Science.gov

Sample records for sagittal coronal planes

  1. Sagittal plane deformity: an overview of interpretation and management.

    PubMed

    Roussouly, Pierre; Nnadi, Colin

    2010-11-01

    The impact of sagittal plane alignment on the treatment of spinal disorders is of critical importance. A failure to recognise malalignment in this plane can have significant consequences for the patient not only in terms of pain and deformity, but also social interaction due to deficient forward gaze. A good understanding of the principles of sagittal balance is vital to achieve optimum outcomes when treating spinal disorders. Even when addressing problems in the coronal plane, an awareness of sagittal balance is necessary to avoid future complications. The normal spine has lordotic curves in the cephalad and caudal regions with a kyphotic curve in between. Overall, there is a positive correlation between thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis. There are variations on the degree of normal curvature but nevertheless this shape allows equal distribution of forces across the spinal column. It is the disruption of this equilibrium by pathological processes or, as in most cases, ageing that results in deformity. This leads to adaptive changes in the pelvis and lower limbs. The effects of limb alignment on spinal posture are well documented. We now also know that changes in pelvic posture also affect spinal alignment. Sagittal malalignment presents as an exaggeration or deficiency of normal lordosis or kyphosis. Most cases seen in clinical practise are due to kyphotic deformity secondary to inflammatory, degenerative or post-traumatic disorders. They may also be secondary to infection or tumours. There is usually pain and functional disability along with concerns about self-image and social interaction due to inability to maintain a horizontal gaze. The resultant pelvic and lower limb posture is an attempt to restore normal alignment. Addressing this complex problem requires detailed expertise and awareness of the potential pitfalls surrounding its treatment.

  2. Sagittal plane deformity: an overview of interpretation and management

    PubMed Central

    Roussouly, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The impact of sagittal plane alignment on the treatment of spinal disorders is of critical importance. A failure to recognise malalignment in this plane can have significant consequences for the patient not only in terms of pain and deformity, but also social interaction due to deficient forward gaze. A good understanding of the principles of sagittal balance is vital to achieve optimum outcomes when treating spinal disorders. Even when addressing problems in the coronal plane, an awareness of sagittal balance is necessary to avoid future complications. The normal spine has lordotic curves in the cephalad and caudal regions with a kyphotic curve in between. Overall, there is a positive correlation between thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis. There are variations on the degree of normal curvature but nevertheless this shape allows equal distribution of forces across the spinal column. It is the disruption of this equilibrium by pathological processes or, as in most cases, ageing that results in deformity. This leads to adaptive changes in the pelvis and lower limbs. The effects of limb alignment on spinal posture are well documented. We now also know that changes in pelvic posture also affect spinal alignment. Sagittal malalignment presents as an exaggeration or deficiency of normal lordosis or kyphosis. Most cases seen in clinical practise are due to kyphotic deformity secondary to inflammatory, degenerative or post-traumatic disorders. They may also be secondary to infection or tumours. There is usually pain and functional disability along with concerns about self-image and social interaction due to inability to maintain a horizontal gaze. The resultant pelvic and lower limb posture is an attempt to restore normal alignment. Addressing this complex problem requires detailed expertise and awareness of the potential pitfalls surrounding its treatment. PMID:20567858

  3. High-resolution sagittal and coronal reformatted CT images of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Johnson, G.A.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-04-01

    Computed tomography has become the major technique for evaluation of patients with laryngeal corcinoma and trauma to the larynx. The routine examination usually consists of 5 mm contiguous selection through the larynx in quiet respiration. Reformatted images obtained from these sections have not been of clinical value, in part because of the poor resolution of these images. In the past, thin-section scanning (1.5 mm collimation) has been impractical because of the significant time required to scan the entire larynx. By using the technique of rapid sequential scanning with automated table incrementation this logistic difficulty can be overcome, and the total thin-section examination may be performed in less than 9 min. Sophisticated computer software allows rapid reformatting of transaxial images in sagittal and coronal planes. This report illustates the normal and abnormal appearance of the larynx on coronal and sagittal reformatted images and compares reformatted images using the routine technique to those using the thin-section technique.

  4. Sagittal plane balancing in the total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manson, Theodore T; Khanuja, Harpal S; Jacobs, Michael A; Hungerford, Marc W

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative stiffness or instability may result from a total knee arthroplasty imbalanced in the sagittal plane. Total knee arthroplasty instrumentation systems differ in the basic strategies used to assure this balance. In an anterior referencing system, changes in femoral size affect flexion gap tightness, and femoral size selection is paramount to assure sagittal plane balance. Conversely, in posterior referencing systems, femoral size changes do not affect the flexion gap but, rather, influence femoral component-patella articulation. Flexion/extension gap systems use calibrated spacer blocks to ensure gap balance but do not guarantee midrange stability; if used incorrectly, they may cause component malposition and joint line elevation. The authors reviewed the strengths and weaknesses of system types and provided system-specific troubleshooting guidelines for clinicians addressing intraoperative sagittal plane imbalance.

  5. Percutaneous sagittal plane closing wedge osteotomy of the first metatarsal.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-02-01

    Osteotomy of the first metatarsal in the sagittal plane is useful in correction of numerous deformity of the foot. Plantarflexion osteotomy of the first metatarsal can be used to treat hallux rigidus, hallux limitus, forefoot varus in flatfoot deformity and iatrogenic metatarsus primus elevates. Dorsiflexion osteotomy of the first metatarsal is an important component in surgical correction of pes cavus. It is also indicated in recalcitrant diabetic neuropathic ulcers at the first metatarsal head. We described a minimally invasive technique of sagittal plane corrective osteotomy of the first metatarsal, which can be either a plantarflexion or dorsiflexion one.

  6. Unilateral coronal synostosis: can we trust the sagittal suture as a landmark for the underlying superior sagittal sinus?

    PubMed

    Protzenko Cervante, Tatiana; Arnaud, Eric; Brunelle, Francis; Di Rocco, Federico

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The sagittal suture is usually considered an external anatomical landmark, indicating the location of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) for surgical approaches. Children with unilateral coronal synostosis (UCS) often present with an important deviation of the sagittal suture. Because these patients usually undergo frontal reconstruction or even endoscope-assisted minimally invasive procedures, it is imperative to know the location of the SSS. The aim of this investigation was to study the anatomical relationship between the SSS and the sagittal suture in children with anterior plagiocephaly. METHODS The authors retrospectively studied the relationship between the sagittal sinus and the sagittal suture at 5 points: nasion, midpoint nasion-bregma, bregma, midpoint bregma-lambda, and lambda. The study analyzed CT scans of 50 children with UCS admitted to the craniofacial unit of Necker Enfants Malades Hospital between March 2006 and March 2013 and compared them with 50 control children with no evidence of craniosynostosis, bone disease, or genetic syndromes. The authors also analyzed the presence of extracerebral fluid collection and ventricular asymmetry in children with UCS. RESULTS Fifty-six percent of patients had anterior right UCS and 44% had left-sided UCS. Type I UCS was seen in 1 patient, Type IIA in 20 patients, Type IIB in 20 patients, and Type III in 9 patients. The authors found that the nasion is usually deviated to the ipsilateral side of the synostosis, the bregma contralaterally, and the lambda ipsilaterally. The gap distances between the reference point and the SSS were 0-7.3 mm (mean 1.4 mm) at the nasion; 0-16.7 mm (mean 3.8 mm) at the midpoint nasion-bregma; 0-12 mm (mean 5.8 mm) at the bregma; 0-9.5 mm (mean 3 mm) at the midpoint bregma-lambda; and 0-11.6 mm (mean 5.5 mm) at the lambda. Conversely, a discrepancy of more than 1 mm between the SSS and the position of the suture was found only in 7 control cases (14%). Of patients with UCS

  7. Human foot placement and balance in the sagittal plane.

    PubMed

    Millard, Matthew; Wight, Derek; McPhee, John; Kubica, Eric; Wang, David

    2009-12-01

    Foot placement has long been recognized as the primary mechanism that humans use to restore balance. Many biomechanists have examined where humans place their feet during gait, perturbations, and athletic events. Roboticists have also used foot placement as a means of control but with limited success. Recently, Wight et al. (2008, "Introduction of the Foot Placement Estimator: A Dynamic Measure of Balance for Bipedal Robotics," ASME J. Comput. Nonlinear Dyn., 3, p. 011009) introduced a planar foot placement estimator (FPE) algorithm that will restore balance to a simplified biped that is falling. This study tested the FPE as a candidate function for sagittal plane human-foot-placement (HFP) by recording the kinematics of 14 healthy subjects while they performed ten walking trials at three speeds. The FPE was highly correlated with HFP (rho>or=0.997) and its accuracy varied linearly from 2.6 cm to -8.3 cm as walking speed increased. A sensitivity analysis revealed that assumption violations of the FPE cannot account for the velocity-dependent changes in FPE-HFP error suggesting that this behavior is volitional.

  8. Global sagittal axis: a step toward full-body assessment of sagittal plane deformity in the human body.

    PubMed

    Diebo, Bassel G; Oren, Jonathan H; Challier, Vincent; Lafage, Renaud; Ferrero, Emmanuelle; Liu, Shian; Vira, Shaleen; Spiegel, Matthew Adam; Harris, Bradley Yates; Liabaud, Barthelemy; Henry, Jensen K; Errico, Thomas J; Schwab, Frank J; Lafage, Virginie

    2016-10-01

    the human body in the sagittal plane. The GSA correlated highly with spinopelvic and lower-extremities sagittal parameters and exhibited remarkable correlations with HRQOL, which exceeded other commonly used parameters.

  9. The influence of computer-assisted surgery on rotational, coronal and sagittal alignment in revision total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite good results of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the number of revision total knee arthroplasties (rTKAs) is rising. Proper implant position is essential, since malposition leads to worse clinical outcome. In rTKA most anatomical landmarks have disappeared because of extensive bone loss, making it more difficult to adequately implant the knee prosthesis. In primary TKA, computer-assisted surgery (CAS) leads to better prosthetic alignment than mechanical navigation guides. Literature about the use of CAS in rTKA is scarce though, and the effect on rotational prosthetic alignment has not been investigated yet. Hence the primary objective of this study is to compare rotational prosthetic alignment when using CAS in rTKA compared to a mechanical navigation guide. Secondary objectives are to compare prosthetic alignment in the coronal and sagittal planes. It is hypothesized that CAS leads to better rotational, coronal and sagittal prosthetic alignment when used during rTKA. Methods/Design A prospective clinical intervention study with use of a historical control group will be conducted. Forty-four patients with a minimum age of 18 to be admitted for CAS-rTKA between September 2012 and September 2015 will be included in the intervention group. Forty-four patients with a minimum age of 18 who underwent rTKA with the use of a mechanical navigation guide between January 2002 and April 2012 will form the historical control group. Both groups will be matched according to gender and type of revision prosthesis. Rotational prosthesis alignment will be evaluated using a CT-scan of the knee joint. Discussion Proper implant position is essential, since malposition leads to worse clinical outcome. Several studies show a significantly positive influence of CAS on prosthetic alignment in primary TKA, but literature about the use of CAS in rTKA is limited. The purpose of this study is thus to investigate the influence of CAS during rTKA on postoperative

  10. Sagittal plane alignment of the spine and gravity: a radiological and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Legaye, Jean; Duval-Beaupère, Ginette

    2005-04-01

    Analysis of the sagittal balance of the spine includes the study of the spinal curves and of the pelvis in the sagittal plane. It therefore requires full-spine lateral radiographs. The sagittal balance of the spine was studied in forty-nine young adults. Strong correlations were observed between parameters related to the pelvis ("pelvic incidence angle", "sacral slope" and "pelvic tilting"), and the sagittal spinal curves ("lordosis" and "kyphosis"). We therefore propose to begin the evaluation of the sagittal plane alignment of the spine in clinical practice with measurement of the pelvic incidence angle. The relationship between the pelvic incidence angle and the sacral slope, as well as between the sacral slope and lordosis, is then assessed, and these are related to each other. The use of a graphic abacus facilitates assessment of the physiological comparison of the measured values and of the relationship between pelvic and spinal parameters, within their range of physiological variability. This analysis of the sagittal alignment of the spine also considers its dynamic aspect and the importance of gravity load and of muscular contraction on the lumbar structures. These data have been published previously and are recalled here. Three basic patterns of disruption of the relations between parameters may be encountered: a sacral slope angle exceeding the value expected considering the measured pelvic incidence angle (owing to fixed flexion contracture of the hips), excessive lordosis with regard to the observed sacral slope angle (with hyperkyphosis at the thoracic level) and stiff hypolordosis with pelvic retroversion. These three conditions are analysed in the light of the repercussions of the gravity load on the lumbar structures. A convenient method is thus available for functional analysis of the sagittal balance of the spine.

  11. Assessment of methods to extract the mid-sagittal plane from brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Leemans, Alexander; Viergever, Max A.; Vincken, Koen L.

    2013-03-01

    Automatic detection of the mid-sagittal plane, separating both hemispheres of the brain, is useful in various applications. Several methods have been developed in the past years, applying different techniques to estimate the position of the mid-sagittal plane. These methods can be classified into three distinct classes: feature-based, global symmetry based, and local symmetry based methods. Feature-based methods use the shape or intensity of the interhemispheric fissure to extract the mid-sagittal plane. Global symmetry based methods reflect the entire image with respect to the sagittal axes and perform a rigid registration. Local symmetry based methods try to optimize a symmetry-measure in a small band covering the interhemispheric fissure. From each class, one leading method has been implemented. The methods have been evaluated on the same datasets to allow a fair comparison. Manual delineations were made by two experienced human observers. The results show that the examined methods perform similar to human observers. No significant differences were found between errors (defined as the angle and volume between planes) made by the methods and the inter-observer differences. Feature-based and local symmetry based methods have a low computation time of 1.8 and 0.5 seconds, respectively. The global symmetry based method has a higher computation time of 33.6 seconds, caused by the full 3D rigid registration. The largest errors, both by the methods and observers, are made in participants with cerebral atrophy. These participants have a widened interhemispheric fissure, allowing many plane orientations and positions to result in a valid division of the hemispheres.

  12. Evaluation of fractured condylar head along the sagittal plane: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Rajesh Kumar, Bekal Pattathan; Rai, Kirthi Kumar; Shiva Kumar, H R; Upasi, Amarnath P; Shah, Ashwin

    2012-06-01

    There are case reports of sagittal fractures of the condylar head leading to bifid condyle. However bifid condyles maybe found in patients with no history of trauma. A split in the saggital plane of the condyle is not visible with a lateral, oblique or panaromic radiographs but only with anteriorposterior, transorbital projections or CT scan of the temperomandibular joint. The chances of condyle being split in the sagittal plane may be due to the medial pole extending beyond the condylar neck, moreover the condyle is composed of cancellous bone covered by a thin layer of cortical bone. Here we are presenting three case reports of Saggital split condyles and stress the need for inclusion of these type of fractures in the classification of condylar fractures.

  13. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs

    PubMed Central

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). Objective: To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. Data Sources: The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 and June 2008. Reference lists of selected articles were also reviewed. Study Selection: Studies were included that evaluated healthy participants for knee flexion angle, sagittal plane knee kinetics, or VGRF after performing a multisession training program. Two individuals reviewed all articles and determined which articles met the selection criteria. Approximately 4% of the articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Data Extraction: Data were extracted regarding each program’s duration, frequency, exercise type, population, supervision, and testing procedures. Means and variability measures were recorded to calculate effect sizes. One reviewer extracted all data and assessed study quality using PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database). A second reviewer (blinded) verified all information. Results: There is moderate evidence to indicate that knee flexion angle, external knee flexion moment, and VGRF can be successfully modified by an ACL injury prevention program. Programs utilizing multiple exercises (ie, integrated training) appear to produce the most improvement, in comparison to that of single-exercise programs. Knee flexion angle was improved following integrated training (combined balance and strength exercises or combined plyometric and strength exercises). Similarly, external knee flexion moment was improved following integrated training consisting of balance, plyometric, and strength exercises. VGRF was improved when incorporating supervision with instruction and

  14. Sagittal plane spinal mobility is associated with dynamic balance ability of community-dwelling elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Yahiko

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between the range of spinal mobility on the sagittal plane and the dynamic balance ability of elderly people living in communities. [Subjects and Methods] The persons studied were 31 healthy elderly people living in the community (16 females and 15 males). The range of mobility of the participants’ spines in the sagittal plane was measured by using a spinal mouse®. Balance ability was evaluated by using Functional reach (FR), Timed up and go (TUG), and Maximum walking speed (MWS). [Results] A significant positive correlation between the flexion range of the lumbar vertebrae and the FR distance was identified, and a significant negative correlation between the extension range of the thoracic vertebrae and the time required for TUG was also identified. In addition, a significant positive correlation between the extension range of the entire spine and MWS, was identified. [Conclusion] The result of this study have clarified that mobility of the spine in the sagittal plane is associated with dynamic balance ability, which is related to falling. PMID:28210054

  15. Knee joint passive stiffness and moment in sagittal and frontal planes markedly increase with compression.

    PubMed

    Marouane, H; Shirazi-Adl, A; Adouni, M

    2015-01-01

    Knee joints are subject to large compression forces in daily activities. Due to artefact moments and instability under large compression loads, biomechanical studies impose additional constraints to circumvent the compression position-dependency in response. To quantify the effect of compression on passive knee moment resistance and stiffness, two validated finite element models of the tibiofemoral (TF) joint, one refined with depth-dependent fibril-reinforced cartilage and the other less refined with homogeneous isotropic cartilage, are used. The unconstrained TF joint response in sagittal and frontal planes is investigated at different flexion angles (0°, 15°, 30° and 45°) up to 1800 N compression preloads. The compression is applied at a novel joint mechanical balance point (MBP) identified as a point at which the compression does not cause any coupled rotations in sagittal and frontal planes. The MBP of the unconstrained joint is located at the lateral plateau in small compressions and shifts medially towards the inter-compartmental area at larger compression forces. The compression force substantially increases the joint moment-bearing capacities and instantaneous angular rigidities in both frontal and sagittal planes. The varus-valgus laxities diminish with compression preloads despite concomitant substantial reductions in collateral ligament forces. While the angular rigidity would enhance the joint stability, the augmented passive moment resistance under compression preloads plays a role in supporting external moments and should as such be considered in the knee joint musculoskeletal models.

  16. Sectional anatomy of the adrenal gland in the coronal plane.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gang; Liu, Shu Wei; Zhao, Zhen Mei; Lin, Xiang Tao; Lou, Li; Li, Zhen Ping; Tang, Yu Chun; Zhong, Shi Zhen

    2008-05-01

    To provide practical anatomic data for the imaging diagnosis and surgical treatment of adrenal disease, we investigated the anatomy of the adrenal gland and its relationships to regional structures using 31 sets of serial coronal sections of upper abdomen of Chinese adult cadavers and correlated coronal magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten upper abdomens of adult healthy volunteers and coronal reconstructed multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) images of five patients without lesions in the adrenal gland. The adrenal glands were visualized mainly on the successive coronal sections between 18 mm anterior to the posterior margin of inferior vena cava and 24 mm posterior to the posterior margin of inferior vena cava. In general, the left adrenal gland was visualized two sections earlier than the right adrenal gland. On the plane through the anterior parts of bilateral renal hili (A18), the appearance rate of bilateral adrenal glands was 100%, and the maximal measurements of bilateral adrenal glands were visualized. The length, width, thickness of right adrenal body, thickness of medial limb and lateral limb were, respectively, 34.02 +/- 2.12 mm, 10.91 +/- 0.89 mm, 5.82 +/- 0.26 mm, 2.78 +/- 0.08 mm, 2.62 +/- 0.06 mm, whereas the measurements of left adrenal gland were 28.31 +/- 2.46 mm, 18.40 +/- 1.06 mm, 6.84 +/- 0.24 mm, 3.02 +/- 0.08 mm, 2.86 +/- 0.07 mm, respectively. The coronal plane has superior advantage in showing the bilateral adrenal glands. The shapes of adrenal glands are various, whereas the range of adrenal thickness is quite narrow. The thickness of adrenal medial and lateral limbs, especially the thickness of lateral limb are useful for the diagnosis of the bilateral adrenocortical disease.

  17. Biomechanical Comparison of Single- and Double-Leg Jump Landings in the Sagittal and Frontal Plane

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeffrey B.; Ford, Kevin R.; Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Double-leg forward or drop-jump landing activities are typically used to screen for high-risk movement strategies and to determine the success of neuromuscular injury prevention programs. However, research suggests that these tasks that occur primarily in the sagittal plane may not adequately represent the lower extremity biomechanics that occur during unilateral foot contact or non–sagittal plane movements that are characteristic of many multidirectional sports. Purpose: To examine the extent to which lower extremity biomechanics measured during a jump landing on a double leg (DL) after a sagittal plane (SAG) movement is representative of biomechanics measured during single-leg (SL) or frontal plane (FRONT) jump landing tasks. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Lower extremity biomechanics were measured in 15 recreationally active females (mean age [±SD], 19.4 ± 2.1 years; mean height, 163.3 ± 5.9 cm; mean weight, 61.1 ± 7.1 kg) while performing SAGDL, SAGSL, FRONTDL, and FRONTSL jump landing tasks. Repeated-measures analyses of variance examined differences in lower extremity biomechanics between the 4 tasks, and linear regressions examined the extent to which an individual’s biomechanics during SAGDL were representative of their biomechanics during SAGSL, FRONTDL, and FRONTSL. Results: Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics differed by condition, with the SAGDL task generally eliciting greater hip and knee flexion angles and lower hip and knee forces than the other tasks (P < .05). Although biomechanics during the SAGDL task were strongly associated with those during the FRONTDL task (R 2, 0.41-0.82), weaker associations were observed between SAGDL and single-leg tasks for hip kinematics (R 2, 0.03-0.25) and kinetics (R 2, 0.05-0.20) and knee abduction moments (R 2, 0.06-0.18) (P < .05). Conclusion: Standard double-leg sagittal plane jump landing tasks used to screen for ACL injury risk and the effectiveness of ACL injury

  18. Modeling Localization of Amplitude-Panned Virtual Sources in Sagittal Planes.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Robert; Majdak, Piotr

    2015-08-18

    Vector-base amplitude panning (VBAP) aims at creating virtual sound sources at arbitrary directions within multichannel sound reproduction systems. However, VBAP does not consistently produce listener-specific monaural spectral cues that are essential for localization of sound sources in sagittal planes, including the front-back and up-down dimensions. In order to better understand the limitations of VBAP, a functional model approximating human processing of spectro-spatial information was applied to assess accuracy in sagittal-plane localization of virtual sources created by means of VBAP. First, we evaluated VBAP applied on two loudspeakers in the median plane, and then we investigated the directional dependence of the localization accuracy in several three-dimensional loudspeaker arrangements designed in layers of constant elevation. The model predicted a strong dependence on listeners' individual head-related transfer functions, on virtual source directions, and on loudspeaker arrangements. In general, the simulations showed a systematic degradation with increasing polar-angle span between neighboring loudspeakers. For the design of VBAP systems, predictions suggest that spans up to 40° polar angle yield a good trade-off between system complexity and localization accuracy. Special attention should be paid to the frontal region where listeners are most sensitive to deviating spectral cues.

  19. Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Ankle Braces With and Without Free Rotation in the Sagittal Plane

    PubMed Central

    Alfuth, Martin; Klein, Dieter; Koch, Raphael; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Context: Various designs of braces including hinged and nonhinged models are used to provide external support of the ankle. Hinged ankle braces supposedly allow almost free dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot in the sagittal plane. It is unclear, however, whether this additional degree of freedom affects the stabilizing effect of the brace in the other planes of motion. Objective: To investigate the dynamic and passive stabilizing effects of 3 ankle braces, 2 hinged models that provide free plantar flexion–dorsiflexion in the sagittal plane and 1 ankle brace without a hinge. Design: Crossover study. Setting: University Movement Analysis Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Seventeen healthy volunteers (5 women, 12 men; age = 25.4 ± 4.8 years; height = 180.3 ± 6.5 cm; body mass = 75.5 ± 10.4 kg). Intervention(s): We dynamically induced foot inversion on a tilting platform and passively induced foot movements in 6 directions via a custom-built apparatus in 3 brace conditions and a control condition (no brace). Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximum inversion was determined dynamically using an in-shoe electrogoniometer. Passively induced maximal joint angles were measured using a torque and angle sensor. We analyzed differences among the 4 ankle-brace conditions (3 braces, 1 control) for each of the dependent variables with Friedman and post hoc tests (P < .05). Results: Each ankle brace restricted dynamic foot-inversion movements on the tilting platform as compared with the control condition, whereas only the 2 hinged ankle braces differed from each other, with greater movement restriction caused by the Ankle X model. Passive foot inversion was reduced with all ankle braces. Passive plantar flexion was greater in the hinged models as compared with the nonhinged brace. Conclusions: All ankle braces showed stabilizing effects against dynamic and passive foot inversion. Differences between the hinged braces and the nonhinged brace did not appear to be

  20. Agreement between fiber optic and optoelectronic systems for quantifying sagittal plane spinal curvature in sitting.

    PubMed

    Cloud, Beth A; Zhao, Kristin D; Breighner, Ryan; Giambini, Hugo; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-07-01

    Spinal posture affects how individuals function from a manual wheelchair. There is a need to directly quantify spinal posture in this population to ultimately improve function. A fiber optic system, comprised of an attached series of sensors, is promising for measuring large regions of the spine in individuals sitting in a wheelchair. The purpose of this study was to determine the agreement between fiber optic and optoelectronic systems for measuring spinal curvature, and describe the range of sagittal plane spinal curvatures in natural sitting. Able-bodied adults (n = 26, 13 male) participated. Each participant assumed three sitting postures: natural, slouched (accentuated kyphosis), and extension (accentuated lordosis) sitting. Fiber optic (ShapeTape) and optoelectronic (Optotrak) systems were applied to the skin over spinous processes from S1 to C7 and used to measure sagittal plane spinal curvature. Regions of kyphosis and lordosis were identified. A Cobb angle-like method was used to quantify lordosis and kyphosis. Generalized linear model and Bland-Altman analyses were used to assess agreement. A strong correlation exists between curvature values obtained with Optotrak and ShapeTape (R(2) = 0.98). The mean difference between Optotrak and ShapeTape for kyphosis in natural, extension, and slouched postures was 4.30° (95% LOA: -3.43 to 12.04°), 3.64° (95% LOA: -1.07 to 8.36°), and 4.02° (95% LOA: -2.80 to 10.84°), respectively. The mean difference for lordosis, when present, in natural and extension postures was 2.86° (95% LOA: -1.18 to 6.90°) and 2.55° (95% LOA: -3.38 to 8.48°), respectively. In natural sitting, the mean ± SD of kyphosis values was 35.07 ± 6.75°. Lordosis was detected in 8/26 participants: 11.72 ± 7.32°. The fiber optic and optoelectronic systems demonstrate acceptable agreement for measuring sagittal plane thoracolumbar spinal curvature.

  1. A dynamic finite element analysis of human foot complex in the sagittal plane during level walking.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhihui; Ren, Lei; Ding, Yun; Hutchinson, John R; Ren, Luquan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational framework for investigating the dynamic behavior and the internal loading conditions of the human foot complex during locomotion. A subject-specific dynamic finite element model in the sagittal plane was constructed based on anatomical structures segmented from medical CT scan images. Three-dimensional gait measurements were conducted to support and validate the model. Ankle joint forces and moment derived from gait measurements were used to drive the model. Explicit finite element simulations were conducted, covering the entire stance phase from heel-strike impact to toe-off. The predicted ground reaction forces, center of pressure, foot bone motions and plantar surface pressure showed reasonably good agreement with the gait measurement data over most of the stance phase. The prediction discrepancies can be explained by the assumptions and limitations of the model. Our analysis showed that a dynamic FE simulation can improve the prediction accuracy in the peak plantar pressures at some parts of the foot complex by 10%-33% compared to a quasi-static FE simulation. However, to simplify the costly explicit FE simulation, the proposed model is confined only to the sagittal plane and has a simplified representation of foot structure. The dynamic finite element foot model proposed in this study would provide a useful tool for future extension to a fully muscle-driven dynamic three-dimensional model with detailed representation of all major anatomical structures, in order to investigate the structural dynamics of the human foot musculoskeletal system during normal or even pathological functioning.

  2. Changes in sagittal plane kinematics with treadmill familiarization to barefoot running.

    PubMed

    Moore, Isabel S; Dixon, Sharon J

    2014-10-01

    Interest in barefoot running and research on barefoot running are growing. However a methodological issue surrounding investigations is how familiar the participants are with running barefoot. The aim of the study was to assess the amount of time required for habitually shod runners to become familiar with barefoot treadmill running. Twelve female recreational runners, who were experienced treadmill users, ran barefoot on a treadmill for three bouts, each bout consisting of 10 minutes at a self-selected speed with 5 minute rest periods. Sagittal plane kinematics of the hip, knee, ankle, and foot during stance were recorded during the first and last minute of each 10-minute bout. Strong reliability (ICC > .8) was shown in most variables after 20 minutes of running. In addition, there was a general trend for the smallest standard error of mean to occur during the same period. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in any of the biomechanical variables after 20 minutes of running. Together, this suggests that familiarization was achieved between 11 and 20 minutes of running barefoot on a treadmill. Familiarization was characterized by less plantar flexion and greater knee flexion at touchdown. These results indicate that adequate familiarization should be given in future studies before gait assessment of barefoot treadmill running.

  3. A finite element study of a lumbar motion segment subjected to pure sagittal plane moments.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-Adl, A; Ahmed, A M; Shrivastava, S C

    1986-01-01

    A nonlinear finite element program has been developed and applied to the analysis of a three-dimensional model of the lumbar L2-3 motion segment subjected to sagittal plane moments. The analysis accounts for both material and geometric nonlinearities and is based on the Updated Lagrangian approach. The disc nucleus has been considered as an incompressible inviscid fluid and the annulus as a composite of collagenous fibres embedded in a matrix of ground substance. Articulation at the facet joints has been treated as a general moving contact problem and the spinal ligaments have been modelled as a collection of nonlinear axial elements. Effects of the loss of intradiscal pressure in flexion and of facetectomy in extension have been analyzed. Comparison of the predicted gross response characteristics with available measurements indicates satisfactory agreement. In flexion relatively large intradiscal pressures are generated, while in extension negative pressures (i.e. suction) of low magnitude are predicted. The stress distribution results indicate that the load transfer path through the posterior elements of the joint in flexion is different from that in extension. In flexion the ligaments are the means of load transfer, while in extension the load is transmitted through the pedicles, laminae and articular processes. In flexion, the inner annulus fibres at the posterolateral location are subject to maximum tensile strain. It is suggested that large flexion moment in combination with other loads is a likely cause of disc prolapse commonly found at this location of the annulus.

  4. Muscle contributions to whole-body sagittal plane angular momentum during walking.

    PubMed

    Neptune, R R; McGowan, C P

    2011-01-04

    Walking is a complex dynamic task that requires the regulation of whole-body angular momentum to maintain dynamic balance while performing walking subtasks such as propelling the body forward and accelerating the leg into swing. In human walking, the primary mechanism to regulate angular momentum is muscle force generation. Muscles accelerate body segments and generate ground reaction forces that alter angular momentum about the body's center-of-mass to restore and maintain dynamic stability. In addition, gravity contributes to whole-body angular momentum through its contribution to the ground reaction forces. The purpose of this study was to generate a muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulation of normal walking to quantify how individual muscles and gravity contribute to whole-body angular momentum in the sagittal plane. In early stance, the uniarticular hip and knee extensors (GMAX and VAS), biarticular hamstrings (HAM) and ankle dorsiflexors (TA) generated backward angular momentum while the ankle plantar flexors (SOL and GAS) generated forward momentum. In late stance, SOL and GAS were the primary contributors and generated angular momentum in opposite directions. SOL generated primarily forward angular momentum while GAS generated backward angular momentum. The difference between muscles was due to their relative contributions to the horizontal and vertical ground reaction forces. Gravity contributed to the body's angular momentum in early stance and to a lesser extent in late stance, which was counteracted primarily by the plantar flexors. These results may provide insight into balance and movement disorders and provide a basis for developing locomotor therapies that target specific muscle groups.

  5. A New Model to Produce Sagittal Plane Rotational Induced Diffuse Axonal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Marten

    2011-01-01

    A new in vivo animal model that produces diffuse brain injuries in sagittal plane rearward rotational acceleration has been developed. In this model, the skull of an anesthetized adult rat is tightly secured to a rotating bar. During trauma, the bar is impacted by a striker that causes the bar and the animal head to rotate rearward; the acceleration phase last 0.4 ms and is followed by a rotation at constant speed and a gentle deceleration when the bar makes contact with a padded stop. The total head angle change is less than 30°. By adjusting the air pressure in the rifle used to accelerate the striker, resulting rotational acceleration between 0.3 and 2.1 Mrad/s2 can be produced. Numerous combinations of trauma levels, post-trauma survival times, brain and serum retrieval, and tissue preparation techniques were adopted to characterize this new model. The trauma caused subdural bleedings in animals exposed to severe trauma. Staining brain tissue with β-Amyloid Precursor Protein antibodies and FD Neurosilver that detect degenerating axons revealed wide spread axonal injuries (AI) in the corpus callosum, the border between the corpus callosum and cortex and in tracts in the brain stem. The observed AIs were apparent only when the rotational acceleration level was moderate and above. On the contrary, only limited signs of contusion injuries were observed following trauma. Macrophage invasions, glial fibrillary acidic protein redistribution or hypertrophy, and blood brain barrier (BBB) changes were unusual. S100 serum analyses indicate that blood vessel and glia cell injuries occur following moderate levels of trauma despite the absence of obvious BBB injuries. We conclude that this rotational trauma model is capable of producing graded axonal injury, is repeatable and produces limited other types of traumatic brain injuries and as such is useful in the study of injury biomechanics, diagnostics, and treatment strategies following diffuse axonal injury. PMID

  6. The effects of changes in the sagittal plane alignment of running-specific transtibial prostheses on ground reaction forces

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Shuichi; Sakuraba, Keisyoku; Usui, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To verify the effects of sagittal plane alignment changes in running-specific transtibial prostheses on ground reaction forces (GRFs). [Subjects and Methods] Eight transtibial amputees who used running-specific prostheses during sprinting participated. The sprint movements were recorded using a Vicon-MX system and GRF measuring devices. The experiment levels were set as regularly recommended alignment (REG; the normal alignment for the subjects) and dorsiflexion or plantar flexion from the REG. [Results] The subjects were classified into fast (100-m personal best < 12.50 s) and slow (100-m personal best ≥ 12.50 s) groups. In both groups, there were no significant differences in the center of gravity speed; further, the difference in the stance time was significant in the slow group but not in the fast group. Significant differences were observed in the step length for the fast group, whereas the stance time and step rate significantly differed in the slow group. The GRF impulse showed significant differences in the vertical and braking directions in both groups. [Conclusion] The GRFs are affected by sagittal plane alignment changes in running-specific prostheses. Moreover, our results suggest that the change in GRFs along with the altered sagittal plane alignment influenced the step length and step rate. PMID:26157216

  7. Acoustic and non-acoustic factors in modeling listener-specific performance of sagittal-plane sound localization

    PubMed Central

    Majdak, Piotr; Baumgartner, Robert; Laback, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The ability of sound-source localization in sagittal planes (along the top-down and front-back dimension) varies considerably across listeners. The directional acoustic spectral features, described by head-related transfer functions (HRTFs), also vary considerably across listeners, a consequence of the listener-specific shape of the ears. It is not clear whether the differences in localization ability result from differences in the encoding of directional information provided by the HRTFs, i.e., an acoustic factor, or from differences in auditory processing of those cues (e.g., spectral-shape sensitivity), i.e., non-acoustic factors. We addressed this issue by analyzing the listener-specific localization ability in terms of localization performance. Directional responses to spatially distributed broadband stimuli from 18 listeners were used. A model of sagittal-plane localization was fit individually for each listener by considering the actual localization performance, the listener-specific HRTFs representing the acoustic factor, and an uncertainty parameter representing the non-acoustic factors. The model was configured to simulate the condition of complete calibration of the listener to the tested HRTFs. Listener-specifically calibrated model predictions yielded correlations of, on average, 0.93 with the actual localization performance. Then, the model parameters representing the acoustic and non-acoustic factors were systematically permuted across the listener group. While the permutation of HRTFs affected the localization performance, the permutation of listener-specific uncertainty had a substantially larger impact. Our findings suggest that across-listener variability in sagittal-plane localization ability is only marginally determined by the acoustic factor, i.e., the quality of directional cues found in typical human HRTFs. Rather, the non-acoustic factors, supposed to represent the listeners' efficiency in processing directional cues, appear to be

  8. Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) locomotion: forelimb joint mechanics across speed in the sagittal and frontal planes.

    PubMed

    Shine, Catherine L; Robbins, Charles T; Nelson, O Lynne; McGowan, Craig P

    2017-04-01

    The majority of terrestrial locomotion studies have focused on parasagittal motion and paid less attention to forces or movement in the frontal plane. Our previous research has shown that grizzly bears produce higher medial ground reaction forces (lateral pushing from the animal) than would be expected for an upright mammal, suggesting frontal plane movement may be an important aspect of their locomotion. To examine this, we conducted an inverse dynamics analysis in the sagittal and frontal planes, using ground reaction forces and position data from three high-speed cameras of four adult female grizzly bears. Over the speed range collected, the bears used walks, running walks and canters. The scapulohumeral joint, wrist and the limb overall absorb energy (average total net work of the forelimb joints, -0.97 W kg(-1)). The scapulohumeral joint, elbow and total net work of the forelimb joints have negative relationships with speed, resulting in more energy absorbed by the forelimb at higher speeds (running walks and canters). The net joint moment and power curves maintain similar patterns across speed as in previously studied species, suggesting grizzly bears maintain similar joint dynamics to other mammalian quadrupeds. There is no significant relationship with net work and speed at any joint in the frontal plane. The total net work of the forelimb joints in the frontal plane was not significantly different from zero, suggesting that, despite the high medial ground reaction forces, the forelimb acts as a strut in that plane.

  9. Fast, Accurate and Precise Mid-Sagittal Plane Location in 3D MR Images of the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergo, Felipe P. G.; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Yasuda, Clarissa L.; Ruppert, Guilherme C. S.

    Extraction of the mid-sagittal plane (MSP) is a key step for brain image registration and asymmetry analysis. We present a fast MSP extraction method for 3D MR images, based on automatic segmentation of the brain and on heuristic maximization of the cerebro-spinal fluid within the MSP. The method is robust to severe anatomical asymmetries between the hemispheres, caused by surgical procedures and lesions. The method is also accurate with respect to MSP delineations done by a specialist. The method was evaluated on 64 MR images (36 pathological, 20 healthy, 8 synthetic), and it found a precise and accurate approximation of the MSP in all of them with a mean time of 60.0 seconds per image, mean angular variation within a same image (precision) of 1.26o and mean angular difference from specialist delineations (accuracy) of 1.64o.

  10. Diagonal movement of the upper limb produces greater adaptive plasticity than sagittal plane flexion in the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Rayele; Lial, Lysnara; Teles Monteiro, Maria Gabriela; Aragão, Alice; Santos David, Lorena; Coertjens, Marcelo; Silva-Júnior, Fernando L; Dias, Gildário; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Teixeira, Silmar Silva; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2017-03-16

    The motor rehabilitation is based on exercises that involve various joints and muscle groups. One such treatment method is Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF), which involves diagonal movements simulating many activities of daily living. The objective of this study was to investigate the differences between PNF and shoulder flexion movements performed without the diagonal component (i.e., only in the sagittal plane) using beta band absolute power as a measure of plasticity. The study included 30 volunteers randomized into three groups (control, PNF, and FLEX), with electroencephalographic signals captured before and after the performance of the task. The PNF group showed an increase in beta band absolute power in both hemispheres, indicating greater plasticity than that seen in the FLEX group. Therefore, PNF seems to be capable of promoting cortical adaptations that lead to the recruitment of both hemispheres, thus influencing cortical organization in more complex tasks.

  11. Determination of isocentric machine parameters for inclined treatment volumes: a single solution for angled transverse or coronal treatment planes.

    PubMed

    Bradley, F L

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of the trigonometric equations necessary to calculate gantry, floor and collimator settings for a treatment plane at an angle phi to the transverse plane of the patient has been described previously. The derivation of a second set of equations to facilitate treatment in a plane at an angle phi to the coronal plane has also been described previously. This work reinterprets the geometry of inclined volumes and shows that essentially only one set of equations is required to determine the settings for treatment planes at an angle phi to either the transverse or coronal planes of the patient.

  12. Sagittal plane hip motion reversals during walking are associated with disease severity and poorer function in subjects with hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C; Schlink, Bryan R; Shakoor, Najia; Wimmer, Markus A

    2012-05-11

    A midstance reversal of sagittal plane hip motion during walking, or motion discontinuity (MD), has previously been observed in subjects with endstage hip osteoarthritis (OA) and in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether this gait pattern is a marker of OA presence or radiographic severity by analyzing a large IRB approved motion analysis data repository. We also hypothesized that subjects with the MD would show more substantial gait impairments than those with normal hip motion. We identified 150 subjects with symptomatic unilateral hip OA and Kellgren-Lawrence OA severity data on file, and a control group of 159 asymptomatic subjects whose ages fell within 2 standard deviations of the mean OA group age. From the gait data, the MD was defined as a reversal in the slope of the hip flexion angle curve during midstance. Logistic regressions and general linear models were used to test the association between the MD and OA presence, OA severity and, other gait variables. 53% of OA subjects compared to 7.5% of controls had the MD (p<0.001); occurrence of the MD was associated with OA severity (p=0.009). Within the OA subject group, subjects with the MD had reduced dynamic range of motion, peak, extension, and internal rotation moments compared to those who did not (MANCOVA p ≤ 0.042) after controlling for walking speed. We concluded that sagittal plane motion reversals are indeed associated with OA presence and severity, and with more severe gait abnormalities in subjects with hip OA.

  13. A direct in vivo measurement of the three-dimensional orientation of the occlusal plane and of the sagittal discrepancy of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F.; Sforza, Chiarella; Serrao, Graziano; Ciusa, Veronica

    2000-02-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to three dimensionally assess craniofacial relationships in vivo. Specifically, by using a non-invasive direct technique, the following measurements were made: 1) natural head position relative to the ground; 2) orientation of the occlusal plane relative to the subject's intrinsic facial planes; and 3) anteroposterior discrepancy of the dental bases, taking into consideration all the facial hard- and soft-tissue structures. Several dental and soft-tissue facial landmarks were directly digitized from 24 adult healthy volunteers with Angle Class I occlusions by means of an electromagnetic three-dimensional computerized digitizer. In natural head position, the three-dimensional orientation of Camper's, occlusal, and mandibular planes were measured along with the anteroposterior maxillo-mandibular discrepancies. In the frontal plane projection, all the measured planes appeared about horizontal. In the lateral plane projection, on average, Camper's plane deviated from the true horizontal by approximately 18 degrees (in a 'head flexed' direction). The occlusal plane deviated from the same horizontal by about 14 degrees, while the mandibular plane had a steeper inclination (about 30 degrees ); both planes were significantly correlated to Camper's plane. The measurements of anteroposterior jaw discrepancy revealed a wide range of sagittal relationships in the analyzed subjects. The method was found to be repeatable and fast. This direct three-dimensional in vivo assessment of the orientation of occlusal plane relative to the other facial planes could allow for a more comprehensive analysis of maxillo-mandibular sagittal discrepancies.

  14. Comparing inclined locomotion in a ground-living and a climbing ant species: sagittal plane kinematics.

    PubMed

    Weihmann, Tom; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2009-11-01

    Formicine ants are able to detect slopes in the substrates they crawl on. It was assumed that hair fields between the main segments of the body and between the proximal leg segments contribute to graviception which triggers a change of posture in response to substrate slopes. The sagittal kinematics of two ant species were investigated and compared on different slopes. Cataglyphis fortis, a North African desert ant, is well known for its extraordinary sense of orientation in texturally almost uniform habitats, while Formica pratensis, a common central-European species, primarily uses landmarks and pheromone traces for orientation. A comparison of these two species reveals differences in postural adaptations during inclined locomotion. Only minor slope-dependent angular adjustments were observed. The largest is a 25 degrees head rotation for Cataglyphis, even if the slope is changed by 150 degrees, suggesting dramatic changes in the field of vision. The trunk's pitch adjustment towards the increasing slope is low in both species. On all slopes Cataglyphis achieves higher running speeds than Formica and displays greater slope-dependent variation in body height. This indicates different strategies for coping with changing slopes. These specific aspects have to be reflected in the ants' respective mode of slope perception.

  15. Erratum: Modeling sound-source localization in sagittal planes for human listeners [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 136, 791-802 (2014)].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Robert; Majdak, Piotr; Laback, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    This erratum concerns Eq. (4) of the original article, which defines the distance metric of the comparison process of the sagittal-plane sound localization model. The distance metric was actually implemented as a mean absolute difference but was erroneously described as a L1-norm difference.

  16. Effect of Acute Alterations in Foot Strike Patterns during Running on Sagittal Plane Lower Limb Kinematics and Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Kevin A.; Lynn, Scott K.; Mikelson, Lisa R.; Noffal, Guillermo J.; Judelson, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of foot strike patterns and converted foot strike patterns on lower limb kinematics and kinetics at the hip, knee, and ankle during a shod condition. Subjects were videotaped with a high speed camera while running a 5km at self-selected pace on a treadmill to determine natural foot strike pattern on day one. Preferred forefoot group (PFFG, n = 10) and preferred rear foot group (PRFG, n = 11) subjects were identified through slow motion video playback (n = 21, age = 22.8±2.2 years, mass = 73.1±14.5 kg, height 1.75 ± 0.10 m). On day two, subjects performed five overground run trials in both their natural and unnatural strike patterns while motion and force data were collected. Data were collected over two days so that foot strike videos could be analyzed for group placement purposes. Several 2 (Foot Strike Pattern –forefoot strike [FFS], rearfoot strike [RFS]) x 2 (Group – PFFG, PRFG) mixed model ANOVAs (p < 0.05) were run on speed, active peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), peak early stance and mid stance sagittal ankle moments, sagittal plane hip and knee moments, ankle dorsiflexion ROM, and sagittal plane hip and knee ROM. There were no significant interactions or between group differences for any of the measured variables. Within subject effects demonstrated that the RFS condition had significantly lower (VGRF) (RFS = 2.58 ± .21 BW, FFS = 2.71 ± 0.23 BW), dorsiflexion moment (RFS = -2.6 1± 0.61 Nm·kg-1, FFS = -3.09 ± 0.32 Nm·kg-1), and dorsiflexion range of motion (RFS = 17.63 ± 3.76°, FFS = 22.10 ± 5.08°). There was also a significantly higher peak plantarflexion moment (RFS = 0.23 ± 0.11 Nm·kg-1, FFS = 0.01 ± 0.01 Nm·kg-1), peak knee moment (RFS = 2.61 ± 0.54 Nm·kg-1, FFS = 2.39 ± 0.61 Nm·kg-1), knee ROM (RFS = 31.72 ± 2.79°, FFS = 29.58 ± 2.97°), and hip ROM (RFS = 42.72 ± 4.03°, FFS = 41.38 ± 3.32°) as compared with the FFS condition. This research suggests that

  17. Effect of Acute Alterations in Foot Strike Patterns during Running on Sagittal Plane Lower Limb Kinematics and Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Kevin A; Lynn, Scott K; Mikelson, Lisa R; Noffal, Guillermo J; Judelson, Daniel A

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of foot strike patterns and converted foot strike patterns on lower limb kinematics and kinetics at the hip, knee, and ankle during a shod condition. Subjects were videotaped with a high speed camera while running a 5km at self-selected pace on a treadmill to determine natural foot strike pattern on day one. Preferred forefoot group (PFFG, n = 10) and preferred rear foot group (PRFG, n = 11) subjects were identified through slow motion video playback (n = 21, age = 22.8±2.2 years, mass = 73.1±14.5 kg, height 1.75 ± 0.10 m). On day two, subjects performed five overground run trials in both their natural and unnatural strike patterns while motion and force data were collected. Data were collected over two days so that foot strike videos could be analyzed for group placement purposes. Several 2 (Foot Strike Pattern -forefoot strike [FFS], rearfoot strike [RFS]) x 2 (Group - PFFG, PRFG) mixed model ANOVAs (p < 0.05) were run on speed, active peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), peak early stance and mid stance sagittal ankle moments, sagittal plane hip and knee moments, ankle dorsiflexion ROM, and sagittal plane hip and knee ROM. There were no significant interactions or between group differences for any of the measured variables. Within subject effects demonstrated that the RFS condition had significantly lower (VGRF) (RFS = 2.58 ± .21 BW, FFS = 2.71 ± 0.23 BW), dorsiflexion moment (RFS = -2.6 1± 0.61 Nm·kg(-1), FFS = -3.09 ± 0.32 Nm·kg(-1)), and dorsiflexion range of motion (RFS = 17.63 ± 3.76°, FFS = 22.10 ± 5.08°). There was also a significantly higher peak plantarflexion moment (RFS = 0.23 ± 0.11 Nm·kg(-1), FFS = 0.01 ± 0.01 Nm·kg(-1)), peak knee moment (RFS = 2.61 ± 0.54 Nm·kg(-1), FFS = 2.39 ± 0.61 Nm·kg(-1)), knee ROM (RFS = 31.72 ± 2.79°, FFS = 29.58 ± 2.97°), and hip ROM (RFS = 42.72 ± 4.03°, FFS = 41.38 ± 3.32°) as compared with the FFS condition. This research suggests

  18. Lumbosacral compression in maximal lifting efforts in sagittal plane with varying mechanical disadvantage in isometric and isokinetic modes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S

    1994-12-01

    Nine normal male subjects (mean age 28.2 years and mean weight 72.6 kg) performed 20 standardized maximal effort lifting tasks. They were asked to perform stoop and squat lifts at half, three-quarters and full individual horizontal reach distances in mid-sagittal plane in isometric and isokinetic modes (fixed velocity 60 cm/s). Both stoop and squat lifts were initiated at the floor level and terminated at the individual's knuckle height keeping the horizontal distance constant throughout the lift. The isometric stoop lifts were performed with hip at 60 degrees and 90 degrees of flexion with hands at preselected reach distances. The isometric squat lifts were performed with knees at 90 degrees and 135 degrees of flexion with hands at similarly preselected reach distances. The force was measured using a Static Dynamic Strength Tester with load cell (SM 1000). The postures were recorded using a two-dimensional Peak Performance System with an event synchronizing unit. The load cell was sampled at 60 Hz and the video filming was done at 60 frames per second. The force and postural data were fed to a biomechanical model (Cheng and Kumar 1991) to extract external moment and lumbosacral compression. The strengths generated in different conditions were significantly different (p < 0.01). The strength variation ranged by up to 73% whereas the lumbosacral compression varied by only up to 15%. A high level of lumbosacral compression was maintained in all conditions.

  19. Three-dimensional imaging of the uterus: The value of the coronal plane

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lufee; White, Nikki; Ramkrishna, Jayshree; Júnior, Edward Araujo; Meagher, Simon; Costa, Fabricio Da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Advent in three-dimensional (3D) imaging technology has seen 3D ultrasound establish itself as a useful adjunct complementary to traditional two-dimensional imaging of the female pelvis. This advantage largely arises from its ability to reconstruct the coronal plane of the uterus, which allows further delineation of many gynecological disorders. 3D imaging of the uterus is now the preferred imaging modality for assessing congenital uterine anomalies and intrauterine device localization. Newer indications include the diagnosis of adenomyosis. It can also add invaluable information to delineate other endometrial and myometrial pathology such as fibroids and endometrial polyps. PMID:26753063

  20. An investigation of lower extremity energy dissipation strategies during single-leg and double-leg landing based on sagittal and frontal plane biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Chen Hua; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2011-06-01

    There is limited understanding of the differences in lower extremity energy dissipation strategies between single-leg and double-leg landing maneuvers. This study sought to investigate these differences in sagittal and frontal planes, and explain the differences using kinematics and kinetics. We hypothesized that single-leg and double-leg landing maneuvers involve different lower extremity energy dissipation strategies in both planes. Ten recreational athletes were recruited and instructed to perform double-leg and single-leg landing from 0.60-m height. Force-plates and motion-capture system were used to obtain kinetics and kinematics data respectively. Joint power was taken as product of joint moment and angular velocity. Joint work was computed as integral of joint power over time, whereby negative work represented energy dissipation. In the sagittal plane, the hip and knee showed major contributions to energy dissipation during double-leg landing; the hip and ankle were the dominant energy dissipaters during single-leg landing. In the frontal plane, the hip acted as the key energy dissipater during double-leg landing; the knee contributed the most energy dissipation during single-leg landing. The knee also exhibited greater frontal plane joint ROM, moment and energy dissipation during single-leg landing than double-leg landing. Our findings indicated that different energy dissipation strategies were adopted for double-leg and single-leg landing in sagittal and frontal planes. Considering the prominent frontal plane biomechanics exhibited by the knee during single-leg landing, we expect that this maneuver may have greater likelihood of leading to traumatic knee injuries, particularly non-contact ACL injuries, compared to the double-leg landing maneuver.

  1. The effect of centre of mass location on sagittal plane moments around the centre of mass in trotting horses.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Sarah Jane; Richards, Jim; Clayton, Hilary M

    2014-04-11

    The diagonal limb support pattern at trot provides pitch and roll stability, but little is known about the control of moments about the centre of mass (COM) in horses. Correct COM location is critical in the calculation of pitching moments. The objectives were to determine the effect of COM location on pitching moments in trotting horses and explore how COM location could influence balance. Kinematic (120 Hz) and GRF (4 force plates, 960 Hz) data were collected at trot from three trials of eight horses. The position of the COM was determined from the weighted summation of the segmental COMs and this was then manipulated cranially and caudally to test the model. Sagittal-plane moments around the COM were calculated for each manipulation of the model and their relationship determined using reduced major axis regression. Over the stride, the moments must sum to zero to prevent accumulation of rotational motion. This was found when the weight on the forelimbs in standing was 58.7% ± 3% (mean ± 95% C.I.), which corresponded closely to the COP ratio in standing. Moments were typically nose-up at foot strike changing to nose-down prior to midstance, and then reversing to nose-up in late stance. Mean moments were larger in the hindlimbs and more sensitive to COM location changes. Divergence of the COM from the COP creating a vertical force moment arm prior to midstance may assist the hindlimb in relation to propulsive effort. A similar effect is seen in the forelimb during single limb support.

  2. Coronal plane socket stability during gait in persons with transfemoral amputation: Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fatone, Stefania; Dillon, Michael; Stine, Rebecca; Tillges, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Little research describes which transfemoral socket design features are important for coronal plane stability, socket comfort, and gait. Our study objectives were to (1) relate socket comfort during gait to a rank order of changes in ischial containment (IC) and tissue loading and (2) compare socket comfort during gait when tissue loading and IC were systematically manipulated. Six randomly assigned socket conditions (IC and tissue compression) were assessed: (1) IC and high, (2) IC and medium, (3) IC and low, (4) no IC and high, (5) no IC and medium, and (6) no IC and low. For the six subjects in this study, there was a strong, negative relationship between comfort and changes in IC and tissue loading (rho = -0.89). With the ischium contained, tissue loading did not influence socket comfort (p = 0.47). With no IC, the socket was equally comfortable with high tissue loading (p = 0.36) but the medium (p = 0.04) and low (p = 0.02) tissue loading conditions decreased comfort significantly. Coronal plane hip moments, lateral trunk lean, step width, and walking speed were invariant to changes in IC and/or tissue loading. Our results suggest that in an IC socket, medial tissue loading mattered little in terms of comfort. Sockets without IC required high tissue loading to be as comfortable as those with IC, while suboptimal tissue loading compromised comfort.

  3. Correlations between sagittal plane kinematics and landing impact force during single-leg lateral jump-landings

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Junya; Ohji, Shunsuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tadashi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The correlations of peak vertical ground reaction force and sagittal angles during single-leg lateral jump-landing with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury remain unknown. This study aimed to clarify the correlations between kinematics and impact force during lateral jump-landing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty active males were included in the analysis. A sagittal-view movie camera and force plate were time synchronized. Trunk and lower extremity sagittal angles were measured 100 ms before initial contact and at peak vertical ground reaction force. Peak vertical ground reaction force, time between initial contact and peak vertical ground reaction force, and loading rate were calculated. [Results] The mean sagittal angle was 40.7° ± 7.7° for knee flexion during the flight phase and 16.4° ± 6.3° for pelvic anterior inclination during the landing phase. The mean peak vertical ground reaction force was four times the body weight. The median time to peak vertical ground reaction force was 63.8 ms. The knee flexion during the flight phase and pelvic anterior inclination angles during the landing phase were related to the peak vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] Increasing knee flexion and decreasing pelvic anterior inclination might reduce the impact during single-leg lateral jump-landing. PMID:27630422

  4. Correlations between sagittal plane kinematics and landing impact force during single-leg lateral jump-landings.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Junya; Ohji, Shunsuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tadashi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The correlations of peak vertical ground reaction force and sagittal angles during single-leg lateral jump-landing with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury remain unknown. This study aimed to clarify the correlations between kinematics and impact force during lateral jump-landing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty active males were included in the analysis. A sagittal-view movie camera and force plate were time synchronized. Trunk and lower extremity sagittal angles were measured 100 ms before initial contact and at peak vertical ground reaction force. Peak vertical ground reaction force, time between initial contact and peak vertical ground reaction force, and loading rate were calculated. [Results] The mean sagittal angle was 40.7° ± 7.7° for knee flexion during the flight phase and 16.4° ± 6.3° for pelvic anterior inclination during the landing phase. The mean peak vertical ground reaction force was four times the body weight. The median time to peak vertical ground reaction force was 63.8 ms. The knee flexion during the flight phase and pelvic anterior inclination angles during the landing phase were related to the peak vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] Increasing knee flexion and decreasing pelvic anterior inclination might reduce the impact during single-leg lateral jump-landing.

  5. Automated Breast Volume Scanning: Identifying 3-D Coronal Plane Imaging Features May Help Categorize Complex Cysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Zhu, Qing-Li; Zhang, Jing; Xiao, Meng-Su; Liu, He; Dai, Qing; Li, Jian-Chu; Sun, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The study described here sought to identify specific ultrasound (US) automated breast volume scanning (ABVS) features that distinguish benign from malignant lesions. Medical records of 750 patients with 792 breast lesions were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 750 patients, 101 with 122 cystic lesions were included in this study, and the results ABVS results were compared with biopsy pathology results. These lesions were classified into six categories based on ABVS sonographic features: type I = simple cyst; type II = clustered cyst; type III = cystic masses with thin septa; type IV = complex cyst; type V = predominantly cystic masses; and type VI = predominantly solid masses. Comparisons were conducted between the ABVS coronal plane features of the lesions and histopathology results, and the positive predictive value (PPV) was calculated for each feature. Of the 122 lesions, 90 (73.8%) were classified as benign, and 32 (26.2%) were classified as malignant. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy associated with ABVS features for cystic lesions were 78.1%, 74.4% and 75.4%, respectively. The 11 cases (8.9%) of type I-IV cysts were all benign. Of the 22 (18.0%) type V cysts, 16 (13.1%) were benign and 6 (4.9%) were malignant. Of the 89 (72.9%) type VI cysts, 63 (51.7%) were benign and 26 (21.3%) were malignant. The typical symptoms of malignancy on ABVS include retraction (PPV = 100%, p < 0.05), hyper-echoic halos (PPV = 85.7%, p < 0.05), microcalcification (PPV = 66.7%, p < 0.05), thick walls or thick septa (PPV = 62.5%, p < 0.05), irregular shape (PPV: 51.2%, p < 0.05), indistinct margin (PPV: 48.6%, p < 0.05) and predominantly solid masses with eccentric cystic foci (PPV = 46.8%, p < 0.05). ABVS can reveal sonographic features of the lesions along the coronal plane, which may be of benefit in the detection of malignant, predominantly cystic masses and provide high clinical values.

  6. Keyhole Revascularization for Treatment of Coronal Plane Fracture of the Lunate in Kienböck Disease.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, Jouni; Jokihaara, Jarkko; Paavilainen, Pasi; Leppänen, Olli V

    2016-11-01

    Coronal plane fracture of lunate in Kienböck disease is a challenging problem with no proven treatment. We present a technique for the treatment. A vascularized bone graft from the distal radius employing the fourth and fifth extracompartmental artery pedicles is used as a mechanical support in order to enable fracture union. The technical pearls and pitfalls are described and a clinical case is presented.

