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Sample records for saline soluble inorganic

  1. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  2. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 84. Solubility of Inorganic Actinide Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hála, Jiri

    2007-12-01

    This volume presents the solubility of inorganic compounds of actinides except for carbonates, which are included in Volume 74 of this series, and nitrates, which are covered in Volume 55. Also included are solubility data of compounds such as organosulfates, phosphates, and arsenates, which are not covered in Volume 74. The predominant part of this volume covers solubility data of thorium, uranium, neptunium, and plutonium compounds. Fewer data have been published for americium compounds and very few for compounds of actinium, protactinium, and transamericium elements. The literature has been covered up to the end of 2004. Documents which remained unavailable to the editor, and could not be included in the volume are listed in the Appendix. For some compounds it was not possible to show the Chemical Abstracts registry numbers since these have not been assigned.

  3. Soluble organic and inorganic nutrient fluxes in clearcut and mature deciduous forests

    Treesearch

    R.G. Qualls; B.L. Haines; W.T. Swank; S.W. Tyler

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms by which forest ecosystems retain or lose soluble inorganic nutrients after disturbance are well known, but substantial amounts of soluble organic nutrients may also be released from cut vegetation. Our objective was to compare the leaching of dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients in cut and mature forest stands and to develop hypotheses about...

  4. An inorganic CO2 diffusion and dissolution process explains negative CO2 fluxes in saline/alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Zhong-Yuan; Stevenson, Bryan A; Zheng, Xin-Jun; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    An 'anomalous' negative flux, in which carbon dioxide (CO2) enters rather than is released from the ground, was studied in a saline/alkaline soil. Soil sterilization disclosed an inorganic process of CO2 dissolution into (during the night) and out of (during the day) the soil solution, driven by variation in soil temperature. Experimental and modeling analysis revealed that pH and soil moisture were the most important determinants of the magnitude of this inorganic CO2 flux. In the extreme cases of air-dried saline/alkaline soils, this inorganic process was predominant. While the diurnal flux measured was zero sum, leaching of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the soil solution could potentially effect net carbon ecosystem exchange. This finding implies that an inorganic module should be incorporated when dealing with the CO2 flux of saline/alkaline land. Neglecting this inorganic flux may induce erroneous or misleading conclusions in interpreting CO2 fluxes of these ecosystems.

  5. Microbial response to salinity stress in a tropical sandy soil amended with native shrub residues or inorganic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Sall, Saïdou Nourou; Ndour, Ndèye Yacine Badiane; Diédhiou-Sall, Siré; Dick, Richard; Chotte, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-15

    Soil degradation and salinization caused by inappropriate cultivation practices and high levels of saltwater intrusion are having an adverse effect on agriculture in Central Senegal. The residues of Piliostigma reticulatum, a local shrub that coexists with crops, were recently shown to increase particulate organic matter and improve soil quality and may be a promising means of alleviating the effects of salinization. This study compared the effects of inorganic fertilizer and P. reticulatum residues on microbial properties and the ability of soil to withstand salinity stress. We hypothesized that soils amended with P. reticulatum would be less affected by salinity stress than soils amended with inorganic fertilizer and control soil. Salinity stress was applied to soil from a field site that had been cultivated for 5 years under a millet/peanut crop rotation when microbial biomass, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) community profile, catabolic diversity, microbial activities were determined. Microbial biomass, nitrification potential and dehydrogenase activity were higher by 20%, 56% and 69% respectively in soil with the organic amendment. With salinity stress, the structure and activities of the microbial community were significantly affected. Although the biomass of actinobacteria community increased with salinity stress, there was a substantial reduction in microbial activity in all soils. The soil organically amended was, however, less affected by salinity stress than the control or inorganic fertilizer treatment. This suggests that amendment using P. reticulatum residues may improve the ability of soils to respond to saline conditions.

  6. Field and laboratory studies of reactions between atmospheric water soluble organic acids and inorganic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel; Shilling, John; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  7. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  8. Storage/Turnover Rate of Inorganic Carbon and Its Dissolvable Part in the Profile of Saline/Alkaline Soils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yugang; Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Soil inorganic carbon is the most common form of carbon in arid and semiarid regions, and has a very long turnover time. However, little is known about dissolved inorganic carbon storage and its turnover time in these soils. With 81 soil samples taken from 6 profiles in the southern Gurbantongute Desert, China, we investigated the soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and the soil dissolved inorganic carbon (SDIC) in whole profiles of saline and alkaline soils by analyzing their contents and ages with radiocarbon dating. The results showed that there is considerable SDIC content in SIC, and the variations of SDIC and SIC contents in the saline soil profile were much larger than that in the alkaline profile. SDIC storage accounted for more than 20% of SIC storage, indicating that more than 1/5 of the inorganic carbon in both saline and alkaline soil is not in non-leachable forms. Deep layer soil contains considerable inorganic carbon, with more than 80% of the soil carbon stored below 1 m, whether for SDIC or SIC. More importantly, SDIC ages were much younger than SIC in both saline soil and alkaline soil. The input rate of SDIC and SIC ranged from 7.58 to 29.54 g C m-2 yr-1 and 1.34 to 5.33 g C m-2 yr-1 respectively for saline soil, and from 1.43 to 4.9 g C m-2 yr-1 and 0.79 to 1.27 g C m-2 yr-1respectively for alkaline soil. The comparison of SDIC and SIC residence time showed that using soil inorganic carbon to estimate soil carbon turnover would obscure an important fraction that contributes to the modern carbon cycle: namely the shorter residence and higher input rate of SDIC. This is especially true for SDIC in deep layers of the soil profile. PMID:24312399

  9. Storage/Turnover rate of inorganic carbon and its dissolvable part in the profile of saline/alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yugang; Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Soil inorganic carbon is the most common form of carbon in arid and semiarid regions, and has a very long turnover time. However, little is known about dissolved inorganic carbon storage and its turnover time in these soils. With 81 soil samples taken from 6 profiles in the southern Gurbantongute Desert, China, we investigated the soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and the soil dissolved inorganic carbon (SDIC) in whole profiles of saline and alkaline soils by analyzing their contents and ages with radiocarbon dating. The results showed that there is considerable SDIC content in SIC, and the variations of SDIC and SIC contents in the saline soil profile were much larger than that in the alkaline profile. SDIC storage accounted for more than 20% of SIC storage, indicating that more than 1/5 of the inorganic carbon in both saline and alkaline soil is not in non-leachable forms. Deep layer soil contains considerable inorganic carbon, with more than 80% of the soil carbon stored below 1 m, whether for SDIC or SIC. More importantly, SDIC ages were much younger than SIC in both saline soil and alkaline soil. The input rate of SDIC and SIC ranged from 7.58 to 29.54 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 1.34 to 5.33 g C m(-2) yr(-1) respectively for saline soil, and from 1.43 to 4.9 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 0.79 to 1.27 g C m(-2) yr(-1)respectively for alkaline soil. The comparison of SDIC and SIC residence time showed that using soil inorganic carbon to estimate soil carbon turnover would obscure an important fraction that contributes to the modern carbon cycle: namely the shorter residence and higher input rate of SDIC. This is especially true for SDIC in deep layers of the soil profile.

  10. Estimating the environmental behavior of inorganic and organometal contaminants: Solubilities, bioaccumulation, and acute aquatic toxicities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The estimation of environmental properties of inorganic species has been difficult. In this presentation aqueous solubility, bioconcentration and acute aquatic toxicity are estimated for inorganic compounds using existing Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER) equations. Many estimations fall within an order of magnitude of the measured property. For complex solution chemistry, the accuracy of the estimations improve with the more complete description of the solution species present. The toxicities also depend on an estimation of the bioactive amount and configuration. A number of anion/cation combinations (salts) still resist accurate property estimation, and the reasons currently are not understood. These new variable values will greatly extend the application and utility of LSER for the estimation of environmental properties.

  11. The role of salinity in shaping dissolved inorganic nitrogen and N₂O dynamics in estuarine sediment-water interface.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Joye, Samantha B; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2013-01-15

    We investigated the influence of salinity on sediment inorganic nitrogen dynamics in three Portuguese estuaries (Cávado, Ave and Douro). Anaerobic slurry experiments were run at different salinity treatments (0, 10, and 25) and net changes in concentration of nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and nitrous oxide were monitored. Salinity-induced NH₄⁺ sediment desorption was observed at all sites. No significant salinity driven changes in NO₃⁻ concentrations were observed, except for Ave estuarine sediments, where NO₃⁻ consumption increased 10 times as the salinity rose from 0 to 10. In the upper stretches of the three estuaries, N₂O production increased sharply as salinity rose. Although no stimulation of N₂O production was observed in higher salinity areas, the salinity-driven changes in N₂O production are of major concern given the greenhouse characteristics of the gas. The global trend of decreasing freshwater discharge, and therefore increase in salinity, to estuarine systems could thereby exacerbate N₂O production and global warming. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of salinity on PAH Uptake from water soluble fraction of crude oil in Tilapia mossambica.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P; Gopalani, M; Ramteke, D S; Wate, S R

    2007-12-01

    Accidents during marine transport and offshore production facilities often are responsible for oil spills in the open sea. In few cases, these oil slicks drift towards the shore and further into the estuaries, which serve as an important spawning and nursing grounds for many fish species. This study examined the role of salinity in the uptake and accumulation of toxic PAH from crude oil in select somatic and reproductive organs of Tilapia mossambica. Our results showed significantly (ANOVA, p < 0.01) lower PAH solubility in higher salinity waters and its uptake by fish. The differences were largest with the low molecular weight (LMW) two (naphthalenes) and three (phenanthrene) ring compounds as compared with higher molecular weight (HMW) compounds such as pyrene (four ringed).

  13. Salinity impacts on water solubility and N-octanol/water partition coefficients of selected pesticides and oil constituents.

    PubMed

    Saranjampour, Parichehr; Vebrosky, Emily N; Armbrust, Kevin L

    2017-03-06

    Salinity has been reported to influence the water solubility of organic chemicals entering marine ecosystems. However, there is limited data available on salinity impacts for chemicals potentially entering seawater. Impacts on water solubility would correspondingly impact chemical sorption as well as overall bioavailability and exposure estimates used in the regulatory assessment. Pesticides atrazine, fipronil, bifenthrin, cypermethrin, as well as crude oil constituents dibenzothiophene as well as 3 of its alkyl derivatives all have different polarities and were selected as model compounds to demonstrate the impact of salinity on their solubility and partitioning behavior. The n-octanol/water partition coefficient (KOW ) was measured in both distilled-deionized water as well as artificial seawater (3.2%). All compounds had diminished solubility and increased KOW values in artificial seawater as compared to distilled-deionized water. A linear correlation curve estimated salinity may increase the log KOW value 2.6% per one log unit increase in distilled water (R(2)  = 0.97). Salinity appears to generally decrease the water solubility and increase partitioning potential. Environmental fate estimates based upon these parameters indicate elevated chemical sorption to sediment, overall bioavailability, and toxicity in artificial seawater. These dramatic differences suggest that salinity should be taken into account when conducting exposure estimates for marine organisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of drug adsorbates onto soluble inorganic silicate glass surface: example with acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Hristova, Yoanna; Djambaski, Peter; Samuneva, Biserka; Rangelova, Nadya; Bogdanova, Svetla

    2008-02-01

    A ternary melt-derived inorganic glass system (Igl) of composition corresponding to 62SiO(2), 35Na(2)O, 3Al(2)O(3 )(wt.%) has been formulated and studied as a drug carrier. The [Al(2)O(3)/Na(2)O] ratio is less than one and the aluminium ion is a network former that retards the glass dissolution. The processing conditions lead to a brittle, easily grinding, amorphous product. The Igl structure was proven by IR-spectroscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy. A very important fact established is that the Igl corrosion (dissolution) is pH-dependent. Inorganic glass system was transformed into model acetaminophen (APH) adsorbate (APH/Igla 1:1(w/w)) with mild experimental conditions and evaluated as a drug carrier. No interactions between Igl and APH during the processing were proven. Besides, APH settles onto the glass surface as crystalline phase. A lower extent of corrosion, apparent solubility and delayed in vitro APH release from the adsorbate in water and artificial gastric juice in comparison to the samples untreated drug and APH/Iglm physical mixture were established. It is hypothesized that the glass decomposition products, formed into contact with a solvent, initiate interactions with APH at the glass/solution interface. Similar behaviour of the Igl and its drug adsorbates could be expected in gastro-intestinal tract.

  15. Effect of inorganic nitrogenous fertilizer on productivity of recently reclaimed saline sodic soils with and without biofertilizer.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, S M; Sarfraz, M; Shabbir, G; Abbas, G

    2007-07-15

    Saline sodic soils after reclamation become infertile due to leaching of most of the nutrients along with salts from the rooting medium. Microbes can play a vital role in the productivity improvement of such soils. In this study a saline sodic field having EC, 6.5 dS m(-1), pH, 9.1 and gypsum requirement (GR) 3.5 tons acre(-1) was reclaimed by applying gypsum at the rate of 100% GR. Rice and wheat crops were transplanted/sown for three consecutive years. Inorganic nitrogenous fertilizer was used with and without biofertilizers i.e., Biopower (Azospirillum) for rice and diazotroph inoculums for wheat. Nitrogen was applied at the rate of 0, 75% of recommended dose (RD), RD, 125% of RD and 150% of RD. Recommended dose of P without K was applied to all the plots. Biopower significantly improved Paddy and straw yield of rice over inorganic nitrogenous fertilizer. In case of wheat diazotroph inoculum improved grain and straw yield significantly over inorganic nitrogenous fertilizer. Among N fertilizer rates, RD + 25% additional N fertilizer was found to be the best dose for rice and wheat production in recently reclaimed soils. Nitrogen concentration and its uptake by paddy, grain and straw were also increased by biopower and diazotroph inoculum over inorganic nitrogenous fertilizer. Among N fertilizer rates, RD + 25% additional N fertilizer was found to be the best dose for nitrogen concentration and its uptake by paddy, grain and straw. Total soil N, available P and extractable K were increased while salinity/sodicity parameters were decreased with the passage of time. The productivity of the soil was improved more by biofertilizers over inorganic N fertilizers.

  16. Evaluation of the dependence of aqueous solubility of nitro compounds on temperature and salinity: a COSMO-RS simulation.

    PubMed

    Kholod, Yana A; Gryn'ova, Ganna; Gorb, Leonid; Hill, Frances C; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2011-04-01

    The solubility in pure and saline water at various temperatures was calculated for selected nitro compounds (nitrobenzene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 2-nitrotoluene, 3-nitrotoluene, 4-nitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,3-dinitrotoluene, 3,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) using the Conductor-like Screening model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS). The results obtained were compared with experimental values. The COSMO-RS predictions have shown high accuracy in reproducing the trends of aqueous solubilities for both temperature and salinity. The proposed methodology was then applied to predict the aqueous solubilities of 19 nitro compounds in the temperature range of 5-50°C in saline solutions. The salting-out parameters of the Setschenow equation were also calculated. The predicted salting-out parameters were overestimated when compared to the measured values, but these parameters can still be used for qualitative estimation of the trends.

  17. Freshwater and Saline Loads of Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen to Hood Canal and Lynch Cove, Western Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Frans, Lonna M.; Noble, Marlene; Kendall, Carol; Josberger, Edward G.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2006-01-01

    Hood Canal is a long (110 kilometers), deep (175 meters) and narrow (2 to 4 kilometers wide) fjord of Puget Sound in western Washington. The stratification of a less dense, fresh upper layer of the water column causes the cold, saltier lower layer of the water column to be isolated from the atmosphere in the late summer and autumn, which limits reaeration of the lower layer. In the upper layer of Hood Canal, the production of organic matter that settles and consumes dissolved oxygen in the lower layer appears to be limited by the load of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN): nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia. Freshwater and saline loads of DIN to Hood Canal were estimated from available historical data. The freshwater load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal, which could be taken up by phytoplankton, came mostly from surface and ground water from subbasins, which accounts for 92 percent of total load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal. Although DIN in rain falling on land surfaces amounts to about one-half of the DIN entering Hood Canal from subbasins, rain falling directly on the surface of marine waters contributed only 4 percent of the load to the upper layer. Point-source discharges and subsurface flow from shallow shoreline septic systems contributed less than 4 percent of the DIN load to the upper layer. DIN in saline water flowing over the sill into Hood Canal from Admiralty Inlet was at least 17 times the total load to the upper layer of Hood Canal. In September and October 2004, field data were collected to estimate DIN loads to Lynch Cove - the most inland marine waters of Hood Canal that routinely contain low dissolved-oxygen waters. Based on measured streamflow and DIN concentrations, surface discharge was estimated to have contributed about one-fourth of DIN loads to the upper layer of Lynch Cove. Ground-water flow from subbasins was estimated to have contributed about one-half of total DIN loads to the upper layer. In autumn 2004, the relative

  18. Characteristics of Water-Soluble Inorganic Ions in Aerosol Particles in Jingjinji-Mega Typical Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li

    2013-06-01

    Aerosol has important effects on climate, environment and human health and water-soluble ions are important chemical composition in aerosol. It is important to study concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water-soluble ions in aerosol. In recent years, with the increasing of energy consumption and the amount of automobile, regional pollution has become more serious in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. Especially since the haze happened frequently in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region, it is an imminent study about water-soluble ions in aerosol.To investigate the concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water soluble inorganic ions (WSI), size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using Andersen cascade sampler from Aug2010to Aug2011in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding. The WSI were analyzed by ion chromatography(IC).The results indicated that the order of total WSI (TWSI) concentration of TSP in the region was Tianjin-Baoding-Beijing-Tangshan. The order of TWSI of the fine particles in the region was Baoding-Tianjin-Beijing-Tangshan. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the coarse mode were 41.36±15.76,48.04±15.79,39.40±11.03,40.49±13.32μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the fine mode were 66.54±47.95,69.12±34.85, 61.80±44.63,71.73±45.12μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. All the annual mean concentrations of TWSIin the fine mode in the four sites had exceeded averaged concentration of PM2.5in the environmental quality standards (35μg m-3), which indicated that the pollution of TWSI was serious. Secondary water-soluble ions (SWSI)(SO42-, NO3-and NH4+) and Cl-were the main components, and were mainly found in the fine particles in the four sites of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. In the coarse particles, NO3-Ca2+ and SO42-were the dominant contributions to WSI. Almost all water-soluble ions in fine particles are similar

  19. Comparative proteomics of Thellungiella halophila leaves from plants subjected to salinity reveals the importance of chloroplastic starch and soluble sugars in halophyte salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Wang, Baichen; Wang, Dan; Li, Pinghua; Wang, Limin; Yi, Xiaoping; Huang, Qixing; Peng, Ming; Guo, Anping

    2013-08-01

    Thellungiella halophila, a close relative of Arabidopsis, is a model halophyte used to study plant salt tolerance. The proteomic/physiological/transcriptomic analyses of Thellungiella plant leaves subjected to different salinity levels, reported herein, indicate an extraordinary ability of Thellungiella to adapt to large concentrations of exogenous saline by compartmentalizing Na(+) into cell vacuoles and accumulating proline and soluble sugars as organic osmolytes. Salinity stress stimulated the accumulation of starch in chloroplasts, which resulted in a greatly increased content of starch and total sugars in leaves. Comparative proteomics of Thellungiella leaves identified 209 salt-responsive proteins. Among these, the sequences of 108 proteins were strongly homologous to Arabidopsis protein sequences, and 30 had previously been identified as Thellungiella proteins. Functional classification of these proteins into 16 categories indicated that the majority are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, followed by those involved in energy production and conversion, and then those involved in the transport of inorganic ions. Pathway analysis revealed that most of the proteins are involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, carbon fixation, photosynthesis, and glycolysis. Of these processes, the most affected were starch and sucrose metabolism, which might be pivotal for salt tolerance. The gene expression patterns of the 209 salt-responsive proteins revealed through hierarchical clustering of microarray data and the expression patterns of 29 Thellungiella genes evaluated via quantitative RT-PCR were similar to those deduced via proteomic analysis, which underscored the possibility that starch and sucrose metabolism might play pivotal roles in determining the salt tolerance ability of Thellungiella. Our observations enabled us to propose a schematic representation of the systematic salt-tolerance phenotype in Thellungiella and suggested that the increased accumulation of

  20. Comparative Proteomics of Thellungiella halophila Leaves from Plants Subjected to Salinity Reveals the Importance of Chloroplastic Starch and Soluble Sugars in Halophyte Salt Tolerance*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Wang, Baichen; Wang, Dan; Li, Pinghua; Wang, Limin; Yi, Xiaoping; Huang, Qixing; Peng, Ming; Guo, Anping

    2013-01-01

    Thellungiella halophila, a close relative of Arabidopsis, is a model halophyte used to study plant salt tolerance. The proteomic/physiological/transcriptomic analyses of Thellungiella plant leaves subjected to different salinity levels, reported herein, indicate an extraordinary ability of Thellungiella to adapt to large concentrations of exogenous saline by compartmentalizing Na+ into cell vacuoles and accumulating proline and soluble sugars as organic osmolytes. Salinity stress stimulated the accumulation of starch in chloroplasts, which resulted in a greatly increased content of starch and total sugars in leaves. Comparative proteomics of Thellungiella leaves identified 209 salt-responsive proteins. Among these, the sequences of 108 proteins were strongly homologous to Arabidopsis protein sequences, and 30 had previously been identified as Thellungiella proteins. Functional classification of these proteins into 16 categories indicated that the majority are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, followed by those involved in energy production and conversion, and then those involved in the transport of inorganic ions. Pathway analysis revealed that most of the proteins are involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, carbon fixation, photosynthesis, and glycolysis. Of these processes, the most affected were starch and sucrose metabolism, which might be pivotal for salt tolerance. The gene expression patterns of the 209 salt-responsive proteins revealed through hierarchical clustering of microarray data and the expression patterns of 29 Thellungiella genes evaluated via quantitative RT-PCR were similar to those deduced via proteomic analysis, which underscored the possibility that starch and sucrose metabolism might play pivotal roles in determining the salt tolerance ability of Thellungiella. Our observations enabled us to propose a schematic representation of the systematic salt-tolerance phenotype in Thellungiella and suggested that the increased accumulation of

  1. Characterization of water-soluble inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols in coastal city, Xiamen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinping; Zhang, Fuwang; Xu, Ya; Chen, Jinsheng

    2011-03-01

    The samples of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIs), including anions (F-, Cl-, SO42-, NO3-) and cations (NH4+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) in 8 size-segregated particle matter (PM), were collected using a sampler (with 8 nominal cut-sizes ranged from 0.43 to 9.0 μm) from October 2008 to September 2009 at five sites in both polluted and background regions of a coastal city, Xiamen. The results showed that particulate matters in the fine mode (PM2.1, Dp < 2.1 μm) comprised large part of mass concentrations of aerosols, which accounted for 45.56-51.27%, 40.04-60.81%, 42.02-60.81%, and 40.46-57.07% of the total particulate mass in spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively. The water-soluble ionic species in the fine mode at five sampling sites varied from 15.33 to 33.82 (spring), 14.03 to 28.06 (summer), 33.47 to 72.52 (autumn), and 48.39 to 69.75 μg m- 3 (winter), respectively, which accounted for 57.30 ± 6.51% of the PM2.1 mass concentrations. Secondary pollutants of NH4+, SO42- and NO3- were the dominant contributors of WSIs, which suggested that pollutants from anthropogenic activities, such as SO2, NOx were formed in aerosols by photochemical reactions. The size distributions of Na+, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- were bimodal, peaking at 0.43-0.65 μm and 3.3-5.8 μm. Although some ions, such as NH4+ presented bimodal distributions, the coarse mode was insignificant compared to the fine mode. Ca2+ and Mg2+ exhibited unimodal distributions at all sampling sites, peaking at 2.1-3.3 μm, while K+ having a bimodal distributions with a major peak at 0.43-0.65 μm and a minor one at 3.3-4.7 μm, were used in most of samples. Seasonal and spatial variations in the size-distribution profiles suggested that meteorological conditions (seasonal patterns) and sampling locations (geographical patterns) were the main factors determining the formation of secondary aerosols and characteristics of size distributions for WSIs.

