabilities "following a beyond-design-basis extreme natural event" and have a reliable indication of the water level in spent-fuel storage pools.

  14. Intelligent tires for improved tire safety using wireless strain measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Todoroki, Akira

    2008-03-01

    From a traffic safety point-of-view, there is an urgent need for intelligent tires as a warning system for road conditions, for optimized braking control on poor road surfaces and as a tire fault detection system. Intelligent tires, equipped with sensors for monitoring applied strain, are effective in improving reliability and control systems such as anti-lock braking systems (ABSs). In previous studies, we developed a direct tire deformation or strain measurement system with sufficiently low stiffness and high elongation for practical use, and a wireless communication system between tires and vehicle that operates without a battery. The present study investigates the application of strain data for an optimized braking control and road condition warning system. The relationships between strain sensor outputs and tire mechanical parameters, including braking torque, effective radius and contact patch length, are calculated using finite element analysis. Finally, we suggested the possibility of optimized braking control and road condition warning systems. Optimized braking control can be achieved by keeping the slip ratio constant. The road condition warning would be actuated if the recorded friction coefficient at a certain slip ratio is lower than a 'safe' reference value.

  15. Correspondence between Simulator and On-Road Drive Performance: Implications for Assessment of Driving Safety.

    PubMed

    Aksan, Nazan; Hacker, Sarah D; Sager, Lauren; Dawson, Jeffrey; Anderson, Steven; Rizzo, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Forty-two younger (Mean age = 35) and 37 older drivers (Mean age = 77) completed four similar simulated drives. In addition, 32 younger and 30 older drivers completed a standard on-road drive in an instrumented vehicle. Performance in the simulated drives was evaluated using both electronic drive data and video-review of errors. Safety errors during the on-road drive were evaluated by a certified driving instructor blind to simulator performance, using state Department of Transportation criteria. We examined the degree of convergence in performance across the two platforms on various driving tasks including lane change, lane keeping, speed control, stopping, turns, and overall performance. Differences based on age group indicated a pattern of strong relative validity for simulator measures. However, relative rank-order in specific metrics of performance suggested a pattern of moderate relative validity. The findings have implications for the use of simulators in assessments of driving safety as well as its use in training and/or rehabilitation settings.

  16. Correspondence between Simulator and On-Road Drive Performance: Implications for Assessment of Driving Safety

    PubMed Central

    Aksan, Nazan; Hacker, Sarah D.; Sager, Lauren; Dawson, Jeffrey; Anderson, Steven; Rizzo, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Forty-two younger (Mean age = 35) and 37 older drivers (Mean age = 77) completed four similar simulated drives. In addition, 32 younger and 30 older drivers completed a standard on-road drive in an instrumented vehicle. Performance in the simulated drives was evaluated using both electronic drive data and video-review of errors. Safety errors during the on-road drive were evaluated by a certified driving instructor blind to simulator performance, using state Department of Transportation criteria. We examined the degree of convergence in performance across the two platforms on various driving tasks including lane change, lane keeping, speed control, stopping, turns, and overall performance. Differences based on age group indicated a pattern of strong relative validity for simulator measures. However, relative rank-order in specific metrics of performance suggested a pattern of moderate relative validity. The findings have implications for the use of simulators in assessments of driving safety as well as its use in training and/or rehabilitation settings. PMID:28649572

  17. Five-year safety and performance results from the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Lyndon; Dorn, Jessy D.; Humayun, Mark S.; Dagnelie, Gislin; Handa, James; Barale, Pierre-Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Stanga, Paulo E.; Hafezi, Farhad; Safran, Avinoam B.; Salzmann, Joel; Santos, Arturo; Birch, David; Spencer, Rand; Cideciyan, Artur V.; de Juan, Eugene; Duncan, Jacque L.; Eliott, Dean; Fawzi, Amani; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Ho, Allen C.; Brown, Gary; Haller, Julia; Regillo, Carl; Del Priore, Lucian V.; Arditi, Aries; Greenberg, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., Sylmar, CA) was developed to restore some vision to patients blind from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or outer retinal degeneration. A clinical trial was initiated in 2006 to study the long-term safety and efficacy of the Argus II System in patients with bare or no light perception due to end-stage RP. Design The study is a prospective, multicenter, single-arm, clinical trial. Within-patient controls included the non-implanted fellow eye and patients' native residual vision compared to their vision when using the System. Subjects There were 30 subjects in 10 centers in the U.S. and Europe. Methods The worse-seeing eye of blind patients was implanted with the Argus II System. Patients wore glasses mounted with a small camera and a video processor that converted images into stimulation patterns sent to the electrode array on the retina. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome measures were safety (the number, seriousness, and relatedness of adverse events) and visual function, as measured by three computer-based, objective tests. Secondary measures included functional vision performance on objectively-scored real-world tasks. Results Twenty-four out of 30 patients remained implanted with functioning Argus II Systems at 5 years post-implant. Only one additional serious adverse event was experienced since the 3-year time point. Patients performed significantly better with the System ON than OFF on all visual function tests and functional vision tasks. Conclusions The five-year results of the Argus II trial support the long-term safety profile and benefit of the Argus II System for patients blind from RP. The Argus II is the first and only retinal implant to have market approval in the European Economic Area, the United States, and Canada. PMID:27453256

  18. Improving Patient Safety in Public Hospitals: Developing Standard Measures to Track Medical Errors and Process Breakdowns.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Sara L; Gourley, Gato; Le, Gem; Williams, Pamela; Yazdany, Jinoos; Sarkar, Urmimala

    2018-03-14

    The aim of the study was to develop standards for tracking patient safety gaps in ambulatory care in safety net health systems. Leaders from five California safety net health systems were invited to participate in a modified Delphi process sponsored by the Safety Promotion Action Research and Knowledge Network (SPARKNet) and the California Safety Net Institute in 2016. During each of the three Delphi rounds, the feasibility and validity of 13 proposed patient safety measures were discussed and prioritized. Surveys and transcripts from the meetings were analyzed to understand the decision-making process. The Delphi process included eight panelists. Consensus was reached to adopt 9 of 13 proposed measures. All 9 measures were unanimously considered valid, but concern was expressed about the feasibility of implementing several of the measures. Although safety net health systems face high barriers to standardized measurement, our study demonstrates that consensus can be reached on acceptable and feasible methods for tracking patient safety gaps in safety net health systems. If accompanied by the active participation key stakeholder groups, including patients, clinicians, staff, data system professionals, and health system leaders, the consensus measures reported here represent one step toward improving ambulatory patient safety in safety net health systems.

  19. Measuring Resident Physicians' Performance of Preventive Care

    PubMed Central

    Palonen, Katri P; Allison, Jeroan J; Heudebert, Gustavo R; Willett, Lisa L; Kiefe, Catarina I; Wall, Terry C; Houston, Thomas K

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has suggested various methods for evaluation of practice-based learning and improvement competency, but data on implementation of these methods are limited. OBJECTIVE To compare medical record review and patient surveys on evaluating physician performance in preventive services in an outpatient resident clinic. DESIGN Within an ongoing quality improvement project, we collected baseline performance data on preventive services provided for patients at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Internal Medicine Residents' ambulatory clinic. PARTICIPANTS Seventy internal medicine and medicine-pediatrics residents from the UAB Internal Medicine Residency program. MEASUREMENTS Resident- and clinic-level comparisons of aggregated patient survey and chart documentation rates of (1) screening for smoking status, (2) advising smokers to quit, (3) cholesterol screening, (4) mammography screening, and (5) pneumonia vaccination. RESULTS Six hundred and fifty-nine patient surveys and 761 charts were abstracted. At the clinic level, rates for screening of smoking status, recommending mammogram, and for cholesterol screening were similar (difference <5%) between the 2 methods. Higher rates for pneumonia vaccination (76% vs 67%) and advice to quit smoking (66% vs 52%) were seen on medical record review versus patient surveys. However, within-resident (N=70) comparison of 2 methods of estimating screening rates contained significant variability. The cost of medical record review was substantially higher ($107 vs $17/physician). CONCLUSIONS Medical record review and patient surveys provided similar rates for selected preventive health measures at the clinic level, with the exception of pneumonia vaccination and advising to quit smoking. A large variation among individual resident providers was noted. PMID:16499544

  20. Impact of individual resilience and safety climate on safety performance and psychological stress of construction workers: A case study of the Ontario construction industry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuting; McCabe, Brenda; Hyatt, Douglas

    2017-06-01

    The construction industry has hit a plateau in terms of safety performance. Safety climate is regarded as a leading indicator of safety performance; however, relatively little safety climate research has been done in the Canadian construction industry. Safety climate may be geographically sensitive, thus it is necessary to examine how the construct of safety climate is defined and used to improve safety performance in different regions. On the other hand, more and more attention has been paid to job related stress in the construction industry. Previous research proposed that individual resilience may be associated with a better safety performance and may help employees manage stress. Unfortunately, few empirical research studies have examined this hypothesis. This paper aims to examine the role of safety climate and individual resilience in safety performance and job stress in the Canadian construction industry. The research was based on 837 surveys collected in Ontario between June 2015 and June 2016. Structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques were used to explore the impact of individual resilience and safety climate on physical safety outcomes and on psychological stress among construction workers. The results show that safety climate not only affected construction workers' safety performance but also indirectly affected their psychological stress. In addition, it was found that individual resilience had a direct negative impact on psychological stress but had no impact on physical safety outcomes. These findings highlight the roles of both organizational and individual factors in individual safety performance and in psychological well-being. Construction organizations need to not only monitor employees' safety performance, but also to assess their employees' psychological well-being. Promoting a positive safety climate together with developing training programs focusing on improving employees' psychological health - especially post-trauma psychological

  1. Can Leader-Member Exchange Contribute to Safety Performance in An Italian Warehouse?

    PubMed

    Mariani, Marco G; Curcuruto, Matteo; Matic, Mirna; Sciacovelli, Paolo; Toderi, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The research considers safety climate in a warehouse and wants to analyze the Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) role in respect to safety performance. Griffin and Neal's safety model was adopted and Leader-Member Exchange was inserted as moderator in the relationships between safety climate and proximal antecedents (motivation and knowledge) of safety performance constructs (compliance and participation). Materials and Methods: Survey data were collected from a sample of 133 full-time employees in an Italian warehouse. The statistical framework of Hayes (2013) was adopted for moderated mediation analysis. Results: Proximal antecedents partially mediated the relationship between Safety climate and safety participation, but not safety compliance. Moreover, the results from the moderation analysis showed that the Leader-Member Exchange moderated the influence of safety climate on proximal antecedents and the mediation exist only at the higher level of LMX. Conclusion: The study shows that the different aspects of leadership processes interact in explaining individual proficiency in safety practices. Practical Implications: Organizations as warehouses should improve the quality of the relationship between a leader and a subordinate based upon the dimensions of respect, trust, and obligation for high level of safety performance.

  2. Can Leader–Member Exchange Contribute to Safety Performance in An Italian Warehouse?

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Marco G.; Curcuruto, Matteo; Matic, Mirna; Sciacovelli, Paolo; Toderi, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The research considers safety climate in a warehouse and wants to analyze the Leader–Member Exchange (LMX) role in respect to safety performance. Griffin and Neal’s safety model was adopted and Leader-Member Exchange was inserted as moderator in the relationships between safety climate and proximal antecedents (motivation and knowledge) of safety performance constructs (compliance and participation). Materials and Methods: Survey data were collected from a sample of 133 full-time employees in an Italian warehouse. The statistical framework of Hayes (2013) was adopted for moderated mediation analysis. Results: Proximal antecedents partially mediated the relationship between Safety climate and safety participation, but not safety compliance. Moreover, the results from the moderation analysis showed that the Leader–Member Exchange moderated the influence of safety climate on proximal antecedents and the mediation exist only at the higher level of LMX. Conclusion: The study shows that the different aspects of leadership processes interact in explaining individual proficiency in safety practices. Practical Implications: Organizations as warehouses should improve the quality of the relationship between a leader and a subordinate based upon the dimensions of respect, trust, and obligation for high level of safety performance. PMID:28553244

  3. Definition and measurement of rider-intrinsic physical attributes influencing all-terrain vehicle safety.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A; Bond, Brandon J; Hafner, John W; Morris, Martin J; Travis, Jennifer; Hannah, Greg; Webster, Jim; Lin, Julian J

    2011-11-01

    All-terrain vehicle (ATV) usage has grown tremendously over the years, reaching 9.5 million vehicles in use in 2007. Accompanying this growth has been a concomitant increase in rider morbidity (including traumatic brain and spine injuries) and death, especially in children. The purpose of this study was to define and measure, through field testing, those physical attributes intrinsic to riders, such as height, weight, and wingspan, which may have implications for ATV riders' safety. Three field tests (J-hook, brake, and bump) were developed and performed to allow direct measurement of the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical dynamics in 5 riders of varying heights, weights, and wingspans. Two ATVs, a utility and a sport model, were tested for further comparisons. Data were acquired using a comprehensive data acquisition system attached to the ATVs. Assignment of individual rider/ATV test safety ratings and a rider/ATV Total Safety Rating were made from the results of these field tests. The J-hook test results demonstrated that larger rider wingspans positively influence ATV rider safety and mitigate against lateral instability. From the brake test it was determined that a 10-in (25.4-cm) longitudinal displacement, such as that experienced during a sharp deceleration, for a rider of any height or weight, breached the level of defined safety. As rider weight increased, displacement decreased. The bump test provided evidence that increased rider weight also mitigates against vertical displacement. Individuals with light weights and small wingspans, such as those in the pediatric population, are under considerable risk of injury when operating an ATV due to lateral, longitudinal, and vertical operational instability.

  4. 77 FR 35747 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ...-0061] Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement... Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices dated, September 17, 1993 (58 FR 48705). DATES: Effective Date... Safety Administration (NHTSA) published the Standards for Devices to Measure Breath Alcohol (38 FR 30459...

  5. You can't improve what you don't measure: Safety climate measures available in the German-speaking countries to support safety culture development in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Manser, Tanja; Brösterhaus, Mareen; Hammer, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Safety climate measurement is a key input into safety culture development. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the safety climate measures that have been evaluated for their psychometric properties in a German-speaking country and to make recommendations on how to use them in quality and patient safety improvement. A systematic search strategy was implemented to obtain relevant articles. PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched, and 128 abstracts were identified. After application of limits, 33 full texts were retrieved for subsequent evaluation. Studies were included on the basis of predetermined inclusion criteria and independent assessment by two reviewers. Publications were reviewed concerning healthcare setting, target group, safety culture dimensions covered and results of their psychometric evaluation. This review identified 11 instruments for safety climate assessment in different healthcare settings (i. e. hospitals, nursing homes, primary care, dental care and community pharmacy) for which acceptable to good internal consistency was reported. We observed wide variability concerning the number of dimensions (1 to 14; in some cases including outcome dimensions) and items (9 to 128) that the instruments were comprised of. Nevertheless, consistency with regard to the thematic areas covered was rather high. While there is clear evidence that we can assess safety climate in healthcare, the application of safety climate measures by quality and patient safety practitioners has so far been rather limited. This review bridges this gap between research and improvement practice by highlighting the central role of safety climate assessment in a mixed methods approach to inform safety culture development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. 76 FR 34867 - Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Blue Angels Air Show safety zone on Lake Washington, Seattle, WA from 9 a.m. on August 4, 2011 to 4 p.m... Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance safety zone in 33 CFR 165.1319 daily from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1319 - Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA. 165.1319 Section 165.1319 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1319 Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1319 - Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA. 165.1319 Section 165.1319 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1319 Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance...

  9. 77 FR 44470 - Safety Zone; Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... the safety hazards associated with the Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance which include low... Coast Guard is establishing this rule because the current regulation associated with the Seafair Blue...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1319 - Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA. 165.1319 Section 165.1319 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1319 Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1319 - Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA. 165.1319 Section 165.1319 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1319 Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance...

  12. Developing Probabilistic Safety Performance Margins for Unknown and Underappreciated Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Allan; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Everett, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Probabilistic safety requirements currently formulated or proposed for space systems, nuclear reactor systems, nuclear weapon systems, and other types of systems that have a low-probability potential for high-consequence accidents depend on showing that the probability of such accidents is below a specified safety threshold or goal. Verification of compliance depends heavily upon synthetic modeling techniques such as PRA. To determine whether or not a system meets its probabilistic requirements, it is necessary to consider whether there are significant risks that are not fully considered in the PRA either because they are not known at the time or because their importance is not fully understood. The ultimate objective is to establish a reasonable margin to account for the difference between known risks and actual risks in attempting to validate compliance with a probabilistic safety threshold or goal. In this paper, we examine data accumulated over the past 60 years from the space program, from nuclear reactor experience, from aircraft systems, and from human reliability experience to formulate guidelines for estimating probabilistic margins to account for risks that are initially unknown or underappreciated. The formulation includes a review of the safety literature to identify the principal causes of such risks.