  7. A new radiographic method for evaluation of the position of the carpus in the coronal plane: results in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Aufauvre, B; Herzberg, G; Garret, J; Berthonneaud, E; Dimnet, J

    1999-01-01

    The methods used to quantify pathological variations of the position of the carpus in the coronal plane, mainly ulnar translation of the carpus from trauma or rheumatoid disease, are often difficult to use in arthritic or postsurgical wrists; moreover, they require the measurement of the whole length of the third metacarpal. The aim of this study was to determine a reliable and easy-to-use index to analyse the position of the carpus in the coronal plane. One hundred PA X-rays of normal wrists were studied, of which 56 presented with a medial hamate facet of the lunate. An index of position of the carpus in the coronal plane is defined as the ratio of orthogonal distances from [1] the most medial point of the distal radius and [2] the most medial point of the capitate to the long axis of the radius: its mean value being 1.06 (+/- 0.13) in this series of normal wrists. The index is influenced by the presence of a medial hamate facet of the lunate, but is not dependent on the ulnar head and radial styloid process, nor on the length of the third metacarpal. To help to define the usefulness of the index in quantifying the different types of ulnar carpal translations in clinical practice, further studies are required.

  8. Coronal holes near the equatorial plane and the solar wind abundance of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.; Yellin, K. A.

    1996-03-01

    Composition analysis of the solar wind from two equatorial coronal holes has been carried out with the Ion Composition Instrument on the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The abundances of oxygen, neon and iron were determined as coronal hole-related material flowed past the spacecraft. The results show that the edges of the hole-related flow are sharply defined with abundances closer to the abundances in the photosphere than in the slower solar wind. These results are similar to those found in flows from the southern polar coronal hole and suggest an underlying unity between the polar and equatorial regions of the sun.

  9. Acute coronal plane scaphoid fracture and scapholunate dissociation from an axial load: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Alexander Y; Horton, Todd; Bishop, Allen T

    2005-03-01

    Coronal fractures of the scaphoid are rare and can be difficult to diagnose. Axial load injuries that result in a complete coronal fracture of the scaphoid associated with an acute scapholunate dissociation are exceedingly rare. In our patient the radiographic finding of wide scapholunate dissociation was obvious; however, the coronal scaphoid fracture was not recognized initially nor suspected. During surgery the coronal scaphoid fracture was identified, reduced anatomically, and fixed with a compression screw. The scapholunate ligament also was repaired. A good result was obtained with return to sports with extension of 60 degrees and flexion of 70 degrees , grip strength equal to that of the uninjured wrist, and no radiographic problems (arthrosis, avascular necrosis, nonunion).

  10. Influence of the lateral ventricles and irregular skull base on brain kinematics due to sagittal plane head rotation.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, J; Viano, D C; Lövsund, P

    2002-08-01

    Two-dimensional physical models of the human head were used to investigate how the lateral ventricles and irregular skull base influence kinematics in the medial brain during sagittal angular head dynamics. Silicone gel simulated the brain and was separatedfrom the surrounding skull vessel by paraffin that provided a slip interface between the gel and vessel. A humanlike skull base model (HSB) included a surrogate skull base mimicking the irregular geometry of the human. An HSBV model added an elliptical inclusion filled with liquid paraffin simulating the lateral ventricles to the HSB model. A simplified skull base model (SSBV) included ventricle substitute but approximated the anterior and middle cranial fossae by a flat and slightly angled surface. The models were exposed to 7600 rad/s2 peak angular acceleration with 6 ms pulse duration and 5 deg forced rotation. After 90 deg free rotation, the models were decelerated during 30 ms. Rigid body displacement, shear strain and principal strains were determined from high-speed video recorded trajectories of grid markers in the surrogate brains. Peak values of inferior brain surface displacement and strains were up to 10.9X (times) and 3.3X higher in SSBV than in HSBV. Peak strain was up to 2.7X higher in HSB than in HSBV. The results indicate that the irregular skull base protects nerves and vessels passing through the cranial floor by reducing brain displacement and that the intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid relieves strain in regions inferior and superior to the ventricles. The ventricles and irregular skull base are necessary in modeling head impact and understanding brain injury mechanisms.

  11. Reliability of sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle joint angles from a single frame of video data using the GAITRite camera system.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sandy A; Rice, Clinton; Von Behren, Kristyn; Meyer, April; Alexander, Rachel; Murfin, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish intra-rater, intra-session, and inter-rater, reliability of sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle angles with and without reflective markers using the GAITRite walkway and single video camera between student physical therapists and an experienced physical therapist. This study included thirty-two healthy participants age 20-59, stratified by age and gender. Participants performed three successful walks with and without markers applied to anatomical landmarks. GAITRite software was used to digitize sagittal hip, knee, and ankle angles at two phases of gait: (1) initial contact; and (2) mid-stance. Intra-rater reliability was more consistent for the experienced physical therapist, regardless of joint or phase of gait. Intra-session reliability was variable, the experienced physical therapist showed moderate to high reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.50-0.89) and the student physical therapist showed very poor to high reliability (ICC = 0.07-0.85). Inter-rater reliability was highest during mid-stance at the knee with markers (ICC = 0.86) and lowest during mid-stance at the hip without markers (ICC = 0.25). Reliability of a single camera system, especially at the knee joint shows promise. Depending on the specific type of reliability, error can be attributed to the testers (e.g. lack of digitization practice and marker placement), participants (e.g. loose fitting clothing) and camera systems (e.g. frame rate and resolution). However, until the camera technology can be upgraded to a higher frame rate and resolution, and the software can be linked to the GAITRite walkway, the clinical utility for pre/post measures is limited.

  12. Redefining the Boundaries of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from Observations at the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, C.; Palacios, J.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2016-09-01

    On 2015 January 6-7, an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) was observed at L1. This event, which can be associated with a weak and slow coronal mass ejection, allows us to discuss the differences between the boundaries of the magnetic cloud and the compositional boundaries. A fast stream from a solar coronal hole surrounding this ICME offers a unique opportunity to check the boundaries’ process definition and to explain differences between them. Using Wind and ACE data, we perform a complementary analysis involving compositional, magnetic, and kinematic observations providing relevant information regarding the evolution of the ICME as travelling away from the Sun. We propose erosion, at least at the front boundary of the ICME, as the main reason for the difference between the boundaries, and compositional signatures as the most precise diagnostic tool for the boundaries of ICMEs.

  13. A comparison of four techniques to measure anterior and posterior vertebral body heights and sagittal plane wedge angles in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Newell, Nicolas; Grant, Caroline A; Keenan, Bethany E; Izatt, Maree T; Pearcy, Mark J; Adam, Clayton J

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a three-dimensional (3D) spinal deformity of unknown aetiology. Increased growth of the anterior part of the vertebrae known as anterior overgrowth has been proposed as a potential driver for AIS initiation and progression. To date, there has been no objective evaluation of the 3D measurement techniques used to identify this phenomenon and the majority of previous studies use 2D planar assessments which contain inherent projection errors due to the vertebral rotation which is part of the AIS deformity. In this study, vertebral body (VB) heights and wedge angles were measured in a test group of AIS patients and healthy controls using four different image analysis and measurement techniques. Significant differences were seen between the techniques in terms of VB heights and VB wedge angles. The low variability, and the fact that the rotation and tilt of the deformed VBs are taken into account, suggests that the proposed technique using the full 3D orientation of the vertebrae is the most reliable method to measure anterior and posterior VB heights and sagittal plane wedge angles in 3D image data sets. These results have relevance for future investigations that aim to quantify anterior overgrowth in AIS patients for comparison with healthy controls.

  14. Correction of coronal plane deformities around the knee using a tension band plate in children younger than 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ruta M; Ilyas Rushnaiwala, Faizaan M; Kulkarni, GS; Negandhi, Rajiv; Kulkarni, Milind G; Kulkarni, Sunil G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Guided growth through temporary hemiepiphysiodesis has gained acceptance as the preferred primary treatment in treating pediatric lower limb deformities as it is minimally invasive with a lesser morbidity than the traditional osteotomy. The tension band plate is the most recent development in implants used for temporary hemiepiphysiodesis. Our aim was to determine its safety and efficacy in correcting coronal plane deformities around the knee in children younger than 10 years. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 children under the age of 10 were operated for coronal plane deformities around the knee with a single extra periosteal tension band plate and two nonlocking screws. All the children had a pathological deformity for which a detailed preoperative work-up was carried out to ascertain the cause of the deformity and rule out physiological ones. The average age at hemiepiphysiodesis was 5 years 3 months (range: 2 years to 9 years 1 month). Results: The plates were inserted for an average of 15.625 months (range: 7 months to 29 months). All the patients showed improvement in the mechanical axis. Two patients showed partial correction. Two cases of screw loosening were observed. In the genu valgum group, the tibiofemoral angle improved from a preoperative mean of 19.89° valgus (range: 10° valgus to 40° valgus) to 5.72° valgus (range: 2° varus to 10° valgus). In patients with genu varum the tibiofemoral angle improved from a mean of 28.27° varus (range: 13° varus to 41° varus) to 1.59° valgus (range: 0-8° valgus). Conclusion: Temporary hemiepiphysiodesis through the application of the tension band plate is an effective method to correct coronal plane deformities around the knee with minimal complications. Its ease and accuracy of insertion has extended the indication of temporary hemiepiphysiodesis to patients younger than 10 years and across a wide variety of diagnosis including pathological physis, which were traditionally out of the

  15. Accuracy and repeatability of quantitative fluoroscopy for the measurement of sagittal plane translation and finite centre of rotation in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Breen, Alexander; Breen, Alan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) was developed to measure intervertebral mechanics in vivo and has been found to have high repeatability and accuracy for the measurement of intervertebral rotations. However, sagittal plane translation and finite centre of rotation (FCR) are potential measures of stability but have not yet been fully validated for current QF. This study investigated the repeatability and accuracy of QF for measuring these variables. Repeatability was assessed from L2-S1 in 20 human volunteers. Accuracy was investigated using 10 consecutive measurements from each of two pairs of linked and instrumented dry human vertebrae as reference; one which tilted without translation and one which translated without tilt. The results found intra- and inter-observer repeatability for translation to be 1.1mm or less (SEM) with fair to substantial reliability (ICC 0.533-0.998). Intra-observer repeatability of FCR location for inter-vertebral rotations of 5° and above ranged from 1.5mm to 1.8mm (SEM) with moderate to substantial reliability (ICC 0.626-0.988). Inter-observer repeatability for FCR ranged from 1.2mm to 5.7mm, also with moderate to substantial reliability (ICC 0.621-0.878). Reliability was substantial (ICC>0.81) for 10/16 measures for translation and 5/8 for FCR location. Accuracy for translation was 0.1mm (fixed centre) and 2.2mm (moveable centre), with an FCR error of 0.3mm(x) and 0.4mm(y) (fixed centre). This technology was found to have a high level of accuracy and with a few exceptions, moderate to substantial repeatability for the measurement of translation and FCR from fluoroscopic motion sequences.

  16. Center of mass trajectory and orientation to ankle and knee in sagittal plane is maintained with forward lean when backpack load changes during treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Caron, Robert R; Wagenaar, Robert C; Lewis, Cara L; Saltzman, Elliot; Holt, Kenneth G

    2013-01-04

    Maintaining the normal shape and amplitude of the vertical trajectory of the center of mass (COM) during stance has been shown to maximize the efficiency of unloaded gait. Kinematic adaptations to load carriage, such as forward lean have yet to be understood in relation to COM movement. The purpose of this study is to better understand how load impacts the vertical COM(TSYS) trajectory and to clarify the impact of forward lean as it relates to the dynamics of sagittal plane COM(TSYS) movement during stance with changing load. 17 subjects walked on treadmill at a constant preferred walking velocity while nine different loads ranging from 12.5% to 40% bodyweight were systematically added and removed from a backpack. Kinematic data were collected using an Optotrak, three-dimensional motion analysis system and used to estimate position of the COM as well as segment and COM-to-joint vector orientation angles. The shape and amplitude of the COM vertical trajectory was maintained across all loaded conditions. The orientations of COM-to-ankle and -knee vectors were maintained in all loaded conditions except the heaviest load (40% BW). Results suggest that forward lean changed linearly with changes in load to maintain the COM-to-ankle and -knee vector orientations. COM vertical trajectory was maintained by a combination of invariants including lower-limb segment angles and a constant direction of toe-off impulse vector. The kinematic invariants found suggest a simplified control mechanism by which the system limits degrees of freedom and potentially minimizes torque about lower-extremity joints with added load.

  17. Effects of mid-foot contact area ratio on lower body kinetics/kinematics in sagittal plane during stair descent in women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinkyu; Hong, Yoon No Gregory; Shin, Choongsoo S

    2016-07-01

    The mid-foot contact area relative to the total foot contact area can facilitate foot arch structure evaluation. A stair descent motion consistently provides initial fore-foot contact and utilizes the foot arch more actively for energy absorption. The purpose of this study was to compare ankle and knee joint angle, moment, and work in sagittal plane during stair descending between low and high Mid-Foot-Contact-Area (MFCA) ratio group. The twenty-two female subjects were tested and classified into two groups (high MFCA and low MFCA) using their static MFCA ratios. The ground reaction force (GRF) and kinematics of ankle and knee joints were measured while stair descending. During the period between initial contact and the first peak in vertical GRF (early absorption phase), ankle negative work for the low MFCA ratio group was 33% higher than that for the high MFCA ratio group (p<0.05). However, ankle negative work was not significantly different between the two groups during the period between initial contact and peak dorsiflexion angle (early absorption phase+late absorption phase). The peak ankle dorsiflexion angle was smaller in the low MFCA ratio group (p<0.05). Our results suggest that strategy of energy absorption at the ankle and foot differs depending upon foot arch types classified by MFCA. The low MFCA ratio group seemed to absorb more impact energy using strain in the planar fascia during early absorption phase, whereas the high MFCA ratio group absorbed more impact energy using increased dorsiflexion during late absorption phase.

  18. Asymmetry of the leg alignment affects trunk bending in the coronal plane after unilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harato, Kengo; Yoshida, Hiroki; Otani, Toshiro

    2013-08-01

    Unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) would produce asymmetric changes of lower extremity in patients with bilateral varus deformity. Our purpose was to investigate whether asymmetry of the leg alignment would affect trunk bending in the coronal plane after unilateral TKA. Twenty patients (mean 76 years old) with bilateral end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) participated. Spine images during relaxed standing were obtained on pre- and postoperative day 21. As a result, the shoulder tilted more to the TKA side and the pelvis inclined more to the contralateral OA side. These results suggested that the trunk would bend away from the contralateral OA side after unilateral TKA in patients with bilateral end-stage knee OA and varus deformity. Asymmetry of the leg alignment led to asymmetric trunk bending.

  19. A portable system with sample rate of 250 Hz for characterization of knee and hip angles in the sagittal plane during gait

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gait analysis and research have been developed to obtain characteristics of movement patterns of people while walking. However, traditional measuring systems present different drawbacks that reduce their use and application. Among those drawbacks one can find: high price, low sampling frequency and limiting number of steps to be analyzed. Traditional measuring gait systems carry out their measurement at frequencies oscillating between 60 to 100 Hz. It can be argued about the need of higher sampling rates for gait measurements. However small displacements of the knee or hip for example, cannot be seen with low frequencies required a more detailed sampling and higher frequency sampling. Bearing this in mind, in this paper is presented a 250 Hz system based on accelerometers for gait measurement, and the particularities of knee and hip angles during gait are highlighted. Methods The system was designed with a PCI data acquisition card instrumented with an FPGA to achieve a rate sample of 250 Hz. The accelerometers were placed in thighs and legs to calculate the joint angles of hip and knee in the sagittal plane. The angles were estimated using the acceleration polygon method without integrating the acceleration and without filters. Results The gait of thirty healthy people of Mexican phenotype was analyzed over a flat floor free of obstacles. The results showed the gait phases and particularities associated with the walking style and people's laterality; the movement patterns were similar in the thirty persons. Based on the results, the particularities as the maximum amplitude in the angles and the shape in the movement patterns were related to the anthropometry and people phenotype. Conclusions The sampling frequency was essential to record 340 samples in single gait cycle and so registering the gait cycle with its particularities. In this work were recorded an average of 8 to 10 gait cycles, and the results showed variation regarding works carried out

  20. Coronal plane segmental flexibility in thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis assessed by fulcrum-bending radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Hefti, Fritz; Büchler, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge about segmental flexibility in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is crucial for a better biomechanical understanding, particularly for the development of fusionless, growth-guiding techniques. Currently, there is lack of data in this field. The objective of this study was, therefore, to compute segmental flexibility indices (standing angle minus corrected angle/standing angle). We compared segmental disc angles in 76 preoperative sets of standing and fulcrum-bending radiographs of thoracic curves (paired, two-tailed t tests, p < 0.05). The mean standing Cobb angle was 59.7° (range 41.3°–95°) and the flexibility index of the curve was 48.6% (range 16.6–78.8%). The disc angles showed symmetric periapical distribution with significant decrease (all p values <0.0001) for every cephalad (+) and caudad (−) level change. The periapical levels +1 and −1 wedged at 8.3° and 8.7° (range 3.5°–14.8°), respectively. All angles were significantly smaller on the-bending views (p values <0.0001). We noted mean periapical flexibility indices of 46% (+1), 49% (−1), 57% (+2) and 81% (−2), which were significantly less (p < 0.001) than for the group of remote levels 105% (+3), 149% (−3), 231% (+4) and 300% (−4). The discal and bony wedging was 60 and 40%, respectively, and mean values 35° and 24° (p < 0.0001). Their relationship with the Cobb angle showed a moderate correlation (r = 0.56 and 0.45). Functional, radiographic analysis of idiopathic thoracic scoliosis revealed significant, homogenous segmental tethering confined to four periapical levels. Future research will aim at in vivo segmental measurements in three planes under defined load to provide in-depth data for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20186443

  1. Sagittal deformities of the spine: factors influencing the outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Diebo, Bassel G; Henry, Jensen; Lafage, Virginie; Berjano, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative changes have the potential to greatly disrupt the normal curvature of the spine, leading to sagittal malalignment. This phenomenon is often treated with operative modalities, such as osteotomies, though even with surgery, only one-third of patients may reach neutral alignment. Improvement in surgical outcomes may be achieved through better understanding of radiographic spino-pelvic parameters and their association with deformity. Methodical surgical planning, including selection of levels of instrumentation and site of the osteotomy, is crucial in determining the optimal plan for a patient's specific pathology and may minimize risk of developing postoperative proximal junctional kyphosis/failure. While sagittal alignment is essential in operative strategy, the coronal plane should not be overlooked, as it may affect the osteotomy technique. The concepts of sagittal balance and alignment are further complicated in patients with neuromuscular diseases such as Parkinson's disease, and appreciation of the interplay between anatomic and postural deformities is necessary to properly treat these patients. Finally, given the importance of sagittal alignment and the role of osteotomies in treatment for deformity, the need for future research becomes apparent. Novel intraoperative measurement techniques and three-dimensional analysis of the spine may allow for vastly improved operative correction. Furthermore, awareness of the relationship between alignment and balance, the soft tissue envelope, and compensatory mechanisms will provide a more comprehensive conception of the nature of spinal deformity and the modalities with which it is treated.

  2. Cone-beam computed tomographic evaluation of the condylar remodeling occurring after mandibular set-back by bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy and rigid fixation

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Man-Hee; Park, Soo-Byung; Kim, Seong-Sik; Son, Woo-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate condylar head remodeling after mandibular set-back sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) with rigid fixation in skeletal class III deformities. The correlation between condylar head remodeling and condylar axis changes was determined using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) superimposition. Methods The CBCT data of 22 subjects (9 men and 13 women) who had undergone mandibular set-back SSRO with rigid fixation were analyzed. Changes in the condylar head measurements and the distribution of the signs of condylar head remodeling were evaluated by CBCT superimposition. Results The subjects showed inward rotation of the axial condylar angle; reduced condylar heights on the sagittal and coronal planes; and resorptive remodeling in the anterior and superior areas on the sagittal plane, superior and lateral areas on the coronal plane, and anterior-middle and anterior-lateral areas on the axial plane (p < 0.05). Conclusions The CBCT superimposition method showed condylar head remodeling after mandibular set-back SSRO with rigid fixation. In skeletal class III patients, SSRO with rigid fixation resulted in rotation, diminution, and remodeling of the condylar head. However, these changes did not produce clinical signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. PMID:24396735

  3. Definition of bulky disease in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma in computed tomography era: prognostic significance of measurements in the coronal and transverse planes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anita; Burger, Irene A; Zhang, Zhigang; Drill, Esther N; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Ng, Andrea; LaCasce, Ann; Wall, Darci; Witzig, Thomas E; Ristow, Kay; Yahalom, Joachim; Moskowitz, Craig H; Zelenetz, Andrew D

    2016-10-01

    Disease bulk is an important prognostic factor in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma, but its definition is unclear in the computed tomography era. This retrospective analysis investigated the prognostic significance of bulky disease measured in transverse and coronal planes on computed tomography imaging. Early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients (n=185) treated with chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy from 2000-2010 were included. The longest diameter of the largest lymph node mass was measured in transverse and coronal axes on pre-treatment imaging. The optimal cut off for disease bulk was maximal diameter greater than 7 cm measured in either the transverse or coronal plane. Thirty patients with maximal transverse diameter of 7 cm or under were found to have bulk in coronal axis. The 4-year overall survival was 96.5% (CI: 93.3%, 100%) and 4-year relapse-free survival was 86.8% (CI: 81.9%, 92.1%) for all patients. Relapse-free survival at four years for bulky patients was 80.5% (CI: 73%, 88.9%) compared to 94.4% (CI: 89.1%, 100%) for non-bulky; Cox HR 4.21 (CI: 1.43, 12.38) (P=0.004). In bulky patients, relapse-free survival was not impacted in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy; however, it was significantly lower in patients treated with chemotherapy alone. In an independent validation cohort of 38 patients treated with chemotherapy alone, patients with bulky disease had an inferior relapse-free survival [at 4 years, 71.1% (CI: 52.1%, 97%) vs 94.1% (CI: 83.6%, 100%), Cox HR 5.27 (CI: 0.62, 45.16); P=0.09]. Presence of bulky disease on multidimensional computed tomography imaging is a significant prognostic factor in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma. Coronal reformations may be included for routine Hodgkin lymphoma staging evaluation. In future, our definition of disease bulk may be useful in identifying patients who are most appropriate for chemotherapy alone.

  4. CORONAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P. E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-04-10

    We have recently noticed cellular features in Fe XII 193 A images of the 1.2 MK corona. They occur in regions bounded by a coronal hole and a filament channel, and are centered on flux elements of the photospheric magnetic network. Like their neighboring coronal holes, these regions have minority-polarity flux that is {approx}0.1-0.3 times their flux of majority polarity. Consequently, the minority-polarity flux is 'grabbed' by the majority-polarity flux to form low-lying loops, and the remainder of the network flux escapes to connect with its opposite-polarity counterpart in distant active regions of the Sun. As these regions are carried toward the limb by solar rotation, the cells disappear and are replaced by linear plumes projecting toward the limb. In simultaneous views from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, these plumes project in opposite directions, extending away from the coronal hole in one view and toward the hole in the other view, suggesting that they are sky-plane projections of the same radial structures. We conclude that these regions are composed of closely spaced radial plumes, extending upward like candles on a birthday cake and visible as cells when seen from above. We suppose that a coronal hole has this same discrete, cellular magnetic structure, but that it is not seen until the encroachment of opposite-polarity flux closes part or all of the hole.

  5. Application of Ni-Ti Alloy connector for the treatment of comminuted coronal plane supracondylar-condylar femoral fractures: a retrospective review of 21 patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our preliminary retrospective study assessed outcomes after the use of Ni-Ti arched shape-memory connector (ASC) combined with partially threaded cancellous screws (PTCS) to repair coronal plane supracondylar-condylar femoral fractures. Methods Twenty-one patients (16 men and 5 women) with a mean age of 34.1 years (range, 28 to 44 years) with coronal plane supracondylar and condylar fractures of the distal femur were included in this study. Each patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation using the ASC and PTCS. Active functional exercises with restricted weight bearing were initiated the first postoperative day. A gradual increase in weight bearing status and range of motion was permitted and subjects progressed to full weight bearing by 8 weeks. Surgical time, blood loss, postoperative knee range of motion, American Knee Society Scores (KSS), and postoperative complications were assessed. Results The mean surgical time was 75 mins (range, 45 to 100 mins) and average blood loss was 105 ml (range, 35 to 130 ml). Mean follow-up was 65 months (range, 22 to 90 months). No subjects demonstrated evidence of osteonecrosis or arthritis at the final follow-up. The mean KSS was excellent (≥85) in 8 subjects, good (70-84) in 11 subjects, and fair (60-69) in 2 subjects. The mean active range of motion of knee flexion at final follow-up was 100 degrees (range, 85 to 110 degrees). Conclusions ASC combined with PTCS can serve as an effective means for managing comminuted femoral fractures that extend from the condyle to the supracondylar region. However, further prospective comparative studies and biomechanical analyses are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes using these materials. PMID:24341860

  6. Immediate coronal plane kinetic effects of novel lateral-offset sole shoes and lateral-wedge insole shoes in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jong Woo; Park, Hae Soo; Na, Choon Kyun; Park, Jong Woong; Hong, Jungwha; Lee, Soon Hyuck

    2013-02-01

    To investigate kinetic differences in the coronal plane between healthy individuals wearing shoes with lateral-offset soles and shoes with lateral-wedge insoles while walking, hip abduction, knee adduction, and ankle abduction moments were estimated using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system under 3 different conditions: wearing conventional shoes (control), wearing lateral-offset sole shoes (condition A), and wearing lateral-wedge insole shoes (condition B). Forty-eight healthy individuals (24 men and 24 women) were tested. Condition A resulted in a significantly reduced peak knee adduction moment compared with the control (condition A=0.316 Nm/kg; control=0.380 Nm/kg; P=.006). The peak knee adduction moment of condition B was also lower than that of the control (condition B=0.299 Nm/kg; P=.002); however, the peak knee adduction moment was not significantly different between conditions A and B (P=.386). Condition B resulted in an increased mean ankle abduction moment in the stance phase compared with the control and condition A (control=0.007 Nm/kg; condition A=0.013 Nm/kg; condition B=0.023 Nm/kg) (control vs condition A, P=.051; control vs condition B, P<.001; condition A vs condition B, P=.002). The hip abduction moments were not significantly different between the control and condition A, control and condition B, or conditions A and B. Wearing lateral-offset sole shoes reduces the peak knee adduction moment and exerts less influence on ankle moment than does wearing lateral-wedge insole shoes. Neither lateral-offset sole shoes nor lateral-wedge insole shoes induce kinetic changes in the coronal plane of the hip.

  7. The Relationships Between the Center of Mass Position and the Trunk, Hip, and Knee Kinematics in the Sagittal Plane: A Pilot Study on Field-Based Video Analysis for Female Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Shogo; Nagano, Yasuharu; Kaneko, Satoshi; Imamura, Shoichiro; Koabayshi, Takuma; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Athletes with non-contact anterior cruciate ligament tears have common features in the sagittal plane; namely, the body’s center of mass (COM) is located posterior to the base of support, the trunk and knee joints are extended, and the hip angle is flexed. However, the relationships among these variables have not been assessed in field-based movements. This study sought to determine relationships between distances from the COM to the base of support and the trunk, hip, and knee positions in women while playing soccer. Sixty events (29 single-leg landing and 31 single-leg stopping events) were analyzed using two-dimensional video analysis. The relationships among the measurement variables were determined using the Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient, and stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to explore the relationships between the COM position and the kinematic variables. The distance from the COM to the base of support displayed a moderate negative relationship with the trunk angle (r = −0.623, p < .0001, r2 = 0.388) and a strong positive relationship with the limb angle (r = 0.869, p < .0001, r2 = 0.755). The limb, knee, and trunk angles were selected in the best regression model (adjusted r2 = 0.953, p < .0001, f2 = 20.277). These findings suggest that an increased trunk angle and a decreased limb angle at initial contact are associated with a safer COM position. Neuromuscular training may be useful for controlling the trunk and lower limb positions during dynamic activities. PMID:25964811

  8. Examination of Inertial Sensor-Based Estimation Methods of Lower Limb Joint Moments and Ground Reaction Force: Results for Squat and Sit-to-Stand Movements in the Sagittal Plane

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Joint moment estimation by a camera-based motion measurement system and a force plate has a limitation of measurement environment and is costly. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate quantitatively inertial sensor-based joint moment estimation methods with five-link, four-link and three-link rigid body models using different trunk segmented models. Joint moments, ground reaction forces (GRF) and center of pressure (CoP) were estimated for squat and sit-to-stand movements in the sagittal plane measured with six healthy subjects. The five-link model and the four-link model that the trunk was divided at the highest point of the iliac crest (four-link-IC model) were appropriate for joint moment estimation with inertial sensors, which showed average RMS values of about 0.1 Nm/kg for all lower limb joints and average correlation coefficients of about 0.98 for hip and knee joints and about 0.80 for ankle joint. Average root mean square (RMS) errors of horizontal and vertical GRFs and CoP were about 10 N, 15 N and 2 cm, respectively. Inertial sensor-based method was suggested to be an option for estimating joint moments of the trunk segments. Inertial sensors were also shown to be useful for the bottom-up estimation method using measured GRFs, in which average RMS values and average correlation coefficients were about 0.06 Nm/kg and larger than about 0.98 for all joints. PMID:27490544

  9. Examination of Inertial Sensor-Based Estimation Methods of Lower Limb Joint Moments and Ground Reaction Force: Results for Squat and Sit-to-Stand Movements in the Sagittal Plane.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Joint moment estimation by a camera-based motion measurement system and a force plate has a limitation of measurement environment and is costly. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate quantitatively inertial sensor-based joint moment estimation methods with five-link, four-link and three-link rigid body models using different trunk segmented models. Joint moments, ground reaction forces (GRF) and center of pressure (CoP) were estimated for squat and sit-to-stand movements in the sagittal plane measured with six healthy subjects. The five-link model and the four-link model that the trunk was divided at the highest point of the iliac crest (four-link-IC model) were appropriate for joint moment estimation with inertial sensors, which showed average RMS values of about 0.1 Nm/kg for all lower limb joints and average correlation coefficients of about 0.98 for hip and knee joints and about 0.80 for ankle joint. Average root mean square (RMS) errors of horizontal and vertical GRFs and CoP were about 10 N, 15 N and 2 cm, respectively. Inertial sensor-based method was suggested to be an option for estimating joint moments of the trunk segments. Inertial sensors were also shown to be useful for the bottom-up estimation method using measured GRFs, in which average RMS values and average correlation coefficients were about 0.06 Nm/kg and larger than about 0.98 for all joints.

  10. Sagittal Balance in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Zi-Xuan; Wei, Xian-Zhao; Bai, Yu-Shu; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between spinal sagittal alignment and pelvic parameters is well known in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. However, few studies have reported the sagittal spinopelvic relationship after selective posterior fusion of thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L) curves. We evaluated the relationship between spinal sagittal alignment and the pelvis, and analyzed how the pelvic sagittal state is adjusted in Lenke type 5C patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 36 patients with Lenke type 5C curves who received selective posterior TL/L curve fusion. Coronal and spinopelvic sagittal parameters were pre and postoperatively compared. Pearson coefficients were used to analyze the correlation between all spinopelvic sagittal parameters before and after surgery. We also evaluated 3 pelvic morphologies (anteverted, normal, and retroverted) before and after surgery. Preoperatively, the mean pelvic incidence was 46.0°, with a pelvic tilt and sacral slope (SS) of 8.2° and 37.8°, respectively, and 25% (9/36) of patients had an anteverted pelvis, whereas the other 75% had a normal pelvis. Postoperatively, 42% (15/36) of patients had a retroverted pelvis, 53% (19/36) had a normal pelvis, and 2 patients had an anteverted pelvis. Logistic regression analyses yielded 2 factors that were significantly associated with the risk for a postoperative unrecovered anteverted pelvis, including increased lumbar lordosis (LL) (odds ratio [OR] 4.8, P = 0.029) and increased SS (OR 5.6, P = 0.018). Four factors were significantly associated with the risk of a postoperative newly anteverted pelvis, including LL at the final follow-up (OR 6.9, P = 0.009), increased LL (OR 8.9, P = 0.003), LL below fusion (OR 9.4, P = 0.002), and increased SS (OR 11.5, P = 0.001). The pelvic state may be adjusted after selective posterior TL/L curve fusion in Lenke 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. It is difficult to improve an anteverted pelvis in patients who have

  11. Measuring Coronal Magnetic Fields with Coronal Emission Line Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.

    2003-12-01

    Magnetic field is the dominating field in the solar corona, responsible for the majestic coronal structures and dynamic events. However, no direct measurements of the coronal magnetic fields are routinely available and we can only infer the coronal magnetic field structures from observed intensity images. Although several methods for the diagnostics of coronal magnetic fields have been demonstrated, measurement of the coronal magnetic fields remains a very challenging observational task. This paper reports on a concerted effort at the Institute for Astronomy (IfA) to establish routine vector coronal magnetic field measurement capabilities using spectropolarimetric observation of the near infrared Fe XIII 1074.7 nm coronal emission line. The IfA effort includes observations of two-dimensional circular polarization maps of the emission line which carry information about the coronal magnetic field strength. High resolution observation of the linear polarization maps which yield the projected direction of the coronal magnetic field in the plane of the sky will also be obtained. The latest results from these experiments will be presented.

  12. ARTICULATOR-RELATED REGISTRATION AND ANALYSIS OF SAGITTAL CONDYLAR INCLINATION.

    PubMed

    Cimić, Samir; Simunković, Sonja Kraljević; Suncana Simonić Kocijan; Matijević, Jurica; Dulcić, Niksa; Catić, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study sagittal condylar inclination values within a uniform sample (Angle class I occlusion) using 'articulator-related registration' and Camper's plane as a reference plane. The study was performed on a sample of 58 Angle class I subjects (mean age 25.1, SD 3.1). Measurements were performed with an ultrasonic jaw tracking device with six degrees of freedom. After a paraocclusal tray was fixed in the mouth, each subject had to make three protrusive movements and three right and left laterotrusive movements. From protrusive movements the software of the device automatically calculated the left and the right sagittal condylar inclination values used for setting of the articulator. The mean sagittal condylar inclinationvalue was 41.0° (SD 10.5) for the right joint and 40.7° (SD 9.8) for the left joint. The maximum value was 65.0° for the right and 68.6° for the left joint, and the minimum value was 13.7° for the right and 21.7° for the left joint. The results of this study suggested the average articulator setting for sagittal condylar inclination for fully dentate adult subjects to be 40° in relation to Camper's plane. This is especially important for the articulators that are set up in relation to Camper's plane.

  13. Sagittal focusing of synchrotron x radiation with curved crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, C.J. Jr.; Ice, G.E.; Wong, J.; Batterman, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    We describe the sagittal focusing of x rays with singly bent crystals that accept the meridian plane divergence from a similar but flat crystal to form a pair in a nondispersive two-crystal Bragg monochromator. Curved crystals can intercept from 5 to 20 times the sagittal divergence of curved mirrors at x-ray energies above 10 keV. Anticlastic (transverse) bending of the crystal is made negligible in the meridian plane with reinforcing ribs cut parallel to the plane of scattering. Results show that at energies of 10, 20, and 30 keV the bent crystal performs efficiently and images the source size at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source.

  14. Coronal Holes.

    PubMed

    Cranmer, Steven R

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance), but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  15. Hinged-Knee External Fixator Used to Reduce and Maintain Subacute Tibiofemoral Coronal Subluxation.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Erik J; Arzeno, Alexander H; Medvecky, Michael J

    Dislocation of the knee is a rare phenomenon that is becoming increasingly recognized with the expansion of its definition to include knees presenting with multiligament compromise. Hinged external fixators are now considered a viable supplementary treatment option in the management of acute ligament repair or reconstruction but their use in the management of subacute or chronic tibiofemoral dislocations or subluxations is less well defined. We report a case of a hinged-knee external fixator used to facilitate and maintain reduction of a chronic coronal tibial subluxation that presented after repair of an acute knee dislocation with lateral ligament injury secondary to a motor vehicle accident. At 5-year follow-up, the patient treated with hinged external fixation had a stable joint, was able to tolerate regular aerobic exercise, was minimally symptomatic, and did not require more extensive ligament reconstruction. Although there are reports on postoperative use of hinged external fixation to maintain the reduction of chronic or subacute knee dislocations in the sagittal plane after cruciate ligament repair, there are no reports on management of subacute tibiofemoral subluxation in the coronal plane.

  16. Properties and Radial Trends of Coronal Mass Ejecta and Their Associated Shocks Observed by Ulysses in the Ecliptic Plane. Appendix 2; Repr. from Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 105, 2000 p 12,617-12,626

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, magnetic and plasma measurements are used to analyze 17 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs) identified by Ulysses during its in-ecliptic passage to Jupiter. We focus on the expansion characteristics of these CMEs (as inferred from the time rate of change of the velocity profiles through the CMEs) and the properties of 14 forward shocks unambiguously associated with these CMEs. We highlight radial trends from 1 to 5.4 AU. Our results indicate that the CMEs are generally expanding at all heliocentric distances. With regard to the shocks preceding these ejecta, we note the following: (1) There is a clear tendency for the shock speed (in the upstream frame of reference) to decrease with increasing heliocentric distance as the CMEs transfer momentum to the ambient solar wind and slow down; (2) 86% of the shock fronts are oriented in the ecliptic plane such that their normals point westward (i.e., in the direction of planetary motion about the Sun), (3) 86% of the shocks are propagating toward the heliographic equator; and (4) no clear trend was found in the strength of the shocks versus heliocentric distance. These results are interpreted using simple dynamical arguments and are supported by fluid and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations.

  17. Coronal Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-10

    have recently noticed cellular features in Fe xii 193 Å images of the 1.2 MK corona . They occur in regions bounded by a coronal hole and a filament...Sun. As these regions are carried toward the limb by solar rotation, the cells disappear and are replaced by linear plumes projecting toward the limb...In simultaneous views from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, these plumes project in opposite

  18. Coronal and Prominence Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, Arthur I. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Various aspects of solar prominences and the solar corona are discussed. The formation of prominences, prominence diagnostics and structure, prominence dissappearance, large scale coronal structure, coronal diagnostics, small scale coronal structure, and non-equilibrium/coronal heating are among the topics covered.

  19. Sagittal back contour and craniofacial morphology in preadolescents.

    PubMed

    Lippold, Carsten; Segatto, Emil; Végh, András; Drerup, Burkhard; Moiseenko, Tatjana; Danesh, Gholamreza

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation ratios between the sagittal back contour (flèche cervicale and lombaire, trunk inclination) and selected parameters of craniofacial morphology in children. The patient sample consisted of 66 healthy children with a mean age of 11.2 years (SD 1.6 years), of which 34 were male (mean age 11.5 years, SD 1.3 years) and 32 were females (mean age 10.9 years, SD 1.9 years). The children were recruited during the preparation of the initial orthodontic treatment records. Craniofacial morphology was analyzed by six angular measurements: facial axis, mandibular plane angle, inner gonial angle, lower facial height, facial depth and maxilla position. Rasterstereography was used for reconstruction of the spinal back sagittal profile. From the profile flèche cervicale, flèche lombaire and trunk inclination were determined and the correlations with the craniofacial morphology were calculated (Pearson and Mann-Whitney U test). Significant correlations were found with respect to the inner gonial angle and the flèche cervicale, the mandibular plane angle and the flèche lombaire, the inner gonial angle and the flèche lombaire, and the angular lower facial height and the flèche lombaire, as well as the inner gonial angle and the trunk inclination. The craniofacial vertical growth pattern, presented by mandibular plane angle, inner gonial angle and the angular lower facial height, and the correlation to flèche cervicale and lombaire as well as trunk inclination reveal correlations between growth pattern and sagittal back contour.

  20. Sagittal back contour and craniofacial morphology in preadolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Carsten; Végh, András; Drerup, Burkhard; Moiseenko, Tatjana; Danesh, Gholamreza

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation ratios between the sagittal back contour (flèche cervicale and lombaire, trunk inclination) and selected parameters of craniofacial morphology in children. The patient sample consisted of 66 healthy children with a mean age of 11.2 years (SD 1.6 years), of which 34 were male (mean age 11.5 years, SD 1.3 years) and 32 were females (mean age 10.9 years, SD 1.9 years). The children were recruited during the preparation of the initial orthodontic treatment records. Craniofacial morphology was analyzed by six angular measurements: facial axis, mandibular plane angle, inner gonial angle, lower facial height, facial depth and maxilla position. Rasterstereography was used for reconstruction of the spinal back sagittal profile. From the profile flèche cervicale, flèche lombaire and trunk inclination were determined and the correlations with the craniofacial morphology were calculated (Pearson and Mann–Whitney U test). Significant correlations were found with respect to the inner gonial angle and the flèche cervicale, the mandibular plane angle and the flèche lombaire, the inner gonial angle and the flèche lombaire, and the angular lower facial height and the flèche lombaire, as well as the inner gonial angle and the trunk inclination. The craniofacial vertical growth pattern, presented by mandibular plane angle, inner gonial angle and the angular lower facial height, and the correlation to flèche cervicale and lombaire as well as trunk inclination reveal correlations between growth pattern and sagittal back contour. PMID:19946733

  1. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  2. Sagittal osteotomy of the patella after Morscher

    PubMed Central

    Pećina, Marko; Hudetz, Damir; Smoljanović, Tomislav; Janković, Saša

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present long-term results of sagittal osteotomy of the patella after Morscher. The study included 70 patients treated for patellar dysplasia with a postoperative follow-up from nine to 20 years. There were 59 females and 11 males with an average age of 21 years at the time of operation. Results were evaluated for the entire group of 70 patients and then presented separately for the 30 patients in whom sagittal osteotomy of the patella was performed as a single procedure and 40 patients in whom, in addition to sagittal osteotomy of the patella, medialisation and ventralisation or distalisation of the tibial tuberosity were also performed. The mean value of the Wiberg patellar angle was 112 degrees preoperatively and 140 degrees postoperatively. In the whole group of patients excellent results were obtained in 24 (35%), good results in 30 (42%), fair results in 13 (19%) and poor results in three (4%) patients. In 30 patients with sagittal osteotomy as a single operation excellent results were obtained in 13 (43%), good results in 14 (47%) and fair results in three (10%) patients, while in the 40 patients with sagittal osteotomy and additional surgical procedures, 11 (27%) were excellent, 16 (40%) good, ten (25%) fair and three (8%) had poor results. Sagittal osteotomy of the patella after Morscher is an enrichment of the spectrum of the secondary-causal and preventive procedures for the treatment of patello-femoral disorders. PMID:19998034

  3. Implications for Coronal Heating from Coronal Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, P.; Shibata, K.; Carlsson, M.; van der Voort, L. R.; Vissers, G.; Hansteen, V.

    2012-08-01

    Coronal rain is a phenomenon above active regions in which cool plasma condensations fall down from coronal heights. Numerical simulations of loops have shown that such condensations can naturally form in the case of footpoint concentrated heating through the “catastrophic cooling” mechanism. In this work we analize high resolution limb observations in Ca II H and Hα of coronal rain performed by Hinode/SOT and by Crisp of SST and derive statistical properties. We further investigate the link between coronal rain and the coronal heating mechanisms by performing 1.5-D MHD simulations of a loop subject to footpoint heating and to Alfvén waves generated in the photosphere. It is found that if a loop is heated predominantly from Alfvén waves coronal rain is inhibited due to the characteristic uniform heating they produce. Hence coronal rain can point both to the spatial distribution of the heating and to the agent of the heating itself, thus acting as a marker for coronal heating mechanisms.

  4. Coronal heating by waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.

    1983-01-01

    Alfven waves or Alfvenic surface waves carry enough energy into the corona to provide the coronal energy requirements. Coronal loop resonances are an appealing means by which large energy fluxes enter active region loops. The wave dissipation mechanism still needs to be elucidated, but a Kolmogoroff turbulent cascade is fully consistent with the heating requirements in coronal holes and active region loops.

  5. Motion Magnification in Coronal Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anfinogentov, Sergey; Nakariakov, Valery M.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new method for the investigation of low-amplitude transverse oscillations of solar plasma non-uniformities, such as coronal loops, individual strands in coronal arcades, jets, prominence fibrils, polar plumes, and other contrast features that have been observed with imaging instruments. The method is based on the two-dimensional dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTℂWT). It allows us to magnify transverse, in the plane-of-the-sky, quasi-periodic motions of contrast features in image sequences. The tests performed on the artificial data cubes that imitated exponentially decaying, multi-periodic and frequency-modulated kink oscillations of coronal loops showed the effectiveness, reliability, and robustness of this technique. The algorithm was found to give linear scaling of the magnified amplitudes with the original amplitudes, provided these are sufficiently small. In addition, the magnification is independent of the oscillation period in a broad range of the periods. The application of this technique to SDO/AIA EUV data cubes of a non-flaring active region allowed for the improved detection of low-amplitude decay-less oscillations in the majority of loops.

  6. Walking in simulated Martian gravity: Influence of added weight on sagittal dynamic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M.; O'Connor, Daniel P.; Layne, Charles S.; Josić, Krešimir; Kurz, Max J.

    2010-05-01

    With human exploration of the Moon and Mars on the horizon, research considerations for space suit redesign have surfaced. Review of Apollo mission videos revealed repeated instance of falling during extravehicular activities. A better understanding of how suit weight influences the sagittal dynamic stability of the gait pattern may provide insight for new suit design such that space missions may have more productive extravehicular activities and smaller risk of falls that may cause injuries and damage equipment. Participants walked for 4 min in simulated Martian gravity with additional loads of 0%, 15%, 30% and 45% of their body weight. Floquet and Lyapunov analysis techniques were used to quantify the dynamic stability of the sagittal plane gait pattern. Additionally, sagittal plane joint kinematics were evaluated to determine if any modification occurred. Results indicated that weight (i.e., added load) had little effect on the sagittal dynamic stability or joint kinematics while in simulated Martian gravity. Potentially, suit weight may not be a priority for space suit redesign.

  7. Comparing Acute Bouts of Sagittal Plane Progression Foam Rolling vs. Frontal Plane Progression Foam Rolling.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Corey A; Krein, Darren D; Antonio, Jose; Sanders, Gabriel J; Silver, Tobin A; Colas, Megan

    2015-08-01

    Many strength and conditioning professionals have included the use of foam rolling devices within a warm-up routine prior to both training and competition. Multiple studies have investigated foam rolling in regards to performance, flexibility, and rehabilitation; however, additional research is necessary in supporting the topic. Furthermore, as multiple foam rolling progressions exist, researching differences that may result from each is required. To investigate differences in foam rolling progressions, 16 athletically trained males underwent a 2-condition within-subjects protocol comparing the differences of 2 common foam rolling progressions in regards to performance testing. The 2 conditions included a foam rolling progression targeting the mediolateral axis of the body (FRml) and foam rolling progression targeting the anteroposterior axis (FRap). Each was administered in adjunct with a full-body dynamic warm-up. After each rolling progression, subjects performed National Football League combine drills, flexibility, and subjective scaling measures. The data demonstrated that FRml was effective at improving flexibility (p ≤ 0.05) when compared with FRap. No other differences existed between progressions.

  8. Sagittal laser optical tomography for imaging of rheumatoid finger joints.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H; Klose, Alexander D; Scheel, Alexander K; Moa-Anderson, Bryte; Backhaus, Marina; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen

    2004-04-07

    We present a novel optical tomographic imaging system that was designed to determine two-dimensional spatial distribution of optical properties in a sagittal plane through finger joints. The system incorporates a single laser diode and a single silicon photodetector into a scanning device that records spatially resolved light intensities as they are transmitted through a finger. These data are input to a model-based iterative image reconstruction (MOBIIR) scheme, which uses the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) as a forward model for light propagation through tissue. We have used this system to obtain tomographic images of six proximal interphalangeal finger joints from two patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The optical images were compared to clinical symptoms and ultrasound images.

  9. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome with Sagittal Craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andrew S; Weathers, William M; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Bollo, Robert J; Hollier, Larry H; Buchanan, Edward P

    2015-06-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare disorder (the incidence is estimated at around 7/1,000,000) characterized by the clinical tetrad of chondrodystrophy, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cardiac anomalies. Sagittal synostosis is characterized by a dolichocephalic head shape resulting from premature fusion of the sagittal suture. Both are rare disorders, which have never been reported together. We present a case of EVC and sagittal synostosis. We report the clinical features of a Hispanic boy with EVC and sagittal craniosynostosis who underwent cranial vault remodeling. The presentation of this patient is gone over in detail. A never before reported case of EVC and sagittal synostosis is presented in detail.

  10. Coronal transverse magnetohydrodynamic waves in a solar prominence.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T J; Tsuneta, S; Berger, T E; Ichimoto, K; Katsukawa, Y; Lites, B W; Nagata, S; Shibata, K; Shimizu, T; Shine, R A; Suematsu, Y; Tarbell, T D; Title, A M

    2007-12-07

    Solar prominences are cool 10(4) kelvin plasma clouds supported in the surrounding 10(6) kelvin coronal plasma by as-yet-undetermined mechanisms. Observations from Hinode show fine-scale threadlike structures oscillating in the plane of the sky with periods of several minutes. We suggest that these represent Alfvén waves propagating on coronal magnetic field lines and that these may play a role in heating the corona.

  11. Tangential and sagittal curvature from the normals computed by the null screen method in corneal topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada-Molina, Amilcar; Díaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2011-08-01

    A new method for computing the tangential and sagittal curvatures from the normals to a cornea is proposed. The normals are obtained through a Null Screen method from the coordinates of the drops shaped spots at the null screen, the coordinates on a reference approximating surface and the centroids on the image plane. This method assumes that the cornea has rotational symmetry and our derivations will be carried out in the meridional plane that contains the symmetry axis. Experimental results are shown for a calibration spherical surface, using cylindrical null screens with radial point arrays.

  12. SPINNING MOTIONS IN CORONAL CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Stenborg, G. E-mail: guillermo.stenborg.ctr.ar@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-08-20

    In movies made from Fe XII 19.5 nm images, coronal cavities that graze or are detached from the solar limb appear as continually spinning structures, with sky-plane projected flow speeds in the range 5-10 km s{sup -1}. These whirling motions often persist in the same sense for up to several days and provide strong evidence that the cavities and the immediately surrounding streamer material have the form of helical flux ropes viewed along their axes. A pronounced bias toward spin in the equatorward direction is observed during 2008. We attribute this bias to the poleward concentration of the photospheric magnetic flux near sunspot minimum, which leads to asymmetric heating along large-scale coronal loops and tends to drive a flow from higher to lower latitudes; this flow is converted into an equatorward spinning motion when the loops pinch off to form a flux rope. As sunspot activity increases and the polar fields weaken, we expect the preferred direction of the spin to reverse.

  13. Assessment of Coronal Radiographic Parameters of the Spine in the Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Mohsen; Maleki, Arash; Mazda, Keyvan

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine the most important preoperative factors that affect postoperative coronal parameters of scoliotic curves. Methods: All Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) patients included in the study were classified according to Lenke and King Classification. The fusion levels were selected according to the rigidity of the existing curves (correction less than 50%), tilt of T1 and shoulders, sagittal angle of the curves and with considering stable and neutral end vertebra. The radiographic coronal parameters: shoulders tilt angle, iliolumbar angle and coronal balance were measured in all patients before, after, and in the last follow-up visit. Results: One hundred twenty patients after mean of 25 months follow-up (18-40 months) were included in the study. Before operation, abnormal coronal balance (more than 2 cm shift) was noticed in 46 patents (38%) and in the last visit, was noted in 22 patients (18%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed a significant predictive value of the preoperative coronal balance on the last visit coronal balance (P value=0.01). Conclusion: Preoperative coronal balance is very important to make a balanced spine after surgery. Other parameters like Lenke classification or main thoracic overcorrection did not affect postoperative coronal decompensation. PMID:27847853

  14. Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooker, Nancy; Joselyn, Jo Ann; Feynman, Joan

    The early 1970's can be said to mark the beginning of The Enlightenment in the history of the Space Age, literally as well as by analogy to European history. Instruments blinded by Earth's atmosphere were lifted above and, for the first time, saw clearly and continuously the ethereal white light and sparkling x-rays from the solar corona. From these two bands of the light spectrum came images of coronal mass ejections and coronal holes, respectively. But whereas coronal holes were immediately identified as the source of high-speed solar wind streams, at first coronal mass ejections were greeted only by a sense of wonder. It took years of research to identify their signatures in the solar wind before the fastest ones could be identified with the well-known shock disturbances that cause the most violent space storms.

  15. CSF hydrodynamics in superior sagittal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, B; Malm, J; Markgren, P; Ekstedt, J

    1992-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics were investigated with a constant pressure infusion method in patients with superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Ten patients were studied with serial examinations up to 15 years after the onset of the disease. A total of 70 CSF hydrodynamic examinations were performed. A clear increase in intracranial pressure due to raised pressure in the major dural sinus was seen in all patients. A striking feature was the persistent intracranial pressure increase that declined only gradually. This had no obvious clinical impact. Change in CSF resorption facility played only a minor role in the intracranial pressure elevation. None of the patients developed hydrocephalus. PMID:1583513

  16. Value of sagittal color Doppler ultrasonography as a supplementary tool in the differential diagnosis of fetal cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of sagittal color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) for the diagnosis of fetal cleft lip (CL) and cleft palate (CP). Methods We performed targeted ultrasonography on 25 fetuses with CL and CP, taking coronal and axial images of the upper lip and maxillary alveolar arch in each case. The existence of defects in and malalignment of the alveolus on the axial image, hard palate defects on the midsagittal image, and flow-through defects on CDUS taken during fetal breathing or swallowing were assessed. We compared the ultrasonography findings with postnatal findings in all fetuses. Results Alveolar defects were detected in 16 out of 17 cases with CP and four out of eight cases with CL. Alveolar malalignment and hard palate defects were detected in 11 out of 17 cases and 14 out of 17 cases with CP, respectively, but not detected in any cases with CL. Communicating flow through the palate defect was detected in 11 out of 17 cases of CL with CP. The accuracy of detection in axial scans of an alveolar defect and malalignment was 80% and 76%, respectively. Accuracy of detection of in mid-sagittal images of hard palate defect and flow was 80% and 86%, respectively. The overall diagnostic accuracy of combined axial and sagittal images with sagittal CDUS was 92%. Conclusion Sagittal CDUS of the fetal hard palate is a feasible method to directly reveal hard palate bony defects and flow through defects, which may have additional value in the differential diagnosis of fetal CL and CP. PMID:27764909

  17. Atlas of axial, sagittal and coronal anatomy with CT and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Christoforidis, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book correlates CT scans and nuclear magnetic resonance images with cross sections of all parts of the body-head and neck, thorax, abdomen, male and female pelvis and extremities. Cross sections are fixed, and images are made from the sections to provide exact section-to-scan correlation. Shows all three cross-sectional axes. Includes selected pathologic cases to demonstrate technique.

  18. White-Light Polarization and Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalyan, O. G.; Livshits, M. A.; Sýkora, J.

    1997-06-01

    The results of the white-light polarization measurements performed during three solar eclipses (1973, 1980, 1991) are presented. The eclipse images were processed and analysed by the same technique and method and, consequently, the distributions of the polarization and coronal intensity around the Sun were obtained in unified form for all three solar eclipses. The mutual comparisons of our results, and their comparison with the distributions found by other authors, allowed the real accuracy of the current measurements of the white-light corona polarization, which is not worse than +/-5%, to be estimated. We have investigated the behaviour of the polarization in dependence on heliocentric distance in helmet streamers and coronal holes. Simultaneous interpretation of the data on polarization and intensity in white-light helmet streamers is only possible if a considerable concentration of coronal matter (plasma) towards the plane of the sky is assumed. The values obtained for the coronal hole regions can be understood within the framework of a spherically symmetrical model of the low density solar atmosphere. A tendency towards increasing polarization in coronal holes, connected with the decrease of the hole's size and with the transition from the minimum to the maximum of the solar cycle, was noticed. The problem of how the peculiarities of the large-scale coronal structures are related to the orientation of the global (dipole) solar magnetic field and to the degree of the goffer character of the coronal and interplanetary current sheet is discussed briefly.

  19. SOLAR WIND AND CORONAL BRIGHT POINTS INSIDE CORONAL HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Karachik, Nina V.; Pevtsov, Alexei A. E-mail: apevtsov@nso.edu

    2011-07-01

    Observations of 108 coronal holes (CHs) from 1998-2008 were used to investigate the correlation between fast solar wind (SW) and several parameters of CHs. Our main goal was to establish the association between coronal bright points (CBPs; as sites of magnetic reconnection) and fast SW. Using in situ measurements of the SW, we have connected streams of the fast SW at 1 AU with their source regions, CHs. We studied a correlation between the SW speed and selected parameters of CHs: total area of the CH, total intensity inside the CH, fraction of area of the CH associated with CBPs, and their integrated brightness inside each CH. In agreement with previous studies, we found that the SW speed most strongly correlates with the total area of the CHs. The correlation is stronger for the non (de)projected areas of CHs (which are measured in image plane) suggesting that the near-equatorial parts of CHs make a larger contribution to the SW measured at near Earth orbit. This correlation varies with solar activity. It peaks for periods of moderate activity, but decreases slightly for higher or lower levels of activity. A weaker correlation between the SW speed and other studied parameters was found, but it can be explained by correlating these parameters with the CH's area. We also studied the spatial distribution of CBPs inside 10 CHs. We found that the density of CBPs is higher in the inner part of CHs. As such, results suggest that although the reconnection processes occurring in CBPs may contribute to the fast SW, they do not serve as the main mechanism of wind acceleration.

  20. Solar Wind and Coronal Bright Points inside Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachik, Nina V.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2011-07-01

    Observations of 108 coronal holes (CHs) from 1998-2008 were used to investigate the correlation between fast solar wind (SW) and several parameters of CHs. Our main goal was to establish the association between coronal bright points (CBPs; as sites of magnetic reconnection) and fast SW. Using in situ measurements of the SW, we have connected streams of the fast SW at 1 AU with their source regions, CHs. We studied a correlation between the SW speed and selected parameters of CHs: total area of the CH, total intensity inside the CH, fraction of area of the CH associated with CBPs, and their integrated brightness inside each CH. In agreement with previous studies, we found that the SW speed most strongly correlates with the total area of the CHs. The correlation is stronger for the non (de)projected areas of CHs (which are measured in image plane) suggesting that the near-equatorial parts of CHs make a larger contribution to the SW measured at near Earth orbit. This correlation varies with solar activity. It peaks for periods of moderate activity, but decreases slightly for higher or lower levels of activity. A weaker correlation between the SW speed and other studied parameters was found, but it can be explained by correlating these parameters with the CH's area. We also studied the spatial distribution of CBPs inside 10 CHs. We found that the density of CBPs is higher in the inner part of CHs. As such, results suggest that although the reconnection processes occurring in CBPs may contribute to the fast SW, they do not serve as the main mechanism of wind acceleration.

  1. Geometrical Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, Hebe; Bothmer, Volker

    Based on the SOHO/LASCO dataset, a collection of "structured" coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been compiled within the period 1996-2002, in order to analyze their three-dimensional configuration. These CME events exhibit white-light fine structures, likely indicative of their possible 3D topology. From a detailed investigation of the associated low coronal and photospheric source regions, a generic scheme has been deduced, which considers the white-light topology of a CME projected in the plane of the sky as being primarily dependent on the orientation and position of the source region's neutral line on the solar disk. The obtained results imply that structured CMEs are essentially organized along a symmetry axis, in a cylindrical manner. The measured dimensions of the cylinder's base and length yield a ratio of 1.6. These CMEs seem to be better approximated by elliptic cones, rather than by the classical ice cream cone, characterized by a circular cross section.

  2. Optic flow and the metric of the visual ground plane.

    PubMed

    Beusmans, J M

    1998-04-01

    A theory is developed in which the optic flow of an observer translating over the ground plane determines the metric of egocentric visual space. Optic flow is used to operationalize the equality of spatial intervals not unlike physicists use time to compare spatial intervals. The theory predicts empirical matching ratios for collinear, sagittal intervals to within 2% of the mean (eight subjects, standard error also 2%). The theory predicts that frontoparallel intervals on the ground plane will match sagittal intervals if their relative image motions match, which was found empirically. It is suggested that the optic flow metric serves to calibrate static depth cues such as angular elevation and binocular parallax.

  3. Global Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.

    2016-02-01

    After the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named ``EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal loop. Such a two-wave paradigm was proposed more than 13 years ago, and now is being recognized by more and more colleagues. In this paper, we review how various controversies can be resolved in the two-wave framework and how important it is to have two different names for the two types of coronal waves.