  2. Levels and indoor-outdoor relationships of PM 10 and soluble inorganic ions in Beirut, Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, N. A.; Atallah, M.; Al-Kadamany, G.

    2009-03-01

    PM 10, which is considered among the major indoor and outdoor pollutants, was measured in several residential homes and corresponding outdoor environments in the Great Beirut area over the summer and winter seasons of 2005. Few studies on PM 10 levels indoors in Beirut are restricted to short-term periods in public places. In this study, 78 PM 10 samples were collected on Teflon filters using an active sampler at a flow rate of 5 L/min. PM 10 mass concentrations were determined by gravimetric analysis, and inorganic chemical speciation was carried out using ion chromatography. Outdoors, PM 10 elevated mass concentrations correlated well with high traffic density. The observed high intra-site temporal variation (minimum of 34 and a maximum of 120 μg/m 3) was attributed to the dynamic air masses passing over the Eastern Mediterranean region. Indoors, PM 10 levels were highly affected by outdoor levels, but were enhanced over those of outdoors when smoking activities were recorded. In winter, the overall average outdoor concentration dropped by 19%, whereas the average indoor concentration increased by 50% over the ones calculated for the summer. Ventilation and air exchange rates were found to be approximately equal to unity during summer since most doors and windows remain open. This rate drops to almost half during winter. As for particulate ions namely nitrates and sulfates, the former showed concentrations that are higher than the values reported in the region in both winter and summer seasons, suggesting high emissions from local vehicles. However, SO 42- average concentrations were comparable to values reported in other studies conducted in Eastern Mediterranean sites. Soluble particulate nitrates and sulfates exhibited similar indoor and outdoor levels in non-smoking homes (IO ~ 1), but in smoking homes the drop in nitrate concentrations reached around 70%, indicating a high anionic reactivity with tobacco smokes.

  3. Altitudinal effect to the size distribution of water soluble inorganic ions in PM at Huangshan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Yin, Yan; Kong, Shaofei; Wen, Bin; Chen, Kui; Yuan, Liang; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the vertical variation of water soluble inorganic ions (WSI) in aerosols at a regional background mountainous site, nine size fractions of particles (10.0-9.0, 9.0-5.8, 5.8-4.7, 4.7-3.3, 3.3-2.1, 2.1-1.1, 1.1-0.65, 0.65-0.43 and <0.43 μm) were collected at two different altitudes simultaneously at Huangshan in southeast China, from 14 September to 26 October of 2012. The mass concentrations of PM1.1, PM2.1 and PM10 were 17.07, 21.28 and 39.25 μg/m3 at the summit (SM, 1840 m), respectively and were 24.79, 29.02 and 42.39 μg/m3 at a lower height site (LL, 869 m). The average mass concentrations of total WSI for PM1.1, PM2.1 and PM10 were 9.59, 11.73 and 17.16 μg/m3 at SM, and were 16.88, 19.38 and 27.61 μg/m3 at LL. The concentrations of particulates and WSI both decreased with altitude increasing from 869 m to 1840 m. SO42- and NH4+ exhibited peak values 0.43-0.65 μm at SM, whereas maintained peak values 0.65-1.1 μm at LL. NO3- were mostly concentrated in fine mode for SM but in coarse mode for LL. Further analyses showed that at LL, the heterogeneous reaction on coarse particles containing more calcium and magnesium may explain the higher concentrations of NO3- in coarse mode and also the higher temperature may reduce the concentrations of NO3- in fine mode. Na+, Cl- and K+ exhibited bimodal size distributions; Ca2+ and Mg2+ showed maximum values in coarse mode. Aerosol acidity analysis showed a higher acidity of aerosol particles at LL when compared with those at SM. The average concentration of [H+] was relatively low when compared with those observed at two other mountains in China. This corresponds with the relatively low concentrations of SO42- and HSO4- and lower water content at Huangshan.

  4. Analysis of inorganic nitrogen and related anions in high salinity water using ion chromatography with tandem UV and conductivity detectors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brian; Gandhi, Jay; Zhang, Chunlong Carl

    2011-09-01

    Over 97% of the Earth's water is high salinity water in the form of gulfs, oceans, and salt lakes. There is an increasing concern for the quality of water in bays, gulfs, oceans, and other natural waters. These waters are affected by many different sources of contamination. The sources are, but not limited to, groundwater run-off of nitrogen containing fertilizer, pesticides, cleaning agents, solid wastes, industrial waters, and many more. The final destinations of these contaminants are rivers, lakes, and bayous that eventually will lead to bays, gulfs, and oceans. Many industries depend on the quality of these waters, such as the fishing industry. In addition to wild marine life, there are large aquariums and fish and shrimp farms that are required to know the quality of the water. However, the ability of these industries to monitor their processes is limited. Most analytical methods do not apply to the analysis of high salinity waters. They are dependent on wet chemistry techniques, spectrophotometers, and flow analyzers. These methods do not have the accuracy, precision, and sensitivity when compared to ion chromatography (IC). Since the inception of IC, it has become a standard practice for determining the content of many different water samples. Many IC methods are limited in the range of analytes that can be detected, as well as the numerous sample sources of which the methods are applicable. The main focus of current IC methods does not include high salinity waters. This research demonstrates an ion chromatographic method that has the ability to determine low level concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and related anions (nitrite-N, nitrate-N, phosphorous-P, sulfate, bromide, chloride, sulfide, fluoride, ammonia, calcium, and magnesium) in a single run using a combination of UV and conductivity detectors. This method is applicable to various waters, and uses both freshwater and high salinity water samples.

  5. Equations for O2 and CO2 solubilities in saline and plasma: combining temperature and density dependences.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Kevin M; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2017-05-01

    Solubilities of respiratory gasses in water, saline, and plasma decrease with rising temperatures and solute concentrations. Henry's Law, C = α·P, states that the equilibrium concentration of a dissolved gas is solubility times partial pressure. Solubilities in the water of a solution depend on temperature and the content of other solutes. Blood temperatures may differ more than 20°C between skin and heart, and an erythrocyte will undergo that range as blood circulates. The concentrations of O2 and CO2 are the driving forces for diffusion, exchanges, and for reactions. We provide an equation for O2 and CO2 solubilities, α, that allows for continuous changes in temperature, T, and solution density, ρ, in dynamically changing states:[Formula: see text]This two-exponential expression with a density scalar γ, and a density exponent β, accounts for solubility changes due to density changes of an aqueous solution. It fits experimental data on solubilities in water, saline, and plasma over temperatures from 20 to 40°C, and for plasma densities, ρsol up to 1.020 g/ml with ~0.3% error. The amounts of additional bound O2 (to Hb) and CO2 (bicarbonate and carbamino) depend on the concentrations in the local water space and the reaction parameters. During exercise, solubility changes are large; both ρsol and T change rapidly with spatial position and with time. In exercise hemoconcentration plasma, ρsol exceeds 1.02, whereas T may range over 20°C. The six parameters for O2 and the six for CO2 are constants, so solubilities are calculable continuously as T and ρsol change.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Solubilities for oxygen and carbon dioxide are dependent on the density of the solution, on temperature, and on the partial pressure. We provide a brief equation suitable for hand calculators or mathematical modeling, accounting for these factors over a wide range of temperatures and solution densities for use in rapidly changing conditions, such as extreme exercise or osmotic

  6. THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE WATER-SOLUBLE INORGANIC ORTHOPHOSPHATE IONS WITHIN THE CELL: ACCUMULATION IN THE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Libanati, Cesar M.; Tandler, Carlos J.

    1969-01-01

    Lead acetate treatment of unfixed cells immobilizes the intracellular water-soluble, inorganic orthophosphate ions as microcrystalline lead hydroxyapatite precipitates (see reference 1). These precipitates have been analyzed with the electron microprobe. A much higher concentration of phosphorus has been found in the nucleoli of maize root tip cells fixed in lead acetate-glutaraldehyde (organic phosphorus plus inorganic orthophosphate), as compared to the nucleoli of roots fixed in glutaraldehyde alone (organic phosphorus). The concentration of the inorganic orthophosphate pool in these nucleoli is three to five times as high as the concentration of the macromolecular organic phosphate. Since nearly all of the latter is in RNA, the concentration of inorganic phosphate in the nucleolus is calculated to be roughly 0.5–0.8 M. About 30%—and up to 50%—of the total cellular inorganic phosphate is accumulated in the nucleolus since the mean concentration per cell is about 10-2 M. In the extranucleolar part of the nucleus the mean concentration was estimated by densitometry to be roughly six times less than in the nucleolus (⩽ 0.1 M), and appears more concentrated in the nucleoplasm than in the condensed chromatin. While there is no direct evidence for the concentration in the cytoplasm, it certainly must be much lower than the mean cellular level (i.e., < 10-2 M) since the nucleus is about 10% of the total cell volume. The implications of this compartmentation in the intact cell are discussed in connection with (A) the availability of orthophosphate ions for the cytoplasm in those processes in which these ions affect the rate of enzymatic reactions, and (B) protein nucleic acid interactions within the nucleus and nucleolus. PMID:5801427

  7. Numerical Procedures for the Calculations of Inorganic Solubility and Cohesive Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D.

    1996-01-01

    The entire history of chemistry bears witness to the extraorinary importance of the phenomena of solubility. It is necessary to emphasize that the Hildebrand parameter (solubility parameter) is fundamentally a liquid state property. When gases are considered they are treated as hypothetical.

  8. The influence of temperature and salinity on the Li/Ca and d7Li of inorganic and biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriott, C.; Staubwasser, M.; Crompton, R.; Henderson, G.

    2003-04-01

    Lithium is the sixth most abundant metal in the ocean. It is conservative with a residence time of around 1Ma and has two stable isotopes ^7Li and ^6Li that are not actively involved in biological processes. Isotopic fractionation is observed during incorporation into calcium carbonate but no previous work has systematically examined the controls on this fractionation. We have investigated Li incorporation and isotopic fraction in both inorganically precipitated calcite and coralline aragonite (1). In both cases there is an inverse correlation of Li concentration with temperature and no significant variation in isotopic fractionation. A decrease in D Li/Ca from 0.0092 to 0.0030 is seen over a temperature range of 5--30^oC, whilst an offset of approximately -8.5 ppm is seen in the δ^7Li ratio relative to the growth solution. The temperature dependence of Li/Ca has an increased sensitivity at low temperatures and might therefore be useful in examining changes in bottom water temperature. We are now investigating Li/Ca and δ^7Li of foraminifera. Previous work (2) has suggested little variability in Li/Ca with temperature, although this was for samples from warmer water where Li/Ca is not sensitive. In this study, Uvigerina are examined in a series of core top samples from the Arabian Sea with a depth range of 95--1800m and corresponding temperature range of 5--20^oC. A series of inorganic calcite samples have also been precipitated in order to examine the effect of salinity on Li/Ca, δ^7Li and δ44Ca over a salinity range of 10--50 psu. The distribution coefficient of Li shows a positive correlation with salinity over this range. δ^7Li and δ44Ca measurements for these samples are presently being analysed. (1) Marriott et al., 2002, GCA, 66, A485 (2) Delaney et al., 1985, GCA, 49, 1327

  9. Solubility studies of inorganic-organic hybrid nanoparticle photoresists with different surface functional groups.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chakrabarty, Souvik; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Ben; Ober, Christopher; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2016-01-21

    The solubility behavior of Hf and Zr based hybrid nanoparticles with different surface ligands in different concentrations of photoacid generator as potential EUV photoresists was investigated in detail. The nanoparticles regardless of core or ligand chemistry have a hydrodynamic diameter of 2-3 nm and a very narrow size distribution in organic solvents. The Hansen solubility parameters for nanoparticles functionalized with IBA and 2MBA have the highest contribution from the dispersion interaction than those with tDMA and MAA, which show more polar character. The nanoparticles functionalized with unsaturated surface ligands showed more apparent solubility changes after exposure to DUV than those with saturated ones. The solubility differences after exposure are more pronounced for films containing a higher amount of photoacid generator. The work reported here provides material selection criteria and processing strategies for the design of high performance EUV photoresists.

  10. Solubility studies of inorganic-organic hybrid nanoparticle photoresists with different surface functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Chakrabarty, Souvik; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Ben; Ober, Christopher; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2016-01-01

    The solubility behavior of Hf and Zr based hybrid nanoparticles with different surface ligands in different concentrations of photoacid generator as potential EUV photoresists was investigated in detail. The nanoparticles regardless of core or ligand chemistry have a hydrodynamic diameter of 2-3 nm and a very narrow size distribution in organic solvents. The Hansen solubility parameters for nanoparticles functionalized with IBA and 2MBA have the highest contribution from the dispersion interaction than those with tDMA and MAA, which show more polar character. The nanoparticles functionalized with unsaturated surface ligands showed more apparent solubility changes after exposure to DUV than those with saturated ones. The solubility differences after exposure are more pronounced for films containing a higher amount of photoacid generator. The work reported here provides material selection criteria and processing strategies for the design of high performance EUV photoresists.The solubility behavior of Hf and Zr based hybrid nanoparticles with different surface ligands in different concentrations of photoacid generator as potential EUV photoresists was investigated in detail. The nanoparticles regardless of core or ligand chemistry have a hydrodynamic diameter of 2-3 nm and a very narrow size distribution in organic solvents. The Hansen solubility parameters for nanoparticles functionalized with IBA and 2MBA have the highest contribution from the dispersion interaction than those with tDMA and MAA, which show more polar character. The nanoparticles functionalized with unsaturated surface ligands showed more apparent solubility changes after exposure to DUV than those with saturated ones. The solubility differences after exposure are more pronounced for films containing a higher amount of photoacid generator. The work reported here provides material selection criteria and processing strategies for the design of high performance EUV photoresists. Electronic supplementary

  11. Degradation of Environmental Contaminants with Water-Soluble Cobalt Catalysts: An Integrative Inorganic Chemistry Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Alexandra L.; Messersmith, Reid E.; Green, David B.; Fritsch, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrative laboratory investigation incorporating skills from inorganic chemistry, analytical instrumentation, and physical chemistry applied to a laboratory-scale model of the environmental problem of chlorinated ethylenes in groundwater. Perchloroethylene (C[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 4], PCE) a common dry cleaning solvent,…

  12. Degradation of Environmental Contaminants with Water-Soluble Cobalt Catalysts: An Integrative Inorganic Chemistry Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Alexandra L.; Messersmith, Reid E.; Green, David B.; Fritsch, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrative laboratory investigation incorporating skills from inorganic chemistry, analytical instrumentation, and physical chemistry applied to a laboratory-scale model of the environmental problem of chlorinated ethylenes in groundwater. Perchloroethylene (C[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 4], PCE) a common dry cleaning solvent,…

  13. State and solubility of cadmium as related to xenotic inorganic phases generated homogeneously in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The state and solubility of cadmium in waste-treated soils was investigated. Three sets of experiments were designed to elucidate solid phase control of soil solution cadmium. First, the soil solution composition of two soils amended with either sludge or metal contaminated mulch was examined to determine the presence of anions capable of precipitating or co-precipitating cadmium. Results indicated that no known pure solid phases of cadmium developed but that high concentrations of phosphate, sulfate and carbonate apparently influenced cadmium solubility. Secondly, three soils were amended with 10 ug of cadmium as cadmium acetate/g of soil. Three different levels of glycerophosphate, cysteine and acetate were added to the soils and incubated at constant temperature and water content in order to release phosphate, sulfate and alkalinity under conditions conducive for homogeneous precipitation. Another set of treatments was prepared in the same fashion with an additional amendment of calcium carbonate to raise soil pH's to 7.0. In the presence of sulfate, cadmium solubility increased with no apparent solid phase formation. The addition of calcium carbonate shifted solid phase control to either calcium carbonate or calcium sulfate. The generation of alkalinity by acetate addition produced solid phase calcium carbonate which in turn controlled cadmium solubility through chemisorption of cadmium on calcite surfaces. In the presence of monobasic calcium phosphate, cadmium was interfacially adsorbed. In the presence of dibasic calcium phosphate, however, cadmium was homogeneously precipitated in the host crystal suggesting possible solid solution.

  14. Solubility, retention, and metabolism of intratracheally and orally administered inorganic arsenic compounds in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Marafante, E.; Vahter, M.

    1987-02-01

    The absorption, biotransformation, and tissue retention of arsenic following intratracheal and oral administration of /sup 74/As-labeled sodium arsenite, sodium arsenate, arsenic trisulfide (suspension), and lead arsenate (suspension) have been studied in hamsters, and correlated to the in vitro and in vivo solubility of the compounds. After intratracheal instillation, the clearance of /sup 74/As from the lungs was positively correlated to the in vivo solubility. Less than 0.1% of the sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate was retained in the lungs after 3 days, compared to 1.3% of the arsenic trisulfide particles and 45% of the lead arsenate particles. The latter showed a very low solubility both in vivo and in vitro. In general, orally administered arsenic had a shorter biological half-life than intratracheally administered, especially when given in the form of arsenic trisulfide or lead arsenate particles, which seemed to be absorbed to only 20-30% in the gastrointestinal tract. Reduction, oxidation, and methylation of arsenic varied to a great extent with the arsenic compound and the route of exposure. Trivalent arsenic was methylated to a greater extent than pentavalent and less soluble compounds (suspended particles) more than dissolved compounds. The trivalent arsenic compounds caused higher concentrations than the pentavalent in the upper gastrointestinal tract but not in other tissues.

  15. [Characteristics of aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions in three types air-pollution incidents of Nanjing City].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Chen; Zhu, Bin; Su, Ji-Feng; Wang, Hong-Lei

    2012-06-01

    In order to compare aerosol water-soluble inorganic species in different air-pollution periods, samples of PM10, PM2.1, PM1.1 and the main water-soluble ions (NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, NO2(-), F(-), NO3(-), Cl(-), SO4(2-)) were measured, which were from 3 air-pollution incidents (continued pollution in October 16-30 of 2009, sandstorm pollution in April 27-30 of 2010, and crop burning pollution in June 14 of 2010. The results show that aerosol pollution of 3 periods is serious. The lowest PM2.1/PM10 is only 0.27, which is from sandstorm pollution period, while the largest is 0. 7 from crop burning pollution period. In continued pollution periods, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) are the dominant ions, and the total anions account for an average of 18.62%, 32.92% and 33.53% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1. Total water-soluble ions only account for 13.36%, 23.72% and 28.54% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1 due to the insoluble species is increased in sandstorm pollution period. The mass concentration of Ca2+ in sandstorm pollution period is higher than the other two pollution periods, and which is mainly in coarse particles with diameter larger than 1 microm. All the ten water-soluble ions are much higher in crop burning pollution especially K+ which is the tracer from crop burning. The peak mass concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NH4+ are in 0.43-0.65 microm.

  16. Multimodel Predictive System for Carbon Dioxide Solubility in Saline Formation Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zan; Small, Mitchell J; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2013-02-05

    The prediction of carbon dioxide solubility in brine at conditions relevant to carbon sequestration (i.e., high temperature, pressure, and salt concentration (T-P-X)) is crucial when this technology is applied. Eleven mathematical models for predicting CO{sub 2} solubility in brine are compared and considered for inclusion in a multimodel predictive system. Model goodness of fit is evaluated over the temperature range 304–433 K, pressure range 74–500 bar, and salt concentration range 0–7 m (NaCl equivalent), using 173 published CO{sub 2} solubility measurements, particularly selected for those conditions. The performance of each model is assessed using various statistical methods, including the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Different models emerge as best fits for different subranges of the input conditions. A classification tree is generated using machine learning methods to predict the best-performing model under different T-P-X subranges, allowing development of a multimodel predictive system (MMoPS) that selects and applies the model expected to yield the most accurate CO{sub 2} solubility prediction. Statistical analysis of the MMoPS predictions, including a stratified 5-fold cross validation, shows that MMoPS outperforms each individual model and increases the overall accuracy of CO{sub 2} solubility prediction across the range of T-P-X conditions likely to be encountered in carbon sequestration applications.

  17. Multimodel predictive system for carbon dioxide solubility in saline formation waters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zan; Small, Mitchell J; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2013-02-05

    The prediction of carbon dioxide solubility in brine at conditions relevant to carbon sequestration (i.e., high temperature, pressure, and salt concentration (T-P-X)) is crucial when this technology is applied. Eleven mathematical models for predicting CO(2) solubility in brine are compared and considered for inclusion in a multimodel predictive system. Model goodness of fit is evaluated over the temperature range 304-433 K, pressure range 74-500 bar, and salt concentration range 0-7 m (NaCl equivalent), using 173 published CO(2) solubility measurements, particularly selected for those conditions. The performance of each model is assessed using various statistical methods, including the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Different models emerge as best fits for different subranges of the input conditions. A classification tree is generated using machine learning methods to predict the best-performing model under different T-P-X subranges, allowing development of a multimodel predictive system (MMoPS) that selects and applies the model expected to yield the most accurate CO(2) solubility prediction. Statistical analysis of the MMoPS predictions, including a stratified 5-fold cross validation, shows that MMoPS outperforms each individual model and increases the overall accuracy of CO(2) solubility prediction across the range of T-P-X conditions likely to be encountered in carbon sequestration applications.

  18. [Characteristics of water soluble inorganic ions in fine particles emitted from coal-fired power plants].