  13. Continuous Evaluation Of In-Service Highway Safety Feature Performance

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-09-01

    This report documents the research effort, findings, conclusions, and recommendations of a study to develop a program for the continuous in-service evaluation of highway safety features. The study consisted of two phases and eight tasks. An in-servic...

  14. Performance Based Traffic Safety Education Course. Two-Phase Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board of Education, Olympia.

    This course for high school highway traffic safety education is intended to help students learn to make good driving decisions. It consists of twenty-one modules--ten sequenced, two not in specific sequence but intended to be completed in the earlier part of the course, and nine non-sequenced modules. Each module begins with an outline providing…

  15. Measuring mining safety with injury statistics: lost workdays as indicators of risk.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Patrick J; Kerkering, John C

    2007-01-01

    Mining in the United States remains one of the most hazardous industries, despite significant reductions in fatal injury rates over the last century. Coal mine fatality rates, for example, have dropped almost a thousand-fold since their peak in 1908. While incidence rates are very important indicators, lost worktime measures offer an alternative metric for evaluating job safety and health performance. The first objective of this study examined the distributions and summary statistics of all injuries reported to the Mine Safety and Health Administration from 1983 through 2004. Over the period studied (1983-2004), there were 31,515,368 lost workdays associated with mining injuries, for an equivalent of 5,700 person-years lost annually. The second objective addressed the problem of comparing safety program performance in mines for situations where denominator data were lacking. By examining the consequences of injuries, comparisons can be made between disparate operations without the need for denominators. Total risk in the form of lost workday sums can help to distinguish between lower- and higher-risk operations or time periods. Our method was to use a beta distribution to model the losses and to compare underground coal mining to underground metal/nonmetal mining from 2000 to 2004. Our results showed the probability of an injury having 10 or more lost workdays was 0.52 for coal mine cases versus 0.35 for metal/nonmetal mine cases. In addition, a comparison of injuries involving continuous mining machines over 2001-2002 versus 2003-2004 showed that the ratio of average losses in the later period to those in the earlier period was approximately 1.08, suggesting increasing risks for such operations. This denominator-free safety measure will help the mining industry more effectively identify higher-risk operations and more realistically evaluate their safety improvement programs. Attention to a variety of metrics concerning the performance of a job safety and health

  16. Five-Year Safety and Performance Results from the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    da Cruz, Lyndon; Dorn, Jessy D; Humayun, Mark S; Dagnelie, Gislin; Handa, James; Barale, Pierre-Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Stanga, Paulo E; Hafezi, Farhad; Safran, Avinoam B; Salzmann, Joel; Santos, Arturo; Birch, David; Spencer, Rand; Cideciyan, Artur V; de Juan, Eugene; Duncan, Jacque L; Eliott, Dean; Fawzi, Amani; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C; Ho, Allen C; Brown, Gary; Haller, Julia; Regillo, Carl; Del Priore, Lucian V; Arditi, Aries; Greenberg, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products, Inc, Sylmar, CA) was developed to restore some vision to patients blind as a result of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or outer retinal degeneration. A clinical trial was initiated in 2006 to study the long-term safety and efficacy of the Argus II System in patients with bare or no light perception resulting from end-stage RP. Prospective, multicenter, single-arm clinical trial. Within-patient controls included the nonimplanted fellow eye and patients' native residual vision compared with their vision with the Argus II. Thirty participants in 10 centers in the United States and Europe. The worse-seeing eye of blind patients was implanted with the Argus II. Patients wore glasses mounted with a small camera and a video processor that converted images into stimulation patterns sent to the electrode array on the retina. The primary outcome measures were safety (the number, seriousness, and relatedness of adverse events) and visual function, as measured by 3 computer-based, objective tests. Secondary measures included functional vision performance on objectively scored real-world tasks. Twenty-four of 30 patients remained implanted with functioning Argus II Systems at 5 years after implantation. Only 1 additional serious adverse event was experienced after the 3-year time point. Patients performed significantly better with the Argus II on than off on all visual function tests and functional vision tasks. The 5-year results of the Argus II trial support the long-term safety profile and benefit of the Argus II System for patients blind as a result of RP. The Argus II is the first and only retinal implant to have market approval in the European Economic Area, the United States, and Canada. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Testing the effects of safety climate and disruptive children behavior on school bus drivers performance: A multilevel model.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Dov; Lee, Jin

    2016-10-01

    The study was designed to test a multilevel path model whose variables exert opposing effects on school bus drivers' performance. Whereas departmental safety climate was expected to improve driving safety, the opposite was true for in-vehicle disruptive children behavior. The driving safety path in this model consists of increasing risk-taking practices starting with safety shortcuts leading to rule violations and to near-miss events. The study used a sample of 474 school bus drivers in rural areas, driving children to school and school-related activities. Newly developed scales for measuring predictor, mediator and outcome variables were validated with video data taken from inner and outer cameras, which were installed in 29 buses. Results partially supported the model by indicating that group-level safety climate and individual-level children distraction exerted opposite effects on the driving safety path. Furthermore, as hypothesized, children disruption moderated the strength of the safety rule violation-near miss relationship, resulting in greater strength under high disruptiveness. At the same time, the hypothesized interaction between the two predictor variables was not supported. Theoretical and practical implications for studying safety climate in general and distracted driving in particular for professional drivers are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the safety performance of highway alignments based on fault tree analysis and safety boundaries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yikai; Wang, Kai; Xu, Chengcheng; Shi, Qin; He, Jie; Li, Peiqing; Shi, Ting

    2018-05-19

    To overcome the limitations of previous highway alignment safety evaluation methods, this article presents a highway alignment safety evaluation method based on fault tree analysis (FTA) and the characteristics of vehicle safety boundaries, within the framework of dynamic modeling of the driver-vehicle-road system. Approaches for categorizing the vehicle failure modes while driving on highways and the corresponding safety boundaries were comprehensively investigated based on vehicle system dynamics theory. Then, an overall crash probability model was formulated based on FTA considering the risks of 3 failure modes: losing steering capability, losing track-holding capability, and rear-end collision. The proposed method was implemented on a highway segment between Bengbu and Nanjing in China. A driver-vehicle-road multibody dynamics model was developed based on the 3D alignments of the Bengbu to Nanjing section of Ning-Luo expressway using Carsim, and the dynamics indices, such as sideslip angle and, yaw rate were obtained. Then, the average crash probability of each road section was calculated with a fixed-length method. Finally, the average crash probability was validated against the crash frequency per kilometer to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method. The results of the regression analysis and correlation analysis indicated good consistency between the results of the safety evaluation and the crash data and that it outperformed the safety evaluation methods used in previous studies. The proposed method has the potential to be used in practical engineering applications to identify crash-prone locations and alignment deficiencies on highways in the planning and design phases, as well as those in service.

  19. Performance and Safety Characteristics of Lithium-molybdenum Disulfide Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiles, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The lithium-molybdenum disulfide system offers attractive characteristics including high rate capability, successful operation up to 75 C, a very low self-discharge rate, a good cycle life and safety characteristics which compare favorably to those of other lithium cells. Moreover, the materials and manufacturing costs for the system is effectively controlled, so the cells should ultimately be competitive with currently marketed rechargeable cells.

  20. Performance and safety testing of lithium batteries for the Expendable, Mobile, ASW Training Target (EMATT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallal, P. B.; Bis, R. F.

    1986-08-01

    The developmental EMATT (expendable, mobile, ASW training target) may use a high-energy (lithium/sulfuryl chloride) battery system. Safety problems with the original battery cell design were experienced during early performance and safety testing. After redesign of the battery cell, performance and safety tests were made under specified abuse conditions, as well as under simulated launch conditions. The test results showed that the power system now meets all safety requirements, and that the EMATT vehicle is safe to deploy for its engineering development phase.

  1. Performance measurements of hybrid PIN diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, J.G.; Arens, J.F.; Kramer, G.

    We report on the successful effort to develop hybrid PIN diode arrays and to demonstrate their potential as components of vertex detectors. Hybrid pixel arrays have been fabricated by the Hughes Aircraft Co. by bump bonding readout chips developed by Hughes to an array of PIN diodes manufactured by Micron Semiconductor Inc. These hybrid pixel arrays were constructed in two configurations. One array format having 10 {times} 64 pixels, each 120 {mu}m square, and the other format having 256 {times} 256 pixels, each 30 {mu}m square. In both cases, the thickness of the PIN diode layer is 300 {mu}m. Measurementsmore » of detector performance show that excellent position resolution can be achieved by interpolation. By determining the centroid of the charge cloud which spreads charge into a number of neighboring pixels, a spatial resolution of a few microns has been attained. The noise has been measured to be about 300 electrons (rms) at room temperature, as expected from KTC and dark current considerations, yielding a signal-to-noise ratio of about 100 for minimum ionizing particles. 4 refs., 13 figs.« less

  2. Safety measurement and monitoring in healthcare: a framework to guide clinical teams and healthcare organisations in maintaining safety

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Charles; Burnett, Susan; Carthey, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Patients, clinicians and managers all want to be reassured that their healthcare organisation is safe. But there is no consensus about what we mean when we ask whether a healthcare organisation is safe or how this is achieved. In the UK, the measurement of harm, so important in the evolution of patient safety, has been neglected in favour of incident reporting. The use of softer intelligence for monitoring and anticipation of problems receives little mention in official policy. The Francis Inquiry report into patient treatment at the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust set out 29 recommendations on measurement, more than on any other topic, and set the measurement of safety an absolute priority for healthcare organisations. The Berwick review found that most healthcare organisations at present have very little capacity to analyse, monitor or learn from safety and quality information. This paper summarises the findings of a more extensive report and proposes a framework which can guide clinical teams and healthcare organisations in the measurement and monitoring of safety and in reviewing progress against safety objectives. The framework has been used so far to promote self-reflection at both board and clinical team level, to stimulate an organisational check or analysis in the gaps of information and to promote discussion of ‘what could we do differently’. PMID:24764136

  3. Measurement equivalence of patient safety climate in Chinese hospitals: can we compare across physicians and nurses?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junya

    2018-06-11

    Self-report instruments have been widely used to better understand variations in patient safety climate between physicians and nurses. Research is needed to determine whether differences in patient safety climate reflect true differences in the underlying concepts. This is known as measurement equivalence, which is a prerequisite for meaningful group comparisons. This study aims to examine the degree of measurement equivalence of the responses to a patient safety climate survey of Chinese hospitals and to demonstrate how the measurement equivalence method can be applied to self-report climate surveys for patient safety research. Using data from the Chinese Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Climate from six Chinese hospitals in 2011, we constructed two groups: physicians and nurses (346 per group). We used multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses to examine progressively more stringent restrictions for measurement equivalence. We identified weak factorial equivalence across the two groups. Strong factorial equivalence was found for Organizational Learning, Unit Management Support for Safety, Adequacy of Safety Arrangements, Institutional Commitment to Safety, Error Reporting and Teamwork. Strong factorial equivalence, however, was not found for Safety System, Communication and Peer Support and Staffing. Nevertheless, further analyses suggested that nonequivalence did not meaningfully affect the conclusions regarding physician-nurse differences in patient safety climate. Our results provide evidence of at least partial equivalence of the survey responses between nurses and physicians, supporting mean comparisons of its constructs between the two groups. The measurement equivalence approach is essential to ensure that conclusions about group differences are valid.

  4. A review on the benchmarking concept in Malaysian construction safety performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, Nurfadzillah; Azizan, Muhammad Azizi

    2018-02-01

    Construction industry is one of the major industries that propels Malaysia's economy in highly contributes to our nation's GDP growth, yet the high fatality rates on construction sites have caused concern among safety practitioners and the stakeholders. Hence, there is a need of benchmarking in performance of Malaysia's construction industry especially in terms of safety. This concept can create a fertile ground for ideas, but only in a receptive environment, organization that share good practices and compare their safety performance against other benefit most to establish improvement in safety culture. This research was conducted to study the awareness important, evaluate current practice and improvement, and also identify the constraint in implement of benchmarking on safety performance in our industry. Additionally, interviews with construction professionals were come out with different views on this concept. Comparison has been done to show the different understanding of benchmarking approach and how safety performance can be benchmarked. But, it's viewed as one mission, which to evaluate objectives identified through benchmarking that will improve the organization's safety performance. Finally, the expected result from this research is to help Malaysia's construction industry implement best practice in safety performance management through the concept of benchmarking.

  5. 26 CFR 801.2 - Measuring organizational performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Measuring organizational performance. 801.2... REVENUE PRACTICE BALANCED SYSTEM FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.2 Measuring organizational performance. The performance measures that comprise the...

  6. The relationships between OHS prevention costs, safety performance, employee satisfaction and accident costs.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Metin; Ünğan, Mustafa C; Ardıç, Kadir

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about the costs of safety. A literature review conducted for this study indicates there is a lack of survey-based research dealing with the effects of occupational health and safety (OHS) prevention costs. To close this gap in the literature, this study investigates the interwoven relationships between OHS prevention costs, employee satisfaction, OHS performance and accident costs. Data were collected from 159 OHS management system 18001-certified firms operating in Turkey and analyzed through structural equation modeling. The findings indicate that OHS prevention costs have a significant positive effect on safety performance, employee satisfaction and accident costs savings; employee satisfaction has a significant positive effect on accident costs savings; and occupational safety performance has a significant positive effect on employee satisfaction and accident costs savings. Also, the results indicate that safety performance and employee satisfaction leverage the relationship between prevention costs and accident costs.

  7. Integration of Occupational Safety to Contractors` or Subcontractors` Performance Evaluation in Construction Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovská, Mária; Struková, Zuzana

    2013-06-01

    Several factors should be considered by the owner and general contractor in the process of contractors` and subcontractors` selection and evaluation. The paper reviews the recent models addressed to guide general contractors in subcontractors' selection process and in evaluation of different contractors during the execution of the project. Moreover the paper suggests the impact of different contractors' performance to the overall level of occupational health and safety culture at the sites. It deals with the factors influencing the safety performance of contractors during construction and analyses the methods for assessing the safety performance of construction contractors. The results of contractors' safety performance evaluation could be a useful tool in motivating contractors to achieve better safety outcomes or could have effect on owners` or general contractors' decision making about contractors suitability for future contracting works.

  8. Preliminary Marine Safety Risk Assessment, Brandon Road Lock and Dam Invasive Species Control Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    i Classification | CG-926 RDC | author | audience | month year Preliminary Marine Safety Risk Assessment, Brandon Road Lock & Dam...No. 4. Title and Subtitle Preliminary Marine Safety Risk Assessment, Brandon Road Lock & Dam Invasive Species Control Measures 5. Report Date...safety due to proposed invasive species control measures located in the vicinity of the Brandon Road Lock and Dam (BRLD) Navigation Project on the

  9. Principles and safety measures of electrosurgery in laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Schollmeyer, Thoralf; Hawaldar, Nusrat A; Sharma, Nidhi; Mettler, Liselotte

    2012-01-01

    Electrosurgical units are the most common type of electrical equipment in the operating room. A basic understanding of electricity is needed to safely apply electrosurgical technology for patient care. We reviewed the literature concerning the essential biophysics, the incidence of electrosurgical injuries, and the possible mechanisms for injury. Various safety guidelines pertaining to avoidance of injuries were also reviewed. Electrothermal injury may result from direct application, insulation failure, direct coupling, capacitive coupling, and so forth. A thorough knowledge of the fundamentals of electrosurgery by the entire team in the operating room is essential for patient safety and for recognizing potential complications. Newer hemostatic technologies can be used to decrease the incidence of complications.

  10. 78 FR 66420 - Proposed Enhancements to the Motor Carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS) Public Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ...-0392] Proposed Enhancements to the Motor Carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS) Public Web Site AGENCY... on the Agency's Safety Measurement System (SMS) public Web site. FMCSA first announced the... public Web site that are the direct result of feedback from stakeholders regarding the information...

  11. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FY 1995 Performance Plan

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-09-01

    The NHTSA Fiscal Year 1995 performance plan for the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) is the second in the three year pilot phase of the Act. This plan differs from the FY 1994 plan in two respects: 1) it uses a different "perform...

  12. Challenges in performance of food safety management systems: a case of fish processing companies in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kussaga, Jamal B; Luning, Pieternel A; Tiisekwa, Bendantunguka P M; Jacxsens, Liesbeth

    2014-04-01

    This study provides insight for food safety (FS) performance in light of the current performance of core FS management system (FSMS) activities and context riskiness of these systems to identify the opportunities for improvement of the FSMS. A FSMS diagnostic instrument was applied to assess the performance levels of FSMS activities regarding context riskiness and FS performance in 14 fish processing companies in Tanzania. Two clusters (cluster I and II) with average FSMS (level 2) operating under moderate-risk context (score 2) were identified. Overall, cluster I had better (score 3) FS performance than cluster II (score 2 to 3). However, a majority of the fish companies need further improvement of their FSMS and reduction of context riskiness to assure good FS performance. The FSMS activity levels could be improved through hygienic design of equipment and facilities, strict raw material control, proper follow-up of critical control point analysis, developing specific sanitation procedures and company-specific sampling design and measuring plans, independent validation of preventive measures, and establishing comprehensive documentation and record-keeping systems. The risk level of the context could be reduced through automation of production processes (such as filleting, packaging, and sanitation) to restrict people's interference, recruitment of permanent high-skilled technological staff, and setting requirements on product use (storage and distribution conditions) on customers. However, such intervention measures for improvement could be taken in phases, starting with less expensive ones (such as sanitation procedures) that can be implemented in the short term to more expensive interventions (setting up assurance activities) to be adopted in the long term. These measures are essential for fish processing companies to move toward FSMS that are more effective.