  4. Coronal mass ejections and coronal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildner, E.; Bassi, J.; Bougeret, J. L.; Duncan, R. A.; Gary, D. E.; Gergely, T. E.; Harrison, R. A.; Howard, R. A.; Illing, R. M. E.; Jackson, B. V.

    1986-01-01

    Research on coronal mass ejections (CMF) took a variety of forms, both observational and theoretical. On the observational side there were: case studies of individual events, in which it was attempted to provide the most complete descriptions possible, using correlative observations in diverse wavelengths; statistical studies of the properties CMEs and their associated activity; observations which may tell us about the initiation of mass ejections; interplanetary observations of associated shocks and energetic particles even observations of CMEs traversing interplanetary space; and the beautiful synoptic charts which show to what degree mass ejections affect the background corona and how rapidly (if at all) the corona recovers its pre-disturbance form. These efforts are described in capsule form with an emphasis on presenting pictures, graphs, and tables so that the reader can form a personal appreciation of the work and its results.

  5. Coronal Magnetometry in the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Tomczyk, Steven

    Coronal magnetic field plays a crucial role in solar activity. However, due to the high temperature, low density and weak magnetic field properties of the corona, it is hard to directly measure coronal magnetic field, especially for the vector magnetic field. In this presentation, I will briefly review the past endeavor to measure the coronal magnetic field and present current methodology. I will introduce in more detail about the proposed Coronal Magnetism Telescopes of China (COMTEC) and the Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) in the United States of America. Both of them are dedicated to measure the vector magnetic field in the corona as well as chromospheric magnetic field. They, once established, will certainly contribute much to the comprehensive understanding of important questions in solar physics, such as coronal and chromospheric heating, solar wind acceleration, global and long-time variation of coronal magnetic field, etc.

  6. SNAPing Coronal Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    This is a Snapshot Survey to explore two forbidden lines of highly ionized iron in late-type coronal sources. Fe XII 1349 {T 2 MK} and Fe XXI 1354 {T 10 MK} - well known to Solar Physics - have been detected in about a dozen cool stars, mainly with HST/STIS. The UV coronal forbidden lines are important because they can be observed with velocity resolution of better than 15 km/s, whereas even the state-of-the-art X-ray spectrometers on Chandra can manage only 300 km/s in the kilovolt band where lines of highly ionized iron more commonly are found. The kinematic properties of hot coronal plasmas, which are of great interest to theorists and modelers, thus only are accessible in the UV at present. The bad news is that the UV coronal forbidden lines are faint, and were captured only in very deep observations with STIS. The good news is that 3rd-generation Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, slated for installation in HST by SM4, in a mere 25 minute exposure with its G130M mode can duplicate the sensitivity of a landmark 25-orbit STIS E140M observation of AD Leo, easily the deepest such exposure of a late-type star so far. Our goal is to build up understanding of the properties of Fe XII and Fe XXI in additional objects beyond the current limited sample: how the lineshapes depend on activity, whether large scale velocity shifts can be detected, and whether the dynamical content of the lines can be inverted to map the spatial morphology of the stellar corona {as in "Doppler Imaging''}. In other words, we want to bring to bear in the coronal venue all the powerful tricks of spectroscopic remote sensing, well in advance of the time that this will be possible exploiting the corona's native X-ray radiation. The 1290-1430 band captured by side A of G130M also contains a wide range of key plasma diagnostics that form at temperatures from below 10,000 K {neutral lines of CNO}, to above 200,000 K {semi-permitted O V 1371}, including the important bright multiplets of C II at 1335 and

  7. Gender differences in sagittal standing alignment before pubertal peak growth: the importance of subclassification and implications for spinopelvic loading.

    PubMed

    Dolphens, Mieke; Cagnie, Barbara; Vleeming, Andry; Vanderstraeten, Guy; Danneels, Lieven

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze gender differences in sagittal standing alignment at pre-peak height velocity age thereby applying a scientifically sound and practically oriented classification scheme for overall standing balance. The study population consisted of healthy boys (n = 639) and girls (n = 557) before pubertal peak growth. During subjects' habitual standing, sagittal plane measures of the spine, pelvis and lower limbs were collected using a clinical screening protocol. With each subject classified as one of three postural types (neutral, sway-back, or leaning-forward), differences in sagittal plane alignment were analyzed between sexes. The results revealed clear differences between genders in each of the postural types. Within the neutral and sway-back postural subgroups, boys presented more forward inclination of the trunk, more thoracic kyphosis and more pelvis backtilt compared with girls. Within the leaning-forward category, girls displayed more forward trunk lean, less thoracic kyphosis and more pelvic anteversion. A state of lumbar segmental hyperextension appeared to exist in female leaning-forward subjects. Our results reveal for the first time that sagittal standing alignment is different between prepubescent boys and girls when subjects are appropriately subclassified, and conversely represent a 'wash-out effect' when pooled. When the classification system is applied, gender-specificity in gravity line position is suggested, implying gender-related differences in lever arms and thus load. Present findings may add to our understanding of gender-specific biomechanical challenges posed by habitual posture, and may shed new light on sagittal standing alignment as a possible contributory factor in developmental spinal-pelvic disorders.

  8. Sagittal Balance Correction in Lateral Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallizzi, Michael A.; Sheets, Charles; Smith, Benjamin T.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Eure, Megan; Brown, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sagittal balance restoration has been shown to be an important determinant of outcomes in corrective surgery for degenerative scoliosis. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a less-invasive technique which permits the placement of a high lordosis interbody cage without risks associated with traditional anterior or transforaminal interbody techniques. Studies have shown improvement in lumbar lordosis following LIF, but only one other study has assessed sagittal balance in this population. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of LIF to restore sagittal balance in degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Methods Thirty-five patients who underwent LIF for degenerative thoracolumbar scoliosis from July 2013 to March 2014 by a single surgeon were included. Outcome measures included sagittal balance, lumbar lordosis, Cobb Angle, and segmental lordosis. Measures were evaluated pre-operative, immediately post-operatively, and at their last clinical follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess the differences between pre-operative, first postoperative, and a follow-up visit. Results The average sagittal balance correction was not significantly different: 1.06cm from 5.79cm to 4.74cm forward. The average Cobb angle correction was 14.1 degrees from 21.6 to 5.5 degrees. The average change in global lumbar lordosis was found to be significantly different: 6.3 degrees from 28.9 to 35.2 degrees. Conclusions This study demonstrates that LIF reliably restores lordosis, but does not significantly improve sagittal balance. Despite this, patients had reliable improvement in pain and functionality suggesting that sagittal balance correction may not be as critical in scoliosis correction as previous studies have indicated. Clinical Relevance LIF does not significantly change sagittal balance; however, clinical improvement does not seem to be contingent upon sagittal balance correction in the degenerative scoliosis population. The DUHS IRB has determined this

  9. Coronal streamers' theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, C. Göran

    1994-10-01

    Some theoretical aspects of solar coronal streamers are discussed with emphasis on the current sheet and reconnection processes going on along the axis of the streamer. The dynamics of the streamer is a combination of MHD and transport, with acceleration of particles due to reconnection and leakage of plasma outwards as a “slow” solar wind as the observable results. The presence of the almost-closed magnetic bottles of streamers that can store high-energy particles for significant times provides the birdcage for solar cosmic rays, the reconnection in the sheet feeds medium-energy protons into the corona for the large-scale storage needed for certain flare models, and the build-up of excess density sets the stage for coronal mass ejections.

  10. Coronal and interplanetary magnetic field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1999-06-01

    We provide an historical perspective of coronal and interplanetary field models. The structure of the interplanetary medium is controlled by the coronal magnetic field from which the solar wind emanates. This field has been described with ``Source Surface'' (SS) and ``Heliospheric Current Sheet'' (HCS) models. The ``Source Surface'' model was the first to open the solar field into interplanetary space using volumetric coronal currents, which were a ``source'' for the IMF. The Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) model provided a more physically realistic solution. The field structure was primarily a dipole, however, without regard to sign, the shape appeared to be a monopole pattern (uniform field stress). Ulysses has observed this behavior. Recently, Sheeley and Wang have utilized the HCS field model to calculate solar wind structures fairly accurately. Fisk, Schwadron, and Zurbuchen have investigated small differences from the SS model. These differences allow field line motions reminiscent of a ``timeline'' or moving ``streakline'' in a flow field, similar to the smoke pattern generated by a skywriting plane. Differences exist in the magnetic field geometry, from the Parker ``garden hose'' model affecting both the ``winding angle'' as well as the amount of latitudinal ``wandering.''

  11. Coronal mass ejections

    SciTech Connect

    Steinolfson, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are now recognized as an important component of the large-scale evolution of the solar corona. Some representative observations of CMEs are reviewed with emphasis on more recent results. Recent observations and theory are examined as they relate to the following aspects of CMEs: (1) the role of waves in determining the white-light signature; and (2) the mechanism by which the CME is driven (or launched) into the corona.

  12. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  13. CORONAL RAIN AS A MARKER FOR CORONAL HEATING MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Antolin, P.; Vissers, G.; Shibata, K. E-mail: g.j.m.vissers@astro.uio.n

    2010-06-10

    Reported observations in H{alpha}, Ca II H, and K or other chromospheric lines of coronal rain trace back to the days of the Skylab mission. Corresponding to cool and dense plasma, coronal rain is often observed falling down along coronal loops in active regions. A physical explanation for this spectacular phenomenon has been put forward thanks to numerical simulations of loops with footpoint-concentrated heating, a heating scenario in which cool condensations naturally form in the corona. This effect has been termed 'catastrophic cooling' and is the predominant explanation for coronal rain. In this work, we further investigate the link between this phenomenon and the heating mechanisms acting in the corona. We start by analyzing observations of coronal rain at the limb in the Ca II H line performed by the Hinode satellite, and derive interesting statistical properties concerning the dynamics. We then compare the observations with 1.5-dimensional MHD simulations of loops being heated by small-scale discrete events concentrated toward the footpoints (that could come, for instance, from magnetic reconnection events), and by Alfven waves generated at the photospheric level. Both our observation and simulation results suggest that coronal rain is a far more common phenomenon than previously thought. Also, we show that the structure and dynamics of condensations are far more sensitive to the internal pressure changes in loops than to gravity. Furthermore, it is found that if a loop is predominantly heated from Alfven waves, coronal rain is inhibited due to the characteristic uniform heating they produce. Hence, coronal rain may not only point to the spatial distribution of the heating in coronal loops but also to the agent of the heating itself. We thus propose coronal rain as a marker for coronal heating mechanisms.

  14. Modeling Coronal Jets with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; Deforest, C. E.

    2008-05-01

    We report on a comparative study of coronal jet formation with and without reconnection using two different simulation strategies. Coronal jets are features on the solar surface that appear to have some properties in common with coronal mass ejections, but are less energetic, massive, and broad. Magnetic free energy is built up over time and then suddenly released, which accelerates plasma outward in the form of a coronal jet. We compare results from the ARMS adaptive mesh and FLUX reconnection-less codes to study the role of reconnection in this system. This is the first direct comparison between FLUX and a numerical model with a 3D spatial grid.

  15. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Developmental Instability in Sagittal Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Valerie Burke; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether premature sagittal craniosynostosis is associated with developmental instability in the skull by analyzing fluctuating asymmetry in skull shape. Design: Cranial shape was quantified by collecting coordinate data from landmarks located on three-dimensional reconstructions of preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of 22 children with sagittal craniosynostosis and 22 age-matched controls. A fluctuating asymmetry application of Euclidean distance matrix analysis (EDMA) was used to quantify and compare asymmetry in cranial shape using these landmark data. Results: In contrast to expectations, the sagittal craniosynostosis group did not show a statistically significant increase in the overall level of fluctuating asymmetry relative to the control group. However, we discerned statistically significant localized increases in fluctuating asymmetry in the sagittal craniosynostosis group at pterion and the anterior clinoid processes (α = .05). We also determined a significant correlation of fluctuating asymmetry values between the two groups (r = .71). Conclusions: We conclude that there is no evidence of a role for system-wide developmental instability in the etiology of nonsyndromic sagittal craniosynostosis. However, the localized evidence of asymmetry at the anterior clinoid processes in the sagittal synostosis group suggests an association with the tracts of dura mater that attach there. PMID:19254065

  16. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steve; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coronal plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction, and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS), Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), and Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO). Our models show that shock formation occurs at relatively low coronal heights, typically within 1.2 RsuN, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking criterion given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although such waves are probably not the main energy supply mechanism.

  17. Coronal and chromospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, J. T.; Landman, D. A.; Orrall, F. Q.

    1983-01-01

    Achievements and completed results are discussed for investigations covering solar activity during the solar maximum mission and the solar maximum year; other studies of solar activity and variability; infrared and submillimeter photometry; solar-related atomic physics; coronal and transition region studies; prominence research; chromospheric research in quiet and active regions; solar dynamics; eclipse studies; and polarimetry and magnetic field measurements. Contributions were also made in defining the photometric filterograph instrument for the solar optical telescope, designing the combined filter spectrograph, and in expressing the scientific aims and implementation of the solar corona diagnostic mission.

  18. How is sagittal balance acquired during bipedal gait acquisition? Comparison of neonatal and adult pelves in three dimensions. Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, Christine; Bonneau, Noémie; Hecquet, Jérôme; Boulay, Christophe; Marty, Catherine; Legaye, Jean; Duval-Beaupère, Geneviève

    2013-08-01

    We compare adult and intact neonatal pelves, using a pelvic sagittal variable, the angle of sacral incidence, which presents significant correlations with vertebral curvature in adults and plays an important role in sagittal balance of the trunk on the lower limbs. Since the lumbar curvature develops in the child in association with gait acquisition, we expect a change in this angle during growth which could contribute to the acquisition of sagittal balance. To understand the mechanisms underlying the sagittal balance in the evolution of human bipedalism, we also measure the angle of incidence of hominid fossils. Fourty-seven landmarks were digitized on 50 adult and 19 intact neonatal pelves. We used a three-dimensional model of the pelvis (DE-VISU program) which calculates the angle of sacral incidence and related functional variables. Cross-sectional data from newborns and adults show that the angle of sacral incidence increases and becomes negatively correlated with the sacro-acetabular distance. During ontogeny the sacrum becomes curved, tends to sink down between the iliac blades as a wedge and moves backward in the sagittal plane relative to the acetabula, thus contributing to the backwards displacement of the center of gravity of the trunk. A chain of correlations links the degree of the sacral slope and of the angle of incidence, which is tightly linked with the lumbar lordosis. We sketch a model showing the coordinated changes occurring in the pelvis and vertebral column during the acquisition of bipedalism in infancy. In the australopithecine pelves, Sts 14 and AL 288-1, and in the Homo erectus Gona pelvis the angle of sacral incidence reaches the mean values of humans. Discussing the incomplete pelves of Ardipithecus ramidus, Australopithecus sediba and the Nariokotome Boy, we suggest how the functional linkage between pelvis and spine, observed in humans, could have emerged during hominid evolution.

  19. Explaining Warm Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Patsourakos, Spiros

    2008-01-01

    One of the great mysteries of coronal physics that has come to light in the last few years is the discovery that warn (- 1 INK) coronal loops are much denser than expected for quasi-static equilibrium. Both the excess densities and relatively long lifetimes of the loops can be explained with bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively to very high temperatures. Since neighboring strands are at different stages of cooling, the composite loop bundle is multi-thermal, with the distribution of temperatures depending on the details of the "nanoflare storm." Emission hotter than 2 MK is predicted, but it is not clear that such emission is always observed. We consider two possible explanations for the existence of over-dense warm loops without corresponding hot emission: (1) loops are bundles of nanoflare heated strands, but a significant fraction of the nanoflare energy takes the form of a nonthermal electron beam rather then direct plasma heating; (2) loops are bundles of strands that undergo thermal nonequilibrium that results when steady heating is sufficiently concentrated near the footpoints. We present numerical hydro simulations of both of these possibilities and explore the observational consequences, including the production of hard X-ray emission and absorption by cool material in the corona.

  20. Out-of-ecliptic studies of coronal holes and their relation to the solar wind. [project planning for solar probes to study solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The advantages of observing coronal holes of the sun above the solar ecliptic plane by a solar probe are discussed. Also discussed are the size of coronal holes, their temperature, and magnetic fields associated with the holes. The role of coronal holes in contributing to the solar wind is examined. Data and observations on coronal holes from Skylab and OSO are treated. It is concluded that an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission would greatly add to the understanding of coronal holes (at high latitudes) thus adding a new perspective to the observation of these phenomena. (Photographs of the sun taken by Skylab are shown).

  1. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine after neck injury.

    PubMed

    Beltsios, Michail; Savvidou, Olga; Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kaspiris, Angelos; Efstathopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2013-07-01

    The normal sagittal alignment of the cervical spine is lordotic and is affected by the posture of the head and neck. The question of whether loss of cervical lordosis is the result of muscle spasm after injury or a normal variation, and the clinical significance of such changes in sagittal profile of the cervical spine has been an issue of several studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of normal cervical lordosis and its changes after neck injury compared to the healthy population. We studied the lateral radiographs of the cervical spine of 60 patients with neck injury compared to 100 patients without a neck injury. Lateral radiographs were obtained in the standing or sitting position, and the curvature of the cervical spine was measured using the angle formed between the inferior end plates of the C2 and C7 vertebrae. In the patients without neck injury, lordotic and straight cervical spine sagittal alignment was observed in 36.5% each, double curvature in 17%, and kyphotic in 10%. In the patients with neck injury, lordotic sagittal alignment was observed in 36%, straight in 34%, double curvature in 26% and kyphotic in 4%. No significant difference between the two groups regarding all types of sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was found (p > 0.100). The alterations in normal cervical lordosis in patients with neck injury must be considered coincidental. These alterations should not be associated with muscle spasm caused by neck pain.

  2. The coronal fricative problem

    PubMed Central

    Dinnsen, Daniel A.; Dow, Michael C.; Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Green, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidence is also presented that replicates the cross-sectional results, offering further insight into the life-cycle of the conspiracy. Several of the observed typological anomalies are argued to follow from a modified version of Optimality Theory with Candidate Chains (McCarthy, 2007). PMID:24790247

  3. The coronal fricative problem.

    PubMed

    Dinnsen, Daniel A; Dow, Michael C; Gierut, Judith A; Morrisette, Michele L; Green, Christopher R

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidence is also presented that replicates the cross-sectional results, offering further insight into the life-cycle of the conspiracy. Several of the observed typological anomalies are argued to follow from a modified version of Optimality Theory with Candidate Chains (McCarthy, 2007).

  4. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, S.; Landi, E.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields are arguably the most important observables required for advances in our understanding of the processes responsible for coronal heating, coronal dynamics and the generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a proposed ground-based suite of instruments designed for routine study of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields and their environment, and to understand the formation of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their relation to other forms of solar activity. This new facility will be operated by the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) with partners at the University of Michigan, the University of Hawaii and George Mason University in support of the solar and heliospheric community. It will replace the current NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu). COSMO will enhance the value of existing and new observatories on the ground and in space by providing unique and crucial observations of the global coronal and chromospheric magnetic field and its evolution. The design and current status of the COSMO will be reviewed.

  5. An overview of coronal seismology.

    PubMed

    De Moortel, I

    2005-12-15

    The idea of exploiting observed oscillations as a diagnostic tool for determining the physical conditions of the coronal plasma was first suggested several decades ago (Roberts et al. 1984 Astrophys. J. 279, 857). Until recently, the application of this idea has been very limited by a lack of high-quality observations of coronal oscillations. However, during the last few years, this situation has changed dramatically, especially due to space-based observations by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and waves and oscillations have now been observed in a wide variety of solar structures, such as coronal loops, polar plumes and prominences. This paper will briefly summarize MHD wave theory, which forms the basis for coronal seismology, as well as present an overview of the variety of recently observed waves and oscillations in the solar corona. The present state of coronal seismology will also be discussed. Currently, the uncertainty associated with the obtained parameters is still considerable and, hence, the results require a cautious interpretation. However, these examples do show that coronal seismology is rapidly being transformed from a theoretical possibility to a viable technique.

  6. Surgical Correction of Nonsyndromic Sagittal Craniosynostosis: Concepts and Controversies.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrew; Wong, Alison L; Bezuhly, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Sagittal craniosynostosis remains the most common type of isolated craniosynostosis, accounting for nearly half of all nonsyndromic cases. The clinical diagnosis is typically made on the basis of a scaphocephalic head shape and is confirmed by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The current review examines the major surgical options for correction of isolated sagittal craniosynostosis, including their complications and short- and long-term outcomes. Reconstructive techniques have benefited from advances in perioperative anesthesia monitoring and improved safety of blood transfusion. Although extensive calvarial remodeling is considered safe and may confer greater long-term skull shape correction and decreased neuropsychological sequelae, minimally invasive techniques, such as device-assisted expansion of the cranium continue to increase in popularity. This review underscores the need for additional prospective studies comparing different techniques to determine the optimal reconstructive approach for correction of sagittal craniosynostosis.

  7. Coronal transient--eruptive prominence of 1980 August 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.; Garcia, C.J.; Seagraves, P.

    1981-06-15

    A coronal transient was observed in association with an eruptive prominence event using the Mauna Loa experiment system. The transient, a rarefaction, formed before the acceleration of the eruptive prominence. Upward velocities of various features, as seen in the plane of the sky, show a marked difference as a function of time between the transient and the eruptive prominence. A region of enhanced electron density formed slowly in front of the rarefaction.

  8. Diffraction crystals for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1982-06-07

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  9. Diffraction crystal for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Ice, Gene E.; Sparks, Jr., Cullie J.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  10. Comparison of parameters of spinal curves in the sagittal plane measured by photogrammetry and inclinometry.

    PubMed

    Walicka-Cupryś, Katarzyna; Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna; Mrozkowiak, Mirosław

    2013-10-31

    BACKGROUND. The photogrammetric method and inclinometer-based measurements are commonly employed to assess the anteroposterior curvatures of the spine. These methods are used both in clinical trials and for screening purposes. The aim of the study was to compare the parameters used to characterise the anteroposterior spinal curvatures as measured by photogrammetry and inclinometry. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study enrolled 341 subjects: 169 girls and 172 boys, aged 4 to 9 years, from kindergartens and primary schools in Rzeszów. The anteroposterior spinal curvatures were examined by photogrammetry and with a mechanical inclinometer. RESULTS. There were significant differences in the α angle between the inclinometric and photogrammetric assessment in the Student t test (p=0.017) and the Fisher Snedecor test (p=0.0001), with similar differences in the β angle (Student's t p=0.0001, Fisher Snedecor p=0.007). For the γ angle, significant differences were revealed with Student's t test (p=0.0001), but not with the Fisher Snedecor test (p = 0.22). CONCLUSIONS. 1. Measurements of inclination of particular segments of the spine obtained with the photogrammetric method and the inclinometric method in the same study group revealed statistically significant differences. 2. The results of measurements obtained by photogrammetry and inclinometry are not comparable. 3. Further research on agreement between measurements of the anteroposterior spinal curvatures obtained using the available measurement equipment is recommended.

  11. Modeling effects of sagittal-plane hip joint stiffness on reciprocating gait orthosis-assisted gait.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William Brett; Fatone, Stefania; Gard, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Upright ambulation is believed to improve quality of life for persons with lower-limb paralysis (LLP). However, ambulatory orthoses for persons with LLP, like reciprocating gait orthoses (RGOs), result in a slow, exhausting gait. Increasing the hip joint stiffness of these devices may improve the efficiency of RGO-assisted gait. The small, diverse population of RGO users makes subject recruitment challenging for clinical investigations. Therefore, we developed a lower-limb paralysis simulator (LLPS) that enabled nondisabled persons to exhibit characteristics of RGO-assisted gait, thereby serving as surrogate models for research. For this study, tests were conducted to determine the effects of increased hip joint stiffness on gait of nondisabled persons walking with the LLPS. A motion capture system, force plates, and spirometer were used to measure the hip flexion, crutch ground reaction forces (GRFs), and oxygen consumption of subjects as they walked with four different hip joint stiffness settings. Increasing the hip joint stiffness decreased hip flexion during ambulation but did not appear to affect the crutch GRFs. Walking speed was observed to initially increase with increases in hip joint stiffness, and then decrease. These findings suggest that increasing hip joint stiffness may increase walking speed for RGO users.

  12. The back compressive forces during maximal push-pull activities in the sagittal plane.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S

    1994-12-01

    Ten normal young male and ten normal young female subjects (each group with a mean age of 21.1 years) performed isometric and isokinetic (50 cm per second) push and pull activity at 35 cm, 100 cm and 150 cm heights. The subjects were placed on a specially designed subject-stabilizing-platform to stabilize their lower extremities. Horizontal push-pull forces were exerted through a friction-reduced rod and sleeve assembly attached to the modified Static Dynamic Strength Tester. The strength measured by a SM 500 load cell was fed to an IBM XT through an A to D converter. The postural records were made on a videotape. The posture and strength were synchronized through an external light signal. The strength for pull activities was higher than the corresponding push activities (p < 0.01). The isometric strengths were significantly higher than the isokinetic strengths (p < 0.01). Though the push strengths were significantly lower than the pull strength, the low-back compressive forces for the push activities were 129% to 627% of the corresponding pull conditions. It is concluded that the push activities are more hazardous due to the higher magnitude of compressive load and their faster contribution to the threshold level of cumulative load leading to the precipitation of injuries.

  13. Markerless motion capture can provide reliable 3D gait kinematics in the sagittal and frontal plane.

    PubMed

    Sandau, Martin; Koblauch, Henrik; Moeslund, Thomas B; Aanæs, Henrik; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B

    2014-09-01

    Estimating 3D joint rotations in the lower extremities accurately and reliably remains unresolved in markerless motion capture, despite extensive studies in the past decades. The main problems have been ascribed to the limited accuracy of the 3D reconstructions. Accordingly, the purpose of the present study was to develop a new approach based on highly detailed 3D reconstructions in combination with a translational and rotational unconstrained articulated model. The highly detailed 3D reconstructions were synthesized from an eight camera setup using a stereo vision approach. The subject specific articulated model was generated with three rotational and three translational degrees of freedom for each limb segment and without any constraints to the range of motion. This approach was tested on 3D gait analysis and compared to a marker based method. The experiment included ten healthy subjects in whom hip, knee and ankle joint were analysed. Flexion/extension angles as well as hip abduction/adduction closely resembled those obtained from the marker based system. However, the internal/external rotations, knee abduction/adduction and ankle inversion/eversion were less reliable.

  14. Analysis of muscle activity during active pelvic tilting in sagittal plane

    PubMed Central

    TAKAKI, Sho; KANEOKA, Koji; OKUBO, Yu; OTSUKA, Satoru; TATSUMURA, Masaki; SHIINA, Itsuo; MIYAKAWA, Shumpei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pelvic tilting is performed to improve lumbopelvic flexibility or retrain the motor control of local muscles. However, few studies investigated the activity of local muscles during pelvic tilting. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity during anterior and posterior pelvic tilting. Method: Twelve healthy males (age, 22.6 ± 1.4 years) participated. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the bilateral lumbar multifidus (MF) and transversus abdominis (TrA). Surface electrodes were used to record activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis, external oblique, and erector spinae (ES), and the unilateral right latissimus dorsi, gluteus maximus, semitendinosus, and rectus femoris muscles. The electromyographic activities during anterior and posterior pelvic tilting in a standing position were recorded and expressed as a percentage of the maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC) for each muscle. Results: The activities of the bilateral MF (right: 23.9 ± 15.9 %MVC, left: 23.9 ± 15.1 %MVC) and right ES (19.0 ± 13.3 %MVC) were significantly greater than those of the other muscles during anterior pelvic tilting. The activity of the left TrA (14.8 ± 16.4 %MVC) was significantly greater than that of the other muscles during posterior pelvic tilting. Conclusions: The results suggested that the MF and ES are related to anterior pelvic tilting. The activity of the TrA, which was classified as a local muscle, was greater during posterior pelvic tilting. This study indicated that local muscles such as the MF and TrA may be related to pelvic tilting. PMID:28289581

  15. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in describing and interpreting coronal plasma processes and the relationship between the solar corona and its stellar counterparts is reported. Topics covered include: stellar X-ray emission, HEAO 2 X-ray survey of the Pleiades, closed coronal structures, X-ray survey of main-sequence stars with shallow convection zones, implications of the 1400 MHz flare emission, and magnetic field stochasticity.

  16. Gravitational forces and sagittal shape of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Duval-Beaupere, G.

    2007-01-01

    The sagittal morphology of the pelvis determines the amount of lordosis needed for each individual. The proper harmony of the sagittal spinal curves allows a stable balance, economical in terms of mechanical effects and muscular energy. A previous barycentremetrical laboratory study allowed us to demonstrate that the axis of gravity of the upper body segment was located behind the lumbar vertebrae and the femoral heads, thus ensuring economy and stability. The determination of the anatomical connection of the individual gravity is thus of primary importance for the evaluation of sagittal balance. Data for 42 patients without spinal pathology, previously evaluated by barycentremetry, were used to establish a predictive equation for the application point of the gravity at the level of the third lumbar vertebra (L3). This equation, using anthropometric and radiographic pelvic and spinal parameters, was integrated into a software program called Similibary. It was applied to the same 42 subjects. These results were compared in order to validate the method. No significant difference was observed between the two techniques. This easy-to-use tool allows a personalised evaluation of the sagittal balance of the spine, both through the evaluation of the harmonious relationship between the spinal curves and the pelvis, and through the location of gravity supported by the vertebral structures in L3. PMID:17653545

  17. The Holely Coronal Graveyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T.

    A 100 ks FUSE pointing will probe the O VI and C III emissions of an archetype denizen of the coronal graveyard--Aldebaran (Alpha Tauri; K5 III). HST spectra suggest the possible--surprising--presence of solar-like magnetic activity on the old, spun-down red giant. But, many of the characteristic 1150-1500 A UV emissions apparently are extinguished by a cool absorber overlying the hot (100,000 K) structures. Detection of O VI by FUSE suggests that the cool absorber opacity thins out just above the LyC edge, so O VI 1032 (and C III 977) could be a sensitive probe of the submerged activity through the far-UV opacity hole. The deep pointing will achieve high S/N, to search for discrete absorption structure in the hot lines, impressed on them by the cool absorber; and will allow an assessment of temporal variability due to the heating process, which might be convective-acoustic but probably is magnetic. If the latter, the buried magnetic activity on red giants possibly plays a key role in driving their winds--a long-standing astrophysical mystery, and a crucial component of galactic chemical evolution. The existing FUSE spectrum is too low in S/N to unambiguously measure discrete absorption components, and its singular nature precludes any variability analysis.

  18. Solar coronal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  19. Interceptive orthopedics for the correction of maxillary transverse and sagittal deficiency in the early mixed dentition period

    PubMed Central

    Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Karnati Praveen; Kommi, Pradeep Babu; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2011-01-01

    Dentofacial Orthopedics directed to a hypoplastic maxilla in the prepubertal period redirects growth of the maxilla in the vertical, transverse and sagittal planes of space. The orthopedic correction of maxillary hypoplasia in the early mixed dentition period thus intercepts the establishment of permanent structural asymmetry in the mandible and helps in the achievement of optimal dentofacial esthetics. This paper presents the growth redirection in a hypoplastic maxilla of an 8-year-old girl with simultaneous rapid maxillary expansion and protraction headgear therapy for a period of 11 months which corrected the posterior unilateral cross-bite, the positional asymmetry of the mandible and established an orthognathic profile in the individual. PMID:22346162

  20. Influence of metopic suture fusion associated with sagittal synostosis.

    PubMed

    Domeshek, Leahthan F; Das, Rajesh R; Van Aalst, John A; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-01

    Some patients with sagittal synostosis present with a fused metopic suture. We hypothesize that premature metopic suture fusion consistently and identifiably alters form associated with sagittal synostosis. We previously validated three-dimensional vector analysis as a tool for the study of cranial morphology and used it herein to distinguish between dysmorphologies of isolated sagittal synostosis (ISS) and combined sagittal-metopic synostosis (CSM). Preoperative computed tomographic scans for patients with ISS and CSM were compared with matched normative counterparts. Premature metopic suture fusion was defined by established radiographic criteria. Color-coded point clouds were created for each scan, with color gradient based on patient deviation from normal across the dysmorphic skull. Standard deviation data were evaluated in 7 cranial regions and compared between ISS and CSM. Mean ISS and CSM point clouds were evaluated. Using three-dimensional vector analysis, standard anthropometric data/indices were determined and compared between the 2 groups. Differences in ISS and CSM regional deviations and index measurements were not statistically significant. Mean ISS and CSM representations depicted similar overall morphology. Using accepted criteria for identification of metopic synostosis in CSM, only subtle differences appear between the 2 populations on average. Expected morphologic changes associated with metopic synostosis are present in only a small number of patients with CSM, arguing against our hypothesis, and calling into question the criteria used to identify premature metopic suture fusion. Normal metopic suture fusion occurs for a continuum of time. Our findings suggest that the normal continuum may begin earlier than the literature suggests. In the setting of sagittal synostosis, the influence of metopic suture fusion and treatment is best determined by individual morphologic analysis.

  1. Coronal View Ultrasound Imaging of Movement in Different Segments of the Tongue during Paced Recital: Findings from Four Normal Speakers and a Speaker with Partial Glossectomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim; Flowers, Heather; Wong, Willy; Irish, Jonathan C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to quantitatively describe aspects of coronal tongue movement in different anatomical regions of the tongue. Four normal speakers and a speaker with partial glossectomy read four repetitions of a metronome-paced poem. Their tongue movement was recorded in four coronal planes using two-dimensional B-mode ultrasound…

  2. Coronal Seismology -- Achievements and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, Michael

    Coronal seismology is a new and fast developing branch of the solar physics. The main idea of coronal seismology is the same as of any branches of seismology: to determine basic properties of a medium using properties of waves propagating in this medium. The waves and oscillations in the solar corona are routinely observed in the late space missions. In our brief review we concentrate only on one of the most spectacular type of oscillations observed in the solar corona - the transverse oscillations of coronal magnetic loops. These oscillations were first observed by TRACE on 14 July 1998. At present there are a few dozens of similar observations. Shortly after the first observation of the coronal loop transverse oscillations they were interpreted as kink oscillations of magnetic tubes with the ends frozen in the dense photospheric plasma. The frequency of the kink oscillation is proportional to the magnetic field magnitude and inversely proportional to the tube length times the square root of the plasma density. This fact was used to estimate the magnetic field magnitude in the coronal loops. In 2004 the first simultaneous observation of the fundamental mode and first overtone of the coronal loop transverse oscillation was reported. If we model a coronal loop as a homogeneous magnetic tube, then the ratio of the frequencies of the first overtone and the fundamental mode should be equal to 2. However, the ratio of the observed frequencies was smaller than 2. This is related to the density variation along the loop. If we assume that the corona is isothermal and prescribe the loop shape (usually it is assumed that it has the shape of half-circle), then, using the ratio of the two frequencies, we can determine the temperature of the coronal plasma. The first observation of transverse oscillations of the coronal loops showed that they were strongly damped. This phenomenon was confirmed by the subsequent observations. At present, the most reliable candidate for the

  3. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurman, Joseph (Technical Monitor); DeLuca, Edward

    2005-01-01

    During the final year of this program we concentrated on understanding the how to constrain the models with the best available observations. Work on developing accurate temperature and density diagnostics fkom TRACE and CDS together with constrained fits of non-potential force free fields will be extremely useful in the guiding the next generation of coronal models. The program has produced three fully operation numerical codes that model multi-species of ions in coronal loops: Static models and constant flow models. The time dependent numerical models have not been completed. We have extended the steady flow investigations to study the effect these flows have on coronal structure as observed with TRACE. Coronal observations derive from heavy-ion emission; thus, we focus on the extent to which flow may modify coronal abundances by examining the heavy-ion abundance stratification within long-lived loops. We discuss the magnitudes of the physical effects modeled and compare simulated results with TRACE observations. These results can have a profound effect on the interpretation of TRACE observations.

  4. Key aspects of coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We highlight 10 key aspects of coronal heating that must be understood before we can consider the problem to be solved. (1) All coronal heating is impulsive. (2) The details of coronal heating matter. (3) The corona is filled with elemental magnetic stands. (4) The corona is densely populated with current sheets. (5) The strands must reconnect to prevent an infinite build-up of stress. (6) Nanoflares repeat with different frequencies. (7) What is the characteristic magnitude of energy release? (8) What causes the collective behaviour responsible for loops? (9) What are the onset conditions for energy release? (10) Chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of coronal plasma. Significant progress in solving the coronal heating problem will require coordination of approaches: observational studies, field-aligned hydrodynamic simulations, large-scale and localized three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and possibly also kinetic simulations. There is a unique value to each of these approaches, and the community must strive to coordinate better. PMID:25897094

  5. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Laming, J. M.; Taylor, B. D.; Obenschain, K.

    2016-11-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  6. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1989-01-01

    Progress in observational, theoretical, and radio studies of coronal plasmas is summarized. Specifically work completed in the area of solar and stellar magnetic fields, related photospheric phenomena and the relationships between magnetism, rotation, coronal and chromospheric emission in solar-like stars is described. Also outlined are theoretical studies carried out in the following areas, among others: (1) neutral beams as the dominant energy transport mechanism in two ribbon-flares; (2) magneto hydrodynamic and circuit models for filament eruptions; and (3) studies of radio emission mechanisms in transient events. Finally, radio observations designed for coronal activity studies of the sun and of solar-type coronae are described. A bibliography of publications and talks is provided along with reprints of selected articles.

  7. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Harvey, Karen

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is to study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and ground-based data. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of various features in the solar atmosphere at different heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the, rocket flights, which took place during the declining phase of a solar cycle, 2-4 years before the minimum. The investigation is narrowly focused on comparing the physics of small- and medium-scale strong-field structures with that of large-scale, weak fields. As we close th is investigation, we have to recall that our present position in the understanding of basic solar physics problems (such as coronal heating) is much different from that in 1995 (when we proposed this investigation), due largely to the great success of SOHO and TRACE. In other words, several topics and techniques we proposed can now be better realized with data from these missions. For this reason, at some point of our work, we started concentrating on the 1992 data, which are more unique and have more supporting data. As a result, we discontinued the investigation on small-scale structures, i.e., bright points, since high-resolution TRACE images have addressed more important physics than SPDE EUV images could do. In the final year, we still spent long time calibrating the 1992 data. The work was complicated because of the old-fashioned film, which had problems not encountered with more modern CCD detectors. After our considerable effort on calibration, we were able to focus on several scientific topics, relying heavily on the SPDE UV images. They include the relation between filaments and filament channels, the identification of hot

  8. On-Disk Coronal Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, Patrick; Vissers, Gregal; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc

    2012-10-01

    Small and elongated, cool and dense blob-like structures are being reported with high resolution telescopes in physically different regions throughout the solar atmosphere. Their detection and the understanding of their formation, morphology, and thermodynamical characteristics can provide important information on their hosting environment, especially concerning the magnetic field, whose understanding constitutes a major problem in solar physics. An example of such blobs is coronal rain, a phenomenon of thermal non-equilibrium observed in active region loops, which consists of cool and dense chromospheric blobs falling along loop-like paths from coronal heights. So far, only off-limb coronal rain has been observed, and few reports on the phenomenon exist. In the present work, several data sets of on-disk Hα observations with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish 1- m Solar Telescope (SST) are analyzed. A special family of on-disk blobs is selected for each data set, and a statistical analysis is carried out on their dynamics, morphology, and temperature. All characteristics present distributions which are very similar to reported coronal rain statistics. We discuss possible interpretations considering other similar blob-like structures reported so far and show that a coronal rain interpretation is the most likely one. The chromospheric nature of the blobs and the projection effects (which eliminate all direct possibilities of height estimation) on one side, and their small sizes, fast dynamics, and especially their faint character (offering low contrast with the background intensity) on the other side, are found as the main causes for the absence until now of the detection of this on-disk coronal rain counterpart.

  9. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

    SciTech Connect

    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  10. CORONAL FOURIER POWER SPECTRA: IMPLICATIONS FOR CORONAL SEISMOLOGY AND CORONAL HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, J.; McAteer, R. T. J.; Inglis, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of regions of the solar corona are investigated using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å and 193 Å data. The coronal emission from the quiet Sun, coronal loop footprints, coronal moss, and from above a sunspot is studied. It is shown that the mean Fourier power spectra in these regions can be described by a power law at lower frequencies that tails to a flat spectrum at higher frequencies, plus a Gaussian-shaped contribution that varies depending on the region studied. This Fourier spectral shape is in contrast to the commonly held assumption that coronal time series are well described by the sum of a long timescale background trend plus Gaussian-distributed noise, with some specific locations also showing an oscillatory signal. The implications of the observed spectral shape on the fields of coronal seismology and the automated detection of oscillations in the corona are discussed. The power-law contribution to the shape of the Fourier power spectrum is interpreted as being due to the summation of a distribution of exponentially decaying emission events along the line of sight. This is consistent with the idea that the solar atmosphere is heated everywhere by small energy deposition events.

  11. Force-Induced Craniosynostosis in the Murine Sagittal Suture

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Rhee, Samuel T.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The etiology of non-syndromic craniosynostosis remains elusive. While compressive forces have been implicated in premature suture fusion, conclusive evidence of force-induced craniosynostosis is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclical loading of the murine calvarium could induce suture fusion. METHODS Calvarial coupons from post-natal day 21, B6CBA wild-type mice (n = 18) were harvested and cultured. A custom appliance capable of delivering controlled, cyclical, compressive loads was applied perpendicular to the sagittal suture within the coupon in vitro. Nine coupons were subjected to 0.3g of force for 30 minutes each day for a total of 14 days. A control group of nine coupons was clamped in the appliance without loading. Analysis of suture phenotype was performed using alkaline phosphatase and H&E staining techniques, as well as in situ hybridization analysis using Bone Sialoprotein (BSP). RESULTS Control group sagittal sutures—which normally remain patent in mice—showed their customary histological appearance. In contradistinction, sagittal sutures subjected to cyclic loading showed histological evidence of premature fusion (craniosynostosis). In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and BSP expression was observed to be increased in the experimental group when compared to matched controls. CONCLUSIONS An in vitro model of forced-induced craniosynostosis has been devised. Premature fusion of the murine sagittal suture was induced with the application of controlled, cyclical, compressive loads. These results implicate abnormal forces in the development of non-syndromic craniosynostosis, which supports our global hypothesis that epigenetic phenomena have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. PMID:19952640

  12. Solar wind flow upstream of the coronal slow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1986-01-01

    Slow shocks have been predicted to exist embedded in large coronal holes at low altitude. Two or more curved slow shocks may link together to form a composite discontinuity surface around the sun which may be called the coronal slow shock (CSS). Here a solar-wind model is studied under the assumption that a standing CSS exists and cororates with the sun at a constant angular velocity. A steady, axisymmetrical one-fluid model is introduced to study the expansion of solar wind in the open-field region upstream of the CSS. The model requires that the conditions downstream of the CSS near the equatorial plane can produce a solar wind agreeable with the observations made near the earth's orbit. The paper presents an illustrative calculation in which the polar caps within 60 deg of the polar angle are assumed to be the source region of the solar wind.

  13. Three-dimensional reconstruction of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Bernard V.; Hick, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Computer assisted tomography (CAT) techniques are used to reconstruct the three dimensional shape of coronal mass ejections in the interplanetary medium. Both the Helios 2 spacecraft zodiacal-light photometers and the Solwind coronograph measure changes in Thomson scattering of sunlight from electrons. The technique from near-perpendicular Solwind and Helios views are applied to determine the density of a mass ejection which left the solar surface on 24 May 1979. The coronograph and the Helios perspective views are not simultaneous; the Solwind observations extend outward to sky plane distances of only 10 of the solar radius, whereas the Helios 16 photometer observes to as close as 17 of the solar radius from the sun. The solution is obtained by assuming outward radial expansion and that the coronal mass ejections (CME's) have the same speed everywhere at the same height. The analyses show that CME's are extensive three dimensional structures (the CME of 24 May appears approximately shell) like in three dimensions.

  14. Significance of Coronal Proset Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Hidden Zone of the Mid-Zone Stenosis in the Lumbar Spine and Morphometric Analysis of the Mid-Zone Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo-Sae; Son, Whee Sung; Shin, Ji-Hoon; Ahn, Myun-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective exploratory imaging study. Purpose To investigate the significance of the coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Proset technique to detect the hidden zone in patients with mid-zone stenosis by comparing with conventional axial and sagittal MRI and to explore the morphologic characteristic patterns of the mid-zone stenosis. Overview of Literature Despite advancements in diagnostic modalities such as computed tomography and MRI, stenotic lesions under the pedicle and pars interarticularis, also called the mid-zone, are still difficult to definitely detect with the conventional axial and sagittal MRI due to its inherited anatomical peculiarity. Methods Of 180 patients scheduled to undergo selective nerve root block, 20 patients with mid-zone stenosis were analyzed using MRI. Characteristic group patterns were also explored morphologically by comparing MRI views of each group after verifying statistical differences between them. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to classify morphological characteristic groups based on three-dimensional radiologic grade for stenosis at all three zones. Results At the mid-zone, the stenosis of grade 2 or more was found in 14 cases in the coronal image,13 cases in the sagittal image, and 9 cases in the axial image (p<0.05). Especially, mid-zone stenosis was not detected in six of 20 cases at the axial images. At the entrance and exit-zone, coronal image was also associated with more accurate detection of hidden zone compared to other views such as axial and sagittal images. After repeated statistical verification, the morphological patterns of hidden zone were classified into 5 groups: 6 cases in group I; 1 case in group II; 4 cases in group III; 7 cases in group IV; and 2 cases in group V. Conclusions Coronal MRI using the Proset technique more accurately detected hidden zone of the mid-zone stenosis compared to conventional axial and sagittal images. PMID:27559443

  15. [Optical path difference in off-plane quasi-Littrow dispersion mountings].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin-Xin; Yang, Huai-Dong; Huang, Zhan-Hua; Jin, Guo-Fan

    2013-07-01

    The present paper analyzes the relative relation between the meridian and sagittal rays in off-plane quasi-Littrow (OP-QL) dispersion mountings. It's concluded that the off-plane angle will cause the rotation of the beam and result in the mismatch between the sagittal beams on different optical elements. Therefore the total optical path difference (OPD) should be an accumulation of corresponding beams instead of the sagittal beam of each element itself. Then, a directional derivative based method is put forward to calculate the OPD for spherical mirrors in various directions. Based on the method, the numerical OPD for OP-QL mountings is solved. Finally, this methodology is validated with both echelette and echelle examples.

  16. Coronal Heating by Magnetic Explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, D. A.; Porter, Jason G.; Suess, Steven T.

    1998-01-01

    We build a case for the persistent strong coronal heating in active regions and the pervasive quasi-steady heating of the corona in quiet regions and coronal holes being driven in basically the same way as the intense transient heating in solar flares: by explosions of sheared magnetic fields in the cores of initially closed bipoles. We begin by summarizing the observational case for exploding sheared core fields being the drivers of a wide variety of flare events, with and without coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the arrangement of an event's flare heating, whether there is a coronal mass ejection, and the time and place of the ejection relative to the flare heating are all largely determined by four elements of the form and action the magnetic field: (1) the arrangement of the impacted, interacting bipoles participating in the event, (2) which of these bipoles are active (have sheared core fields that explode) and which are passive (are heated by injection from impacted active bipoles), (3) which core field explodes first, and (4) which core-field explosions are confined within the closed field of their bipoles and which ejectively open their bipoles.

  17. Coronal Dimmings and Energetic CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Cliver, E. W.; Nitta, N.; Delannee, C.; Delaboudiniere, J.-P.

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the coronal dimmings for seven fast (> 600 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occurring between 23 April and 9 May which were associated with flares from NOAA active region (AR) 8210. These dimming regions were identified by their strong depletion in coronal emission within a half hour of the estimated time of CME lift-off. They included areas which were as dark as quiescent coronal holes as well as other regions with weaker brightness depletions. We found that the extended dimming areas in these events generally mapped out the apparent "footprint" of the CME. In two of the seven cases, a pair of dimmings were more or less symmetrically positioned north and south of the flare site. In the five remaining cases, the dimmings were most prominent to the north of AR 8210 (approximately S15 latitude) and extended well north of the solar equator, consistent with the locations of the CMEs. We discuss the implications of these results for the sigmoid/double dimming/flux rope model of CMEs.

  18. Dynamics of Coronal Hole Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, A. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Wyper, P. F.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2017-03-01

    Remote and in situ observations strongly imply that the slow solar wind consists of plasma from the hot, closed-field corona that is released onto open magnetic field lines. The Separatrix Web theory for the slow wind proposes that photospheric motions at the scale of supergranules are responsible for generating dynamics at coronal-hole boundaries, which result in the closed plasma release. We use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to determine the effect of photospheric flows on the open and closed magnetic flux of a model corona with a dipole magnetic field and an isothermal solar wind. A rotational surface motion is used to approximate photospheric supergranular driving and is applied at the boundary between the coronal hole and helmet streamer. The resulting dynamics consist primarily of prolific and efficient interchange reconnection between open and closed flux. The magnetic flux near the coronal-hole boundary experiences multiple interchange events, with some flux interchanging over 50 times in one day. Additionally, we find that the interchange reconnection occurs all along the coronal-hole boundary and even produces a lasting change in magnetic-field connectivity in regions that were not driven by the applied motions. Our results show that these dynamics should be ubiquitous in the Sun and heliosphere. We discuss the implications of our simulations for understanding the observed properties of the slow solar wind, with particular focus on the global-scale consequences of interchange reconnection.

  19. Finite element analysis of head-neck kinematics during motor vehicle accidents: analysis in multiple planes.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ee Chon; Zhang, Qing Hang; Huang, Russel C

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a detailed three-dimensional head-neck (C0-C7) finite element (FE) model developed previously based on the actual geometry of a human cadaver specimen was used. Five simulation analyses were performed to investigate the kinematic responses of the head-neck complex under rear-end, front, side, rear- and front-side impacts. Under rear-end and front impacts, it was predicted that the global and intervertebral rotations of the head-neck in the sagittal plane displayed nearly symmetric curvatures about the frontal plane. The primary sagittal rotational angles of the neck under direct front and rear-end impact conditions were higher than the primary frontal rotational angles under other side impact conditions. The analysis predicted early S-shaped and subsequent C-shaped curvatures of the head-neck complex in the sagittal plane under front and rear-end impact, and in the frontal plane under side impact. The head-neck complex flexed laterally in one direction with peak magnitude of larger than 22 degrees and a duration of about 130 ms before flexing in the opposite direction under both side and rear-side impact, compared to the corresponding values of about 15 degrees and 105 ms under front-side impact. The C0-C7 FE model has reasonably predicted the effects of impact direction in the primary sagittal and frontal segmental motion and curvatures of the head-neck complex under various impact conditions.

  20. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Su, Y. N.; Ji, H. S.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Coronal dimmings are regions of decreased extreme-ultravoilet (EUV) and/or X-ray (originally Skylab, then Yohkoh/SXT) intensities, which are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The large-scale impulsive dimmings have been thoroughly observed and investigated. The pre-flare dimmings before the flare impulsive phase, however, have rarely been studied in detail. Aims: We focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME that was produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. Methods: The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white-light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) on board SOHO. Results: About 96 min before the onset of the flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly, with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8-9 Mm) continued to be nearly constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fan-like twin dimmings appeared and expanded, with a much larger extent and lower intensities than the pre-flare dimmings. The percentage of the 171 Å intensity decrease reaches 40%. The pre-flare dimmings are most striking in 171, 193, and 211 Å with formation temperatures of 0.6-2.5 MK. The northern part of the pre-flare dimmings could also be recognized in 131 and 335 Å. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first detailed study of pre-flare coronal dimmings; they can be explained by density depletion as a result of the gradual

  1. Lumbosacral Sagittal Alignment in Association to Intervertebral Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farid; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Mahdavi, Ali; Saberi, Hooshang

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A cross-sectional case-control study was designed to compare the sagittal alignment of lumbosacral regions in two groups of patients suffering from low back pain, one with intervertebral disc pathologies and one without. Purpose To evaluate the correlation between lumbosacral sagittal alignment and disc degeneration. Overview of Literature Changes in lumbar lordosis and pelvic parameters in degenerative disc lesions have been assessed in few studies. Overall, patients with discopathy were shown to have lower lumbar lordosis and more vertical sacral profiles. Methods From patients with intractable low back pain undergoing lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging, 50 subjects with disc degeneration and 50 controls with normal scans were consecutively enrolled. A method was defined with anterior tangent-lines going through anterior bodies of L1 and S1 to measure global lumbosacral angle, incorporating both lumbar lordosis and sacral slope. Global lumbosacral angle using the proposed method and lumbar lordosis using Cobb's method were measured in both groups. Results Lumbar lordosis based on Cobb's method was lower in group with discopathy (20°-67°; mean, 40.48°±9.89°) than control group (30°-62°; mean, 44.96°±7.68°), although it was not statistically significant. The proposed global lumbosacral angle in subject group (53°-103°; mean, 76.5°±11.018°) was less than control group (52°-101°; mean, 80.18°±9.95°), with the difference being statistically significant (p=0.002). Conclusions Patients with intervertebral disc lesions seem to have more straightened lumbosacral profiles, but it has not been proven which comes first: disc degeneration or changes in sagittal alignment. Finding an answer to this dilemma demands more comprehensive long-term prospective studies. PMID:25558325

  2. [Sagittal balance of the spine: a therapeutic revolution].

    PubMed

    Faundez, A; Roussouly, P; Le Huec, J C

    2011-12-21

    In humans, the erect position and bipedal walk is possible because of a balance between pelvic and spinal parameters. The most important pelvic parameter is the pelvic incidence which represents the base on which the spine lies. With aging, thoracic kyphosis increases, lumbar lordosis decreases, compromising the spino-pelvic balance. Compensatory phenomenons are possible, but rely mostly on the amplitude of pelvic incidence. Analysis of spino-pelvic parameters and detection of a compensated or uncompensated sagittal imbalance are mandatory before any therapeutic action is undertaken for a degenerative pathology of the spine.

  3. Rondeau Seminars amalgamated mid-sagittal (lateral) cephalometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Palencar, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    The author presents a comprehensive International Association for Orthodontics--Rondeau Seminars Amalgamated Mid-sagittal (Lateral) Cephalometric Analysis. Norms on the Cephalometric Data Sheet are age and gender specific for the Caucasian population and the postings are color coded for visual attraction. If the patient is ofa different ethnic group, the Norms should be adjusted accordingly. This Cephalometric Analysis is comprised often Sections, in alphabetical order and twenty nine Factors. The author expanded Rondeau Seminars Cephalometric Analysis by only six Factors, thus fulfilling the requirement for the case presentation for the Fellow of the IAO and the Diplomate ofthe IBO.

  4. Sagittal Spinal Morphology in Highly Trained Adolescent Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Muyor, José M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, Estefanía; Sanz-Rivas, David; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    Sports with a predominance of forward-bending and extension postures have been associated with alterations in the sagittal spinal curvatures and greater risk of spinal injury. Because, the tennis players adopt these postures, the aims of this study were: 1) to describe spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in male and female highly trained adolescent tennis players during relaxed standing posture and with thoracic spine corrected (in prone lying on the floor); and 2) to determine the frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis and lumbar hypo/hyper lordosis in these postures. Forty adolescent tennis players (24 male and 16 female) aged 13-18 years, participated voluntarily in this study. The Spinal Mouse system was used to measure sagittal spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt. The mean values in the relaxed standing posture were 43.83° ± 7.87° (thoracic kyphosis), - 27.58° ± 7.01° (lumbar lordosis), and 13.38° ± 5.57° (pelvic tilt) for male tennis players, respectively; and 36.13° ± 6.69° (thoracic kyphosis), - 32.69° ± 5.06° (lumbar lordosis), 20.94° ± 5.36° (pelvic tilt) for female tennis players (p < 0.05 between genders in all spinal parameters). The male and female tennis players showed a frequency of 62.5% and 93.8% (p = 0.032) for neutral thoracic kyphosis, and 83.3% and 93.8% (p = 0.062) in neutral lumbar lordosis, respectively. In conclusion, due to the high percentage of neutral spinal curvatures in both male and female tennis players, to practice tennis in these levels does not alter sagittal spinal morphology in the relaxed standing posture in adolescent highly trained tennis players. Key Points This study evaluated thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt during several postures in young highly trained tennis players. Female tennis players showed statistically significant greater anterior pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis and lower thoracic kyphosis than male tennis players. The high percentage of neutral thoracic kyphosis and lumbar

  5. Automatic recognition of corpus callosum from sagittal brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chulhee; Unser, Michael A.; Ketter, Terence A.

    1995-08-01

    We propose a new method to find the corpus callosum from sagittal brain MR images automatically. First, we calculate the statistical characteristics of the corpus callosum and obtain shape information. The recognition algorithm consists of two stages: extracting regions satisfying the statistical characteristics (gray level distribtuions) of the corpus callosum, and finding a region matching the shape information. An innovative feature of the algorithm is that we adaptively relax the statistical requirement until we find a region matching the shape information. In order to match the shape information, we propose a new directed window region growing algorithm instead of using conventional contour matching. Experiments show promising results.

  6. Sagittal spine movements of small therian mammals during asymmetrical gaits.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Nadja; Hackert, Rémi

    2006-10-01

    Mammalian locomotion is characterized by the use of asymmetrical gaits associated with extensive flexions and extensions of the body axis. Although the impact of sagittal spine movements on locomotion is well known, little information is available on the kinematics of spinal motion. Intervertebral joint movements were studied in two metatherian and three eutherian species during the gallop and halfbound using high-speed cineradiography. Fast-Fourier transformation was used to filter out high frequency digitizing errors and keep the lower frequency sinusoid oscillations that characterize the intervertebral angular movements. Independent of their regional classification as thoracic or lumbar vertebrae, 7+/-1 presacral intervertebral joints were involved in sagittal bending movements. In only one species, no more than five intervertebral joints contributed to the resulting 'pelvic movement'. In general, the trunk region involved in sagittal bending during locomotion did not correspond to the traditional subdivisions of the vertebral column (e.g. as thoracic and lumbar or pre- and postdiaphragmatic region). Therefore, these classifications do not predict the regions involved in spinal oscillations during locomotion. Independent of the gait, maximum flexion of the spine was observed in the interval between the last third of the swing phase and touch-down. This results in a retraction of the pelvis and hindlimbs before touch-down and, we hypothesize, enhances the stability of the system. Maximum extension occurred during the first third of the swing phase (i.e. after lift-off) in all species. In general, the observed timing of dorsoventral oscillations of the spine are in accordance with that observed in other mammals and with activity data of respiratory and epaxial back muscles. Although no strict craniocaudal pattern was observable, the more cranial intervertebral joints tend to flex and extend earlier than the more caudal ones. This is in accordance with the

  7. Radio Studies of Coronal Holes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Maps Solar Wind Streams Radio Spectra Interplanetary Scintillation 20. A9 RACY (Continue an reveree side If necesary end Identify by block number...summarizes our efforts to identify individual high latitudecoronal holes with high speed solar wind streams far above or below the ecliptic,/The coronal...holes were identified from the Kitt Peak 10830 1 synoptic maps, while the high speed solar wind streams were identified from the interplanetary

  8. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  9. Polarization of Coronal Forbidden Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio; Qu, Zhongquan

    2017-03-01

    Since the magnetic field is responsible for most manifestations of solar activity, one of the most challenging problems in solar physics is the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields, particularly in the outer atmosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools to interpret polarimetric observations in suitable spectral lines. This paper is devoted to analyzing the diagnostic content of linear polarization imaging observations in coronal forbidden lines. Although this technique is restricted to off-limb observations, it represents a significant tool to diagnose the magnetic field structure in the solar corona, where the magnetic field is intrinsically weak and still poorly known. We adopt the quantum theory of polarized line formation developed in the framework of the density matrix formalism, and synthesize images of the emergent linear polarization signal in coronal forbidden lines using potential-field source-surface magnetic field models. The influence of electronic collisions, active regions, and Thomson scattering on the linear polarization of coronal forbidden lines is also examined. It is found that active regions and Thomson scattering are capable of conspicuously influencing the orientation of the linear polarization. These effects have to be carefully taken into account to increase the accuracy of the field diagnostics. We also found that linear polarization observation in suitable lines can give valuable information on the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the solar corona.