    PubMed

    Duan, Lei; Ma, Zi-Zhen; Li, Zhen; Jiang, Jing-Kun; Ye, Zhi-Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Currently, China suffers from serious pollution of fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Coal-fired power plant is one of the most important sources of PM2.5 in the atmosphere. To achieve the national goals of total emission reductions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) during the 11th and 12th Five-Year Plan, most of coal-fired power plants in China have installed or will install flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and flue gas denitrification (DNO(x)) systems. As a result, the secondary PM2.5, generated from gaseous pollutants in the atmosphere, would be decreased. However, the physical and chemical characteristics of PM2.5 in flue gas would be affected, and the emission of primary PM2.5 might be increased. This paper summarized the size distributions of PM2.5 and its water soluble ions emitted from coal-fired power plants, and highlighted the effects of FGD and DNO(x) on PM2.5 emission, especially on water soluble ions (such as SO4(2-), Ca2+ and NH4+) in PM2.5. Under the current condition of serious PM2.5 pollution and wide application of FGD and DNO(x), quantitative study on the effects of FGD and DNO(x) installation on emission characteristics of PM2.5 from coal-fired power plants is of great necessity.

  19. Solubility-temperature-salinity diagrams as a means for interpreting fluid-inclusion/mineral-zoning data from the Creede District, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Plumlee, G.S.; Hayba, D.O.

    1985-01-01

    Boiling and fluid mixing, which are widely regarded as effective ore-deposition mechanisms, can be differentiated by plotting fluid-inclusion data on temperature (enthalpy)-salinity diagrams. Solubilities of ore and gangue minerals can also be contoured on these diagrams to evaluate the relative chemical effects of mixing and boiling, and thereby reconcile ore-deposition models based on fluid-inclusion data with mineral-zoning patterns. For example, fluid-inclusion data from epithermal vein mineralization at Creede indicate the progressive mixing of metal-bearing brines with overlying ground water. Along this mixing path, solubility contours for sphalerite indicate a change of several orders of magnitude, consistent with the abundant sphalerite found in the northern veins. Temperatures and salinities are as high as 285/sup 0/C and 11.5 wt% NaCl eq. in these sulfide-rich northern veins, but as low as 160-200/sup 0/C and 2-7 wt% NaCl eq. in the barite-rich southern veins. Solubility-temperature-salinity (STS) diagrams show barite solubility changes relatively little at high temperatures and salinities, but drops significantly only at salinities below approx.6 wt% eq. Fluid mixing was the depositional mechanism for barite because most mixing paths cross solubility contours while boiling paths are parallel to them. Thus hot, saline fluids originating in the northern parts of the district deposited mainly sphalerite and galena, but only after significant cooling and dilution did they deposit the large quantities of barite seen in the southern parts of the district. STS diagrams are thus useful for visualizing chemical influences on mineral-zoning patterns and relating mineral solubilities to fluid-inclusion data.

  20. Counter-intuitive enhancement in the dissolution of indomethacin with the incorporation of cohesive poorly water-soluble inorganic salt additives.

    PubMed

    Tay, Tracy; Allahham, Ayman; Morton, David A V; Stewart, Peter J

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of various micronized poorly water-soluble inorganic materials on the dissolution and de-agglomeration behaviour of a micronized, poorly water-soluble model drug, indomethacin, from lactose interactive mixtures. Dissolution of indomethacin was studied using the USP paddle method and the data were modelled with multi-exponential equations using a nonlinear least squares algorithm in order to obtain key parameter estimates. The dispersion of indomethacin mixtures was measured by laser diffraction. The addition of aluminium hydroxide and calcium phosphate to binary mixtures of indomethacin counter-intuitively improved the dissolution rate of indomethacin due to significant increases in both the estimated initial concentration and dissolution rate constant of dispersed particles of indomethacin. While some enhancement was due to pH changes in the dissolution medium, the presence of these poorly water-soluble inorganic salts caused de-agglomeration. Average particle size distributions indicated that the presence of aluminium hydroxide within the matrix of indomethacin had reduced the agglomerate concentration whilst increasing the dispersed particle concentration. These findings provide the first evidence of the ability of poorly water-soluble inorganic salts to enhance the de-agglomeration and dissolution of micronized powders, potentially translating to improved bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Characteristics of concentrations and water-soluble inorganic ions in PM2.5 in Handan City, Hebei province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, C. C.; Wang, L. T.; Zhang, F. F.; Wei, Z.; Ma, S. M.; Ma, X.; Yang, J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the spatial, temporal, and chemical characteristics of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution in Handan city, China, a comprehensive dataset including continuous online observations at four air quality monitoring stations in 2013 and 2014, and the concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSII) (NO3-, SO42 -, NH4+, Cl-, Na+, Mg2 +, K+, Ca2 +) in PM2.5 samples collected in four representative seasons in 2013 and 2014 are analyzed in this study. And the principal component analysis (PCA) method is applied to identify the source of WSII in Handan. Our results indicate that PM2.5 concentration decreased from 139.4 μg/m3 in 2013 to 116.0 μg/m3 in 2014 on annual average. Spatial variations of PM2.5 mass are not pronounced, indicating that PM2.5 is nearly evenly spread over the study area. The seasonal variations of PM2.5 concentration are significant, normally with 1.7 to 2.4 times higher in winter than in summer. The concentrations of TWSII (total water-soluble inorganic ions) remain relatively stable in two years, with annual averages of 63.1 μg/m3 in 2013 and 57.2 μg/m3 in 2014. SNA (SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+) dominates in the TWSII, accounting for ~ 87% of the TWSII. Similar to PM2.5, WSII exhibits obvious seasonal variations with higher concentrations in autumn and winter, lower in spring and summer. PM2.5 samples are acidic in spring, summer and autumn of 2013, while in winter of 2013 and all seasons of 2014, they are alkaline. SO42 -, NO3- are formed mainly through homogeneous reactions, heterogeneous reactions also exist in winter. Finally, the major sources of WSII in Handan are identified as the mixture of secondary origin, coal combustion, biomass burning (46.1%), dust sources (25.8%), and motor vehicle (12.3%).

  2. Soluble Porous Coordination Frameworks Constructed from Inorganic Nanoparticles as Homogenized Heterogeneous Photocatalysts for Suzuki Coupling Reactions under Near-Infrared Light.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuting; Peng, Yong; Liu, Weisheng; Chen, Fengjuan; Wang, Baodui

    2017-07-03

    Self-assembly has emerged as a promising method to control the structure and properties of ensembles of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) for exploiting their collective effects. However, the rational assembly of inorganic NPs into soluble porous architectures for use as homogenized heterogeneous catalysts has been less studied. Herein, it is shown that inorganic NPs can be used for the assembly of soluble porous coordination frameworks (PCFs) by atom-scale interfacial coordination-driven assembly. Owing to their large pore size, high dispersity in solution, strong absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) range, and long-lived electron-hole pair, the obtained soluble frameworks could serve as a platform for homogenized heterogeneous photocatalysts, which exhibited excellent activity, high apparent quantum efficiency, and recyclability in the catalysis of the noble-metal-free Suzuki coupling reactions under NIR light at room temperature. Moreover, PCF catalysts can be reused more than five times without significant loss of activity, which indicates long-term stability. The present strategy to fabricate soluble porous nanostructures opens a new chemical toolbox for homogenized heterogeneous catalysts and may bring new inspiration to photocatalysis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Below-cloud wet scavenging of soluble inorganic ions by rain in Beijing during the summer of 2014.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danhui; Ge, Baozhu; Wang, Zifa; Sun, Yele; Chen, Yong; Ji, Dongshen; Yang, Ting; Ma, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Nianliang; Hao, Jianqi; Yao, Xuefeng

    2017-11-01

    Wet deposition is one of the most important and efficient removal mechanisms in the reduction of air pollution. As a key parameter determining wet deposition, the wet scavenging coefficient (WSC) is widely used in chemical transport models (CTMs) and reported values have large uncertainties. In this study, a high-resolution observational dataset of the soluble inorganic aerosols (SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+), hereafter SNA) in the air and in rainwater during multiple precipitation events was collected using sequential sampling and used to estimate the below-cloud WSC in Beijing during the summer of 2014. The average concentrations of SNA in precipitation during the observational period were 7.9 mg/L, 6.2 mg/L and 4.6 mg/L, with the contributions from below-cloud scavenging constituting 56%, 61% and 47% of this, respectively. The scavenging ratios of SNA (i.e., the ratio of the concentrations in rain to concentrations in the air) were used with the height of the cloud base and the precipitation intensity to estimate the WSC. The estimated WSC of SO4(2-) is comparable to that reported elsewhere. The relationship between the below-cloud WSC and the precipitation intensity followed an exponential power distribution (K=aP(b)) for SNA. In contrast to previous studies, this study considers the differences between the chemical compositions of the SNA, with the highest WSC for NO3(-), followed by those of SO4(2-) and NH4(+). Therefore, we recommend that CTMs include ion specific WSCs in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing of Plastidial Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Impairs Essential Leaf Anabolic Pathways and Reduces Drought Stress Tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    George, Gavin M.; van der Merwe, Margaretha J.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bauer, Rolene; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Kossmann, Jens; Lloyd, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The role of pyrophosphate in primary metabolism is poorly understood. Here, we report on the transient down-regulation of plastid-targeted soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase in Nicotiana benthamiana source leaves. Physiological and metabolic perturbations were particularly evident in chloroplastic central metabolism, which is reliant on fast and efficient pyrophosphate dissipation. Plants lacking plastidial soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (psPPase) were characterized by increased pyrophosphate levels, decreased starch content, and alterations in chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis, while constituents like amino acids (except for histidine, serine, and tryptophan) and soluble sugars and organic acids (except for malate and citrate) remained invariable from the control. Furthermore, translation of Rubisco was significantly affected, as observed for the amounts of the respective subunits as well as total soluble protein content. These changes were concurrent with the fact that plants with reduced psPPase were unable to assimilate carbon to the same extent as the controls. Furthermore, plants with lowered psPPase exposed to mild drought stress showed a moderate wilting phenotype and reduced vitality, which could be correlated to reduced abscisic acid levels limiting stomatal closure. Taken together, the results suggest that plastidial pyrophosphate dissipation through psPPase is indispensable for vital plant processes. PMID:20605913

  5. Virus-induced gene silencing of plastidial soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase impairs essential leaf anabolic pathways and reduces drought stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    George, Gavin M; van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bauer, Rolene; Fernie, Alisdair R; Kossmann, Jens; Lloyd, James R

    2010-09-01

    The role of pyrophosphate in primary metabolism is poorly understood. Here, we report on the transient down-regulation of plastid-targeted soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase in Nicotiana benthamiana source leaves. Physiological and metabolic perturbations were particularly evident in chloroplastic central metabolism, which is reliant on fast and efficient pyrophosphate dissipation. Plants lacking plastidial soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (psPPase) were characterized by increased pyrophosphate levels, decreased starch content, and alterations in chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis, while constituents like amino acids (except for histidine, serine, and tryptophan) and soluble sugars and organic acids (except for malate and citrate) remained invariable from the control. Furthermore, translation of Rubisco was significantly affected, as observed for the amounts of the respective subunits as well as total soluble protein content. These changes were concurrent with the fact that plants with reduced psPPase were unable to assimilate carbon to the same extent as the controls. Furthermore, plants with lowered psPPase exposed to mild drought stress showed a moderate wilting phenotype and reduced vitality, which could be correlated to reduced abscisic acid levels limiting stomatal closure. Taken together, the results suggest that plastidial pyrophosphate dissipation through psPPase is indispensable for vital plant processes.

  6. Removal of Soluble Strontium via Incorporation into Biogenic Carbonate Minerals by Halophilic Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain TK2d in a Highly Saline Solution.

    PubMed

    Horiike, Takumi; Dotsuta, Yuma; Nakano, Yuriko; Ochiai, Asumi; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Mitsuo

    2017-10-15

    Radioactive strontium ((90)Sr) leaked into saline environments, including the ocean, from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after a nuclear accident. Since the removal of (90)Sr using general adsorbents (e.g., zeolite) is not efficient at high salinity, a suitable alternative immobilization method is necessary. Therefore, we incorporated soluble Sr into biogenic carbonate minerals generated by urease-producing microorganisms from a saline solution. An isolate, Bacillus sp. strain TK2d, from marine sediment removed >99% of Sr after contact for 4 days in a saline solution (1.0 × 10(-3) mol liter(-1) of Sr, 10% marine broth, and 3% [wt/vol] NaCl). Transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that Sr and Ca accumulated as phosphate minerals inside the cells and adsorbed at the cell surface at 2 days of cultivation, and then carbonate minerals containing Sr and Ca developed outside the cells after 2 days. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy revealed that Sr, but not Mg, was present in the carbonate minerals even after 8 days. X-ray absorption fine-structure analyses showed that a portion of the soluble Sr changed its chemical state to strontianite (SrCO3) in biogenic carbonate minerals. These results indicated that soluble Sr was selectively solidified into biogenic carbonate minerals by the TK2d strain in highly saline environments.IMPORTANCE Radioactive nuclides ((134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (90)Sr) leaked into saline environments, including the ocean, from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Since the removal of (90)Sr using general adsorbents, such as zeolite, is not efficient at high salinity, a suitable alternative immobilization method is necessary. Utilizing the known concept that radioactive (90)Sr is incorporated into bones by biomineralization, we got the idea of removing (90)Sr via incorporation into biominerals. In this study, we revealed the ability of the isolated ureolytic bacterium to remove Sr under high-salinity

  7. Changes of soluble proteins in leaf and thylakoid exposed in high saline condition of a mangrove taxa Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Behera, Bishnupriya; Das, Anath Bandhu; Mohanty, Prasanna

    2009-01-01

    One-year-old seedlings of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L) Savingay were exposed to 500 mM NaCl for 6d under hydroponic culture condition to characterize the changes in leaf and thylakoid protein profiles in response to short-term salt exposures. Significant changes in leaf dry mass, chlorophylls and soluble leaf proteins were observed in short term of salt exposures, as it happens under tidal situations in nature. Chlorophyll a/b ratio showed decrease of light harvesting efficiency in salt treatment. Total soluble proteins in leaves were extracted from control and NaCl-treated plants at 2d intervals and were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Intensity of several protein bands of different molecular mass of leaf protein profile ranging from 10 to 86 kDa (10, 16, 23, 33, 37, 42, 44, 50 and 86 kDa) were decreased due to high salt treatment. Out of these, 16, 23 and 33 kDa protein bands decreased dramatically from 1-3 fold but recovered in 7d growth, except the 33 kDa band. SDSPAGE profile of thylakoid protein revealed that both number and the intensity of several protein bands got altered by salt concentration. However, 33 kDa protein band of thylakoid reappeared in recovery that might not be of the same characteristics with same molecular mass as shown in total leaf protein profile. The numbers of major bands found in SDS-PAGE were reduced when analyzed in urea-SDS-PAGE to minimize protein aggregations by high salt. It was noted that 47 kDa disappeared while some proteins of apparent molecular mass like 23 kDa, 33 kDa, 37 kDa and 50 kDa degraded to minor bands. Partial restoration of protein bands occurred when the salt-treated plants were brought back to initial growth condition. These results clearly demonstrate that short term high salt concentration could cause major alterations to photosynthetic apparatus of a true non salt-secreting tree mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and adapted against fluctuation of salinity by altering leaf protein pool relatively more than the thylakoid

  8. Characterization and source analysis of water-soluble inorganic ionic species in PM2.5 in Taiyuan city, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiusheng; Yan, Yulong; Guo, Lili; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Guixiang; Wang, Xinming

    2017-02-01

    PM2.5 samples were collected in urban area in Taiyuan for four seasons from August 2009 to April 2010. The Water-soluble inorganic ions (WSI, including F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2 +, and Ca2 +) were analyzed by ion chromatography. The daily PM2.5 levels in the field samples varied from 49.90 to 477.93 μg/m3 with the mean of 209.54 μg/m3, which all largely exceeded the PM2.5 24-hour limitation value of 35 μg/m3 in Environmental Protection Administration of United States and 75 μg/m3 in Ministry of Environmental Protection of China. The WSI average concentration was 68.86 μg/m3 and accounted for about 32.86% of PM2.5. As the most abundant anion and cation, SO42 - and NH4+ were 43.53 and 14.78 percent of WSI, respectively. PM2.5 in Taiyuan was acidic by the micro-equivalents concentration methods but nearly neutral in autumn, and the chemical forms of WSI were mainly NH4HSO4, (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3. PM2.5 and WSI levels showed obvious seasonal variation and were the highest in winter in all samples. PM2.5, SO42 -, and some coal-related ions such as NH4+ and Cl- were higher in winter than other seasons, which mainly attributed to more coal combustion for power and indoor heating supply. The ratio analysis showed that Mg2 + and Ca2 + were not only from soil dust, but also from coal combustion and industry emission. Biomass burning such as the cornstalk and tree branches led to the highest K+ emission in autumn and summer. Wind had a regular influence on the PM2.5 and WSI, and would transport the soil dust mainly from the northwest and also lead to re-suspension of dust in the air when the wind speed was high. Furthermore, the dustpan topography easily helped the pollutants to concentrate in Taiyuan city, and some coal coking industries might contribute to high PM2.5 and WSI in Taiyuan.

  9. Seasonal variation and secondary formation of size-segregated aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions during pollution episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zirui; Zhang, Junke; Wen, Tianxue; Ji, Dongsheng; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a serious issue that has aroused great public attention in Beijing. To examine the seasonal characteristics of aerosols in typical pollution episodes, water-soluble inorganic ions (SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, K+, Na+, Ca2 + and Mg2 +) in size-segregated PM collected by an Anderson sampler (equipped with 50% effective cut-off diameters of 9.0, 5.8, 4.7, 3.3, 2.1, 1.1, 0.65, 0.43 μm and an after filter) were investigated in four intensive campaigns from June 2013 to May 2014 in the Beijing urban area. Pronounced seasonal variation of TWSIs in fine particles (aerodynamic diameter less than 2.1 μm) was observed, with the highest concentration in summer (71.5 ± 36.3 μg/m3) and the lowest in spring (28.1 ± 15.2 μg/m3). Different ion species presented different seasonal characteristics of mass concentration and size distribution, reflecting their different dominant sources. As the dominant component, SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) in fine particles appeared to play an important role in the formation of high PM pollution since its contribution to the TWSIs and PM2.1 mass increased significantly during pollution episodes. Due to the hygroscopic growth and enhanced secondary formation in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm) from clean days to polluted days, the size distribution peak of SNA in the fine mode tended to shift from 0.43-0.65 μm to 0.65-2.1 μm. Relative humidity (RH) and temperature contributed to influence the secondary formation and regulate the size distributions of sulfates and nitrates. Partial correlation analysis found that high RH would promote the sulfur and nitrogen oxidation rates in the fine mode, while high temperature favored the sulfur oxidation rate in the condensation mode (0.43-0.65 μm) and reduced the nitrogen oxidation rate in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm). The NO3-/SO42 - mass ratio in PM2.1 (73% of the samples) exceeded 1.0, suggesting that vehicle exhaust currently makes a greater contribution to aerosol

  10. Sr2+/Ca2+ and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during inorganic calcite formation: III. Impact of salinity/ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianwu; Niedermayr, Andrea; Köhler, Stephan J.; Böhm, Florian; Kısakürek, Basak; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In order to apply Sr/Ca and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation as a proxy to reconstruct paleo-environments, it is essential to evaluate the impact of various environmental factors. In this study, a CO2 diffusion technique was used to crystallize inorganic calcite from aqueous solutions at different ionic strength/salinity by the addition of NaCl at 25 °C. Results show that the discrimination of Sr2+ versus Ca2+ during calcite formation is mainly controlled by precipitation rate (R in μmol/m2/h) and is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity. In analogy to Sr incorporation, 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during precipitation of calcite is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity too. At 25 °C the calcium isotope fractionation between calcite and aqueous calcium ions (Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq = δ44/40Cacalcite − δ44/40Caaq) correlates inversely to log R values for all experiments. In addition, an inverse relationship between Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq and log DSr, which is independent of temperature, precipitation rate, and aqueous (Sr/Ca)aq ratio, is not affected by ionic strength/salinity either. Considering the log DSr and Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq relationship, Sr/Ca and δ44/40Cacalcite values of precipitated calcite can be used as an excellent multi-proxy approach to reconstruct environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) of calcite growth and diagenetic alteration. PMID:22347722

  11. Determination of UV active inorganic anions in potable and high salinity water by ion pair reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sadiq Khan, Sadaf; Riaz, M

    2014-05-01

    Reversed phase column was dynamically modified into anion exchange column using various types of tetraalkylammonium salts as ion pair reagents (IPRs) for the separation and quantification of toxic anions such as nitrite, bromate, bromide and nitrate in potable and high salinity water. Various chromatographic parameters such as types and concentration of IPRs, concentration of organic modifier, phosphate buffer and mobile phase pH were optimized for the base-line separation of anions. The lowest detection limits (LDLs) were 0.2 for nitrate and nitrite, 0.6 µg ml(-1)for bromate and bromide respectively for potable water samples. NaCl and Na₂SO₄ were incorporated in the mobile phase for the analysis of high salinity water samples to minimize matrix interferences. This has resulted in change in elution order of anions, better tolerance of matrix anions such as chloride and sulphate. The developed method was successfully utilized for analysis of anions in potable, high salinity and sea water samples.

  12. [Characteristics of mass distributions of aerosol particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in summer over a suburb farmland in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Zhu, Tong; Liang, Bao-sheng; Hu, Min; Kang, Ling; Gong, Ji-cheng

    2006-02-01

    Agricultural activity is one of the important sources of aerosol particle. To understand the mass distribution and sources of aerosol particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in the suburb farmland of Beijing, particle samples were collected with a MOUDI cascade impactor in the summer of 2004 in a suburb vegetable field. The mass distributions of the particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in the diameter range of 0.18 to approximately 18 microm were measured. The dominant ions in the fine particle were SO4(2-), NOS3(-) and NH4+. The association of day to day variation of the concentration of these ions with temperature, humidity and solar radiation suggests that they are formed by the reaction of NH3 released from the vegetable field with the acid species produced from photochemical reactions. K+ in the fine particle is likely from the vegetation emission and biomass burning. Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) in the coarse particle are suggested to come from the mechanical process by which the soil particle entered the atmosphere, and from the reactions of the acid species at the surface of the soil particle. The results show that fertilizer and soil are possibly important factors determining the aerosol particle over the agricultural fields, and the vegetable fields in suburb Beijing could contribute significantly to the aerosol particle.