  13. Safety outcomes in the United States: trends and challenges in measurement.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael D; Haviland, Amelia M; Yu, Hao; Farley, Donna O

    2009-04-01

    To prepare Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) for monitoring the impact of its own patient safety initiative, by exploring available outcomes data, assessing usability of measures, and estimating national trends in patient outcomes. Annual summary data on incidence of Joint Commission Sentinel Events, MEDMARX medication error events, and MDS measures of falls and pressure ulcers in nursing home residents. HCUP National Inpatient Sample (NIS) administrative claims data. Description and assessment of published summary data on selected safety measures. Analysis of selected Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) and Utah–Missouri adverse event measures using HCUP NIS claims data (1994–2003). Interpretation of safety outcome trends requires close attention to the characteristics of underlying data sources and measures. Encounter-based measures have been affected by changes in definitions and ICD-9 coding, as well as by changes in the structure of administrative datasets like HCUP NIS. Historical trends are mixed for the safety outcome measures reviewed, with some measures showing improvement, others deterioration, and still others remaining fairly stable. Constructing national trends of safety outcomes is difficult because of limitations in available data sources and measures. Tracking growth in the adoption of safe practices could offer an important strategy for complementing existing safety measurement capabilities.

  14. Measuring Best Practices for Workplace Safety, Health, and Well-Being: The Workplace Integrated Safety and Health Assessment.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Glorian; Sparer, Emily; Williams, Jessica A R; Gundersen, Daniel; Boden, Leslie I; Dennerlein, Jack T; Hashimoto, Dean; Katz, Jeffrey N; McLellan, Deborah L; Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Revette, Anna; Wagner, Gregory R

    2018-05-01

    To present a measure of effective workplace organizational policies, programs, and practices that focuses on working conditions and organizational facilitators of worker safety, health and well-being: the workplace integrated safety and health (WISH) assessment. Development of this assessment used an iterative process involving a modified Delphi method, extensive literature reviews, and systematic cognitive testing. The assessment measures six core constructs identified as central to best practices for protecting and promoting worker safety, health and well-being: leadership commitment; participation; policies, programs, and practices that foster supportive working conditions; comprehensive and collaborative strategies; adherence to federal and state regulations and ethical norms; and data-driven change. The WISH Assessment holds promise as a tool that may inform organizational priority setting and guide research around causal pathways influencing implementation and outcomes related to these approaches.

  15. A Novel Lithium-ion Laminated Pouch Cell Tested For Performance And Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Inoue, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    A new Li-ion 4.0 Ah pouch cell from GS Yuasa has been tested to determine its performance and safety. The cell is of a laminate pouch design with liquid electrolyte. The rate, thermal and vacuum performance capabilities have been tested to determine the optimum parameters. Under vacuum conditions, the cells were cycled under restrained and unrestrained configurations. The burst pressure of the laminate pouch was also determined. The overcharge, overdischarge into reversal and external short circuit safety tests were also performed to determine the cell s tolerance to abuse. Key Words: Li-ion, safety, vacuum test, abuse, COTS batteries, rate capability

  16. Global real-time dose measurements using the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, D.; Smart, D.; Shea, M.; Bailey, J.; Didkovsky, L.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C.; Xu, X.; Wiltberger, M.; Wiley, S.; Teets, E.; Jones, B.; Hong, S.; Yoon, K.

    2016-11-01

    The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) program has successfully deployed a fleet of six instruments measuring the ambient radiation environment at commercial aircraft altitudes. ARMAS transmits real-time data to the ground and provides quality, tissue-relevant ambient dose equivalent rates with 5 min latency for dose rates on 213 flights up to 17.3 km (56,700 ft). We show five cases from different aircraft; the source particles are dominated by galactic cosmic rays but include particle fluxes for minor radiation periods and geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The measurements from 2013 to 2016 do not cover a period of time to quantify galactic cosmic rays' dependence on solar cycle variation and their effect on aviation radiation. However, we report on small radiation "clouds" in specific magnetic latitude regions and note that active geomagnetic, variable space weather conditions may sufficiently modify the magnetospheric magnetic field that can enhance the radiation environment, particularly at high altitudes and middle to high latitudes. When there is no significant space weather, high-latitude flights produce a dose rate analogous to a chest X-ray every 12.5 h, every 25 h for midlatitudes, and every 100 h for equatorial latitudes at typical commercial flight altitudes of 37,000 ft ( 11 km). The dose rate doubles every 2 km altitude increase, suggesting a radiation event management strategy for pilots or air traffic control; i.e., where event-driven radiation regions can be identified, they can be treated like volcanic ash clouds to achieve radiation safety goals with slightly lower flight altitudes or more equatorial flight paths.

  17. Extended time-to-collision measures for road traffic safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Minderhoud, M M; Bovy, P H

    2001-01-01

    This article describes two new safety indicators based on the time-to-collision notion suitable for comparative road traffic safety analyses. Such safety indicators can be applied in the comparison of a do-nothing case with an adapted situation, e.g. the introduction of intelligent driver support systems. In contrast to the classical time-to-collision value, measured at a cross section, the improved safety indicators use vehicle trajectories collected over a specific time horizon for a certain roadway segment to calculate the overall safety indicator value. Vehicle-specific indicator values as well as safety-critical probabilities can easily be determined from the developed safety measures. Application of the derived safety indicators is demonstrated for the assessment of the potential safety impacts of driver support systems from which it appears that some Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control (AICC) designs are more safety-critical than the reference case without these systems. It is suggested that the indicator threshold value to be applied in the safety assessment has to be adapted when advanced AICC-systems with safe characteristics are introduced.

  18. Measuring, managing and maximizing refinery performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bascur, O.A.; Kennedy, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Implementing continuous quality improvement is a confluence of total quality management, people empowerment, performance indicators and information engineering. Supporting information technologies allow a refiner to narrow the gap between management objectives and the process control level. Dynamic performance monitoring benefits come from production cost savings, improved communications and enhanced decision making. A refinery workgroup information flow model helps automate continuous improvement of processes, performance and the organization. The paper discusses the rethinking of refinery operations, dynamic performance monitoring, continuous process improvement, the knowledge coordinator and repository manager, an integrated plant operations workflow, and successful implementation.

  19. Application of Rasch Measurement to a Measure of Musical Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Kathleen A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Rasch calibration of a portion of the Watkins Farnum Performance Scale (J. Watkins and S. Farnum, 1954), a test of instructional music performance, for 218 sixth graders. Results show how Rasch scaling allows item difficulties to be estimated, the test to be administered more efficiently, and diagnostic information to be obtained.…

  20. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 238 - Suspension System Safety Performance Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension System Safety Performance Standards C Appendix C to Part 238 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER EQUIPMENT SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 238, App. C...

  1. 77 FR 18298 - Improvements to the Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) Motor Carrier Safety Measurement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... effectively identify and prioritize high-risk and other unsafe motor carriers for enforcement interventions... interventions by more accurately identifying safety sensitive carriers (i.e., carriers transporting people and carriers hauling hazardous materials (HM)), so that such firms can be selected for CSA interventions at...

  2. FMCSA Safety Program Effectiveness Measurement: Carrier Intervention Effectiveness Model, Version 1.1-Report for FY 2014 Interventions - Analysis Brief

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-04-01

    The Carrier Intervention Effectiveness Model (CIEM) provides the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) with a tool for measuring the safety benefits of carrier interventions conducted under the Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) e...

  3. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : carrier intervention effectiveness model, version 1.1 - report for FY 2013 interventions : analysis brief

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-04-01

    The Carrier Intervention Effectiveness Model (CIEM) provides the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) with a tool for measuring the safety benefits of carrier interventions conducted under the Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) e...

  4. Performance of exhaust-protective (class I) biological 'safety' cabinets.

    PubMed Central

    Newsom, S W

    1979-01-01

    Nineteen open-fronted (class I) safety cabinets were subjected to spore containment and airflow tests, which suggested that a flow of 0.75 m/s was the minimum required for safe operation; further tests on three of the cabinets were repeated at different air speeds and confirmed this. The airflow is required to overcome the effect of laboratory or external air currents. Contamination of surfaces (including the operator's hands) by aerosols liberated inside the cabinets was investigated and found to depend more on turbulence within the cabinet (as from a restricted front opening) than on the number of air changes. The findings suggest that the product protection provided by a well-designed class I cabinet might equal that of a class II (laminar flow) unit. Images Fig. 6 PMID:469014

  5. Measuring Institutional Performance at the State Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogue, E. G.

    The Performance Funding Project of the State of Tennessee is discussed. The Project was instituted to explore the question of whether it is desirable and possible to allocate some portion of state funds to community colleges and universities on a performance effectiveness criterion rather than the current credit hour and enrollment criteria. Major…

  6. Performance Measures for Adaptive Decisioning Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-11

    set to hypothesis space mapping best approximates the known map. Two assumptions, a sufficiently representative training set and the ability of the...successful prediction of LINEXT performance. The LINEXT algorithm above performs the decision space mapping on the training-set ele- ments exactly. For a

  7. Measuring Contract Agency Performance with Administrative Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulczyn, Fred; Orlebeke, Britany; Melamid, Elan

    2000-01-01

    Analyzed the relative performance of contract agencies providing out-of-home care by examining administrative data on the length of time it took children placed in out-of-home care to return to their families. Found that contract agency performance differs and that "agency effects" leave an independent imprint on a child's out-of-home…

  8. Measuring Student Performance in General Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ara C.; Ben-Daat, Hagit; Zhu, Mary; Atkinson, Robert; Barrows, Nathan; Gould, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Student performance in general organic chemistry courses is determined by a wide range of factors including cognitive ability, motivation and cultural capital. Previous work on cognitive factors has tended to focus on specific areas rather than exploring performance across all problem types and cognitive skills. In this study, we have categorized…

  9. Implementation of Ultraviolet Radiation Safety Measures for Outdoor Workers.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Erin; Spurr, Alison

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) poses a major risk for outdoor workers, putting them at greater risk for skin cancer. In the general population, the incidence of both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers is increasing. It is estimated that 90% of skin cancers in Canada are directly attributable to UVR exposure, making this cancer largely preventable with the appropriate precautions. A scoping review was conducted on the barriers and facilitators to UVR safety in outdoor workers to elucidate why these precautions are not in use currently. We discuss these results according to the Hierarchy of Controls as a means to outline effective and feasible prevention strategies for outdoor workers. In doing so, this review may be used to inform the design of future workplace interventions for UVR safety in outdoor workers to decrease the risk of skin cancer in this vulnerable population.

  10. Principles and Safety Measures of Electrosurgery in Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Schollmeyer, Thoralf; Hawaldar, Nusrat A.; Sharma, Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Electrosurgical units are the most common type of electrical equipment in the operating room. A basic understanding of electricity is needed to safely apply electrosurgical technology for patient care. Methods: We reviewed the literature concerning the essential biophysics, the incidence of electrosurgical injuries, and the possible mechanisms for injury. Various safety guidelines pertaining to avoidance of injuries were also reviewed. Results: Electrothermal injury may result from direct application, insulation failure, direct coupling, capacitive coupling, and so forth. Conclusion: A thorough knowledge of the fundamentals of electrosurgery by the entire team in the operating room is essential for patient safety and for recognizing potential complications. Newer hemostatic technologies can be used to decrease the incidence of complications. PMID:22906341

  11. From striving to thriving: systems thinking, strategy, and the performance of safety net hospitals.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jonathan; Singer, Sara; Kane, Nancy; Valentine, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Safety net hospitals (SNH) have, on average, experienced declining financial margins and faced an elevated risk of closure over the past decade. Despite these challenges, not all SNHs are weakening and some are prospering. These higher-performing SNHs provide substantial care to safety net populations and produce sustainable financial returns. Drawing on the alternative structural positioning and resource-based views, we explore strategic management as a source of performance differences across SNHs. We employ a mixed-method design, blending quantitative and qualitative data and analysis. We measure financial performance using hospital operating margin and quantitatively evaluate its relationship with a limited set of well-defined structural positions. We further evaluate these structures and also explore the internal resources of SNHs based on nine in-depth case studies developed from site visits and extensive interviews. Quantitative results suggest that structural positions alone are not related to performance. Comparative case studies suggest that higher-performing SNH differ in four respects: (1) coordinating patient flow across the care continuum, (2) engaging in partnerships with other providers, (3) managing scope of services, and (4) investing in human capital. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model of strategic action related to systems thinking--the ability to see wholes and interrelationships rather than individual parts alone. Our exploratory findings suggest the need to move beyond generic strategies alone and acknowledge the importance of underlying managerial capabilities. Specifically, our findings suggest that effective strategy is a function of both the internal resources (e.g., managers' systems-thinking capability) and structural positions (e.g., partnerships) of organizations. From this perspective, framing resources and positioning as distinct alternatives misses the nuances of how strategic advantage is actually achieved.

  12. A strategic management model for evaluation of health, safety and environmental performance.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Majid; Toutounchian, Solmaz; Roayaei, Emad; Nassiri, Parvin

    2012-05-01

    Strategic health, safety, and environmental management system (HSE-MS) involves systematic and cooperative planning in each phase of the lifecycle of a project to ensure that interaction among the industry group, client, contractor, stakeholder, and host community exists with the highest level of health, safety, and environmental standard performances. Therefore, it seems necessary to assess the HSE-MS performance of contractor(s) by a comparative strategic management model with the aim of continuous improvement. The present Strategic Management Model (SMM) has been illustrated by a case study and the results show that the model is a suitable management tool for decision making in a contract environment, especially in oil and gas fields and based on accepted international standards within the framework of management deming cycle. To develop this model, a data bank has been created, which includes the statistical data calculated by converting the HSE performance qualitative data into quantitative values. Based on this fact, the structure of the model has been formed by defining HSE performance indicators according to the HSE-MS model. Therefore, 178 indicators have been selected which have been grouped into four attributes. Model output provides quantitative measures of HSE-MS performance as a percentage of an ideal level with maximum possible score for each attribute. Defining the strengths and weaknesses of the contractor(s) is another capability of this model. On the other hand, this model provides a ranking that could be used as the basis for decision making at the contractors' pre-qualification phase or during the execution of the project.

  13. Investigating different approaches to develop informative priors in hierarchical Bayesian safety performance functions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjie; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2013-07-01

    The Bayesian inference method has been frequently adopted to develop safety performance functions. One advantage of the Bayesian inference is that prior information for the independent variables can be included in the inference procedures. However, there are few studies that discussed how to formulate informative priors for the independent variables and evaluated the effects of incorporating informative priors in developing safety performance functions. This paper addresses this deficiency by introducing four approaches of developing informative priors for the independent variables based on historical data and expert experience. Merits of these informative priors have been tested along with two types of Bayesian hierarchical models (Poisson-gamma and Poisson-lognormal models). Deviance information criterion (DIC), R-square values, and coefficients of variance for the estimations were utilized as evaluation measures to select the best model(s). Comparison across the models indicated that the Poisson-gamma model is superior with a better model fit and it is much more robust with the informative priors. Moreover, the two-stage Bayesian updating informative priors provided the best goodness-of-fit and coefficient estimation accuracies. Furthermore, informative priors for the inverse dispersion parameter have also been introduced and tested. Different types of informative priors' effects on the model estimations and goodness-of-fit have been compared and concluded. Finally, based on the results, recommendations for future research topics and study applications have been made. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Implementation of a novel taxonomy based on cognitive work analysis in the assessment of safety performance.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Toivo

    2017-12-12

    The aim of this study was to examine how the developed taxonomy of cognitive work analysis (CWA) can be applied in combination with statistical analysis regarding different sociotechnical categories. This study applied a combination of quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Workers (n = 120) and managers (n = 85) in the chemical industry were asked in a questionnaire how different occupational safety and health (OSH) measures were being implemented. The exploration of the qualitative CWA taxonomy consisted of an analysis of the following topics: (a) work domain; (b) control task; (c) strategies; (d) social organization and cooperation; (e) worker competencies. The following hypotheses were supported - activities of the management had positive impacts on the aggregated variables: near-accident investigation and instructions (H 1 ); OSH training (H 2 ); operations, technical processes and safe use of chemicals (H 3 ); use of personal protective equipment (H 4 ); measuring, follow-up and prevention of major accidents (H 5 ). The CWA taxonomy was applied in mixed methods when testing H 1 -H 5 . A special approach is to analyze the work demands of complex sociotechnical systems with the taxonomy of CWA. In problem-solving, the CWA taxonomy should seek to capitalize on the strengths and minimize the limitations of safety performance.