  10. THE CORONAL LOOP INVENTORY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S. S.; Paul, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Most coronal physicists now seem to agree that loops are composed of tangled magnetic strands and have both isothermal and multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. As yet, however, there is no information on the relative importance of each of these categories, and we do not know how common one is with respect to the other. In this paper, we investigate these temperature properties for all loop segments visible in the 171-Å image of AR 11294, which was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on 2011 September 15. Our analysis revealed 19 loop segments, but only 2 of these were clearly isothermal. Six additional segments were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within measurement uncertainties. One loop had both isothermal transition region and multithermal coronal solutions. Another five loop segments require multithermal plasma to reproduce the AIA observations. The five remaining loop segments could not be separated reliably from the background in the crucial non-171-Å AIA images required for temperature analysis. We hope that the direction of coronal heating models and the efforts modelers spend on various heating scenarios will be influenced by these results.

  11. Skeletal Stability after Large Mandibular Advancement (> 10 mm) with Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy and Skeletal Elastic Intermaxillary Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo-Domingo, Maria; Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of the present study was to assess the skeletal stability after large mandibular advancement (> 10 mm) with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation and to correlate the skeletal stability with the vertical facial type. Material and Methods A total of 33 consecutive patients underwent bimaxillary surgery to correct skeletal Class II malocclusion with a mandibular advancement (> 10 mm) measured at B-point and postoperative skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation for 16 weeks. Skeletal stability was evaluated using lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained preoperative (T1), 8 weeks postoperatively (T2), and 18 month postoperatively (T3). B-point and pogonion (Pog) was used to measure the skeletal relapse and the mandibular plane angle (MP-angle) was used to determine the vertical facial type. Results The mean advancement from T1 to T2 were 11.6 mm and 13.5 mm at B-point and Pog, respectively. The mean skeletal relapse from T2 to T3 was -1.3 mm at B-point and -1.6 mm at Pog. The nineteen patients characterized as long facial types, showed the highest amount of skeletal relapse (-1.5 mm at B-point and -1.9 mm at Pog). Conclusions The present study showed a limited amount of skeletal relapse in large mandibular advancement (> 10 mm) with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and skeletal elastic intermaxillary fixation. Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy in combination with skeletal intermaxillary fixation can therefore be an alternative to distraction osteogenesis in large mandibular advancements. PMID:27489609

  12. On the nature of transverse coronal waves revealed by wavefront dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ariste, A.; Luna, M.; Arregui, I.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Coronal waves are an important aspect of the dynamics of the plasma in the corona. Wavefront dislocations are topological features of most waves in nature and also of magnetohydrodynamic waves. Are there dislocations in coronal waves? Aims: The finding and explanation of dislocations may shed light on the nature and characteristics of the propagating waves, their interaction in the corona, and in general on the plasma dynamics. Methods: We positively identify dislocations in coronal waves observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) as singularities in the Doppler shifts of emission coronal lines. We study the possible singularities that can be expected in coronal waves and try to reproduce the observed dislocations in terms of localization and frequency of appearance. Results: The observed dislocations can only be explained by the interference of a kink and sausage wave modes propagating with different frequencies along the coronal magnetic field. In the plane transverse to the propagation, the cross-section of the oscillating plasma must be smaller than the spatial resolution, and the two waves result in net longitudinal and transverse velocity components that are mixed through projection onto the line of sight. Alfvén waves can be responsible for the kink mode, but a magnetoacoustic sausage mode is necessary in all cases. Higher (flute) modes are excluded. The kink mode has a pressure amplitude that is less than the pressure amplitude of the sausage mode, though its observed velocity is higher. This concentrates dislocations on the top of the loop. Conclusions: To explain dislocations, any model of coronal waves must include the simultaneous propagation and interference of kink and sausage wave modes of comparable but different frequencies with a sausage wave amplitude much smaller than the kink one. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Retrograde lag screw placement in anterior acetabular column with regard to the anterior pelvic plane and midsagittal plane -- virtual mapping of 260 three-dimensional hemipelvises for quantitative anatomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Bjoern Gunnar; Stuby, Fabian Maria; Ateschrang, Atesch; Stoeckle, Ulrich; Gonser, Christoph Emanuel

    2014-10-01

    Percutaneous screw placement can be used for minimally invasive treatment of none or minimally displaced fractures of the anterior column. The complex pelvic geometry can pose a major challenge even for experienced surgeons. The present study examined the preformed bone stock of the anterior column in 260 hemipelvises (130 male and 130 female). Screws were virtually implanted using iPlan(®) CMF (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany); the maximal implant length and the maximal implant diameter were assessed. The study showed, that 6.5mm can generally be used in men; in women however individual planning is essential in regard to the maximal implant diameter since we found that in 15.4% of women, screws with a diameter less than 6.5mm were necessary. The virtual analysis of the preformed bone stock corridor of the anterior column showed two constrictions of crucial clinical importance. These can be found after 18% and 55% (men) respectively 16% and 55% (women) measured from the entry point along the axis of the implant. The entry point of the retrograde anterior column screw in our collective was located lateral of tuberculum pubicum at the level of the superior-medial margin of foramen obturatum. In female patients, the entry point was located significantly more lateral of symphysis and closer to the cranial margin of ramus superior ossis pubis. The mean angle between the screw trajectory and the anterior pelvic plane in sagittal section was 31.6 ± 5.5°, the mean angle between the screw trajectory and the midsagittal plane in axial section was 55.9 ± 4.6° and the mean angle between the screw trajectory and the midsagittal plane in coronal section was 42.1 ± 3.9° with no significant deviation between both sexes. The individual angles formed by the screw trajectory and the anterior pelvic and midsagittal plane are independent from anthropometric parameters sex, age, body length and weight. Therefore, they can be used for orientation in lag screw placement keeping

  14. Distribution of sagittal occlusal relationships in different stages of dentition.

    PubMed

    Emine, Kaygisiz; Lale, Taner; Kahraman, Gungor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of sagittal occlusal relationships in different dentition periods in a Turkish sample group. In total, 1,110 patients (561 females, 549 males) aged 4.6-23 years were randomly chosen after intraoral clinical examination. The subjects were classified according to their sagittal occlusal relationships and four dentition stages -deciduous, early mixed, late mixed, and permanent dentition. The statistical significance of the occurrence of malocclusion types in dentition stages was evaluated by Chi-square and Fischer's exact tests. Class I malocclusion was observed at the highest rate in all dentition stages. Class III malocclusion was observed at the highest rate in the permanent dentition, whereas Class II malocclusion was observed at the highest rate in the late mixed dentition. The rates of Class I, II, and III malocclusions were similar in males and females. Our study reveals that the prevalence of malocclusion and need for orthodontic treatment has increased in the population towards the permanent dentition.

  15. Mid-callosal plane determination using preferred directions from diffusion tensor images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, André L.; Rittner, Letícia; Lotufo, Roberto A.; Appenzeller, Simone

    2015-03-01

    The corpus callosum is the major brain structure responsible for inter{hemispheric communication between neurons. Many studies seek to relate corpus callosum attributes to patient characteristics, cerebral diseases and psychological disorders. Most of those studies rely on 2D analysis of the corpus callosum in the mid-sagittal plane. However, it is common to find conflicting results among studies, once many ignore methodological issues and define the mid-sagittal plane based on precary or invalid criteria with respect to the corpus callosum. In this work we propose a novel method to determine the mid-callosal plane using the corpus callosum internal preferred diffusion directions obtained from diffusion tensor images. This plane is analogous to the mid-sagittal plane, but intended to serve exclusively as the corpus callosum reference. Our method elucidates the great potential the directional information of the corpus callosum fibers have to indicate its own referential. Results from experiments with five image pairs from distinct subjects, obtained under the same conditions, demonstrate the method effectiveness to find the corpus callosum symmetric axis relative to the axial plane.

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of Mandibular Residual Asymmetry after Bilateral Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy Correction of Menton Point Deviation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiuping; Huang, Xiaoqiong; Xu, Yue; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Facial asymmetry often persists even after mandibular deviation corrected by the bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO) operation, since the reference facial sagittal plane for the asymmetry analysis is usually set up before the mandibular menton (Me) point correction. Our aim is to develop a predictive and quantitative method to assess the true asymmetry of the mandible after a midline correction performed by a virtual BSSRO, and to verify its availability by evaluation of the post-surgical improvement. Patients and Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted at the Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University (China) of patients with pure hemi-mandibular elongation (HE) from September 2010 through May 2014. Mandibular models were reconstructed from CBCT images of patients with pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. After mandibular de-rotation and midline alignment with virtual BSSRO, the elongation hemi-mandible was virtually mirrored along the facial sagittal plane. The residual asymmetry, defined as the superimposition and boolean operation of the mirrored elongation side on the normal side, was calculated, including the volumetric differences and the length of transversal and vertical asymmetry discrepancy. For more specific evaluation, both sides of the hemi-mandible were divided into the symphysis and parasymphysis (SP), mandibular body (MB), and mandibular angle (MA) regions. Other clinical variables include deviation of Me point, dental midline and molar relationship. The measurement of volumetric discrepancy between the two sides of post-surgical hemi-mandible were also calculated to verify the availability of virtual surgery. Paired t-tests were computed and the P value was set at .05. Results This study included 45 patients. The volume differences were 407.8±64.8 mm3, 2139.1±72.5 mm3, and 422.5±36.9 mm3; residual average transversal discrepancy, 1.9 mm, 1.0 mm, and 2.2 mm; average vertical discrepancy, 1.1 mm, 2.2 mm, and 2

  17. Super-resolution reconstruction in frequency, image, and wavelet domains to reduce through-plane partial voluming in MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Gholipour, Ali Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K.; Aganj, Iman; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the use of super-resolution reconstruction (SRR), in frequency, image, and wavelet domains, to reduce through-plane partial voluming effects in magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: The reconstruction of an isotropic high-resolution image from multiple thick-slice scans has been investigated through techniques in frequency, image, and wavelet domains. Experiments were carried out with thick-slice T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence on the Academic College of Radiology MRI phantom, where the reconstructed images were compared to a reference high-resolution scan using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity image metric (SSIM), mutual information (MI), and the mean absolute error (MAE) of image intensity profiles. The application of super-resolution reconstruction was then examined in retrospective processing of clinical neuroimages of ten pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to reduce through-plane partial voluming for improved 3D delineation and visualization of thin radial bands of white matter abnormalities. Results: Quantitative evaluation results show improvements in all evaluation metrics through super-resolution reconstruction in the frequency, image, and wavelet domains, with the highest values obtained from SRR in the image domain. The metric values for image-domain SRR versus the original axial, coronal, and sagittal images were PSNR = 32.26 vs 32.22, 32.16, 30.65; SSIM = 0.931 vs 0.922, 0.924, 0.918; MI = 0.871 vs 0.842, 0.844, 0.831; and MAE = 5.38 vs 7.34, 7.06, 6.19. All similarity metrics showed high correlations with expert ranking of image resolution with MI showing the highest correlation at 0.943. Qualitative assessment of the neuroimages of ten TSC patients through in-plane and out-of-plane visualization of structures showed the extent of partial voluming effect in a real clinical scenario and its reduction using SRR. Blinded expert evaluation of image resolution in

  18. Some Considerations about Inferring Coronal Magnetic Fields and Other Coronal Properties from Coronal Emission Line Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, J.; Habbal, S. R.; Arndt, M.; Woo, R.

    2003-12-01

    Ground based studies of Coronal Emission Lines (CEL) linear polarization had been carried out for the 530.3 nm FeXIV line at Pic du Midi and for the 1074.7 nm Fe XIII line at Sac Peak in the 1977-1980 period. The large scale organization of the polarization has clearly revealed the existence of a large scale structure of the coronal magnetic field. More recently, the first successful eclipse CEL polarimetric measurements were made in the 1074.7 nm line during the total solar eclipse of 21 June 2001, confirming earlier results of the predominance of a radial direction of the coronal magnetic field. A first measurement of the circular polarization in the 1074.7 nm line has also recently been performed. Circular polarization gives access to the strength of the LOS magnetic field while the linear polarization maps the transverse magnetic field direction. We will use ground based and eclipse 1074.7 nm line polarimetric data to provide examples of the properties (e.g., magnetic field, abundances, inhomogeneities) such observations can help to infer in this 3-D and optically thin medium.

  19. A SOLAR CORONAL JET EVENT TRIGGERS A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S.

    2015-11-10

    In this paper, we present multi-point, multi-wavelength observations and analysis of a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it to propagate at a high speed of over 1000 km s{sup −1}. The jet erupted before the CME and shared the same source region. The temporal and spacial relationship between these two events lead us to the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario hold the promise of enriching our understanding of the triggering mechanism of CMEs and their relations to coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/HMI instrument along with the off-limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA in the 171 Å passband provide the first detailed observation of the three-dimensional reconnection process of a large-scale jet as simulated in Pariat et al. The eruption process of the jet highlights the importance of filament-like material during the eruption of not only small-scale X-ray jets, but likely also of large-scale EUV jets. Based on our observations and analysis, we propose the most probable mechanism for the whole event, with a blob structure overlaying the three-dimensional structure of the jet, to describe the interaction between the jet and the CME.

  20. EUV Coronal Dimming and its Relationship to Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James

    2016-05-01

    As a coronal mass ejection (CME) departs from the inner solar atmosphere, it leaves behind a void. This region of depleted plasma results in a corresponding decrease in coronal emissions that can be observed by instruments tuned to measure the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. These coronal dimmings can be observed with EUV imagers and EUV spectral irradiance instruments. Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) provide complementary observations; together they can be used to obtain high spatial and spectral resolution. AIA provides information about the location, extent, and spatial evolution of the dimming while EVE data are important to understand plasma temperature evolution. Concurrent processes with similar timescales to mass-loss dimming also impact the observations, which makes a deconvolution method necessary for the irradiance time series in order to have a “clean” mass-loss dimming light curve that can be parameterized and compared with CME kinematics. This presentation will first provide background on these various physical processes and the deconvolution method developed. Two case studies will then be presented, followed by a semi-statistical study (~30 events) to establish a correlation between dimming and CME parameters. In particular, the slope of the deconvolved irradiance dimming light curve is representative of the CME speed, and the irradiance dimming depth can serve as a proxy for CME mass. Finally, plans and early results from a more complete statistical study of all dimmings in the SDO era, based on an automated detection routine using EVE data, will be described and compared with independently derived dimmings automatically detected with AIA data.

  1. The relationship between coronal streamers and CMEs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsheng; Tong, Yi; Yang, Jing; Eselevich, V. G.

    1999-06-01

    The variation of the polarization brightness of coronal streamer in Carrington Rotations 1591 - 1592 is investigated. The distribution of the polarization brightness along streamer belts is inhomogeneous; the degree of the inhomogeneity is 10% - 50%. In the absence of coronal mass ejection (CME) influence, the distribution of coronal streamers along the streamer belts can persist stable during nearly two Carrington Rotations. The rise velocity of the top of the cusp region in a coronal streamer may be more than 2 km/s, if the longitude angular size is more than 27° associated with a CME occurrence.

  2. Understanding Coronal Dimming and its Relation to Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, J. P.; Woods, T. N.; Caspi, A.; Hock, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    When extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emitting material in the corona is lost during a coronal mass ejection (CME), the solar spectral irradiance is impacted and these effects are observed in data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). This process is one of the physical mechanisms that can lead to the observation of 'coronal dimming,' a phenomenon lasting eight hours on average and rarely persisting longer than one day. Other mechanisms that can cause observed dimming include obscuration of bright material (e.g., flare arcade) by dark material (e.g., filament), temperature evolution (e.g., cool plasma being heated causing transient decreases in characteristic emission lines), and propagation of global waves. Each of these processes has a unique spectral signature, which will be explained and exemplified. In particular, the 7 August 2010 M1.0 flare with associated ~870 km/s CME will be analyzed in detail using both AIA and EVE to demonstrate new techniques for isolating dimming due to the CME ('core dimming'). Further analysis will estimate CME mass and velocity using only parameterization of core dimming and compare these estimates to traditionally calculated CME kinetics.

  3. Using Strong Solar Coronal Emission Lines as Coronal Flux Proxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Jordan, Studart D.; Davila, Joseph M.; Thomas, Roger J.; Andretta, Vincenzo; Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Hara, Hirosha

    1997-01-01

    A comparison of Skylab results with observations of the strong EUV lines of Fe XVI at 335 A and 361 A from the Goddard Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) flight of 1989 suggests that these lines, and perhaps others observed with SERTS, might offer good proxies for estimating the total coronal flux over important wavelength ranges. In this paper, we compare SERTS observations from a later, 1993 flight with simultaneous cospatial Yohkoh soft X-ray observations to test this suggestion over the energy range of the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh. Both polynomial and power-law fits are obtained, and errors are estimated, for the SERTS lines of Fe XVI 335 A and 361 A, Fe XV 284 A and 417 A, and Mg IX 368 A. It is found that the power-law fits best cover the full range of solar conditions from quiet Sun through active region, though not surprisingly the 'cooler' Mg IX 368 A line proves to be a poor proxy. The quadratic polynomial fits yield fair agreement over a large range for all but the Mg IX line, but the linear fits fail conspicuously when extrapolated into the quiet Sun regime. The implications of this work for the He 11 304 A line formation problem are briefly considered. The paper concludes with a discussion of the value of these iron lines observed with SERTS for estimating stellar coronal fluxes, as observed for example with the EUVE satellite.

  4. On Recurrent/Homologous Coronal Jets Emission: Coronal Geyser Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razvan Paraschiv, Alin; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    Active region 11302 has shown a vast display of solar jets during its lifetime. We examine the emission mechanism responsible for multiple coronal jet events occurring at the center-east side of the active region. Identified jet events were detected in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV), hard X-ray (HXR) and radio emissions, observed by dedicated instruments such as SDO's AIA and HMI, STEREO's EUVI and WAVES, and RHESSI, respectively. We report the detection of a base-arch structure in the lower atmosphere. The site was labelled "Coronal Geyser". The structure had emitted jets quasi-periodically for the entire time the AR was visible in SDO'S field of view. The jets expand into the corona with an apparent line of sight velocity of ~200-300$ km/s. To our knowledge the long time-scale behaviour of jet recurrence and base geyser structure was not previously discussed and data analysis of this phenomena will provide new information for theoretical modelling and data interpretation of jets.

  5. Removal of Deeply Impacted Mandibular Molars by Sagittal Split Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Isler, Sabri Cemil

    2016-01-01

    Mandibular third molars are the most common impacted teeth. Mandibular first and second molars do not share the same frequency of occurrence. In rare cases the occlusal surfaces of impacted molars are united by the same follicular space and the roots pointing in opposite direction; these are called kissing molars. In some cases, a supernumerary fourth molar can be seen as unerupted and, in this case, such a supernumerary, deeply impacted fourth molar is seen neighboring kissing molars. The extraction of deeply impacted wisdom molars from the mandible may necessitate excessive bone removal and it causes complications such as damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and iatrogenic fractures of the mandible. This case report describes the use of the sagittal split osteotomy technique to avoid extensive bone removal and protect the inferior alveolar nerve during surgical extruction of multiple impacted teeth. PMID:27429810

  6. Sagittal spinopelvic parameters in 2-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Hui; Liu, Huan; Ma, Lei; Liu, Feng-Yu; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of our study is to evaluate sagittal parameters in 2-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) (TLDS). A total of 15 patients with TLDS, 40 patients with single-level DS (SLDS), and 30 normal volunteers as control were included in our study. All subjects performed on full spine X-ray. Two categorized data were analyzed: patient characteristics—age, sex, body mass index, radiographic parameters-pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral slope (SS), PI–LL, Cobb between the fifth thoracic vertebral and 12th thoracic vertebral (T5–T12), sagittal vertical axis (SVA) Cobb angle of spondylolisthesis level (CSL), ratio of PT to SS (PT/SS), CSL/LL, variation trend of SS over PI, and LL over PI. The PI (73.1° vs 52.9°), SS (50.8° vs 32.2°), LL (53.1° vs 46.9°), SVA (66.1 vs 22.0 mm), PI–LL (20.0° vs 6.0°), and CSL (23.6° vs 20.0°) in TLDS were significantly larger than these in SLDS. The PI (73.1° vs 40.6°), PT (22.3° vs 17.1°), SS (50.8° vs 23.5°), LL (53.1° vs 32.5°), PI–LL (20.0° vs 8.1°), and SVA (66.1 vs 17.0 mm) in TLDS were significantly larger than those in the normal group (NG). The PI (52.9° vs 40.6°), PT (21.0° vs 17.1°), SS (32.2° vs 23.5°), LL (46.9° vs 32.5°), and SVA (22.0 vs 17.0 mm) in SLDS were significantly higher than those in NG. However, PT/SS (44.0%), LL over PI (y = 0.39x + 24.25), SS over PI (y = 10.79 + 0.55x) were lower in TLDS than these in SLDS (63.8%, y = 0.41x + 25, y = 0.65x − 2.09, respectively), and the similar tend between SLDS and NG (74.0%, y = 0.49x + 13.09, y = 0.67x − 3.9, respectively). Our results showed that 2-level lumbar DS, which was caused by multiple-factors, has a severe sagittal imbalance, but single-level has not any. When we plan for surgical selection for 2-level lumbar DS, global sagittal balance must be considered. PMID:27977581

  7. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2005-01-01

    We have extended our study of the structure of coronas in cool stars to very young stars still accreting from their surrounding disks. In addition we are pursing the connection between coronal X-rays and a powerful diagnostic line in the infrared, the He I 10830Angstrom transition of helium. Highlights of these are summarized below including publications during this reporting period and presentations. Spectroscopy of the infrared He I (lambda10830) line with KECK/NIRSPEC and IRTF/CSHELL and of the ultraviolet C III (lambda977) and O VI (lambda1032) emission with FUSE reveals that the classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae exhibits P Cygni profiles, line asymmetries, and absorption indicative of a continuous, fast (approximately 400 kilometers per second), hot (approximately 300,000 K) accelerating outflow with a mass loss rate approximately 10(exp -11)-10(exp -12) solar mass yr(sup -1) or larger. Spectra of T Tauri N appear consistent with such a wind. The source of the emission and outflow seems restricted to the stars themselves. Although the mass accretion rate is an order of magnitude less for TW Hya than for T Tau, the outflow reaches higher velocities at chromospheric temperatures in TW Hya. Winds from young stellar objects may be substantially hotter and faster than previously thought. The ultraviolet emission lines, when corrected for absorption are broad. Emission associated with the accretion flow and shock is likely to show turbulent broadening. We note that the UV line widths are significantly larger than the X-ray line widths. If the X-rays from TW Hya are generated at the accretion shock, the UV lines may not be directly associated with the shock. On the other hand, studies of X-ray emission in young star clusters, suggest that the strength of the X-ray emission is correlated with stellar rotation, thus casting doubt on an accretion origin for the X-rays. We are beginning to access the infrared spectral region where the He I 108308Angstroms transition

  8. Photospheric and coronal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N.R., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on small-scale and large-scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields during 1987-1990 is reviewed, focusing on observational studies. Particular attention is given to the new techniques, which include the correlation tracking of granules, the use of highly Zeeman-sensitive infrared spectral lines and multiple lines to deduce small-scale field strength, the application of long integration times coupled with good seeing conditions to study weak fields, and the use of high-resolution CCD detectors together with computer image-processing techniques to obtain images with unsurpassed spatial resolution. Synoptic observations of large-scale fields during the sunspot cycle are also discussed. 101 refs.

  9. Extensor Tendon Instability Due to Sagittal Band Injury in a Martial Arts Athlete: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Andrew; Rayan, Ghazi

    2017-03-01

    A Taekwondo participant sustained a hand injury from punching an opponent that resulted in painful instability of the ring finger extensor digitorum communis tendon due to sagittal band damage. His symptoms resolved after reconstructive surgery on the sagittal band (SB) with stabilization of the extensor tendon over the metacarpophalangeal joint.

  10. Deep coronal hole associated with quiescent filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesumaningrum, Rasdewita; Herdiwidjaya, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the morphology of quiescent filament observed by H-alpha Solar Telescope at Bosscha Observatory in association with coronal hole observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in 193 Å from Solar Dynamics Observatory. H-alpha images were processed by imaging softwares, namely Iris 5.59 and ImageJ, to enhance the signal to noise ratio and to identify the filament features associated with coronal hole. For images observed on October 12, 2011, November 14, 2011 and January 2, 2012, we identified distinct features of coronal holes above the quiescent filaments. This associated coronal holes have filament-like morphology with a thick long thread as it's `spine', defined as Deep Coronal Hole. Because of strong magnetic field of sunspot, these filaments and coronal holes emerged far from active region and lasted for several days. It is interesting as for segmented filament, deep coronal holes above the filaments lasted for a quite long period of time and merged. This association between filament and deep coronal hole can be explained by filament magnetic loop.

  11. Small-scale coronal structure, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, David F.

    1986-01-01

    Recent observations and models pertaining specifically to solar coronal bright points (BPs) and generally to small-scale coronal structure are reviewed. Two questions were addressed: What is the degree of correspondence among various alleged signatures of BPs at different levels of atmosphere and what can PBs tell about the emerging flux spectrum of the sun?

  12. Reliability and Validity Measurement of Sagittal Lumbosacral Quiet Standing Posture with a Smartphone Application in a Mixed Population of 183 College Students and Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Nikoloudaki, Maria; Thacheth, Sara; Zagli, Kalliroi; Bitrou, Konstantina; Nigritinos, Andreas; Botton, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Accurate recording of spinal posture with simple and accessible measurement devices in clinical practice may lead to spinal loading optimization in occupations related to prolonged sitting and standing postures. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish the level of reliability of sagittal lumbosacral posture in quiet standing and the validity of the method in differentiating between male and female subjects, establishing in parallel a normative database. 183 participants (83 males and 100 females), with no current low back or pelvic pain, were assessed using the “iHandy Level” smartphone application. Intrarater reliability (3 same-day sequential measurements) was high for both the lumbar curve (ICC2,1: 0.96, SEM: 2.13°, and MDC95%: 5.9°) and the sacral slope (ICC2,1: 0.97, SEM: 1.61°, and MDC95%: 4.46°) sagittal alignment. Data analysis for each gender separately confirmed equally high reliability for both male and female participants. Correlation between lumbar curve and sacral slope was high (Pearson's r = 0.86, p < 0.001). Between-gender comparisons confirmed the validity of the method to differentiate between male and female lumbar curve and sacral slope angles, with females generally demonstrating greater lumbosacral values (p < 0.001). The “iHandy Level” application is a reliable and valid tool in the measurement of lumbosacral quiet standing spinal posture in the sagittal plane. PMID:27843650

  13. Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a synopsis of the initiation of the strong-field magnetic explosions that produce large, fast coronal mass ejections. Cartoons based on observations are used to describe the inferred basic physical processes and sequences that trigger and drive the explosion. The magnetic field that explodes is a sheared-core bipole that may or may not be embedded in surrounding strong magnetic field, and may or may not contain a flux rope before it starts to explode. We describe three different mechanisms that singly or in combination trigger the explosion: (1) runaway internal tether-cutting reconnection, (2) runaway external tether-cutting reconnection, and (3) ideal MHD instability or loss or equilibrium. For most eruptions, high-resolution, high-cadence magnetograms and chromospheric and coronal movies (such as from TRACE and/or Solar-B) of the pre-eruption region and of the onset of the eruption and flare are needed to tell which one or which combination of these mechanisms is the trigger. Whatever the trigger, it leads to the production of an erupting flux rope. Using a simple model flux rope, we demonstrate that the explosion can be driven by the magnetic pressure of the expanding flux rope, provided the shape of the expansion is "fat" enough.

  14. Coronal Modeling and Synchronic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Downs, C.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C.

    2013-07-01

    MHD simulations of the solar corona rely on maps of the solar magnetic field (typically measured at the photosphere) for input as boundary conditions. These "synoptic" maps (available from a number of ground-based and space-based solar observatories), which are perhaps better described as "diachronic," are built up over a solar rotation. A well-known problem with this approach is that the maps contain data that is as much as 27 days old. The Sun's magnetic flux is always evolving, and these changes in the flux affect coronal and heliospheric structure. Flux evolution models can in principle provide a more accurate specification, by estimating the likely state of the photospheric magnetic field on unobserved portions of the Sun. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model (Arge et al. 2010), which incorporates data assimilation techniques into the Worden and Harvey (2000) flux evolution model, is especially well-suited for this purpose. In this presentation we describe the use of such "synchronic" maps with coronal models. We compare results using synchronic maps versus the traditional synoptic maps. Research supported by AFOSR, NASA, and NSF.

  15. Magnetic shuffling of coronal downdrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Channelled fragmented downflows are ubiquitous in magnetized atmospheres, and have recently been addressed based on an observation after a solar eruption. Aims: We study the possible back-effect of the magnetic field on the propagation of confined flows. Methods: We compared two 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of dense supersonic plasma blobs that fall down along a coronal magnetic flux tube. In one, the blobs move strictly along the field lines; in the other, the initial velocity of the blobs is not perfectly aligned with the magnetic field and the field is weaker. Results: The aligned blobs remain compact while flowing along the tube, with the generated shocks. The misaligned blobs are disrupted and merge through the chaotic shuffling of the field lines. They are structured into thinner filaments. Alfvén wave fronts are generated together with shocks ahead of the dense moving front. Conclusions: Downflowing plasma fragments can be chaotically and efficiently mixed if their motion is misaligned with field lines, with broad implications for disk accretion in protostars, coronal eruptions, and rain, for example. Movies associated to Figs. 2 and 3 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Coronal manifestations of preflare activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, E. J.; Webb, D. F.; Woodgate, B.; Waggett, P.; Bentley, R.; Hurford, G.; Schadee, A.; Schrijver, J.; Harrison, R.; Martens, P.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of coronal manifestations of precursors or preheating for flares are discussed. Researchers found that almost everyone with a telescope sees something before flares. Whether an all-encompassing scenario will ever be developed is not at all clear at present. The clearest example of preflare activity appears to be activated filaments and their manifestations, which presumably are signatures of a changing magnetic field. But researchers have seen two similar eruptions, one without any evidence of emerging flux (Kundu et al., 1985) and the other with colliding poles (Simon et al., 1984). While the reconnection of flux is generally agreed to be required to energize a flare, the emergence of flux from below (at least on short timescales and in compact regions) does not appear to be a necessary condition. In some cases the cancelling of magnetic flux (Martin, 1984) by horizontal motions instead may provide the trigger (Priest, 1985) Researchers found similarities and some differences between these and previous observations. The similarities, besides the frequent involvement of filaments, include compact, multiple precursors which can occur both at and near (not at) the flare site, and the association between coronal sources and activity lower in the atmosphere (i.e., transition zone and chromosphere).

  17. An articulatory view of Kinyarwanda coronal harmony.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel; Byrd, Dani; Mpiranya, Fidèle

    2008-12-01

    Coronal harmony in Kinyarwanda causes alveolar fricatives to become postalveolar preceding a postalveolar fricative within a stem. Alveolar and postalveolar stops, affricates and palatals block coronal harmony, but the flap and non-coronal consonants are reported to be transparent. Kinematic data on consonant production in Kinyarwanda were collected using electromagnetic articulography. The mean angle for the line defined by receivers placed on the tongue tip and blade was calculated over the consonant intervals. Mean angle reliably distinguished alveolar and postalveolar fricatives, with alveolars showing a lower tip relative to blade. Mean angle during transparent non-coronal consonants showed a higher tip relative to blade than in contexts without harmony, and the mean angle during transparent [m] was not significantly different than during postalveolar fricatives. This is consistent with a model where Kinyarwanda coronal harmony extends a continuous tip-blade gesture, causing it to be present during 'transparent' segments, but without perceptible effect.

  18. Association between CYP19A1 genotype and pubertal sagittal jaw growth

    PubMed Central

    He, Shushu; Hartsfield, James K.; Guo, Yujiao; Cao, Yang; Wang, Si; Chen, Song

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sagittal jaw growth is influenced during puberty by a ratio of androgens and estrogens. The CYP19A1 (formerly CYP19) gene encodes the cytochrome P450 enzyme aromatase (estrogen synthetase), which converts testosterone to estrogen. Genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms might regulate CYP19A1 gene expression or the function of the aromatase protein and thus influence sagittal jaw growth. Methods The annual sagittal jaw growth in 92 pubertal orthodontic patients was determined by using pretreatment and posttreatment cephalometric radiographs. Single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2470144 and rs2445761 were genotyped and haplotypes constructed. Associations between genotypes or haplotypes and the annual sagittal growth were estimated by using JMP (version 9.0; SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Results Two single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with average differences in annual sagittal jaw growth in boys. Haplotype analysis demonstrated that haplotypes Trs2470144Trs2445761 and Crs2470144Trs2445761 had significant effects on annual sagittal maxillary growth and on mandibular growth in boys. No association was found in girls. Conclusions A quantitative trait locus that influences male pubertal sagittal jaw growth might exist in the CYP19A1 gene, and single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2470144 and rs2445761 might be inside this quantitative trait locus or be linked to it. PMID:23116507

  19. Recent advances in coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    De Moortel, Ineke; Browning, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This ‘coronal heating problem’ requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue. PMID:25897095

  20. Coronal Structure: Legacy of EUVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, Andrea K,

    1999-01-01

    During this past school year, the Smithsonian Predoctoral student, Jorge Sanz-Forcada, began work on this Ph.D. thesis research which will focus on the coronal structure of active cool binary stars. He developed a semi-automatic algorithm to derive the emission measure distribution from EUVE spectra using the latest atomic parameters. To date, he has modeled our long EUVE pointing on lambda And that occurred in the fall of 1998, and has reduced and modeled spectra from EUVE pointings on AR Lac and UX Ari. Some of these observations were made simultaneous with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Physics (ASCA) satellite, and the results reported at the HEAD meeting in Spring 1999.

  1. Modeling Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    Heliospheric models of Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) propagation and evolution provide an important insight into the dynamics of CMEa and are a valuable tool for interpreting interplanetary in situ observations. Moreover, they represent a virtual laboratory for exploring conditions and regions of space that are not conveniently or currently accessible by spacecraft. In this review I summarize recent advances in modeling the properties and evolution of CMEs in the solar wind. In particular, I will focus on: (1) the types of ICME models; (2) the boundary conditions that are imposed, (3) the role of the ambient solar wind; (4) predicting new phenomena; and (5) distinguishing between competing CME initiation mechanisms. I will conclude by discussing what topics will likely be important for models to address in the future.

  2. Recent advances in coronal heating.

    PubMed

    De Moortel, Ineke; Browning, Philippa

    2015-05-28

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This 'coronal heating problem' requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue.

  3. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  4. FORWARD: A Toolset for Multiwavelength Coronal Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Therese A.; White, Stephen M.; Dove, James B.; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake C.; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  5. Initiation of a coronal transient

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B.C.; Munro, R.H.; Fisher, R.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper analyzes the coronal transient/eruptive prominence event of 1980 August 5 observed by the Mauna Loa experiment system. This event yielded data on the early development of the transient in the low corona between 1.2 R/sub sun/ and 2.2 R/sub sun/, information which was not available when earlier attempts were made to explain transient phenomena. The transient's initial appearance in the form of a rising density-depleted structure, prior to the eruption of the associated prominence, can be explained as an effect of magnetic buoyancy. The data indicate that this transient has a density depletion of 17% to 33% relative to an undisturbed corona which is approximately isothermal with a temperature of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ K and a coronal density of 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ at the base of the corona. The height versus base length relationship of the evolving transient resembles, remarkably well, the theoretical predictions obtained from a quasi-static model of a margnetically buoyant loop system. By matching this relationship with the theoretical model, we estimate the magnetic field at the base of the transient to be between 2 and 3 gauss. It is also shown that the initial, nearly constant speed of the top of the transient, 80 +- 20 km s/sup -1/, is consistent with a theoretical estimate calculated from the quasi-static model. These results suggest that some transients are not initiated impulsively, the initial stage of the development being driven by a quasi-static response to a slow change in magnetic field conditions at the base of the corona.

  6. Sagittal sinus thrombosis due to L-asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar A.; Kosar, Tasleem; Pala, Nazir A.; Qureshi, Umar A.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis (CSVT) is a serious complication of L-asparaginase chemotherapy for leukemia in children. Clinical features of headache, altered consciousness, focal neurological deficit, and seizures developing during or immediately after treatment with L-asparaginase should alert the treating physician to the possibility of CSVT. Immediate imaging of the brain should be done using CT and MRI and the veins should be visualized noninvasively by CT and MR venography. We report two children on induction therapy for acute leukemia who presented with seizures, headache, and altered consciousness. Venous infarcts with and without hemorrhage were seen on CT in one patient and the empty delta sign was seen after contrast injection; however, the early changes were missed by CT. MRI detected dural sinus thrombosis relatively earlier in another patient, while the CT findings were equivocal; in this patient, contrast-enhanced MRI showed the empty delta sign and MR venography confirmed absent flow in the superior sagittal sinus, which was diagnostic of sinus thrombosis. Rapid anticoagulation was started with heparin and maintained with warfarin. The child with a unilateral small nonhemorrhagic infarct made a complete recovery while the other, with bilateral hemorrhagic infarcts, did not survive. We stress the importance of early diagnosis of CSVT using CT and MRI in children with leukemia being treated with L-asparaginase; this will permit timely treatment. PMID:21042505

  7. Effect of Trunk Sagittal Attitude on Shoulder, Thorax and Pelvis Three-Dimensional Kinematics in Able-Bodied Subjects during Gait

    PubMed Central

    Leardini, Alberto; Berti, Lisa; Begon, Mickaël; Allard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that an original attitude in forward or backward inclination of the trunk is maintained at gait initiation and during locomotion, and that this affects lower limb loading patterns. However, no studies have shown the extent to which shoulder, thorax and pelvis three-dimensional kinematics are modified during gait due to this sagittal inclination attitude. Thirty young healthy volunteers were analyzed during level walking with video-based motion analysis. Reflecting markers were mounted on anatomical landmarks to form a two-marker shoulder line segment, and a four-marker thorax and pelvis segments. Absolute and relative spatial rotations were calculated, for a total of 11 degrees of freedom. The subjects were divided into two groups of 15 according to the median of mean thorax inclination angle over the gait cycle. Preliminary MANOVA analysis assessed whether gender was an independent variable. Then two-factor nested ANOVA was used to test the possible effect of thorax inclination on body segments, planes of motion and gait periods, separately. There was no significant difference in all anthropometric and spatio-temporal parameters between the two groups, except for subject mass. The three-dimensional kinematics of the thorax and pelvis were not affected by gender. Nested ANOVA revealed group effect in all segment rotations apart those at the pelvis, in the sagittal and frontal planes, and at the push-off. Attitudes in sagittal thorax inclination altered trunk segments kinematics during gait. Subjects with a backward thorax showed less thorax-to-pelvis motion, but more shoulder-to-thorax and thorax-to-laboratory motion, less motion in flexion/extension and in lateral bending, and also less motion during push-off. This contributes to the understanding of forward propulsion and sideways load transfer mechanisms, fundamental for the maintenance of balance and the risk of falling. PMID:24204763

  8. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES, DECAYING ACTIVE REGIONS, AND GLOBAL CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Haislmaier, K. J.

    2013-10-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active-region magnetic fields, coronal holes, and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group synoptic magnetograms, Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory extreme-ultraviolet synoptic maps, and coronal potential-field source-surface models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, 4 from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure, and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposing-polarity fields from opening and the remnant active-region flux preserved the regions' low-order multipole moments long after the regions had decayed. Thus, the polarity of each coronal hole necessarily matched the polar field on the side of the streamer belt where the corresponding active region decayed. For magnetically isolated active regions initially located within the streamer belt, the more intense polarity generally survived to form the hole. For non-isolated regions, flux imbalance and topological asymmetry prompted the opposite to occur in some cases.

  9. Aug. 31, 2012 Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This two part movie shows an Aug. 31 coronal mass ejection (CME) from the sun , the same event that caused depletion and refilling of the radiation belts just after the Relativistic Electron-Proton...

  10. Observational Consequences of Coronal Heating Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan C.; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The coronal heating problem remains unsolved today, 80 years after its discovery, despite 50 years of suborbital and orbital coronal observatories. Tens of theoretical coronal heating mechanisms have been suggested, but only a few have been able to be ruled out. In this talk, we will explore the reasons for the slow progress and discuss the measurements that will be needed for potential breakthrough, including imaging the solar corona at small spatial scales, measuring the chromospheric magnetic fields, and detecting the presence of high temperature, low emission measure plasma. We will discuss three sounding rocket instruments developed to make these measurements: the High resolution Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP), and the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS).

  11. Sept. 28, 2012 Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This Sept. 28 coronal mass ejection (CME) from the sun, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), is the event which caused the near total annihilation of the new radiation belt and sl...

  12. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Coronal magnetic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Valerii V.; Stepanov, Alexander V.

    2008-11-01

    The goal of this review is to outline some new ideas in the physics of coronal magnetic loops, the fundamental structural elements of the atmospheres of the Sun and flaring stars, which are involved in phenomena such as stellar coronal heating, flare energy release, charged particle acceleration, and the modulation of optical, radio, and X-ray emissions. The Alfvén-Carlqvist view of a coronal loop as an equivalent electric circuit allows a good physical understanding of loop processes. Describing coronal loops as MHD-resonators explains various ways in which flaring emissions from the Sun and stars are modulated, whereas modeling them by magnetic mirror traps allows one to describe the dynamics and emission of high-energy particles. Based on these approaches, loop plasma and fast particle parameters are obtained and models for flare energy release and stellar corona heating are developed.

  13. Results of coronal hole research: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of the last 10 years of coronal hole research, in particular since 1970, is presented. The findings of the early investigations and the more recent results obtained with Skylab/Apollo Telescope Mount instrumentation are discussed.

  14. Solar Coronal Cells as Seen by STEREO

    NASA Video Gallery

    The changes of a coronal cell region as solar rotation carries it across the solar disk as seen with NASA's STEREO-B spacecraft. The camera is fixed on the region (panning with it) and shows the pl...

  15. Relating magnetic reconnection to coronal heating.

    PubMed

    Longcope, D W; Tarr, L A

    2015-05-28

    It is clear that the solar corona is being heated and that coronal magnetic fields undergo reconnection all the time. Here we attempt to show that these two facts are related--i.e. coronal reconnection generates heat. This attempt must address the fact that topological change of field lines does not automatically generate heat. We present one case of flux emergence where we have measured the rate of coronal magnetic reconnection and the rate of energy dissipation in the corona. The ratio of these two, [Formula: see text], is a current comparable to the amount of current expected to flow along the boundary separating the emerged flux from the pre-existing flux overlying it. We can generalize this relation to the overall corona in quiet Sun or in active regions. Doing so yields estimates for the contribution to coronal heating from magnetic reconnection. These estimated rates are comparable to the amount required to maintain the corona at its observed temperature.

  16. Relating magnetic reconnection to coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    Longcope, D. W.; Tarr, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    It is clear that the solar corona is being heated and that coronal magnetic fields undergo reconnection all the time. Here we attempt to show that these two facts are related—i.e. coronal reconnection generates heat. This attempt must address the fact that topological change of field lines does not automatically generate heat. We present one case of flux emergence where we have measured the rate of coronal magnetic reconnection and the rate of energy dissipation in the corona. The ratio of these two, , is a current comparable to the amount of current expected to flow along the boundary separating the emerged flux from the pre-existing flux overlying it. We can generalize this relation to the overall corona in quiet Sun or in active regions. Doing so yields estimates for the contribution to coronal heating from magnetic reconnection. These estimated rates are comparable to the amount required to maintain the corona at its observed temperature. PMID:25897089

  17. Energy conversion in the coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Solar and stellar X-ray emission are the observed waste products of the interplay between magnetic fields and the motion of stellar plasma. Theoretical understanding of the process of coronal heating is of utmost importance, since the high temperature is what defines the corona in the first place. Most of the research described deals with the aspects of the several rivalling theories for coronal heating. The rest of the papers deal with processes of energy conversion related to flares.

  18. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  19. Multidimensional Modeling of Coronal Rain Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  20. Dynamic simulation of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Wu, S. T.

    1980-01-01

    A model is developed for the formation and propagation through the lower corona of the loop-like coronal transients in which mass is ejected from near the solar surface to the outer corona. It is assumed that the initial state for the transient is a coronal streamer. The initial state for the streamer is a polytropic, hydrodynamic solution to the steady-state radial equation of motion coupled with a force-free dipole magnetic field. The numerical solution of the complete time-dependent equations then gradually approaches a stationary coronal streamer configuration. The streamer configuration becomes the initial state for the coronal transient. The streamer and transient simulations are performed completely independent of each other. The transient is created by a sudden increase in the pressure at the base of the closed-field region in the streamer configuration. Both coronal streamers and coronal transients are calculated for values of the plasma beta (the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure) varying from 0.1 to 100.

  1. Neuromuscular Fatigue Alters Postural Control and Sagittal Plane Hip Biomechanics in Active Females With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Barnett S.; Gilsdorf, Christine M.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Prentice, William E.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Females with history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and subsequent ligament reconstruction are at high risk for future ACL injury. Fatigue may influence the increased risk of future injury in females by altering lower extremity biomechanics and postural control. Hypothesis: Fatigue will promote lower extremity biomechanics and postural control deficits associated with ACL injury. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Fourteen physically active females with ACL reconstruction (mean age, 19.64 ± 1.5 years; mean height, 163.52 ± 6.18 cm; mean mass, 62.6 ± 13.97 kg) volunteered for this study. Postural control and lower extremity biomechanics were assessed in the surgical limb during single-leg balance and jump-landing tasks before and after a fatigue protocol. Main outcome measures were 3-dimensional hip and knee joint angles at initial contact, peak angles, joint angular displacements and peak net joint moments, anterior tibial shear force, and vertical ground reaction force during the first 50% of the loading phase of the jump-landing task. During the single-leg stance task, the main outcome measure was center of pressure sway speed. Results: Initial contact hip flexion angle decreased (t = −2.82, P = 0.01; prefatigue, 40.98° ± 9.79°; postfatigue, 36.75° ± 8.61°) from pre- to postfatigue. Hip flexion displacement (t = 2.23, P = 0.04; prefatigue, 45.19° ± 14.1°; postfatigue, 47.48° ± 14.21°) and center of pressure sway speed (t = 3.95, P < 0.05; prefatigue, 5.18 ± 0.96 cm/s; postfatigue, 6.20 ± 1.72 cm/s) increased from pre- to postfatigue. There was a trending increase in hip flexion moment (t = 2.14, P = 0.05; prefatigue, 1.66 ± 0.68 Nm/kg/m; postfatigue, 1.91 ± 0.62 Nm/kg/m) from pre- to postfatigue. Conclusion: Fatigue may induce lower extremity biomechanics and postural control deficits that may be associated with ACL injury in physically active females with ACL reconstruction. Clinical Relevance: Rehabilitation and maintenance programs should incorporate activities that aim to improve muscular endurance and improve the neuromuscular system’s tolerance to fatiguing exercise in efforts to maintain stability and safe landing technique during subsequent physical activity. PMID:24982701

  2. Spine Shape in Sagittal and Frontal Planes in Short- and Tall-Statured Children Aged 13 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichota, Malgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To assess spine curvatures, postural categories and scolioses in short and tall children aged 13 years. Material and methods: Short-statured (below Percentile 10) and tall-statured (above Percentile 90) boys (n = 13 and 18, respectively) and girls (n = 10 and 11, respectively) aged 13 years were studied. The following angles of spine…

  3. Gender Differences among Sagittal Plane Knee Kinematic and Ground Reaction Force Characteristics during a Rapid Sprint and Cut Maneuver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, C. Roger; Sizer, Phillip S.; Starch, David W.; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Slauterbeck, James

    2004-01-01

    Women are more prone to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during cutting sports than men. The purpose of this study was to examine knee kinematic and ground reaction forces (GRF) differences between genders during cutting. Male and female athletes performed cutting trials while force platform and video data were recorded (180 Hz).…

  4. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2004-01-01

    Many papers have been published that further elucidate the structure of coronas in cool stars as determined from EUVE, HST, FUSE, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations. In addition we are exploring the effects of coronas on the He I 1083081 transition that is observed in the infrared. Highlights of these are summarized below including publications during this reporting period and presentations. Ground-based magnetic Doppler imaging of cool stars suggests that active stars have active regions located at high latitudes on their surface. We have performed similar imaging in X-ray to locate the sites of enhanced activity using Chandra spectra. Chandra HETG observations of the bright eclipsing contact binary 44i Boo and Chandra LETG observations for the eclipsing binary VW Cep show X-ray line profiles that are Doppler-shifted by orbital motion. After careful analysis of the spectrum of each binary, a composite line-profile is constructed by adding the individual spectral lines. This high signal-to-noise ratio composite line-profile yields orbital velocities for these binaries that are accurate to 30 km/sec and allows their orbital motion to be studied at higher time resolutions. In conjunction with X-ray lightcurves, the phase-binned composite line-profiles constrain coronal structures to be small and located at high latitudes. These observations and techniques show the power of the Doppler Imaging Technique applied to X-ray line emission.

  5. EXPLOSIVE INSTABILITY AND CORONAL HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Liu, J.-H.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Nigro, G.

    2009-10-20

    The observed energy-loss rate from the solar corona implies that the coronal magnetic field has a critical angle at which energy is released. It has been hypothesized that at this critical angle an 'explosive instability' would occur, leading to an enhanced conversion of magnetic energy into heat. In earlier investigations, we have shown that a shear-dependent magnetohydrodynamic process called 'secondary instability' has many of the distinctive features of the hypothetical 'explosive instability'. In this paper, we give the first demonstration that this 'secondary instability' occurs in a system with line-tied magnetic fields and boundary shearing-basically the situation described by Parker. We also show that, as the disturbance due to secondary instability attains finite amplitude, there is a transition to turbulence which leads to enhanced dissipation of magnetic and kinetic energy. These results are obtained from numerical simulations performed with a new parallelized, viscoresistive, three-dimensional code that solves the cold plasma equations. The code employs a Fourier collocation-finite difference spatial discretization, and uses a third-order Runge-Kutta temporal discretization.

  6. The Global Coronal Structure Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-01-01

    During the past year we have completed the changeover from the NIXT program to the new TXI sounding rocket program. The NIXT effort, aimed at evaluating the viability of the remaining portions of the NIXT hardware and design, has been finished and the portions of the NIXT which are viable and flightworthy, such as filters, mirror mounting hardware, electronics and telemetry interface systems, are now part of the new rocket payload. The backup NIXT multilayer-coated x-ray telescope and its mounting hardware have been completely fabricated and are being stored for possible future use in the TXI rocket. The H-alpha camera design is being utilized in the TXI program for real-time pointing verification and control via telemetry. A new H-alpha camera has been built, with a high-resolution RS170 CCD camera output. Two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program, have been written and published this year: 1. "The Solar X-ray Corona," by L. Golub, Astrophysics and Space Science, 237, 33 (1996). 2. "Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure," Keynote Paper, Proceedings STEPWG1 Workshop on Measurements and Analyses of the Solar 3D Magnetic Field, Solar Physics, 174, 99 (1997).

  7. Coronal Reconstruction using LASCO and UVCS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P. P.

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of the research described in the original proposal was to develop methods to quantify coronal and inner-heliospheric velocity fields of the 'quiet' solar wind. For this we planned to use several sources of observations:(1) SOHO/UVCS velocity information in the range 1.5-3 Solar Radii obtained from Doppler dimming observations; (2) projected solar wind velocities (into the plane of the sky) obtained from SOHO/ LASCO images (1.1-30 Solar Radii), primarily derived from two-dimensional correlation tracking techniques; (3) Interplanetary scintillation observations of the heliospheric (> 26 Solar Radii) solar wind velocity from the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab) in Nagoya, Japan; (4) Ecliptic in situ observations: data for the ecliptic solar wind are available from the MIT and Los Alamos plasma experiments on the Earth-orbiting IMP-8 spacecraft, from the Cellas instrument on SOHO near the LI Lagrange point, and from the WIND spacecraft; (5) Out-of-ecliptic in situ observations: these data are available primarily from the Los Alamos SWOOPS instrument on Ulysses, which passed over the solar north pole in August 1995, about one year prior to the Whole Sun Month period. Where ever possible we planned to use the first Whole Sun Month as the main time period for the analysis, since we expected that for this period it would be easiest to obtain adequate coverage over the extended period of time required to analyze 'quiet' solar wind patterns. Beyond the observations mentioned above (primarily SOHO data) we extended our selection of data to several events identified in the Yohkoh/SXT data base which directly promised to provide us with clues about the connection between the slow solar wind observed by IPS in the inner heliosphere and their sources in the low corona, in particular active regions. We also obtained valuable results using SWOOPS ill situ observations from the pole-to-pole passage of Ulysses in a comparison with solar wind velocities

  8. The Search for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Jacqueline; Hallinan, Gregg; Monroe, Ryan; Bourke, Stephen; Starburst Program Team

    2017-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may dramatically impact habitability and atmospheric composition of planets around magnetically active stars, including young solar analogs and many M dwarfs. Theoretical predictions of such effects are limited by the lack of observations of stellar CMEs. My thesis addresses this gap through a search for the spectral and spatial radio signatures of CMEs on active M dwarfs.Solar CMEs produce radio bursts with a distinctive spectral signature, narrow-band plasma emission that drifts to lower frequency as a CME expands outward. To search for analogous events on nearby stars, I worked on system design, software, and commissioning for the Starburst project, a wideband single-baseline radio interferometry backend dedicated to stellar observations. In addition, I led a survey of nearby active M dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), detecting 12 bright (>10 mJy) radio bursts in 58 hours. This survey’s ultra-wide bandwidth (0.23-6.0 GHz) dynamic spectroscopy, unprecedented for stellar observations, revealed diverse behavior in the time-frequency plane. Flare star UV Ceti produced complex, luminous events reminiscent of brown dwarf aurorae; AD Leo sustained long-duration, intense, narrow-band "storms"; and YZ CMi emitted a burst with substructure with rapid frequency drift, resembling solar Type III bursts, which are attributed to electrons moving at speeds of order 10% of the speed of light.To search for the spatial signature of CMEs, I led 8.5-GHz observations with the Very Long Baseline Array simultaneous to 24 hours of the JVLA survey. This program detected non-thermal continuum emission from the stars in all epochs, as well as continuum flares on AD Leo and coherent bursts on UV Ceti, enabling measurement of the spatial offset between flaring and quiescent emission.These observations demonstrate the diversity of stellar transients that can be expected in time-domain radio surveys, especially with the advent of large low

  9. Observational characteristics of coronal mass ejections without low-coronal signatures

    SciTech Connect

    D'Huys, E.; Seaton, D. B.; Berghmans, D.; Poedts, S.

    2014-11-01

    Solar eruptions are usually associated with a variety of phenomena occurring in the low corona before, during, and after the onset of eruption. Though easily visible in coronagraph observations, so-called stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) do not obviously exhibit any of these low-coronal signatures. The presence or absence of distinct low-coronal signatures can be linked to different theoretical models to establish the mechanisms by which the eruption is initiated and driven. In this study, 40 CMEs without low-coronal signatures occurring in 2012 are identified. Their observational and kinematic properties are analyzed and compared to those of regular CMEs. Solar eruptions without clear on-disk or low-coronal signatures can lead to unexpected space weather impacts, since many early warning signs for significant space weather activity are not present in these events. A better understanding of their initiation mechanism(s) will considerably improve the ability to predict such space weather events.

  10. Disruption of a coronal streamer by an eruptive prominence and coronal mass ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illing, R. M. E.; Hundhausen, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    The coronal mass ejection of August 18, 1980 is analyzed using images from the coronagraph on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite. The event occurred at the site of a large coronal helmet streamer and evolved into the three-part structure of a bright frontal shell, followed by a relatively dark space surrounding a bright filamentary core as seen in many mass ejections of the SMM epoch. The bright core can be identified as material from a prominence whose eruption was observed from the ground. The mass of the frontal shell is equal to that of the coronal helmet streamer, indicating that the shell is the coronal material previously in the helmet streamer, displaced and set into motion by the erupting prominence and surrounding cavity. The mass ejected in the bright core (or prominences) is estimated to be 50 percent larger than the 'coronal' material in the front loop.

  11. Modeling the Effects of Sensorineural Hearing Loss on Sound Localization in the Median Plane

    PubMed Central

    Majdak, Piotr; Laback, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Listeners use monaural spectral cues to localize sound sources in sagittal planes (along the up-down and front-back directions). How sensorineural hearing loss affects the salience of monaural spectral cues is unclear. To simulate the effects of outer-hair-cell (OHC) dysfunction and the contribution of different auditory-nerve fiber types on localization performance, we incorporated a nonlinear model of the auditory periphery into a model of sagittal-plane sound localization for normal-hearing listeners. The localization model was first evaluated in its ability to predict the effects of spectral cue modifications for normal-hearing listeners. Then, we used it to simulate various degrees of OHC dysfunction applied to different types of auditory-nerve fibers. Predicted localization performance was hardly affected by mild OHC dysfunction but was strongly degraded in conditions involving severe and complete OHC dysfunction. These predictions resemble the usually observed degradation in localization performance induced by sensorineural hearing loss. Predicted localization performance was best when preserving fibers with medium spontaneous rates, which is particularly important in view of noise-induced hearing loss associated with degeneration of this fiber type. On average across listeners, predicted localization performance was strongly related to level discrimination sensitivity of auditory-nerve fibers, indicating an essential role of this coding property for localization accuracy in sagittal planes. PMID:27659486

  12. The non-radial propagation of coronal streamers in minimum activity epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, Andrey G.; Vasil'eva, Valeria V.

    2010-02-01

    We have analyzed the shape of the solar corona using the data of daily observations with Mark-3/4 (1980-2008) and SOHO/Lasco-2 (1996-2008) telescopes. The angles of deviation of coronal rays from the radial direction Δθ vary cyclically, reaching the maximum deviation towards the solar equator at the minimum of the solar activity. At the minimum of the 24-th cycle of activity, the Δθ angles were smaller than they were at the minimum of the 22-nd and 23-rd cycles. We also analyzed of the solar structure corona during eclipses for minimum activity from 1870 till 2008. We examined changes in the index, which characterizes the angle of large coronal streamers to the equatorial plane. It has been shown that the index has been smoothly changing during the last 140 years. The maximal value of an index was during 17-19 activity cycles. The minimal values are reached in the end of 19 centuries and at the present time. We consider the relations between the angles of deviation of coronal rays at the minimum of activity, the parameters of the global magnetic field of the Sun, and the amplitude of the subsequent cycle of activity, and discuss the hypothesis that the variations of the inclination of coronal rays may affect the parameters of the solar wind and the indices of geomagnetic perturbations at the minima of the solar activity cycles.

  13. Measurement of spinal sagittal curvatures using the laser triangulation method.

    PubMed

    Celan, Dusan; Palfy, Miroslav; Bracun, Drago; Turk, Zmago; Mozina, Janez; Komadina, Radko

    2012-03-01

    nourishment influence the size of the sagittal spinal angles. In the observed sample the effect of age was not confirmed.