  13. Inorganic, organic and macromolecular components of fine aerosol in different areas of Europe in relation to their water solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappoli, S.; Andracchio, A.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Gelencsér, A.; Kiss, G.; Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.; Mészáros, E.; Hansson, H.-C.; Rosman, K.; Zebühr, Y.

    A chemical mass balance of fine aerosol (<1.5 μm AED) collected at three European sites was performed with reference to the water solubility of the different aerosol classes of components. The sampling sites are characterised by different pollution conditions and aerosol loading in the air. Aspvreten is a background site in central Sweden, K-puszta is a rural site in the Great Hungarian Plain and San Pietro Capofiume is located in the polluted Po Valley, northern Italy. The average fine aerosol mass concentration was 5.9 μg m -3 at the background site Aspvreten, 24 μg m -3 at the rural K-puszta and 38 μg m -3 at the polluted site San Pietro Capofiume. However, a similarly high soluble fraction of the aerosol (65-75%) was measured at the three sites, while the percentage of water soluble organic species with respect to the total soluble mass was much higher at the background site (ca. 50%) than at the other two sites (ca. 25%). A very high fraction (over 70%) of organic compounds in the aerosol consisted of polar species. The presence of water soluble macromolecular compounds was revealed in the samples from K-puszta and San Pietro Capofiume. At both sites these species accounted for between ca. 20-50% of the water soluble organic fraction. The origin of the compounds was tentatively attributed to biomass combustion.

  14. Salinization and Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    L-1), although the chloride comprises only a fraction of the total dissolved salts in water. The Cl/TDS ratio varies from 0.1 in nonmarine saline waters to ˜0.5 in marine-associated saline waters. Water salinity is also defined by electrical conductivity (EC). In soil studies, the electrical conductivity and the ratio of Na/√(Ca+Mg) (SAR) are often used as an indirect measure of soil salinity. In addition to chloride, high levels of other dissolved constituents may limit the use of water for domestic, agriculture, and industrial applications. In some parts of Africa, China, and India, for example, high fluoride content is associated with saline groundwater and causes severe dental and skeletal fluorosis (Shiklomanov, 1997). Hence, the "salinity" problem is only the "tip of the iceberg," as high levels of salinity are associated with high concentrations of other inorganic pollutants (e.g., sodium, sulfate, boron, fluoride), and bioaccumulated elements (e.g., selenium, and arsenic) (see Chapter 9.03).The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that the chloride concentration of the water supply for human consumption should not exceed 250 mg L-1. Agriculture applications also depend upon the salinity level of the supplied water. Many crops, such as citrus, avocado, and mango, are sensitive to chloride concentration in irrigation water (an upper limit of 250 mg L-1). In addition, long-term irrigation with water enriched with sodium results in a significant reduction in the hydraulic conductivity and hence the fertility of the irrigated soil. Similarly, the industrial sector demands water of high quality. For example, the high-tech industry requires a large amount of water with low levels of dissolved salts. Hence, the salinity level of groundwater is one of the limiting factors that determine the suitability of water for a variety of applications.The salinity problem is a global phenomenon but it is more severe in water-scarce areas, such as arid and semi

  15. Host-guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-12-01

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host-guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 1011 Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs.

  16. Host–guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host–guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 1011 Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs. PMID:26647828

  17. Host-guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-12-09

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host-guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 10(11) Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs.

  18. Immobilization of high concentrations of soluble Mn(II) from electrolytic manganese solid waste using inorganic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Du, Bing; Hou, Deyin; Duan, Ning; Zhou, Changbo; Wang, Jun; Dan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Electrolytic manganese solid waste (EMSW) is a by-product of electrolytic manganese production and generally contains a high concentration of soluble Mn(II) (2000-3000 mg/L). Millions of tons of EMSW are stored in China, and the environmental pollution caused by manganese in this waste product is concerning. Unfortunately, little attention has been paid to the immobilization of manganese from industrial solid waste because manganese is absent from toxicological identification standards, and there is a lack of relevant quality standards in China. The objectives of this study were to immobilize soluble Mn(II) using chemical reagents, to analyze the immobilization mechanism, and to identify the most economical reagents. We investigated the immobilization degrees of soluble Mn(II) achieved by the reagents quicklime (CaO), carbonates (NaHCO₃ and Na₂CO₃), phosphates (Na₃PO₄, Na₂HPO₄, NH₄H₂PO₄, and Ca₁₀(PO₄)₆(OH)₂), and caustic magnesia (MgO) both individually and in combination. Our results showed that the use of 9% CaO+ 5% NaHCO₃, 9% CaO+ 5% Na₃PO₄, 10% MgO alone, or with 1-5% NaHCO₃ or 1-5% Na₂CO₃ can reduce the amount of Mn(II) leached to 100 mg/kg when the eluate pH was in the range of 6-9. The most economical reagent treatments were determined using K-means cluster analysis. Analysis of the immobilization mechanism showed that CaO + NaHCO₃ may be favorable for immobilizing soluble Mn(II) as precipitation and oxidation products because the addition of NaHCO₃ releases OH(-) and buffers the system.

  19. Evolution of the sink and source of dissolved inorganic nitrogen with salinity as a tracer during summer in the Pearl River Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mei-Lin; Hong, Yi-Guo; Yin, Jian-Ping; Dong, Jun-De; Wang, You-Shao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the sink and source of the surface water along the PRE using a mixing model method with salinity as tracer. The observational data showed that the decreasing of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) did not closely follow the physical mixing lines of freshwater and modified seawater. In the western part, DIN consumption by phytoplankton and bacteria uptake (ΔDIN)varied from 15.81 μmol L−1 to 88.53 μmol L−1. On the contrary, in the eastern part, ΔDIN varied from −63.66 μmol L−1 to −10.45 μmol L−1. DIN source in the eastern part may be mainly caused by organic matter decomposition, while DIN remove is strongly associated with phytoplankton growth and bacteria consumption. These differential behaviors of the estuary with respect to DIN are largely due to varying degrees of hydrodynamics due to different topography in the two areas. Sensitivity analysis indicated reduction strategies of DIN inputs to coastal waters may improve environment quality in the PRE, due to DIN changes in the freshwater end-member having a determined influence on biological activities (R). Our results indicate that the model may be a valuable way to address the sources and sink of DIN in the river-dominated estuaries. PMID:27833110

  20. Evolution of the sink and source of dissolved inorganic nitrogen with salinity as a tracer during summer in the Pearl River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mei-Lin; Hong, Yi-Guo; Yin, Jian-Ping; Dong, Jun-De; Wang, You-Shao

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the sink and source of the surface water along the PRE using a mixing model method with salinity as tracer. The observational data showed that the decreasing of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) did not closely follow the physical mixing lines of freshwater and modified seawater. In the western part, DIN consumption by phytoplankton and bacteria uptake (ΔDIN)varied from 15.81 μmol L-1 to 88.53 μmol L-1. On the contrary, in the eastern part, ΔDIN varied from -63.66 μmol L-1 to -10.45 μmol L-1. DIN source in the eastern part may be mainly caused by organic matter decomposition, while DIN remove is strongly associated with phytoplankton growth and bacteria consumption. These differential behaviors of the estuary with respect to DIN are largely due to varying degrees of hydrodynamics due to different topography in the two areas. Sensitivity analysis indicated reduction strategies of DIN inputs to coastal waters may improve environment quality in the PRE, due to DIN changes in the freshwater end-member having a determined influence on biological activities (R). Our results indicate that the model may be a valuable way to address the sources and sink of DIN in the river-dominated estuaries.

  1. Solubility Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility Database (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The database includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.

  2. Polyimide/metal composite films via in situ decomposition of inorganic additives - Soluble polyimide versus polyimide precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rancourt, J. D.; Porta, G. M.; Moyer, E. S.; Madeleine, D. G.; Taylor, L. T.

    1988-01-01

    Polyimide-metal oxide (Co3O4 or CuO) composite films have been prepared via in situ thermal decomposition of cobalt (II) chloride or bis(trifluoroacetylacetonato)copper(II). A soluble polyimide (XU-218) and its corresponding prepolymer (polyamide acid) were individually employed as the reaction matrix. The resulting composites exhibited a greater metal oxide concentration at the air interface with polyamide acid as the reaction matrix. The water of imidization that is released during the concurrent polyamide acid cure and additive decomposition is believed to promote metal migration and oxide formation. In contrast, XU-218 doped with either HAuCl4.3H2O or AgNO3 yields surface gold or silver when thermolyzed (300 C).

  3. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  4. Water soluble inorganic species of PM10 and PM2.5 at an urban site of Delhi, India: Seasonal variability and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Mohit; Sharma, A.; Sen, A.; Saxena, Priyanka; Saraswati; Mandal, T. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Sharma, C.

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive data of 2 years (2013-2014) of water soluble inorganic species (WSIS) in the particulate matter (PM10: mean: 233.0 ± 124.6 μg m- 3 and PM2.5: mean: 108.0 ± 86.5 μg m- 3) have been used to study seasonal effect on the variation of total WSIS concentration, composition variability of inorganic aerosols and extent to which secondary formation of sulfate and nitrate aerosol occurred from their precursor gases. Mean concentrations of total WSIS in PM10 and PM2.5 were 82.12 ± 72.15 μg m- 3 and 54.03 ± 49.22 μg m- 3, respectively during the study period. Concentrations of total WSIS (PM10: 140.11 ± 90.67 μg m- 3; PM2.5: 74.41 ± 47.55 μg m- 3) during winter season was recorded higher than summer, monsoon and spring seasons. Significant correlation (p < 0.01) between NH4+ and Cl-, SO42 -, NO3- in PM10 and PM2.5, respectively indicates NH4+ as the major cation species for the neutralization of acidic components in the winter season. On the contrary, in summer season Ca2 +, Mg2 +, Na+ and K+ were the alkaline species responsible for the neutralization of acidic components in the PM10 samples. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that secondary aerosol, biomass burning and soil driven dust were the possible sources that explained 70% of the total variance. Cluster analysis and Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) analysis for different season depicts the advection of air masses over the continental landmasses of Afghanistan (summer season), northwestern region of Pakistan (summer and winter season), marine region (monsoon season) and adjoining states of Delhi. These air masses from different regions could be the cause of an increase in PM10 and PM2.5 aerosol over the study site.

  5. Solubility of water in water-in-oil microemulsions stabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium: Effects of the surfactant counterion, the nature and composition of the oil, and the salinity of the droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Abuin, E.B.; Rubio, M.A.; Lissi, E.A. )

    1993-06-01

    The solubility of water in water-in-oil microemulsions stabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA) has been investigated as a function of the nature of the surfactant counterion (bromide; CTAB/chloride; CTAC), the composition of the oil (chloroform and chloroform/heptane mixtures), the salinity of the droplets, and the nature of the salt employed to modify it. Changing the composition of the oil from neat chloroform to a 500% mixture with heptane produces an increase of the water solubility in the microemulsions stabilized by CATB and decreases it in the CTAC microemulsions. Strong alterations of the solubility of water were found to occur upon mixing of the surfactants. Solubility increases abruptly on going from either CTAC- or CTAB-stabilized microemulsions to mixtures of both surfactants, reaching a maximum at CTAC mole fractions of 0.5 and 0.4 for solutions of the surfactants in chloroform and chloroform/heptane, respectively. Mixtures of CTAC and CATB in a solvent comprising 500% chloroform/heptane show a different behavior. In this system, water solubility continuously decreases when the CTAC/CTAB ratio increases. Solubility increases with salinity in the CTAC-stabilized microemulsions and decreases in the CTAB-stabilized microemulsions. Nevertheless, the magnitude of the effects observed is dependent on the nature of the salt employed to modify the salinity of the droplets. The results obtained are explained in terms of the model of Shah and coworkers by considering that, due to the stronger binding of bromide than of chloride to the surfactant heads at the micellar interface, water solubility in solutions of CTAB or CTAC in chloroform is determined by different factors: the curvature of the surfactant film (CTAB) and the interaction between droplets (CTAC).

  6. Requirement of a soluble intracellular factor for activation of transient receptor potential A1 by pungent chemicals: role of inorganic polyphosphates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghee; Cavanaugh, Eric J

    2007-06-13

    Pungent chemicals such as allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), cinnamaldehyde, and allicin, produce nociceptive sensation by directly activating transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) expressed in sensory afferent neurons. In this study, we found that pungent chemicals added to the pipette or bath solution easily activated TRPA1 in cell-attached patches but failed to do so in inside-out or outside-out patches. Thus, a soluble cytosolic factor was required to activate TRPA1. N-Ethylmaleimide, (2-aminoethyl)-methane thiosulfonate, 2-aminoethoxydiphneyl borate, and trinitrophenol, compounds that are known to activate TRPA1, also failed to activate it in inside-out patches. To identify a factor that supports activation of TRPA1 by pungent chemicals, we screened approximately 30 intracellular molecules known to modulate ion channels. Among them, pyrophosphate (PPi) and polytriphosphate (PPPi) were found to support activation of TRPA1 by pungent chemicals. Structure-function studies showed that inorganic polyphosphates (polyP(n), where n = number of phosphates) with at least four phosphate groups were highly effective (polyP4 approximately = polyP65 approximately = polyP45 approximately = polyP25 > PPPi > PPi), with K(1/2) values ranging from 0.2 to 2.8 mM. Inositol-trisphosphate and inositol-hexaphosphate also partially supported activation of TRPA1 by AITC. ATP, GTP, and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate that have three phosphate groups did not support TRPA1 activation. TRPA1 recorded from cell bodies of trigeminal ganglion neurons showed similar behavior with respect to sensitivity to pungent chemicals; no activation was observed in inside-out patches unless a polyphosphate was present. These results show that TRPA1 requires an intracellular factor to adopt a functional conformation that is sensitive to pungent chemicals and suggest that polyphosphates may partly act as such a factor.

  7. A luminescent-water soluble inorganic co-crystal for a selective pico-molar range arsenic(III) sensor in water medium.

    PubMed

    Dey, Biswajit; Saha, Rajat; Mukherjee, Priyanka

    2013-08-14

    The water solution of an intriguing luminescent 'Inorganic Co-crystal' of Cu(II) monomeric and dimeric units shows extremely selective sensing ability towards inorganic arsenic(III) in water medium in the pico-molar concentration range even in the presence of other cations.

  8. The impact of relative humidity on the size distribution and chemical processes of major water-soluble inorganic ions in the megacity of Chongqing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Ji, Dongsheng; Li, Yi; Gao, Meng; Tian, Shili; Wen, Tianxue; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Lili; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Changsheng; Wang, Yuesi

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the impacts of relative humidity (RH) on the size distribution and evolution of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) in Chongqing, China, size-resolved aerosols were collected using nine-stage viable Andersen cascade impactors bi-weekly from June 2012 to May 2014. The WSIIs (SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+, K+, Na+, Cl-, Ca2 +, Mg2 + and F-) were analyzed. The SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ peaks shifted from 0.43-0.65 μm particles at 40-60% RH to 0.65-1.1 μm particles at 70-90% RH. For K+, Na+ and Cl-, the peak concentrations were in the size range of 0.65-2.1 μm and increased as the RH increased from 40 to 90%. However, the Ca2 +, Mg2 + and F- peaks at all RH levels were mainly concentrated in the coarse mode, and their concentrations did not increase as regularly as those of SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+. All of the results suggest that RH was likely an important factor in determining the size distributions of the WSIIs. SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ increased linearly in all size ranges as a function of RH (40-90%). Additionally, SO42 - presented the highest rate of mass increase at 1.8 μg/m3/10% RH in 1.1 < Dp ≤ 2.1 μm particles. For NO3-, the ratio of NO3- in the WSIIs in 1.1 < Dp ≤ 2.1 μm particles increased more with increasing RH than that in the other size ranges. The NO3- in 0.43 < Dp ≤ 2.1 μm particles increased by approximately 8% when the RH increased from 40-60% to 60-90%. The NH4+ in 1.1 < Dp ≤ 2.1 μm particles increased at the highest rate with increasing RH, and the proportion of NH4+ in the WSIIs in 0.43 < Dp ≤ 1.1 μm particles was higher than that in the other size ranges. Aerosol acidity in the fine-mode particles increased with increasing RH but decreased with the increase in particle size.

  9. The use of stable isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and trace metals to understand carbon cycling in tidal marshes along an estuarine salinity gradient of the Elbe river (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Michael E.; Weiss, Andreas; Amann, Thorben; Winde, Vera; Hartmann, Jens

    2017-04-01

    The temporal dynamics of the dissolved carbon system in four tidal marshes under impact of the Elbe river (Germany) were studied along a salinity gradient (0.3 to 30.7) to assess their impact as source/sink areas for DIC, TA, and selected trace elements for the southeastern coastal North Sea. Besides pH, TA, major and trace metals (Sr, Ba, Mn), the concentrations and stable carbon isotope composition DIC were followed in the main creeks of each sampling station over complete tidal cycles at different seasons. Substantial differences in salinity and tidal responses in concentrations of trace elements and the dissolved inorganic and organic carbon system were observed. Carbon isotope signatures of DIC down to -13.9 ‰ vs. VPDB were observed, with the isotopically most enriched DIC (up to -1.5 ‰ vs. VPDB) found to be associated with the highest salinities. The tidal dynamic in dissolved concentrations of DIC was high, showing an up to 3-fold difference between low and high tide waters. Whereas, Sr was impacted by mixing processes and carbonate dissolution, Ba showed a dependence from sulfate availability, and dissolved Mn was controlled by benthic microbial activity and fluxes across the sediment-water interface. The application of a binary mixing model based on the cationic and stable isotope composition reveal that both carbonate mineral dissolution at all sites and benthic microbial sulfate reduction at the brackish sites are important sources for producing alkalinity.

  10. A one-year, on-line, multi-site observational study on water-soluble inorganic ions in PM2.5 over the Pearl River Delta region, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wu, Dui; Fan, Shaojia; Mao, Xia; Chen, Huizhong

    2017-12-01

    As the significant components of PM2.5, almost all of previous studies on water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) have been limited by the use of single sampling station, short sampling times or low temporal resolution. This paper focuses on analysing one-year (2012) observations of WSIIs at a regional central (RCEN) site, a coastal urban (CURB) site and a coastal rural (CRUR) site in the Pearl River Delta region. On average, secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) were the most abundant component and accounted for over 80% of the total WSIIs. The ratio among sulfate, nitrate and ammonium mass concentrations was close to 2:1:1 (5:2:1) at the RCEN and CURB sites (CRUR site). Most components (except Na(+)) showed higher concentrations in the dry season. The diurnal variations of different ions showed obvious differences, which were partially controlled by photochemical reactions and diffusion conditions in the boundary layer. Ionic formation patterns were different among the three sites. Secondary inorganic pollution was much more serious in the northwestern PRD, and it had a significant effect on pollution in the coastal areas. High SO4(2-) concentrations at the CRUR site may be associated with local emissions, such as dimethysulfide (DMS). Long-range transport along the southeastern coastline also played an important role in SO4(2-) pollution over the PRD region. Sea salt aerosols were an important source in coastal regions; they contributed large amounts of Cl(-), Na(+), Mg(2+) at the CRUR site and large amounts of Na(+), Mg(2+) at the CURB site. The case studies found that sea salt aerosols concentrations increased obviously during the heavy precipitation period of typhoon. The presence of warm-wet air masses before continuous moist weather (CMW) was favourable for the formation of SIA. On the other hand, during CMW periods, SIA concentrations decreased rapidly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficiency of soil organic and inorganic amendments on the remediation of a contaminated mine soil: I. Effects on trace elements and nutrients solubility and leaching risk.

    PubMed

    Pardo, T; Bernal, M P; Clemente, R

    2014-07-01

    A mesocosm experiment, in columns, was conducted in a growth chamber to assess the viability of two organic materials (pig slurry and compost; in combination with hydrated lime) for the remediation of a highly acidic and trace elements (TEs) contaminated mine soil and the reduction of its associated leaching risks. Their influence on the evolution throughout the soil depth of the physicochemical properties (including TEs mobility) of the soil and soil solution (in situ periodic collection) and on Lolium perenne growth and foliar TEs accumulation was evaluated. Soluble and extractable concentrations of the different TEs were considerably high, although the organic amendments (with lime) and lime addition successfully decreased TEs mobility in the top soil layer, as a consequence of a rise in pH and changes in the redox conditions. Compost and pig slurry increased the soluble organic-C and dissolved N, K and P of the soil, producing a certain downwards displacement of N and K. The organic amendments allowed the growth of L. perenne in the soil, thus indicating improvement of soil conditions, but elevated TEs availability in the soil led to toxicity symptoms and abnormally high TEs concentrations in the plants. An evaluation of the functioning and ecotoxicological risks of the remediated soils is reported in part II: this allows verification of the viability of the amendments for remediation strategies.

  12. Reactive Transport Modeling of Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: The Influence of Intra-Aquifer Shales and the Relative Effectiveness of Structural, Solubility, and Mineral Trapping During Prograde and Retrograde Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Steefel, C I; Knauss, K G

    2001-04-24

    In this study, we address a series of fundamental questions regarding the processes and effectiveness of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline aquifers. We begin with the broadest: what is the ultimate fate of CO{sub 2} injected into these environments? Once injected, it is immediately subject to two sets of competing processes: migration processes and sequestration processes. In terms of migration, the CO{sub 2} moves by volumetric displacement of formation waters, with which it is largely immiscible; by gravity segregation, which causes the immiscible CO{sub 2} plume to rise owing to its relatively low density; and by viscous fingering, owing to its relatively low viscosity. In terms of sequestration, some fraction of the rising plume will dissolve into formation waters (solubility trapping); some fraction may react with formation minerals to precipitate carbonates (mineral trapping); and the remaining portion eventually reaches the cap rock, where it migrates up-dip, potentially accumulating in local topographic highs (structural trapping). Although this concept of competing migration/sequestration processes is intuitively obvious, identifying those sub-processes that dominate the competition is by no means straightforward. Hence, at present there are large uncertainties associated with the ultimate fate of injected CO{sub 2} (Figure 1). Principal among these: can a typical shale cap rock provide a secure seal? Because gravity segregation will always keep the immiscible CO{sub 2} plume moving towards the surface, caprock integrity is the single most important variable influencing isolation security. An extremely thick shale cap rock exists at Sleipner (several 100 m); here, however, we examine the performance of a 25-m-thick cap, which is more representative of the general case. Although the cap rock represents the final barrier to vertical CO{sub 2} migration, what is the effect of intra-aquifer permeability structure? Because this structure directs the

  13. In situ determination of salinity by PGNAA.

    PubMed

    Borsaru, M; Smith, C; Merritt, J; Aizawa, T; Rojc, A

    2006-05-01

    Salinity is a very important environmental issue all around the world. In many cases salinity was produced from human activities like farming and mining. Different soluble salts contribute to salinity, however, NaCl is the most common salt producing salinity. This work deals with the application of the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique for in situ determination of salinity. The technique is based on the measurement of chlorine, a component of the common salt, by PGNAA.