  15. 75 FR 38725 - Service Performance Measurement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... of Customer Sastisfaction A. General Considerations B. Rule 3055.91--Consumer Access to Postal Services C. Rule 3055.92--Customer Experience Measurement Surveys D. Rule 3055.93--Mystery Shopper Program... Commission is adopting a final rule on service perfomance measurement and customer satisfaction. The final...

  16. A rough set-based measurement model study on high-speed railway safety operation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qizhou; Tan, Minjia; Lu, Huapu; Zhu, Yun

    2018-01-01

    Aiming to solve the safety problems of high-speed railway operation and management, one new method is urgently needed to construct on the basis of the rough set theory and the uncertainty measurement theory. The method should carefully consider every factor of high-speed railway operation that realizes the measurement indexes of its safety operation. After analyzing the factors that influence high-speed railway safety operation in detail, a rough measurement model is finally constructed to describe the operation process. Based on the above considerations, this paper redistricts the safety influence factors of high-speed railway operation as 16 measurement indexes which include staff index, vehicle index, equipment index and environment. And the paper also provides another reasonable and effective theoretical method to solve the safety problems of multiple attribute measurement in high-speed railway operation. As while as analyzing the operation data of 10 pivotal railway lines in China, this paper respectively uses the rough set-based measurement model and value function model (one model for calculating the safety value) for calculating the operation safety value. The calculation result shows that the curve of safety value with the proposed method has smaller error and greater stability than the value function method's, which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness.

  17. Opinion and Special Articles: Stress when performing the first lumbar puncture may compromise patient safety.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Mikael Johannes Vuokko; Wienecke, Troels; Kristiansen, Jesper; Park, Yoon Soo; Ringsted, Charlotte; Konge, Lars

    2018-05-22

    To quantify physician stress levels when performing lumbar puncture (LP) and explore operator stress effect on patient outcomes. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study. Novices, intermediates, and experts in performing LP were recruited from 4 departments of neurology and emergency medicine. Stress was measured before and during performance of the LP using cognitive appraisal (CA), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Short (STAI-S) questionnaire, and the heart rate variability measure low frequency/high frequency index (LF/HF ratio). Patient-related outcomes were pain, confidence in the operator, and postdural puncture headache (PDPH). Forty-six physicians were included in the study: 22 novices, 12 intermediates, and 12 experts. Novices had the highest stress level and experts the lowest measured by cognitive appraisal and STAI-S before and during LP performance ( p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Novices had the highest sympathetic tonus indicated by the highest LF/HF ratio before ( p = 0.004) and during ( p = 0.056) LP performance. Physician stress level was not significantly related to patients' pain. However, there was a significant relationship between STAI-S during the procedure and patient confidence in the operator (regression coefficient = -0.034, p = 0.008). High physician heart rate during the procedure significantly increased the odds of PDPH (odds ratio = 1.17, p = 0.036). Novice stress levels were high before and during performance of LP. Stress was significantly related to patient confidence in the operator and risk of PDPH. Simulation-based training should be considered to reduce novice residents' stress levels and increase patient safety. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Implementation of probe data performance measures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-04-03

    This report presents results from a 12-month project where three arterial analysis tools based on probe vehicle segment speed data were developed for District 6. A case study of 5 arterials and two incidents was performed.

  19. Development of access management performance measures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-05-01

    In 2007, the Virginia General Assembly passed legislation calling for Access Management, the : regulation of entrances and intersections along highway corridors in Virginia. Some property owners may oppose : access management. Therefore, performance ...

  20. Performance measures for public transit mobility management.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    "Mobility management is an innovative approach for managing and delivering coordinated public : transportation services that embraces the full family of public transit options. At a national level, there are : currently no industry recognized perform...

  1. Chip seal performance measures : best practices.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-01

    The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has a long history of designing, constructing, : and maintaining chip seal or bituminous surface treatment pavements. However, to date WSDOT has not : developed pavement performance indicators...

  2. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  3. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  4. Measuring collections effort improves cash performance.

    PubMed

    Shutts, Joe

    2009-09-01

    Having a satisfied work force can lead to an improved collections effort. Hiring the right people and training them ensures employee engagement. Measuring collections effort and offering incentives is key to revenue cycle success.

  5. 45 CFR 305.2 - Performance measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... establishment percentage (commonly known as the PEP). The count of children shall not include any child who is a... count. The equation to compute the measure is as follows (expressed as a percent): ER27DE00.047 (3...

  6. 45 CFR 305.2 - Performance measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... establishment percentage (commonly known as the PEP). The count of children shall not include any child who is a... count. The equation to compute the measure is as follows (expressed as a percent): ER27DE00.047 (3...

  7. 45 CFR 305.2 - Performance measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... establishment percentage (commonly known as the PEP). The count of children shall not include any child who is a... count. The equation to compute the measure is as follows (expressed as a percent): ER27DE00.047 (3...

  8. 45 CFR 305.2 - Performance measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... establishment percentage (commonly known as the PEP). The count of children shall not include any child who is a... count. The equation to compute the measure is as follows (expressed as a percent): ER27DE00.047 (3...

  9. 45 CFR 305.2 - Performance measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... establishment percentage (commonly known as the PEP). The count of children shall not include any child who is a... count. The equation to compute the measure is as follows (expressed as a percent): ER27DE00.047 (3...

  10. Analysis of safety reports involving area navigation and required navigation performance procedures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-11-03

    In order to achieve potential operational and safety benefits enabled by Area Navigation (RNAV) and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) procedures it is important to monitor emerging issues in their initial implementation. Reports from the Aviation...

  11. Michigan urban trunkline intersections safety performance functions (SPFs) development and support.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-06-01

    This study involves the development of safety performance functions (SPFs) for signalized and stop-controlled intersections : located along urban and suburban arterials in the state of Michigan. Extensive databases were developed that resulted in the...

  12. Prediction Of The Expected Safety Performance Of Rural Two-Lane Highways

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-12-01

    This report presents an algorithm for predicting the safety performance of a rural two-lane highway. The accident prediction algorithm consists of base models and accident modification factors for both roadway segments and at-grade intersections on r...

  13. Analysis of new entrant motor carrier safety performance and compliance using SafeStat

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-03-01

    This report documents the findings of a special study undertaken to update, confirm and expand upon previous studies on the comparative (to experienced carriers) safety performance and compliance of large commercial motor vehicle operators (motor car...

  14. Evaluating safety performance and developing guidelines for the use of right turn on red (RTOR).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-12-01

    This research project investigates the safety performance of Right Turn on Red (RTOR) at intersections. Also, new design alternatives, such as dual right-turn lanes and guidelines incorporating the use of RTOR at intersections are evaluated. To this ...

  15. Highway safety performance metrics and emergency response in an advanced transportation environment : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-01

    Traditional highway safety performance metrics have been largely based on fatal crashes and more recently serious injury crashes. In the near future however, there may be less severe motor vehicle crashes due to advances in driver assistance systems,...

  16. Public reporting and pay-for-performance: safety-net hospital executives' concerns and policy suggestions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, L Elizabeth; Henderson, Stuart; Dohan, Daniel P; Talavera, Jason A; Dudley, R Adams

    2007-01-01

    Safety-net hospitals (SNHs) may gain little financial benefit from the rapidly spreading adoption of public reporting and pay-for-performance, but may feel compelled to participate (and bear the costs of data collection) to meet public expectations of transparency and accountability. To better understand the concerns that SNH administrators have regarding public reporting and pay-for-performance, we interviewed 37 executives at randomly selected California SNHs. The main concerns noted by SNH executives were that human and financial resource constraints made it difficult for SNHs to accurately measure their performance. Additionally, some executives felt that market-driven public reporting and pay-for-performance may focus on clinical areas and incentive structures that may not be high-priority clinical areas for SNHs. Executives at SNHs suggested several policy responses to these concerns-such as offering training programs for SNH data collectors-that could be relatively inexpensive and might improve the cost-benefit ratio of public reporting and pay-for-performance programs.

  17. Job hindrances, job resources, and safety performance: The mediating role of job engagement.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhenyu; Li, Yongjuan; Tetrick, Lois E

    2015-11-01

    Job engagement has received widespread attention in organizational research but has rarely been empirically investigated in the context of safety. In the present study, we examined the mediating role of job engagement in the relationships between job characteristics and safety performance using self-reported data collected at a coal mining company in China. Most of our study hypotheses were supported. Job engagement partially mediated the relationships between job resources and safety performance dimensions. Theoretical and practical implications and directions for future research are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Air Force Maintenance Technician Performance Measurement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-28

    R G A N I Z A T IO N N A M E A N D A D R S A R E A P HO R U I T N U M B E R AFIT STUDENT AT: Arizona State Univ II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND...inflated, or provide incomplete and non -current coverage of maintenance organizations. The performance aopraisal method developed relies on subjective...highly inflated, or provided incomplete and non -current coverage of maintenance organizations. The performance appraisal method developed relied on

  19. Transformational leadership and employee safety performance: a within-person, between-jobs design.

    PubMed

    Inness, Michelle; Turner, Nick; Barling, Julian; Stride, Chris B

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the extent to which the safety performance (i.e., self-reported safety compliance and safety participation) of employees with 2 jobs was predicted by their respective supervisors' transformational leadership behaviors. We compared 2 within-person models: a context-specific model (i.e., transformational leadership experienced by employees in 1 context related to those same employees' safety performance only in that context) and a context-spillover model (i.e., transformational leadership experienced by employees in 1 context related to those same employees' safety performance in the same and other contexts). Our sample comprised 159 "moonlighters" (73 men, 86 women): employees who simultaneously hold 2 different jobs, each with a different supervisor, providing within-person data on the influence of different supervisors on employee safety performance across 2 job contexts. Having controlled for individual differences (negative affectivity and conscientiousness) and work characteristics (e.g., hours worked and length of relationship with supervisor), the context-specific model provided the best fit to the data among alternative nested models. Implications for the role of transformational leadership in promoting workplace safety are discussed.

  20. Implementing the new HEDIS hypertension performance measure.

    PubMed

    Sennett, C

    2000-04-01

    There is a problem with blood pressure control in the United States--a problem with significant implications for the health and welfare of the populace. This problem is bigger than managed care, but managed care organizations have both unique opportunities and unique obligations to address it. NCQA has responded to this problem, and to the opportunity for better care implicit in it, by introducing into HEDIS a measure that focuses on hypertension control. This measure will add pressure to health plans to address the problem of hypertension control, but it also will create the opportunity for positive recognition for those plans that succeed. The HEDIS hypertension measure is well grounded in both the science of medicine and the science of measurement. But HEDIS measurement alone will not create change. To effect change will require analysis of the problems that limit the delivery of effective care to patients with hypertension. It will require measurement of the success of the key processes of care upon which effective care depends. And it will require response--rational, focused, and operationally effective. These, in turn, will challenge key managers in health plans. Medical directors will have to influence provider behavior. Pharmacy directors will have to leverage pharmacy resources to support efforts to change provider and enrollee behaviors. And QA directors will have to manage a challenging set of measurement activities, from which plans' efforts to improve will be launched. The next few years will not be easy--demands for improvement increase annually, and resources are every year more scarce. Yet the goal is worth the struggle--to transform an industry that the public perceives to be interested in limiting care into one that the public turns to for assurance that care represents high value. Responding effectively to the HEDIS hypertension measure creates a unique opportunity for managed care--to demonstrate to the public that managed care is leading

  1. Considerations for calculating arterial system performance measures in Virginia.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-02-01

    The Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) mandates that state departments of transportation monitor and report performance measures in several areas. System performance measures on the National Highway System (NHS) are part of th...

  2. Measuring Institutional Performance in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerson, Joel W., Ed.; Massy, William F., Ed.

    This collection of seven essays from the Stanford Forum for Higher Education Futures focuses on how downsizing, quality management, and reengineering have are affecting higher education. An introductory paper, "Introduction: Change in Higher Education: Its Effect on Institutional Performance," (Joel W. Meyerson and Sandra L. Johnson)…

  3. Domains of the Florida Performance Measurement System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This monograph sets forth in detail the concepts included in the five domains of teaching as identified by the Florida Coalition for the Development of a Performance Evaluation System. The first domain, planning, includes the concepts: (1) content coverage; (2) utilization of instructional materials; (3) activity structure; (4) goal focusing; and…

  4. Performance measurements of the first RAID prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, Ann L.

    1990-01-01

    The performance is examined of Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) the First, a prototype disk array. A hierarchy of bottlenecks was discovered in the system that limit overall performance. The most serious is the memory system contention on the Sun 4/280 host CPU, which limits array bandwidth to 2.3 MBytes/sec. The array performs more successfully on small random operations, achieving nearly 300 I/Os per second before the Sun 4/280 becomes CPU limited. Other bottlenecks in the system are the VME backplane, bandwidth on the disk controller, and overheads associated with the SCSI protocol. All are examined in detail. The main conclusion is that to achieve the potential bandwidth of arrays, more powerful CPU's alone will not suffice. Just as important are adequate host memory bandwidth and support for high bandwidth on disk controllers. Current disk controllers are more often designed to achieve large numbers of small random operations, rather than high bandwidth. Operating systems also need to change to support high bandwidth from disk arrays. In particular, they should transfer data in larger blocks, and should support asynchronous I/O to improve sequential write performance.

  5. Expanded Measures of School Performance. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Heather L.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Stecher, Brian M.; Steele, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    The upcoming reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act provides an opportunity to reconsider what factors school performance-reporting systems should include. Critics of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) have pointed to the narrowing effects of the law's focus on mathematics and reading achievement, and they have called for efforts…

  6. Measuring Performance: Teacher-Made Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haladyna, Tom

    Among the new testing developments are the use of objectives or goals in instruction, competency based approaches to instruction, criterion referenced testing, and performance oriented testing. These new approaches often emphasize individualized learning; each student's progress is individually monitored by comparison with clear statements of what…

  7. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: LASER POWER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser power abstract
    The reliability of the confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) to obtain intensity measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. The laser power test appears to be one ...

  8. Measuring the Performance of Document Supply Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Line, Maurice B.

    Produced by Unesco as part of its program designed to help member states develop national information systems, including libraries, information services, and archives, this manual is a guide to document supply measurement techniques that are applicable to a wide range of countries. The first of seven chapters considers the objectives, nature, and…

  9. Cognitive Styles, Dynamic Geometry and Measurement Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitta-Pantazi, Demetra; Christou, Constantinos

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the outcomes of an empirical study undertaken to investigate the effect of students' cognitive styles on achievement in measurement tasks in a dynamic geometry learning environment, and to explore the ability of dynamic geometry learning in accommodating different cognitive styles and enhancing students' learning. A total of 49…

  10. 75 FR 18256 - Withdrawal of Proposed Improvements to the Motor Carrier Safety Status Measurement System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... improved Carrier Safety Measurement System (CSMS) on November 30, 2010. The CSMS has been developed and...-2251. Mail: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, Room W12-140, 1200 New...) Accident, (2) Driver, (3) Vehicle and (4) Safety Management. The four SEA values are then combined into an...

  11. Safety in ready mixed concrete industry: descriptive analysis of injuries and development of preventive measures

    PubMed Central

    AKBOĞA, Özge; BARADAN, Selim

    2016-01-01

    Ready mixed concrete (RMC) industry, one of the barebones of construction sector, has its distinctive occupational safety and health (OSH) risks. Employees experience risks that emerge during the fabrication of concrete, as well as its delivery to the construction site. Statistics show that usage and demand of RMC have been increasing along with the number of producers and workers. Unfortunately, adequate OSH measures to meet this rapid growth are not in place even in top RMC producing countries, such as Turkey. Moreover, lack of statistical data and academic research in this sector exacerbates this problem. This study aims to fill this gap by conducting data mining in Turkish Social Security Institution archives and performing univariate frequency and cross tabulation analysis on 71 incidents that RMC truck drivers were involved. Also, investigations and interviews were conducted in seven RMC plants in Turkey and Netherlands with OSH point of view. Based on the results of this research, problem areas were determined such as; cleaning truck mixer/pump is a hazardous activity where operators get injured frequently, and struck by falling objects is a major hazard at RMC industry. Finally, Job Safety Analyses were performed on these areas to suggest mitigation methods. PMID:27524105

  12. Safety in ready mixed concrete industry: descriptive analysis of injuries and development of preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Akboğa, Özge; Baradan, Selim

    2017-02-07

    Ready mixed concrete (RMC) industry, one of the barebones of construction sector, has its distinctive occupational safety and health (OSH) risks. Employees experience risks that emerge during the fabrication of concrete, as well as its delivery to the construction site. Statistics show that usage and demand of RMC have been increasing along with the number of producers and workers. Unfortunately, adequate OSH measures to meet this rapid growth are not in place even in top RMC producing countries, such as Turkey. Moreover, lack of statistical data and academic research in this sector exacerbates this problem. This study aims to fill this gap by conducting data mining in Turkish Social Security Institution archives and performing univariate frequency and cross tabulation analysis on 71 incidents that RMC truck drivers were involved. Also, investigations and interviews were conducted in seven RMC plants in Turkey and Netherlands with OSH point of view. Based on the results of this research, problem areas were determined such as; cleaning truck mixer/pump is a hazardous activity where operators get injured frequently, and struck by falling objects is a major hazard at RMC industry. Finally, Job Safety Analyses were performed on these areas to suggest mitigation methods.