  14. Correlations of Cervical Sagittal Alignment before and after Occipitocervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Takachika; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Takeshita, Katsushi; Oshima, Yasushi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective radiographic study. Objective To investigate changes and correlations of cervical sagittal alignment including T1 slope before and after occipitocervical corrective surgery. We also investigated the relevance for preoperative planning. Methods We conducted a retrospective radiographic analysis of 27 patients who underwent surgery for occipitocervical deformity. There were 7 men and 20 women with a mean age of 56.0 years. Mean follow-up was 68.0 months (range 24 to 120). The radiographic parameters measured before surgery and at final follow-up included McGregor slope, T1 slope, occipito (O)–C2 angle, O–C7 angle, and C2–C7 angle. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to examine the correlation between the radiographic parameters. Results There was a stronger positive correlation between the T1 slope and the O–C7 angle both preoperatively and postoperatively (r = 0.72 and r = 0.83, respectively) than between the T1 slope and the C2–C7 angle (r = 0.60 and r = 0.76, respectively). The O–C2 angle and C2–C7 angle had inverse correlations to each other both pre- and postoperatively (r =  − 0.50 and −0.45). McGregor slope and T1 slope did not significantly change postoperatively at final follow-up. Increase in O–C2 angle after surgery (mean change, 10.7 degrees) inversely correlated with decrease in postoperative C2–C7 angle (mean change, 12.2 degrees). As result of these complementary changes, O–C7 angle did not statistically change. Conclusions Our results suggest that the O–C7 angle is regulated by T1 slope and the corresponding O–C7 angle is divided into the O–C2 and C2–C7 angles, which have inverse correlation to each other and then maintain McGregor slope (horizontal gaze). PMID:27190739

  15. Normalization of brain morphology after surgery in sagittal craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Eric D; Yang, Jenny; Beckett, Joel S; Lacadie, Cheryl; Scheinost, Dustin; Persing, Sarah; Zellner, Elizabeth G; Oosting, Devon; Keifer, Cara; Friedman, Hannah E; Wyk, Brent Vander; Jou, Roger J; Sun, Haosi; Gary, Cyril; Duncan, Charles C; Constable, R Todd; Pelphrey, Kevin A; Persing, John A

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (NSC) is associated with significant learning disability later in life. Surgical reconstruction is typically performed before 1 year of age to correct the cranial vault morphology and to allow for normalized brain growth with the goal of improving cognitive function. Yet, no studies have assessed to what extent normalized brain growth is actually achieved. Recent advances in MRI have allowed for automated methods of objectively assessing subtle and pronounced brain morphological differences. The authors used one such technique, deformation-based morphometry (DBM) Jacobian mapping, to determine how previously treated adolescents with sagittal NSC (sNSC) significantly differ in brain anatomy compared with healthy matched controls up to 11.5 years after surgery. METHODS Eight adolescent patients with sNSC, previously treated via whole-vault cranioplasty at a mean age of 7 months, and 8 age- and IQ-matched control subjects without craniosynostosis (mean age for both groups = 12.3 years), underwent functional 3-T MRI. Statistically significant group tissue-volume differences were assessed using DBM, a whole-brain technique that estimates morphological differences between 2 groups at each voxel (p < 0.01). Group-wise Jacobian volume maps were generated using a spacing of 1.5 mm and a resolution of 1.05 × 1.05 × 1.05 mm(3). RESULTS There were no significant areas of volume reduction or expansion in any brain areas in adolescents with sNSC compared with controls at a significance level of p < 0.01. At the more liberal threshold of p < 0.05, two areas of brain expansion extending anteroposteriorly in the right temporooccipital and left frontoparietal regions appeared in patients with sNSC compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS Compared with previous reports on untreated infants with sNSC, adolescents with sNSC in this cohort had few areas of brain dysmorphology many years after surgery. This result suggests that comprehensive cranioplasty

  16. Cervical vertebrae maturation index estimates on cone beam CT: 3D reconstructions vs sagittal sections

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Marco A E; Costa, André L F; Ximenez, Michel E L; Cotrim-Ferreira, Flávio A; Ferreira-Santos, Rívea I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of CBCT three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and sagittal sections for estimates of cervical vertebrae maturation index (CVMI). Methods: The sample consisted of 72 CBCT examinations from patients aged 8–16 years (45 females and 27 males) selected from the archives of two private clinics. Two calibrated observers (kappa scores: ≥0.901) interpreted the CBCT settings twice. Intra- and interobserver agreement for both imaging exhibition modes was analyzed by kappa statistics, which was also used to analyze the agreement between 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections. Correlations between cervical vertebrae maturation estimates and chronological age, as well as between the assessments by 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections, were analyzed using gamma Goodman–Kruskal coefficients (α = 0.05). Results: The kappa scores evidenced almost perfect agreement between the first and second assessments of the cervical vertebrae by 3D reconstructions (0.933–0.983) and sagittal sections (0.983–1.000). Similarly, the agreement between 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections was almost perfect (kappa index: 0.983). In most divergent cases, the difference between 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections was one stage of CVMI. Strongly positive correlations (>0.8, p < 0.001) were found not only between chronological age and CVMI but also between the estimates by 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Although CBCT imaging must not be used exclusively for this purpose, it may be suitable for skeletal maturity assessments. PMID:26509559

  17. Modeling eruptive coronal magnetohydrodynamic systems with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.

    In this dissertation I explore solar coronal energetic eruptions in the context of magnetic reconnection, which is commonly thought to be a required trigger mechanism for solar eruptions. Reconnection is difficult to directly observe in the corona, and current numerical methods cannot model reconnectionless control cases. Thus, it is not possible to determine if reconnection is a necessary component of these eruptions. I have executed multiple controlled simulations to determine the importance of reconnection for initiation and evolution of several eruptive systems using FLUX, a numerical model that uses the comparatively new fluxon technique. I describe two types of eruptions modeled with FLUX: a metastable confined flux rope theory for coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation, and symmetrically twisted coronal jets in a uniform vertical background field. In the former, I identified an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability that allows metastable twisted flux rope systems to suddenly lose stability and erupt even in the absence of reconnection, contradicting previous conjecture. The CME result is in contrast to the azimuthally symmetric coronal jet initiation model, where jet-like behavior does not manifest without reconnection. My work has demonstrated that some of the observed eruptive phenomena may be triggered by non-reconnective means such as ideal MHD instabilities, and that magnetic reconnection is not a required element in all coronal eruptions.

  18. The lower chromosphere in a coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplitskaya, R.; Turova, I.; Ozhogina, O.

    Coronal holes draw special attention of the Sun researchers In particular they are known as suppositional sources of fast solar wind flows A coronal hole was observed for three days of its passage near the central meridian of the Sun Spectrograms containing strong lines of ionized calcium were obtained The Ca II K H and lambda 854 2 nm line profiles in the region of the coronal hole and in the quiet Sun region outside its boundaries were measured Only the line profiles that were confidently identified as being undisturbed even by weak plages were selected All the profiles were averaged in each of the two chromospheric network components network cell and the average profiles were calculated using all of the available data network cell Comparing the profiles was carried out separately for cells and cell boundaries of the chromospheric network Our principal result is that space- and time- averaged observed profiles of the central self-reversal on the coronal hole sites differ from those remote from the hole intensities of the K 3 H 3 central depressions are increased in cell while unchanged in network height of the K 2 peaks is reduced in cell and particularly in network the central self-reversal asymmetry is intensified in network Distinctions appear at a high significance level Line wings as well as average characteristics of the infrared line remain practically invariable We discuss probable causes for the revealed behavior of the lower chromosphere lines at the base of a coronal hole

  19. Implications for coronal heating and magnetic field topology from coronal rain observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, Patrick

    2012-05-01

    According to tropical wisdom, when the atmosphere feels hot and dense we can expect rain. Such thinking may also apply to the Sun, as this thesis explains. The presented new high-resolution observations with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) of Hinode and the CRISP spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) show a picture of the Sun in which coronal rain seems to be a far more common phenomenon of active regions (the hot and dense regions in the solar atmosphere) than previously thought. Coronal rain, a phenomenon of thermal instability in plasmas for the case of coronal loops, is composed of small cool and dense blobs observed in chromospheric lines such as Hα or Ca II H, rapidly forming and falling down from coronal heights along loop-like paths. Apart from suggesting its ubiquitous character, in this thesis the importance of coronal rain is highlighted in 3 different ways. First, its potential as a marker for coronal heating mechanisms is shown. More specifically, through numerical simulations the effects of Alfvén waves (a strong coronal heating candidate) on the thermal stability of loops is treated. The results indicate that coronae heated through shock heating from mode conversion of Alfvén waves cannot exhibit coronal rain, thus suggesting that this mechanism may not be important for the heating of active region coronae. Second, the role it plays in coronal seismology is shown. Transverse MHD oscillations in loops are put in evidence by coronal rain in observations with Hinode/SOT, thus offering a way to estimate the coronal magnetic field strength, one of the hardest physical quantities to measure accurately, yet lying at the root of most solar and heliospheric physics. Third, due to the very small sizes of the blobs of which it is composed of, it also serves as a probe for the internal structure and local thermodynamic conditions in loops. In the obtained picture with CRISP of the SST coronal loops appear with constant area cross

  20. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S. E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  1. A contemporary view of coronal heating.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Clare E; De Moortel, Ineke

    2012-07-13

    Determining the heating mechanism (or mechanisms) that causes the outer atmosphere of the Sun, and many other stars, to reach temperatures orders of magnitude higher than their surface temperatures has long been a key problem. For decades, the problem has been known as the coronal heating problem, but it is now clear that 'coronal heating' cannot be treated or explained in isolation and that the heating of the whole solar atmosphere must be studied as a highly coupled system. The magnetic field of the star is known to play a key role, but, despite significant advancements in solar telescopes, computing power and much greater understanding of theoretical mechanisms, the question of which mechanism or mechanisms are the dominant supplier of energy to the chromosphere and corona is still open. Following substantial recent progress, we consider the most likely contenders and discuss the key factors that have made, and still make, determining the actual (coronal) heating mechanism (or mechanisms) so difficult.

  2. The Fundamental Structure of Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy; Warren, Harry; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    During the past ten years, solar physicists have attempted to infer the coronal heating mechanism by comparing observations of coronal loops with hydrodynamic model predictions. These comparisons often used the addition of sub ]resolution strands to explain the observed loop properties. On July 11, 2012, the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi ]C) was launched on a sounding rocket. This instrument obtained images of the solar corona was 0.2 ]0.3'' resolution in a narrowband EUV filter centered around 193 Angstroms. In this talk, we will compare these high resolution images to simultaneous density measurements obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on Hinode to determine whether the structures observed with Hi ]C are resolved.

  3. MHD shocks in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is the study of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced as a result of the interaction of ejected lower coronal plasma with the ambient corona. The types of shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced for representative coronal conditions and disturbance velocities were determined. The wave system and the interactions between the ejecta and ambient corona were studied using both analytic theory and numerical solutions of the time-dependent, nonlinear MHD equations. Observations from the SMM coronagraph/polarimeter provided both guidance and motivation and are used extensively in evaluating the results. As a natural consequence of the comparisons with the data, the simulations assisted in better understanding the physical interactions in coronal mass ejections (CME's).

  4. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  5. X-RAY POLARIZATION FROM ACCRETING BLACK HOLES: CORONAL EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H. E-mail: jhk@pha.jhu.ed

    2010-04-01

    We present new calculations of X-ray polarization from accreting black holes (BHs), using a Monte Carlo ray-tracing code in full general relativity. In our model, an optically thick disk in the BH equatorial plane produces thermal seed photons with polarization oriented parallel to the disk surface. These seed photons are then inverse-Compton scattered through a hot (but thermal) corona, producing a hard X-ray power-law spectrum. We consider three different models for the corona geometry: a wedge 'sandwich' with aspect ratio H/R and vertically integrated optical depth tau{sub 0} constant throughout the disk; an inhomogeneous 'clumpy' corona with a finite number of hot clouds distributed randomly above the disk within a wedge geometry; and a spherical corona of uniform density, centered on the BH and surrounded by a truncated thermal disk with inner radius R{sub edge}. In all cases, we find a characteristic transition from horizontal polarization at low energies to vertical polarization above the thermal peak; the vertical direction is defined as the projection of the BH spin axis on the plane of the sky. We show how the details of the spectropolarization signal can be used to distinguish between these models and infer various properties of the corona and BH. Although the bulk of this paper focuses on stellar-mass BHs, we also consider the effects of coronal scattering on the X-ray polarization signal from supermassive BHs in active galactic nuclei.

  6. Polar Plumes Observed at Extreme Coronal Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C. E.; Plunkett, S. P.

    1999-09-01

    Polar plumes, unipolar high density structures in the polar coronal holes, are key to our understanding of solar wind acceleration and coronal heating. Because unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the coronal hole account for approximately 50 leaves the coronal hole (DeForest et al., 1996), plumes (which arise from some such concentrations) are tracers of a type of magnetic structure that fills nearly half of the solar system at solar minimum. Plumes have been observed up to altitudes of about 10 solar radii with the LASCO instrument (DeForest et al., 1996), above which they fade into the coronal background. There is some contention (Habbal and Woo, 1997; Paetzold and Bird, 1998) over whether plumes extend into the interplanetary medium or become mixed with the interplume solar wind at altitudes between 10 and 100 solar radii. Several mechanisms, including the Kelvin-Helmholtz two-stream instability and cross-mode resonant wave scattering near the alfvenic point in the wind's acceleration, have been proposed that could break up the structure of the observed plumes. Using the LASCO C-3 instrument aboard SOHO (Brueckner et al, 1995) to accumulate multiple images that we then recombine, we have generated coronal images with effective exposure times in the thousands of seconds and actual durations of less than four hours. These images clearly show polar plumes extending to altitudes of 25 solar radii or more, very close to the outer edge of the C-3 field of view and above the likely alfvenic point of the wind flow.

  7. Interchange Reconnection and Coronal Hole Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Lynch, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic reconnection between open and closed field, (often referred to as "interchange" reconnection), on the dynamics and topology of coronal hole boundaries. The most important and most prevalent 3D topology of the interchange process is that of a small-scale bipolar magnetic field interacting with a large-scale background field. We determine the evolution of such a magnetic topology by numerical solution of the fully 3D MHD equations in spherical coordinates. First, we calculate the evolution of a small-scale bipole that initially is completely inside an open field region and then is driven across a coronal hole boundary by photospheric motions. Next the reverse situation is calculated in which the bipole is initially inside the closed region and driven toward the coronal hole boundary. In both cases we find that the stress imparted by the photospheric motions results in deformation of the separatrix surface between the closed field of the bipole and the background field, leading to rapid current sheet formation and to efficient reconnection. When the bipole is inside the open field region, the reconnection is of the interchange type in that it exchanges open and closed field. We examine, in detail, the topology of the field as the bipole moves across the coronal hole boundary, and find that the field remains well-connected throughout this process. Our results imply that open flux cannot penetrate deeply into the closed field region below a helmet streamer and, hence, support the quasi-steady models in which open and closed flux remain topologically distinct. Our results also support the uniqueness hypothesis for open field regions as postulated by Antiochos et al. We discuss the implications of this work for coronal observations. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection Sun: coronal hole

  8. Do we understand coronal mass ejections yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildner, Ernest

    Though many more coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed, and though much more has been learned about them during the Solar Maximum Analysis period, they are not yet fully understood. A few recent observational results are reviewed; conclusions and implications drawn from these observations are presented. An emerging picture of the magnetic character of CMEs is sketched; the variations of CMEs' frequency and latitudes over most of a solar cycle are shown. A strong caution about the present lack of concensus on the definition of CMEs is illustrated with examples of the consequences of using different definitions. Finally, some remaining questions about coronal mass ejections are posed.

  9. On the theory of coronal heating mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperus, M.; Ionson, J. A.; Spicer, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models describing solar coronal heating mechanisms are reviewed in some detail. The requirements of chromospheric and coronal heating are discussed in the context of the fundamental constraints encountered in modelling the outer solar atmosphere. Heating by acoustic processes in the 'nonmagnetic' parts of the atmosphere is examined with particular emphasis on the shock wave theory. Also discussed are theories of heating by electrodynamic processes in the magnetic regions of the corona, either magnetohydrodynamic waves or current heating in the regions with large electric current densities (flare type heating). Problems associated with each of the models are addressed.

  10. Discrete changes in solar coronal hole boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Moses, D.

    1990-01-01

    Sequences of Skylab X-ray images near central meridian passages of a large solar coronal hole are used here to examine hole boundary changes with a time resolution of 90 min. It is found that X-ray bright points play a key role in both the expansion and contraction of the coronal hole. The size scale of the boundary changes is about 20,000 km, and the time scale is 3 hr or less. A scenario is suggested in which a large-scale closed magnetic field interacts with a bright point to effect a change in the hole boundary.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of Coronal Evolution and Disruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon

    2002-01-01

    Flux cancellation, defined observationally as the mutual disappearance of magnetic fields of opposite polarity at the neutral line separating them, has been found to occur frequently at the site of filaments (called prominences when observed on the limb of the Sun). During the second year of this project, we have studied theoretically the role that flux cancellation may play in prominence formation, prominence eruption, and the initiation of coronal mass ejections. This work has been in published in two papers: "Magnetic Field Topology in Prominences" by Lionello, Mikic, Linker, and Amari and "Flux Cancellation and Coronal Mass Ejections" by Linker, Mikic, Riley, Lionello, Amari, and Odstrcil.

  12. Coronal and interplanetary Type 2 radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cane, H. V.

    1987-09-01

    Several observations suggest that the disturbances which generate coronal (meter wavelength) type II radio bursts are not driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). A new analysis using a large sample of metric radio bursts and associated soft X-ray events provides further support for the original hypothesis that type II-producing disturbances are blast waves generated at the time of impulsive energy release in flares. Interplanetary (IP) shocks, however, are closely associated with CMEs. The shocks responsible for IP type II events (observed at kilometer wavelengths) are associated with the most energetic CMEs.

  13. Halo Coronal Mass Ejections and Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, I show that the discrepancies in the geoeffectiveness of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) reported in the literature arise due to the varied definitions of halo CMEs used by different authors. In particular, I show that the low geoeffectiveness rate is a direct consequence of including partial halo CMEs. The geoeffectiveness of partial halo CMEs is lower because they are of low speed and likely to make a glancing impact on Earth. Key words: Coronal mass ejections, geomagnetic storms, geoeffectiveness, halo CMEs.

  14. Featuring dark coronal structures: physical signatures of filaments and coronal holes for automated recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, Judith; Cid, Consuelo; Saiz, Elena; Cerrato, Yolanda; Guerrero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Filaments may be mistaken for coronal holes when observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images; however, a closer and more careful look reveals that their photometric properties are different. The combination of EUV images with photospheric magnetograms shows some characteristic differences between filaments and coronal holes. We have performed analyses with 7 different SDO/AIA wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 211, 193, 304, 335 Å) and SDO/HMI magnetograms obtained in September 2011 and March 2012 to study coronal holes and filaments from the photometric, magnetic, and also geometric point of view, since projection effects play an important role on the aforementioned traits.

  15. Solar wind and coronal structure near sunspot minimum - Pioneer and SMM observations from 1985-1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Hundhausen, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in solar wind speed and magnetic polarity observed at the Pioneer spacecraft are discussed here in terms of the changing magnetic geometry implied by SMM coronagraph observations over the period 1985-1987. The pattern of recurrent solar wind streams, the long-term average speed, and the sector polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field all changed in a manner suggesting both a temporal variation, and a changing dependence on heliographic latitude. Coronal observations during this epoch show a systematic variation in coronal structure and the magnetic structure imposed on the expanding solar wind. These observations suggest interpretation of the solar wind speed variations in terms of the familiar model where the speed increases with distance from a nearly flat interplanetary current sheet, and where this current sheet becomes aligned with the solar equatorial plane as sunspot minimum approaches, but deviates rapidly from that orientation after minimum.

  16. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  17. Evaluation of nasal morphology in predicting vertical and sagittal maxillary skeletal discrepancies’

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Mandava; Chaitanya, Nellore; Reddy, Karnati Praveen Kumar; Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar; Myla, Vijaya Bhaskar; Shetty, Sharath Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the relationship between nasal morphology and maxillary skeletal pattern. The clinical significance was to emphasize the importance of role of nasal pattern in diagnosis and treatment planning. Materials and Methods: The sample included the pre-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs of 180 South Indian adults (94 women, 86 men), aged 18 to 28 years. Six maxillary and six nasal soft tissue parameters were measured. Pearson correlation coefficients and Analysis of variance were used for statistical analyses. Results: There were significant correlations between maxillary vertical and sagittal, skeletal and soft tissue parameters. The Mean and standard deviations were correlated between low insignificant range to high significant levels with nasal length, nasal depth and columella convexity. Nasal length also showed significant correlation with inclination of palatal plane. Significant influence of gender was seen on nasal length, nasal depth, columella convexity and nasal tip angle. A statistically significant difference was seen regarding nasal length between males and females, with nasal length being more in males (50.26 ± 4.18) than in females (48.86 ± 3.45), nasal depth being more in males (18.64 ± 2.56) than in females (16.63 ± 2.16), columella convexity being greater in males (4.31 ± 1.26) than in females (3.41 ± 1.13), nasolabial angle decreased in males (87.26° ±13.79°) than in females (89.38° ±15.72°) and nasal tip angle being more in females (80.18° ±9.44°) than in males (73.60° ±10.24°). There was no statistically significant difference in nasal hump between males (-2.01 ± 1.76) and females (-2.02 ± 1.62). Conclusion: Long nose with increased nasal prominence were seen with increase in the anteroposterior length and vertical height of maxilla. Male and female genders had a varied amount of nasal length, nasal depth and columella convexity along with nasal

  18. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis: assessment with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Even-Sapir, E.; Feinsud, M.

    1986-02-01

    The diagnostic value of scintigraphy with technetium-99m labeled red blood cells (Tc-RBC) was assessed in 19 patients with clinical suggestion of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST). Comparison of Tc-RBC static images with dynamic flow studies in the brain showed a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 86%, and accuracy of 94% for static studies and values of 87%, 20%, and 61%, respectively, for the flow studies. Tc-RBC scintigraphy enables direct visualization of the integrity of the superior sagittal sinus, whereas CT scanning shows various but nonspecific changes in the brain associated with SSST. Single-photon emission CT study using Tc-RBC, performed in six patients, appears to have potential in the diagnosis of SSST, allowing separation of vascular structures that are superimposed on the superior sagittal sinus in planar scintigraphy study.

  19. Bad splits in bilateral sagittal split osteotomy: systematic review of fracture patterns.

    PubMed

    Steenen, S A; Becking, A G

    2016-07-01

    An unfavourable and unanticipated pattern of the mandibular sagittal split osteotomy is generally referred to as a 'bad split'. Few restorative techniques to manage the situation have been described. In this article, a classification of reported bad split pattern types is proposed and appropriate salvage procedures to manage the different types of undesired fracture are presented. A systematic review was undertaken, yielding a total of 33 studies published between 1971 and 2015. These reported a total of 458 cases of bad splits among 19,527 sagittal ramus osteotomies in 10,271 patients. The total reported incidence of bad split was 2.3% of sagittal splits. The most frequently encountered were buccal plate fractures of the proximal segment (types 1A-F) and lingual fractures of the distal segment (types 2A and 2B). Coronoid fractures (type 3) and condylar neck fractures (type 4) have seldom been reported. The various types of bad split may require different salvage approaches.

  20. Stereoscopy and Tomography of Coronal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Patoul, J.

    2012-04-01

    The hot solar corona consists of a low density plasma, which is highly structured by the magnetic field. To resolve and study the corona, several solar Ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray telescopes are operated with high spatial and temporal resolution. EUV (Extreme UV) image sequences of the lower solar corona have revealed a wide variety of structures with sizes ranging from the Sun's diameter to the limit of the angular resolution. Active regions can be observed with enhanced temperature and density, as well as 'quiet' regions, coronal holes with lower density and numerous other transient phenomena such as plumes, jets, bright points, flares, filaments, coronal mass ejections, all structured by the coronal magnetic field. In this work, we analyze polar plumes in a sequence of Solar EUV images taken nearly simultaneously by the three telescopes on board of the spacecraft STEREO/SECCHI A and B, and SOHO/EIT. Plumes appear in EUV images as elongated objects starting on the surface of the Sun extending super-radially into the corona. Their formation and contribution to the fast solar wind and other coronal phenomena are still under debate. Knowledge of the polar plume 3-D geometry can help to understand some of the physical processes in the solar corona. In this dissertation we develop new techniques for the characterization of polar plume structures in solar coronal images (Part II) then we analyze these structures using the techniques (Part III): We design a new technique capable of automatically identifying plumes in solar EUV images close to the limb at 1.01-1.39 Ro. This plume identification is based on a multi-scale Hough-wavelet analysis. We show that the method is well adapted to identifying the location, width and orientation of plumes. Starting from Hough-wavelet analysis, we elaborate on two other techniques to determine 3-D plume localization and structure: (i) tomography employing data from a single spacecraft over more than half a rotation and (ii) stereoscopy

  1. USING RUNNING DIFFERENCE IMAGES TO TRACK PROPER MOTIONS OF XUV CORONAL INTENSITY ON THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P.; Lee, J. E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil; Chung, S.; Katz, J.; Namkung, M

    2014-12-20

    We have developed a procedure for observing and tracking proper motions of faint XUV coronal intensity on the Sun and have applied this procedure to study the collective motions of cellular plumes and the shorter-period waves in sunspots. Our space/time maps of cellular plumes show a series of tracks with the same 5-8 minute repetition times and ∼100 km s{sup –1} sky-plane speeds found previously in active-region fans and in coronal hole plumes. By synchronizing movies and space/time maps, we find that the tracks are produced by elongated ejections from the unipolar flux concentrations at the bases of the cellular plumes and that the phases of these ejections are uncorrelated from cell to cell. Thus, the large-scale motion is not a continuous flow, but is more like a system of independent conveyor belts all moving in the same direction along the magnetic field. In contrast, the proper motions in sunspots are clearly waves resulting from periodic disturbances in the sunspot umbras. The periods are ∼2.6 minutes, but the sky-plane speeds and wavelengths depend on the heights of the waves above the sunspot. In the chromosphere, the waves decelerate from 35-45 km s{sup –1} in the umbra to 7-8 km s{sup –1} toward the outer edge of the penumbra, but in the corona, the waves accelerate to ∼60-100 km s{sup –1}. Because chromospheric and coronal tracks originate from the same space/time locations, the coronal waves must emerge from the same umbral flashes that produce the chromospheric waves.

  2. Correlation Between Dental Arch Width and Sagittal Dento-Skeletal Morphology in Untreated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar; Etezadi, Tahura

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dental arch form is one of the most important characteristics of dentition. However, this dimension usually receives less attention in diagnosis or treatment planning and orthodontic patients are traditionally classified with regard to their sagittal characteristics. The objectives of this study were to investigate if a relationship exists between the dental arch width (transverse dimension) and sagittal skeletal and dental parameters in orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods: Dental casts and lateral cephalograms of 108 consecutive untreated Iranian patients (47 males and 61 females) between 16 and 31 years of age were evaluated. Arch width (AW) parameters including upper and lower inter-molar width (UIMW and LIMW) and upper and lower inter-canine width (UICW and LICW) were measured by a digital caliper. Sagittal parameters included SNA and SNB angle and Wits’ appraisal obtained from lateral cephalograms in addition to upper and lower arch length (UAL and LAL) obtained from dental casts. The correlation between the aforementioned parameters was evaluated applying Pearson correlation coefficients. Molar and canine relationship according to Angle’s classification was also recorded and the means of all parameters were compared between three occlusal relationship classes and two gender groups by means of two-way ANOVA. Results: According to statistical analysis a significant positive correlation between sagittal parameters and arch width measures exists between SNA and UICW and between LICW and LAL. Upper and lower ICW were significantly correlated, the relationship between upper and lower IMW and between UAL and LAL were significant. Among sagittal measures, both UAL and LAL were correlated with the ANB angle. The means of arch width parameters in three occlusal classes were not significantly different. Conclusion: The only significant correlation between arch width and sagittal parameters existed between UICW and SNA angle and between LICW and

  3. Three-Dimensional Morphology of a Coronal Prominence Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hill, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Rachmeler, L.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmieder, B.; Schmit, D. J.; Seaton, D. B.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft-X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally-extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step towards quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explains the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east vs. west limbs

  4. [The theoretical substantiation of myofunctional correction of sagittal occlusion abnormalities and temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Danilova, M A; Ishmurzin, P V; Zakharov, S V

    2012-01-01

    Simulation in 3D-model of skeletal forms of sagittal malocclusion revealed tendency in tonus' modification of muscles of mastication in formation of distal and mesial occlusion. It's shown that distal occlusion is characterized by hypotonic condition of muscles of mastication, except posterior fibers of temporal muscle. Mesial occlusion is characterized by complex combination of muscle tone with prevalence of hypotonic condition of anterior fibers of temporal muscle, superficial portion of masseter muscle and medial pterygoid muscle. We have detected that using of myofunctional devices in treatment of sagittal malocclusion, temporomandibular joint dysfunction promotes of tone increasing of muscles of mastication.

  5. Large-Scale Coronal Heating, Clustering of Coronal Bright Points, and Concentration of Magnetic Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    By combining quiet-region Fe XII coronal images from SOHO/EIT with magnetograms from NSO/Kitt Peak and from SOHO/MDI, we show that on scales larger than a supergranule the population of network coronal bright points and the magnetic flux content of the network are both markedly greater under the bright half of the quiet corona than under the dim half. These results (1) support the view that the heating of the entire corona in quiet regions and coronal holes is driven by fine-scale magnetic activity (microflares, explosive events, spicules) seated low in the magnetic network, and (2) suggest that this large-scale modulation of the magnetic flux and coronal heating is a signature of giant convection cells.

  6. Can Thermal Nonequilibrium Explain Coronal Loops?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    Any successful model of coronal loops must explain a number of observed properties. For warm (approx. 1 MK) loops, these include: 1. excess density, 2. flat temperature profile, 3. super-hydrostatic scale height, 4. unstructured intensity profile, and 5. 1000-5000 s lifetime. We examine whether thermal nonequilibrium can reproduce the observations by performing hydrodynamic simulations based on steady coronal heating that decreases exponentially with height. We consider both monolithic and multi-stranded loops. The simulations successfully reproduce certain aspects of the observations, including the excess density, but each of them fails in at least one critical way. -Xonolithic models have far too much intensity structure, while multi-strand models are either too structured or too long-lived. Storms of nanoflares remain the only viable explanation for warm loops that has been proposed so far. Our results appear to rule out the widespread existence of heating that is both highly concentrated low in the corona and steady or quasi-steady (slowly varying or impulsive with a rapid cadence). Active regions would have a very different appearance if the dominant heating mechanism had these properties. Thermal nonequilibrium may nonetheless play an important role in prominences and catastrophic cooling e(veen.gts..,coronal rain) that occupy a small fraction of the coronal volume. However, apparent inconsistencies between the models and observations of cooling events have yet to be understood.

  7. TRACE (Transition Region and Coronal Explorer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, B.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) is a NASA Small-Explorer (SMEX) satellite developed to study the impact of magnetic fields on the solar outer atmosphere. The instrument observes the solar surface (SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE) and the hotter overlying domains (TRANSITION REGION and CORONA) with an angular resolution of 1 arcsec, equivalent to 725 km on the Sun, an average cadence of about...

  8. Modeling Eruptive Coronal Magnetohydrodynamic Systems with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, Laurel

    2010-05-01

    I explore solar coronal energetic eruptions in the context of magnetic reconnection, which is commonly thought to be a required trigger mechanism for solar eruptions. Reconnection is difficult to observe in the corona, and current numerical methods cannot model reconnectionless control cases. Thus, it is not possible to determine if it is a necessary component. I have executed multiple controlled simulations to determine the importance of reconnection for initiation and evolution of several eruptive systems using FLUX, a numerical model that uses the comparatively new fluxon technique. I describe two types of eruptions modeled with FLUX: a confined flux rope theory for CME initiation, and symmetrically twisted coronal jets in a uniform vertical background field. In the former, I identified an ideal MHD instability that allows metastable twisted flux rope systems to suddenly lose stability and erupt even in the absence of reconnection, contradicting previous conjecture. The CME result is in contrast to the azimuthally symmetric coronal jet initiation model, where jet-like behavior does not manifest without reconnection. I demonstrate that some eruptive phenomena may be triggered by non-reconnective means such as ideal MHD instabilities, and that magnetic reconnection is not a required element in all coronal eruptions.

  9. MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY OF CORONAL HOLE LINKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Antiochos, S. K. E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com E-mail: lionel@predsci.com

    2011-04-20

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open flux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the field with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three new important results. First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. It is known that such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because they allow this process to occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being confined to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open-field corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to the motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  10. Magnetic Topology of Coronal Hole Linkages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open ux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes, and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the eld with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three important new results: First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. Such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because it can now occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being con ned to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open- eld corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  11. Disruption of coronal magnetic field arcades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.

    1994-01-01

    The ideal and resistive properties of isolated large-scale coronal magnetic arcades are studied using axisymmetric solutions of the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in spherical geometry. We examine how flares and coronal mass ejections may be initiated by sudden disruptions of the magnetic field. The evolution of coronal arcades in response to applied shearing photospheric flows indicates that disruptive behavior can occur beyond a critical shear. The disruption can be traced to ideal MHD magnetic nonequilibrium. The magnetic field expands outward in a process that opens the field lines and produces a tangential discontinuity in the magnetic field. In the presence of plasma resistivity, the resulting current sheet is the site of rapid reconnection, leading to an impulsive release of magnetic energy, fast flows, and the ejection of a plasmoid. We relate these results to previous studies of force-free fields and to the properties of the open-field configuration. We show that the field lines in an arcade are forced open when the magnetic energy approaches (but is still below) the open-field energy, creating a partially open field in which most of the field lines extend away from the solar surface. Preliminary application of this model to helmet streamers indicates that it is relevant to the initiation of coronal mass ejections.

  12. Thermodynamic MHD Modeling of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Titov, V.

    2007-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) disrupt the large-scale coronal magnetic field and propel plasma and magnetic flux outward into interplanetary space. The most energetic CMEs typically originate from active regions on the Sun. Accurately modeling active regions while also capturing the entire corona requires MHD models that include energy transport (radiative losses,anisotropic thermal conduction, and coronal heating) in the transition region and solar corona. We refer to this as the thermodynamic MHD model. The more accurate representation of energy flow in the thermodynamic MHD model allows us to to compute simulated EUV and X-ray emission as would be observed from spacecraft such as SOHO, STEREO, and Hinode. With this approach, theorists no longer get to argue what emission they think their favorite model's magnetic field evolution implies; we can actually go compute the emission and compare with observations. As an example, we show a simulation of the May 12, 1997 CME, and compare the simulated emission with observations from the actual event of dimming regions, postflare loops, and reformation of loops near the northern polar coronal hole. Work supported by NASA, NSF and the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (an NSF Science and Technology Center).

  13. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  14. Coronal Bright Points Associated with Minifilament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 109 cm-3. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  15. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  16. Glimmers of Life in the Coronal Graveyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    Red giants represent the final stage in the life cycle of normal stars. Those evolving from low-mass dwarfs like the Sun were magnetically active for most of their main sequence phase, thanks to a spin-catalyzed convective dynamo. At the same time, such stars also experienced significant rotational braking by their coronal winds. Once they expanded into red giants, their spins further plummeted, and they should have become magnetically dead; an expectation seemingly confirmed by a conspicuous lack of coronal X-ray detections. However, reports of the deaths of red giant coronae were premature - far-UV C IV emissions (an important coronal proxy) have been detected in archetype members of the class by HST, and now O VI has been seen by FUSE in at least one case. Curiously, however, features formed at similar temperatures -- Si IV and N V -- are absent, apparently removed by a mysterious cool absorber. Our objective is to obtain additional detections of the O VI doublet in key red giants, to help address the question of the nature of the cool absorber, and the implications for smothering any coronal X-ray emission. If we can show that there is lingering magnetic activity on the red giants, we might have found a possible link to the acceleration of their chromospheric winds, which chemically enrich the ISM and themselves are a long-standing astrophysical puzzle.

  17. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves.

    PubMed

    Warmuth, Alexander

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  18. Static and dynamic loading of mandibular condyles and their positional changes after bilateral sagittal split advancement osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Dicker, G J; Tuijt, M; Koolstra, J H; Van Schijndel, R A; Castelijns, J A; Tuinzing, D B

    2012-09-01

    This study analysed the effects of change of direction of masseter (MAS) and medial pterygoid muscles (MPM) and changes of moment arms of MAS, MPM and bite force on static and dynamic loading of the condyles after surgical mandibular advancement. Rotations of the condyles were assessed on axial MRIs. 16 adult patients with mandibular hypoplasia were studied. The mandibular plane angle (MPA) was <39° in Group I (n=8) and >39° in Group II (n=8). All mandibles were advanced with a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO). In Group II, BSSO was combined with Le Fort I osteotomy. Pre and postoperative moment arms of MAS, MPM and bite force were used in a two-dimensional model to assess static loading of the condyles. Pre and postoperative data on muscle cross-sectional area, volume and direction were introduced in three-dimensional dynamic models of the masticatory system to assess the loading of the condyles during opening and closing. Postsurgically, small increases of static condylar loading were calculated. Dynamic loading decreased slightly. Minor rotations of the condyles were observed. The results do not support the idea that increased postoperative condylar loading is a serious cause for condylar resorption or relapse.

  19. Effect of perioperative buccal fracture of the proximal segment on postoperative stability after sagittal split ramus osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yoon; Yang, Hoon Joo; Han, Jeong-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Buccal fracture of the mandibular proximal bone segment during bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) reduces the postoperative stability. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of this type of fracture on bone healing and postoperative stability after mandibular setback surgery. Materials and Methods Ten patients who experienced buccal fracture during SSRO for mandibular setback movement were evaluated. We measured the amount of bone generation on a computed tomography scan, using an image analysis program, and compared the buccal fracture side to the opposite side in each patient. To investigate the effect on postoperative stability, we measured the postoperative relapse in lateral cephalograms, immediately following and six months after the surgery. The control group consisted of ten randomly-selected patients having a similar amount of set-back without buccal fracture. Results Less bone generation was observed on the buccal fracture side compared with the opposite side (P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in anterior-posterior postoperative relapse between the group with buccal fracture and the control group. The increased mandibular plane angle and anterior facial height after the surgery in the group with buccal fracture manifested as a postoperative clockwise rotation of the mandible. Conclusion Bone generation was delayed compared to the opposite side. However, postoperative stability in the anterior-posterior direction could be maintained with rigid fixation. PMID:24471048

  20. Modelling the coronal hole -- coronal loop boundary as a compressible current-vortex sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R.; Einaudi, G.

    Recent observations and theoretical developments have re-awakened interest in finding out what happens at the boundary between closed and open magnetic field regions in the solar corona, i.e., between coronal loops and coronal holes. Habbal et al. (2001) report the existence of a pervasive radial magnetic field in the solar corona These observations appear to indicate that closed and open magnetic fields are in close proximity in the solar corona, making it likely that that interactions between the two are common. However, it is not necessary that open magnetic field lines thread through closed magnetic fields. It is possible that coronal holes have a fractal boundary, and that instead "estuaries" of open field intrude into active regions. Theoretical interest is shown in the ideas behind coronal whips (Pneumann 1974) and more recently models based of the magnetic junkyard (Dowdy et al. 1986) and the magnetic furnace (Axford and McKenzie 1992). A model for the coronal hole - coronal loop boundary, based on the linear and nonlinear evolution of a compressible current-vortex sheet, is proposed. The loop is modelled as force-free and massive, with the plasma in motion along the magnetic field. The hole is modelled with a potential magnetic field containing a rarer, static plasma. Both linear and nonlinear properties are explored. An acceleration along the coronal hole magnetic field direction is observed which would enhance the fast solar wind speed. W. I. Axford and J. F. McKenzie, in Solar Wind Seven, eds. E. Marsch and R. Schwenn, (Oxford: Pergamon Press), pp 1-5 (1992). J. F. Dowdy, D. Rabin, and R. L. Moore, Solar Phys. 105, 35 (1986). S. R. Habbal, R. Woo, and J. Arnaud, Astrophys. J. 55, 852 (2001). G. W. Pneumann, in Coronal Disturbances, ed. G. Newkirk, (Dordrecht: Reidel), p 35 (1974).

  1. Genesis Solar Wind Interstream, Coronal Hole and Coronal Mass Ejection Samples: Update on Availability and Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent refinement of analysis of ACE/SWICS data (Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) and of onboard data for Genesis Discovery Mission of 3 regimes of solar wind at Earth-Sun L1 make it an appropriate time to update the availability and condition of Genesis samples specifically collected in these three regimes and currently curated at Johnson Space Center. ACE/SWICS spacecraft data indicate that solar wind flow types emanating from the interstream regions, from coronal holes and from coronal mass ejections are elementally and isotopically fractionated in different ways from the solar photosphere, and that correction of solar wind values to photosphere values is non-trivial. Returned Genesis solar wind samples captured very different kinds of information about these three regimes than spacecraft data. Samples were collected from 11/30/2001 to 4/1/2004 on the declining phase of solar cycle 23. Meshik, et al is an example of precision attainable. Earlier high precision laboratory analyses of noble gases collected in the interstream, coronal hole and coronal mass ejection regimes speak to degree of fractionation in solar wind formation and models that laboratory data support. The current availability and condition of samples captured on collector plates during interstream slow solar wind, coronal hole high speed solar wind and coronal mass ejections are de-scribed here for potential users of these samples.

  2. CORONAL SEISMOLOGY USING EIT WAVES: ESTIMATION OF THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N.; Dolla, L.; Rodriguez, L.

    2011-04-01

    Coronal EIT waves have been observed for many years. The nature of EIT waves is still contentious, however, there is strong evidence that some of them might be fast magnetosonic waves, or at least have a fast magnetosonic wave component. The fast magnetosonic wave speed is formed from two components; the Alfven speed (magnetic) and the sound speed (thermal). By making measurements of the wave speed, coronal density and temperature it is possible to calculate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength through coronal seismology. In this paper, we investigate an EIT wave observed on 2009 February 13 by the SECCHI/EUVI instruments on board the STEREO satellites. The wave epicenter was observed at disk center in the STEREO B (Behind) satellite. At this time, the STEREO satellites were separated by approximately 90 deg., and as a consequence the STEREO A (Ahead) satellite observed the wave on the solar limb. These observations allowed us to make accurate speed measurements of the wave. The background coronal density was derived through Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations of the quiet Sun and the temperature was estimated through the narrow temperature response in the EUVI bandpasses. The density, temperature, and speed measurements allowed us to estimate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength to be approximately 0.7 {+-} 0.7 G.

  3. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar Corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and Momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from Corona] holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature above the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer instrument (UVCS), and with the Ulysses/Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun instrument (SWOOPS) proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 and 5 solar radii (2 and 5 R(sub S)) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201.-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta [19941. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al. [1998], and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub S), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models [e.g., Steinolfson et al., 1982; also G. A. Gary and D. Alexander, Constructing the coronal magnetic field, submitted to Solar Physics, 1998].

  4. Standing sausage modes in curved coronal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Magnetohydrodynamic waveguides such as dense coronal loops can support standing modes. The ratios of the periods of oscillations for different longitudinal harmonics depend on the dispersive nature of the waveguide and so may be used as a seismological tool to determine coronal parameters. Aims: We extend models of standing sausage modes in low β coronal loops to include the effects of loop curvature. The behaviour of standing sausage modes in this geometry is used to explain the properties of observed oscillations that cannot be accounted for using straight loop models. Methods: We perform 2D numerical simulations of an oscillating coronal loop, modelled as a dense slab embedded in a potential magnetic field. The loop is field-aligned and so experiences expansion with height in addition to being curved. Standing sausage modes are excited by compressive perturbations of the loop and their properties are studied. Results: The spatial profiles of standing sausage modes are found to be modified by the expanding loop geometry typical for flaring loops and modelled by a potential magnetic field in our simulations. Longitudinal harmonics of order n > 1 have anti-nodes that are shifted towards the loop apex and the amplitude of anti-nodes near the loop apex is smaller than those near the loop footpoints. Conclusions: We find that the observation of standing sausage modes by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph in a flaring coronal loop on 12 January 2000 is consistent with interpretation in terms of the global mode (n = 1) and third harmonic (n = 3). This interpretation accounts for the period ratio and spatial structure of the observed oscillations.

  5. Interchange Reconnection and Coronal Hole Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Lynch, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic reconnection between open and closed fields, often referred to as interchange reconnection, on the dynamics and topology of coronal hole boundaries. The most important and most prevalent three-dimensional topology of the interchange process is that of a small-scale bipolar magnetic field interacting with a large-scale background field. We determine the evolution of such a magnetic topology by numerical solution of the fully three-dimensional MHD equations in spherical coordinates. First, we calculate the evolution of a small-scale bipole that initially is completely inside an open field region and then is driven across a coronal hole boundary by photospheric motions. Next the reverse situation is calculated in which the bipole is initially inside the closed region and driven toward the coronal hole boundary. In both cases, we find that the stress imparted by the photospheric motions results in deformation of the separatrix surface between the closed field of the bipole and the background field, leading to rapid current sheet formation and to efficient reconnection. When the bipole is inside the open field region, the reconnection is of the interchange type in that it exchanges open and closed fields. We examine, in detail, the topology of the field as the bipole moves across the coronal hole boundary and find that the field remains well connected throughout this process. Our results, therefore, provide essential support for the quasi-steady models of the open field, because in these models the open and closed flux are assumed to remain topologically distinct as the photosphere evolves. Our results also support the uniqueness hypothesis for open field regions as postulated by Antiochos et al. On the other hand, the results argue against models in which open flux is assumed to diffusively penetrate deeply inside the closed field region under a helmet streamer. We discuss the implications of this work for coronal observations.

  6. DARK JETS IN SOLAR CORONAL HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Peter R.

    2015-03-10

    A new solar feature termed a dark jet is identified from observations of an extended solar coronal hole that was continuously monitored for over 44 hr by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode spacecraft in 2011 February 8–10 as part of Hinode Operation Plan No. 177 (HOP 177). Line of sight (LOS) velocity maps derived from the coronal Fe xii λ195.12 emission line, formed at 1.5 MK, revealed a number of large-scale, jet-like structures that showed significant blueshifts. The structures had either weak or no intensity signal in 193 Å filter images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, suggesting that the jets are essentially invisible to imaging instruments. The dark jets are rooted in bright points and occur both within the coronal hole and at the quiet Sun–coronal hole boundary. They exhibit a wide range of shapes, from narrow columns to fan-shaped structures, and sometimes multiple jets are seen close together. A detailed study of one dark jet showed LOS speeds increasing along the jet axis from 52 to 107 km s{sup −1} and a temperature of 1.2–1.3 MK. The low intensity of the jet was due either to a small filling factor of 2% or to a curtain-like morphology. From the HOP 177 sample, dark jets are as common as regular coronal hole jets, but their low intensity suggests a mass flux around two orders of magnitude lower.

  7. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from coronal holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature in the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UVCS, and with the Ulysses/SWOOPS proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 solar radii and 5 solar radii (2RS and 5RS) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer, the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub s), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models.

  8. Nonlinear Force-free Coronal Magnetic Stereoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chifu, Iulia; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2017-03-01

    Insights into the 3D structure of the solar coronal magnetic field have been obtained in the past by two completely different approaches. The first approach are nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolations, which use photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The second approach uses stereoscopy of coronal magnetic loops observed in EUV coronal images from different vantage points. Both approaches have their strengths and weaknesses. Extrapolation methods are sensitive to noise and inconsistencies in the boundary data, and the accuracy of stereoscopy is affected by the ability of identifying the same structure in different images and by the separation angle between the view directions. As a consequence, for the same observational data, the 3D coronal magnetic fields computed with the two methods do not necessarily coincide. In an earlier work (Paper I) we extended our NLFFF optimization code by including stereoscopic constrains. The method was successfully tested with synthetic data, and within this work, we apply the newly developed code to a combined data set from SDO/HMI, SDO/AIA, and the two STEREO spacecraft. The extended method (called S-NLFFF) contains an additional term that monitors and minimizes the angle between the local magnetic field direction and the orientation of the 3D coronal loops reconstructed by stereoscopy. We find that when we prescribe the shape of the 3D stereoscopically reconstructed loops, the S-NLFFF method leads to a much better agreement between the modeled field and the stereoscopically reconstructed loops. We also find an appreciable decrease by a factor of two in the angle between the current and the magnetic field. This indicates the improved quality of the force-free solution obtained by S-NLFFF.

  9. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Alp; Demirkan, Fahir; Sabir, Nuran; Oto, Murat; Yorukoglu, Cagdas; Kiter, Esat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP) is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21–84 years). Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA) and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA) along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA) in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78–102°). On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP); instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively). Combined correlation is perfect (R2 = 1) as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component positioning

  10. Technique and Early Results of Percutaneous Reduction of Sagittally Unstable Intertrochateric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young Soo; Oh, Hyunsup; Cho, Yoon Je

    2011-01-01

    Background This paper introduces a percutaneous reduction technique using one or two Steinman pin(s) to reduce sagittally unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Methods A fracture was defined as a sagittally unstable intertrochanteric fracture when posterior sagging of a distal fragment and flexion of the proximal fragment worsens after usual maneuvers for a closed reduction. Of 119 intertrochanteric fractures treated from June 2007 to December 2008, twenty-one hips showed sagittal instability. The sagittal displacement was reduced using a Steinmann pin as a joystick, and stabilized with a nail device. Nineteen hips were followed up for more than one year. The clinical and radiological results were reviewed in 19 hips and compared with those of the remaining cases. Results The demographics were similar in both groups. The mean anesthetic time did not differ. Although the pre-injury and final activity levels were significantly lower in the study group, the degree of recovery was the same. No clinical complications related to this technique were encountered. Radiologically, the reduction was good in all hips in both groups. Union was obtained in all cases without any time differences. Conclusions This less invasive reduction technique is simple and safe to use for this type of difficult fracture. PMID:21909469

  11. Gravitational forces and sagittal shape of the spine. Clinical estimation of their relations.

    PubMed

    Legaye, J; Duval-Beaupere, G

    2008-12-01

    The sagittal morphology of the pelvis determines the amount of lordosis needed for each individual. The proper harmony of the sagittal spinal curves allows a stable balance, economical in terms of mechanical effects and muscular energy. A previous barycentremetrical laboratory study allowed us to demonstrate that the axis of gravity of the upper body segment was located behind the lumbar vertebrae and the femoral heads, thus ensuring economy and stability. The determination of the anatomical connection of the individual gravity is thus of primary importance for the evaluation of sagittal balance. Data for 42 patients without spinal pathology, previously evaluated by barycentremetry, were used to establish a predictive equation for the application point of the gravity at the level of the third lumbar vertebra (L3). This equation, using anthropometric and radiographic pelvic and spinal parameters, was integrated into a software program called Similibary. It was applied to the same 42 subjects. These results were compared in order to validate the method. No significant difference was observed between the two techniques. This easy-to-use tool allows a personalised evaluation of the sagittal balance of the spine, both through the evaluation of the harmonious relationship between the spinal curves and the pelvis, and through the location of gravity supported by the vertebral structures in L3.

  12. Sagittal alignment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint after arthrodesis for rheumatoid forefoot deformity.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Akihiko; Majima, Tokifumi; Onodera, Tomohiro; Sawaguchi, Naohiro; Watanabe, Takuya; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    The present study assessed the midterm results of reconstruction for rheumatoid forefoot deformity with arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, scarf osteotomy, resection arthroplasty of the metatarsal head of the lesser toes, and surgical repair of hammertoe deformity (arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint). Special focus was placed on the sagittal alignment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint after arthrodesis. We retrospectively evaluated the postoperative clinical outcomes and radiographic findings for 16 consecutive female patients (20 feet) with symptomatic rheumatoid forefoot deformities. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.9 (range 4 to 13) years. All first MTP joints and first metatarsal bones were fused successfully. The mean value of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and Japanese Society for Foot Surgery clinical scores significantly improved overall, except for 2 patients (10%), who complained of first toe pain at the final follow-up visit owing to sagittal misalignment of the fused first MTP joint. Sagittal alignment of the first metatarsal varies greatly because of the rheumatoid midfoot and hindfoot deformities. Therefore, inclination of the first metatarsal should be considered when determining the first MTP joint sagittal fusion angle.

  13. Sagittal alignment of the spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W. J.; Liu, F.; Zhu, Y.W.; Sun, M.H.; Qiu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Normal sagittal spine-pelvis-lower extremity alignment is crucial in humans for maintaining an ergonomic upright standing posture, and pathogenesis in any segment leads to poor balance. The present study aimed to investigate how this sagittal alignment can be affected by severe knee osteoarthritis (KOA), and whether associated changes corresponded with symptoms of lower back pain (LBP) in this patient population. Methods Lateral radiograph films in an upright standing position were obtained from 59 patients with severe KOA and 58 asymptomatic controls free from KOA. Sagittal alignment of the spine, pelvis, hip and proximal femur was quantified by measuring several radiographic parameters. Global balance was accessed according to the relative position of the C7 plumb line to the sacrum and femoral heads. The presence of chronic LBP was documented. Comparisons between the two groups were carried by independent samples t-tests or chi-squared test. Results Patients with severe KOA showed significant backward femoral inclination (FI), hip flexion, forward spinal inclination, and higher prevalence of global imbalance (27.1% versus 3.4%, p < 0.001) compared with controls. In addition, patients with FI of 10° (n = 23) showed reduced lumbar lordosis and significant forward spinal inclination compared with controls, whereas those with FI > 10° (n = 36) presented with significant pelvic anteversion and hip flexion. A total of 39 patients with KOA (66.1%) suffered from LBP. There was no significant difference in sagittal alignment between KOA patients with and without LBP. Conclusions The sagittal alignment of spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis was significantly influenced by severe KOA. The lumbar spine served as the primary source of compensation, while hip flexion and pelvic anteversion increased for further compensation. Changes in sagittal alignment may not be involved in the pathogenesis of LBP in this patient population. Cite this article: W. J. Wang, F. Liu

  14. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  15. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Coronal Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-01-01

    Brief summaries of the four published papers produced within the present performance period of NASA Grant NAGW-4081 are presented. The full text of the papers are appended to the report. The first paper titled "Coronal Structures Observed in X-rays and H-alpa Structures" was published in the Kofu Symposium proceedings. The study analyzes cool and hot behavior of two x-ray events, a small flare and a surge. It was found that a large H-alpha surge appears in x-rays as a very weak event, while a weak H-alpha feature corresponds to the brightest x-ray emission on the disk at the time of the observation. Calculations of the heating necessary to produce these signatures, and implications for the driving and heating mechanisms of flares vs. surges are presented. The second paper "Differential Magnetic Field Shear in an Active Region" has been published in The Astrophysical Journal. The study compared the three dimensional extrapolation of magnetic fields with the observed coronal structure in an active region. Based on the fit between observed coronal structure throughout the volume of the region and the calculated magnetic field configurations, the authors propose a differential magnetic field shear model for this active region. The decreasing field shear in the outer portions of the AR may indicate a continual relaxation of the magnetic field with time, corresponding to a net transport of helicity outward. The third paper "Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure" has been published in the journal Solar Physics. This paper discusses the evidence that the temperature and density structure of the corona are far more complicated than had previously been thought. The discussion is based on five studies carried out by the group on coronal plasma properties, showing that any one x-ray instrument does see all of the plasma present in the corona, that hot and cool material may appear to be co-spatial at a given location in the corona, and that simple magnetic field

  17. Reconnection and Spire Drift in Coronal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    It is observed that there are two morphologically-different kinds of X-ray/EUV jets in coronal holes: standard jets and blowout jets. In both kinds: (1) in the base of the jet there is closed magnetic field that has one foot in flux of polarity opposite that of the ambient open field of the coronal hole, and (2) in coronal X-ray/EUV images of the jet there is typically a bright nodule at the edge of the base. In the conventional scenario for jets of either kind, the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade, the downward product of interchange reconnection of closed field in the base with impacted ambient open field, and the upper product of this reconnection is the jet-outflow spire. It is also observed that in most jets of either kind the spire drifts sideways away from the bright nodule. We present the observed bright nodule and spire drift in an example standard jet and in two example blowout jets. With cartoons of the magnetic field and its reconnection in jets, we point out: (1) if the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade made by interchange reconnection, then the spire should drift toward the bright nodule, and (2) if the bright nodule is instead a compact flare arcade made, as in a filament-eruption flare, by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting sheared-field core of a lobe of the closed field in the base, then the spire, made by the interchange reconnection that is driven on the outside of that lobe by the lobe’s internal convulsion, should drift away from the bright nodule. Therefore, from the observation that the spire usually drifts away from the bright nodule, we infer: (1) in X-ray/EUV jets of either kind in coronal holes the interchange reconnection that generates the jet-outflow spire usually does not make the bright nodule; instead, the bright nodule is made by reconnection inside erupting closed field in the base, as in a filament eruption, the eruption being either a confined eruption for a standard jet or a blowout eruption (as

  18. [Prosthetic evaluation of the sagittal curve of the edentulous mandibular ridge].

    PubMed

    Fejérdy, Pál; Esztári, Imre; Kaán, Miklós

    2003-10-01

    The literature lacks reports on measurement-based investigations of the sagittal curve of the mandibular ridge. The prosthetic significance of that curve is a debated issue even today. Our investigations have been carried out on functional samples of randomly selected edentulous patients (55 females and 17 males) treated at the Department of Prosthodontics of the Semmelweis University, Budapest. We made photographs using a Polaroid MACRO 5 SLR camera on a squared factory-made film, under standard circumstances, from both right and left directions. The photographs were then scanned with 600 dpi resolution and saved as non-compressed tif files (Tag Image File Format). The evaluation of the digitalized photographs has been carried out using a specifically developed computer program. On the four-times enlarged pictures, we made three measurements at each point; the arithmetical means of those sets of three figures served as a basis for statistical analysis. The data were analysed by gender and by side, using the SPSS program package (t-test). Our measurements showed that the sagittal curve is characteristic of the edentulous mandibular ridge as well. However, it does not exhibit significant differences by gender, individual, or side. The average value of the lowest point of the sagittal curve was 5.78 mm, s +/- 1.96 mm, minimum = 1.83 mm, maximum = 11.12 mm. It was concluded from our measurements and comparative anatomical data--clinical observations, as well as measurement-based investigations--that the Spee-curve of the healthy dentition and the sagittal curve of the edentulous mandibular ridge are formed by the same forces. If, in everyday practice, sagittal curves of the occlusion surfaces of complete lower dentures are set parallel with the mandibular edge, this is the most preferable solution with respect to both the stability of complete lower dentures and the optimal functioning of constrictor muscles.

  19. Coronal Heating: Testing Models of Coronal Heating by Forward-Modeling the AIA Emission of the Ansample of Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanushenko, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a systemic exploration of the properties of coronal heating, by forward-modeling the emission of the ensemble of 1D quasi-steady loops. This approximations were used in many theoretical models of the coronal heating. The latter is described in many such models in the form of power laws, relating heat flux through the photosphere or volumetric heating to the strength of the magnetic field and length of a given field line. We perform a large search in the parameter space of these power laws, amongst other variables, and compare the resulting emission of the active region to that observed by AIA. We use a recently developed magnetic field model which uses shapes of coronal loops to guide the magnetic model; the result closely resembles observed structures by design. We take advantage of this, by comparing, in individual sub-regions of the active region, the emission of the active region and its synthetic model. This study allows us to rule out many theoretical models and formulate predictions for the heating models to come.

  20. Precise measurement of planeness.

    PubMed

    Schulz, G; Schwider, J

    1967-06-01

    Interference methods are reviewed-particularly those developed at the German Academy of Sciences in Berlin-with which the deviations of an optically flat surface from the ideal plane can be measured with a high degree of exactness. One aid to achieve this is the relative methods which measure the differences in planeness between two surfaces. These are then used in the absolute methods which determine the absolute planeness of a surface. This absolute determination can be effected in connection with a liquid surface, or (as done by the authors) only by suitable evaluation of relative measurements between unknown plates in various positional combinations. Experimentally, one uses two- or multiple-beam interference fringes of equal thickness(1) or of equal inclination. The fringes are observed visually, scanned, or photographed, and in part several wavelengths or curves of equal density (Aquidensiten) are employed. The survey also brings the following new methods: a relative method, where, with the aid of fringes of superposition, the fringe separation is subdivided equidistantly thus achieving an increase of measuring precision, and an absolute method which determines the deviations of a surface from ideal planeness along arbitrary central sections, without a liquid surface, from four relative interference photographs.

  1. Plane Jane(s).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Describes an assignment that was used in an advanced drawing class in which the students created self-portraits, breaking up their images using planes and angles to suggest their bone structure. Explains that the students also had to include three realistic portions in their drawings. (CMK)

  2. Coronal heating by stochastic magnetic pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Uchida, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Recent observational data cast serious doubt on the widely held view that the Sun's corona is heated by traveling waves (acoustic or magnetohydrodynamic). It is proposed that the energy responsible for heating the corona is derived from the free energy of the coronal magnetic field derived from motion of the 'feet' of magnetic field lines in the photosphere. Stochastic motion of the feet of magnetic field lines leads, on the average, to a linear increase of magnetic free energy with time. This rate of energy input is calculated for a simple model of a single thin flux tube. The model appears to agree well with observational data if the magnetic flux originates in small regions of high magnetic field strength. On combining this energy input with estimates of energy loss by radiation and of energy redistribution by thermal conduction, we obtain scaling laws for density and temperature in terms of length and coronal magnetic field strength.

  3. Solar Coronal Magneto- Seismology With Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verth, G.; Erdéyi, R.

    2007-01-01

    MHD waves in solar coronal loops, which were previously only predicted by theory have now actually been detected with instruments such as TRACE and SUMER on-board SOHO. These observations have given the solar community an important and novel tool to measure fundamental parameters in the magnetically embedded solar corona. Theory has been developed to derive detailed diagnostic information, e.g., density, magnetic field look structure, geometry, and stratifications. In this paper we demonstrate through examples of case studies how the EUV imager on Solar Orbiter can be used for solar atmospheric (coronal) magneto-seismology. Possible methods will be discussed to determine (i) if magnetic field divergence or plasma density stratification is the dominating factor in transversal loop oscillations (ii) important parameters such as the density scale heigh and magnetic dipole depth of a loop.