  14. Secondary Inorganic Soluble Aerosol in Hong Kong: Continuous Measurements, Formation Mechanism Discussion and Improvement of an Observation-Based Model to Study Control Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian

    Work in this thesis focuses on half-hourly or hourly measurements of PM2.5 secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) in two locations in Hong Kong (HK) using a continuous system, PILS (Particle-into-Liquid System) coupled to two ion chromatographs. The high-resolution data sets allow the examination of SIA temporal dynamics in the scale of hours that the filter-based approach is incapable of providing. (1) Impacts of local emissions, regional transports and their interactions on chemical composition and concentrations of PM2.5 SIA and other ionic species were investigated at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), a receptor site, under three synoptic conditions. (2) Chemical compositions and size characteristics of ionic species were investigated at Tung Chung, a new town area located in the Southwest part of HK. The sampling period was from 17 to 26 December 2009, covering both normal conditions and an aerosol episode. The three major secondary inorganic ions, SO42, NH4+ and NO 3-, accounted for 47 +/- 6% of PM2.5 mass. Further examination of size characteristics of NO3 - shows that fine mode NO3- is more likely to occur in environments when the fine particles are less acidic and the sea-salt aerosol contributions are low. (3) The ionic chemical composition of PM2.5 and meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, RH) obtained at the HKUST site under all three different synoptic conditions are input into Aerosol Inorganic Model (AIM-III) for estimation of in situ pH through calculation of H+ amount and aerosol liquid water content (LWC). The second part of this thesis work is to improve an observation-based model (OBAMAP) for SIA, which was first developed by Dr. Zibing Yuan (2006) to evaluate the sensitivity of formation of nitrate ad sulfate to changes in the emissions of their precursors (i.e., NOx, SO2, and VOCs). The improvement work includes incorporating updated chemical mechanisms, thermodynamic equilibrium for gas-aerosol phase

  15. Salinization alters fluxes of bioreactive elements from stream ecosystems across land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, S.; Kaushal, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    There has been increased salinization of fresh water over decades due to the use of road salt deicers, wastewater discharges, saltwater intrusion, human-accelerated weathering, and groundwater irrigation. Salinization can mobilize bioreactive elements (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur) chemically via ion exchange and/or biologically via influencing of microbial activity. However, the effects of salinization on coupled biogeochemical cycles are still not well understood. We investigated potential impacts of increased salinization on fluxes of bioreactive elements from stream ecosystems (sediments and riparian soils) to overlying stream water and evaluated the implications of percent urban land use on salinization effects. Two-day incubations of sediments and soils with stream and deionized water across three salt levels were conducted at eight routine monitoring stations across a land-use gradient at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Results indicated (1) salinization typically increased sediment releases of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (ammonium + ammonia + dissolved organic nitrogen), and sediment transformations of nitrate; (2) salinization generally decreased DOC aromaticity and fluxes of soluble reactive phosphorus from both sediments and soils; (3) the effects of increased salinization on sediment releases of DOC and TKN and DOC quality increased with percentage watershed urbanization. Biogeochemical responses to salinization varied between sediments and riparian soils in releases of DOC and DIC, and nitrate transformations. The differential responses of riparian soils and sediments to increased salinization were likely due to differences in organic matter sources and composition. Our results suggest that short-term increases in salinization can cause releases of significant amounts of labile organic

  16. Field performance of a semi-continuous monitor for ambient PM2.5 water-soluble inorganic ions and gases at a suburban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Li-Hao; Li, Chiao-Hsin; Lin, Ming-Yeng; Hwang, Bing-Fang; Hsu, Hui-Tsung; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Jung, Chau-Ren; Chen, Kuan-Chi; Cheng, Dung-Hung; Wang, Ven-Shing; Chiang, Hung-Che; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    2016-11-01

    To reduce sampling artifacts and to improve time-resolved measurements of inorganic aerosol system, a recently commercialized semi-continuous In-situ Gas and Aerosol Composition (IGAC) monitoring system was evaluated against a reference annular denuder system (ADS; denuder/two-stage filter pack) at a suburban site over a year, during which the average PM2.5 was 37.0 ± 24.8 μg/m3. A suite of eight ions SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ and two gases SO2 and NH3 were the target species. In comparison to the reference ADS method, the IGAC performed well in measuring the major ions SO42-, NO3- and NH4+, and the SO2. For those species, the linear slopes, intercepts and R2 values between the two methods all passed the performance evaluation criteria outlined by earlier similar studies. The performance of IGAC on Cl-, Na+, K+ and NH3 was marginally acceptable, whereas Ca2+ and Mg2+ could not be properly evaluated due to the low concentrations (<0.2 μg/m3) and hence inadequate amount of sample size. The ionic balance of the hourly IGAC samples averaged very close to unity, as did the daily ADS samples, though the former was considerably more variable than the latter. The overall performance of the IGAC has been shown to be comparable to other similar monitors and its improvements are discussed.

  17. Chemical coupling between acid gases and water-soluble inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols during Arabian Dust in Beirut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Najat; Dada, Lubna; Baalbaki, Rima

    2015-04-01

    In the proximity of the Eastern Mediterranean region, the combination of two large desert areas; Arabian and African, with heavy oil industry and high insolation during summer delineate a unique location of atmospheric processes in the region. Once emitted, dust particles can be transported over long distances and/or remain suspended in the atmosphere for several days. The so-called remnant dust episodes in Beirut originate from both African and Arabian deserts. In this study, the gas and particle transformations and gas-to-particle conversion during Arabian-dust (Ar-D) events are assessed. The increase in primary and secondary gas concentrations during Ar-D days is ascribed to three contributing factors; (i) the regional-long-range transport (LRT), (ii) the drop in the average solar radiation leading to a slow primary-to-secondary conversion and secondary gas photo-degradation, and (iii) the enhancement of the recirculation and accumulation of the main pollutants during dusty days. In parallel, a respective mass increase by 137, 149 and 13% in the coarse (CPM), accumulation (ACC) and ultrafine (UF) fractions was measured and an increase in particle volume distribution was mostly noticed for particles ranging in sizes between 2.25 and 5 μm. This lead to major changes in the inorganic chemical composition of all particle sizes. In particular, the enhanced presence of several types of nitrate and sulfate salts in the accumulation mode confirms that remnant dust episodes offer a favorable environment for gas-to-particle conversion and particle chemical transformations and growth.

  18. Water-soluble inorganic ions in airborne particulates from the nano to coarse mode: a case study of aerosol episodes in southern region of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Peng; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chang, Kai-Lun; Lin, Jim Juimin

    2008-06-01

    In 2004, airborne particulate matter (PM) was collected for several aerosol episodes occurring in the southern region of Taiwan. The particulate samples were taken using both a MOUDI (Micro-orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor) and a nano-MOUDI sampler. These particulate samples were analyzed for major water-soluble ionic species with an emphasis to characterize the mass concentrations and distributions of these ions in the ambient ultrafine (PM0.1, diameter <0.1 microm) and nano mode (PMnano, diameter <0.056 microm) particles. Particles collected at the sampling site (the Da-Liao station) on the whole exhibited a typical tri-modal size distribution on mass concentration. The mass concentration ratios of PMnano/PM2.5, PM0.1/PM2.5, and PM1/PM2.5 on average were 1.8, 2.9, and 71.0%, respectively. The peak mass concentration appeared in the submicron particle mode (0.1 microm < diameter <1.0 microm). Mass fractions (percentages) of the three major water-soluble ions (nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium) as a group in PMnano, PM0.1, PM1, and PM2.5 were 18.4, 21.7, 50.0, and 50.7%, respectively. Overall, results from this study supported the notion that secondary aerosols played a significant role in the formation of ambient submicron particulates (PM0.1-1). Particles smaller than 0.1 microm were essentially basic, whereas those greater than 2.5 microm were neutral or slightly acidic. The neutralization ratio (NR) was close to unity for airborne particles with diameters ranging from 0.18 to 1 microm. The NRs of these airborne particles were found strongly correlated with their sizes, at least for samples taken during the aerosol episodes under study. Insofar as this study is exploratory in nature, as only a small number of particulate samples were used, there appears to be a need for further research into the chemical composition, source contribution, and formation of the nano and ultrafine mode airborne particulates.

  19. Indicators: Salinity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Salinity is the dissolved salt content of a body of water. Excess salinity, due to evaporation, water withdrawal, wastewater discharge, and other sources, is a chemical sterssor that can be toxic for aquatic environments.

  20. Assessing water salinity along River Limón and Caño San Miguel irrigation paleochannel (Maracaibo, Venezuela) as affected by the balance of soluble salts in alluvium soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Raquel; Moreno, Juan; Hermosilla, Daphne; Gascó, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The saline degradation of soils that are irrigated with brackish water is worrisome increasing worldwide, and it may further affect the salinity of fresh water in those streams flowing across. The problem that is caused by an increasing concentration of salts that are more soluble than gypsum depends on the quality of irrigation water, climatic aridity, and drainage limitations. All these conditions meet in the alluvium soils of River Limón basin that are crossed by Caño San Miguel irrigation paleochannel. River Limón's regulation by closing Manuelote and Tulé artificial reservoirs has diminished the input of water and sediments from flooding events, which exerted dilutive effects in the past. In addition, the balance of soluble salts in these soils has also registered further net accumulation during those extremely dry years happened before 2006, because the great dilution contribution of ombrogenic dammed water coming from rain has not been enough to compensate salts concentration generated by water evapotranspiration in those irrigated soils of the middle basin, particularly in the absence of superficial runoff and deep drainage. Considering those semi-arid climate conditions prevailing in the area (annual precipitation = 710 mm; potential evapotransporation = 2361 mm), it resulted that water analyses in River Limón showed a ten-fold increased maximum annual salinity concentration (March) along the stream; that is, an electric conductivity (Ce) of 0.37 dS•m-1 (at 25 °C) at Puente Carrasquero pumping station, where water for crop irrigation is subtracted, turns to 34.60 dS•m-1 (at 25 °C) at its base level in Puerto Mara, where it discharges to Lake Maracaibo. In addition, the quality of irrigation water from Caño San Miguel, which aggregates to those coming from River Limón at the pumping station located in Carrasquero just before running through the alluvium of this water stream, resulted pretty irregular. In short, it spanned form C1 to C4 soil

  1. Salinization Enhances Mobilization of Nutrients from Sediments to Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S.; Kaushal, S.; Hohman, S.; Coplin, J.; Duan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many regions of the U.S. and elsewhere are experiencing increased salinization of freshwater due to the widespread application of road salts. Increased salinization has the potential to release stored nutrients from sediments, decrease biodiversity, and perturb water quality. We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the potential effects of road salt (NaCl) on nutrient mobilization from sediments to stream water. Sediments and stream water were incubated from 2 urbanizing watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan area. Stream sediment was incubated from 11 routinely monitored streams exhibiting a land use gradient within the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological Research (BES LTER) site and Anacostia River watershed. Our results indicate that salinization increased the release of soluble reactive phosphorus and total dissolved nitrogen at all sites. The release of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic carbon varied between sites, and these differential responses may be due to: stream sediment composition, organic matter content, and ambient water quality. The magnitude and frequency of road salt application may be amplified in the near future due to the interactive effects of climate variability and urbanization, and our research suggests this can have water quality and ecological implications for freshwater ecosystems. Further research is necessary to elucidate driving mechanisms of changes in sediment biogeochemical cycles in response to salinization and the temporal response of freshwater ecosystems.

  2. Characteristics of water-soluble inorganic ions in PM2.5 and PM 2.5-10 in the coastal urban agglomeration along the Western Taiwan Strait Region, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liqian; Niu, Zhenchuan; Chen, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Jinsheng; Zhang, Fuwang; Xu, Lingling

    2014-04-01

    PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 aerosol samples were collected in four seasons during November 2010, January, April, and August 2011 at 13 urban/suburban sites and one background site in Western Taiwan Straits Region (WTSR), which is the coastal area with rapid urbanization, high population density, and deteriorating air quality. The 10 days average PM2.5 concentrations were 92.92, 51.96, 74.48, and 89.69 μg/m(3) in spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively, exceeding the Chinese ambient air quality standard for annual average value of PM2.5 (grade II, 35 μg/m(3)). Temporal distribution of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) in PM2.5 was coincident with PM2.5 mass concentrations, showing highest in spring, lowest in summer, and middle in autumn and winter. WSIIs took considerable proportion (42.2 ∼ 50.1 %) in PM2.5 and PM2.5-10. Generally, urban/suburban sites had obviously suffered severer pollution of fine particles compared with the background site. The WSIIs concentrations and characteristics were closely related to the local anthropogenic activities and natural environment, urban sites in cities with higher urbanization level, or sites with weaker diffuse condition suffered severer WSIIs pollution. Fossil fuel combustion, traffic emissions, crustal/soil dust, municipal constructions, and sea salt and biomass burnings were the major potential sources of WSIIs in PM2.5 in WTSR according to the result of principal component analysis.

  3. APPLICATION OF INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY TO THE ANALYSIS OF INORGANIC NITRATES. PHASE 1. SPECTRA OF INORGANIC NITRATES IN ACETONE AND THE USE OF SUCH SPECTRA IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A study was made of the spectra of soluble inorganic nitrates in acetone solution and the use of such spectra in analytical chemistry . The spectra of...solubilities of anhydrous inorganic nitrates in acetone. The applications of the spectra of inorganic nitrates in acetone to analytical chemistry is

  4. Arsenic, inorganic

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Arsenic , inorganic ; CASRN 7440 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  5. Salinity Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  6. Salinity Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  7. Characterization of Soluble Organics in Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, D.T.

    2002-01-16

    Soluble organics in produced water and refinery effluents represent treatment problems for the petroleum industry. Neither the chemistry involved in the production of soluble organics nor the impact of these chemicals on total effluent toxicity is well understood. The U.S. Department of Energy provides funding for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support a collaborative project with Shell, Chevron, Phillips, and Statoil entitled ''Petroleum and Environmental Research Forum project (PERF 9844: Manage Water-Soluble Organics in Produced Water''). The goal of this project, which involves characterization and evaluation of these water-soluble compounds, is aimed at reducing the future production of such contaminants. To determine the effect that various drilling conditions might have on water-soluble organics (WSO) content in produced water, a simulated brine water containing the principal inorganic components normally found in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) brine sources was prepared. The GOM simulant was then contacted with as-received crude oil from a deep well site to study the effects of water cut, produced-water pH, salinity, pressure, temperature, and crude oil sources on the type and content of the WSO in produced water. The identities of individual semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were determined in all as-received crude and actual produced water samples using standard USEPA Method (8270C) protocol. These analyses were supplemented with the more general measurements of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the gas (C{sub 6}-C{sub 10}), diesel (C{sub 10}-C{sub 20}), and oil (C{sub 20}-C{sub 28}) carbon ranges as determined by both gas chromatographic (GC) and infrared (IR) analyses. An open liquid chromatographic procedure was also used to differentiate the saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, and polar components within the extractable TPH. Inorganic constituents in the produced water were analyzed by ion-selective electrodes and inductively

  8. Understanding Solubility through Excel Spreadsheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Pamela

    2001-02-01

    This article describes assignments related to the solubility of inorganic salts that can be given in an introductory general chemistry course. Le Châtelier's principle, solubility, unit conversion, and thermodynamics are tied together to calculate heats of solution by two methods: heats of formation and an application of the van't Hoff equation. These assignments address the need for math, graphing, and computer skills in the chemical technology program by developing skill in the use of Microsoft Excel to prepare spreadsheets and graphs and to perform linear and nonlinear curve-fitting. Background information on the value of understanding and predicting solubility is provided.

  9. The chemical control of soluble phosphorus in the Amazon estuary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, L. E.; Wofsy, S. C.; Sager, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of sediments in controlling concentrations of soluble phosphorous in the Amazon estuary is examined. The efflux of phosphorous through the estuary is calculated using data collected on field excursions in December 1982 and May 1983, and laboratory mixing experiments. It is observed that soluble phosphorus was released from bottom sediments at a rate of 0.2 micro-M/day, when in seawater and deionizd water mixtures. The relation between release rates and salinity and sediment concentrations is studied. A one-dimensional dispersion model was developed to estimate phosphate inputs to the estuary. The model predicted total fluxes of soluble inorganic phosphorous of 15 x 10 to the 6th mole/day for December 1982 and 27 x 10 to the 6th mole/day for May 1983; the predictions correlate with field observations. It is noted that phosphorous removal is between 0 and 4 ppt at a rate of 0.044 + or - 0.01 micron-M/ppt per day and the annual mean input of phophorous from Amazon to outer-estuary is 23 x 10 to the 6th moles/day.

  10. The chemical control of soluble phosphorus in the Amazon estuary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, L. E.; Wofsy, S. C.; Sager, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of sediments in controlling concentrations of soluble phosphorous in the Amazon estuary is examined. The efflux of phosphorous through the estuary is calculated using data collected on field excursions in December 1982 and May 1983, and laboratory mixing experiments. It is observed that soluble phosphorus was released from bottom sediments at a rate of 0.2 micro-M/day, when in seawater and deionizd water mixtures. The relation between release rates and salinity and sediment concentrations is studied. A one-dimensional dispersion model was developed to estimate phosphate inputs to the estuary. The model predicted total fluxes of soluble inorganic phosphorous of 15 x 10 to the 6th mole/day for December 1982 and 27 x 10 to the 6th mole/day for May 1983; the predictions correlate with field observations. It is noted that phosphorous removal is between 0 and 4 ppt at a rate of 0.044 + or - 0.01 micron-M/ppt per day and the annual mean input of phophorous from Amazon to outer-estuary is 23 x 10 to the 6th moles/day.

  11. Method for producing heat-resistant semi-inorganic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Okamura, K.; Shishido, T.; Hasegawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The method for producing a heat resistant, semi-inorganic compound is discussed. Five examples in which various alcohols, phenols, and aromatic carbonic acids are used to test heat resistance and solubility are provided.

  12. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  13. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  14. Last Glacial Maximum Salinity Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that salinity can be reconstructed from sediment porewater. The goal of our study is to reconstruct high precision salinity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Salinity is usually determined at high precision via conductivity, which requires a larger volume of water than can be extracted from a sediment core, or via chloride titration, which yields lower than ideal precision. It has been demonstrated for water column samples that high precision density measurements can be used to determine salinity at the precision of a conductivity measurement using the equation of state of seawater. However, water column seawater has a relatively constant composition, in contrast to porewater, where variations from standard seawater composition occur. These deviations, which affect the equation of state, must be corrected for through precise measurements of each ion's concentration and knowledge of apparent partial molar density in seawater. We have developed a density-based method for determining porewater salinity that requires only 5 mL of sample, achieving density precisions of 10-6 g/mL. We have applied this method to porewater samples extracted from long cores collected along a N-S transect across the western North Atlantic (R/V Knorr cruise KN223). Density was determined to a precision of 2.3x10-6 g/mL, which translates to salinity uncertainty of 0.002 gms/kg if the effect of differences in composition is well constrained. Concentrations of anions (Cl-, and SO4-2) and cations (Na+, Mg+, Ca+2, and K+) were measured. To correct salinities at the precision required to unravel LGM Meridional Overturning Circulation, our ion precisions must be better than 0.1% for SO4-/Cl- and Mg+/Na+, and 0.4% for Ca+/Na+, and K+/Na+. Alkalinity, pH and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon of the porewater were determined to precisions better than 4% when ratioed to Cl-, and used to calculate HCO3-, and CO3-2. Apparent partial molar densities in seawater were

  15. Practically Saline

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jonathan; O’Neal, Catherine; Jagneaux, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2), and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak. PMID:26668812

  16. Saline Valley

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11164

  17. Saline Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Figure 2

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  18. Biogeochemical functioning of grazed estuarine tidal marshes along a salinity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dausse, Armel; Garbutt, Angus; Norman, Louiza; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Jones, Laurence M.; Robins, Peter E.; Thomas, David N.

    2012-03-01

    Depending on their location along an estuarine salinity gradient, tidal marshes are thought to have different impacts on the chemical composition of the water during flooding. However, there is a lack of direct measurements of fluxes occurring between the marsh surface and the water column to corroborate this hypothesis. This study compared fluxes of nutrient and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) between the water column and the marsh surface and the emission of greenhouse gases, at four sites located along the salinity gradient of an estuary of north-western Wales (UK). The exchanges of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (DON), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), soluble reactive phosphorus and silicic acid, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide were measured during tidal inundation in May and September 2008 using in situ incubation chambers. There was no linear pattern along the salinity gradient and the concentration of nutrients and DOC in the flood water did not appear to control the biogeochemical processes driving the marsh surface/water column exchanges in the studied marshes. Multivariate analysis showed a clear discrimination in functioning between sites with the fresh and brackish marshes having a more similar functioning compared to low and middle marshes. The main differences between these two groupings were in the fluxes of DOC and nitrate. The phenology of plant species, soil organic matter content and soil oxygenation appear be the dominant factors explaining the observed fluxes.

  19. Remote Monitoring, Inorganic Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of applicability, amenability, and operating parameter ranges for various inorganic parameters:this chapter will also provide a compilation of existing and new online technologies for determining inorganic compounds in water samples. A wide vari...

  20. Remote Monitoring, Inorganic Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of applicability, amenability, and operating parameter ranges for various inorganic parameters:this chapter will also provide a compilation of existing and new online technologies for determining inorganic compounds in water samples. A wide vari...

  1. The effect of biological activity, CaCO3 mineral dynamics, and CO2 degassing in the inorganic carbon cycle in sea ice in late winter-early spring in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, S.; Kennedy, H.; Norman, L.; Kennedy, D. P.; Dieckmann, G. S.; Thomas, D. N.

    A large-scale geographical study of the ice pack in the seasonal ice zone of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, took place from September to October 2006. Sea ice brines with a salinity greater than 58 and temperature lower than -3.6°C were sampled from 22 ice stations. The brines had large deficits in total alkalinity and in the concentrations of the major dissolved macronutrients (total dissolved inorganic carbon, nitrate, and soluble reactive phosphorus) relative to their concentrations in the surface oceanic water and conservative behavior during seawater freezing. The concentration deficits were related to the dissolved inorganic carbon-consuming processes of photosynthesis, CaCO3 precipitation, and CO2 degassing. The largest concentration deficits in total dissolved inorganic carbon were found to be associated with CaCO3 precipitation and CO2 degassing, because the magnitude of the photosynthesis-induced concentration deficit in total dissolved inorganic carbon is controlled by the size of the inorganic nutrient pool, which can be limited in sea ice by its openness to exchange with the surrounding oceanic water.