  13. Scientific Approach for Optimising Performance, Health and Safety in High-Altitude Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böcker, Michael; Vogy, Joachim; Nolle-Gösser, Tanja

    2008-09-01

    The ESO coordinated study “Optimising Performance, Health and Safety in High-Altitude Observatories” is based on a psychological approach using a questionnaire for data collection and assessment of high-altitude effects. During 2007 and 2008, data from 28 staff and visitors involved in APEX and ALMA were collected and analysed and the first results of the study are summarised. While there is a lot of information about biomedical changes at high altitude, relatively few studies have focussed on psychological changes, for example with respect to performance of mental tasks, safety consciousness and emotions. Both, biomedical and psychological changes are relevant factors in occupational safety and health. The results of the questionnaire on safety, health and performance issues demonstrate that the working conditions at high altitude are less detrimental than expected.

  14. 26 CFR 801.3 - Measuring employee performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... REVENUE PRACTICE BALANCED SYSTEM FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.3 Measuring employee performance. (a) In general. All employees of the IRS will be... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Measuring employee performance. 801.3 Section...

  15. Formative and Summative Evaluation: Related Issues in Performance Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholey, Joseph S.

    1996-01-01

    Performance measurement can serve both formative and summative evaluation functions. Formative evaluation is typically more useful for government purposes whereas performance measurement is more useful than one-shot evaluations of either formative or summative nature. Evaluators should study performance measurement through case studies and…

  16. Air Force Materiel Command: A Survey of Performance Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-12

    AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND: A SURVEY OF PERFORMANCE MEASURES THESIS Marcia Leonard, Capt...AFIT/GLM/ENS/04-10 AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND: A SURVEY OF PERFORMANCE MEASURES THESIS Presented to the Faculty...SURVEY OF PERFORMANCE MEASURES Marcia Leonard, BS Capt, USAF Approved: //signed// 12 March 2004

  17. [Safety evaluation and risk control measures of Cassiae Semen].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Meng; Wu, Li; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xue-Min; Sun, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Chun

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the authors reviewed domestic and foreign literatures, conducted the textual research on origin and development of Cassia Semen, studied records in ancient books and ancient and modern literatures, clinical adverse reactions and relevant experimental studies in recent years, and summarized the clinical features and influencing factors related to the safety of Cassiae Semen. According to the findings,Cassia Semen's safety risks are mainly liver and kidney system damages, with the main clinical features of fatigue, anorexia, disgusting of oil, yellow urine and gray stool; digestive system injury, with the main clinical features of diarrhea, abdominal distension, nausea and loose stool; reproductive system damage, with the main clinical features of vaginal bleeding. Allergic reactions and clinical adverse events, with the main clinical features for numb mouth, itching skin, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, wheezing and lip cyanosis were also reported. The toxicological studies on toxic components of Cassiae Semen obtusifolia were carried out through acute toxicity test, subacute toxicity test, subchronic toxicity test and chronic toxicity test. Risk factors might include patients, compatibility and physicians. Physicians should strictly abide by the medication requirements in the Pharmacopoeia, pay attention to rational compatibility, appropriate dosage,correct usage and appropriate processing, control the dosage below 15 g to avoid excessive intake, strictly control the course of treatment to avoid accumulated poisoning caused by long-term administration. At the same time, clinicians should pay attention to the latest research progress, update the knowledge structure, quickly find the latest and useful materials from clinical practice, scientific research and drug information and other literatures, make evaluation and judgment for the materials, establish a traditional Chinese medicine intelligence information library, and strengthen the control over

  18. Performance Measurements for the Microsoft Kinect Skeleton

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Information Inter- faces and Presentation]: User Interfaces—Input devices and strate- gies; 1 INTRODUCTION The Microsoft Kinect for Xbox 360 (“Kinect...these values. 2 MEASUREMENTS We conducted our tests on a machine configured with Windows 7 Ultimate (Service Pack 1) equipped with two Intel Core2...test. We tested with one , two, and three users present, although only two skeletons may be tracked. 2.1 Range We need to know how close and how far a

  19. Dust control products at Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge, Texas: environmental safety and performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunz, Bethany K.; Little, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling fugitive dust while protecting natural resources is a challenge faced by all managers of unpaved roads. Unfortunately, road managers choosing between dust control products often have little objective environmental information to aid their decisions. To address this information gap, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collaborated on a field test of three dust control products with the objectives of (a) evaluating product performance under real-world conditions, (b) verifying the environmental safety of products identified as practically nontoxic in laboratory tests, and (c) testing the feasibility of several environmental monitoring techniques for use in dust control tests. In cooperation with refuge staff and product vendors, three products (one magnesium chloride plus binder, one cellulose, and one synthetic fluid plus binder) were applied in July 2012 to replicated road sections at the Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge in Texas. These sections were monitored periodically for 12 months after application. Product performance was assessed by mobile-mounted particulate-matter meters measuring production of fugitive dust and by observations of road conditions. Environmental safety was evaluated through on-site biological observations and leaching tests with samples of treated aggregate. All products reduced dust and improved surface condition during those 12 months. Planned environmental measurements were not always compatible with day-to-day refuge management actions; this incompatibility highlighted the need for flexible biological monitoring plans. As one of the first field tests of dust suppressants that explicitly incorporated biological endpoints, this effort provides valuable information for improving field tests and for developing laboratory or semifield alternatives.

  20. Measuring patient safety in a UK dental hospital: development of a dental clinical effectiveness dashboard.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, M N; Ashley, M P; Shaw, A; Dickson, S; Saksena, A

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety is an important marker of quality for any healthcare organisation. In 2008, the British Government white paper entitled High quality care for all, resulting from a review led by Lord Darzi, identified patient safety as a key component of quality and discussed how it might be measured, analysed and acted upon. National and local clinically curated metrics were suggested, which could be displayed via a 'clinical dashboard'. This paper explains the development of a clinical effectiveness dashboard focused on patient safety in an English dental hospital and how it has helped us identify relevant patient safety issues in secondary dental care.

  1. Taguchi Based Performance and Reliability Improvement of an Ion Chamber Amplifier for Enhanced Nuclear Reactor Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, R. D.; Agarwal, Vivek

    2008-08-01

    An ion chamber amplifier (ICA) is used as a safety device for neutronic power (flux) measurement in regulation and protection systems of nuclear reactors. Therefore, performance reliability of an ICA is an important issue. Appropriate quality engineering is essential to achieve a robust design and performance of the ICA circuit. It is observed that the low input bias current operational amplifiers used in the input stage of the ICA circuit are the most critical devices for proper functioning of the ICA. They are very sensitive to the gamma radiation present in their close vicinity. Therefore, the response of the ICA deteriorates with exposure to gamma radiation resulting in a decrease in the overall reliability, unless desired performance is ensured under all conditions. This paper presents a performance enhancement scheme for an ICA operated in the nuclear environment. The Taguchi method, which is a proven technique for reliability enhancement, has been used in this work. It is demonstrated that if a statistical, optimal design approach, like the Taguchi method is used, the cost of high quality and reliability may be brought down drastically. The complete methodology and statistical calculations involved are presented, as are the experimental and simulation results to arrive at a robust design of the ICA.

  2. Deploying and measuring a risk and patient safety program.

    PubMed

    Orel, Howard; McGroarty, Molly; Marchegiani, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Health care continues to evolve at a rapid rate. Over just the past decade, the industry has seen the introduction and widespread implementation of an electronic health record, increase in presence of nurse practitioners and physician assistants to help manage the shortage of physicians, and the introduction of accountable care organizations. It is with these changes that new challenges and opportunities emerge. One such challenge is the increase in the severity of medical malpractice claims throughout the nation. Another emerging challenge is the introduction of outcome-based reimbursements, with providers potentially losing a portion of their payment should the patient experience result in a preventable adverse event. These trends are resulting in providers continuously seeking innovative approaches to reducing risk and improving patient safety. © 2017 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  3. Toward an understanding of the impact of production pressure on safety performance in construction operations.

    PubMed

    Han, Sanguk; Saba, Farzaneh; Lee, Sanghyun; Mohamed, Yasser; Peña-Mora, Feniosky

    2014-07-01

    It is not unusual to observe that actual schedule and quality performances are different from planned performances (e.g., schedule delay and rework) during a construction project. Such differences often result in production pressure (e.g., being pressed to work faster). Previous studies demonstrated that such production pressure negatively affects safety performance. However, the process by which production pressure influences safety performance, and to what extent, has not been fully investigated. As a result, the impact of production pressure has not been incorporated much into safety management in practice. In an effort to address this issue, this paper examines how production pressure relates to safety performance over time by identifying their feedback processes. A conceptual causal loop diagram is created to identify the relationship between schedule and quality performances (e.g., schedule delays and rework) and the components related to a safety program (e.g., workers' perceptions of safety, safety training, safety supervision, and crew size). A case study is then experimentally undertaken to investigate this relationship with accident occurrence with the use of data collected from a construction site; the case study is used to build a System Dynamics (SD) model. The SD model, then, is validated through inequality statistics analysis. Sensitivity analysis and statistical screening techniques further permit an evaluation of the impact of the managerial components on accident occurrence. The results of the case study indicate that schedule delays and rework are the critical factors affecting accident occurrence for the monitored project. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-measure Performance Assessment and Benchmarking of the Divisions of the Wyoming Highway Patrol

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-12-01

    With many lives lost every year in traffic related crashes, traffic safety is a major concern all around the world. One way to improve traffic safety is to improve the organizational performance of agencies responsible for enforcing traffic safety. I...

  5. A false sense of security: safety behaviors erode objective speech performance in individuals with social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Rowa, Karen; Paulitzki, Jeffrey R; Ierullo, Maria D; Chiang, Brenda; Antony, Martin M; McCabe, Randi E; Moscovitch, David A

    2015-05-01

    In the current study, 55 participants with a diagnosis of generalized social anxiety disorder (SAD), 23 participants with a diagnosis of an anxiety disorder other than SAD with no comorbid SAD, and 50 healthy controls completed a speech task as well as self-reported measures of safety behavior use. Speeches were videotaped and coded for global and specific indicators of performance by two raters who were blind to participants' diagnostic status. Results suggested that the objective performance of people with SAD was poorer than that of both control groups, who did not differ from each other. Moreover, self-reported use of safety behaviors during the speech strongly mediated the relationship between diagnostic group and observers' performance ratings. These results are consistent with contemporary cognitive-behavioral and interpersonal models of SAD and suggest that socially anxious individuals' performance skills may be undermined by the use of safety behaviors. These data provide further support for recommendations from previous studies that the elimination of safety behaviors ought to be a priority in cognitive behavioral therapy for SAD. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Measuring Mental Workload: A Performance Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    1982). Subjective mental workload. Human Factors, 24, 25-40. Neisser , U ., Novick, R., & Lazar, R. (1963). Searching for ten targets 0...818 MES~A [G MENTAL WORKLOAD: A PERFORMANCE BATTERY( U ) 1/ • i NUN ENGINEERING LAS ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MO L A MHITAKER ET AL .EP 87 HEL-TH-21-87...UNCLASSIFIED FG 5/9IIEEEEEEIE EhhIEllE~lllEE I.E.E.E I1.2 P e- - ,uIII j .. - - I ,,, 65 -S S p *q 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 u -; 5 . . ~qqr AD-A187 118

  7. Performance appraisal & promotion process: A measured approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jitendra

    2012-06-01

    Most of the companies have yearly performance appraisal process for their employees. This process involves rating of employees by their manager. And Companies rely purely on managerís state of thinking and perception. Humans have tendency to become biased, corrupt, give favor to some employees whom they like. This favor is due to some other reasons e.g. personal reason, social reason, political reason, flattering. All these reasons are not related to the work that the employee is doing for the organization.

  8. Relationship Between Operating Room Teamwork, Contextual Factors, and Safety Checklist Performance.

    PubMed

    Singer, Sara J; Molina, George; Li, Zhonghe; Jiang, Wei; Nurudeen, Suliat; Kite, Julia G; Edmondson, Lizabeth; Foster, Richard; Haynes, Alex B; Berry, William R

    2016-10-01

    Studies show that using surgical safety checklists (SSCs) reduces complications. Many believe SSCs accomplish this by enhancing teamwork, but evidence is limited. Our study sought to relate teamwork to checklist performance, understand how they relate, and determine conditions that affect this relationship. Using 2 validated tools for observing and coaching operating room teams, we evaluated the association between checklist performance with surgeon buy-in and 4 domains of surgical teamwork: clinical leadership, communication, coordination, and respect. Hospital staff in 10 South Carolina hospitals observed 207 procedures between April 2011 and January 2013. We calculated levels of checklist performance, buy-in, and measures of teamwork, and evaluated their relationship, controlling for patient and case characteristics. Few teams completed most or all SSC items. Teams more often completed items considered procedural "checks" than conversation "prompts." Surgeon buy-in, clinical leadership, communication, a summary measure of teamwork overall, and observers' teamwork ratings positively related to overall checklist completion (multivariable model estimates from 0.04, p < 0.05 for communication to 0.17, p < 0.01 for surgeon buy-in). All measures of teamwork and surgeon buy-in related positively to completing more conversation prompts; none related significantly to procedural checks (estimates from 0.10, p < 0.01 for communication to 0.27, p < 0.001 for surgeon buy-in). Patient age was significantly associated with completing the checklist and prompts (p < 0.05); only case duration was positively associated with performing more checks (p < 0.10). Surgeon buy-in and surgical teamwork characterized by shared clinical leadership, open communication, active coordination, and mutual respect were critical in prompting case-related conversations, but not in completing procedural checks. Findings highlight the importance of surgeon engagement and high-quality, consistent

  9. Measuring Progress in Chemical Safety: A Guide for Local Emergency Planning Committees and Similar Groups

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    LEPCs set goals and determine if their actions continue to achieve desired outcomes. Based on Guidance on Developing Safety Performance Indicators related to Chemical Accident Prevention, Preparedness and Response for Public Authorities and Communities.

  10. High Power MPD Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Strzempkowski, Eugene; Pencil, Eric

    2004-01-01

    High power magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are being developed as cost effective propulsion systems for cargo transport to lunar and Mars bases, crewed missions to Mars and the outer planets, and robotic deep space exploration missions. Electromagnetic MPD thrusters have demonstrated, at the laboratory level, the ability to process megawatts of electrical power while providing significantly higher thrust densities than electrostatic electric propulsion systems. The ability to generate higher thrust densities permits a reduction in the number of thrusters required to perform a given mission, and alleviates the system complexity associated with multiple thruster arrays. The specific impulse of an MPD thruster can be optimized to meet given mission requirements, from a few thousand seconds with heavier gas propellants up to 10,000 seconds with hydrogen propellant. In support of programs envisioned by the NASA Office of Exploration Systems, Glenn Research Center is developing and testing quasi-steady MW-class MPD thrusters as a prelude to steady state high power thruster tests. This paper provides an overview of the GRC high power pulsed thruster test facility, and presents preliminary performance data for a quasi-steady baseline MPD thruster geometry.

  11. Driver performance modelling and its practical application to railway safety.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, W Ian; Clarke, Theresa

    2005-11-01

    This paper reports on the development and main features of a model of driver information processing. The work was conducted on behalf of Network Rail to meet a requirement to understand and manage the driver's interaction with the infrastructure through lineside reminder appliances. The model utilises cognitive theory and modelling techniques to describe driver performance in relation to infrastructure features and operational conditions. The model is capable of predicting the performance time, workload and error consequences of different operational conditions. The utility of the model is demonstrated through reports of its application to the following studies: Research on the effect of line speed on driver interaction with signals and signs. Calculation of minimum reading times for signals. Development of a human factors signals passed at danger (SPAD) hazard checklist, and a method to resolve conflicts between signal sighting solutions. Research on the demands imposed on drivers by European train control system (ETCS) driving in a UK context. The paper also reports on a validation of the model's utility as a tool for assessing cab and infrastructure drivability.