  4. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A. C.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; DeVore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; Török, T.; Mason, H.; Curdt, W.; Meyer, K.; Dalmasse, K.; Matsui, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  5. Coronal Structures Observed by Radio Propagation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes (1) advances in our knowledge of coronal structures inferred from radio propagation measurements, and (2) gains in our understanding of the relationship between radio propagation and white-light coronagraph measurements. Radio propagation measurements confirm that streamers are ray-like structures as depicted in coronagraph pictures, but also reveal a hierarchy of filamentary structures throughout the corona, extending from the size of streamers down to scale sizes as small as about 1 km at the Sun (10(ghe) arcsec). Doppler scintillation measurements, therefore, open a new window on small-scale structure that has long eluded coronagraph measurements. In addition, high precision ranging measurements make it possible to investigate large-scale structures not yet observed in corona graphs, such as plumes in equatorial coronal regions.

  6. Coronal Mass Ejections - A Statistical View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintCyr, O. C.; Cremades, H.

    2008-01-01

    Although first recognized in 1971, the quasi-continuous record since 1979 of the appearance of coronal mass ejections (CMEs-perhaps more appropriately called coronal magnetic ejections) has resulted in a stable understanding of their properties, at least from a statistical viewpoint. These eruptions occur every few days during solar activity minimum and many times per day during maximum. They are believed to play an important role throughout the heliosphere in such diverse events as removing helicity from the corona; modulating the energetic particle environment in the inner heliosphere; causing severe geomagnetic storms at Earth and other magnetic bodies throughout the solar system; and controlling the galactic cosmic ray flux. It is therefore understandable that researchers have studied both individual events and the ensemble of CMEs observed over several solar cycles. We will present an overview of these statistics, some new recent observations, and a personal perspective on potential paths of future research.

  7. Damped transverse oscillations of interacting coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto; Luna, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Damped transverse oscillations of magnetic loops are routinely observed in the solar corona. This phenomenon is interpreted as standing kink magnetohydrodynamic waves, which are damped by resonant absorption owing to plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field. The periods and damping times of these oscillations can be used to probe the physical conditions of the coronal medium. Some observations suggest that interaction between neighboring oscillating loops in an active region may be important and can modify the properties of the oscillations. Here we theoretically investigate resonantly damped transverse oscillations of interacting nonuniform coronal loops. We provide a semi-analytic method, based on the T-matrix theory of scattering, to compute the frequencies and damping rates of collective oscillations of an arbitrary configuration of parallel cylindrical loops. The effect of resonant damping is included in the T-matrix scheme in the thin boundary approximation. Analytic and numerical results in the specific case of two interacting loops are given as an application.

  8. Empirical scaling laws for coronal heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1983-01-01

    The origins and uses of scaling laws in studies of stellar outer atmospheres are reviewed with particular emphasis on the properties of coronal loops. Some evidence is presented for a fundamental structuring of the solar corona and the thermodynamics of scaling laws are discussed. It is found that magnetic field-related scaling laws can be obtained by relating coronal pressure, temperature, and magnetic field strength. Available data validate this method. Some parameters of the theory, however, must be treated as adjustable, and it is considered necessary to examine data from other stars in order to determine the validity of the parameters. Using detailed observational data, the applicability of single loop models is examined.

  9. WAVE LEAKAGE AND RESONANT ABSORPTION IN A LOOP EMBEDDED IN A CORONAL ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Rial, S.; Terradas, J.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Arregui, I. E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the temporal evolution of impulsively generated perturbations in a potential coronal arcade with an embedded loop. For the initial configuration we consider a coronal loop, represented by a density enhancement, which is unbounded in the ignorable direction of the arcade. The linearized time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic equations have been numerically solved in field-aligned coordinates and the time evolution of the initial perturbations has been studied in the zero-{beta} approximation. For propagation constrained to the plane of the arcade, the considered initial perturbations do not excite trapped modes of the system. This weakness of the model is overcome by the inclusion of wave propagation in the ignorable direction. Perpendicular propagation produces two main results. First, damping by wave leakage is less efficient because the loop is able to act as a better wave trap of vertical oscillations. Second, the consideration of an inhomogeneous corona enables the resonant damping of vertical oscillations and the energy transfer from the interior of the loop to the external coronal medium.

  10. The Coronal Magnetic Field, Signatures of Coronal Holes and Silicon Nanometer Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, S. R.; Arndt, M. B.; Nayfeh, M.; Arnaud, J.; Woo, R.

    2003-12-01

    The near-infrared part of the solar spectrum is where some of the strongest coronal forbidden lines are formed. Polarized emission in these lines offers the only tool currently known for the inference of the direction of the coronal magnetic field. The first successful observations of the polarized emission from the 1074.7 nm Fe XIII line were made by Eddy, Lee and Emerson during the eclipse of 1966 in a limited region of the corona. The only subsequent polarimetric observations in this line were carried out with the coronagraph at Sac Peak from 1977-1980. We report on the first successful polarimetric measurements of the 1074.7 nm line in a field of view extending out to 3.5 solar radii which were made during the total solar eclipse of 21 June 2001. In addition to confirming earlier results of the predominance of a radial direction of the coronal magnetic field, these measurements yielded the first polarimetric signature of coronal holes, and the signature of nanometer size dust grains in the corona. These observations suggest the existence of a rich coronal spectrum of narrow lines in the near-infared produced by the fluorescence of silicon nanometer dust grains in the inner corona. This work was funded by NSF grant ATM-0003661 and NASA grant NAG5-10873 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  11. Constructing the Coronal Magnetic Field: by Correlating Parameterized Magnetic Field Lines with Observed Coronal Plasma Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    The reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field is carried out using a perturbation procedure. A set of magnetic field lines generated from magnetogram data is parameterized and then deformed by varying the parameterized values. The coronal fluxtubes associated with this field are adjusted until the correlation between the field lines and the observed coronal loops is maximized. A mathematical formulation is described which ensures (1) that the normal component of the photospheric field remains unchanged, (2) that the field is given in the entire corona, (3) that the field remains divergence free, and (4) that electrical currents are introduced into the field. It is demonstrated that a simple radial parameterization of a potential field, comprising a radial stretching of the field, can provide a match for a simple bipolar active region, AR 7999, which crossed the central meridian on 1996 Nov 26. At a coronal height of 30 km, the resulting magnetic field is a non-force free magnetic field with the maximum Lorentz force being on the order of 2.6 x 10(exp -9) dyn resulting from an electric current density of $0.13 mu A/ sq m. This scheme is an important tool in generating a magnetic field solution consistent with the coronal flux tube observations and the observed photospheric magnetic field.

  12. Bridging the Gap between Coronal and Non-Coronal Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Nielsen, Krister E.; Kober, Gladys V.

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Treasury Program "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL)" enables investigations of a broad range of problems including the character and dynamics of the wind and chromosphere of cool stars. This paper presents an investigation of the change in spectral characteristics when transitioning from the cool non-coronal objects with fluorescent emission spectra from the iron group elements, molecular hydrogen, and carbon monoxide to the warmer stars on the blue side of the Linsky-Haish dividing line in the HR diagram. These warmer objects exhibit chromospheric emission from significantly hotter environments in addition to coronal signatures, while the hybrid stars overlap in the HR-diagram with some of the non-coronal objects and share many spectral characteristics but show differences in the wind properties. We show how the wind, fluorescent features, and hot stellar signatures dramatically change with spectral class by comparing the already analyzed non-coronal objects (Alpha Ori, Gamma Cru) with the hybrid stars (Gamma Dra, Beta Gem and Alpha Aqr) and the coronal object Beta Dra. We aim to gain understanding of the physical processes in these objects' outer atmospheres and their evolutionary tracks.

  13. The photospheric Poynting flux and coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Brian T.

    2015-04-01

    Some models of coronal heating suppose that convective motions at the photosphere shuffle the footpoints of coronal magnetic fields and thereby inject sufficient magnetic energy upward to account for observed coronal and chromospheric energy losses in active regions. Using high-resolution observations of plage magnetic fields made with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite, we investigate this idea by estimating the upward transport of magnetic energy-the vertical Poynting flux, Sz-across the photosphere in a plage region. To do so, we combine the following: (i) estimates of photospheric horizontal velocities, vh, determined by local correlation tracking applied to a sequence of line-of-sight magnetic field maps from the Narrowband Filter Imager, with (ii) a vector magnetic field measurement from the SpectroPolarimeter. Plage fields are ideal observational targets for estimating energy injection by convection, because they are (i) strong enough to be measured with relatively small uncertainties, (ii) not so strong that convection is heavily suppressed (as within umbrae), and (iii) unipolar, so Sz in plage is not influenced by mixed-polarity processes (e.g., flux emergence) unrelated to heating in stable, active-region fields. In this plage region, we found that the average Sz varied in space, but was positive (upward) and sufficient to explain coronal heating, with values near (5 ± 1) × 107 erg cm-2 s-1. We find the energy input per unit magnetic flux to be on the order of 105 erg s-1 Mx-1. A comparison of intensity in a Ca II image co-registered with one plage magnetogram shows stronger spatial correlations with both total field strength and unsigned vertical field, |Bz|, than either Sz or horizontal flux density, Bh. The observed Ca II brightness enhancement, however, probably contains a strong contribution from a near-photosphere hot-wall effect, which is unrelated to heating in the solar atmosphere.

  14. ON THE ERUPTION OF CORONAL FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.

    2010-08-10

    We present three-dimensional MHD simulations of the evolution of the magnetic field in the corona where the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube is driven at the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. Through a sequence of simulations in which we vary the amount of twisted flux transported into the corona before the emergence is stopped, we investigate the conditions that lead to a dynamic eruption of the resulting coronal flux rope. It is found that the critical condition for the onset of eruption is for the center of the flux rope to reach a critical height at which the corresponding potential field declines with height at a sufficiently steep rate, consistent with the onset of the torus instability of the flux rope. In some cases, immediately after the emergence is stopped, the coronal flux rope first settles into a quasi-static rise with an underlying sigmoid-shaped current layer developing. Preferential heating of field lines going through this current layer may give rise to the observed quiescent X-ray sigmoid loops before eruption. Reconnections in the current layer during the initial quasi-static stage is found to add detached flux to the coronal flux rope, allowing it to rise quasi-statically to the critical height and dynamic eruption of the flux rope then ensues. By identifying field lines whose tops are in the most intense part of the current layer during the eruption, we deduce the evolution and morphology of the post-flare X-ray loops and the flare ribbons at their footpoints.

  15. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  16. Structure and dynamics of coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Progress for the period July 1995 - June 1996 included work on the differential magnetic field shear in an active region; observations and modeling of the solar chromosphere seen in soft X-ray absorption by NIXT; and modeling magnetic flux emergence. These were the subjects of three papers. The plans for the current year include projects on a converging flux model for point-like brightenings around sunspots, and difficulties in observing coronal structure.

  17. Interchange Reconnection and Coronal Hole Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    calculate the time-dependent dynamics of coronal hole boundaries rigorously and test our conjectures. We describe below our numerical simulations of...radiation and thermal conduction are needed in order to test such a model. It is tempting to conjecture that this process of releasing the closed-field... HTP , TR&T, and SR&T Programs, and has benefited greatly from the authors’ participation in the NASA TR&T focused science team on the solar

  18. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-08-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R{sub sun} and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R{sub sun} than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  19. The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, Alan; Bruner, M.; Jurcevich, B.; Lemen, J.; Strong, K.; Tarbell, Ted; Wolfson, C. Jacob; Golub, L.; Bookbinder, J.; Fisher, R.

    1995-01-01

    The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE) NASA small explorer mission and instrument are presented. The TRACE scientific investigation explores the relationships between fine-scale magnetic fields and the associated solar plasma structures. The instrument collects images of solar plasmas at temperatures from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 7) K with one arcsec spatial resolution. The design specifications of the trace instrument are presented.

  20. Structure and dynamics of coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1995-01-01

    The Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope (NIXT) obtained a unique set of high resolution full disk solar images which were exposed simultaneously by X-rays in a passband at 63.5 A and by visible light. The perfect alignment of a photospheric visible light image with a coronal X-ray image enables us to present observations of X-ray intensity vs an accurately determined height above the visible limb. The height at which the observed X-ray intensity peak varies from 4000 km in active regions to 9000 km in quiet regions of the sun. The interpretation of the observations stems from the previously established fact that, for the coronal loops, emission in the NIXT bandpass peaks sharply just above the footpoints. Because there is not a sharp peak in the observed X-ray intensity vs off limb height, we conclude that the loop footpoints, when viewed at the limb, are obscured by absorption in chromospheric material along the line of sight. We calculate the X-ray intensity vs height predicted by a number of different idealizations of the solar atmosphere, and we compare these calculations with the observed X-ray intensity vs height. The calculations use existing coronal and chromospheric models. In order for the calculations to reproduce the observed off limb X-ray intensities, we are forced to assume an atmosphere in which the footpoints of coronal loops are interspersed along the line of sight with cooler chromospheric material extending to heights well above the loop footpoints. We argue that the absorption coefficient for NIXT X-rays by chromospheric material is roughly proportional to the neutral hydrogen density, and we estimate an average neutral hydrogen density and scale height implied by the data.

  1. Coronal microleakage: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover coronal microleakage.

  2. A model for stealth coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Masson, S.; Li, Y.; DeVore, C. R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Antiochos, S. K.; Fisher, G. H.

    2016-11-01

    Stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are events in which there are almost no observable signatures of the CME eruption in the low corona but often a well-resolved slow flux rope CME observed in the coronagraph data. We present results from a three-dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of the 1-2 June 2008 slow streamer blowout CME that Robbrecht et al. (2009) called "the CME from nowhere." We model the global coronal structure using a 1.4 MK isothermal solar wind and a low-order potential field source surface representation of the Carrington Rotation 2070 magnetogram synoptic map. The bipolar streamer belt arcade is energized by simple shearing flows applied in the vicinity of the helmet streamer's polarity inversion line. The flows are large scale and impart a shear typical of that expected from the differential rotation. The slow expansion of the energized helmet streamer arcade results in the formation of a radial current sheet. The subsequent onset of expansion-induced flare reconnection initiates the stealth CME while gradually releasing the stored magnetic energy. We present favorable comparisons between our simulation results and the multiviewpoint SOHO-LASCO (Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph) and STEREO-SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) coronagraph observations of the preeruption streamer structure and the initiation and evolution of the stealth streamer blowout CME.

  3. Solar origins of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    The large scale properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), such as morphology, leading edge speed, and angular width and position, have been cataloged for many events observed with coronagraphs on the Skylab, P-78, and SMM spacecraft. While considerable study has been devoted to the characteristics of the SMEs, their solar origins are still only poorly understood. Recent observational work has involved statistical associations of CMEs with flares and filament eruptions, and some evidence exists that the flare and eruptive-filament associated CMEs define two classes of events, with the former being generally more energetic. Nevertheless, it is found that eruptive-filament CMEs can at times be very energetic, giving rise to interplanetary shocks and energetic particle events. The size of the impulsive phase in a flare-associated CME seems to play no significant role in the size or speed of the CME, but the angular sizes of CMEs may correlate with the scale sizes of the 1-8 angstrom x-ray flares. At the present time, He 10830 angstrom observations should be useful in studying the late development of double-ribbon flares and transient coronal holes to yield insights into the CME aftermath. The recently available white-light synoptic maps may also prove fruitful in defining the coronal conditions giving rise to CMEs.

  4. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  5. Fast Waves in Smooth Coronal Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of transverse density structuring in coronal slab-like waveguides on the properties of fast waves. We generalized previous results obtained for the exponential and Epstein profiles to the case of an arbitrary transverse density distribution. The criteria are given to determine the possible (trapped or leaky) wave regime, depending on the type of density profile function. In particular, there are plasma slabs with transverse density structuring that support pure trapped fast waves for all wavelengths. Their phase speed is nearly equal to the external Alfvén speed for the typical parameters of coronal loops. Our findings are obtained on the basis of Kneser’s oscillation theorem. To confirm the results, we analytically solved the wave equation evaluated at the cutoff point and the original wave equation for particular cases of transverse density distribution. We also used the WKB method and obtained approximate solutions of the wave equation at the cutoff point for an arbitrary transverse density profile. The analytic results were supplemented by numerical solutions of the obtained dispersion relations. The observed high-quality quasi-periodic pulsations of flaring loops are interpreted in terms of the trapped fundamental fast-sausage mode in a slab-like coronal waveguide.

  6. EIT Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurman, J. B.; Fisher, Richard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Before the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we had only the sketchiest of clues as to the nature and topology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) below 1.1 - 1.2 solar radii. Occasionally, dimmings (or 'transient coronal holes') were observed in time series of soft X-ray images, but they were far less frequent than CME's. Simply by imaging the Sun frequently and continually at temperatures of 0.9 - 2.5 MK we have stumbled upon a zoo of CME phenomena in this previously obscured volume of the corona: (1) waves, (2) dimmings, and (3) a great variety of ejecta. In the three and a half years since our first observations of coronal waves associated with CME's, combined Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) and extreme ultra-violet imaging telescope (EIT) synoptic observations have become a standard prediction tool for space weather forecasters, but our progress in actually understanding the CME phenomenon in the low corona has been somewhat slower. I will summarize the observations of waves, hot (> 0.9 MK) and cool ejecta, and some of the interpretations advanced to date. I will try to identify those phenomena, analysis of which could most benefit from the spectroscopic information available from ultraviolet coronograph spectrometer (UVCS) observations.

  7. The Coronal X-ray Deficiency Syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    Something strange happens to M ~ 3 M(sun) stars during their post-MS evolution through the Hertzsprung gap (F--G0), on their way ultimately to the post-helium-flash ``Clump (G8--K0). The subcoronal emissions of the H-gap stars (traced by Mg II and C IV) appear to be normal for fast-rotating giants, but their coronal X-ray luminosities are depressed by an order of magnitude or more. The nearby binary Capella is the archetype: the G0 secondary has a C IV flux 10 times that of the G8 primary, and rotates faster by a similar factor. Yet, evidence points to near equality of the coronal X-ray fluxes. We propose to continue our broad-reaching exploration of the dichotomy (and its implications for coronal heating and the evolution of Dynamo action) through EUVE spectroscopy of key stars along the post-Main-Sequence trajectories connecting the Hertzsprung gap and the Clump.

  8. Temporal Intermittency in Solar Coronal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, K.

    1998-11-01

    The nonlinear response of the solar coronal plasma against a continuous helicity injection is investigated by magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations. Particularly, we perform a long time simulation to examine a self-consistent dynamics which hardly depends on the initial setting. The model is two-dimensional, and the helicity is supplied by a shearing motion at the feet of magnetic loops. The results show us that an intermittent cyclic process happens even though the helicity is constantly supplied. Each process, which is consist of the storage of helicity, the coronal loop instability, reconnection, and the plasmoid ejection, forms a limit cycle in a parameter space of energy and helicity. The limit cycle locates in a region between two branches of the bifurcated linear force free field. As the magnetic Reynolds number increases, the amplitude as well as the period of the cycle increases, and the temporal evolution indicates the saw-tooth like intermittency. They suggest that, even if there is no trigger, the coronal plasma is able to generates an intermittent dynamics like flares, when the magnetic Reynolds number is much larger than unity.

  9. The formation of an equatorial coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Zhang, Jun

    2010-02-01

    The formation of an equatorial coronal hole (CH) from 2006 January 9 to 12 was simultaneously observed by GOES-12/SXI, SOHO/EIT and SOHO/MDI instruments. The varieties of soft X-ray and EUV brightness, coronal temperature, and total magnetic flux in the CH were examined and compared with that of a quiet-sun (QS) region nearby. The following results are obtained. (1) A preexisting dark lane appeared on the location of the followed CH and was reinforced by three enhanced networks. (2) The CH gradually formed in about 81 hours and was predominated by positive magnetic flux. (3) During the formation, the soft X-ray and EUV brightness, coronal temperature, and total magnetic flux obviously decreased in the CH, but were almost no change in the QS region. The decrease of the total magnetic flux may be the result of magnetic reconnection between the open and closed magnetic lines, probably indicating the physical mechanism for the birth of the CH.

  10. The Lower Chromosphere in a Coronal Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplitskaya, R. B.; Turova, I. P.; Ozhogina, O. A.

    2007-07-01

    We study the Ca ii K, H, and λ 849.8 nm line profiles in two regions of the quiet Sun, one being located in the extensive low-latitude coronal hole observed on 3 through 5 August 2003, and the other being located outside the coronal hole. Comparison of the profiles was carried out separately for cells and cell boundaries of the chromospheric network. Our principal result is that space- and time-averaged profiles of the central self-reversal in the coronal hole sites differ from those outside of the hole: Intensities of the K3 and H3 central depressions are increased in the cells but are unchanged in the network; the height of the K2 peaks is reduced in the cells and particularly in the network; the central self-reversal asymmetry is intensified in the network. Distinctions appear at a high confidence level. Line wings as well as average characteristics of the infrared line remain practically unchanged. We discuss probable causes for this behavior of the lower chromosphere lines.

  11. Automatic Determination of the Conic Coronal Mass Ejection Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Oates, T.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of the three-dimensional structure of solar transients using incomplete plane of sky data is a difficult problem whose solutions have potential for societal benefit in terms of space weather applications. In this paper transients are characterized in three dimensions by means of conic coronal mass ejection (CME) approximation. A novel method for the automatic determination of cone model parameters from observed halo CMEs is introduced. The method uses both standard image processing techniques to extract the CME mass from white-light coronagraph images and a novel inversion routine providing the final cone parameters. A bootstrap technique is used to provide model parameter distributions. When combined with heliospheric modeling, the cone model parameter distributions will provide direct means for ensemble predictions of transient propagation in the heliosphere. An initial validation of the automatic method is carried by comparison to manually determined cone model parameters. It is shown using 14 halo CME events that there is reasonable agreement, especially between the heliocentric locations of the cones derived with the two methods. It is argued that both the heliocentric locations and the opening half-angles of the automatically determined cones may be more realistic than those obtained from the manual analysis

  12. Determining the Full Halo Coronal Mass Ejection Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.

    2010-11-01

    Observing halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) in the coronagraph field of view allows one to only determine the apparent parameters in the plane of the sky. Recently, several methods have been proposed allowing one to find some true geometrical and kinematical parameters of HCMEs. In most cases, a simple cone model was used to describe the CME shape. Observations show that various modifications of the cone model ("ice cream models") are most appropriate for describing the shapes of individual CMEs. This paper uses the method of determining full HCME parameters proposed by the author earlier, for determining the parameters of 45 full HCMEs, with various modifications of their shapes. I show that the determined CME characteristics depend significantly on the chosen CME shape. I conclude that the absence of criteria for a preliminary evaluation of the CME shape is a major source of error in determining the true parameters of a full HCME with any of the known methods. I show that, regardless of the chosen CME form, the trajectory of practically all the HCMEs in question deviate from the radial direction towards the Sun-Earth axis at the initial stage of their movement, and their angular size, on average, significantly exceeds that of all the observable CMEs.

  13. In situ observations of coronal mass ejections in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections, CMEs, in the solar wind at 1 AU generally have distinct plasma and field signatures by which they can be distinguished from the ordinary solar wind. These include one or more of the following: helium abundance enhancements, ion and electron temperature depressions, unusual ionization states, strong magnetic fields, low plasma beta, low magnetic field variance, coherent field rotations, counterstreaming (along the field) energetic protons, and counterstreaming suprathermal electrons. The most reliable of these appears to be counterstreaming electrons, which indicates that CMEs at 1 AU typically are closed field structures either rooted at both ends in the Sun or entirely disconnected from it as plasmoids. About 1/3 of all CMEs have sufficiently high speeds to produce transient interplanetary shock disturbances at 1 AU; the remainder simply ride along with the solar wind. The frequency of occurrence of CMEs in the ecliptic plane, as distinguished by the counterstreaming electron signature, varies roughly in phase and amplitude with the 11-yr solar activity cycle. Near solar maximum they account for {approximately} 15% of all solar wind measurements, while near solar minimum they account for less than 1% of all the measurements. All but one of the 37 largest geomagnetic storms near the last solar maximum were associated with Earth-passage of interplanetary disturbances driven by fast CMEs; that is, CMEs are the prime link between solar and geomagnetic activity. However, more than half of all earthward directed CMEs are relatively ineffective in a geomagnetic sense. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Simulations of emerging magnetic flux. II. The formation of unstable coronal flux ropes and the initiation of coronal mass ejections

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-05-20

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (∼36 Mm above the surface). We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as 'magnetic breakout', are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  15. Simulations of Emerging Magnetic Flux. II. The Formation of Unstable Coronal Flux Ropes and the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (approximately 36 Mm above the surface).We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as "magnetic breakout," are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  16. Lumbar facet joint arthritis is associated with more coronal orientation of the facet joints at the upper lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Thorsten; Geiger, James; Zimmermann, Stefan M; Slankamenac, Ksenija; Nguyen-Kim, Thi Dan Linh; Werner, Clément M L

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of 620 individuals, who presented to our traumatology department between 2008 and 2010. Facet joint (FJ) arthritis was present in 308 (49.7%) individuals with a mean grade of 1. It was seen in 27% of individuals ≤40 years and in 75% of individuals ≥41 years (P < 0.0001) as well as in 52% of females and 49% of males (P = 0.61). Mean FJ orientation was 30.4° at L2/3, 38.7° at L3/4, 47° at L4/5, and 47.3° at L5/S1. FJ arthritis was significantly associated with more coronal (increased degree) FJ orientation at L2/3 (P = 0.03) with a cutoff point at ≥32°. FJs were more coronally oriented (48.8°) in individuals ≤40 years and more sagittally oriented (45.6°) in individuals ≥41 years at L5/S1 (P = 0.01). Mean FJ asymmetry was 4.89° at L2/3, 6.01° at L3/4, 6.67° at L4/5, and 7.27° at L5/S1, without a significant difference for FJ arthritis. FJ arthritis is common, increases with age, and affects both genders equally. More coronally oriented FJs (≥32°) in the upper lumbar spine may be an individual risk factor for development of FJ arthritis.

  17. A unified theory of electrodynamic coupling in coronal magnetic loops - The coronal heating problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ionson, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The coronal heating problem is studied, and it is demonstrated that Ionson's (1982) LRC approach results in a unified theory of coronal heating which unveils a variety of new heating mechanisms and which links together previously proposed mechanisms. Ionson's LRC equation is rederived, focusing on various aspects that were not clarified in the original article and incorporating new processes that were neglected. A parameterized heating rate is obtained. It is shown that Alfvenic surface wave heating, stochastic magnetic pumping, resonant electrodynamic heating, and dynamical dissipation emerge as special cases of a much more general formalism. This generalized theory is applied to solar coronal loops and it is found that active region and large scale loops are underdamped systems. Young active region loops and (possibly) bright points are found to be overdamped systems.

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Coronal Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    During the past year this grant has funded research in the interaction between magnetic fields and the hot plasma in the solar outer atmosphere. The following is a brief summary of the published papers, abstracts and talks which have been supported. The paper 'Coronal Structures Observed in X-rays and H-alpha Structures' was published in the Kofu Symposium proceedings. The study analyzes cool and hot behavior of two x-ray events, a small flare and a surge. We find that a large H-alpha surge appears in x-rays as a very weak event, while a weak H-alpha feature corresponds to the brightest x-ray emission on the disk at the time of the observation. Calculations of the heating necessary to produce these signatures, and implications for the driving and heating mechanisms of flares vs. surges are presented. A copy of the paper is appended to this report. The paper 'Differential Magnetic Field Shear in an Active Region' has been published in The Astrophysical Journal. We have compared the 3D extrapolation of magnetic fields with the observed coronal structure in an active region. Based on the fit between observed coronal structure throughout the volume of the region and the calculated magnetic field configurations, we propose a differential magnetic field shear model for this active region. The decreasing field shear in the outer portions of the AR may indicate a continual relaxation of the magnetic field with time, corresponding to a net transport of helicity outward. The paper 'Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure' has been accepted for publication in the journal Solar Physics. In this paper we discuss the evidence that the temperature and density structure of the corona are far more complicated than had previously been thought. The discussion is based on five studies carried out by our group on coronal plasma properties, showing that any one x-ray instrument does see all of the plasma present in the corona, that hot and cool material may appear to be co

  19. Constructing the Coronal Magnetic Field by Correlating Parameterized Magnetic Field Lines with Observed Coronal Plasma Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Gary G.; Alexander, David

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented for constructing the coronal magnetic field from photospheric magnetograms and observed coronal loops. A set of magnetic field lines generated from magnetogram data is parameterized and then deformed by varying the parameterized values. The coronal flux tubes associated with this field are adjusted until the correlation between the field lines and the observed coronal loops is maximized. A mathematical formulation is described which ensures that (1) the normal component of the photospheric field remains unchanged, (2) the field is given in the entire corona over an active region, (3) the field remains divergence-free, and 4electric currents are introduced into the field. It is demonstrated that a parameterization of a potential field, comprising a radial stretching of the field, can provide a match for a simple bipolar active region, AR 7999, which crossed the central meridian on 1996 November 26. The result is a non-force-free magnetic field with the Lorentz force being of the order of 10(exp -5.5) g per s(exp 2) resulting from an electric current density of 0.79 micro A per m(exp 2). Calculations show that the plasma beta becomes larger than unity at a strong non-radial currents requires low height of about 0.25 solar radii supporting the non-force-free conclusion. The presence of such strong non-radial currents requires large transverse pressure gradients fo maintain a magnetostatic atmosphere, required by the relatively persistent nature of the coronal structures observed in AR 7999. This scheme is an important tool in generating a magnetic field solution consistent with the coronal flux tube observations and the observed photospheric magnetic field.

  20. AN IMPROVEMENT ON MASS CALCULATIONS OF SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS VIA POLARIMETRIC RECONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xinghua; Wang, Huaning; Huang, Xin; Du, Zhanle; He, Han

    2015-03-01

    The mass of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is calculated from the measured brightness and assumed geometry of Thomson scattering. The simplest geometry for mass calculations is to assume that all of the electrons are in the plane of the sky (POS). With additional information like source region or multiviewpoint observations, the mass can be calculated more precisely under the assumption that the entire CME is in a plane defined by its trajectory. Polarization measurements provide information on the average angle of the CME electrons along the line of sight of each CCD pixel from the POS, and this can further improve the mass calculations as discussed here. A CME event initiating on 2012 July 23 at 2:20 UT observed by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory is employed to validate our method.

  1. Parameter Plane Design Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Th usr a toente aninteer a thca sms b esta 1 Fp-ocsing 2. Enter P1 values, lwgt, ldig - > 9 Table I give us proper values. Table 1. PARAMETER TABLE...necessary and identify by block number) In this thesis a control systems analysis package is developed using parameter plane methods. It is an interactive...designer is able to choose values of the parameters which provide a good compromise between cost and dynamic behavior. 20 Distribution Availability of

  2. LOS velocity as a tracer of coronal cavity magnetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak-Steslicka, Urszula; Gibson, Sarah; Fan, Yuhong

    The Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter (CoMP) makes daily observations of the lower corona in linear polarization, but also measures Doppler shifts, which allows us to obtain the line-of-sight velocity of coronal plasma. CoMP observations of polarization of coronal emission allows, for the first time, an analysis of the coronal magnetic field direction in quiescent prominence cavities. We present an analysis of Doppler velocity measurements of the numerous quiescent prominence cavities. Such observations are common in cavities and characteristic concentric circles of different values of flow may appear. CoMP data analysis of quiescent cavities is important for understanding pre-CME configuration.

  3. Clinical Impact of Sagittal Spinopelvic Parameters on Disc Degeneration in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2015-10-01

    The sagittal balance plays an important role in the determination of shear and compressive forces applied on the anterior (vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs) and posterior (facet joints) elements of the lumbar vertebral column. Many studies have also examined the effect of structural changes in the disc on the biomechanical characteristics of the spinal segment. Nevertheless, the relationship between sagittal balance and the degree of disc degeneration has not been extensively explored. Thus, here we investigated the relationships between various sagittal spinopelvic parameters and the degree of disc degeneration in young adults.A total of 278 young adult male patients were included in this study (age range: 18-24 years old). Multiple sagittal spinopelvic parameters, including pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral inclination (SI), lumbosacral angle (LSA), and sacral table angle (STA), were measured from standing lateral lumbosacral radiographs. The degree of intervertebral disc degeneration was classified using a modified Pfirrmann scale. To assess the pain intensity of each patient, the visual analogue scale (VAS) score for low back pain (LBP) was obtained from all the patients. Finally, the relationships between these spinopelvic parameters and the degree of disc degeneration in young adults were analyzed. Also, we performed multiple logistic regression study.Out of all the spinopelvic parameters measured in this study, a low STA and a low SI were the only significant risk factors that were associated with disc degeneration in young adults. It means that patients with disc degeneration tend to have more severe sacral kyphosis and vertical sacrum.We found that patients with disc degeneration showed a lower SI and lower STA compared with patients without disc degeneration in young adults. Therefore, we suggest that the patients with disc degeneration tend to have more vertical sacrum, more sacral kyphosis

  4. Melanotic Neuroectodermal Tumor of Infancy with Involvement of the Superior Sagittal Sinus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kimberly A; Choudhri, Asim; Lingo, Ryan; Boop, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy (MNTI) is a rare lesion that typically manifests in the first year of life, most commonly involving the facial bones. We present 2 infants with MNTI involving the posterior skull with associated compression of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). A review of the anatomical locations of MNTI is offered, and the implications of SSS involvement are described. This represents the first known description of MNTI with involvement of the posterior SSS.

  5. Sagittal jaw position in relation to body posture in adult humans – a rasterstereographic study

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Carsten; Danesh, Gholamreza; Schilgen, Markus; Drerup, Burkhard; Hackenberg, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Background The correlations between the sagittal jaw position and the cranio – cervical inclination are described in literature. Only few studies focus on the sagittal jaw position and the body posture using valid and objective orthopaedic examination methods. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with malocclusions reveal significant differences in body posture compared to those without (upper thoracic inclination, kyphotic angle, lordotic angle and lower lumbar inclination). Methods Eighty-four healthy adult patients (with a mean age = 25.6 years and ranging from 16.1 to 55.8 years) were examined with informed consent. The orthodontic examination horizontal overjet (distance between upper and lower incisors) was determined by using an orthodontic digital sliding calliper. The subjects were subdivided in respect of the overjet with the following results: 18 revealed a normal overjet (Class I), 38 had an increased overjet (Class II) and 28 had an reversed overjet (Class III). Rasterstereography was used to carry out a three – dimensional back shape analysis. This method is based on photogrammetry. A three-dimensional shape was produced by analysing the distortion of parallel horizontal white light lines projected on the patient's back, followed by mathematical modelling. On the basis of the sagittal profile the upper thoracic inclination, the thoracic angle, the lordotic angle and the pelvic inclination were determined with a reported accuracy of 2.8° and the correlations to the sagittal jaw position were calculated by means of ANOVA, Scheffé and Kruskal-Wallis procedures. Results Between the different overjet groups, no statistically significant differences or correlations regarding the analysed back shape parameters could be obtained. However, comparing males and females there were statistically significant differences in view of the parameters 'lordotic angle' and 'pelvic inclination'. Conclusion No correlations between overjet and

  6. Zebrin II Is Expressed in Sagittal Stripes in the Cerebellum of Dragon Lizards (Ctenophorus sp.).

    PubMed

    Wylie, Douglas R; Hoops, Daniel; Aspden, Joel W; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase C, also known as zebrin II (ZII), is a glycolytic enzyme that is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells of the vertebrate cerebellum. In both mammals and birds, ZII is expressed heterogeneously, such that there are sagittal stripes of Purkinje cells with high ZII expression (ZII+) alternating with stripes of Purkinje cells with little or no expression (ZII-). In contrast, in snakes and turtles, ZII is not expressed heterogeneously; rather all Purkinje cells are ZII+. Here, we examined the expression of ZII in the cerebellum of lizards to elucidate the evolutionary origins of ZII stripes in Sauropsida. We focused on the central netted dragon (Ctenophorus nuchalis) but also examined cerebellar ZII expression in 5 other dragon species (Ctenophorus spp.). In contrast to what has been observed in snakes and turtles, we found that in these lizards, ZII is heterogeneously expressed. In the posterior part of the cerebellum, on each side of the midline, there were 3 sagittal stripes consisting of Purkinje cells with high ZII expression (ZII+) alternating with 2 sagittal stripes with weaker ZII expression (ZIIw). More anteriorly, most of the Purkinje cells were ZII+, except laterally, where the Purkinje cells did not express ZII (ZII-). Finally, all Purkinje cells in the auricle (flocculus) were ZII-. Overall, the parasagittal heterogeneous expression of ZII in the cerebellum of lizards is similar to that in mammals and birds, and contrasts with the homogenous ZII+ expression seen in snakes and turtles. We suggest that a sagittal heterogeneous expression of ZII represents the ancestral condition in stem reptiles which was lost in snakes and turtles.

  7. Evidence linking coronal transients to the evolution of coronal holes. [solar X-ray observations on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Nolte, J. T.; Solodyna, C. V.; Mcintosh, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    The positions of X-ray coronal transients outside of active regions observed during Skylab were superposed on H-alpha synoptic charts and coronal hole boundaries for seven solar rotations. A detailed spatial association between the transients and neutral lines was confirmed. It was found that most of the transients were related to large-scale changes in coronal hole area and tended to occur on the borders of evolving equatorial holes.

  8. Prediction accuracy in estimating joint angle trajectories using a video posture coding method for sagittal lifting tasks.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Chi; McGorry, Raymond W; Lin, Jia-Hua; Xu, Xu; Hsiang, Simon M

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated prediction accuracy of a video posture coding method for lifting joint trajectory estimation. From three filming angles, the coder selected four key snapshots, identified joint angles and then a prediction program estimated the joint trajectories over the course of a lift. Results revealed a limited range of differences of joint angles (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle) between the manual coding method and the electromagnetic motion tracking system approach. Lifting range significantly affected estimate accuracy for all joints and camcorder filming angle had a significant effect on all joints but the hip. Joint trajectory predictions were more accurate for knuckle-to-shoulder lifts than for floor-to-shoulder or floor-to-knuckle lifts with average root mean square errors (RMSE) of 8.65 degrees , 11.15 degrees and 11.93 degrees , respectively. Accuracy was also greater for the filming angles orthogonal to the participant's sagittal plane (RMSE = 9.97 degrees ) as compared to filming angles of 45 degrees (RMSE = 11.01 degrees ) or 135 degrees (10.71 degrees ). The effects of lifting speed and loading conditions were minimal. To further increase prediction accuracy, improved prediction algorithms and/or better posture matching methods should be investigated. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Observation and classification of postures are common steps in risk assessment of manual materials handling tasks. The ability to accurately predict lifting patterns through video coding can provide ergonomists with greater resolution in characterising or assessing the lifting tasks than evaluation based solely on sampling with a single lifting posture event.

  9. Reliability of sagittal pelvic position assessments in standing, sitting and during hip flexion using palpation meter.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Daniel Camara; Santos, Henrique; Carneiro, Ricardo Luiz; Andrade, Guilherme Trivellato

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate reliability of assessing sagittal pelvic position using the palpation meter (PALM) in healthy subjects while sitting, standing and while in different hip flexion angles in standing. Twenty healthy subjects were assessed two times by the same examiner, with a 48-h interval between test sessions. Reliability indices of PALM measures (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC) were calculated. ICC values showed excellent intra-rater reliability for measurements of sagittal pelvic position in standing and sitting position and for both standing hip flexion angles (ICC = .89-.96). SEM values ranged from .5° (hip flexion 90°) to 1.5° (sitting position). SDC values ranged from 1.5° (hip flexion 90°) to 4.0° (sitting position). The results of this study showed excellent intra-rater reliability for assessing sagittal pelvic position in standing, sitting and hip flexion in healthy subjects using the PALM.

  10. A primo vascular system underneath the superior sagittal sinus in the brain of a rabbit.

    PubMed

    Nam, Min-Ho; Lim, Jaekwan; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Sungchul; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2012-10-01

    The primo vascular systems (PVS) observed in the central nervous system have been limited to the ones floating in the cerebrospinal fluid. In those experiments, it was difficult to obtain the same results because the PVS was not fixed in a given anatomical position. In the current work, we report a finding of a PVS in a well-defined location, namely, underneath the superior sagittal sinus in the sagittal fissure, so that repetition of the experiments is possible. This provides a cornerstone for PVS research because the lack of reproducible sample-taking hindered a deeper study of the PVS, such as RNA sequencing or RNA microarray. This obstacle can be overcome through the discovery in the current work. This PVS showed characteristics of the PVS observed in other organs. It showed the bundle structure of subvessels, the parallel distributions of F-actins, and the rod-shaped nuclei. Furthermore, it had a primo node in front of the confluence of sinuses above the pineal body. It had branches shooting off from the main primo vessel in the subarachnoid space toward the cerebral hemispheres. The results indicate that this PVS underneath superior sagittal sinus has proper features to function as a flowing channel.

  11. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars: XMM-NEWTON Hybrid Stars and Coronal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This program addresses the evolution of stellar coronas by comparing a solar-like corona in the supergiant Beta Dra (G2 Ib-IIa) to the corona in the allegedly more evolved state of a hybrid star, alpha TrA (K2 II-III). Because the hybrid star has a massive wind, it appears likely that the corona will be cooler and less dense as the magnetic loop structures are no longer closed. By analogy with solar coronal holes, when the topology of the magnetic field is configured with open magnetic structures, both the coronal temperature and density are lower than in atmospheres dominated by closed loops. The hybrid stars assume a pivotal role in the definition of coronal evolution, atmospheric heating processes and mechanisms to drive winds of cool stars. We are attempting to determine if this model of coronal evolution is correct by using XMM-NEWTON RGS spectra for the 2 targets we were allocated through the Guest Observer program.

  12. SOLAR JET–CORONAL HOLE COLLISION AND A CLOSELY RELATED CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang

    2016-03-10

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using high-quality imaging data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory, we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which the part of the jet with embedding coronal loops runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced in the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME with an initially narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 Å dark material flowing from the jet–CH interaction region toward the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet–CH collision and the large-scale magnetic topology of the CH being important in defining the eventual propagating direction of this particular jet–CME eruption.

  13. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  14. Coronal plasma diagnostics from eclipse observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Habbal, S. R.; Tomczyk, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this talk we will discuss the diagnostic potential of observationsof visible spectral lines formed in the extended solar corona that canbe obtained during eclipses. We will discuss the possible diagnosticapplications of visible eclipse observations to measure the physicalparameters of the extended corona, to understand solar wind origin andacceleration, and to determine the evolution of Coronal Mass Ejectionsduring onset.We will first review the mechanisms of formation of spectral lineintensities, we will then illustrate their diagnostic applications,and show some results from recent eclipse observations. We will alsoreview the spectral lines that are most likely to be observed inthe extended solar corona during the upcoming 2017 eclipse in thecontinental United States.

  15. Internal morphology of the nonsyndromic prematurely fused sagittal suture in the human skull--A preliminary micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Nowaczewska, W; Ziółkowski, G; Dybała, B

    2015-10-01

    Although nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (NSC) of the sagittal suture is a well-known type of craniosynostosis, little is currently known about the internal morphology of this prematurely fused suture in modern humans. Recently, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has been applied as a new tool for the quantitative evaluation of cranial suture morphology. However, so far there are only a small number of reports concerning studies of the internal morphology of prematurely fused sagittal suture in humans using micro-CT. The primary aim of this study was to examine the internal morphology of a completely obliterated sagittal suture in NSC. Two modern human skulls were used in this study: a skull of a child (aged 10 ± 2.5 years) displaying NSC of the sagittal suture and a skull of an adult showing non-prematurely completely obliterated sagittal suture. Quantitative variables of the sagittal sutures were assessed using method proposed by the authors. Porosity, and relative thickness of three bone layers in two examined skulls (inner cortical, diploë and outer cortical) were analysed using micro-CT in three equal sections of the sagittal suture. In the case of the prematurely fused suture, there were statistically significant differences mainly in the mean values of the porosity, thickness and relative thickness of the diploë between the anterior part and the two other parts (central and posterior) of this suture. Significant differences were also observed in some of the analysed variables between the sections of the sagittal suture of the skull with NSC and the normal skull.

  16. ‘Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis’ Is Not Byword for Degenerative Sagittal Imbalance: Time to Replace a Misconception

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Jang, Jee-Soo; Kim, Sung-Min; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) is a subgroup of the flat-back syndrome and is most commonly caused by unique life styles, such as a prolonged crouched posture during agricultural work and performing activities of daily living on the floor. Unfortunately, LDK has been used as a byword for degenerative sagittal imbalance, and this sometimes causes confusion. The aim of this review was to evaluate the exact territory of LDK, and to introduce another appropriate term for degenerative sagittal deformity. Unlike what its name suggests, LDK does not only include sagittal balance disorder of the lumbar spine and kyphosis, but also sagittal balance disorder of the whole spine and little lordosis of the lumbar spine. Moreover, this disease is closely related to the occupation of female farmers and an outdated Asian life style. These reasons necessitate a change in the nomenclature of this disorder to prevent misunderstanding. We suggest the name “primary degenerative sagittal imbalance” (PDSI), which encompasses degenerative sagittal misalignments of unknown origin in the whole spine in older-age patients, and is associated with back muscle wasting. LDK may be regarded as a subgroup of PDSI related to an occupation in agriculture. Conservative treatments such as exercise and physiotherapy are recommended as first-line treatments for patients with PDSI, and surgical treatment is considered only if conservative treatments failed. The measurement of spinopelvic parameters for sagittal balance is important prior to deformity corrective surgery. LDK can be considered a subtype of PDSI that is more likely to occur in female farmers, and hence the use of LDK as a global term for all degenerative sagittal imbalance disorders is better avoided. To avoid confusion, we recommend PDSI as a newer, more accurate diagnostic term instead of LDK. PMID:28264231

  17. 1990 Volvo Award in clinical sciences. The consistency and accuracy of roentgenograms for measuring sagittal translation in the lumbar vertebral motion segment. An experimental model.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, W O; Spratt, K F; Weinstein, J; Lehmann, T R; Goel, V

    1990-08-01

    An experimental model of the L4-L5 lumbar motion segment was developed that allowed precise manipulation of sagittal translation, rotation of L5 relative to L4, tilt of L4 on L5, and control of roentgenogram quality (image clarity) by placing a water bath between the tube and the vertebral body. A series of experiments were designed to systematically assess the consistency and accuracy of sagittal translation measurements from roentgenograms of varying quality, using different measurement protocols and various rater combinations on models with varying degrees of concomitant motions (rotations and tilts). Study 1 assessed the effects of roentgenogram quality, raters, and seven measurement methods on the consistency and accuracy of evaluating translations in the sagittal plane. Results indicated very high reliabilities across roentgenogram quality, raters, and measurement. As expected, high-quality roentgenograms were more accurately evaluated than lower-quality roentgenograms. However, closer inspection of the consequences of errors in measured translations indicated surprisingly high false-positive and false-negative rates, with significant differences observed between measurement methods. Study 2 assessed the effects of concomitant motions and measurement methods on the consistency and accuracy of evaluations. Within-rater consistency and accuracy indices were remarkably high and similar across measurement methods and degrees of concomitant motions. However, important differences in the false-positive and false-negative rates were again observed. Method 2, described by Morgan and King, demonstrated the overall best performance and the least interference due to concomitant motions. Study 3 assessed the effects of raters and measurement methods on the consistency of measuring translation in clinical roentgenograms, where concomitant motion factors may be present, but not explicitly considered. Results indicated substantially lower within- and between

  18. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, Thomas N.; Webb, David F.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar flare, as is often the case, the flare component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37 dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011 plus an event on 2010 August 7, analyzed in a previous paper to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to the dimming light curves, and compare the dimming parameters with corresponding CME parameters of mass and speed. The best linear relationships found are \\begin{eqnarray*}{v}{CME} ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{{{s}}}\\right] & ≈ & 2.36× {10}6 ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{ % }\\right]× {s}\\dim ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{ % }{{{s}}}\\right]\\ {m}{CME} [{{g}}] & ≈ & 2.59× {10}15≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{g}{ % }\\right]× \\sqrt{{d}\\dim } [ % ].\\end{eqnarray*} These relationships could be used for space weather operations of estimating CME mass and speed using near-real-time irradiance dimming measurements.

  19. Improved methods for determining the kinematics of coronal mass ejections and coronal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J. P.; Long, D. M.; Gallagher, P. T.; Bloomfield, D. S.; Maloney, S. A.; McAteer, R. T. J.; Morgan, H.; Habbal, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    Context. The study of solar eruptive events and associated phenomena is of great importance in the context of solar and heliophysics. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and coronal waves are energetic manifestations of the restructuring of the solar magnetic field and mass motion of the plasma. Characterising this motion is vital for deriving the dynamics of these events and thus understanding the physics driving their initiation and propagation. The development and use of appropriate methods for measuring event kinematics is therefore imperative. Aims: Traditional approaches to the study of CME and coronal wave kinematics do not return wholly accurate nor robust estimates of the true event kinematics and associated uncertainties. We highlight the drawbacks of these approaches, and demonstrate improved methods for accurate and reliable determination of the kinematics. Methods: The Savitzky-Golay filter is demonstrated as a more appropriate fitting technique for CME and coronal wave studies, and a residual resampling bootstrap technique is demonstrated as a statistically rigorous method for the determination of kinematic error estimates and goodness-of-fit tests. Results: It is shown that the scatter on distance-time measurements of small sample size can significantly limit the ability to derive accurate and reliable kinematics. This may be overcome by (i) increasing measurement precision and sampling cadence; and (ii) applying robust methods for deriving the kinematics and reliably determining their associated uncertainties. If a priori knowledge exists and a pre-determined model form for the kinematics is available (or indeed any justified fitting-form to be tested against the data), then its precision can be examined using a bootstrapping technique to determine the confidence interval associated with the model/fitting parameters. Conclusions: Improved methods for determining the kinematics of CMEs and coronal waves are demonstrated to great effect, overcoming many

  20. A Statistical Study of Coronal Mass Ejections and Coronal Holes during 2010-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, J. L.; Evans, R. M.; Muglach, K.

    2014-12-01

    When analyzing CMEs in real time for space weather forecasting, a lack of sufficient coronagraph images can make it difficult to determine the CME's location. In these cases, usually the location of significant disk signatures (for example, an associated flare) is used to estimate the CME's location. Although this assumption seems reasonable, observational and numerical studies have shown that CME locations can deviate by ten or more degrees from the source location close to the solar surface. In this work, we present a study of more than 50 events during 2010-2014 covering a range of CME speeds, widths, and source locations. We use the CCMC's space weather Database Of Notifications, Knowledge, and Information (DONKI) to select events, and use the SWPC's CME Analysis Tool to measure CMEs in the SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI coronagraph images. We find a range of deflections, from less than 5 degrees to more than 15 degrees. It has been proposed that CMEs deflect during propagation due to interactions with other large-scale structures such as coronal holes, streamers, current sheets, and other CMEs. In this study we focus on the influence of coronal holes. We use a combination of SDO/AIA and SECCHI/EUVI images to locate coronal holes near the CME source locations. We present the calculated CME deflection angles as a function of height in the corona, average speed, average width, and coronal hole properties. The goal of this study is to determine appropriate ranges of latitudes and longitudes that can be used in CME ensemble modeling. This requires that coronal hole observations are more systematically incorporated in real time CME analysis for space weather forecasting. J. Zink conducted this research with support from the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program at GMU. R. Evans is supported through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at GSFC, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  1. Evaluation of the Minifilament-Eruption Scenario for Solar Coronal Jets in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baikie, Tomi K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David; Moore, Ronald L.; Savage, Sabrina L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are suspected to result from magnetic reconnection low in the Sun's atmosphere. Sterling et al. (2015) looked as 20 jets in polar coronal holes, using X-ray images from the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). They suggested that each jet was driven by the eruption of twisted closed magnetic field carrying a small-scale filament, which they call a 'minifilament', and that the jet was produced by reconnection of the erupting field with surrounding open field. In this study, we carry out a more extensive examination of polar coronal jets. From 180 hours of XRT polar coronal hole observations spread over two years (2014-2016), we identified 130 clearly-identifiable X-ray jet events and thus determined an event rate of over 17 jets per day per in the Hinode/XRT field of view. From the broader set, we selected 25 of the largest and brightest events for further study in AIA 171, 193, 211, and 304 Angstrom images. We find that at least the majority of the jets follow the minifilament-eruption scenario, although for some cases the evolution of the minifilament in the onset of its eruption is more complex than presented in the simplified schematic of Sterling et al. (2015). For all cases in which we could make a clear determination, the spire of the X-ray jet drifted laterally away from the jet-base-edge bright point; this spire drift away from the bright point is consistent with expectations of the minifilament-eruption scenario for coronal-jet production. This work was supported with funding from the NASA/MSFC Hinode Project Office, and from the NASA HGI program.

  2. How Sublaminar Bands Affect Postoperative Sagittal Alignment in AIS Patients with Preoperative Hypokyphosis? Results of a Series of 34 Patients with 2-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Chalopin, Antoine; Peltier, Emilie; Choufani, Elie; Ollivier, Matthieu; Fuentes, Stéphane; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Hypokyphosis is currently observed in thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. The use of sublaminar bands allows a good restoration of sagittal balance of the spine. The aim of the study was to provide a middle-term radiographic analysis of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with preoperative hypokyphosis treated by posterior arthrodesis with sublaminar bands. This retrospective study included 34 patients with Lenke 1 scoliosis associated with hypokyphosis (TK < 20°). A radiographic evaluation was performed with a 2-year follow-up. Cobb angle, cervical lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and pelvic parameters were measured preoperatively, postoperatively, and at 6-month and 2-year follow-up. The mean preoperative thoracic kyphosis was 10.5° versus 24.1° postoperatively (p < 0.001), representing a mean gain of 13°. Cobb angle ranged from 59.3° to 17.9° postoperatively (mean correction 69%, p < 0.001). Cobb angle increased between the immediate postoperative measurement and the 6-month follow-up (17.9 versus 19.9, p = 0.03). Cervical curvature changed from a 5.6° kyphosis to a 3.5° lordosis (p = 0.001). Concerning lumbar lordosis, preoperative measurement was 39.7° versus 41.3° postoperatively (p = 0.27). At 6-month follow-up, lumbar lordosis significantly increased to 43.6° (p = 0.03). All parameters were stable at final follow-up. Correction performed by sublaminar bands is efficient for both fontal and sagittal planes. Moreover, the restoration of normal thoracic kyphosis is followed by an adaptation of the adjacent curvatures with improved cervical lordosis and lumbar lordosis. PMID:27999791

  3. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  4. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  5. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  6. A Perceptual Correlate of the Labial-Coronal Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Marc; Vallee, Nathalie; Schwartz, Jean-Luc; Rousset, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Statistical studies conducted in various languages on both infants and adults have revealed an intersyllabic preference for initiating words with a labial consonant-vowel-coronal consonant sequence. Speech motor constraints have been proposed to explain this so-called "labial-coronal effect." This study was designed to test for a possible…

  7. NASA’s SDO Spies an Elongated Coronal Hole

    NASA Video Gallery

    A long coronal hole can be seen right down the middle of the sun in this video captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on March 23-25, 2016. Coronal holes are areas on the sun where the solar...

  8. Segmentation of Coronal Holes Using Active Contours Without Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L. E.; Valluri, M.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2016-10-01

    An application of active contours without edges is presented as an efficient and effective means of extracting and characterizing coronal holes. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the Sun with open magnetic field lines. The detection and characterization of these regions is important for testing theories of their formation and evolution, and also from a space weather perspective because they are the source of the fast solar wind. Coronal holes are detected in full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). The proposed method detects coronal boundaries without determining any fixed intensity value in the data. Instead, the active contour segmentation employs an energy-minimization in which coronal holes are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than the surrounding active regions and quiet Sun. The segmented coronal holes tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind observations, and qualitatively match the coronal holes segmented by other methods. The means to identify a coronal hole without specifying a final intensity threshold may allow this algorithm to be more robust across multiple datasets, regardless of data type, resolution, and quality.

  9. Coronal magnetohydrodynamic waves and oscillations: observations and quests.

    PubMed

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2006-02-15

    Coronal seismology, a new field of solar physics that emerged over the last 5 years, provides unique information on basic physical properties of the solar corona. The inhomogeneous coronal plasma supports a variety of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) wave modes, which manifest themselves as standing waves (MHD oscillations) and propagating waves. Here, we briefly review the physical properties of observed MHD oscillations and waves, including fast kink modes, fast sausage modes, slow (acoustic) modes, torsional modes, their diagnostics of the coronal magnetic field, and their physical damping mechanisms. We discuss the excitation mechanisms of coronal MHD oscillations and waves: the origin of the exciter, exciter propagation, and excitation in magnetic reconnection outflow regions. Finally, we consider the role of coronal MHD oscillations and waves for coronal heating, the detectability of various MHD wave types, and we estimate the energies carried in the observed MHD waves and oscillations: Alfvénic MHD waves could potentially provide sufficient energy to sustain coronal heating, while acoustic MHD waves fall far short of the required coronal heating rates.

  10. Magnetism Matters: Coronal Magnetometry Using Multi-Wavelength Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.

    2015-08-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is key both to solving fundamental problems in solar physics such as coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, and to predicting the internal magnetic structure and thus space-weather impact of coronal mass ejections. I will describe the current state of the art in coronal magnetometry, and present results from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), which since 2011 has taken polarimetric observations of the solar corona in the near-infrared on a near-daily basis. I will discuss work in progress that utilizes forward modeling to synthesize polarimetric data at multiple heights and vantage points, and at wavelengths from radio to infrared to visible to ultraviolet. The goal is to use such synthetic testbeds to determine the ideal set of observations for constraining the coronal magnetic field, and to establish a Data-Optimized Coronal Field Model (DOC-FM) that efficiently incorporates these data into global magnetic models. This work will provide essential tools and motivation for the planning and implementation of future coronal polarimetric projects and missions spanning a broad range of wavelengths.

  11. Filament Eruption without Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad; Moore, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We report characteristics of quiescent filament eruptions that were not associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We examined 12 quiescent filament eruptions, each of which was located far from disk center (20.7 R(sub sun)) in diffuse remnant magnetic fields of decayed active regions, was well observed in full-disk movies in Ha and Fe XI, and had good coronagraph coverage. Of the 12 events, 9 were associated with CMEs and 3 were not. Even though the two kinds of eruption were indistinguishable in their magnetic setting and in the eruptive motion of the filament in the Ha movies, each of the CME-producing eruptions produced a two-ribbon flare in Ha and a coronal arcade and/or two-ribbon flare in Fe XII, and each of the non-CME-producing eruptions did not. From this result, and the appearance of the eruptive motion in the Fe XII movies, we conclude that the non-CME-associated filament eruptions are confined eruptions like the confined filament eruptions in active regions.

  12. Analytical investigations on the Coronation Gospels manuscript

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceto, Maurizio; Agostino, Angelo; Fenoglio, Gaia; Idone, Ambra; Crivello, Fabrizio; Griesser, Martina; Kirchweger, Franz; Uhlir, Katharina; Puyo, Patricia Roger

    2017-01-01

    The Coronation Gospels or Krönungsevangeliar is a manuscript kept in Vienna at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, datable to the end of VIII century A.D. and produced at Charlemagne court. It is an example of a purple codex, i.e. its parchment is coloured in purple. It has to be considered as one of the most important medieval codices, according to its use to take oath in the coronation ceremony of kings and emperors of the Holy Roman Empire up to 1792. In order to gather information of the manufacture of the manuscript and its present conservation state, a diagnostic investigation campaign has been carried out in situ with totally non-invasive techniques. X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF), UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry with optical fibres (FORS), spectrofluorimetry, optical microscopy and multispectral analysis have been applied in order to identify the colourants used in the decoration of the manuscript, with the main concern to the dye used to impart the purple hue to the parchment. The information collected was useful in order to address some of the questions raised by art historians concerning its history.

  13. SAUSAGE OSCILLATIONS OF CORONAL PLASMA STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakariakov, V. M.; Hornsey, C.; Melnikov, V. F.

    2012-12-20

    The dependence of the period of sausage oscillations of coronal loops on length together with the depth and steepness of the radial profile are determined. We performed a parametric study of linear axisymmetric fast magnetoacoustic (sausage) oscillations of coronal loops modeled as a field-aligned low-{beta} plasma cylinder with a smooth inhomogeneity of the plasma density in the radial direction. The density decreases smoothly in the radial direction. Sausage oscillations are impulsively excited by a perturbation of the radial velocity, localized at the cylinder axis and with a harmonic dependence on the longitudinal coordinate. The initial perturbation results in either a leaky or a trapped sausage oscillation, depending upon whether the longitudinal wavenumber is smaller or greater than a cutoff value, respectively. The period of the sausage oscillations was found to always increase with increasing longitudinal wavelength, with the dependence saturating in the long-wavelength limit. Deeper and steeper radial profiles of the Alfven speed correspond to more efficient trapping of sausage modes: the cutoff value of the wavelength increases with the steepness and the density (or Alfven speed) contrast ratio. In the leaky regime, the period is always longer than the period of a trapped mode of a shorter wavelength in the same cylinder. For shallow density profiles and shorter wavelengths, the period increases with wavelength. In the long-wavelength limit, the period becomes independent of the wavelength and increases with the depth and steepness of the radial profile of the Alfven speed.