  2. Solubility of Structurally Complicated Materials: II. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Ari L.

    2006-12-01

    Bone is a structurally complex material, formed of both organic and inorganic chemicals. The organic compounds constitute mostly collagen and other proteins. The inorganic or bone mineral components constitute predominantly calcium, phosphate, carbonate, and a host of minor ingredients. The mineralized bone is composed of crystals which are closely associated with a protein of which collagen is an acidic polysaccharide material. This association is very close and the protein integrates into the crystalline structure. The mineralization involves the deposition of relatively insoluble crystals on an organic framework. The solubility process takes place when the outermost ions in the crystal lattice breakaway from the surface and become separated from the crystal. This is characteristic for ions dissolving in water or aqueous solutions at the specified temperature. The magnitude of solubility is temperature and pH dependent. Bone is sparingly soluble in most solvents. Enamel is less soluble than bone and fluoroapatite is the least soluble of all apatites in acid buffers. Collagen is less soluble in neutral salt solution than in dilute acid solutions at ambient temperatures. The solubility of collagens in solvents gradually decreases with increasing age of the bone samples.

  3. DISCRIMINATING THE BENTHIC EFFECTS OF ANTHROPOGENIC POINT SOURCES FROM SALINITY AND NITROGEN LOADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the influence of anthropogenic point sources on estuarine systems, environmental managers must be able to discern the level and effects of significant natural factors and nonpoint source inputs. We compared benthic community state, salinity and dissolved inorganic nit...

  4. Inorganic contents of peats

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Cohen, A.D.

    1988-02-01

    Peat, the precursor of coal, is composed primarily of plant components and secondarily of inorganic matter derived from a variety of sources. The elemental, mineralogic, and petrographic composition of a peat is controlled by a combination of both its botanical and depositional environment. Inorganic contents of peats can vary greatly between geographically separated peat bogs as well as vertially and horizontally within an individual bog. Predicting the form and distribution of inorganic matter in a coal deposit requires understanding the distribution and preservation of inorganic matter in peat-forming environments and diagenetic alterations affecting such material during late-stage peatification and coalification processes. 43 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Distribution of algae in the San Joaquin River, California, in relation to nutrient supply, salinity and other environmental factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.; Brown, L.R.; Mueller, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    1. The taxonomic composition and biomass of the phytoplankton and the taxonomic composition of the phytobenthos of the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries were examined in relation to water chemistry, habitat and flow regime. Agricultural drainage and subsurface flow contribute to a complex gradient of salinity and nutrients in this eutrophic, 'lowland type' river.2. Because of light-limiting conditions for growth, maintenance demands of the algae exceed production during summer and autumn in the San Joaquin River where there is no inflow from tributaries. In contrast to substantial gains in concentration of inorganic nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus during the summer of normal-flow years, net losses of algal biomass (2-4 ??g L-1 day-1 chlorophyll a) occurred in a mid-river segment with no significant tributary inflow. However, downstream of a large tributary draining the Sierra Nevada, a substantial net gain in algal biomass (6-11 μg L-1 day-1) occurred in the summer, but not in the spring (loss of 1-6 μg L-1 day-1) or autumn (loss of 2-5 ??g L-1 day-1).3. The phytoplankton was dominated in summer by 'r-selected' centric diatoms (Thalassiosirales), species both tolerant of variable salinity and widely distributed in the San Joaquin River. Pennate diatoms were proportionally more abundant (in biomass) in the winter, spring and autumn. Abundant taxa included the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Skeletonema cf. potamos, Cyclostephanos invisitatus, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nitzschia acicularis, N. palea and N. reversa, and the chlorophytes Chlamydomonas sp. and Scenesdesmus quadricauda. Patterns in the abundance of species indicated that assembly of the phytoplankton is limited more by light and flow regime than by nutrient supply.4. The phytobenthos was dominated by larger, more slowly reproducing pennate diatoms. Few of the abundant species are euryhaline. The diatoms Navicula recens and Nitzschia inconspicua and cyanophytes, Oscillatoria spp

  6. Measuring Salinity by Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapworth, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines procedures for constructing an instrument which uses an electrode and calibration methods to measure the salinity of waters in environments close to and affected by a saline estuary. (Author/DC)

  7. Measuring Salinity by Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapworth, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines procedures for constructing an instrument which uses an electrode and calibration methods to measure the salinity of waters in environments close to and affected by a saline estuary. (Author/DC)

  8. World salinization with emphasis on Australia.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Pichu

    2006-01-01

    Salinization is the accumulation of water-soluble salts in the soil solum or regolith to a level that impacts on agricultural production, environmental health, and economic welfare. Salt-affected soils occur in more than 100 countries of the world with a variety of extents, nature, and properties. No climatic zone in the world is free from salinization, although the general perception is focused on arid and semi-arid regions. Salinization is a complex process involving the movement of salts and water in soils during seasonal cycles and interactions with groundwater. While rainfall, aeolian deposits, mineral weathering, and stored salts are the sources of salts, surface and groundwaters can redistribute the accumulated salts and may also provide additional sources. Sodium salts dominate in many saline soils of the world, but salts of other cations such as calcium, magnesium, and iron are also found in specific locations. Different types of salinization with a prevalence of sodium salts affect about 30% of the land area in Australia. While more attention is given to groundwater-associated salinity and irrigation salinity, which affects about 16% of the agricultural area, recent investigations suggest that 67% of the agricultural area has a potential for "transient salinity", a type of non-groundwater-associated salinity. Agricultural soils in Australia, being predominantly sodic, accumulate salts under seasonal fluctuations and have multiple subsoil constraints such as alkalinity, acidity, sodicity, and toxic ions. This paper examines soil processes that dictate the exact edaphic environment upon which root functions depend and can help in research on plant improvement.

  9. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  10. SPOT5 imagery for soil salinity assessment in Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teggi, S.; Costanzini, S.; Despini, F.; Chiodi, P.; Immordino, F.

    2012-10-01

    Soil salinization is a form of topsoil degradation due to the formation of soluble salts at deleterious levels. This phenomenon can seriously compromise vegetation health and agricultural productivity, and represents a worldwide environmental problem. Remote sensing is a very useful tool for soil salinization monitoring and assessment. In this work we show some results of a study aimed to define a methodology for soil salinity assessment in Iraq based on SPOT 5 imagery. This methodology allows the identification of salinized soils primarily on bare soils. Subsequently some soil salinity assessment can be done on vegetated soils. On bare soil the identification of salt is based on spectral analysis, using the Minimum Noise Fraction transformation and several indexes found in literature. In case of densely vegetated soils the methodology for the discrimination of salinized soils has been integrated with the results obtained from the classification of vegetation coverage.

  11. Synthesis and structure of a water-soluble hexanuclear silver(I) nicotinate cluster comprised of a "cyclohexane-chair"-type of framework, showing effective antibacterial and antifungal activities: use of "sparse matrix" techniques for growing crystals of water-soluble inorganic complexes.

    PubMed

    Tsyba, Irina; Mui, Becky Bun-Kit; Bau, Robert; Noguchi, Ryusuke; Nomiya, Kenji

    2003-12-01

    The synthesis of a water-soluble anionic silver 2-mercaptonicotinate complex having effective antibacterial and antifungal properties is described. Its structure has been confirmed to be a hexameric cluster by an X-ray diffraction analysis of a mixed Na(+)/Tris(+) salt (Tris(+) = tris(hydroxymethyl)methylammonium cation). The [Ag(mna)](6)(6-) cluster has a Ag(6)S(6) core and an overall shape of twisted hexagonal cylinder with six sulfur atoms and six silver atoms alternating on a puckered drum-like surface. Each Ag atom is trigonally coordinated by one N and two S ligands. The overall [Ag(mna)](6)(6-).4Na(+).2[(HOCH(2))(3)CNH(3)](+).10H(2)O complex has a layered appearance in the crystal packing diagram, with a [Ag(mna)](6)(-) cluster layer alternating with a solvent layer consisting of sodium atoms, Tris buffer cations, and water molecules. The structure is almost identical to that of a neutral [Ag(Hmna)](6) complex reported earlier. The neutral and charged complexes are both known to possess antimicrobial activities, and some biological properties of these and related compounds are briefly discussed in this paper.

  12. New inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Birchall, J.D.; Kelly, A.

    1983-05-01

    Inorganic chemistry is preparing to contribute to the conservation of energy and of hydrocarbons by manipulating inorganic chemical compounds at low temperature. In this regard cement preparation and qualities are extensively discussed. Related techniques with regard to glasses are mentioned. The manipulation of inorganic compounds at low temperature is being aided by advances in the understanding of material properties such as porosity. Interestingly, the importance of the control of porosity had not emerged from all the previous work on high-temperature methods of fabrication. It may be too early to speak of a new Neolithic age, but its beginnings are clearly with us.

  13. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  14. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  15. Aqueous SARA ATRP using Inorganic Sulfites.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Carlos M R; Fu, Liye; Carmali, Sheiliza; Serra, Arménio C; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Coelho, Jorge F J

    2017-01-14

    Aqueous supplemental activator and reducing agent atom transfer radical polymerization (SARA ATRP) using inorganic sulfites was successfully carried out for the first time. Under optimized conditions, a well-controlled poly[oligo(ethylene oxide) methyl ether acrylate] (POEOA) was obtained with <30 ppm of soluble copper catalyst using tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPMA) ligand in the presence of an excess of halide salts (e.g. NaCl). Inorganic sulfites (e.g. Na2S2O4) were continuously fed into the reaction mixture. The mechanistic studies proved that these salts can activate alkyl halides directly and regenerate the activator complex. The effects of the feeding rate of the SARA agent (inorganic sulfites), ligand and its concentration, halide salt and its concentration, sulfite used, and copper concentration, were systematically studied to afford fast polymerizations rates while maintaining the control over polymerization. The kinetic data showed linear first-order kinetics, linear evolution of molecular weights with conversion, and polymers with narrow molecular weight distributions (Đ ~1.2) during polymerization even at relatively high monomer conversions (~80%). "One-pot" chain extension and "one-pot" block copolymerization experiments proved the high chain-end functionality. The polymerization could be directly regulated by starting or stopping the continuous feeding of the SARA agent. Under biologically relevant conditions, the aqueous SARA ATRP using inorganic sulfites was used to synthesize a well-defined protein-polymer hybrid by grafting of P(OEOA480) from BSA-O-[iBBr]30.

  16. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Piers; *Morse, John W.

    2010-11-15

    1. Objective The general objective of this research was to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), and modest ranges of T and P. This would be done by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry. Also, nanoscale observations of calcite surface morphology and composition would be made to provide an understanding of rate controlling mechanisms.

  17. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  18. Direct optical lithography of functional inorganic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Fedin, Igor; Zhang, Hao; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-07-01

    Photolithography is an important manufacturing process that relies on using photoresists, typically polymer formulations, that change solubility when illuminated with ultraviolet light. Here, we introduce a general chemical approach for photoresist-free, direct optical lithography of functional inorganic nanomaterials. The patterned materials can be metals, semiconductors, oxides, magnetic, or rare earth compositions. No organic impurities are present in the patterned layers, which helps achieve good electronic and optical properties. The conductivity, carrier mobility, dielectric, and luminescence properties of optically patterned layers are on par with the properties of state-of-the-art solution-processed materials. The ability to directly pattern all-inorganic layers by using a light exposure dose comparable with that of organic photoresists provides an alternate route for thin-film device manufacturing.

  19. Effect of salinity on methylation of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, J.E.; Bartha, R.

    1980-09-01

    Monomethyl and dimethylmercury are potent neurotoxins subject to biomagnification in food webs. This fact was tragically demonstrated by the Minamata and Niigata poisoning incidents in Japan in which 168 persons who ate seafood from mercury polluted waters were poisoned, 52 fatally. Shortly after these two incidents, work conducted in freshwater environments demonstrated the microbial conversion of inorganic and phenylmercury compounds to mono- and di-methylmercury. Consideration of some fragmentary evidence from the literature, however, indicates that the rate and the significance of microbial methylation of mercury in freshwater and saltwater environments may not be the same. A demonstrated relationship between mercury methylation rates and water salinity would greatly influence our thinking about mercury pollution effects in marine versus freshwater environments. Since we were unable to locate published reports on this subject, we are investigating the influence of salinity on the rate of mercury methylation in an estuarine sediment.

  20. Salinity Management in Agriculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Existing guidelines and standards for reclamation of saline soils and management to control salinity exist but have not been updated for over 25 years. In the past few years a looming water scarcity has resulted in questioning of the long term future of irrigation projects in arid and semi arid regi...

  1. Saline infusion sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Saline infusion sonohysterography consists of ultrasonographic imaging of the uterus and uterocervical cavity, using real-time ultrasonography during injection of sterile saline into the uterus. When properly performed, saline infusion sonohysterography can provide information about the uterus and endometrium. The most common indication for sonohysterography is abnormal uterine bleeding. sonohysterography should not be performed in a woman who is pregnant or could be pregnant or in a woman with a pelvic infection or unexplained pelvic tenderness. Physicians who perform or supervise diagnostic saline infusion sonohysterograpy should have training, experience, and demonstrated competence in gynecologic ultrasonography and saline infusion sonohysterography. Portions of this document were developed jointly with the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  2. Remote sensing of salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The complex dielectric constant of sea water is a function of salinity at 21 cm wavelength, and sea water salinity can be determined by a measurement of emissivity at 21 cm along with a measurement of thermodynamic temperature. Three aircraft and one helicopter experiments using two different 21 cm radiometers were conducted under different salinity and temperature conditions. Single or multiple ground truth measurements were used to calibrate the data in each experiment. It is inferred from these experiments that accuracies of 1 to 2%/OO are possible with a single surface calibration point necessary only every two hours if the following conditions are met--water temperatures above 20 C, salinities above 10%/OO, and level plane flight. More frequent calibration, constraint of the aircraft's orientation to the same as it was during calibration, and two point calibration (at a high and low salinity level) rather than single point calibration may give even better accuracies in some instances.

  3. ASSESSING THE IMPACTS OF SALINITY AND NUTRIENT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Healthy seagrass beds were once found throughout the shallow areas of Narragansett Bay, R.I. but have disappeared due to infilling, pollution and disease. In Greenwich Bay, a highly developed embayment within Narragansett Bay, Ruppia maritima has colonized an area on the northern shore once dominated by Zostera marina. This area is sandy, which may allow groundwater seepage. Ruppia is extremely salinity tolerant, and may also be more nutrient tolerant than Zostera. A six week microcosm experiment at two salinity (20 and 30 ppt) and 4 nutrient (0, 5, 10, and 30 µM inorganic N) levels to test their relative tolerance was conducted in 2014. Treatments were renewed daily to simulate tidal flushing and the exposure water was dosed with 15N for the first week of the experiment. At the end of the experiment, the plants were weighed and measured, and dried for later isotopic analysis. In the first experiment, Ruppia had significant structural responses to both nutrients and salinity; there was a slight decline in root weight and a decrease in the total number of shoots with increasing nutrients. Average Ruppia blade length decreased with increasing nutrients and this decrease was more evident at 30 ppt. In contrast, Zostera had no significant structural differences. For both species, there were no differences in shoot or root/rhizome weights in any treatment, nor were there differences in isotopic results due to salinity. However, δ15N in the tissue increase

  4. Hydrogeologic processes in saline systems: Playas, sabkhas, and saline lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yechieli, Y.; Wood, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    Pans, playas, sabkhas, salinas, saline lakes, and salt flats are hydrologically similar, varying only in their boundary conditions. Thus, in evaluating geochemical processes in these systems, a generic water and solute mass-balance approach can be utilized. A conceptual model of a coastal sabkha near the Arabian Gulf is used as an example to illustrate the various water and solute fluxes. Analysis of this model suggests that upward flux of ground water from underlying formations could be a major source of solutes in the sabkha, but contribute only a small volume of the water. Local rainfall is the main source of water in the modeled sabkha system with a surprisingly large recharge-to-rainfall ratio of more than 50%. The contribution of seawater to the solute budget depends on the ratio of the width of the supratidal zone to the total width and is generally confined to a narrow zone near the shoreline of a typical coastal sabkha. Because of a short residence time of water, steady-state flow is expected within a short time (50,000 years). The solute composition of the brine in a closed saline system depends largely on the original composition of the input water. The high total ion content in the brine limits the efficiency of water-rock interaction and absorption. Because most natural systems are hydrologically open, the chemistry of the brines and the associated evaporite deposits may be significantly different than that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. Seasonal changes in temperature of the unsaturated zone cause precipitation of minerals in saline systems undergoing evaporation. Thus, during the hot dry season months, minerals exhibit retrograde solubility so that gypsum, anhydrite and calcite precipitate. Evaporation near the surface is also a major process that causes mineral precipitation in the upper portion of the unsaturated zone (e.g. halite and carnallite), provided that the relative humidity of the atmosphere is less than the activity of water

  5. Salinity controls on Na incorporation in Red Sea planktonic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezger, E. M.; Nooijer, L. J.; Boer, W.; Brummer, G. J. A.; Reichart, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Whereas several well-established proxies are available for reconstructing past temperatures, salinity remains challenging to assess. Reconstructions based on the combination of (in)organic temperature proxies and foraminiferal stable oxygen isotopes result in relatively large uncertainties, which may be reduced by application of a direct salinity proxy. Cultured benthic and planktonic foraminifera showed that Na incorporation in foraminiferal shell calcite provides a potential independent proxy for salinity. Here we present the first field calibration of such a potential proxy. Living planktonic foraminiferal specimens from the Red Sea surface waters were collected and analyzed for their Na/Ca content using laser ablation quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Using the Red Sea as a natural laboratory, the calibration covers a broad range of salinities over a steep gradient within the same water mass. For both Globigerinoides ruber and Globigerinoides sacculifer calcite Na/Ca increases with salinity, albeit with a relatively large intraspecimen and interspecimen variability. The field-based calibration is similar for both species from a salinity of 36.8 up to 39.6, while values for G. sacculifer deviate from this trend in the northernmost transect. It is hypothesized that the foraminifera in the northernmost part of the Red Sea are (partly) expatriated and hence should be excluded from the Na/Ca-salinity calibration. Incorporation of Na in foraminiferal calcite therefore provides a potential proxy for salinity, although species-specific calibrations are still required and more research on the effect of temperature is needed.

  6. Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Nick C.; FitzGerald, Duncan M.; Hughes, Zoe J.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Kulp, Mark A.; Miner, Michael D.; Smith, Jane M.; Barras, John A.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2005 hurricane season, the storm surge and wave field associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita eroded 527 km2 of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher salinity wetlands remained robust and largely unchanged. Here we highlight geotechnical differences between the soil profiles of high and low salinity regimes, which are controlled by vegetation and result in differential erosion. In low salinity wetlands, a weak zone (shear strength 500–1450 Pa) was observed ∼30 cm below the marsh surface, coinciding with the base of rooting. High salinity wetlands had no such zone (shear strengths > 4500 Pa) and contained deeper rooting. Storm waves during Hurricane Katrina produced shear stresses between 425–3600 Pa, sufficient to cause widespread erosion of the low salinity wetlands. Vegetation in low salinity marshes is subject to shallower rooting and is susceptible to erosion during large magnitude storms; these conditions may be exacerbated by low inorganic sediment content and high nutrient inputs. The dramatic difference in resiliency of fresh versus more saline marshes suggests that the introduction of freshwater to marshes as part of restoration efforts may therefore weaken existing wetlands rendering them vulnerable to hurricanes. PMID:20660777

  7. Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands.

    PubMed

    Howes, Nick C; FitzGerald, Duncan M; Hughes, Zoe J; Georgiou, Ioannis Y; Kulp, Mark A; Miner, Michael D; Smith, Jane M; Barras, John A

    2010-08-10

    During the 2005 hurricane season, the storm surge and wave field associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita eroded 527 km(2) of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher salinity wetlands remained robust and largely unchanged. Here we highlight geotechnical differences between the soil profiles of high and low salinity regimes, which are controlled by vegetation and result in differential erosion. In low salinity wetlands, a weak zone (shear strength 500-1450 Pa) was observed approximately 30 cm below the marsh surface, coinciding with the base of rooting. High salinity wetlands had no such zone (shear strengths > 4500 Pa) and contained deeper rooting. Storm waves during Hurricane Katrina produced shear stresses between 425-3600 Pa, sufficient to cause widespread erosion of the low salinity wetlands. Vegetation in low salinity marshes is subject to shallower rooting and is susceptible to erosion during large magnitude storms; these conditions may be exacerbated by low inorganic sediment content and high nutrient inputs. The dramatic difference in resiliency of fresh versus more saline marshes suggests that the introduction of freshwater to marshes as part of restoration efforts may therefore weaken existing wetlands rendering them vulnerable to hurricanes.

  8. Empirical correlations between Krafft temperature and tail length for amidosulfobetaine surfactants in the presence of inorganic salt.

    PubMed

    Chu, Zonglin; Feng, Yujun

    2012-01-17

    Long-chain amidosulfobetaine surfactants, 3-(N-fattyamidopropyl-N,N-dimethyl ammonium) propanesulfonates (n-DAS, n > 18), are insoluble in pure water due to their high Krafft temperature (T(K)), while they are soluble when inorganic salt is added to the surfactant solution as the T(K) of these zwitterionic surfactants is decreased. The influence of the salt content and ionic species of the added electrolytes on the T(K) of the series of amidosulfobetaine surfactants was examined by means of UV-vis spectrophometry and visual inspection. It was found that the T(K) of these surfactants depends strongly on not only the hydrophobic alkyl length (n), but also the salinity of the aqueous environment. When the salt concentration is increased from 0 to 100 mM, the T(K) shows a sharp decrease; when the salinity is fixed between 100 and 2000 mM, the T(K) varies linearly with n with a slope of ~7.7 irrespective of the salt species and the salt content. When the salt concentration is further increased above 2000 mM, a linear function is still observed, but the slope increases slightly. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Inorganic separator technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smatko, J. S.; Weaver, R. D.; Kalhammer, F. R.

    1973-01-01

    Testing and failure analyses of silver zinc cells with largely inorganic separators were performed. The results showed that the wet stand and cycle life objective of the silver-zinc cell development program were essentially accomplished and led to recommendations for cell composition, design, and operation that should yield further improvement in wet and cycle life. A series of advanced inorganic materials was successfully developed and formulated into rigid and semiflexible separator samples. Suitable screening tests for evaluation of largely inorganic separators were selected and modified for application to the separator materials. The results showed that many of these formulations are potentially superior to previously used materials and permitted selection of three promising materials for further evaluation in silver-zinc cells.