  12. Testing the reliability and validity of a measure of safety climate.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E; McGovern, P M; Kochevar, L; Vesley, D; Gershon, R

    2000-01-01

    The lack of compliance with universal precautions (UP) is well documented across a wide variety of healthcare professions and has been reported both before and after the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Gershon, Karkashian, and Felknor (1994) found that several factors correlated significantly with healthcare workers' lack of compliance with UP, including a measure of organizational safety climate (e.g., the employees' perception of their organizational culture and practices regarding safety). We conducted a secondary analysis using data from a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of 1,746 healthcare workers at risk of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens to assess the validity and reliability of Gershon's measure of safety climate. Findings revealed no relationship between safety climate and employees' gender, age, education, tenure in position, profession, hours worked per day, perceived risk, attitude toward risk, and training. An association was demonstrated between safety climate and (1) healthcare worker compliance with UP and (2) the availability of personal protective equipment, providing support for the construct validity of this measure of safety climate. These findings could be used by occupational health professionals to assess employees' perceptions of the safety culture and practices in the workplace and to guide the institution's risk management efforts in association with U.P.

  13. Analysis of occupational accidents: prevention through the use of additional technical safety measures for machinery.

    PubMed

    Dźwiarek, Marek; Latała, Agata

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of results of 1035 serious and 341 minor accidents recorded by Poland's National Labour Inspectorate (PIP) in 2005-2011, in view of their prevention by means of additional safety measures applied by machinery users. Since the analysis aimed at formulating principles for the application of technical safety measures, the analysed accidents should bear additional attributes: the type of machine operation, technical safety measures and the type of events causing injuries. The analysis proved that the executed tasks and injury-causing events were closely connected and there was a relation between casualty events and technical safety measures. In the case of tasks consisting of manual feeding and collecting materials, the injuries usually occur because of the rotating motion of tools or crushing due to a closing motion. Numerous accidents also happened in the course of supporting actions, like removing pollutants, correcting material position, cleaning, etc.

  14. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : Roadside Intervention Effectiveness Model, fiscal year 2010.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-11-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), in cooperation with the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, has developed an analytic model to measure the effectiveness of roadside inspections and traffic enforcements in te...

  15. Evaluation of surrogate measures for pedestrian safety in various road and roadside environments.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    This report presents an investigation of pedestrian conflicts and crash count models to learn which exposure measures and roadway or roadside characteristics significantly influence pedestrian safety at road crossings. Negative binomial models were e...

  16. FDA Proposes New Safety Measures for Indoor Tanning Devices: The Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Proposes New Safety Measures for Indoor Tanning Devices: The Facts ... Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 1-888- ...

  17. Analysis of occupational accidents: prevention through the use of additional technical safety measures for machinery

    PubMed Central

    Dźwiarek, Marek; Latała, Agata

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of results of 1035 serious and 341 minor accidents recorded by Poland's National Labour Inspectorate (PIP) in 2005–2011, in view of their prevention by means of additional safety measures applied by machinery users. Since the analysis aimed at formulating principles for the application of technical safety measures, the analysed accidents should bear additional attributes: the type of machine operation, technical safety measures and the type of events causing injuries. The analysis proved that the executed tasks and injury-causing events were closely connected and there was a relation between casualty events and technical safety measures. In the case of tasks consisting of manual feeding and collecting materials, the injuries usually occur because of the rotating motion of tools or crushing due to a closing motion. Numerous accidents also happened in the course of supporting actions, like removing pollutants, correcting material position, cleaning, etc. PMID:26652689

  18. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : Carrier Intervention Effectiveness Model, Version 1.1, technical report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-04-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), in cooperation with the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe), has developed a quantitative model to measure the effectiveness of motor carrier interventions in terms of ...

  19. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : Roadside Intervention Effectiveness Model, fiscal year 2012.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-02-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), in cooperation with the John A. Volpe National : Transportation Systems Center, has developed an analytic model to measure the effectiveness of roadside : inspections and traffic enforcements i...

  20. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : roadside intervention effectiveness model, fiscal year 2013.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-08-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), in cooperation with the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, has developed an analytic model to measure the effectiveness of roadside inspections and traffic enforcements in te...

  1. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : roadside intervention effectiveness model fiscal year 2011.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-06-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), in cooperation with the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, has developed an analytic model to measure the effectiveness of roadside inspections and traffic enforcements in te...

  2. Effectiveness of double fines as a speed control measure in safety corridors.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-12-01

    The use of elevated traffic fines, and specifically doubling of applicable traffic fines under certain conditions, is widely used in Oregon as a speed control measure. Double fines have applied to safety corridors in Oregon since 1999. Double f...

  3. Special report. New products that improve officer performance, safety.

    PubMed

    1991-12-01

    The need for products that improve performance of security officers is counterbalanced these days by budgetary constraints. While this may limit major investments in security systems and personnel, less costly improvements or innovations might be worth considering. In this report, we will discuss four advances that may be valuable not only in hospital security, but in other industries as well. One of them, a smoke filter, was originally developed for the hotel industry. Another, a drug detection device, may replace the use of undercover agents or drug-sniffing' dogs in certain circumstances. The third new product is an economical patrol vehicle for parking facilities which might replace more costly vehicles such as golf carts or cars. The fourth product, a roving CCTV camera, is actually being tested at a Midwest medical center and may allow you to monitor areas of parking garages with cameras instead of officers on patrol.

  4. Economic evaluation of traffic safety measures for transport companies.

    PubMed

    Rienstra, S A; Rietveld, P; Lindeijer, J E

    2000-09-01

    This paper addresses the economic feasibility of measures to reduce the material damage of transport companies. Results are presented of a series of interviews among transport companies as well as from a postal questionnaire survey. Next, calculations are presented for three types of companies: a small family company, a large family company and a large formalised company. From the viewpoint of costs and benefits, damage prevention measures appear to be particularly interesting to larger companies. Small companies, being the largest group, tend to have an informal culture in which measures are less effective. Especially those measures for which no large investments are needed, which influence the behaviour of drivers and need not to be contracted out, are perceived as attractive by the transport companies.

  5. Higher energy prices are associated with diminished resources, performance and safety in Australian ambulance systems.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lawrence H; Chaiechi, Taha; Buettner, Petra G; Canyon, Deon V; Crawford, J Mac; Judd, Jenni

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of changing energy prices on Australian ambulance systems. Generalised estimating equations were used to analyse contemporaneous and lagged relationships between changes in energy prices and ambulance system performance measures in all Australian State/Territory ambulance systems for the years 2000-2010. Measures included: expenditures per response; labour-to-total expenditure ratio; full-time equivalent employees (FTE) per 10,000 responses; average salary; median and 90th percentile response time; and injury compensation claims. Energy price data included State average diesel price, State average electricity price, and world crude oil price. Changes in diesel prices were inversely associated with changes in salaries, and positively associated with changes in ambulance response times; changes in oil prices were also inversely associated with changes in salaries, as well with staffing levels and expenditures per ambulance response. Changes in electricity prices were positively associated with changes in expenditures per response and changes in salaries; they were also positively associated with changes in injury compensation claims per 100 FTE. Changes in energy prices are associated with changes in Australian ambulance systems' resource, performance and safety characteristics in ways that could affect both patients and personnel. Further research is needed to explore the mechanisms of, and strategies for mitigating, these impacts. The impacts of energy prices on other aspects of the health system should also be investigated. © 2013 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2013 Public Health Association of Australia.

  6. Performance measurement in surgery through the National Quality Forum.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Joseph A; Roy, Nathalie; Wakeam, Elliot; Hernandez, Roland; Kim, Simon P; Bader, Angela M; Cima, Robert R; Nguyen, Louis L

    2014-11-01

    Performance measurement has become central to surgical practice. We systematically reviewed all endorsed performance measures from the National Quality Forum, the national clearing house for performance measures in health care, to identify measures relevant to surgical practice and describe measure stewardship, measure types, and identify gaps in measurement. Performance measures current to June 2014 were categorized by denominator statement as either assessing surgical practice in specific or as part of a mixed medical and surgical population. Measures were further classified by surgical specialty, Donabedian measure type, patients, disease and events targeted, reporting eligibility, and measure stewards. Of 637 measures, 123 measures assessed surgical performance in specific and 123 assessed surgical performance in aggregate. Physician societies (51 of 123, 41.5%) were more common than government agencies (32 of 123, 26.0%) among measure stewards for surgical measures, in particular, the Society for Thoracic Surgery (n = 32). Outcomes measures rather than process measures were common among surgical measures (62 of 123, 50.4%) compared with aggregate medical/surgical measures (46 of 123, 37.4%). Among outcomes measures, death alone was the most commonly specified outcome (24 of 62, 38.7%). Only 1 surgical measure addressed patient-centered care and only 1 measure addressed hospital readmission. We found 7 current surgical measures eligible for value-based purchasing. Surgical society stewards and outcomes measure types, particularly for cardiac surgery, were well represented in the National Quality Forum. Measures addressing patient-centered outcomes and the value of surgical decision-making were not well represented and may be suitable targets for measure innovation. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Measuring mobile patient safety information system success: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Chao, Chia-Cheng

    2008-10-01

    The Health Risk Reminders and Surveillance (HRRS) system was designed to deliver critical abnormal test results of severely ill patients from Laboratory, Radiology, and Pathology departments to physicians within 5 min using cell phone text messages. This paper explores the success of the HRRS system. This study employed an augmented version of the DeLone and McLean IS success model. Seven variables (system quality, information quality, system use, user satisfaction, mobile healthcare anxiety, impact on the individual and impact on the organization) were used to evaluate the success of the HRRS system. The interrelationships between the seven variables were hypothesized and the hypotheses were empirically tested. The results indicate that the information quality of the HRRS system is positively associated with both system use and user satisfaction. In addition, system use is positively associated with user satisfaction, which is also positively associated with mobile healthcare anxiety. Moreover, results indicate that impact on the individual is positively associated with both user satisfaction and mobile healthcare anxiety. Finally, the impact of the organization is positively associated with impact on the individual. The results of the study provide an expanded understanding of the factors that contribute to mobile patient safety information system (IS) success. Implications of the relationship between system use and physician mobile healthcare anxiety are discussed.

  8. Ergonomic initiatives at Inmetro: measuring occupational health and safety.

    PubMed

    Drucker, L; Amaral, M; Carvalheira, C

    2012-01-01

    This work studies biomechanical hazards to which the workforce of Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia Industrial (Inmetro) is exposed. It suggests a model for ergonomic evaluation of work, based on the concepts of resilience engineering which take into consideration the institute's ability to manage risk and deal with its consequences. Methodology includes the stages of identification, inventory, analysis, and risk management. Diagnosis of the workplace uses as parameters the minimal criteria stated in Brazilian legislation. The approach has several prospectives and encompasses the points of view of public management, safety engineering, physical therapy and ergonomics-oriented design. The suggested solution integrates all aspects of the problem: biological, psychological, sociological and organizational. Results obtained from a pilot Project allow to build a significant sample of Inmetro's workforce, identifying problems and validating the methodology employed as a tool to be applied to the whole institution. Finally, this work intends to draw risk maps and support goals and methods based on resiliency engineering to assess environmental and ergonomic risk management.

  9. Promoting the safety performance of industrial radiography using a quantitative assessment system.

    PubMed

    Kardan, M R; Mianji, F A; Rastkhah, N; Babakhani, A; Azad, S Borhan

    2006-12-01

    The increasing number of industrial radiographers and their considerable occupational exposure has been one of the main concerns of the Iran Nuclear Regulatory Authority (INRA) in recent years. In 2002, a quantitative system of evaluating the safety performance of licensees and a complementary enforcement system was introduced by the National Radiation Protection Department (NRPD). Each parameter of the practice is given a weighting factor according to its importance to safety. Assessment of the licensees is done quantitatively by summing up their scores using prepared tables. Implementing this system of evaluation showed a considerable decrease in deficiencies in the various centres. Tables are updated regularly as a result of findings during the inspections. This system is used in addition to enforcement to promote safety performance and to increase the culture of safety in industrial radiography.

  10. Performance of a Fuel-Injection Spark-Ignition Engine Using a Hydrogenated Safety Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Young, Alfred W

    1934-01-01

    This report presents the performance of a single-cylinder test engine using a hydrogenated safety fuel. The safety fuel has a flash point of 125 degrees f. (Cleveland open-dup method), which is high enough to remove most of the fire hazard, and an octane number of 95, which permits higher compression ratios to be used than are permissible with most undoped gasolines.

  11. Perkins Core Performance Measures: Results and Targets, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHewitt, Earl R.; Taylor, Garry

    This document describes the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) Core Indicators for the Perkins III Core Performance Standards and Measures. Core indicators and measures include: (1) student attainment, measured by academic and technical skills; (2) completion, measured by graduation rate; (3) placement and persistence, measured by placement,…

  12. A Study of Truck Drivers and Their Job Performance Regarding Highway Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nafukho, Fredrick M.; Hinton, Barbara E.; Graham, Carroll M.

    2007-01-01

    Limited research has addressed the issue of truck drivers and their performance regarding highway safety in terms of reduced number of crashes per driver. The primary purpose of this study was to determine how tractor trailer truck drivers' job performance could be improved while at the same time ensuring increased revenue for the transportation…

  13. 75 FR 23589 - Safety Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... Zone Regulations, Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Washington, WA for the annual Seafair Blue Angels Air Show from 10 a.m. on August 5, 2010 to 6 p.m. on August... Washington for the annual Seafair Blue Angels Air Show Performance. The Coast Guard will enforce the safety...

  14. Relationship between preventable hospital deaths and other measures of safety: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Helen; Healey, Frances; Neale, Graham; Thomson, Richard; Vincent, Charles; Black, Nick

    2014-06-01

    To explore associations between the proportion of hospital deaths that are preventable and other measures of safety. Retrospective case record review to provide estimates of preventable death proportions. Simple monotonic correlations using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient to establish the relationship with eight other measures of patient safety. Ten English acute hospital trusts. One thousand patients who died during 2009. The proportion of preventable deaths varied between hospitals (3-8%) but was not statistically significant (P = 0.94). Only one of the eight measures of safety (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia rate) was clinically and statistically significantly associated with preventable death proportion (r = 0.73; P < 0.02). There were no significant associations with the other measures including hospital standardized mortality ratios (r = -0.01). There was a suggestion that preventable deaths may be more strongly associated with some other measures of outcome than with process or with structure measures. The exploratory nature of this study inevitably limited its power to provide definitive results. The observed relationships between safety measures suggest that a larger more powerful study is needed to establish the inter-relationship of different measures of safety (structure, process and outcome), in particular the widely used standardized mortality ratios. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  15. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 222 - Alternative Safety Measures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... field data derived from the crossing sites. The specific crossing and applied mitigation measure will be... of a Public Highway-Rail Grade Crossing, (2) Four-Quadrant Gate System, (3) Gates With Medians or... as provided by 49 U.S.C. 20107. 3. Photo Enforcement: This ASM entails automated means of gathering...

  16. Breath measurement instrumentation as alcohol safety interlock systems

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1974-09-01

    This report describes the results of field tests of in-car instruments which measure alcohol on the driver's breath and prevent him from operating his vehicle if intoxicated. Two types of breath alcohol sensors were used for these tests; a fuel-cell ...

  17. Facility-level outcome performance measures for nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Porell, F; Caro, F G

    1998-12-01

    Risk-adjusted nursing home performance scores were developed for four health outcomes and five quality indicators from resident-level longitudinal case-mix reimbursement data for Medicaid residents of more than 500 nursing homes in Massachusetts. Facility performance was measured by comparing actual resident outcomes with expected outcomes derived from quarterly predictions of resident-level econometric models over a 3-year period (1991-1994). Performance measures were tightly distributed among facilities in the state. The intercorrelations among the nine outcome performance measures were relatively low and not uniformly positive. Performance measures were not highly associated with various structural facility attributes. For most outcomes, longitudinal analyses revealed only modest correlations between a facility's performance score from one time period to the next. Relatively few facilities exhibited consistent superior or inferior performance over time. The findings have implications toward the practical use of facility outcome performance measures for quality assurance and reimbursement purposes in the near future.

  18. Tumescent liposuction report performance measurement initiative: national survey results.

    PubMed

    Hanke, William; Cox, Sue Ellen; Kuznets, Naomi; Coleman, William P

    2004-07-01

    This study was created by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Institute for Quality Improvement to measure clinical performance and improvement opportunities for physicians and ambulatory health-care organizations. Data were collected prospectively between February 2001 and August 2002. Thirty-nine study centers participated, and 688 patients who had tumescent liposuction were surveyed and followed for 6 months. The objective was to determine patient satisfaction with tumescent liposuction and examine current liposuction practice and the safety of tumescent liposuction in a representative cohort of patients. The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Institute for Quality Improvement collected prospective data from February 2001 to August 2002 from 68 organizations registered for this study. Ultimately 39 organizations submitted 688 useable cases performed totally with local anesthesia, "tumescent technique." The overall clinical complication rate found in the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Institute for Quality Improvement study was 0.7% (5 of 702). There was a minor complication rate of 0.57%. The major complication rate was 0.14% with one patient requiring hospitalization. Seventy-five percent of the patients reported no discomfort during their procedures. Of the 59% of patients who responded to a 6-month postoperative survey, 91% were positive about their decision to have liposuction (rating of 4 or 5 on a scale of 1-5) and 84% had high levels (4 or 5 on a scale of 1-5) of overall satisfaction with the procedure. Our findings are consistent with others in that tumescent liposuction is a safe procedure with a low complication rate and high patient satisfaction.