  14. Energetics of solar coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, P.; Vourlidas, A.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We investigate whether solar coronal mass ejections are driven mainly by coupling to the ambient solar wind or through the release of internal magnetic energy. Methods: We examine the energetics of 39 flux-rope like coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun using data in the distance range ~2-20 R⊙ from the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronograph (LASCO) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This comprises a complete sample of the best examples of flux-rope CMEs observed by LASCO in 1996-2001. Results: We find that 69% of the CMEs in our sample experience a clearly identifiable driving power in the LASCO field of view. For those CMEs that are driven, we examine if they might be deriving most of their driving power by coupling to the solar wind. We do not find conclusive evidence in favor of this hypothesis. On the other hand, we find that their internal magnetic energy is a viable source of the required driving power. We have estimated upper and lower limits on the power that can possibly be provided by the internal magnetic field of a CME. We find that, on average, the lower limit to the available magnetic power is around 74% of what is required to drive the CMEs, while the upper limit can be as much as an order of magnitude larger.

  15. Coronal heating by stochastic magnetic pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Uchida, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observational data cast serious doubt on the widely held view that the sun's corona is heated by traveling waves (acoustic or magnetohydrodynamic). It is here proposed that the energy responsible for heating the corona is derived from the free energy of the coronal magnetic field derived from motion of the 'feet' of magnetic field lines in the photosphere. Stochastic motion of the feet of magnetic field lines leads, on the average, to a linear increase of magnetic free energy with time. This rate of energy input is calculated for a simple model of a single thin flux tube. The model appears to agree well with observational data if the magnetic flux originates in small regions of high magnetic field strength as proposed by Tarbell et al. (1979). On combining this energy input with estimates of energy loss by radiation and of energy redistribution by thermal conduction, scaling laws are obtained for density and temperature in terms of length and coronal magnetic field strength.

  16. Modified Homogeneous Data Set of Coronal Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorotovič, I.; Minarovjech, M.; Lorenc, M.; Rybanský, M.

    2014-07-01

    The Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences has published the intensities, recalibrated with respect to a common intensity scale, of the 530.3 nm (Fe xiv) green coronal line observed at ground-based stations up to the year 2008. The name of this publication is Homogeneous Data Set (HDS). We have developed a method that allows one to successfully substitute the ground-based observations by satellite observations and, thus, continue with the publication of the HDS. For this purpose, the observations of the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite, were exploited. Among other data the EIT instrument provides almost daily 28.4 nm (Fe xv) emission-line snapshots of the corona. The Fe xiv and Fe xv data (4051 observation days) taken in the period 1996 - 2008 have been compared and good agreement was found. The method to obtain the individual data for the HDS follows from the correlation analysis described in this article. The resulting data, now under the name of Modified Homogeneous Data Set (MHDS), are identical up to 1996 to those in the HDS. The MHDS can be used further for studies of the coronal solar activity and its cycle. These data are available at http://www.suh.sk.

  17. Slow shocks in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that slow-mode shock compression may produce at least some of the increased brightness observed at the leading edge of coronal mass ejections is investigated. Among the reasons given for the possible existence of slow shocks are the following: (1) transient velocities are often greater than the upstream sound speed but less than the Alfven speed, (2) the presence of a slow shock is consistent with the flat top observed in some transients, and (3) the lateral extension of slow shocks may be responsible for distributing adjacent structures as also seen on the observations. It is shown that there may be some difficulties with this suggestion for transients originating inside the closed-field region at the base of a preexisting coronal streamer. First of all, slow mode characteristics have difficulty emerging from the closed-field region at the streamer base so they can merge to form a slow shock, unless a preceding, large-amplitude disturbance opens the field lines. In addition, a slow shock cannot exist at the center of the streamer current sheet. Finally, numerical simulations demonstrate that at least the last two (and possibly all) of the above reasons for slow shocks can be satisfied by a disturbance whose leading edge propagates at the local fast-mode speed without any shocks. The leading portion of the transient that would be seen in white-light coronagraphs propagates at a speed either less than or equal to the fast-mode speed.

  18. Multi-instrument observations of coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jason Terrence

    This document exhibits results of analysis from data collected with multiple EUV satellites (SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, and SDO). The focus is the detailed observation of coronal loops using multiple instruments, i.e. filter imagers and spectrometers. Techniques for comparing the different instruments and deriving loop parameters are demonstrated. Attention is given to the effects the different instruments may introduce into the data and their interpretation. The assembled loop parameters are compared to basic energy balance equations and scaling laws. Discussion of the blue-shifted, asymmetric, and line broadened spectral line profiles near the footpoints of coronal loops is made. The first quantitative analysis of the anti-correlation between intensity and spectral line broadening for isolated regions along loops and their footpoints is presented. A magnetic model of an active region shows where the separatrices meet the photospheric boundary. At the boundary, the spectral data reveal concentrated regions of increased blue-shifted outflows, blue wing asymmetry, and line broadening. This is found just outside the footpoints of bright loops. The intensity and line broadening in this region are anti-correlated. A comparison of the similarities in the spectroscopic structure near the footpoints of the arcade loops and more isolated loops suggests the notion of consistent structuring for the bright loops forming an apparent edge of an active region core.

  19. Particle Heating Resulting from Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Suman; Sundar De, Syam; Guha, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a continuous phenomena occurring from the entire solar coronal zone responsible for the outflow of solar masses, viz., protons, electrons, neutrons and solar wind in the form of plasma. These perturb the Earth's atmosphere via magnetopause. Very high temperature plasma generator in the solar atmosphere produces huge magnetic dipoles with intense magnetic field. It traps the energetic charged particles released from the solar corona. These particles gyrate along the magnetic field lines and are gradually elongated outwards from the Sun. Due to this, the field lines get detached at some critical limit thereby enhancing the magnetic reconnection with the interplanetary magnetic field releasing huge energy in the form of X-rays and γ-rays. This perturbs the Earth's atmosphere. In this work, the situation has been investigated by momentum balance equation, energy balance equation along with the equations of continuity and states. From the analyses, the dispersive nature of the thermospheric medium is studied. Variation of normalized electron temperature with dimensionless time has been critically contemplated. The altitude dependent electric field in the medium is also investigated.

  20. Current-Driven Instabilities and Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven

    2008-11-01

    Radioastronomical observations of the solar corona have yielded measurements consistent with coronal currents ˜2.5 x10^9 Amperes inside an Amperian Loop with a width of about 35,000 km (Spangler, Astrophysical Journal, 670, 841, 2007). An estimate has been made of the coronal heating due to Joule heating by these currents. It is assumed that the current is concentrated in thin current sheets, as suggested by theories of MHD turbulence. If the Joule heating is to be astrophysically significant, the resistivity in the corona must be enhanced by about 6 orders of magnitude relative to the Spitzer value. In this paper, I explore the possibility that instabilities produced by these currents could be responsible for generating waves and turbulence which raise the resistivity to significant levels. Model-dependent calculations of the electron drift speed in the current sheets indicate that speeds of order the electron thermal speed are possible. Current-driven instabilities and their associated waves are therefore feasible. These drift speeds also exceed the ion acoustic speed, which would excite lower hybrid waves and enhance the resistivity.

  1. Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in Coronal Loops?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbrecht, E.; Berghmans, D.; Nakariakov, V.; Poedts, S.

    1999-10-01

    On May 13, 1998 the EIT and TRACE instruments produced simultaneous high cadence image sequences of the same active region (AR 8218). TRACE achieved a 25 sec cadence in the 171 deg passband while EIT achieved a 15 sec cadence (operating in 'shutterless mode', SOHO JOP 80) in the 195 deg passband. These high cadence observations in two complementary wavelengths have revealed the existence of weak disturbances in an extended coronal loop system. The disturbances originate from small scale brightenings at the footpoints of the loops and propagate along the loops at an apparant speed of the order of 150 km/s which is close to the expected sound speed. To conclude whether these propagating disturbances should be interpreted as slow magnetoacoustic waves or as mass motions ('microflows'), we compare our observational findings with theoretical models. Our results suggest that the recent discovery of DeForest and Gurman (1998) of slow MHD waves in polar plumes, are in fact not typical of polar plumes but occur also in extended coronal structures elsewhere.

  2. Solar Cycle 23 in Coronal Bright Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattarov, Isroil; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Karachik, Nina V.; Sherdanov, Chori T.; Tillaboev, A. M.

    2010-04-01

    We describe an automatic routine to identify coronal bright points (CBPs) and apply this routine to SOHO/EIT observations taken in the 195 Å spectral range during solar cycle 23. We examine the total number of CBPs and its change in the course of this solar cycle. Unlike some other recent studies, we do find a modest ≈30% decrease in the number of CBPs associated with maximum of sunspot activity. Using the maximum brightness of CBPs as a criterion, we separate them on two categories: dim CBPs, associated with areas of a quiet Sun, and bright CBPs, associated with an active Sun. We find that the number of dim coronal bright points decreases at the maximum of sunspot cycle, while the number of bright CBPs increases. The latitudinal distributions suggest that dim CBPs are distributed uniformly over the solar disk. Active Sun CBPs exhibit a well-defined two-hump latitudinal profile suggestive of enhanced production of this type of CBPs in sunspot activity belts. Finally, we investigate the relative role of two mechanisms in cycle variations of CBP number, and conclude that a change in fraction of solar surface occupied by the quiet Sun’s magnetic field is the primary cause, with the visibility effect playing a secondary role.

  3. Guide Field Reconnection Turbulence and Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, M. J.; Told, D.; Terry, P. W.; Jenko, F.; Zweibel, E. G.; Zhdankin, V.; Lesch, H.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a prime contender for explaining plasma heating in the solar corona. This work focuses on turbulent reconnection simulations in the strong-guide-field limit, where the gyrokinetics both captures all relevant physical effects and is numerically efficient. Continuously replenished current sheets force a quasi-stationary turbulent state, where significant levels of j . E heating can be measured. In addition, plasmoids are observed to form in the turbulence, causing secondary reconnection events through mergers. Under coronal conditions, the volumetric heating rate is evaluated as 1 . 5 ×10-3 erg cm-3 s-1, in good agreement with observations. This value scales as, in particular, the reconnecting field to the power of 1 . 8 , and the characteristic current sheet width to the power of 0 . 75 . Moreover, heating bursts associated with plasmoid mergers conform with time scales associated observationally with nanoflares. For further details on this work, as well as on the emergence of temperature anisotropies, see [M.J. Pueschel et al., Magnetic Reconnection Turbulence in Strong Guide Fields: Basic Properties and Application to Coronal Heating, accepted for publication in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser.].

  4. BAYESIAN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SEISMOLOGY OF CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A. E-mail: aasensio@iac.es

    2011-10-10

    We perform a Bayesian parameter inference in the context of resonantly damped transverse coronal loop oscillations. The forward problem is solved in terms of parametric results for kink waves in one-dimensional flux tubes in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For the inverse problem, we adopt a Bayesian approach to infer the most probable values of the relevant parameters, for given observed periods and damping times, and to extract their confidence levels. The posterior probability distribution functions are obtained by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating observed uncertainties in a consistent manner. We find well-localized solutions in the posterior probability distribution functions for two of the three parameters of interest, namely the Alfven travel time and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The obtained estimates for the Alfven travel time are consistent with previous inversion results, but the method enables us to additionally constrain the transverse inhomogeneity length scale and to estimate real error bars for each parameter. When observational estimates for the density contrast are used, the method enables us to fully constrain the three parameters of interest. These results can serve to improve our current estimates of unknown physical parameters in coronal loops and to test the assumed theoretical model.

  5. Data-Driven Global Coronal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete; Henney, Carl; Arge, Charles; Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper

    MHD simulations of the solar corona based on maps of the solar magnetic field have been demonstrated to describe many aspects of coronal structure. However, these models are typically integrated to steady state, using synoptic or daily-updated magnetic maps to derive the boundary conditions. The Sun's magnetic flux is always evolving, and these changes in the flux affect the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere. In this presentation, we describe an approach to evolutionary models of the corona and solar wind, using time-dependent boundary conditions. A key aspect of our approach is the use of the Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model to develop time-evolving boundary conditions for the magnetic field. ADAPT incorporates data assimilation techniques into the Worden and Harvey (2000) flux evolution model, making it an especially suitable candidate for providing boundary conditions to MHD models. We describe initial results and their implications for coronal hole evolution and the origin of the slow solar wind.

  6. Evidence of outward flow of plasma in a coronal hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, G. W.; Rense, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    The solar spectrum was photographed in the range 200-700 A with a grazing-incidence stigmatic rocket spectrograph. Doppler shifts of the three coronal lines Si XI (303 A), Mg X (610 A), and Mg IX (368 A) were measured for various regions of the solar disk, including a coronal hole. From the relative shifts in the latter region, an average outward velocity of 16 km/s was computed for the plasma in the coronal hole. The full widths at half-maximum for the above lines were appreciably less in the coronal-hole region than in a quiet region, indicating a lower temperature in the hole. Both the measured velocity and the temperature results are consistent with solar-wind data and with current theories of coronal holes.

  7. Small-Scale Magnetic Reconnection at Equatorial Coronal Hole Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Derek; DeForest, C. E.

    2011-05-01

    Coronal holes have long been known to be the source of the fast solar wind at both high and low latitudes. The equatorial extensions of polar coronal holes have long been assumed to have substantial magnetic reconnection at their boundaries, because they rotate more rigidly than the underlying photosphere. However, evidence for this reconnection has been sparse until very recently. We present some evidence that reconnection due to the evolution of small-scale magnetic fields may be sufficient to drive coronal hole boundary evolution. We hypothesize that a bias in the direction of that reconnection is sufficient to give equatorial coronal holes their rigid rotation. We discuss the prospects for investigating this using FLUX, a reconnection-controlled coronal MHD simulation framework. This work was funded by the NASA SHP-GI program.

  8. Coronal disturbances and their terrestrial effects /Tutorial Lecture/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is undertaken of recent approaches to the prediction of the interplanetary consequences of coronal disturbances, with attention to the relationships of shocks and energetic particles to coronal transients, of proton events to gamma-ray and microwave bursts, of geomagnetic storms to filament eruptions, and of solar wind increases to the flare site magnetic field direction. A discussion is given concerning the novel phenomenon of transient coronal holes, which appear astride the long decay enhancements of 2-50 A X-ray emission following H-alpha filament eruptions. These voids in the corona are similar to long-lived coronal holes, which are the sources of high speed solar wind streams. The transient coronal holes may also be associated with transient solar wind speed increases.

  9. Determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1993-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second year of the contract entitled 'Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms,' NASW-4728, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993. Under this contract SAIC has conducted research into the determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms, including the development and application of algorithms to determine force-free coronal fields above selected observations of active regions. The contract began on June 30, 1992 and has a completion date of December 31, 1994. This contract is a continuation of work started in a previous contract, NASW-4571, which covered the period November 15, 1990 to December 14, 1991. During this second year we have concentrated on studying additional active regions and in using the estimated coronal magnetic fields to compare to coronal features inferred from observations.

  10. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how they form. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  11. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how these affect weather patterns. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  12. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF CORONAL NULL POINTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MAGNETIC BREAKOUT MODEL OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G. R.; Mackay, D. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu E-mail: duncan@mcs.st-and.ac.u

    2009-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate the solar cycle variation of coronal null points and magnetic breakout configurations in spherical geometry, using a combination of magnetic flux transport and potential field source surface models. Within the simulations, a total of 2843 coronal null points and breakout configurations are found over two solar cycles. It is found that the number of coronal nulls present at any time varies cyclically throughout the solar cycle, in phase with the flux emergence rate. At cycle maximum, peak values of 15-17 coronal nulls per day are found. No significant variation in the number of nulls is found from the rising to the declining phase. This indicates that the magnetic breakout model is applicable throughout both phases of the solar cycle. In addition, it is shown that when the simulations are used to construct synoptic data sets, such as those produced by Kitt Peak, the number of coronal nulls drops by a factor of 1/6. The vast majority of the coronal nulls are found to lie above the active latitudes and are the result of the complex nature of the underlying active region fields. Only 8% of the coronal nulls are found to be connected to the global dipole. Another interesting feature is that 18% of coronal nulls are found to lie above the equator due to cross-equatorial interactions between bipoles lying in the northern and southern hemispheres. As the majority of coronal nulls form above active latitudes, their average radial extent is found to be in the low corona below 1.25 R {sub sun} (175, 000 km above the photosphere). Through considering the underlying photospheric flux, it is found that 71% of coronal nulls are produced though quadrupolar flux distributions resulting from bipoles in the same hemisphere interacting. When the number of coronal nulls present in each rotation is compared to the number of bipoles emerging, a wide scatter is found. The ratio of coronal nulls to emerging bipoles is found to be approximately 1/3. Overall

  13. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER and Venus Express spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MESSENGER data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed Venus Express data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left- and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MESSENGER, Venus Express, STEREO-A, STEREO-B and ACE were examined for multipoint signatures of the catalogued ICMEs. For spacecraft separations below 15° in heliocentric longitude, the second spacecraft observed the ICME flux rope in 82 % of cases; this percentage dropped to 49 % for separations between 15 and 30°, to 18 % for separations between 30 and 45°, and to 12 % for separations between 45 and 60°. As the spacecraft separation increased, it became increasingly likely that only the sheath and not the flux rope of the ICME was observed, in agreement with the notion that ICME flux ropes are smaller in longitudinal extent than the shocks or discontinuities that they often drive. Furthermore, this study has identified 23 ICMEs observed by pairs of spacecraft close to radial alignment. A detailed analysis of these events could lead to a better understanding of how ICMEs evolve during propagation.

  14. Comparison of Cone Model Parameters for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Jang, Soojeong; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Kim, Hae-Yeon

    2013-11-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are a major cause of geomagnetic storms, hence their three-dimensional structures are important for space weather. We compare three cone models: an elliptical-cone model, an ice-cream-cone model, and an asymmetric-cone model. These models allow us to determine three-dimensional parameters of HCMEs such as radial speed, angular width, and the angle [ γ] between sky plane and cone axis. We compare these parameters obtained from three models using 62 HCMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO from 2001 to 2002. Then we obtain the root-mean-square (RMS) error between the highest measured projection speeds and their calculated projection speeds from the cone models. As a result, we find that the radial speeds obtained from the models are well correlated with one another ( R > 0.8). The correlation coefficients between angular widths range from 0.1 to 0.48 and those between γ-values range from -0.08 to 0.47, which is much smaller than expected. The reason may be the different assumptions and methods. The RMS errors between the highest measured projection speeds and the highest estimated projection speeds of the elliptical-cone model, the ice-cream-cone model, and the asymmetric-cone model are 376 km s-1, 169 km s-1, and 152 km s-1. We obtain the correlation coefficients between the location from the models and the flare location ( R > 0.45). Finally, we discuss strengths and weaknesses of these models in terms of space-weather application.

  15. Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1997-01-01

    During the course of the present contract we developed an 'evolutionary technique' for the determination of force-free coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograph observations. The method can successfully generate nonlinear force- free fields (with non-constant-a) that match vector magnetograms. We demonstrated that it is possible to determine coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, and we applied it to vector magnetograms of active regions. We have also studied theoretical models of coronal fields that lead to disruptions. Specifically, we have demonstrated that the determination of force-free fields from exact boundary data is a well-posed mathematical problem, by verifying that the computed coronal field agrees with an analytic force-free field when boundary data for the analytic field are used; demonstrated that it is possible to determine active-region coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, by computing the coronal field above active region 5747 on 20 October 1989, AR6919 on 15 November 1991, and AR7260 on 18 August 1992, from data taken with the Stokes Polarimeter at Mees Solar Observatory, University of Hawaii; started to analyze active region 7201 on 19 June 1992 using measurements made with the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter at NSO/Sac Peak; investigated the effects of imperfections in the photospheric data on the computed coronal magnetic field; documented the coronal field structure of AR5747 and compared it to the morphology of footpoint emission in a flare, showing that the 'high- pressure' H-alpha footpoints are connected by coronal field lines; shown that the variation of magnetic field strength along current-carrying field lines is significantly different from the variation in a potential field, and that the resulting near-constant area of elementary flux tubes is consistent with observations; begun to develop realistic models of coronal fields which can be used to study flare trigger mechanisms; demonstrated that

  16. Buried Alive in the Coronal Graveyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Brown, A.; Harper, G. M.

    2002-12-01

    We have used the highly sensitive ``solar-blind'' Chandra High Resolution Camera (HRC-I) to search for 0.2--10 keV coronal X-ray emission from the key ``noncoronal'' red giants Arcturus (α Boo: K1 III) and Aldebaran (α Tauri: K5 III). Our program follows up previous detections of subcoronal (T ~ 105 K) emission lines, such as C 4 λ 1548, by HST STIS, and its predecessor GHRS. The two deep (19 ks) HRC-I pointings failed to detect either red giant, however, with 3 σ upper limits of 1x 10-4 cnts s-1 and 2x 10-4 cnts s-1 for Arcturus and Aldebaran, respectively. The corresponding 0.2--2.0 keV L X/L bol levels are a factor of a thousand lower than the Sun (itself already an inconspicuous coronal object), establishing new limits of coronal futility among late-type stars. At the same time, STIS far-ultraviolet spectra suggest the presence of a ``cool absorber'' in the red giant atmosphere capable of selectively extinguishing the subcoronal spectrum shortward of ~ 1500 Å. The cool absorber must lie beneath the extensive chromospheric (T ~ 7000 K) envelope, because the chromospheric lines lack absorption signatures from the cool layer. As a result, the hot-line structures must be doubly buried under a large column of neutral hydrogen, undoubtedly smothering any soft X-ray emission that might be present. If small-scale magnetic active regions indeed exist in the lower atmospheres of red giants like Arcturus and Aldebaran, they might in some way be responsible for initiating and sustaining the cool outflows of such stars. The source of the near surface magnetism could be analogous to that of the small-scale ephemeral bipolar regions seen ubiquitously on the Sun throughout the sunspot cycle, and thought to be of direct convective origin. [-3mm] This work was supported by Chandra grant G02-3014X and HST grant GO-09273.01--A to the University of Colorado.

  17. Buried Alive in the Coronal Graveyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Brown, Alexander; Harper, Graham M.

    2003-11-01

    We have used the High Resolution Camera (HRC-I) of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory to search for coronal (T~106 K) emission from the archetype ``noncoronal'' red giants Arcturus (α Bootis=HD 124897, K1 III) and Aldebaran (α Tauri=HD 29139, K5 III). Our program follows up previous detections of ultraviolet coronal proxies such as C IV λ1548 (T~1×105 K) and O VI λ1031 (T~3×105 K). The deep (~19 ks) HRC-I pointings obtained a tentative 3 σ detection of Arcturus, with fX(0.2-2keV)=1.0+1.8-0.8×10-15 ergs cm-2 s-1 (95% confidence limits [CLs]), but failed to record Aldebaran, with an upper limit of <~1.5×10-15 ergs cm-2 s-1 (also at 95% CL). The corresponding LX/Lbol ratios are a factor of ten thousand less than the Sun, a low-activity coronal dwarf. At the same time, Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph far-ultraviolet spectra suggest the presence of a ``cool absorber,'' probably near the base of the red giant chromosphere, imprinting discrete low-excitation absorptions on top of highly ionized features such as Si IV λ1393. The hot emission zones thus are at least partially buried under a large column of chromospheric material, which would severely attenuate any soft X-rays that might be emitted. The submerged hot structures presumably are magnetic because of their high temperatures and broad C IV profiles (FWHM~130 km s-1). Perhaps these structures are analogous to small-scale ephemeral bipolar regions seen ubiquitously on the Sun throughout the sunspot cycle and thought to be of direct convective origin. If small-scale magnetic fields indeed are present in the lower atmospheres of red giants such as Arcturus and Aldebaran, they might play a role in initiating the cool winds of such stars, perhaps through a mechanism similar to solar spicules.

  18. Gravitational steady states of solar coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda E.; Asgari-Targhi, M.

    2017-02-01

    Coronal loops on the surface of the sun appear to consist of curved, plasma-confining magnetic flux tubes or "ropes," anchored at both ends in the photosphere. Toroidal loops carrying current are inherently unstable to expansion in the major radius due to toroidal-curvature-induced imbalances in the magnetic and plasma pressures. An ideal MHD analysis of a simple isolated loop with density and pressure higher than the surrounding corona, based on the theory of magnetically confined toroidal plasmas, shows that the radial force balance depends on the loop internal structure and varies over parameter space. It provides a unified picture of simple loop steady states in terms of the plasma beta βo, the inverse aspect ratio ɛ =a /Ro , and the MHD gravitational parameter G ̂≡g a /vA2 , all at the top of the loop, where g is the acceleration due to gravity, a the average minor radius, and vA the shear Alfvén velocity. In the high and low beta tokamak orderings, βo=2 noT /(Bo2/2 μo)˜ɛ1 and ɛ2 , that fit many loops, the solar gravity can sustain nonaxisymmetric steady states at G ̂˜ɛ βo that represent the maximum stable height. At smaller G ̂≤ɛ2βo , the loop is axisymmetric to leading order and stabilized primarily by the two fixed loop ends. Very low beta, nearly force-free, steady states with βo˜ɛ3 may also exist, with or without gravity, depending on higher order effects. The thin coronal loops commonly observed in solar active regions have ɛ ≃0.02 and fit the high beta steady states. G ̂ increases with loop height. Fatter loops in active regions that form along magnetic neutral lines and may lead to solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections have ɛ ≃0.1 -0.2 and may fit the low beta ordering. Larger loops tend to have G ̂>ɛ βo and be unstable to radial expansion because the exponential hydrostatic reduction in the density at the loop-top reduces the gravitational force -ρG ̂ R ̂ below the level that balances expansion, in agreement with

  19. Origin of Coronal Shocks without Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Moon, Y.-J.; Cho, K.-S.; Dryer, M.; Umapathy, S.

    2006-01-01

    We present an analysis of all the events (around 400) of coronal shocks for which the shock-associated metric type IIs were observed by many spectrographs during the period April 1997 December 2000. The main objective of this analysis is to give evidence for the type IIs related to only flare-blast waves, and thus to find out whether there are any type II-associated coronal shocks without mass ejections. By carefully analyzing the data from multi-wavelength observations (Radio, GOES X-ray, Hα, SOHO/LASCO and SOHO/EIT-EUV data), we have identified only 30 events for which there were actually no reports of CMEs. Then from the analysis of the LASCO and EIT running difference images, we found that there are some shocks (nearly 40%, 12/30) which might be associated with weak and narrow mass ejections. These weak and narrow ejections were not reported earlier. For the remaining 60% events (18/30), there are no mass ejections seen in SOHO/LASCO. But all of them are associated with flares and EIT brightenings. Pre-assuming that these type IIs are related to the flares, and from those flare locations of these 18 cases, 16 events are found to occur within the central region of the solar disk (longitude ≤45^∘). In this case, the weak CMEs originating from this region are unlikely to be detected by SOHO/LASCO due to low scattering. The remaining two events occurred beyond this longitudinal limit for which any mass ejections would have been detected if they were present. For both these events, though there are weak eruption features (EIT dimming and loop displacement) in the EIT images, no mass ejection was seen in LASCO for one event, and a CME appeared very late for the other event. While these two cases may imply that the coronal shocks can be produced without any mass ejections, we cannot deny the strong relationship between type IIs and CMEs.

  20. Effects of extraction treatment on maxillary and mandibular sagittal development in growing patients.

    PubMed

    Kalwitzki, Matthias; Godt, Arnim; Göz, Gernot

    2011-10-01

    This retrospective investigation was designed to assess the effects of extraction treatment on the sagittal dimensions of the maxillary and mandibular skeletal structures of growing patients. The records of 40 patients (17 girls, 23 boys; median age 10 years 11 months) whose orthodontic treatment involved extraction of four premolars were evaluated and compared with a control group of 100 patients (54 girls, 46 boys; median age 10 years 7 months) treated non-extraction. Two lateral cephalograms were obtained of each patient, the first before the extractions, T1, and the second at a later point, T2 (mean difference 59 months). Linear parameters, including S-N, the maxillary/mandibular alveolar process, and maxillary/mandibular base, were measured. The same parameters were determined in the control group at corresponding time points (mean difference 63 months). For analysis, the sagittal dimensions of the alveolar processes and jaw bases were compared with each other. The relationships were also established to a reference line known to be unaffected by extraction treatment (S-N). This procedure was performed for the whole sample and for three subgroups formed according to the Wits appraisal. Statistical analysis was carried out using a Student's t-test. Comparisons of the total sample showed differences between the groups, which were statistically significant for the maxillary alveolar process, the mandibular alveolar process, and the mandibular base. They varied however in the different subgroups. Whenever extraction treatment is considered, it should be borne in mind that the effects on the sagittal dimension of different bony structures may vary.

  1. Is sagittal sinus resection in falcine meningiomas a factor of bad surgical outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Aires, Rogério; Maldaun, Marcos Vinicius Calfatt; Tahara, Adriana; de Souza Filho, Antonio Marcos; Zicarelli, Carlos Alexandre; Ramina, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Meningiomas arising purely from the falx below the longitudinal sinus represents a surgical challenge for the neurosurgeon. The authors discuss the new aspects of surgical details that may avoid complications and determine the prognosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated our surgical experience from June 2004 to January 2010. Seventy patients harboring falcine meningiomas were included and submitted for surgical resection. All historical records, office charts and images were reviewed in order to sample the most important data regarding epidemiology, clinical pictures, radiological findings and surgical results, as well as the main complications. The patients were divided into three main groups: anterior third 32 patients (Group A), middle third 15 patients (Group B), 23 patients in the posterior third of falx (Group C). Results: In Group A, total macroscopic resection was achieved in 31 out of 32 cases (96.87%). Twenty five patients had Rankin 0, five patients had Rankin 1-2, two patients had Rankin 6. In Group B (15 patients), 10 patients had gross resection and Rankin 0, four patients had Rankin 1-2 and one patient had Rankin 6. In Group C (23 patients), 20 patients were absolutely able, Rankin score 0, after six months postoperative period (83.3% had excellent results) and no mortality. Four cases had Rankin score 1 – 2 (16.6%). Ten cases (43.47%) had Simpson I resection and ten cases (43.47%) had Simpson II. Conclusion: Despite larger lesion volumes, Group A meningiomas had a better outcome due to the position they were in, the tumor and surrounding structures. The preoperative preparation and surgical planning can preserve sagittal sinus; but in some cases, this is not possible. Sagittal sinus resection, as proven by this paper, is still a factor of bad surgical outcome. In the middle and posterior third, resection of sagittal sinus is a factor of a bad outcome, due to cerebral infartion. PMID:21125007

  2. A magnetohydrodynamic theory of coronal loop transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, T.

    1982-01-01

    The physical and geometrical characteristics of solar coronal loop transients are described in an MHD model based on Archimedes' MHD buoyancy force. The theory was developed from interpretation of coronagraphic data, particularly from Skylab. The brightness of a loop is taken to indicate the electron density, and successive pictures reveal the electron enhancement in different columns. The forces which lift the loop off the sun surface are analyzed as an MHD buoyancy force affecting every mass element by imparting an inertial force necessary for heliocentrifugal motion. Thermal forces are responsible for transferring the ambient stress to the interior of the loop to begin the process. The kinematic and hydrostatic buoyancy overcome the gravitational force, and a flux rope can then curve upward, spiralling like a corkscrew with varying cross section around the unwinding solar magnetic field lines.

  3. Mass flow in loop type coronal transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzer, U.; Poland, A. I.

    1979-01-01

    Coronal transients having characteristics of a well-defined loop structure are examined, particularly with respect to temporal changes in the density and mass per unit length along the loop over periods of several days after the initial eruption. Measurements of mass distributions as a function of time are presented for eight transients, and one particular transient with a fairly simple configuration is investigated in more detail. Theoretical calculations are combined with the masses and densities derived from the observations to obtain estimates of the material flow in the transients; this flow is modeled on the assumption that magnetic forces drive and confine the loop. The flow field is found to be diverging everywhere, indicating that the density decreases in time. It is inferred that the transient legs are approximately in hydrostatic equilibrium and that most of the mass of the transient is lost from the sun during the initial phase.

  4. Coronal Mass Ejections: From Sun to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are gigantic expulsions of magnetized plasmas from the solar corona into the interplanetary (IP) space. CMEs spawn ~ 1015 gr of mass and reach speeds ranging between several hundred to a few thousand km/s (e.g., Gopalswamy et al. 2009; Vourlidas et al. 2010). It takes 1-5 days for a CME to reach Earth. CMEs are one of the most energetic eruptive manifestations in the solar system and are major drivers of space weather via their magnetic fields and energetic particles, which are accelerated by CME-driven shocks. In this review we give a short account of recent, mainly observational, results on CMEs from the STEREO and SDO missions which include the nature of their pre-eruptive and eruptive configurations and the CME propagation from Sun to Earth. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting capabilities in CME studies that will soon become available from new solar and heliospheric instrumentation.

  5. Observation of oscillations in coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Moortel, I.; Walsh, R. W.; Ireland, J.

    2000-10-01

    High cadence TRACE data (JOP 83) in the 171 Å bandpass are used to report on several examples of outward propagating oscillations in the footpoints of large diffuse coronal loop structures close to active regions. The disturbances travel outward with a propagation speed between 70 and 160 km s-1. The variations in intensity are of the order of 2%-4%, compared to the background brightness and these get weaker as the disturbance propagates along the structure. From a wavelet analysis at different positions along the structures, periods in the 200-400 seconds range are found. It is suggested that these oscillations are slow magneto-acoustic waves propagating along the loop, carrying an estimated energy flux of 4×102 ergs cm-2 s-1. .

  6. Dynamic phenomena in coronal flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariska, J. T.; Boris, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The study of stellar atmospheres and the determination of specific physical mechanisms, geometries, and magnetic structures by which coronae are maintained is examined. Ultraviolet and soft X-ray components observed in the radiative output of cool stars and the Sun require counterentropic temperature gradients for their explanation. The existence of a hot corona is recognized as a result of mechanical or fluid dynamic effects and the importance of the magnetic field in the heating is accepted. Magnetohydrodynamic energy release associated with the emergence of magnetic flux through the chromosphere and its dynamic readjustment in the corona are major counterentropic phenomena which are considered as primary candidates for corona heating. Systematic plows in coronal flux tubes result from asymmetric heating and systematic flows can exist without substantial chromospheric pressure differences.

  7. The evolution of the polar coronal holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    He I 10830 A synoptic maps, obtained at the Kitt Peak National Observatory during 1974-1979, show that the sun's polar coronal holes have contracted significantly during 1977-1978. Prior to the accelerated increase of sunspot activity in mid-1977, the area of each polar cap was on the order of 8% of the sun's total surface area, whereas toward the end of 1978 these areas fell below 2% of the total surface area. Synoptic polar plots show that the vestigial holes had irregular shapes and were often well removed from the poles themselves. These results are consistent with the changes that one would expect when the polar magnetic fields are weakening just prior to sunspot maximum

  8. Turbulent resistive heating of solar coronal arches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that coronal heating occurs by means of anomalous Joule heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is examined, with consideration given to currents running from foot of a loop to the other. It is assumed that self-fields generated by the currents are absent and currents follow the direction of the magnetic field, allowing the plasma cylinder to expand radially. Ion and electron heating rates are defined within the cylinder, together with longitudinal conduction and convection, radiation and cross-field transport, all in terms of Coulomb and turbulent effects. The dominant force is identified as electrostatic ion cyclotron instability, while ion acoustic modes remain stable. Rapid heating from an initial temperature of 10 eV to 100-1000 eV levels is calculated, with plasma reaching and maintaining a temperature in the 100 eV range. Strong heating is also possible according to the turbulent Ohm's law and by resistive heating.

  9. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  10. Magnetic field strength in solar coronal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2017-03-01

    We applied Bayesian techniques to the problem of inferring the magnetic field strength in transversely oscillating solar coronal loops from observed periods and damping times. This was done by computing the marginal posterior probability density for parameters such as the waveguide density, the density contrast, the transverse inhomogeneity length scale, and the magnetic field strength under the assumption that the observed waves can be modelled as standing or propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink modes of magnetic flux tubes. Our results indicate that the magnetic field strength can be inferred, even if the densities inside and outside the structure are largely unknown. When information on plasma density is available, the method enables to self-consistently include this knowledge to further constrain the inferred magnetic field strength. The inclusion of the observed oscillation damping enables to obtain information on the transverse density structuring and considerably alters the obtained posterior for the magnetic field strength.

  11. Solar wind origin in coronal funnels.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chuan-Yi; Zhou, Cheng; Marsch, Eckart; Xia, Li-Dong; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Jing-Xiu; Wilhelm, Klaus

    2005-04-22

    The origin of the solar wind in solar coronal holes has long been unclear. We establish that the solar wind starts flowing out of the corona at heights above the photosphere between 5 megameters and 20 megameters in magnetic funnels. This result is obtained by a correlation of the Doppler-velocity and radiance maps of spectral lines emitted by various ions with the force-free magnetic field as extrapolated from photospheric magnetograms to different altitudes. Specifically, we find that Ne7+ ions mostly radiate around 20 megameters, where they have outflow speeds of about 10 kilometers per second, whereas C3+ ions with no average flow speed mainly radiate around 5 megameters. Based on these results, a model for understanding the solar wind origin is suggested.

  12. Improving Heliospheric Field Models with Optimized Coronal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. I.; Davila, J. M.; Uritsky, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions will travel closer to the sun than any previous mission, collecting unprecedented in situ data. This data can provide insight into coronal structure, energy transport, and evolution in the inner heliosphere. However, in order to take full advantage of this data, researchers need quality models of the inner heliosphere to connect the in situ observations to their coronal and photospheric sources. Developing quality models for this region of space has proved difficult, in part because the only part of the field that is accessible for routine measurement is the photosphere. The photospheric field measurements, though somewhat problematic, are used as boundary conditions for coronal models, which often neglect or over-simplify chromospheric conditions, and these coronal models are then used as boundary conditions to drive heliospheric models. The result is a great deal of uncertainty about the accuracy and reliability of the heliospheric models. Here we present a technique we are developing for improving global coronal magnetic field models by optimizing the models to conform to the field morphology observed in coronal images. This agreement between the coronal model and the basic morphology of the corona is essential for creating accurate heliospheric models. We will present results of early tests of two implementations of this idea, and its first application to real-world data.

  13. Transverse Oscillations in a Coronal Loop Triggered by a Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Pant, V.; Srivastava, A. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-11-01

    We detect and analyse transverse oscillations in a coronal loop, lying at the south-east limb of the Sun as seen from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The jet is believed to trigger transverse oscillations in the coronal loop. The jet originates from a region close to the coronal loop on 19 September 2014 at 02:01:35 UT. The length of the loop is estimated to be between 377 - 539 Mm. Only one complete oscillation is detected with an average period of about 32±5 min. Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seismologic inversion techniques, we estimate the magnetic field inside the coronal loop to be between 2.68 - 4.5 G. The velocity of the hot and cool components of the jet is estimated to be 168 km s^{-1} and 43 km s^{-1}, respectively. The energy density of the jet is found to be greater than the energy density of the oscillating coronal loop. We therefore conclude that the jet triggered transverse oscillations in the coronal loop. To our knowledge, this is the first coronal loop seismology study using the properties of a jet propagation to trigger oscillations.

  14. PROMINENCE ACTIVATION BY CORONAL FAST MODE SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Takuya; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    An X5.4 class flare occurred in active region NOAA11429 on 2012 March 7. The flare was associated with a very fast coronal mass ejection (CME) with a velocity of over 2500 km s{sup −1}. In the images taken with the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-B/COR1, a dome-like disturbance was seen to detach from an expanding CME bubble and propagated further. A Type-II radio burst was also observed at the same time. On the other hand, in extreme ultraviolet images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the expanding dome-like structure and its footprint propagating to the north were observed. The footprint propagated with an average speed of about 670 km s{sup −1} and hit a prominence located at the north pole and activated it. During the activation, the prominence was strongly brightened. On the basis of some observational evidence, we concluded that the footprint in AIA images and the ones in COR1 images are the same, that is, the MHD fast mode shock front. With the help of a linear theory, the fast mode Mach number of the coronal shock is estimated to be between 1.11 and 1.29 using the initial velocity of the activated prominence. Also, the plasma compression ratio of the shock is enhanced to be between 1.18 and 2.11 in the prominence material, which we consider to be the reason for the strong brightening of the activated prominence. The applicability of linear theory to the shock problem is tested with a nonlinear MHD simulation.

  15. The Dynamics of Coronal-Hole Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, A. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Wyper, P. F.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2015-12-01

    The source of the slow solar wind at the Sun is the subject of intense debate in solar and heliospheric physics. Because the majority of the solar wind observed at Earth is slow wind, understanding its origin is essential for understanding and predicting Earth's space weather environment. In-situ and remote observations show that, compared to the fast wind, the slow solar wind corresponds to higher freeze-in temperatures, as indicated by charge-state ratios, and more corona-like elemental abundances. These results indicate that the most likely source for the slow wind is the hot plasma in the closed-field corona; however, the release mechanism for the wind from the closed-field regions is far from understood. Here we present the first fully dynamic, 3D MHD simulations of a coronal-hole boundary driven by photospheric convective flows. We determine in detail the opening and closing of coronal flux due to photospheric motions at the base of a helmet streamer. These changes should lead to the release of plasma from the closed magnetic field at the edge of the streamer. Our analysis demonstrates that the bulk of the release is due to interchange reconnection. We calculate the effective of numerical Lundquist number on the dynamics and discuss the implications of our results for theories of slow-wind origin, in particular the S-Web model. We also discuss the implications of our results for observations, in particular from the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions. This work was supported by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  16. FOXSI-2 Observations and Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, S.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Ramsey, B.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Buitrago Casas, J. C.; Takahashi, T.; Foster, N.

    2015-12-01

    Energy release and particle acceleration on the Sun is a frequent occurrence associated with a number of different solar phenomenon including but not limited to solar flares, coronal mass ejections and nanoflares. The exact mechanism through which particles are accelerated and energy is released is still not well understood. This issue is related to the unsolved coronal heating problem, the mystery of the heating mechanism for the million degree solar corona. One prevalent theory posits the existence of a multitude of small flares, dubbed nanoflares. Recent observations of active region AR11890 by IRIS (Testa et al. 2014) are consistent with numerical simulations of heating by impulsive beams of nonthermal electrons, suggesting that nanoflares may be similar to large flares in that they accelerate particles. Furthermore, observations by the EUNIS sounding rocket (Brosius et al. 2014) of faint Fe XIX (592.2 Angstrom) emission in an active region is indicative of plasma at temperatures of at least 8.9 MK providing further evidence of nanoflare heating. One of the best ways to gain insight into accelerated particles on the Sun and the presence of hot plasma is by observing the Sun in hard X-rays (HXR). We present on observations taken during the second successful flight of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI-2). FOXSI flew on December 11, 2014 with upgraded optics as well as new CdTe strip detectors. FOXSI-2 observed thermal emission (4-15 keV) from at least three active regions (AR#12234, AR#12233, AR#12235) and observed regions of the Sun without active regions. We present on using FOXSI observations to test the presence of hot temperatures in and outside of active regions.

  17. Numerical Simulation of DC Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, Brian D.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection, nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla. To connect these simulations to observations the computed number densities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differential emission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions.

  18. Temperature, Density, and Heating Profiles of Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Joseph; Martens, P. C.; Kankelborg, C.; Ritchie, M.; Scott, J.; Sharma, R.

    2013-07-01

    We show detailed results of a combined DEM and density-sensitive line ratio analysis of coronal loops observed simultaneously by EIS and AIA. The temperature and density profiles of the loop are compared to and isolated from those of the surrounding material, and these properties are fit to an analytic strand heating model developed by Martens (2010). This research builds on our previously reported work by analyzing a number of coronal loops (including one observed by the Hi-C rocket), improved background subtraction and loop fitting. These improvements allow us to place significant constraints on the heating distribution of coronal loops.

  19. Guided MHD waves as a coronal diagnostic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    A description is provided of how fast magnetoacoustic waves are ducted along regions of low Alfven velocity (high density) in the corona, exhibiting a distinctive wave signature which may be used as a diagnostic probe of in situ coronal conditions (magnetic field strength, density inhomogeneity, etc.). Some observational knowledge of the start time of the impulsive wave source, possibly a flare, the start and end times of the generated wave event, and the frequency of the pulsations in that event permits a seismological deduction of the physical properties of the coronal medium in which the wave propagated. With good observations the theory offers a new means of probing the coronal atmosphere.

  20. Coronal Plasmas on the Sun and Nearby Stars,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    D-Al73 265 CORONAL PLASMAS ON THE SUN AND NEARBY STARS(U) TUFTS UNIV MEDFORD MA DEPT OF PHYSICS K R LANG 81 SEP 86 AFOSR-TR- 6-89 6 AFOSR-83-6819...TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED CORONAL PLASMAS ON THE SUN AND NEARBY STARS G. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(q) U. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER...research opportunities for the future." Z’A It -’I /I JS AFGSR.TR 9- 6- 0 9 86 CORONAL PLASMAS ON THE SUN AND NEARBY STARS* 4 KENNETH R. LANG

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic waves and coronal seismology: an overview of recent results.

    PubMed

    De Moortel, Ineke; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-07-13

    Recent observations have revealed that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, with a wide range of periods. We give a brief review of some aspects of MHD waves and coronal seismology that have recently been the focus of intense debate or are newly emerging. In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) the current controversy surrounding propagating intensity perturbations along coronal loops, (ii) the interpretation of propagating transverse loop oscillations, (iii) the ongoing search for coronal (torsional) Alfvén waves, and (iv) the rapidly developing topic of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares.

  2. EUV Coronal Waves: Atmospheric and Heliospheric Connections and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2015-12-01

    Since their discovery in late 90's by EIT on SOHO, the study EUV coronal waves has been a fascinating andfrequently strongly debated research area. While it seems as ifan overall consensus has been reached about the nurture and nature of this phenomenon,there are still several important questions regarding EUV waves. By focusing on the most recentobservations, we will hereby present our current understanding about the nurture and nature of EUV waves,discuss their connections with other atmospheric and heliospheric phenomena (e.g.,flares and CMEs, Moreton waves, coronal shocks, coronal oscillations, SEP events) and finallyassess their possible energetic contribution to the overall budget of relatederuptive phenomena.

  3. Coronal joint spaces of the Temporomandibular joint: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joana-Cristina; Pires, Carlos A.; Ponces-Ramalhão, Maria-João-Feio; Lopes, Jorge-Dias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The joint space measurements of the temporomandibular joint have been used to determine the condyle position variation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the coronal joint spaces measurements of the temporomandibular joint. Material and Methods An electronic database search was performed with the terms “condylar position”; “joint space”AND”TMJ”. Inclusionary criteria included: tomographic 3D imaging of the TMJ, presentation of at least two joint space measurements on the coronal plane. Exclusionary criteria were: mandibular fractures, animal studies, surgery, presence of genetic or chronic diseases, case reports, opinion or debate articles or unpublished material. The risk of bias of each study was judged as high, moderate or low according to the “Cochrane risk of bias tool”. The values used in the meta-analysis were the medial, superior and lateral joint space measurements and their differences between the right and left joint. Results From the initial search 2706 articles were retrieved. After excluding the duplicates and all the studies that did not match the eligibility criteria 4 articles classified for final review. All the retrieved articles were judged as low level of evidence. All of the reviewed studies were included in the meta-analysis concluding that the mean coronal joint space values were: medial joint space 2.94 mm, superior 2.55 mm and lateral 2.16 mm. Conclusions the analysis also showed high levels of heterogeneity. Right and left comparison did not show statistically significant differences. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, systematic review, meta-analysis. PMID:26330944

  4. Effects of frontal and sagittal thorax attitudes in gait on trunk and pelvis three-dimensional kinematics.

    PubMed

    Begon, Mickaël; Leardini, Alberto; Belvedere, Claudio; Farahpour, Nader; Allard, Paul

    2015-10-01

    While sagittal trunk inclinations alter upper body biomechanics, little is known about the extent of frontal trunk bending on upper body and pelvis kinematics in adults during gait and its relation to sagittal trunk inclinations. The objective was to determine the effect of the mean lateral trunk attitude on upper body and pelvis three-dimensional kinematics during gait in asymptomatic subjects. Three gait cycles were collected in 30 subjects using a motion analysis system (Vicon 612) and an established protocol. Sub-groups were formed based on the mean thorax lateral bending angle, bending side, and also sagittal tilt. These were compared based on 38 peak angles identified on pelvis, thorax and shoulder kinematics using MANOVAs. A main effect for bending side (p = 0.038) was found, especially for thorax peak angles. Statistics revealed also a significant interaction (p = 0.04993) between bending side and tilt for the thorax sagittal inclination during body-weight transfer. These results reinforce the existence of different gait patterns, which correlate upper body and pelvis motion measures. The results also suggest that frontal and sagittal trunk attitude should be considered carefully when treating a patient with impaired gait.

  5. Long-term Trend of Solar Coronal Hole Distribution from 1975 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, K.; Tokumaru, M.; Hayashi, K.; Satonaka, D.; Hakamada, K.

    2016-08-01

    We developed an automated prediction technique for coronal holes using potential magnetic field extrapolation in the solar corona to construct a database of coronal holes appearing from 1975 February to 2015 July (Carrington rotations from 1625 to 2165). Coronal holes are labeled with the location, size, and average magnetic field of each coronal hole on the photosphere and source surface. As a result, we identified 3335 coronal holes and found that the long-term distribution of coronal holes shows a similar pattern known as the magnetic butterfly diagram, and polar/low-latitude coronal holes tend to decrease/increase in the last solar minimum relative to the previous two minima.

  6. Influence of meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane on the knee contact mechanics.

    PubMed

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Witkowski, Wojciech; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Zarzycki, Witold

    2015-06-01

    We present a three dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution and menisci deformation in the human knee joint. The study is based on the Open Knee model with the geometry of the lateral meniscus which shows some degenerative disorders. The nonlinear analysis of the knee joint under compressive axial load is performed. We present results for intact knee, knee with complete radial posterior meniscus root tear and knee with total meniscectomy of medial or lateral meniscus. We investigate how the meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane influences knee-joint mechanics by comparing the results for flat (degenerated) lateral and normal medial meniscus. Specifically, the deformation of the menisci in the coronal plane and the corresponding stress values in cartilages are studied. By analysing contact resultant force acting on the menisci in axial plane we have shown that restricted extrusion of the torn lateral meniscus can be attributed to small slope of its cross section in the coronal plane. Additionally, the change of the contact area and the resultant force acting on the menisci as the function of compressive load are investigated.

  7. HINODE/XRT AND STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF A DIFFUSE CORONAL 'WAVE'-CORONAL MASS EJECTION-DIMMING EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Engell, Alexander J.; Wills-Davey, Meredith J.; Grigis, Paolo; Testa, Paola

    2009-10-20

    We report on observations of the first diffuse coronal wave detected by Hinode/XRT. The event occurred near the west solar limb on 2007 May 23, originating from active region (AR) 10956 and was associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and coronal dimmings. The bright emission forming the coronal wave expanded predominantly to the east and south of the AR. We use X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and STEREO Behind (B) data combined with a potential magnetic field extrapolation to derive an understanding of the global magnetic field connectivity. We attribute the brightening to the east of the AR to compression and channeling of the plasma along large-scale loops. The brightening to the south of the AR expands across the quiet Sun, making the southern component a likely candidate for identification as a diffuse coronal wave. We analyze the bright front in STEREO/EUVI (B) 171, 195, and 284 A images, as well as in XRT data, finding the strongest components to be largely cospatial in all bandpasses. We also exploit the near-limb location of this event by combining STEREO/COR1 and Extreme Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (EUVI) data. Using all the data, we derive a full picture of the low-coronal development of the eruption. The COR1 data show that the southernmost outer edge of the CME is progressively displaced southward during the expansion. EUVI data below the COR1 occulting disk show that the CME is significantly distorted in the low corona as a result of the associated filament eruption. The core coronal dimmings map to the core of the CME; the secondary coronal dimmings map to the CME cavity; and the diffuse coronal wave maps to the outermost edge of the expanding CME shell. The analysis of this near-limb event has important implications for understanding earlier eruptions originating from the same AR on 2007 May 16, 19, and 20.

  8. Anterior column realignment following lateral interbody fusion for sagittal deformity correction.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Luiz; Fortti, Fernanda; Oliveira, Leonardo; Marchi, Luis; Jensen, Rubens; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Amaral, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Degenerative and iatrogenic diseases may lead to loss of lordosis or even kyphotic thoracolumbar deformity and sagittal misalignment. Traditional surgery with three-column osteotomies is associated with important neurologic risks and postoperative morbidity. In a novel technique, the lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is complemented with the sacrifice of the anterior longitudinal ligament and anterior portion of the annulus followed by the insertion of a hyperlordotic interbody cage. This is a less invasive lateral technique named anterior column realignment (ACR) and aims to correct sagittal misalignment in adult spinal deformity (ASD), with or without the addition of minor posterior osteotomies. In this article, we provide an account of the evolution to the ACR technique, the literature, and the Brazilian experience in the treatment of adult spinal deformity with this novel advanced application of LTIF. In the presence of ASD, the risk-to-benefit ratio of a surgical correction must be evaluated. Less invasive surgical strategies can be alternatives to treat the deformity and provide better quality of life to the patient. ACR is an advanced application of lateral transpsoas approach, up to date has shown to be reliable and effective when used for ASD, and may minimize complications and morbidity from traditional surgical procedures. Long-term follow-up and comparative studies are needed to evaluate real benefit.

  9. Evaluation of facial morphology and sagittal relationship between dental arches in primary and mixed dentition

    PubMed Central

    Traldi, Aline; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; de Souza, Luciane Zanin; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess facial morphology (Pattern) and sagittal relationship between dental arches (Class), and establish a potential association between them and the variables sex, age and ethnicity, among schoolchildren aged between 4 and 9 years old (mean age of 6.7 years) in primary and mixed dentitions. METHODS: The sample comprised 875 children (457 males and 418 females) attending schools in Descalvado, São Paulo, Brazil. An attempt was made with a view to establish a potential association between children's morphological features with sex, age and ethnicity. RESULTS: Descriptive analysis revealed a predominance of facial Pattern I (69.9 %) and Class I (67.4 %). Statistical tests (p < 0.001) showed that Class I was more frequent among Pattern I children, whereas Class II prevailed among Pattern II, and Class III was frequent among Pattern I and III children. Ethnicity was the only variable associated with facial pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that facial pattern and sagittal relationship between dental arches tend to be correlated. Ethnicity was associated with facial pattern, with Pattern I being the most recurrent among Caucasians and facial Pattern II being recurrent among Afro-descendant subjects. PMID:26352847

  10. Risk factors for breakage of biodegradable plate systems after bilateral sagittal split mandibular setback surgery.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Izumi; Igawa, Kaori; Nagata, Jyunko; Yoshida, Maho; Baba, Takashi; Ichiki, Takeshi; Kondoh, Yudai; Takamori, Koichi; Kashima, Koji; Sakoda, Sumio

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the risk factors associated with breakage of biodegradable plate systems after bilateral sagittal split mandibular setback. We studied 169 Japanese adults (62 men, 107 women; age range 16-53 years) with deformities of the jaw diagnosed as mandibular prognathism. All patients were treated by bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) with 2 biodegradable fixation plates and screws at the anterior mandibular ramus. We collected the following data from the medical records and radiological findings: sex; age; degree of setback; presence of asymmetry; presence of open bite; operation; design of the plate; operating time; and blood loss. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find the factors that were independently associated with the dependent variable: breakage of the biodegradable plate system. In 10 of the 169 patients (6%) the biodegradable plate system for the BSSO broke. Factors that influenced whether or not the biodegradable plate system fractured were if they were asymmetrical (odds ratio (OR) 5.35; P=0.02) and had an open bite (OR 5.20; P=0.02). Asymmetry or open bite was significantly associated with breaks in the biodegradable plate system. Biodegradable plates should be used only when loading is minimal.

  11. Current concepts on the sagittal balance and classification of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Tebet, Marcos Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons and paediatrics. In spondylolisthesis, it has been clearly demonstrated over the past decade that spino-pelvic morphology is abnormal and that it can be associated to an abnormal sacro-pelvic orientation as well as to a disturbed global sagittal balance of spine. This article presents the SDSG (Spinal Deformity Study Group) classification of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. The proper treatment of spondylolisthesis is dependent on recognizing the type of slip, sacro-pelvic balance and overall sagittal balance and its natural history. Although a number of clinical radiographic features have been identified as risk factors, their role as primary causative factors or secondary adaptative changes is not clear. The conservative treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis results in good outcome in the majority of cases. Of those patients who fail conservative treatment, success with surgery is quite good, with significant improvement in neurologic function in those patients with deficits, as well as improvement in patients with back pain.

  12. Long-term morphological outcomes in nonsyndromic sagittal craniosynostosis: a comparison of 2 techniques.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory P L; Johnson, David; Byren, Jo C; Jayamohan, Jayaratnam; Magdum, Shailendra A; Richards, Peter G; Wall, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Correction of scaphocephaly is one of the principle goals of surgery in sagittal craniosynostosis. Reported relapse in head shape after surgery and continued head growth into late adolescence underscores the need for long-term outcomes to be considered when comparing between different surgical approaches in this condition; yet there are relatively few reports of results to 5 years and beyond in the literature. Therefore, a retrospective review was performed of the anthropometric data of 224 patients with sagittal craniosynostosis who underwent primary surgery between 1994 and 2012. During this period, patients underwent either a modified strip craniectomy (MSC) or calvarial remodeling (CR) procedure. Sixty-two patients were treated by MSC and followed up for a mean of 44 months. One hundred sixty-two patients had CR, with follow-up for a mean of 45 months. Overall, 90 patients were seen up to 5 years, and 47 patients to 9 years or more after surgery. The cephalic index (CI) of MSC-treated patients improved from a mean of 67.0 to 72.7, with 31% achieving a CI greater than 75 at one year. Calvarial remodeling was significantly more effective at correcting the scaphocephalic deformity. Patients treated with CR improved from a mean CI of 66.7 to 76.1. Sixty-two percent of the patients achieved a CI greater than 75. In both groups, outcomes were stable throughout follow-up with no significant relapse up to 14 years after surgery.

  13. Current concepts on the sagittal balance and classification of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Tebet, Marcos Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons and paediatrics. In spondylolisthesis, it has been clearly demonstrated over the past decade that spino-pelvic morphology is abnormal and that it can be associated to an abnormal sacro-pelvic orientation as well as to a disturbed global sagittal balance of spine. This article presents the SDSG (Spinal Deformity Study Group) classification of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. The proper treatment of spondylolisthesis is dependent on recognizing the type of slip, sacro-pelvic balance and overall sagittal balance and its natural history. Although a number of clinical radiographic features have been identified as risk factors, their role as primary causative factors or secondary adaptative changes is not clear. The conservative treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis results in good outcome in the majority of cases. Of those patients who fail conservative treatment, success with surgery is quite good, with significant improvement in neurologic function in those patients with deficits, as well as improvement in patients with back pain. PMID:26229765

  14. AUTOMATIC DETECTION AND TRACKING OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. MULTISCALE FILTERING OF CORONAGRAPH IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Jason P.; Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia R.; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2012-06-20

    Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), and future coronagraph missions also makes manual cataloging of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloging packages such as CACTus, SEEDS, and ARTEMIS. Here, we present the development of a new CORIMP (coronal image processing) CME detection and tracking technique that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogs. It works by first employing the dynamic CME separation technique outlined in a companion paper, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane of sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. The algorithms described in this article are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI data sets, and a catalog of results will soon be available to the public.

  15. Automatic Detection and Tracking of Coronal Mass Ejections. II. Multiscale Filtering of Coronagraph Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason P.; Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia R.; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2012-06-01

    Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), and future coronagraph missions also makes manual cataloging of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloging packages such as CACTus, SEEDS, and ARTEMIS. Here, we present the development of a new CORIMP (coronal image processing) CME detection and tracking technique that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogs. It works by first employing the dynamic CME separation technique outlined in a companion paper, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane of sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. The algorithms described in this article are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI data sets, and a catalog of results will soon be available to the public.