  10. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  11. Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    This textbook is intended to give an understanding of the basic principles that constitute the field of non-conventional polymers containing inorganic and organometalic units as the repeating units. Each chapter will be self-explanatory with a good background so that it can be easily understood at the senior undergraduate level. The principles involved in the preparation of these polymers, their characterisation and their applications will be discussed. Basic inorganic chemistry required for the understanding of each topic is presented so that the content of the chapter is readily understood.

  12. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Colombeau, L; Acherar, S; Baros, F; Arnoux, P; Gazzali, A Mohd; Zaghdoudi, K; Toussaint, M; Vanderesse, R; Frochot, C

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a well-established technique employed to treat aged macular degeneration and certain types of cancer, or to kill microbes by using a photoactivatable molecule (a photosensitizer, PS) combined with light of an appropriate wavelength and oxygen. Many PSs are used against cancer but none of them are highly specific. Moreover, most are hydrophobic, so are poorly soluble in aqueous media. To improve both the transportation of the compounds and the selectivity of the treatment, nanoparticles (NPs) have been designed. Thanks to their small size, these can accumulate in a tumor because of the well-known enhanced permeability effect. By changing the composition of the nanoparticles it is also possible to achieve other goals, such as (1) targeting receptors that are over-expressed on tumoral cells or neovessels, (2) making them able to absorb two photons (upconversion or biphoton), and (3) improving singlet oxygen generation by the surface plasmon resonance effect (gold nanoparticles). In this chapter we describe recent developments with inorganic NPs in the PDT domain. Pertinent examples selected from the literature are used to illustrate advances in the field. We do not consider either polymeric nanoparticles or quantum dots, as these are developed in other chapters.

  13. Human exposure and health effects of inorganic and elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Duck; Zheng, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety.

  14. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety. PMID:23230464

  15. Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The heat of the sun also forces evaporation at the ocean's surface, which puts water vapor into the atmosphere but leaves minerals and salts behind, keeping the ocean salty. The salinity of the oce...

  16. Lead and compounds (inorganic)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Lead and compounds ( inorganic ) ; CASRN 7439 - 92 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  17. Geological and Inorganic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, L. L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review focusing on techniques and their application to the analysis of geological and inorganic materials that offer significant changes to research and routine work. Covers geostandards, spectroscopy, plasmas, microbeam techniques, synchrotron X-ray methods, nuclear activation methods, chromatography, and electroanalytical methods.…

  18. Inorganic High Energy Oxidisers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    properties may contribute significantly to the energy of the whole system. A book entitled ’Inorganic High - Energy Oxidisers’ by E.W. Lawless and I.C. Smith is the subject of this Essay Review by W.E. Batty.

  19. Polyhedra in (inorganic) chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Santiago

    2005-07-07

    A systematic description of polyhedra with varying degrees of regularity is illustrated with examples of chemical structures, mostly from different fields of Inorganic Chemistry. Also the geometrical relationships between different polyhedra are highlighted and their application to the analysis of complex structures is discussed.

  20. Assessing the impacts of salinity and nutrient stress to Ruppia ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Healthy seagrass beds were once found throughout the shallow areas of Narragansett Bay, R.I. but have disappeared due to infilling, pollution and disease. In Greenwich Bay, a highly developed embayment within Narragansett Bay, Ruppia maritima has colonized an area on the northern shore historically dominated by Zostera marina. Ruppia is extremely salinity tolerant, and may also be more nutrient tolerant than Zostera. To test this hypothesis 6-week microcosm experiments were conducted in the summers of 2014 and 2015. Microcosms were renewed daily to simulate tidal flushing and the water column was dosed with a 15N tracer for the first week of the experiments. In the 2014 microcosm experiment two salinity (20, 30 ppt) and four nutrient (0, 5, 10, 30 µM inorganic N) levels were used to test the species’ relative tolerance. This experiment yielded structurally significant results for Ruppia but no significant differences were detected for Zostera. In 2015 this experiment was performed for a second time with lower salinity (5, 30 ppt) and higher nutrients (0, 30, 100, 300, 1000 µM inorganic N) in order to determine Zostera’s tolerance to nutrient and salinity stress and confirm the previously observed Ruppia results. Both species had significant structural responses to the nutrient and salinity variables. Isotopic analysis run on above-ground tissue indicated that with increasing nutrient levels δ15N in the seagrass shoots increased, suggesting that nutrients

  1. Chiral Inorganic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; de Moura, André F; Wu, Xiaoling; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2017-06-28

    The field of chiral inorganic nanostructures is rapidly expanding. It started from the observation of strong circular dichroism during the synthesis of individual nanoparticles (NPs) and their assemblies and expanded to sophisticated synthetic protocols involving nanostructures from metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and nanocarbons. Besides the well-established chirality transfer from bioorganic molecules, other methods to impart handedness to nanoscale matter specific to inorganic materials were discovered, including three-dimentional lithography, multiphoton chirality transfer, polarization effects in nanoscale assemblies, and others. Multiple chiral geometries were observed with characteristic scales from ångströms to microns. Uniquely high values of chiral anisotropy factors that spurred the development of the field and differentiate it from chiral structures studied before, are now well understood; they originate from strong resonances of incident electromagnetic waves with plasmonic and excitonic states typical for metals and semiconductors. At the same time, distinct similarities with chiral supramolecular and biological systems also emerged. They can be seen in the synthesis and separation methods, chemical properties of individual NPs, geometries of the nanoparticle assemblies, and interactions with biological membranes. Their analysis can help us understand in greater depth the role of chiral asymmetry in nature inclusive of both earth and space. Consideration of both differences and similarities between chiral inorganic, organic, and biological nanostructures will also accelerate the development of technologies based on chiroplasmonic and chiroexcitonic effects. This review will cover both experiment and theory of chiral nanostructures starting with the origin and multiple components of mirror asymmetry of individual NPs and their assemblies. We shall consider four different types of chirality in nanostructures and related physical, chemical, and

  2. Microbial amelioration of crop salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Ian C; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    The use of soil and irrigation water with a high content of soluble salts is a major limiting factor for crop productivity in the semi-arid areas of the world. While important physiological insights about the mechanisms of salt tolerance in plants have been gained, the transfer of such knowledge into crop improvement has been limited. The identification and exploitation of soil microorganisms (especially rhizosphere bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi) that interact with plants by alleviating stress opens new alternatives for a pyramiding strategy against salinity, as well as new approaches to discover new mechanisms involved in stress tolerance. Although these mechanisms are not always well understood, beneficial physiological effects include improved nutrient and water uptake, growth promotion, and alteration of plant hormonal status and metabolism. This review aims to evaluate the beneficial effects of soil biota on the plant response to saline stress, with special reference to phytohormonal signalling mechanisms that interact with key physiological processes to improve plant tolerance to the osmotic and toxic components of salinity. Improved plant nutrition is a quite general beneficial effect and may contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis of toxic ions under saline stress. Furthermore, alteration of crop hormonal status to decrease evolution of the growth-retarding and senescence-inducing hormone ethylene (or its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid), or to maintain source-sink relations, photosynthesis, and biomass production and allocation (by altering indole-3-acetic acid and cytokinin biosynthesis) seem to be promising target processes for soil biota-improved crop salt tolerance.

  3. Coumarin pretreatment alleviates salinity stress in wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Ahmed Mahmoud; Madany, M M Y

    2015-03-01

    The potentiality of COU to improve plant tolerance to salinity was investigated. Wheat grains were primed with COU (50 ppm) and then grown under different levels of NaCl (50, 100, 150 mM) for two weeks. COU pretreatment improved the growth of wheat seedling under salinity, relative to COU-untreated seedlings, due to the accumulation of osmolytes such as soluble sugars and proline. Moreover, COU treatment significantly improved K(+)/Na(+) ratio in the shoots of both salt stressed and un-stressed seedlings. However, in the roots, this ratio increased only under non-salinity. In consistent with phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), phenolics and flavonoids were accumulated in COU-pretreated seedlings under the higher doses of salinity, relative to COU-untreated seedlings. COU primed seedlings showed higher content of the coumarin derivative, scopoletin, and salicylic, chlorogenic, syringic, vanillic, gallic and ferulic acids, under both salinity and non-salinity conditions. Salinity stress significantly improved the activity of peroxidase (POD) in COU-pretreated seedlings. However, the effect of COU on the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was only obtained at the highest dose of NaCl (150 mM). The present results suggest that COU pretreatment could alleviate the adverse effect of salinity on the growth of wheat seedlings through enhancing, at least partly, the osmoregulation process and antioxidant defense system.

  4. Photoreductive synthesis of water-soluble fluorescent metal nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Xin; Li, Luo; Zhang, Gaowen; Hussain, Irshad; Li, Zhen; Tan, Bien

    2012-01-14

    Water-soluble fluorescent copper, silver and gold nanoclusters with quantum yields of 2.2, 6.8 and 5.3%, respectively, are prepared by a robust photoreduction of their inorganic precursors in the presence of poly (methacrylic acid) functionalized with pentaerythritol tetrakis 3-mercaptopropionate. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  5. Inorganic Chemistry by Gary Wulfsberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Martin N.

    2000-11-01

    Inorganic Chemistry is an interesting new option for teachers of advanced inorganic courses and offers the possibility of serving an introductory course as well. Since PDIC first appeared, more authors have adopted the approach of developing descriptive inorganic chemistry around common principles instead of a group-by-group treatment, which makes this text less of a departure from the traditional than PDIC was. Still, Wulfsberg offers an original and engaging perspective on inorganic chemistry. Even if this text is not adopted for a course, it deserves a place on the shelf of every teacher of inorganic chemistry, where it will be a valuable resource.

  6. Effect of salinity stress on growth and carbohydrate metabolism in three rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars differing in salinity tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pattanagul, Wattana; Thitisaksakul, Maysaya

    2008-10-01

    Rice seedlings cv. Khao Dawk Mali 105 (salt-sensitive), Luang Anan (moderately salt-tolerant) and Pokkali (salt-tolerant) were exposed to 0, 50, 100 and 150 mM NaCI for 9 d. Salinity stress caused reduction in leaf relative water contents in all cultivars. Shoot length of cv. Pokkali was least affected by salinity stress whereas increased root length in response to salinity stress was apparent in cvs. Khao Dawk Mali 105 and Luang Anan. Increased salinity level also caused reduction in fresh and dry weights in cvs. Khao Dawk Mali 105 and Luang Anan, but had no effect in cv. Pokkali except at 150 mM. Accumulation of total soluble sugars and sucrose in mature leaves were observed in cv. Khao Dawk Mali 105 exposed to high level of salinity whereas their concentrations in cvs. Luang Anan and Pokkali remained the same as control plants. Accumulation of sucrose in cv. Khao Dawk Mali 105 was suggested to be resulted from the alteration of photosynthate partitioning since the activities of sucrose phosphate synthase were not affected by salinity in this cultivar. On the contrary, salinity stress induced an accumulation of starch in cv. Pokkali. It is suggested that partitioning sugars into starch may involve in salinity tolerance by avoiding metabolic alterations.

  7. Inorganic biomimetic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Levine, Lauren A; Williams, Mary Elizabeth

    2009-12-01

    Supramolecular structures modeled after biological systems (DNA and enzymes) are being developed to simultaneously mimic natural biological functions including catalysis, information storage, and self-assembly and to engineer novel electronic and magnetic properties. Structural mimics of nucleic acids containing multiple metal-coordinating ligands, and comprising natural and artificial bases or completely synthetic systems, create stable double-stranded structures with new electronic, spectroscopic, and magnetic properties. Supramolecular inorganic mimics of enzymatic function, including metallonucleases and metalloproteases, have begun to be constructed. Alternatively, metal-organic-frameworks have potential as artificial catalysts with substrate-specificity and size-selectivity analogous to biological processes. This review describes some of the recent themes in inorganic supramolecular systems that aim to mimic and exploit nature's ability to self-assemble polyfunctional architectures for new materials and biological applications.

  8. Supported inorganic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Sehgal, Rakesh; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

  9. Inorganic Graphene Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. N. R.; Maitra, Urmimala

    2015-07-01

    In the last four to five years, there has been a great resurgence of research on two-dimensional inorganic materials, partly because of the impetus received from graphene research. Unlike graphene, which is a gap-less material, most inorganic layered materials are semiconductors or insulators. Some of them, as exemplified by MoS2, exhibit unexpected properties, not unlike graphene, with possible applications. Thus, layered metal chalcogenides are being explored intensely, and MoS2 is emerging as a wonder material. In this article, we present the synthesis and properties of nanosheets composing single or few layers of these fascinating materials. Besides metal chalcogenides, boron nitride, borocarbonitrides (BxCyNz), metal oxides, and metal-organic frameworks are also discussed.

  10. Controls on Calcite Solubility in Metamorphic and Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Eguchi, J.; Galvez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Calcite is an important hydrothermal alteration product in a wide range of environments. The role of calcite in hydrothermal alteration depends on its solubility in geologic fluids, especially H2O. At ambient T and P, calcite solubility is low and it exhibits well-known declining, or "reverse", solubility with rising T. However, experimental and theoretical studies show that increasing P yields higher solubility and restricts the region of reverse solubility behavior to higher temperature. At 0.2 GPa the reverse solubility region lies at T>600°C; at 0.5 GPa, >800°C. Thus, whereas calcite possesses relatively low solubility in pure H2O in shallow hydrothermal systems (typically <10 ppm C), it is substantially more soluble at conditions of middle and lower crustal metamorphism and magmatism, reaching concentrations ≥1000 ppm. At the higher P of subduction zones, aragonite solubility in H2O is even greater. Thus, neglecting other solubility controls, calcite precipitation is favored as crustal fluids cool and/or decompress. However, the solubility of calcite in H2O also depends strongly on other solutes, pH, and fO2. Sources of alkalinity decrease calcite solubility. In contrast, sources of acidity such as CO2 and Cl increase solubility. Crustal fluids can be enriched in alkali halides such as NaCl. Calcite solubility increases with increasing salt content at a given P and T. From approximately seawater salinity to salt saturation, the fluid behaves as a dilute molten salt and calcite solubility increases as the square of the salt mole fraction regardless of the alkali (Li, Na, K, Cs) or halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) considered. Similar behavior is seen in mixed salt solutions. At lower salinities, solubility behavior is as expected in dilute electrolyte solutions. The transition from dilute electrolyte to molten salt is fundamental to the properties of crustal fluids. Reduction of carbonate species or CO2 in the fluid to CH4, which is common during serpentinization of

  11. Metabolomics for salinity research.

    PubMed

    Roessner, Ute; Beckles, Diane M

    2012-01-01

    Soil salinity devastates agriculture. It reduces crop yields and makes arable land unsuitable for later use. Many species have evolved highly efficient strategies to sense, transduce, and build up tolerance to high salinity and even sensitive species have endogenous mechanism for coping with this stress. These underlying physiological and metabolic mechanisms can be unraveled using metabolomics. Here we describe detailed protocols of how to extract polar metabolites for analysis using GC-MS and LC-MS. We also touch briefly on considerations that should be taken into account when designing the experiment and how the resulting data may be analyzed and visualized in a biological context.

  12. Salinity on irrigated lands

    SciTech Connect

    Westmore, R.A.; Manbeck, D.M.

    1984-02-01

    The technology for controlling salinity on irrigated lands is relatively simple, involving both minor and major changes in current land-management practices. Minor changes include more frequent irrigation, the use of salt-tolerant crops, preplanning irrigation, and seed placement. The major changes require a shift from gravity to sprinkler or drip systems, increased water supply and quality, soil modification, land grading, and improved drainage. Some of the major changes are difficult, and some impossible, to accomplish. Examples of reclamation include the Mardan Salinity Control and Reclamation Project (SCARP) in Pakistan. 5 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  13. Estimation of environmental properties for inorganic compounds using LSER

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The Great Lakes Science Center has devised values for inorganic species for use in the environmental property- predictive quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER). Property estimation has been difficult for inorganic species. In this presentation aqueous solubility, bioconcentration and acute aquatic toxicity are estimated for inorganic compounds using existing LSER equations. The best estimations arise from the most accurate description of predominant solution species, many within an order of magnitude. The toxicities also depend on an estimation of the bioactive amount and configuration. A number of anion/cation combinations (salts) still resist accurate property estimation, and the reasons currently are not understood. These new variable values will greatly extend the application and utility of LSER for the estimation of environmental properties.

  14. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  15. Genetic variation and plasticity of Plantago coronopus under saline conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, Marret J.; van Tienderen, Peter H.

    2001-08-01

    Phenotypic plasticity may allow organisms to cope with variation in the environmental conditions they encounter in their natural habitats. Salt adaptation appears to be an excellent example of such a plastic response. Many plant species accumulate organic solutes in response to saline conditions. Comparative and molecular studies suggest that this is an adaptation to osmotic stress. However, evidence relating the physiological responses to fitness parameters is rare and requires assessing the potential costs and benefits of plasticity. We studied the response of thirty families derived from plants collected in three populations of Plantago coronopus in a greenhouse experiment under saline and non-saline conditions. We indeed found a positive selection gradient for the sorbitol percentage under saline conditions: plant families with a higher proportion of sorbitol produced more spikes. No effects of sorbitol on fitness parameters were found under non-saline conditions. Populations also differed genetically in leaf number, spike number, sorbitol concentration and percentages of different soluble sugars. Salt treatment led to a reduction of vegetative biomass and spike production but increased leaf dry matter percentage and leaf thickness. Both under saline and non-saline conditions there was a negative trade-off between vegetative growth and reproduction. Families with a high plasticity in leaf thickness had a lower total spike length under non-saline conditions. This would imply that natural selection under predominantly non-saline conditions would lead to a decrease in the ability to change leaf morphology in response to exposure to salt. All other tests revealed no indication for any costs of plasticity to saline conditions.

  16. Overexpression of VP, a vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase gene in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), improves tobacco plant growth under Pi and N deprivation, high salinity, and drought.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Guo, Chengjin; Gu, Juntao; Duan, Weiwei; Zhao, Miao; Ma, Chunying; Du, Xiaoming; Lu, Wenjing; Xiao, Kai

    2014-02-01

    Establishing crop cultivars with strong tolerance to P and N deprivation, high salinity, and drought is an effective way to improve crop yield and promote sustainable agriculture worldwide. A vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (V-H+-PPase) gene in wheat (TaVP) was functionally characterized in this study. TaVP cDNA is 2586-bp long and encodes a 775-amino-acid polypeptide that contains 10 conserved membrane-spanning domains. Transcription of TaVP was upregulated by inorganic phosphate (Pi) and N deprivation, high salinity, and drought. Transgene analysis revealed that TaVP overexpression improved plant growth under normal conditions and specifically under Pi and N deprivation stresses, high salinity, and drought. The improvement of growth of the transgenic plants was found to be closely related to elevated V-H+-PPase activities in their tonoplasts and enlarged root systems, which possibly resulted from elevated expression of auxin transport-associated genes. TaVP-overexpressing plants showed high dry mass, photosynthetic efficiencies, antioxidant enzyme activities, and P, N, and soluble carbohydrate concentrations under various growth conditions, particularly under the stress conditions. The transcription of phosphate and nitrate transporter genes was not altered in TaVP-overexpressing plants compared with the wild type, suggesting that high P and N concentrations regulated by TaVP were caused by increased root absorption area instead of alteration of Pi and NO3- acquisition kinetics. TaVP is important in the tolerance of multiple stresses and can serve as a useful genetic resource to improve plant P- and N-use efficiencies and to increase tolerance to high salinity and drought.

  17. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    PubMed

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials.

  18. Inorganic Halogen Oxidizer Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-21

    nitrogen from composition of NF 4CIO 4. The FOCIO 3, prepared in this a liquid nitrogen drs ice slush used to cool the reaction cylinder, the manner...as metastable solid, which underwent decotipositiot to the ic rresjstnding 11i0* salts and 02 in the temperature range 20 50 O( t he It (t* salts were...34, Vol. 4. Masson et Cie, Paris, 1975. Trans. 2. 72. 1298 (1976). C -9/c- IC APPENDIX D IReprinted from Inorganic Chemistry, 18, 2572 (1979).1 Copyright

  19. Sealed Lithium Inorganic Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    MuWrn , 1,ad iw..am m4 IdM.D to We"L406W) Inorganic Electrolyte lattery Carbon Cathode Evaluation Thionyl Chloride Gas Generation Lithium C ell sign...hardware surface to carry the reductIon of thionyl chloride when in contact with lithium (self discharge) and the corro,’ion of hardware materials... Lithium - Aluminum Chloride 10) AOSTSAC? (Cmawl/e o ade H .m.eewr W MWO, AV 600 nwe w) Stdies were continued of the effects of hardware materials on the

  20. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  1. [Solubilization of nitrobenzene in micellar solutions of Tween 80 and inorganic salts].

    PubMed

    Li, Sui; Zhao, Yong-sheng; Xu, Wei; Dai, Ning

    2008-04-01

    The solubilization of nitrobenzene by a nonionic surfactant Tween 80 was investigated at 10 degrees C. Experimental results indicated that the solubility of nitrobenzene in water was greatly enhanced by Tween 80 at surfactant concentration above CMC(critical micelle concentration) and a linear relationship was obtained between surfactant concentration and nitrobenzene concentration from the solubility curve. The molar solubilization ratio (MSR) value was 5.093 and IgKm was 3.499. The solubilization was attributed to the ethoxylation group in Tween 80 micellar. Effect of four inorganic salts such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl2 , MgCl2 on water solubilities of nitrobenzene in Tween 80 micellar solutions was also investigated by a matrix of batch experiments. Mix the Tween 80-inorganic salts at the total mass ratios of 2:1, 5:1 and 10:1. The results show that the inorganic salts at a high concentration( > or = 500 mg x L(-1)) can enhance the solubilization capacities of Tween 80 micellar solution and increase the value of MSR and IgKm . Because of the salting-out effect between the micellar of Tween 80 and inorganic salts, the volume of micelle turns bigger, which may provide larger solubility volume for nitrobenzene. The mixture of nonionic surfactant and inorganic salts can be used in subsurface remediation as a flushing solution.

  2. Inorganic iodine speciation in tropical Atlantic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. R.

    2004-10-01

    The inorganic speciation of soluble iodine has been determined in size-fractionated aerosol samples collected from the tropical Atlantic Ocean in October/November 2002 during Meteor cruise 55, a pilot study of the German SOLAS programme. Iodide concentrations were appreciable (>0.4 pmol m-3) in the fine and coarse modes of all samples whereas iodate was occasionally below detection limit (~0.7 pmol m-3) in samples from northern hemisphere air and was undetectable in all samples from the southern hemisphere. Iodine was enriched, and chlorine and bromine depleted, relative to seasalt concentrations. The majority of Cl- loss was due to the seasalt displacement reaction. Halogen activation (I- + HOX + H+ = IX + H2O) may also have occurred, but did not result in net I- depletion in any aerosol fraction. The observed variations of iodine speciation cannot be reproduced by current models of aerosol iodine chemistry.