  19. 47 CFR 73.1590 - Equipment performance measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment performance measurements. 73.1590... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1590 Equipment performance... equipment performance measurements for each main transmitter as follows: (1) Upon initial installation of a...

  20. The Bottom Line: Performance Measurement in a Corporate Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Moyra

    This paper discusses performance measurement in the Blake Dawson Waldron (BDW) law firm, a partnership with five offices in Australia, as well as a number overseas. Three levels of performance measurement are described: (1) personal level--through annual performance appraisals; (2) team level--the annual team meeting; and (3) service…

  1. The School Assessment for Environmental Typology (SAfETy): An Observational Measure of the School Environment.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Milam, Adam J; Furr-Holden, C Debra M; Johnson, Sarah Lindstrom

    2015-12-01

    School safety is of great concern for prevention researchers, school officials, parents, and students, yet there are a dearth of assessments that have operationalized school safety from an organizational framework using objective tools and measures. Such a tool would be important for deriving unbiased assessments of the school environment, which in turn could be used as an evaluative tool for school violence prevention efforts. The current paper presents a framework for conceptualizing school safety consistent with Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) model and social disorganization theory, both of which highlight the importance of context as a driver for adolescents' risk for involvement in substance use and violence. This paper describes the development of a novel observational measure, called the School Assessment for Environmental Typology (SAfETy), which applies CPTED and social disorganizational frameworks to schools to measure eight indicators of school physical and social environment (i.e., disorder, trash, graffiti/vandalism, appearance, illumination, surveillance, ownership, and positive behavioral expectations). Drawing upon data from 58 high schools, we provide preliminary data regarding the validity and reliability of the SAfETy and describe patterns of the school safety indicators. Findings demonstrate the reliability and validity of the SAfETy and are discussed with regard to the prevention of violence in schools.

  2. Development of congestion performance measures using ITS information.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to define a performance measure(s) that could be used to show congestion levels on critical corridors throughout Virginia and to develop a method to select and calculate performance measures to quantify congestion in...

  3. Perkins Core Performance Measures Results and Targets, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHewitt, Earl R.; Taylor, Garry

    This is a report on 2000-2001 Perkins III core performance standards and measures for the Virginia Community College System (VCCS). Perkins performance measure definitions for the system were finalized with the Virginia and federal departments of education in fall 2000. Core indicators include: (1) student attainment, which measures academic and…

  4. The algorithmic performance of J-Tpeak for drug safety clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chien, Simon C; Gregg, Richard E

    The interval from J-point to T-wave peak (JTp) in ECG is a new biomarker able to identify drugs that prolong the QT interval but have different ion channel effects. If JTp is not prolonged, the prolonged QT may be associated with multi ion channel block that may have low torsade de pointes risk. From the automatic ECG measurement perspective, accurate and repeatable measurement of JTp involves different challenges than QT. We evaluated algorithm performance and JTp challenges using the Philips DXL diagnostic 12/16/18-lead algorithm. Measurement of JTp represents a different use model. Standard use of corrected QT interval is clinical risk assessment on patients with cardiac disease or suspicion of heart disease. Drug safety trials involve a very different population - young healthy subjects - who commonly have J-waves, notches and slurs. Drug effects include difficult and unusual morphology such as flat T-waves, gentle notches, and multiple T-wave peaks. The JTp initiative study provided ECGs collected from 22 young subjects (11 males and females) in randomized testing of dofetilide, quinidine, ranolazine, verapamil and placebo. We compare the JTp intervals between DXL algorithm and the FDA published measurements. The lead wise, vector-magnitude (VM), root-mean-square (RMS) and principal-component-analysis (PCA) representative beats were used to measure JTp and QT intervals. We also implemented four different methods for T peak detection for comparison. We found that JTp measurements were closer to the reference for combined leads RMS and PCA than individual leads. Differences in J-point location led to part of the JTp measurement difference because of the high prevalence of J-waves, notches and slurs. Larger differences were noted for drug effect causing multiple distinct T-wave peaks (Tp). The automated algorithm chooses the later peak while the reference was the earlier peak. Choosing among different algorithmic strategies in T peak measurement results in the

  5. Trace element measurement for assessment of dog food safety.

    PubMed

    De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A; Elias, Camila; Bacchi, Márcio Arruda; Bode, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The quality of dog diets depends on adequate ingredients capable of providing optimal nutrition and free of contaminants, for promoting long-term health. Trace elements in 95 samples of dry food for dog puppies (n = 32) and adults (n = 63) of various brands were measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The mass fractions of most elements were within the permissible limits for dogs. Aluminum, antimony, and uranium presented fairly high levels in some samples, which may imply health risks. Aluminum mass fractions ranged from <21 to 11,900 mg/kg, in same brand, super-premium dog food. Antimony mass fractions ranged up to 5.14 mg/kg, with the highest values measured in six samples of dog food from the same producer. The mass fractions of uranium was found up to 4 mg/kg in commercial brands from five different producers.

  6. Space Biology and Medicine. Volume 4; Health, Performance, and Safety of Space Crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietlein, Lawrence F. (Editor); Pestov, Igor D. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Volume IV is devoted to examining the medical and associated organizational measures used to maintain the health of space crews and to support their performance before, during, and after space flight. These measures, collectively known as the medical flight support system, are important contributors to the safety and success of space flight. The contributions of space hardware and the spacecraft environment to flight safety and mission success are covered in previous volumes of the Space Biology and Medicine series. In Volume IV, we address means of improving the reliability of people who are required to function in the unfamiliar environment of space flight as well as the importance of those who support the crew. Please note that the extensive collaboration between Russian and American teams for this volume of work resulted in a timeframe of publication longer than originally anticipated. Therefore, new research or insights may have emerged since the authors composed their chapters and references. This volume includes a list of authors' names and addresses should readers seek specifics on new information. At least three groups of factors act to perturb human physiological homeostasis during space flight. All have significant influence on health, psychological, and emotional status, tolerance, and work capacity. The first and most important of these factors is weightlessness, the most specific and radical change in the ambient environment; it causes a variety of functional and structural changes in human physiology. The second group of factors precludes the constraints associated with living in the sealed, confined environment of spacecraft. Although these factors are not unique to space flight, the limitations they entail in terms of an uncomfortable environment can diminish the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. The third group of factors includes the occupational and social factors associated with the difficult, critical nature of the

  7. The development and psychometric evaluation of a safety climate measure for primary care.

    PubMed

    de Wet, C; Spence, W; Mash, R; Johnson, P; Bowie, P

    2010-12-01

    Building a safety culture is an important part of improving patient care. Measuring perceptions of safety climate among healthcare teams and organisations is a key element of this process. Existing measurement instruments are largely developed for secondary care settings in North America and many lack adequate psychometric testing. Our aim was to develop and test an instrument to measure perceptions of safety climate among primary care teams in National Health Service for Scotland. Questionnaire development was facilitated through a steering group, literature review, semistructured interviews with primary care team members, a modified Delphi and completion of a content validity index by experts. A cross-sectional postal survey utilising the questionnaire was undertaken in a random sample of west of Scotland general practices to facilitate psychometric evaluation. Statistical methods, including exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and Cronbach and Raykov reliability coefficients were conducted. Of the 667 primary care team members based in 49 general practices surveyed, 563 returned completed questionnaires (84.4%). Psychometric evaluation resulted in the development of a 30-item questionnaire with five safety climate factors: leadership, teamwork, communication, workload and safety systems. Retained items have strong factor loadings to only one factor. Reliability coefficients was satisfactory (α = 0.94 and ρ = 0.93). This study is the first stage in the development of an appropriately valid and reliable safety climate measure for primary care. Measuring safety climate perceptions has the potential to help primary care organisations and teams focus attention on safety-related issues and target improvement through educational interventions. Further research is required to explore acceptability and feasibility issues for primary care teams and the potential for organisational benchmarking.

  8. Measuring hospital-wide activity volume for patient safety and infection control: a multi-centre study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenshi; Imanaka, Yuichi; Fukuda, Haruhisa

    2007-09-03

    In Japan, as in many other countries, several quality and safety assurance measures have been implemented since the 1990's. This has occurred in spite of cost containment efforts. Although government and hospital decision-makers demand comprehensive analysis of these activities at the hospital-wide level, there have been few studies that actually quantify them. Therefore, the aims of this study were to measure hospital-wide activities for patient safety and infection control through a systematic framework, and to identify the incremental volume of these activities implemented over the last five years. Using the conceptual framework of incremental activity corresponding to incremental cost, we defined the scope of patient safety and infection control activities. We then drafted a questionnaire to analyze these realms. After implementing the questionnaire, we conducted several in-person interviews with managers and other staff in charge of patient safety and infection control in seven acute care teaching hospitals in Japan. At most hospitals, nurses and clerical employees acted as the main figures in patient safety practices. The annual amount of activity ranged from 14,557 to 72,996 person-hours (per 100 beds: 6,240; per 100 staff: 3,323) across participant hospitals. Pharmacists performed more incremental activities than their proportional share. With respect to infection control activities, the annual volume ranged from 3,015 to 12,196 person-hours (per 100 beds: 1,141; per 100 staff: 613). For infection control, medical doctors and nurses tended to perform somewhat more of the duties relative to their share. We developed a systematic framework to quantify hospital-wide activities for patient safety and infection control. We also assessed the incremental volume of these activities in Japanese hospitals under the reimbursement containment policy. Government and hospital decision makers can benefit from this type of analytic framework and its empirical findings.

  9. Acute and chronic safety and efficacy of dose dependent creatine nitrate supplementation and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Elfego; Walker, Dillon K; Simbo, Sunday Y; Dalton, Ryan; Levers, Kyle; O'Connor, Abigail; Goodenough, Chelsea; Barringer, Nicholas D; Greenwood, Mike; Rasmussen, Christopher; Smith, Stephen B; Riechman, Steven E; Fluckey, James D; Murano, Peter S; Earnest, Conrad P; Kreider, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Creatine monohydrate (CrM) and nitrate are popular supplements for improving exercise performance; yet have not been investigated in combination. We performed two studies to determine the safety and exercise performance-characteristics of creatine nitrate (CrN) supplementation. Study 1 participants (N = 13) ingested 1.5 g CrN (CrN-Low), 3 g CrN (CrN-High), 5 g CrM or a placebo in a randomized, crossover study (7d washout) to determine supplement safety (hepatorenal and muscle enzymes, heart rate, blood pressure and side effects) measured at time-0 (unsupplemented), 30-min, and then hourly for 5-h post-ingestion. Study 2 participants (N = 48) received the same CrN treatments vs. 3 g CrM in a randomized, double-blind, 28d trial inclusive of a 7-d interim testing period and loading sequence (4 servings/d). Day-7 and d-28 measured Tendo™ bench press performance, Wingate testing and a 6x6-s bicycle ergometer sprint. Data were analyzed using a GLM and results are reported as mean ± SD or mean change ± 95 % CI. In both studies we observed several significant, yet stochastic changes in blood markers that were not indicative of potential harm or consistent for any treatment group. Equally, all treatment groups reported a similar number of minimal side effects. In Study 2, there was a significant increase in plasma nitrates for both CrN groups by d-7, subsequently abating by d-28. Muscle creatine increased significantly by d-7 in the CrM and CrN-High groups, but then decreased by d-28 for CrN-High. By d-28, there were significant increases in bench press lifting volume (kg) for all groups (PLA, 126.6, 95 % CI 26.3, 226.8; CrM, 194.1, 95 % CI 89.0, 299.2; CrN-Low, 118.3, 95 % CI 26.1, 210.5; CrN-High, 267.2, 95 % CI 175.0, 359.4, kg). Only the CrN-High group was significantly greater than PLA (p < 0.05). Similar findings were observed for bench press peak power (PLA, 59.0, 95 % CI 4.5, 113.4; CrM, 68.6, 95 % CI 11.4, 125.8; CrN-Low, 40.9, 95

  10. History and current safety measures at Laguna Palcacocha, Huaraz, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Checa, César; Cochachin, Alejo; Frey, Holger; Huggel, Christian; Portocarrero, César

    2017-04-01

    Laguna Palcacocha is a large glacier lake in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, located in the Quillcay catchment, above the city of Huaraz, the local capital. On 13 December 1941, the moraine dam lake collapsed, probably after having been impacted by a large ice avalanche, and triggered a major outburst flood. This GLOF destroyed about a third of the city of Huaraz, causing about 2,000 casualties and is therefore one of the deadliest glacier lake outbursts known in history. In 1974, the Glaciology Unit of Peru, responsible for the studying, monitoring and mitigation works related to glacier hazards installed a reinforcement of the natural moraine dam of the newly filled Laguna Palcacocha, with an artificial drainage channel at 7 m below the crest of the reinforced dam. At that time, the lake had an area of 66,800 m2 and a volume of 0.5 x 106 m3. During the past decades, in the course of continued glacier retreat, Laguna Palcacocha has undergone an extreme growth. In February 2016, the lake had an area of 514,000 m2 (7.7 times the area of 1974) and a volume of more than 17 x 106 m3 (more than 34 times the volume of 1974). At the same time, the city of Huaraz, located 20 km downstream of the lake, grew significantly after its almost complete destruction by the 1970 earthquake. Today, about 120,000 people are living in the city. Due to the persisting possibility for large ice avalanches directly above the Palcacocha lake, this constitutes a high-risk situation, requiring new hazard and risk mitigation measures. As an immediate temporal measure, in order to bridge the time until the realization of a more permanent measure, a syphoning system has been installed in 2011, using about ten 700-m pipes with a 10-inch (25.4 cm) diameter. The aim of this syphoning attempt is to lower the lake level by about 7 m, and therefore reduce the lake volume on the one hand, and also reach a higher dam freeboard. However, the system is less effective than assumed, currently the lake level

  11. Time pressure in scenario-based online construction safety quizzes and its effect on students' performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Martin; Adair, Desmond

    2017-05-01

    Online quizzes have been shown to be effective learning and assessment approaches. However, if scenario-based online construction safety quizzes do not include time pressure similar to real-world situations, they reflect situations too ideally. The purpose of this paper is to compare engineering students' performance when carrying out an online construction safety quiz with time pressure versus an online construction safety quiz without time pressure. Two versions of an online construction safety quiz are developed and administered to randomly assigned engineering students based on a quasi-experimental post-test design. The findings contribute to scenario-based learning and assessment of construction safety in four ways. First, the results confirm earlier findings that 'intrinsic stress' does not seem to impair students' performance. Second, students who carry out the online construction safety quiz with time pressure are less likely to 'learn by trial and error'. Third, students exposed to time pressure appreciate that they become better prepared for real life. Finally, preparing students to work under time pressure is an important industry requirement. The results of this study should encourage engineering educators to explore and implement ways to include time pressure in scenario-based online quizzes and learning.

  12. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  13. An Investigation of Health and Safety Measures in a Hydroelectric Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Acakpovi, Amevi; Dzamikumah, Lucky

    2016-12-01

    Occupational risk management is known as a catalyst in generating superior returns for all stakeholders on a sustainable basis. A number of companies in Ghana implemented health and safety measures adopted from international companies to ensure the safety of their employees. However, there exist great threats to employees' safety in these companies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the level of compliance of Occupational Health and Safety management systems and standards set by international and local legislation in power producing companies in Ghana. The methodology is conducted by administering questionnaires and in-depth interviews as measuring instruments. A random sampling technique was applied to 60 respondents; only 50 respondents returned their responses. The questionnaire was developed from a literature review and contained questions and items relevant to the initial research problem. A factor analysis was also carried out to investigate the influence of some variables on safety in general. Results showed that the significant factors that influence the safety of employees at the hydroelectric power plant stations are: lack of training and supervision, non-observance of safe work procedures, lack of management commitment, and lack of periodical check on machine operations. The study pointed out the safety loopholes and therefore helped improve the health and safety measures of employees in the selected company by providing effective recommendations. The implementation of the proposed recommendations in this paper, would lead to the prevention of work-related injuries and illnesses of employees as well as property damage and incidents in hydroelectric power plants. The recommendations may equally be considered as benchmark for the Safety and Health Management System with international standards.

  14. Computer System Performance Measurement Techniques for ARTS III Computer Systems

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1973-12-01

    The potential contribution of direct system measurement in the evolving ARTS 3 Program is discussed and software performance measurement techniques are comparatively assessed in terms of credibility of results, ease of implementation, volume of data,...