  16. Automated Detection of coronal mass ejections in three-dimensions using multi-viewpoint observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Joseph; Morgan, Huw

    2016-10-01

    A new, automated method of detecting Solar Wind transients such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in three dimensions for the LASCO C2 and STEREO COR2 coronagraphs is presented. By triangulating isolated CME signal from the three coronagraphs over a sliding window of five hours, the most likely region through which CMEs pass at 5 solar radii is identified. The centre and size of the region gives the most likely direction of propagation and angular extent. The Automated CME Triangulation (ACT) method is tested extensively using a series of synthetic CME images created using a flux rope density model, and on a sample of real coronagraph data; including Halo CMEs. The accuracy of the detection remains acceptable regardless of CME position relative to the observer, the relative separation of the three observers, and even through the loss of one coronagraph. By comparing the detection results with the input parameters of the synthetic CMEs, and the low coronal sources of the real CMEs, it is found that the detection is on average accurate to within 7.14 degrees. All current CME catalogues (CDAW, CACTus, SEEDS, ARTEMIS and CORIMP) rely on plane-of-sky measurements for key parameters such as height and velocity. Estimating the true geometry using the new method gains considerable accuracy for kinematics and mass/density. The results of the new method will be incorporated into the CORIMP database in the near future, enabling improved space weather diagnostics and forecasting.

  17. SEISMOLOGY OF A LARGE SOLAR CORONAL LOOP FROM EUVI/STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF ITS TRANSVERSE OSCILLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Verwichte, E.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Foullon, C.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Aschwanden, M. J.

    2009-06-10

    The first analysis of a transverse loop oscillation observed by both Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatories (STEREO) spacecraft is presented, for an event on the 2007 June 27 as seen by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI). The three-dimensional loop geometry is determined using a three-dimensional reconstruction with a semicircular loop model, which allows for an accurate measurement of the loop length. The plane of wave polarization is found from comparison with a simulated loop model and shows that the oscillation is a fundamental horizontally polarized fast magnetoacoustic kink mode. The oscillation is characterized using an automated method and the results from both spacecraft are found to match closely. The oscillation period is 630 {+-} 30 s and the damping time is 1000 {+-} 300 s. Also, clear intensity variations associated with the transverse loop oscillations are reported for the first time. They are shown to be caused by the effect of line-of-sight integration. The Alfven speed and coronal magnetic field derived using coronal seismology are discussed. This study shows that EUVI/STEREO observations achieve an adequate accuracy for studying long-period, large-amplitude transverse loop oscillations.

  18. Determination of the Structure of the Coronal Magnetic Field Using Microwave Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogod, V. M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2016-11-01

    An analysis of the oscillatory motions and wave processes in active regions requires knowledge of the structure of the magnetic fields in the chromosphere and corona. We study the magnetic field structure of active regions at coronal heights, as they are determined by means of multiwave observations of polarized radio emission of active regions in the microwave range. Two methods, a stereoscopic method and the analysis of the radio spectrum are used. The method of stereoscopy rotation allows estimating the height of radio sources in a stable active region relative to the photosphere, based on its apparent motion in the image plane recorded over several days of observation. At various times one-dimensional scans at multiple frequencies spanning the 5.98 - 15.95 GHz frequency range from the RATAN-600 instrument are used. The gyroresonance emission mechanism, which is sensitive to the coronal magnetic field strength, is applied to convert the radio source estimated heights at various frequencies, h(f), to information as regards magnetic field vs. height, B(h). Diagrams of longitude - height of some polarized radio sources revealed multiple reversals, suggestive of a spiral magnetic structure. In all cases, the magnetic field strength maintains high values (800 - 1000 G) at the highest altitudes analysed, which reflects a relatively weak divergence in the field of magnetic flux tubes (in the height range 8 - 14 Mm) responsible for the main part of the radio emission of active regions.

  19. Influence of gap balance on the sagittal movement of a specific mobile bearing floating platform design in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Dong-Ki; Shin, Young-Soo; Han, Seung-Beom

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed 119 knees implanted with mobile bearing floating platform prostheses using the navigation-assisted gap balancing technique to analyze the relationship between intraoperative sagittal movement of floating platforms and soft tissue balancing. The 95 (79.8%) knees were classified into the positive rollback group (mean insert posterior rollback 5.86 ± 1.24 mm), and the remaining 24 (20.2%) into the negative rollback group. Lateral flexion gap (LFG) differed significantly between knees with positive and negative rollback (20.5 ± 1.7 mm vs 22.1 ± 1.7 mm, P = .021). Only LFG significantly influenced the occurrence of bearing sagittal movement. Sagittal translation of the insert occurred in about 80% of knees implanted with mobile bearing floating platforms in TKA, and was affected by flexion gaps, especially on the lateral side.

  20. New Instruments to Isolate the Coronal Heating Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The coronal heating problem remains unsolved today, 80 years after its discovery, despite 50 years of suborbital and orbital coronal observatories. Tens of theoretical coronal heating mechanisms have been suggested, but only a few have been able to be ruled out. In this talk, we will explore the reasons for the slow progress and discuss the measurements that will be needed for potential breakthrough, including imaging the solar corona at small spatial scales, measuring the chromospheric magnetic fields, and detecting the presence of high temperature, low-emission measure plasma. We will discuss three sounding rocket instruments developed to make these measurements: the High-resolution Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP), and the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS).

  1. Propagation and Dissipation of MHD Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.

    2006-11-01

    bholadwivedi@gmail.com In view of the landmark result on the solar wind outflow, starting between 5 Mm and 20 Mm above the photosphere in magnetic funnels, we investigate the propagation and dissipation of MHD waves in coronal holes. We underline the importance of Alfvén wave dissipation in the magnetic funnels through the viscous and resistive plasma. Our results show that Alfvén waves are one of the primary energy sources in the innermost part of coronal holes where the solar wind outflow starts. We also consider compressive viscosity and thermal conductivity to study the propagation and dissipation of long period slow longitudinal MHD waves in polar coronal holes. We discuss their likely role in the line profile narrowing, and in the energy budget for coronal holes and the solar wind. We compare the contribution of longitudinal MHD waves with high frequency Alfvén waves.

  2. Coronal reconstruction following anterior teeth traumatism: multidisciplinary treatment.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Carneiro, Flavio; Sponchiado, Emilio Carlos; Garcia, Lucas do Fonseca Roberti; Yurtsever, Fikriye Viga; Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Sena, Amilen

    2013-08-01

    This study describes how periodontology, endodontology, and dentistry were integrated for the coronal reconstruction of anterior teeth extensively destroyed by dental trauma. A 15-year-old girl suffered a bicycle accident that resulted in the fracture of teeth No. 8 and 9. Clinical and radiographic examinations confirmed coronal fracture in both teeth, in addition to compromised pulp vitality, invasion of the biologic periodontal space, and loss of coronal space due to mesialization of the neighboring teeth. The protocol consisted of endodontic treatment for the fractured teeth, periodontal surgery to augment the clinical crown and gingival recontouring, intracanal cementation of esthetic glass fiber posts, and coronal reconstruction with resin composite. At a longitudinal follow-up visit 1 year later, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed successful rehabilitation of the fractured teeth.

  3. Non-polar Coronal Holes and Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachik, N.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate properties of non-polar coronal holes (CHs) and their correlation with fast solar wind at 1 AU. Using EIT/SOHO observations taken from 1998-2008 in 195A and 284A wavelength bands, we identify boundaries of coronal holes, and compute their area, total brightness of corona integrated over the CH, as well as the area and total brightness of pixels inside the CH associated with coronal bright points (CBPs). We investigate the effect of each parameter on solar wind speed, the mutual dependency of the parameters, and their changes with the sunspot activity. Our findings suggest that the reconnection events associated with coronal bright points situated in CHs do not play a major role in acceleration of the fast solar wind.

  4. The X-ray signature of solar coronal mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, R. A.; Waggett, P. W.; Bentley, R. D.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Bruner, M.

    1985-01-01

    The coronal response to six solar X-ray flares has been investigated. At a time coincident with the projected onset of the white-light coronal mass ejection associated with each flare, there is a small, discrete soft X-ray enhancement. These enhancements (precursors) precede by typically about 20 m the impulsive phase of the solar flare which is dominant by the time the coronal mass ejection has reached an altitude above 0.5 solar radii. Motions of hot X-ray emitting plasma, during the precursors, which may well be a signature of the mass ejection onsets, are identified. Further investigations have also revealed a second class of X-ray coronal transient, during the main phase of the flare. These appear to be associated with magnetic reconnection above post-flare loop systems.

  5. Coronal Activity and Extended Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altrock, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Wilson et al. (1988, Nature 333, 748) discussed a number of solar parameters, which appear at high latitudes and gradually migrate towards the equator, merging with the sunspot "butterfly diagram". They found that this concept had been identified by earlier investigators extending back to 1957. They named this process the "Extended Solar Cycle" (ESC). Altrock (1997, Solar Phys. 170, 411) found that this process continued in Fe XIV 530.3 nm emission features. In cycles 21 - 23 solar maximum occurred when the number of Fe XIV emission regions per day > 0.19 (averaged over 365 days and both hemispheres) first reached latitudes 18°, 21° and 21°, for an average of 20° ± 1.7°. Other recent studies have shown that Torsional Oscillation (TO) negative-shear zones are co-located with the ESC from at least 50° down to the equator and also in the zones where the Rush to the Poles occur. These phenomena indicate that coronal activity occurring up to 50° and higher latitudes is related to TO shear zones, another indicator that the ESC is an important solar process. Another high-latitude process, which appears to be connected with the ESC, is the "Rush to the Poles" ("Rush") of polar crown prominences and their associated coronal emission, including Fe XIV. The Rush is is a harbinger of solar maximum (cf. Altrock, 2003, Solar Phys. 216, 343). Solar maximum in cycles 21 - 23 occurred when the center line of the Rush reached a critical latitude. These latitudes were 76°, 74° and 78°, respectively, for an average of 76° ± 2°. Applying the above conclusions to Cycle 24 is difficult due to the unusual nature of this cycle. Cycle 24 displays an intermittent "Rush" that is only well-defined in the northern hemisphere. In 2009 an initial slope of 4.6°/yr was found in the north, compared to an average of 9.4 ± 1.7 °/yr in the previous three cycles. This early fit to the Rush would have reached 76° at 2014.6. However, in 2010 the slope increased to 7.5°/yr (an increase

  6. Models of material ejection. [of solar coronal mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Some recently developed models related to the formation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) are reviewed. The models individually consider the stability of a prominence, the eruption of a coupled prominence and CME configuration with driven reconnection below the prominence, magnetic arcade equilibrium, and coronal evolution due to shear motion. No effort is made to critique the various models. Their relevance to actual observed material ejections will ultimately be determined by detailed comparison with present and future observations.

  7. Associations between coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.; Koomen, M. J.; Michels, D. J.; Schwenn, R.; Muhlhauser, K. H.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Nearly continuous complementary coronal observations and interplanetary plasma measurements for the years 1979-1982 are compared. It is shown that almost all low latitude high speed coronal mass ejections (CME's) were associated with shocks at HELIOS 1. Some suitably directed low speed CME's were clearly associated with shocks while others may have been associated with disturbed plasma (such as NCDE's) without shocks. A few opposite hemisphere CME's associated with great flares seem to be associated with shocks at HELIOS.

  8. MHD Modeling of Differential Rotation in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    The photosphere and the magnetic flux therein undergo differential rotation. Coronal holes appear to rotate almost rigidly. Magnetic reconnection has been invoked to reconcile these phenomena. Mechanism relevant to the formation of the slow solar wind. We have used our MHD model in spherical coordinates to study the effect of differential rotation on coronal holes. We have imposed a magnetic flux distribution similar to and applied differential rotation for the equivalent of 5 solar rotations.

  9. Exploración del modelo coronal MHD de Uchida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francile, C.; Castro, J. I.; Flores, M.

    We present an analysis of the MHD model of an isothermal solar corona with radially symmetrical magnetic field and gravity. The solution in the approximation "WKB" was presented by Uchida (1968). The model is ex- plored for different coronal conditions and heights of initial perturbation to study the propagation of coronal waves and reproduce the observed char- acteristics of phenomena such as Moreton waves. Finally we discuss the obtained results. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  10. Are Spicules the Primary Source of Hot Coronal Plasma?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of Type II spicules has generated considerable excitement. It has even been suggested that these ejections can account for a majority of the hot plasma observed in the corona, thus obviating the need for "coronal" heating. If this is the case, however, then there should be observational consequences. We have begun to examine some of these consequences and find reason to question the idea that spicules are the primary source of hot coronal plasma.

  11. The Contribution of Coronal Jets to the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, R.; Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Leake, J. E.; Mikić, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Linton, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the solar corona, commonly known as coronal (or X-ray) jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity. It has been suggested that these events contribute to the mass and energy content of the corona and solar wind, but the extent of these contributions remains uncertain. We have recently modeled the formation and evolution of coronal jets using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with thermodynamics in a large spherical domain that includes the solar wind. Our model is coupled to 3D MHD flux-emergence simulations, i.e., we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. The model includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction, which enables us to simulate the dynamics and plasma properties of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far. Here, we employ these simulations to calculate the amount of mass and energy transported by coronal jets into the outer corona and inner heliosphere. Based on observed jet-occurrence rates, we then estimate the total contribution of coronal jets to the mass and energy content of the solar wind to (0.4-3.0)% and (0.3-1.0)%, respectively. Our results are largely consistent with the few previous rough estimates obtained from observations, supporting the conjecture that coronal jets provide only a small amount of mass and energy to the solar wind. We emphasize, however, that more advanced observations and simulations (including parametric studies) are needed to substantiate this conjecture.

  12. Coronal Streamers in the Solar Wind at 1 AU

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    our at- tempts to relate these events directly to maps or isophotes 7- i of solar coronal brightness at 1.5 solar radii (R.). This ,"-. study...respectively, where the middle of the streamer belt locally predicted from the 1.5 R. coronal brightness isophotes of is at the same latitude as the... isophotes at those particular longitudes. The shaded intervals in Figure 6 map into the longitudes indicated by the vertical shadings in this figure

  13. Strong variability of the coronal line region in NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landt, Hermine; Ward, Martin J.; Steenbrugge, Katrien C.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2015-12-01

    We present the second extensive study of the coronal line variability in an active galaxy. Our data set for the well-studied Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548 consists of five epochs of quasi-simultaneous optical and near-infrared spectroscopy spanning a period of about five years and three epochs of X-ray spectroscopy overlapping in time with it. Whereas the broad emission lines and hot dust emission varied only moderately, the coronal lines varied strongly. However, the observed high variability is mainly due to a flux decrease. Using the optical [Fe VII] and X-ray O VII emission lines we estimate that the coronal line gas has a relatively low density of ne ˜ 103 cm-3 and a relatively high ionisation parameter of log U ˜ 1. The resultant distance of the coronal line gas from the ionizing source of about eight light-years places this region well beyond the hot inner face of the dusty torus. These results imply that the coronal line region is an independent entity. We find again support for the X-ray heated wind scenario of Pier & Voit; the increased ionizing radiation that heats the dusty torus also increases the cooling efficiency of the coronal line gas, most likely due to a stronger adiabatic expansion. The much stronger coronal line variability of NGC 5548 relative to that of NGC 4151 can also be explained within this picture. NGC 5548 has much stronger coronal lines relative to the low-ionization lines than NGC 4151 indicating a stronger wind, in which case a stronger adiabatic expansion of the gas and so fading of the line emission is expected.

  14. The Multithermal and Multi-stranded Nature of Coronal Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, P.; Vissers, G.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Scullion, E.

    2015-06-01

    We analyze coordinated observations of coronal rain in loops, spanning chromospheric, transition region (TR), and coronal temperatures with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution. Coronal rain is found to be a highly multithermal phenomenon with a high degree of co-spatiality in the multi-wavelength emission. EUV darkening and quasi-periodic intensity variations are found to be strongly correlated with coronal rain showers. Progressive cooling of coronal rain is observed, leading to a height dependence of the emission. A fast-slow two-step catastrophic cooling progression is found, which may reflect the transition to optically thick plasma states. The intermittent and clumpy appearance of coronal rain at coronal heights becomes more continuous and persistent at chromospheric heights just before impact, mainly due to a funnel effect from the observed expansion of the magnetic field. Strong density inhomogeneities of 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2-0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5 are found, in which a transition from temperatures of 105 to 104 K occurs. The 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2-0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 8 width of the distribution of coronal rain is found to be independent of temperature. The sharp increase in the number of clumps at the coolest temperatures, especially at higher resolution, suggests that the bulk distribution of the rain remains undetected. Rain clumps appear organized in strands in both chromospheric and TR temperatures. We further find structure reminiscent of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermal mode (also known as entropy mode), thereby suggesting an important role of thermal instability in shaping the basic loop substructure. Rain core densities are estimated to vary between 2 × 1010 and 2.5× {{10}11} cm-3, leading to significant downward mass fluxes per loop of 1-5 × 109 g s-1, thus suggesting a major role in the chromosphere-corona mass cycle.

  15. Coronal hole structure and the high speed solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, Thomas E.; Leer, Egil

    1997-01-01

    The basic physical processes which are important in the acceleration of high speed wind from coronal holes are reviewed. The early works of Birkeland and Parker are discussed. The extension of Parker's work is included. It is shown that the greatest area of uncertainty is that of coronal heating. It is demonstrated that in modeling solar wind acceleration, it is important to carry out a study on the chromosphere-corona-wind system analysis.

  16. Solar energetic proton events and coronal mass ejections near solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; Mcguire, R. E.; Reames, D. V.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the association of coronal mass ejections (CME's) with solar energetic (9-23 MeV) proton (SEP) events during the 1983-1985 approach to solar minimum. Twenty-two of 25 SEP events were associated with CME's, a result comparable to that previously found for the period 1979-1982 around solar maximum. Peak SEP fluxes were correlated with CME speeds but not with CME angular sizes. In addition, many associated CME's lay well out of the ecliptic plane. In a reverse study using all west hemisphere CME's of speeds exceeding 800 km/s and covering the period 1979-1985, we found that 29 of 31 events originating on the solar disk or limb were associated with observed SEP's. However, in contrast to the previous study, we found no cases of SEP events associated with magnetically well connected flares of short duration that lacked CME's.

  17. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  18. Evidence linking coronal mass ejections with interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.; Hildner, E.

    1983-01-01

    Using proxy data for the occurrence of those mass ejections from the solar corona which are directed earthward, we investigate the association between the post-1970 interplanetary magnetic clouds of Klein and Burlaga and coronal mass ejections. The evidence linking magnetic clouds following shocks with coronal mass ejections is striking; six of nine clouds observed at Earth were preceded an appropriate time earlier by meter-wave type II radio bursts indicative of coronal shock waves and coronal mass ejections occurring near central meridian. During the selected periods when no clouds were detected near Earth, the only type II bursts reported were associated with solar activity near the limbs. Where the proxy solar data to be sought are not so clearly suggested, that is, for clouds preceding interaction regions and clouds within cold magnetic enhancements, the evidence linking the clouds and coronal mass ejections is not as clear; proxy data usually suggest many candidate mass-ejection events for each cloud. Overall, the data are consistent with and support the hypothesis suggested by Klein and Burlaga that magnetic clouds observed with spacecraft at 1 AU are manifestations of solar coronal mass ejection transients.

  19. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS OF A LONGITUDINALLY STRATIFIED CORONAL LOOP SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fathalian, N.; Safari, H. E-mail: safari@znu.ac.i

    2010-11-20

    Collective transverse coronal loop oscillations seem to be detected in observational studies. In this regard, Luna et al. modeled the collective kink-like normal modes of several cylindrical loop systems using the T-matrix theory. This paper investigates the effects of longitudinal density stratification along the loop axis on the collective kink-like modes of the system of coronal loops. The coronal loop system is modeled as cylinders of parallel flux tubes, with two ends of each loop at the dense photosphere. The flux tubes are considered as uniform magnetic fields, with stratified density along the loop axis which changes discontinuously at the lateral surface of each cylinder. The MHD equations are reduced to solve a set of two coupled dispersion relations for frequencies and wavenumbers, in the presence of a stratification parameter. The fundamental and first overtone frequencies and longitudinal wavenumbers are computed. The previous results are verified for an unstratified coronal loop system. Finally, we conclude that an increased longitudinal density stratification parameter will result in an increase of the frequencies. The frequency ratios, first overtones to fundamentals, are very sensitive functions of the density scale height parameter. Therefore, stratification should be included in dynamics of coronal loop systems. For unstratified coronal loop systems, these ratios are the same as monoloop ones.

  20. Coronal Magnetism: Hanle Effect in UV and IR Spectral Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Riley, P.

    2014-12-01

    The plasma thermodynamics in the solar upper atmosphere, particularly in the corona, are dominated by the magnetic field, which controls the flow and dissipation of energy. The relative lack of knowledge of the coronal vector magnetic field is a major handicap for the progress in coronal physics. This makes the development of measurement methods of coronal magnetic fields a high priority in solar physics. The Hanle effect in the UV and IR spectral lines is a largely unexplored diagnostic. Here we use magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to study the magnitude of the signal to be expected for typical coronal magnetic fields for selected spectral lines in the UV and IR wavelength ranges, namely the H I Lyman series (i.e., α, β, and γ), O VI 103.2 nm line, and the He I 1083 nm line. We show that the selected lines may be useful for the diagnostic of coronal magnetic fields. We also show that the combination of polarization measurements of spectral lines with different sensitivities to the Hanle effect may be most appropriate for the interpretation of the data. We propose that UV coronal magnetic field mapper should be a central part of the science payload of any future spacebased solar observatory.

  1. Are chromospheric nanoflares a primary source of coronal plasma?

    SciTech Connect

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Bradshaw, S. J. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2014-08-10

    It has been suggested that the hot plasma of the solar corona comes primarily from impulsive heating events, or nanoflares, that occur in the lower atmosphere, either in the upper part of the ordinary chromosphere or at the tips of type II spicules. We test this idea with a series of hydrodynamic simulations. We find that synthetic Fe XII (195) and Fe XIV (274) line profiles generated from the simulations disagree dramatically with actual observations. The integrated line intensities are much too faint; the blueshifts are much too fast; the blue-red asymmetries are much too large; and the emission is confined to low altitudes. We conclude that chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of hot coronal plasma. Such events may play an important role in producing the chromosphere and powering its intense radiation, but they do not, in general, raise the temperature of the plasma to coronal values. Those cases where coronal temperatures are reached must be relatively uncommon. The observed profiles of Fe XII and Fe XIV come primarily from plasma that is heated in the corona itself, either by coronal nanoflares or a quasi-steady coronal heating process. Chromospheric nanoflares might play a role in generating waves that provide this coronal heating.

  2. Coronal seismology of flare-excited longitudinal slow magnetoacoustic waves in hot coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Sun, X.; Provornikova, E. A.; Davila, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 bandpasses. These oscillations show similar physical properties (such as period, decay time, and trigger) as those slow-mode standing waves previously detected by the SOHO/SUMER spectrometer in Doppler shift of flare lines formed above 6 MK. The multi-wavelength AIA observations with high spatio-temporal resolution and wide temperature coverage enable us to measure both thermal and wave properties of the oscillating hot plasma with unprecedented accuracy. These new measurements can be used to diagnose the complicated energy transport processes in flare plasma by a technique called coronal seismology based on the combination of observations and MHD wave theory. From a detailed case study we have found evidence for thermal conduction suppression in hot loops by measuring the polytropic index and analyzing the phase relationship between the temperature and density wave signals. This result is not only crucial for better understanding the wave dissipation mechanism but also provides an alternative mechanism to explain the puzzles of long-duration events and X-ray loop-top sources which show much slower cooling than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. This finding may also shed a light on the coronal heating problem because weak thermal conductivity implies slower cooling of hot plasma in nanoflares, so increasing the average coronal temperature for the same heating rate. We will discuss the effects of thermal conduction suppression on the wave damping and loop cooling based on MHD simulations.

  3. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Analyses of the Position and Course of the Mandibular Canal: Relevance to the Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Sahman, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to document the position and course of the mandibular canal through the region of the mandibular angle and body in dental patients, using cone beam computed tomographic imaging. Methods. The position and course of the mandibular canal from the region of the third molar to the first molar were measured at five specific locations in the same plane: at three different positions just between the first and second molars; between the second and third molars; and just distal to the third molar. Results. The study sample was composed of 500 hemimandibles from 250 dental patients with a mean age of 26.32. Significant differences were found between genders, distances, and positions. B decreased significantly from the anterior positions to the posterior positions in both females and males. The mean values of S and CB increased significantly from the posterior positions to the anterior positions in both females and males. Conclusion. Because the sagittal split ramus osteotomy is a technically difficult procedure, we hope that the findings of the present study will help the surgeon in choosing the safest surgical technique for the treatment of mandibular deformities. PMID:24719896

  4. Increased sagittal vertical axis is associated with less effective control of acute pain following vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y-C.; Bok, D. H.; Chang, H-G.; Kim, S. W.; Park, M. S.; Oh, J. K.; Kim, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although vertebroplasty is very effective for relieving acute pain from an osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture, not all patients who undergo vertebroplasty receive the same degree of benefit from the procedure. In order to identify the ideal candidate for vertebroplasty, pre-operative prognostic demographic or clinico-radiological factors need to be identified. The objective of this study was to identify the pre-operative prognostic factors related to the effect of vertebroplasty on acute pain control using a cohort of surgically and non-surgically managed patients. Patients and Methods Patients with single-level acute osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture at thoracolumbar junction (T10 to L2) were followed. If the patients were not satisfied with acute pain reduction after a three-week conservative treatment, vertebroplasty was recommended. Pain assessment was carried out at the time of diagnosis, as well as three, four, six, and 12 weeks after the diagnosis. The effect of vertebroplasty, compared with conservative treatment, on back pain (visual analogue score, VAS) was analysed with the use of analysis-of-covariance models that adjusted for pre-operative VAS scores. Results A total of 342 patients finished the 12-week follow-up, and 120 patients underwent vertebroplasty (35.1%). The effect of vertebroplasty over conservative treatment was significant regardless of age, body mass index, medical comorbidity, previous fracture, pain duration, bone mineral density, degree of vertebral body compression, and canal encroachment. However, the effect of vertebroplasty was not significant at all time points in patients with increased sagittal vertical axis. Conclusions For single-level acute osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, the effect of vertebroplasty was less favourable in patients with increased sagittal vertical axis (> 5 cm) possible due to aggravation of kyphotic stress from walking imbalance. Cite this article: Y-C. Kim, D. H

  5. Coronal Neutrino Emission in Hypercritical Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, R.; Mineshige, S.; Kawanaka, N.

    2008-03-01

    Hypercritical accretion flows onto stellar mass black holes (BHs) are commonly believed to be as a promising model of central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this model a certain fraction of the gravitational binding energy of accreting matter is deposited to the energy of relativistic jets via neutrino annihilation and/or magnetic fields. However, some recent studies have indicated that the energy deposition rate by neutrino annihilation is somewhat smaller than that needed to power a GRB. To overcome this difficulty, Ramirez-Ruiz and Socrates proposed that high-energy neutrinos from the hot corona above the accretion disk might enhance the efficiency of the energy deposition. We elucidate the disk corona model in the context of hypercritical accretion flows. From the energy balance in the disk and the corona, we can calculate the disk and coronal temperature, Td and Tc, and neutrino spectra, taking into account the neutrino cooling processes by neutrino-electron scatterings and neutrino pair productions. The calculated neutrino spectra consist of two peaks: one by the neutrino emission from the disk and the other by that from the corona. We find that the disk corona can enhance the efficiency of energy release but only by a factor of 1.5 or so, unless the height of the corona is very small, Hll r. This is because the neutrino emission is very sensitive to the temperature of the emitting region, and then the ratio Tc/Td cannot be very large.

  6. Numerical simulation of solar coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Zang, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Many aspects of solar activity are believed to be due to the stressing of the coronal magnetic field by footpoint motions at the photosphere. The results are presented of a fully spectral numerical simulation which is the first 3-D time dependent simulation of footpoint stressing in a geometry appropriate for the corona. An arcade is considered that is initially current-free and impose a smooth footpoint motion that produces a twist in the field of approx 2 pi. The footprints were fixed and the evolution was followed until the field relaxes to another current-free state. No evidence was seen for any instability, either ideal or resistive and no evidence for current sheet formation. The most striking feature of the evolution is that in response to photospheric motions, the field expands rapidly upward to minimize the stress. The expansion has two important effects. First, it suppresses the development of dips in the field that could support dense, cool material. For the motions assumed, the magnetic field does not develop a geometry suitable for prominence formation. Second, the expansion inhibits ideal instabilities such as kinking. The results indicate that simple stearing of a single arcade is unlikely to lead to solar activity such as flares or prominences. Effects are discussed that might possibly lead to such activity.

  7. L-alpha intensity in coronal streamers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noci, G.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    White-light images are presently the primary source of information on physical conditions in the solar corona at distances greater than a few tenths of a solar radius above the limb. As a consequence, we still only have an incomplete description of structures extending beyond the solar limb. In particular, streamers, although observed for decades, represent a poorly known phenomenon. SOHO, to be launched in 1995, will be able to make long-term observations of these features up to heights of a few solar radii, both in white light and UV. In this paper we present simulations of L-alpha intensity in coronal streamers, based on the two-dimensional (2D) model developed by Wang et at. (1992, 1993) via a time-dependent numerical relaxation approach. Because the model is 2D, we make an a priori hypothesis about the extension of streamers in the third dimension. L-alpha data, obtained from a rocket (Kohl et al., 1983), allowed us to identify a shape which fits the observations.

  8. Kinematical properties of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmer, M.

    2016-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most dynamic phenomena in our solar system. They abruptly disrupt the continuous outflow of solar wind by expelling huge clouds of magnetized plasma into interplanetary space with velocities enabling to cross the Sun-Earth distance within a few days. Earth-directed CMEs may cause severe geomagnetic storms when their embedded magnetic fields and the shocks ahead compress and reconnect with the Earth's magnetic field. The transit times and impacts in detail depend on the initial CME velocity, size, and mass, as well as on the conditions and coupling processes with the ambient solar wind flow in interplanetary space. The observed CME parameters may be severely affected by projection effects and the constant changing environmental conditions are hard to derive. This makes it difficult to fully understand the physics behind CME evolution, preventing to do a reliable forecast of Earth-directed events. This short review focusing on observational data, shows recent methods which were developed to derive the CME kinematical profile for the entire Sun-Earth distance range as well as studies which were performed to shed light on the physical processes that CMEs encounter when propagating from Sun to Earth.

  9. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmidt, D. J.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D. K.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  10. Understanding Coronal Heating with Emission Measure Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchik, James A.; Tripathi, Durgesh; Bradshaw, Stephen J.; Mason, Helen E.

    2011-01-01

    It is widely believed that the cross-field spatial scale of coronal heating is small, so that the fundamental plasma structures (loop strands) are spatially unresolved. We therefore must appeal to diagnostic techniques that are not strongly affected by spatial averaging. One valuable observable is the emission measure distribution, EM(T), which indicates how much material is present at each temperature. Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on the Hinode mission, we have determined emission measure distributions in the cores of two active regions. The distributions have power law slopes of approximately 2.4 coolward of the peak. We compare these slopes, as well as the amount of emission measure at very high temperature, with the predictions of a series of models. The models assume impulsive heating (nanoflares) in unresolved strands and take full account of non equilibrium ionization. A variety of nanoflare properties and initial conditions are considered. We also comment on the selection of spectral lines for upcoming missions like Solar Orbiter.

  11. Energy Release in Driven Twisted Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareford, M. R.; Gordovskyy, M.; Browning, P. K.; Hood, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in twisted magnetic fluxtubes, representing coronal loops. The main goal is to establish the influence of the field geometry and various thermodynamic effects on the stability of twisted fluxtubes and on the size and distribution of heated regions. In particular, we aim to investigate to what extent the earlier idealised models, based on the initially cylindrically symmetric fluxtubes, are different from more realistic models, including the large-scale curvature, atmospheric stratification, thermal conduction and other effects. In addition, we compare the roles of Ohmic heating and shock heating in energy conversion during magnetic reconnection in twisted loops. The models with straight fluxtubes show similar distribution of heated plasma during the reconnection: it initially forms a helical shape, which subsequently becomes very fragmented. The heating in these models is rather uniformly distributed along fluxtubes. At the same time, the hot plasma regions in curved loops are asymmetric and concentrated close to the loop tops. Large-scale curvature has a destabilising influence: less twist is needed for instability. Footpoint convergence normally delays the instability slightly, although in some cases, converging fluxtubes can be less stable. Finally, introducing a stratified atmosphere gives rise to decaying wave propagation, which has a destabilising effect.

  12. Potential Method of Predicting Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imholt, Timothy

    2001-10-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) may be described as a blast of gas and highly charged solar mass fragments ejected into space. These ejections, when directed toward Earth, have many different effects on terrestrial systems ranging from the Aurora Borealis to changes in wireless communication. The early prediction of these solar events cannot be overlooked. There are several models currently accepted and utilized to predict these events, however, with earlier prediction of both the event and the location on the sun where the event occurs allows us to have earlier warnings as to when they will affect man-made systems. A better prediction could perhaps be achieved by utilizing low angular resolution radio telescope arrays to catalog data from the sun at different radio frequencies on a regular basis. Once this data is cataloged a better predictor for these CME’s could be found. We propose a model that allows a prediction to be made that appears to be longer than 24 hours.

  13. Potential Method of Predicting Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imholt, Timothy; Roberts, J. A.; Scott, J. B.; University Of North Texas Team

    2000-10-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) may be described as a blast of gas and highly charged solar mass fragments ejected into space. These ejections, when directed toward Earth, have many different effects on terrestrial systems ranging from the Aurora Borealis to changes in wireless communications. The importance of an early prediction of these solar events cannot be overlooked. There are several models currently accepted and utilized to predict these events, however, with earlier prediction of both the event and the location on the sun where the event occur allows us to have earlier warnings as to when they will effect man-made systems. A better prediction could perhaps be achieved by utilizing low angular resolution radio telescope arrays to catalog data from the sun at different radio frequencies on a regular basis. Once this data is cataloged a better predictor for these CME's could be found. We propose a model that allows a prediction to be made that appears to be longer than 24 hours.

  14. Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have important connections to various types of radio emissions from the Sun. The persistent noise storm radiation (type I storm at metric wavelengths, type III storms at longer wavelengths) can be clearly interrupted by the occurrence of a CME in the active region that produces the storm. Sometimes the noise storm completely disappears and other times, it reappears in the active region. Long-lasting type III bursts are associated with CME eruption, thought to be due to the reconnection process taking place beneath the erupting CME. Type II bursts are indicative of electron acceleration in the CME-driven shocks and hence considered to be the direct response of the CME propagation in the corona and interplanetary medium. Finally type IV bursts indicate large-scale post-eruption arcades containing trapped electrons that produce radio emission. This paper summarizes some key results that connect CMEs to various types of radio emission and what we can learn about particle acceleration in the corona) and interplanetary medium. Particular emphasis will be placed on type If bursts because of their connection to interplanetary shocks detected in situ.

  15. Surface Flux Emergence and Coronal Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Among various active regions, delta-sunspots of aggregated spots of opposite polarities, are of particular interest due to their high productivity in energetic and recurrent eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact delta-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line (PIL). The formation of the delta-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g. the inverted polarity against Hale’s law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the PIL. Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the delta-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  16. Anatomy of Depleted Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocher, M.; Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zhao, L.; Manchester, W. B., IV

    2017-01-01

    We report a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) containing distinct periods of anomalous heavy-ion charge state composition and peculiar ion thermal properties measured by ACE/SWICS from 1998 to 2011. We label them “depleted ICMEs,” identified by the presence of intervals where C6+/C5+ and O7+/O6+ depart from the direct correlation expected after their freeze-in heights. These anomalous intervals within the depleted ICMEs are referred to as “Depletion Regions.” We find that a depleted ICME would be indistinguishable from all other ICMEs in the absence of the Depletion Region, which has the defining property of significantly low abundances of fully charged species of helium, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Similar anomalies in the slow solar wind were discussed by Zhao et al. We explore two possibilities for the source of the Depletion Region associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail of a CME, using CME simulations of the evolution of two Earth-bound CMEs described by Manchester et al.

  17. Why are halo coronal mass ejections faster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing-Min; Guo, Yang; Chen, Peng-Fei; Ding, Ming-De; Fang, Cheng

    2010-05-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been to be significantly faster than normal CMEs, which is a long-standing puzzle. In order to solve the puzzle, we first investigate the observed properties of 31 limb CMEs that clearly display loop-shaped frontal loops. The observational results show a strong tendency that slower CMEs are weaker in white-light intensity. Then, we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of 20000 artificial limb CMEs that have an average velocity of ~523 km s-1. The Thomson scattering of these events is calculated when they are assumed to be observed as limb and halo events, respectively. It is found that the white-light intensity of many slow CMEs becomes remarkably reduced when they turn from being viewed as a limb event to being viewed as a halo event. When the intensity is below the background solar wind fluctuation, it is assumed that they would be missed by coronagraphs. The average velocity of “detectable" halo CMEs is ~922 km s-1 very close to the observed value. This also indicates that wider events are more likely to be recorded. The results soundly suggest that the higher average velocity of halo CMEs is due to that a majority of slow events and some of narrow fast events carrying less material are so faint that they are blended with the solar wind fluctuations, and therefore are not observed.

  18. Active Longitude and Coronal Mass Ejection Occurrences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, N.; Singh, T.; Kiss, T. S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Erdélyi, R.

    2017-03-01

    The spatial inhomogeneity of the distribution of coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrences in the solar atmosphere could provide a tool to estimate the longitudinal position of the most probable CME-capable active regions in the Sun. The anomaly in the longitudinal distribution of active regions themselves is often referred to as active longitude (AL). In order to reveal the connection between the AL and CME spatial occurrences, here we investigate the morphological properties of active regions. The first morphological property studied is the separateness parameter, which is able to characterize the probability of the occurrence of an energetic event, such as a solar flare or CME. The second morphological property is the sunspot tilt angle. The tilt angle of sunspot groups allows us to estimate the helicity of active regions. The increased helicity leads to a more complex buildup of the magnetic structure and also can cause CME eruption. We found that the most complex active regions appear near the AL and that the AL itself is associated with the most tilted active regions. Therefore, the number of CME occurrences is higher within the AL. The origin of the fast CMEs is also found to be associated with this region. We concluded that the source of the most probably CME-capable active regions is at the AL. By applying this method, we can potentially forecast a flare and/or CME source several Carrington rotations in advance. This finding also provides new information for solar dynamo modeling.

  19. The Surgical Overcorrection of Lenke Type 1 Deformities with Selective Fusion Segments: What Happens to the Coronal Balance?

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Sinan; Akman, Yunus Emre; Mert, Murat; Carkci, Engin; Tuzuner, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of our study is to determine the alterations on coronal balance after overcorrection of Lenke type 1 curve, retrospectively. Methods Datas of 34 patients (29 female, 5 male patients; mean age, 16.3±3.3 years; range, 13-24 years) surgically treated for scoliosis between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed, retrospectively. The adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients with Lenke type 1 curve treated with only posterior pedicle screw and postoperative thoracic curves less than 10° by Cobb method on frontal plane were enrolled in this study. Mean follow-up period was 52.5±29.7 months. Results The mean amount of the preoperative thoracic curves was measured as 41.2°±6.1° (range, 30°-56°). The mean amount of the early postoperative thoracic curves was measured as 6.5°±1.8° (range, 3°-9°). The mean amount of the thoracic curves was measured as 8.5°±4.6° (range, 3°-22°) during the last follow-up (p=0.01). The mean preoperative coronal balance was measured as 8.5mm(range, 1-30mm). The mean early postoperative coronal balance was measured as 3.5mm(range, 0-36 mm). The mean coronal balance was measured as 5.5mm(range, 0-38mm) during the last follow-up (p>0.05). Conclusion We suggest that Lenke type 1B and 1C should be carefully evaluated and the fusion levels should be accurately selected in order to maintain the correction of coronal balance. We suggest that selective fusion with overcorrection in Lenke type 1A are applied to curves that can be corrected lumbar curve at the preoperative bending radiograph and curves that not have coronal decompensation and >10° distal junctional kyphosis, preoperatively. PMID:27799996

  20. Coronal Jets in Closed Magnetic Regions on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, Peter Fraser; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Coronal jets are dynamic, collimated structures observed in solar EUV and X-ray emission. They appear predominantly in the open field of coronal holes, but are also observed in areas of closed field, especially active regions. A common feature of coronal jets is that they originate from the field above a parasitic polarity of opposite sign to the surrounding field. Some process - such as instability onset or flux emergence - induces explosive reconnection between the closed “anemone” field and the surrounding open field that generates the jet. The lesser number of coronal jets in closed-field regions suggests a possible stabilizing effect of the closed configuration with respect to coronal jet formation. If the scale of the jet region is small compared with the background loop length, as in for example type II spicules, the nearby magnetic field may be treated as locally open. As such, one would expect that if a stabilizing effect exists it becomes most apparent as the scale of the anemone region approaches that of the background coronal loops.To investigate if coronal jets are indeed suppressed along shorter coronal loops, we performed a number of simulations of jets driven by a rotation of the parasitic polarity (as in the previous open-jet calculations by Pariat et. al 2009, 2010, 2015) embedded in a large-scale closed bipolar field. The simulations were performed with the state of the art Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver. We will report here how the magnetic configuration above the anemone region determines the nature of the jet, when it is triggered, and how much of the stored magnetic energy is released. We show that regions in which the background field and the parasitic polarity region are of comparable scale naturally suppress explosive energy release. We will also show how in the post-jet relaxation phase a combination of confined MHD waves and weak current layers are generated by the jet along the background coronal loops, both of which

  1. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Previously, from analysis of SOHO/EIT coronal images in combination with Kitt Peak magnetograms (Falconer et al 1998, ApJ, 501, 386-396), we found that the quiet corona is the sum of two components: the e-scale corona and the coronal network. The large-scale corona consists of all coronal-temperature (T approx. 10(exp 6) K) structures larger than supergranules (>approx.30,000 km). The coronal network (1) consists of all coronal-temperature structures smaller than supergranules, (2) is rooted in and loosely traces the photospheric magnetic network, (3) has its brightest features seated on polarity dividing fines (neutral lines) in the network magnetic flux, and (4) produces only about 5% of the total coronal emission in quiet regions. The heating of the coronal network is apparently magnetic in origin. Here, from analysis of EIT coronal images of quiet regions in combination with magnetograms of the same quiet regions from SOHO/MDI and from Kitt Peak, we examine the other 95% of the quiet corona and its relation to the underlying magnetic network. We find: (1) Dividing the large-scale corona into its bright and dim halves divides the area into bright "continents" and dark "oceans" having spans of 2-4 supergranules. (2) These patterns are also present in the photospheric magnetograms: the network is stronger under the bright half and weaker under the dim half. (3) The radiation from the large-scale corona increases roughly as the cube root of the magnetic flux content of the underlying magnetic network. In contrast, Fisher et A (1998, ApJ, 508, 985-998) found that the coronal radiation from an active region increases roughly linearly with the magnetic flux content of the active region. We assume, as is widely held, that nearly all of the large-scale corona is magnetically rooted in the network. Our results, together with the result of Fisher et al (1999), suggest that either the coronal heating in quiet regions has a large non-magnetic component, or, if the heating

  2. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2001-05-01

    Previously, from analysis of SOHO/EIT coronal images in combination with Kitt Peak magnetograms (Falconer et al 1998, ApJ, 501, 386-396), we found that the quiet corona is the sum of two components: the large-scale corona and the coronal network. The large-scale corona consists of all coronal-temperature ( million-degree) structures larger than the width of a chromospheric network lane (> 10,000 km). The coronal network (1) consists of all coronal-temperature structures of the scale of the network lanes and smaller (< 10,000 km), (2) is rooted in and loosely traces the photospheric magnetic network, (3) has its brightest features seated on polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network magnetic flux, and (4) produces only about 5% of the total coronal emission in quiet regions. The heating of the coronal network is apparently magnetic in origin. Here, from analysis of EIT coronal images of quiet regions in combination with magnetograms of the same quiet regions from SOHO/MDI and from Kitt Peak, we examine the other 95% of the quiet corona and its relation to the underlying magnetic network. We find: (1) Dividing the large-scale corona into its bright and dim halves divides the area into bright "continents" and dark "oceans" having spans of 2-4 supergranules. (2) These patterns are also present in the photospheric magnetograms: the network is stronger under the bright half and weaker under the dim half. (3) The radiation from the large-scale corona increases roughly as the cube root of the magnetic flux content of the underlying magnetic network. In contrast, Fisher et al (1998, ApJ, 508, 985-998) found that the coronal radiation from an active region increases roughly linearly with the magnetic flux content of the active region. We assume, as is widely held, that nearly all of the large-scale corona is magnetically rooted in the network. Our results, together with the result of Fisher et al (1998), suggest that either the coronal heating in quiet regions

  3. Association of achondroplasia with sagittal synostosis and scaphocephaly in two patients, an underestimated condition?

    PubMed

    Accogli, Andrea; Pacetti, Mattia; Fiaschi, Pietro; Pavanello, Marco; Piatelli, Gianluca; Nuzzi, Daniele; Baldi, Maurizia; Tassano, Elisa; Severino, Maria Savina; Allegri, Anna; Capra, Valeria

    2015-03-01

    We report on two patients with an unusual combination of achondroplasia and surgically treated sagittal synostosis and scaphocephaly. The most common achondroplasia mutation, p.Gly380Arg in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), was detected in both patients. Molecular genetic testing of FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and TWIST1 genes failed to detect any additional mutations. There are several reports of achondroplasia with associated craniosynostosis, but no other cases of scaphocephaly in children with achondroplasia have been described. Recently it has been demonstrated that FGFR3 mutations affect not only endochondral ossification but also membranous ossification, providing new explanations for the craniofacial hallmarks in achondroplasia. Our report suggests that the association of isolated scaphocephaly and other craniosynostoses with achondroplasia may be under recognized.

  4. Observation of sagittal X-ray diffraction by surface acoustic waves in Bragg geometry.

    PubMed

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Evgenii, Emelin; Petsiuk, Andrei; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Erko, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    X-ray Bragg diffraction in sagittal geometry on a Y-cut langasite crystal (La3Ga5SiO14) modulated by Λ = 3 µm Rayleigh surface acoustic waves was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Owing to the crystal lattice modulation by the surface acoustic wave diffraction, satellites appear. Their intensity and angular separation depend on the amplitude and wavelength of the ultrasonic superlattice. Experimental results are compared with the corresponding theoretical model that exploits the kinematical diffraction theory. This experiment shows that the propagation of the surface acoustic waves creates a dynamical diffraction grating on the crystal surface, and this can be used for space-time modulation of an X-ray beam.

  5. Observation of sagittal X-ray diffraction by surface acoustic waves in Bragg geometry1

    PubMed Central

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Evgenii, Emelin; Petsiuk, Andrei; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Erko, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    X-ray Bragg diffraction in sagittal geometry on a Y-cut langasite crystal (La3Ga5SiO14) modulated by Λ = 3 µm Rayleigh surface acoustic waves was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Owing to the crystal lattice modulation by the surface acoustic wave diffraction, satellites appear. Their intensity and angular separation depend on the amplitude and wavelength of the ultrasonic superlattice. Experimental results are compared with the corresponding theoretical model that exploits the kinematical diffraction theory. This experiment shows that the propagation of the surface acoustic waves creates a dynamical diffraction grating on the crystal surface, and this can be used for space–time modulation of an X-ray beam. PMID:28381976

  6. Anomalous PiB enhancement in the superior sagittal and transverse venous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Scott B; Cohen, Ann D; Becker, Carl; Price, Julie; Klunk, William E

    2012-01-01

    Pittsburgh compound-B (PiB), an amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, is widely used for imaging amyloid-β in those with and at risk for Alzheimer disease. Here, we report on an otherwise normal 68-year-old female with abnormally high and very focal PiB retention. Coregistered T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) images confirmed that the focal PiB enhancement was in the superior sagittal and transverse sinuses, outside of the adjacent cortex. Flow through the venous vasculature was normal as assessed by dynamic FDG PET imaging. These features supported the conclusion that PiB retention was not simply due to a hemodynamic abnormality, but may have represented PiB binding to fibrillar deposits of a β-sheet protein (ie, amyloid), whose nature is currently unclear.

  7. Gradual Solar Coronal Dimming and Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejection in the Early Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Cheng, Jianxia

    2017-03-01

    We report observations of a two-stage coronal dimming in an eruptive event of a two-ribbon flare and a fast coronal mass ejection (CME). Weak gradual dimming persists for more than half an hour before the onset of the two-ribbon flare and the fast rise of the CME. It is followed by abrupt rapid dimming. The two-stage dimming occurs in a pair of conjugate dimming regions adjacent to the two flare ribbons, and the flare onset marks the transition between the two stages of dimming. At the onset of the two-ribbon flare, transient brightenings are also observed inside the dimming regions, before rapid dimming occurs at the same places. These observations suggest that the CME structure, most probably anchored at the twin dimming regions, undergoes a slow rise before the flare onset, and its kinematic evolution has significantly changed at the onset of flare reconnection. We explore diagnostics of the CME evolution in the early phase with analysis of the gradual dimming signatures prior to the CME eruption.

  8. Coronal evolution during the sunspot cycle: Coronal holes observed with the Mauna Loa K-coronameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hundhausen, A.J.; Hansen, R.T.; Hansen, S.F.

    1981-04-01

    The white-light corona was observed regularly at the Mauna Loa Observatory during the years 1965--1967 and 1969--1978. Display of the measured polarization brightness in the form of synoptic maps permits the identification of large coronal holes and the study of their slow evolution during the sunspot cycle. The polar coronal holes were clearly seen to shrink in size during the ascending phase of cycle 20 (1965--1967), to be absent during a two-year period (1969--1970) just after sunspot maximum, to reappear near the end of 1970, and to remain as prominent features of the corona for the years 1971--1978. During the sunspot maximum epoch the corona was dominated by 'mid-latitude' holes, elongated in the direction parallel to the solar equator. Large equatorial holes or equatorward extensions of the polar holes were observed during the ascending, maximum, and descending phases of cycle 20 and appear to be sources of solar wind streams with maximum speeds over 600 km s/sup -1/ at all of these epochs. The lifetimes of these holes and streams were greatest during the descending phase of the cycle, or in 1974--1975.

  9. ORIGIN OF CORONAL SHOCK WAVES ASSOCIATED WITH SLOW CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenic, J.; Marque, C.; Zhukov, A. N.; Vrsnak, B.; Zic, T.

    2010-07-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of five coronal mass ejection/flare events (CME/flare) and associated coronal shock waves manifested as type II radio bursts. The study is focused on the events in which the flare energy release, and not the associated CME, is the most probable source of the shock wave. Therefore, we selected events associated with rather slow CMEs (reported mean velocity below 500 km s{sup -1}). To ensure minimal projection effects, only events related to flares situated close to the solar limb were included in the study. We used radio dynamic spectra, positions of radio sources observed by the Nancay Radioheliograph, GOES soft X-ray flux measurements, Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph, and Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope observations. The kinematics of the shock wave signatures, type II radio bursts, were analyzed and compared with the flare evolution and the CME kinematics. We found that the velocities of the shock waves were significantly higher, up to one order of magnitude, than the contemporaneous CME velocities. On the other hand, shock waves were closely temporally associated with the flare energy release that was very impulsive in all events. This suggests that the impulsive increase of the pressure in the flare was the source of the shock wave. In four events the shock wave was most probably flare-generated, and in one event results were inconclusive due to a very close temporal synchronization of the CME, flare, and shock.

  10. Sagittal Pelvic Radius in Low-Grade Isthmic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis of Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Ren-Jie; Cheng, Da-Wei; Dong, Fu-Long; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the variation of pelvic radius and related parameters in low-grade isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods Seventy-four patients with isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis and 47 controls were included in this study. There were 17 males and 57 females between 30 and 66 years of age, including 30 with grade I slippages and 44 grade II slippages; diseased levels included 34 cases on L4 and 40 cases on L5. Thoracic kyphosis (TK), the pelvic radius (PR), the pelvic angle (PA), pelvic morphology (PR-S1), and total lumbopelvic lordosis (PR-T12) were assessed from radiographs. Results Statistically significant differences were found for the PA, PR-T12, and PR-S1 (24.5±6.6°, 83.7±9.8°, and 25.4±11.2°, respectively) of the patients with spondylolisthesis and the healthy volunteers (13.7±7.8°, 92.9±9.2°, and 40.7±8.9°, respectively). The TK/PR-T12 ratios were between 0.15 and 0.75. However, there were no differences in all the parameters between the L4 and L5 spondylolysis subgroups (p>0.05). The TK and PR-S1 of grade II were less than grade I, but the PA was greater. The PR-T12 of female patients were less than male patients, but the PA was greater (p<0.05). Conclusion Pelvic morphology differed in patients with low-grade isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis compared to controls. Gender and the grade of slippage impacted the sagittal configuration of the pelvis, but the segment of the vertebral slip did not. Overall, the spine of those with spondylolisthesis remains able to maintain sagittal balance despite abnormal pelvic morphology. PMID:27226863

  11. Clinical outcome of the modified pi-plasty procedure for sagittal synostosis.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Ferreira, J; Gewalli, F; David, L; Olsson, R; Friede, H; Lauritzen, C G

    2001-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the modified pi-plasty procedure for the treatment of sagittal synostosis, assessing the issues of safety, complications, morphological outcome, and degree of parental satisfaction. A retrospective evaluation of 110 patients with nonsyndromal single suture sagittal synostosis operated on with the modified pi-plasty procedure was undertaken. Cephalometric radiographs were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively at ages 3 and 5 years in three standardized projections. The Cephalic Index and the Axial Width Ratio were determined and used as objective outcome measures. An evaluation of the radiographic digital markings was carried out using a Beaten Copper Score. A parental questionnaire was used to obtain a subjective esthetical outcome assessment. The patient population consisted of 76% boys and 24% girls with a 20% incidence of a positive familial history of craniosynostosis. The mean age at surgery was 7.73 months. Morbidity from the procedure was minimal and there were no mortalities. The Cephalic Index changed from a mean preoperative value of 65% to a postoperative mean value of 72% (P = 0.00004). The mean Axial Width Ratio changed from a preoperative 80% to 72% at the 3-year evaluation (P = 0.00029). The Beaten Copper score changed from a mean preoperative value of 2.35 to 5.42 postoperatively at 3 years (P = 0.00001). The response rate to the questionnaire was 86%, and there were significant postoperative improvements in all studied aspects of the skull shape. The modified pi-plasty is a safe technique, and it induces significant objective changes in skull morphology toward normality. It also yields a high degree of parental satisfaction with regard to aesthetic outcome, as evaluated by a written questionnaire.

  12. Mutation Screening of Candidate Genes in Patients with Nonsyndromic Sagittal Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoqian; Guilmatre, Audrey; Reva, Boris; Peter, Inga; Heuzé, Yann; Richtsmeier, Joan T.; Fox, Deborah J.; Goedken, Rhinda J.; Jabs, Ethylin W; Romitti, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Craniosynostosis is a condition that includes the premature fusion of one or multiple cranial sutures. Among various craniosynostosis forms, midline sagittal nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (sNSC) is the most prevalent. Although different gene mutations have been identified in some craniosynostosis syndromes, the etiology of sNSC remains largely unknown. Methods To screen for candidate genes for sNSC, we performed Sanger sequencing on DNA from 93 sNSC patients from a population-based, case-control study conducted in Iowa and New York states. FGFR1-3 mutational hotspots known to be associated with sNSC, and the entire TWIST1, RAB23, BMP2 coding regions were screened because of their known roles in human nonsyndromic or syndromic sagittal craniosynostosis, expression patterns, and/or animal model studies. Results We identified two rare variants in our cohort. An insertion c.730_731insG in FGFR1, which led to a premature stop codon, was predicted to abolish the entire IgIII domain, including the ligand binding region. A c.439C>G variant was observed in TWIST1 at its highly conserved loop domain in another patient. The patient’s mother harbored the same variant and was reported to have jaw abnormalities. These two variants were not detected in 116 alleles from unaffected controls or seen in the several databases; however, TWIST1 variant was found in a low frequency of .000831 percent in ExAC database. Conclusions The low mutation detection rate indicates that these genes only account for a very small proportion of sNSC patients. Our results add to the perception that sNSC is a complex developmental defect with considerable genetic heterogeneity. PMID:26910679

  13. Surgical Outcomes of Post-Fusion Lumbar Flatback Deformity with Sagittal Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Seong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To review surgical results of post-fusion lumbar flatback treated with pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) or Smith-Petersen osteotomies (SPOs). Methods Twenty-eight patients underwent osteotomies. Radiological outcomes by sagittal vertical axis (SVA), and pelvic tilt (PT), T1 pelvic angle (T1PA), and pelvic incidence (PI)-lumbar lordosis (LL) at preoperative, postoperative 1 month, and final were evaluated. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analog scale (VAS) score of back pain/leg pain, and Scoliosis Research Society-22 score (SRS-22r) were analyzed and compared. Patients were divided into 2 groups (SVA ≤5 cm : normal, SVA >5 cm : positive) at final and compared outcomes. Results Nineteen patients (68%) had PSO and the other 9 patients had SPOs with anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) (Mean age : 65 years, follow-up : 31 months). The PT, PI-LL, SVA, T1PA were significantly improved at 1 month and at final (p<0.01). VAS score, ODI, and SRS-22r were also significantly improved at the final (p<0.01). 23 patients were restored with normal SVA and the rest 5 patients demonstrated to positive SVA. SVA and T1PA at 1 month and SVA, PI-LL, and T1PA at final were significantly different (p<0.05) while the ODI, VAS, and SRS-22r did not differ significantly between the groups (p>0.05). Common reoperations were early 4 proximal junctional failures (14%) and late four rod fractures. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that PSO and SPOs with ALIFs at the lower lumbar are significantly improves sagittal balance. For maintenance of normal SVA, PI-LL might be made negative value and T1PA might be less than 11° even though positive SVA group was also significantly improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27847576

  14. An in vitro comparison between two different designs of sagittal split ramus osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Valdir Cabral; Luthi, Leonardo Flores; Sato, Fabio Loureiro; Pozzer, Leandro; Albergaria-Barbosa, Jose Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the influence of the type of osteotomy in the inferior aspect of the mandible on the mechanical performance. Materials and Methods The study was performed on 20 polyurethane hemimandibles. A sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) was designed in 10 hemimandibles (group 1) with a vertical osteotomy in the buccal side (second molar level) and final osteotomy was performed horizontally on the lingual aspect, while the mandible body osteotomy was finalized as a straight osteotomy in the basilar area, perpendicular to the body. For group 2, the same osteotomy technique was used, but an oblique osteotomy was done in the basilar aspect of the mandibular body, forming continuity with the sagittal cut in the basilar area. Using a surgical guide, osteosynthesis was performed with bicortical screws using an inverted L scheme. In both groups vertical compression tests were performed with a linear load of 1 mm/min on the central fossa of the first molar and tests were done with models made from photoelastic resin. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test, establishing a statistical significance when P <0.05. Results A statistical difference was not observed in the maximum displacements obtained in the two osteotomies (P <0.05). In the extensiometric analysis, statistically significant differences were identified only in the middle screw of the fixation. The photoelastic resin models showed force dissipation towards the inferior aspect of the mandible in both SSRO models. Conclusion We found that osteotomy of the inferior aspect did not influence the mechanical performance for osteosynthesis with an inverted L system. PMID:26131430

  15. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through a Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Buffo, Jacob J.; Spangler, Steven R.

    2015-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Although CMEs have been an active field of research since their discovery in the 1970s, there is still much to understand. While the plasma structure of a CME is typically modeled as a magnetic flux rope, there is no consensus on the effective trigger that initiates a CME. Other issues include identifying what causes the shift towards non-equilibrium and how CMEs are accelerated after initiation. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch and shed light on the initiation process. We made sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations in August, 2012, using L band (1 - 2 GHz) frequencies of a “constellation” of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 solar radii. Because is it difficult to predict whether any given line of sight to a background source will be occulted by a CME, we were only successful in capturing a single CME occultation out of three sessions. In LASCO C3 coronagraph images, the CME clearly occults a few of our sources, the most promising being 0843+1547. The line of sight for this latter source is clearly occulted by the outer loop structure and may also be occulted by the inner cavity most closely associated with the flux rope structure. Preliminary data analysis shows a Faraday rotation transient for 0843+1547; the Faraday rotation measure changes from ~ 0 before CME occultation, to a value of about -12 rad/m^2 before declining after CME passage. In this paper, we discuss the resul