  15. Transportation performance measures for outcome based system management and monitoring.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-09-01

    The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) is mature in its development and use of : performance measures, however there was not a standard approach for selecting measures nor : evaluating if existing ones were used to inform decision-making. Thi...

  16. Performance Measures for Public Participation Methods : Final Report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-01-01

    Public engagement is an important part of transportation project development, but measuring its effectiveness is typically piecemealed. Performance measurementdescribed by the Urban Institute as the measurement on a regular basis of the results (o...

  17. Assessing Green Infrastructure Performance Using Remote Hydologic Monitoring Measures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two locations in Cincinnati were instrumented with level sensing technologies to measure stormwater flow in porous pavement and bioretention areas. Results indicate good performance of porous pavement and a cost effective application of technology to measure those flows. Result...

  18. Human performance cognitive-behavioral modeling: a benefit for occupational safety.

    PubMed

    Gore, Brian F

    2002-01-01

    Human Performance Modeling (HPM) is a computer-aided job analysis software methodology used to generate predictions of complex human-automation integration and system flow patterns with the goal of improving operator and system safety. The use of HPM tools has recently been increasing due to reductions in computational cost, augmentations in the tools' fidelity, and usefulness in the generated output. An examination of an Air Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (Air MIDAS) model evaluating complex human-automation integration currently underway at NASA Ames Research Center will highlight the importance to occupational safety of considering both cognitive and physical aspects of performance when researching human error.

  19. Health, Safety and Performance in High Altitude Observatories: A Sustainable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böcker, Michael; Vogt, Joachim; Christ, Oliver; Müller-Leonhardt, Alice

    2009-09-01

    The research project “Optimising Performance, Health and Safety in High Altitude Observatories” was initiated by ESO to establish an approach to promote the well-being of staff working at its high altitude observatories, and in particular at the Antiplano de Chajnantor. A survey by a questionnaire given to both workers and visitors was employed to assess the effects of working conditions at high altitude. Earlier articles have outlined the project and reported early results. The final results and conclusions are presented, together with a concept for sustainable development to improve the performance, health and safety at high altitude employing Critical Incident Stress Management.

  20. Human performance cognitive-behavioral modeling: a benefit for occupational safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian F.

    2002-01-01

    Human Performance Modeling (HPM) is a computer-aided job analysis software methodology used to generate predictions of complex human-automation integration and system flow patterns with the goal of improving operator and system safety. The use of HPM tools has recently been increasing due to reductions in computational cost, augmentations in the tools' fidelity, and usefulness in the generated output. An examination of an Air Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (Air MIDAS) model evaluating complex human-automation integration currently underway at NASA Ames Research Center will highlight the importance to occupational safety of considering both cognitive and physical aspects of performance when researching human error.

  1. The Effectiveness of California Community Colleges on Selected Performance Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This report presents selected performance measures of California's community colleges during the 1993-94 academic year in the areas of student access (measured by student enrollment and participation rates), student success (measured by student goals, persistence, completion rates, and employment information), staff composition (measured by…

  2. Robotic assistance improves intracorporeal suturing performance and safety in the operating room while decreasing operator workload.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Wang, Fikre; Korndorffer, James R; Dunne, J Bruce; Scott, Daniel J

    2010-02-01

    Intracorporeal suturing is one of the most difficult laparoscopic tasks. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of robotic assistance on novice suturing performance, safety, and workload in the operating room. Medical students (n = 34), without prior laparoscopic suturing experience, were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board-approved, randomized protocol. After viewing an instructional video, subjects were tested in intracorporeal suturing on two identical, live, porcine Nissen fundoplication models; they placed three gastro-gastric sutures using conventional laparoscopic instruments in one model and using robotic assistance (da Vinci) in the other, in random order. Each knot was objectively scored based on time, accuracy, and security. Injuries to surrounding structures were recorded. Workload was assessed using the validated National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) task load index (TLX) questionnaire, which measures the subjects' self-reported performance, effort, frustration, and mental, physical, and temporal demands of the task. Analysis was by paired t-test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. Compared with laparoscopy, robotic assistance enabled subjects to suture faster (595 +/- 22 s versus 459 +/- 137 s, respectively; p < 0.001), achieve higher overall scores (0 +/- 1 versus 95 +/- 128, respectively; p < 0.001), and commit fewer errors per knot (1.15 +/- 1.35 versus 0.05 +/- 0.26, respectively; p < 0.001). Subjects' overall score did not improve between the first and third attempt for laparoscopic suturing (0 +/- 0 versus 0 +/- 0; p = NS) but improved significantly for robotic suturing (49 +/- 100 versus 141 +/- 152; p < 0.001). Moreover, subjects indicated on the NASA-TLX scale that the task was more difficult to perform with laparoscopic instruments compared with robotic assistance (99 +/- 15 versus 57 +/- 23; p < 0.001). Compared with standard laparoscopy, robotic assistance significantly improved intracorporeal suturing

  3. Rodent model for assessing the long term safety and performance of peripheral nerve recording electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Srikanth; Patel, Kunal; Welle, Cristin

    2017-02-01

    Objective. In the US alone, there are approximately 185 000 cases of limb amputation annually, which can reduce the quality of life for those individuals. Current prosthesis technology could be improved by access to signals from the nervous system for intuitive prosthesis control. After amputation, residual peripheral nerves continue to convey motor signals and electrical stimulation of these nerves can elicit sensory percepts. However, current technology for extracting information directly from peripheral nerves has limited chronic reliability, and novel approaches must be vetted to ensure safe long-term use. The present study aims to optimize methods to establish a test platform using rodent model to assess the long term safety and performance of electrode interfaces implanted in the peripheral nerves. Approach. Floating Microelectrode Arrays (FMA, Microprobes for Life Sciences) were implanted into the rodent sciatic nerve. Weekly in vivo recordings and impedance measurements were performed in animals to assess performance and physical integrity of electrodes. Motor (walking track analysis) and sensory (Von Frey) function tests were used to assess change in nerve function due to the implant. Following the terminal recording session, the nerve was explanted and the health of axons, myelin and surrounding tissues were assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The explanted electrodes were visualized under high magnification using scanning electrode microscopy (SEM) to observe any physical damage. Main results. Recordings of axonal action potentials demonstrated notable session-to-session variability. Impedance of the electrodes increased upon implantation and displayed relative stability until electrode failure. Initial deficits in motor function recovered by 2 weeks, while sensory deficits persisted through 6 weeks of assessment. The primary cause of failure was identified as lead wire breakage in all of animals. IHC indicated myelinated and unmyelinated axons

  4. Influence of safety measures on the risks of transporting dangerous goods through road tunnels.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Frank; Haastrup, Palle

    2002-12-01

    Quantitative risk assessment (QRA) models are used to estimate the risks of transporting dangerous goods and to assess the merits of introducing alternative risk reduction measures for different transportation scenarios and assumptions. A comprehensive QRA model recently was developed in Europe for application to road tunnels. This model can assess the merits of a limited number of "native safety measures." In this article, we introduce a procedure for extending its scope to include the treatment of a number of important "nonnative safety measures" of interest to tunnel operators and decisionmakers. Nonnative safety measures were not included in the original model specification. The suggested procedure makes use of expert judgment and Monte Carlo simulation methods to model uncertainty in the revised risk estimates. The results of a case study application are presented that involve the risks of transporting a given volume of flammable liquid through a 10-km road tunnel.

  5. Integrated indicator to evaluate vehicle performance across: Safety, fuel efficiency and green domains.

    PubMed

    Torrao, G; Fontes, T; Coelho, M; Rouphail, N

    2016-07-01

    In general, car manufacturers face trade-offs between safety, efficiency and environmental performance when choosing between mass, length, engine power, and fuel efficiency. Moreover, the information available to the consumers makes difficult to assess all these components at once, especially when aiming to compare vehicles across different categories and/or to compare vehicles in the same category but across different model years. The main objective of this research was to develop an integrated tool able to assess vehicle's performance simultaneously for safety and environmental domains, leading to the research output of a Safety, Fuel Efficiency and Green Emissions (SEG) indicator able to evaluate and rank vehicle's performance across those three domains. For this purpose, crash data was gathered in Porto (Portugal) for the period 2006-2010 (N=1374). The crash database was analyzed and crash severity prediction models were developed using advanced logistic regression models. Following, the methodology for the SEG indicator was established combining the vehicle's safety and the environmental evaluation into an integrated analysis. The obtained results for the SEG indicator do not show any trade-off between vehicle's safety, fuel consumption and emissions. The best performance was achieved for newer gasoline passenger vehicles (<5year) with a smaller engine size (<1400cm(3)). According to the SEG indicator, a vehicle with these characteristics can be recommended for a safety-conscious profile user, as well as for a user more interested in fuel economy and/or in green performance. On the other hand, for larger engine size vehicles (>2000cm(3)) the combined score for safety user profile was in average more satisfactory than for vehicles in the smaller engine size group (<1400cm(3)), which suggests that in general, larger vehicles may offer extra protection. The achieved results demonstrate that the developed SEG integrated methodology can be a helpful tool for

  6. PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT IN TRIBAL HOME VISITING: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julie R; Ferron, Cathy; Whitmore, Corrie; Reifel, Nancy; Geary, Erin; Anderson, Cyndi; Mcdaniel, Judy

    2018-05-01

    Over the last several decades, performance measurement has become an increasingly prevalent requirement among human services agencies for demonstrating program progress and achieving outcomes. In the Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (Tribal MIECHV), performance measurement was one of the central components of the Administration for Children and Families' cooperative agreements to tribes, urban Indian organizations, and tribal organizations. Since the inception of the Tribal MIECHV Program in 2010, the benchmark requirement was intended to be a mechanism to systematically monitor program progress and performance toward improving the quality of home-visiting programs that serve vulnerable American Indian or Alaska Native families. In this article, we examine performance measurement in the context of Tribal MIECHV, providing an overview of performance measurement, the Tribal MIECHV requirement, and how grantees experienced the requirement; we describe the existing literature on performance measurement challenges and benefits, and the specific challenges and advantages experienced by tribal grantees; and provide recommendations for performance measurement in tribal home-visiting contexts based on grantees' own experiences. This article contributes to the literature by examining performance measurement challenges and opportunities in the context of tribal communities, and provides recommendations that may inform future policy on performance measurement design and implementation in tribal communities. © 2018 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  7. 14 CFR 1274.934 - Safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Safety. 1274.934 Section 1274.934... FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.934 Safety. Safety July 2002 NASA's safety priority... shall act responsibly in matters of safety and shall take all reasonable safety measures in performing...

  8. 14 CFR 1274.934 - Safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety. 1274.934 Section 1274.934... FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.934 Safety. Safety July 2002 NASA's safety priority... shall act responsibly in matters of safety and shall take all reasonable safety measures in performing...

  9. Photobiology eye safety for horticultural LED lighting: Transmittance performance of eyewear protection using high-irradiant monochromatic LEDs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo-Sen; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2018-02-01

    Light emitting diodes have slowly gained market share as horticultural lighting systems in greenhouses due to their rapid improvement in color performances and light outputs. These advancements have increased the availability of the full spectrum of visible wavelengths and the corresponding irradiance outputs available to plants. However, light emitting diodes owners have limited information on the proper options for personal eyewear protection as the irradiance levels have increased. The objective of this study was to measure the light transmittance performance of 12 eyewear protection including welding goggles, safety goggles, polarized glasses, and sunglasses across the human visible spectrum (380-740 nm) up to an irradiance level of 1500 W·m -2 from high-irradiant light emitting diodes assemblies. Based on the spectral measurements, certain transmitted spectra exhibited spectrum shifts or an alteration in the bimodal distribution which were different than the light emitting diodes spectra, due to the uneven transmittance efficiencies of the glasses. As for the measured transmittance percentages in two experiments, each type of eyewear protection showed distinct transmittance performances, and the performance of the tested eyewear protection was not impacted by irradiance but was dependent on the wavelength. The mean light transmittance was 1.77% for the welding glasses, 13.12% for the polarized glasses, 15.27% for the safety goggles, and 27.65% for the sunglasses. According to these measured results and the spectral weighting exposure limits from the International Electrotechnical Commission 62471 and EU directive 2006/25, consumers and workers using horticultural lighting can select welding goggles or polarized glasses, to limit the possible ocular impact of the high irradiance of monochromatic light in electrical lighting environment. Sunglasses and safety goggles would not be advised as protection, especially if infrared radiation was used.

  10. 77 FR 35745 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Screening Devices To Measure Alcohol in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ..., battery powered device with a semiconductor sensor. (2) Alcohol Countermeasure Systems Corp., submitted...-0062] Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Screening Devices To Measure Alcohol in... Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids dated, March 31, 2008 (73 FR 16956). DATES: Effective...

  11. Assessment of softball bat safety performance using mid-compression polyurethane softballs.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-07-01

    There is currently much debate about the safety of the sport of softball. Batted-ball speed and average pitcher reaction time are factors often used to determine safe performance. Batted-ball speed is shown to be the most important factor to consider when determining safe play. Average pitcher reaction time is explained and directly correlated to batted-ball speed. Eleven aluminum multi-wall, three aluminum single-wall and two composite softball bats were tested with mid-compression polyurethane softballs averaging 1721+/-62 N/6.4 mm to represent the relative bat-ball performance for the sport of slowpitch softball. Nine men and six women were chosen for this study out of a test group of over three hundred slowpitch softball players. On average, aluminum bat performance results were within the recommended safety limits established by the national softball associations. However, when composite bats were used, their performance results exceeded the recommended safety limits which can pose a significant safety risk. Using aluminum softball bats, batted-ball speeds ranged from 80 to 145km x h(-1) Using composite softball bats, batted-ball speeds ranged from 146 to 161 km x h(-1). The scientific relevance of this study is to provide performance information that can lead to injury prevention in the sport of softball.

  12. Body-Cooling Paradigm in Sport: Maximizing Safety and Performance During Competition.

    PubMed

    Adams, William M; Hosokawa, Yuri; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-12-01

    Although body cooling has both performance and safety benefits, knowledge on optimizing cooling during specific sport competition is limited. To identify when, during sport competition, it is optimal for body cooling and to identify optimal body-cooling modalities to enhance safety and maximize sport performance. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify articles with specific context regarding body cooling, sport performance, and cooling modalities used during sport competition. A search of scientific peer-reviewed literature examining the effects of body cooling on exercise performance was done to examine the influence of body cooling on exercise performance. Subsequently, a literature search was done to identify effective cooling modalities that have been shown to improve exercise performance. The cooling modalities that are most effective in cooling the body during sport competition depend on the sport, timing of cooling, and feasibility based on the constraints of the sports rules and regulations. Factoring in the length of breaks (halftime substitutions, etc), the equipment worn during competition, and the cooling modalities that offer the greatest potential to cool must be considered in each individual sport. Scientific evidence supports using body cooling as a method of improving performance during sport competition. Developing a strategy to use cooling modalities that are scientifically evidence-based to improve performance while maximizing athlete's safety warrants further investigation.

  13. Transforming Performance Measurement for the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatry, Harry P.

    2014-01-01

    While substantial progress has been made in spreading performance measurement across the country and world, much of the information from performance measurement systems has been shallow. Modern technology and the considerable demand for information on progress in achieving the outcomes of public programs and policies are creating major…

  14. 26 CFR 801.2 - Measuring organizational performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Measuring organizational performance. 801.2 Section 801.2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INTERNAL REVENUE PRACTICE BALANCED SYSTEM FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL...

  15. Assessing Organizational Effectiveness: The Role of Performance Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of the challenges associated with demonstrating organizational effectiveness and the role of performance measures as surrogates for demonstrating effectiveness are provided. The complexity of analysis and the importance of use of performance measures provide a way to review the strengths and weakness of eight different ways to…

  16. Automating Performance Measures and Clinical Practice Guidelines: Differences and Complementarities.

    PubMed

    Tu, Samson W; Martins, Susana; Oshiro, Connie; Yuen, Kaeli; Wang, Dan; Robinson, Amy; Ashcraft, Michael; Heidenreich, Paul A; Goldstein, Mary K

    2016-01-01

    Through close analysis of two pairs of systems that implement the automated evaluation of performance measures (PMs) and guideline-based clinical decision support (CDS), we contrast differences in their knowledge encoding and necessary changes to a CDS system that provides management recommendations for patients failing performance measures. We trace the sources of differences to the implementation environments and goals of PMs and CDS.

  17. 40 CFR 1065.205 - Performance specifications for measurement instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Performance specifications for measurement instruments. 1065.205 Section 1065.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments § 1065.205 Performance...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.205 - Performance specifications for measurement instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Performance specifications for measurement instruments. 1065.205 Section 1065.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments § 1065.205 Performance...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.205 - Performance specifications for measurement instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Performance specifications for measurement instruments. 1065.205 Section 1065.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments § 1065.205 Performance...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.205 - Performance specifications for measurement instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance specifications for measurement instruments. 1065.205 Section 1065.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments § 1065.205 Performance...