  3. Soil salination indicators

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salts are naturally present in soils, and many salt elements are essential nutrients for plants. The most common soluble salts in soil include major cations of sodium (Na+), magnesium (Mg2+), calcium (Ca2+), potassium (K+), and anions of chloride (Cl-), sulfate (SO42-), bicarbonate (HCO3-) and carbo...

  4. Pharmacological characterization of novel water-soluble cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Martin, Billy R; Wiley, Jenny L; Beletskaya, Irina; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Smith, Forrest L; Dewey, William L; Cottney, Jean; Adams, Julia; Baker, James; Hill, David; Saha, Bijali; Zerkowski, John; Mahadevan, Anu; Razdan, Raj K

    2006-09-01

    Presently, there are numerous structural classes of cannabinoid receptor agonists, all of which require solubilization for experimental purposes. One strategy for solubilizing water-insoluble tetrahydrocannabinols is conversion of the phenolic hydroxyl to a morpholinobutyryloxy substituent. The hydrochloride salts of these analogs are water-soluble and active in vivo when administered in saline. The present investigation demonstrated that hydrochloride salts of numerous substituted butyryloxy esters are water-soluble and highly potent. The substitutions include piperidine, piperazine, and alkyl-substituted amino moieties. It was also discovered that incorporation of a nitrogenous moiety in the alkyl side chain increased the pharmacological potency of tetrahydrocannabinol. For example, an analog containing a pyrazole in the side chain (O-2545) was found to have high affinity and efficacy at cannabinoid 1 (CB(1)) and CB(2) receptors, and when dissolved in saline, it was highly efficacious when administered either intravenously or intracerebroventricularly to mice. A series of carboxamido and carboxylic acid amide analogs exhibited high pharmacological potency, but their hydrochloride salts were not water-soluble. On the other hand, incorporation of imidazoles into the terminus of the side chain led to water-soluble hydrochloride salts that were highly potent when administered in saline to laboratory animals. It is now possible to conduct cannabinoid research with agonists that are water-soluble and thus obviating the need of solubilizing agents.

  5. Cancer and soluble FAS.

    PubMed

    Abbasova, S G; Vysotskii, M M; Ovchinnikova, L K; Obusheva, M N; Digaeva, M A; Britvin, T A; Bahoeva, K A; Karabekova, Z K; Kazantzeva, I A; Mamedov, U R; Manuchin, I B; Davidov, M I

    2009-10-01

    A test system developed by the authors was used to measure serum concentrations of soluble Fas in patients with malignant and benign tumors of different location and morphology. Relationships between soluble Fas levels and the main clinical and morphological characteristics of cancer were evaluated. It is proven that the concentrations and incidence of detection of soluble Fas in the sera of patients with tumors are significantly higher than in normal subjects. No appreciable differences in the concentrations of soluble Fas were detected in malignant and benign tumors of the mammary gland, bones, ovaries, and adrenals. In thyroid cancer, soluble Fas levels were higher than in benign and hyperplastic processes in this organ. High level of soluble Fas is associated with late stages of the disease (ovarian cancer, cancer of the corpus uteri, adrenocortical and colorectal cancer) and with poor differentiation of the tumor (ovarian cancer and cancer of the corpus uteri), with local metastases (colorectal and adrenocortical cancer), and with tumor invasion into the myometrial tissue, intestinal wall, and adjacent tissues (cancer of the corpus uteri and colorectal cancer). A significantly high level of soluble Fas was detected in colorectal and adrenocortical cancer in the presence of at least 2 local metastases. Soluble Fas levels depended on tumor histogenesis in malignant and benign ovarian tumors. High concentration of soluble Fas was detected in large tumors in patients with ovarian cancer, cancer of the corpus uteri, colorectal cancer, thyroid cancer and adenoma, and in adrenocortical cancer. Initially high levels of soluble Fas are characteristic of patients whose tumors are little sensitive to nonadjuvant radiotherapy. The overall 5-year survival of patients with low levels of soluble Fas is better in osteosarcoma, cancer of the corpus uteri, ovarian and adrenocortical cancer.

  6. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Weisenbach, L.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1995-05-01

    This project is developing inorganic thin films as membranes for gas separation applications, and as discriminating coatings for liquid-phase chemical sensors. Our goal is to synthesize these coatings with tailored porosity and surface chemistry on porous substrates and on acoustic and optical sensors. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, air, and natural gas constituents at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. We are focusing on improving permeability and molecular sieve properties of crystalline zeolitic membranes made by hydrothermally reacting layered multicomponent sol-gel films deposited on mesoporous substrates. We also used acoustic plate mode (APM) oscillator and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor elements as substrates for sol-gel films, and have both used these modified sensors to determine physical properties of the films and have determined the sensitivity and selectivity of these sensors to aqueous chemical species.

  7. Inorganic polymer engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.L.

    1993-06-01

    Phosphazene-based, inorganic-polymer composites have been produced and evaluated as potential engineering materials. The thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties of several different composites made from one polymer formulation have been measured. Measured properties are very good, and the composites show excellent promise for structural applications in harsh environments. Chopped fiberglass, mineral, cellulose, and woodflour filled composites were tested. Chopped fiberglass filled composites showed the best overall properties. The phosphazene composites are very hard and rigid. They have low dielectric constants and typical linear thermal expansion coefficients for polymers. In most cases, the phosphazene materials performed as well or better than analogous, commercially available, filled phenolic composites. After 3 to 5 weeks of exposure, both the phosphazene and phenolics were degraded to aqueous bases and acids. The glass filled phosphazene samples were least affected.

  8. PATHWAY OF INORGANIC ARSENIC METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A remarkable aspect of the metabolism of inorganic arsenic in humans is its conversion to methylated metabolites. These metabolites account for most of the arsenic found in urine after exposure to inorganic arsenic. At least some of the adverse health effects attributed to inor...

  9. Restoration of Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Mel

    1983-01-01

    The movement to reinstate systematic inorganic reaction (descriptive) chemistry into the curriculum is gaining momentum. Offers suggestions and strategies showing that the change is desirable and easy, even for instructors with little experience with systematic fundamental and industrial inorganic chemistry. (Author/JN)

  10. Inorganic Halogen Oxidizer Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-17

    0 4.. *~~ 0 0 4 S a, 0 .- F_ I . 0 - n V t o C N 0 .0 C; 0 . 𔃺~~ V Oh Ix ca . VW W i-si I. 0 (0 UU Clo~~~*N 0 ( l 00 *Lf) 0 j ,) Z, U__ - (00 C6 0...Solubility products fora metathesis in iii [41: CS NiF + 2NF SbF F 2 CsShF 4 +(N i 2 6 𔃾 6 _ 780 6 (N 4)2 ; 6 R ( R8-1 3 H-owever, in cases where the

  11. Solubility of Injectable Valium in Intravenous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Grower, Marvin F.; Russell, Emery A.; Getter, Lee

    1978-01-01

    A study of the solubility of Valium in commonly used intravenous solutions showed Valium to be equally insoluble in 5% dextrose in normal saline, 5% dextrose in water, normal saline, and Ringer's lactate. However, the precipitate which was formed became completely resuspended when mixed with as little as 39-42% plasma in vitro. This would indicate that the chalky precipitate seen in the I. V. tubing when Valium is injected into a running I. V. near the venipuncture site becomes resuspended when mixed with plasma in vivo. If one elects to inject Valium into the tubing of a running I. V., it is recommended that the drug be administered slowly to assure adequate mixing with blood plasma in order to prevent the circulation of particulate matter. Valium is currently one of the most popular drugs used in the psychosedative management of the apprehensive dental patient. Various techniques are advocated for its administration from direct injection into a vein to injection of the drug into a running I. V. However, the manufacturer states that the drug should not be added to I. V. fluids or other solutions or drugs. Presumably this is because of the formation of a cloudy precipitate immediately upon addition to aqueous solutions. Grower et al. have shown that saturated aqueous solutions of Valium in normal saline redissolve when added to plasma; however, they presented no data on the behavior of solutions of Valium added to other commonly used intravenous fluids. The present study was, therefore, undertaken to study the behavior of Valium when added to lactated Ringer's solution, 5% dextrose solutions, and normal saline; and to see how human blood plasma affects the solubility of Valium in these solutions. PMID:292338

  12. What Variables Affect Solubility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Helps middle school students understand the concept of solubility through hands-on experience with a variety of liquids and solids. As they explore factors that affect solubility and saturation, students gain content mastery and an understanding of the inquiry process. Also enables teachers to authentically assess student performance on several…

  13. Applications of Solubility Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkins, Reginald P. T.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes several applications of the use of solubility data. It is not meant to be exhaustive but rather to show that knowledge of solubility data is required in a variety of technical applications that assist in the design of chemical processes. (Contains 3 figures and 1 table.)

  14. What Variables Affect Solubility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Helps middle school students understand the concept of solubility through hands-on experience with a variety of liquids and solids. As they explore factors that affect solubility and saturation, students gain content mastery and an understanding of the inquiry process. Also enables teachers to authentically assess student performance on several…

  15. Applications of Solubility Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkins, Reginald P. T.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes several applications of the use of solubility data. It is not meant to be exhaustive but rather to show that knowledge of solubility data is required in a variety of technical applications that assist in the design of chemical processes. (Contains 3 figures and 1 table.)

  16. Arsenic distribution, speciation and solubility in shallow groundwater of Owens Dry Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, J. I. Hun; Gao, Suduan; Dahlgren, Randy A.; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2002-09-01

    Generation of dust particles from the Owens Lake playa creates a severe air pollution hazard in the western United States. Much of the dust produced from the dry lakebed is derived from salts formed by evaporation of saline groundwater that often contains high concentrations of dissolved arsenic (As). The objectives of this research were to study the spatial distribution of dissolved arsenic in the shallow groundwater, and to examine factors affecting arsenic solubility and speciation. Evapoconcentration, redox potential, pH, and mineral solubility were examined as factors regulating arsenic biogeochemistry. Dissolved arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 96 mg L -1 and showed a general increase from the shoreline to the center of the lakebed. Arsenic concentrations were strongly correlated to electrical conductivity (EC) and δD suggesting that evapoconcentration is an important process regulating total As concentrations. Arsenite [As(III)] was the dominant form of inorganic arsenic at Eh values less than about -170 mV while arsenate [As(V)] was predominant at higher Eh values. Organic arsenic was negligible (<0.21%) in all shallow groundwater samples. Dissolved arsenic concentrations do not appear to be strongly regulated by solid-phase reactions. Solid-phase arsenic concentrations generally ranged between 4.0 and 42.6 mg kg -1 and a maximum concentration range (20 to 40 mg kg -1) was reached as solution concentration increased up to 80 mg L -1, indicating minimal sorption and/or precipitation of arsenic. Chemical equilibrium modeling indicated that orpiment (As 2S 3) was the only solid phase with a positive saturation index (indicating over-saturation), but only at high arsenic and sulfide concentrations. The findings of this research are important for assessing the potential environmental impacts of elevated arsenic concentrations on dust mitigation efforts taking place at Owens Dry Lake.

  17. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny.

  18. The inorganic speciation of tin(II) in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports new voltammetric measurements on the interactions between tin(II) and the most important natural inorganic ligands, OH-, Cl-, F-, CO32-, SO42- and PO43-. For a better understanding of tin(II) speciation, an analysis is also given of prior data on the same systems from the literature. The formation constants were determined at t = 25 °C in different ionic media and at different ionic strengths, specifically the following: Sn(OH)q (0.1 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.0 in NaNO3), SnClr and Sn(OH)Cl (0.1 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 2.3 in Na(NO3, Cl)), Sn(SO4)r (0.1 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.6 in Na(NO3, SO4)), SnHqCO3 and SnHqPO4 (0.15 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.0 in NaNO3), where the subscripts r and q represent the stoichiometric coefficients. Concerning the SnFr species, reliable literature values were considered (0.15 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.0 in NaClO4). Fifteen voltammetric measurements were performed in synthetic seawater; the total seawater binding ability was evaluated by a model in which synthetic seawater is expressed as a single salt, BA. The formation of species between tin(II) and the anion of the marine salt (A) was also proposed, and the corresponding stability constants at different salinities (5 ⩽ S ⩽ 50) were reported. In addition, studies on the solubility of Sn(OH)2(s) were carried out using voltammetry and light scattering measurements. The "extra-stability" of the mixed species with respect to the parent species was evaluated, in particular for Sn(OH)Cl and the corresponding species involving the anion of the marine salt (A). The dependence of the formation constants on ionic strength was analysed using extended Debye-Hückel and Specific ion Interaction Theory (SIT) type equations. Tin(II) speciation was also evaluated in different natural fluid conditions, where, in all cases, carbonate complexation was predominant, hampering the formation of hydrolytic species throughout the investigated pH range. Moreover, some formation enthalpy changes were calculated

  19. The Effect of Salinity on the Malic Dehydrogenase of Pea Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Hason-Porath, Edna; Poljakoff-Mayber, Alexandra

    1969-01-01

    Effect of salinity on malate dehydrogenase activity was studied. Pea root tips contain 2 different malate dehydrogenases. One is located in the particulate, mitochondrial fraction, the other in the soluble, cytoplasmic fraction. Both can act when coupled with either NAD or NADP. Growing plants in Na2SO4 salinated medium did not affect the pattern of the malate dehydrogenases in the root tips. Growing plants in NaCl salinated media resulted in the appearance of a new, third isoenzyme. This new isoenzyme was located in the cytoplasmic fraction. Salinity of both types, when present in growth medium, induced increases in the NADP coupled activity of the mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase. The NAD coupled activity, however, was depressed except in the cytoplasmic fraction of plants grown in media salinated with NaCl to 1 atmosphere. Addition of either of the salts to assay media of enzymes, isolated from plants grown in non salinated substrate, did not have any significant effect. PMID:16657152

  20. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-08-30

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

  1. Overview of SMOS Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, R.

    2014-12-01

    While it is well known that the ocean is one of the most important components of the climate system, with a heat capacity 1100 times greater than the atmosphere, the ocean is also the primary reservoir for freshwater transport to the atmosphere and largest component of the global water cycle. Two new satellite sensors, the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the NASA Aquarius SAC-D missions are now providing the first space borne measurements of the sea surface salinity (SSS). In this talk, we will present examples demonstrating how SMOS-derived SSS data are being used to better characterize key land-ocean and atmosphere-ocean interaction processes that occur within the marine hydrological cycle. In particular, we shall illustrate how SMOS and its ocean mapping capability provides observations across the world's largest tropical ocean fresh pool regions and we will discuss intra-seasonal to interannual precipitation impacts as well as large-scale river runoff from the Amazon-Orinoco and Congo rivers and its offshore advection. Synergistic multi-satellite analyses of these new surface salinity data sets combined with sea surface temperature, dynamical height and currents from altimetry, surface wind, ocean color, rainfall estimates, and in situ observations will be shown to yield new freshwater budget and ocean circulation insight. Examples of SMOS capabilities of monitoring salt exchanges across the Gulf Stream through meso-scale eddies will be provided. SSS observations from the SMOS and Aquarius/SAC-D sensors are combined to examine the response of the upper ocean to tropical cyclone passage including the potential role that a freshwater-induced upper ocean barrier layer may play in modulating surface cooling and enthalpy flux in tropical cyclone track regions.

  2. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water.

  3. The Solubility of Nitrogen and Air in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battino, Rubin; Rettich, Timothy R.; Tominaga, Toshihiro

    1984-04-01

    This review covers the solubility of nitrogen and air in liquids as a function of temperature and pressure. Solubility data for individual systems were critically evaluated. Recommended or tentative values are presented as smoothing equations and/or in tabular form. Trends in homologous series or related solvents are discussed. Data for the n-alkanes were smoothed with respect to temperature, pressure, and carbon number. Liquids include: water; heavy water; seawater; aqueous salt solutions; mixed solvents; hydrocarbons; organic compounds containing oxygen, halogen, sulfur, nitrogen, or silicon; olive oil; various biological fluids; H2S; SO2; NH3; CO2; nitrogen oxides; and several halogen and boron containing inorganic solvents.

  4. What Should We Teach Beginners about Solubility and Solubility Products?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that consideration should be given to whether teaching solubility product calculations is at all useful. Claims that experienced teachers seriously misunderstand and misuse solubility product calculations. (DDR)

  5. What Should We Teach Beginners about Solubility and Solubility Products?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that consideration should be given to whether teaching solubility product calculations is at all useful. Claims that experienced teachers seriously misunderstand and misuse solubility product calculations. (DDR)

  6. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Pohl, P.I.; Brinker, C.J.

    1997-04-01

    Separating light gases using membranes is a technology area for which there exists opportunities for significant energy savings. Examples of industrial needs for gas separation include hydrogen recovery, natural gas purification, and dehydration. A membrane capable of separating H{sub 2} from other gases at high temperatures could recover hydrogen from refinery waste streams, and facilitate catalytic dehydrogenation and the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction. Natural gas purification requires separating CH{sub 4} from mixtures with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and higher alkanes. A dehydrating membrane would remove water vapor from gas streams in which water is a byproduct or a contaminant, such as refrigeration systems. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, natural gas constituents, and water vapor at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. It is in applications such as these that the authors expect inorganic molecular sieve membranes to compete most effectively with current gas separation technologies. Cryogenic separations are very energy intensive. Polymer membranes do not have the thermal stability appropriate for high temperature hydrogen recovery, and tend to swell in the presence of hydrocarbon natural gas constituents. The authors goal is to develop a family of microporous oxide films that offer permeability and selectivity exceeding those of polymer membranes, allowing gas membranes to compete with cryogenic and adsorption technologies for large-scale gas separation applications.

  7. Cancer risk from inorganics

    SciTech Connect

    Swierenga, S.H.; Gilman, J.P.; McLean, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Inorganic metals and minerals for which there is evidence of carcinogenicity are identified. The risk of cancer from contact with them in the work place, the general environment, and under conditions of clinical (medical) exposure is discussed. The evidence indicates that minerals and metals most often influence cancer development through their action as cocarcinogens. The relationship between the physical form of mineral fibers, smoking and carcinogenic risk is emphasized. Metals are categorized as established (As, Be, Cr, Ni), suspected (Cd, Pb) and possible carcinogens, based on the existing in vitro, animal experimental and human epidemiological data. Cancer risk and possible modes of action of elements in each class are discussed. Views on mechanisms that may be responsible for the carcinogenicity of metals are updated and analysed. Some specific examples of cancer risks associated with the clinical use of potentially carcinogenic metals and from radioactive pharmaceuticals used in therapy and diagnosis are presented. Questions are raised as to the effectiveness of conventional dosimetry in accurately measuring risk from radiopharmaceuticals. 302 references.

  8. Biochemical and Anatomical Changes and Yield Reduction in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) under Varied Salinity Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, M. A.; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hanafi, M. M.; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Selamat, Ahmad; Rafii, M. Y.; Latif, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Five Malaysian rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties, MR33, MR52, MR211, MR219, and MR232, were tested in pot culture under different salinity regimes for biochemical response, physiological activity, and grain yield. Three different levels of salt stresses, namely, 4, 8, and 12 dS m−1, were used in a randomized complete block design with four replications under glass house conditions. The results revealed that the chlorophyll content, proline, sugar content, soluble protein, free amino acid, and yield per plant of all the genotypes were influenced by different salinity levels. The chlorophyll content was observed to decrease with salinity level but the proline increased with salinity levels in all varieties. Reducing sugar and total sugar increased up to 8 dS m−1 and decreased up to 12 dS m−1. Nonreducing sugar decreased with increasing the salinity levels in all varieties. Soluble protein and free amino acid also decreased with increasing salinity levels. Cortical cells of MR211 and MR232 did not show cell collapse up to 8 dS m−1 salinity levels compared to susceptible checks (IR20 and BRRI dhan29). Therefore, considering all parameters, MR211 and MR232 showed better salinity tolerance among the tested varieties. Both cluster and principal component analyses depict the similar results. PMID:24579076

  9. Learning about Solubility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Dino G.; Reyes, Juan G.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative questions are proposed to assess the understanding of solubility and some of its applications. To improve those results, a simple quantitative problem on the precipitation of proteins is proposed.

  10. Learning about Solubility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Dino G.; Reyes, Juan G.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative questions are proposed to assess the understanding of solubility and some of its applications. To improve those results, a simple quantitative problem on the precipitation of proteins is proposed.

  11. Solubility of Organic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, K. C.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines factors to be considered in choosing suitable solvents for non-electrolytes and salts of weak acids and bases. Describes how, in some simple situation, the degree of solubility can be estimated. (Author/DF)

  12. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Optimizing solubility: kinetic versus thermodynamic solubility temptations and risks.

    PubMed

    Saal, Christoph; Petereit, Anna Christine

    2012-10-09

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data in guiding medicinal chemistry during lead optimization. The solubility of 465 research compounds was measured using a kinetic and a thermodynamic solubility assay. In the thermodynamic assay, polarized-light microscopy was used to investigate whether the result referred to the crystalline or to the amorphous compound. From the comparison of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data it was noted that kinetic solubility measurements frequently yielded results which show considerably higher solubility compared to thermodynamic solubility. This observation is ascribed to the fact that a kinetic solubility assay typically delivers results which refer to the amorphous compound. In contrast, results from thermodynamic solubility determinations more frequently refer to a crystalline phase. Accordingly, thermodynamic solubility data--especially when used together with an assessment of the solid state form--are deemed to be more useful in guiding solubility optimization for research compounds.

  14. A new family of anionic organic–inorganic hybrid doughnut-like nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhuxiu; Gao, Wen-Yang; Wojtas, Lukasz; Zhang, Zhenjie; Zaworotko, Michael J.

    2015-06-15

    A family of soluble organic–inorganic hybrid doughnut-like anions, hydoughnuts, has been prepared by the self-assembly of polyoxovanadate anions and 1,3-benzenedicarboxylate (bdc) linkers. Derivatives of the parent hydoughnut, [(V₄O₈Cl)₄(bdc)₈]⁴⁻, can be obtained by changing the counter-ion or by using a variant of bdc.

  15. Biologically-synthesized inorganic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Stone, Morley O.; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2004-06-01

    A hallmark of biological systems is their ability to self-assemble. This self-assembly can occur on the molecular, macromolecular and mesoscale. In this work, we have chosen to exploit biology's ability to self-assemble by incorporating additional functionality within the final structure. Our research efforts have been directed at not only understanding how biological organisms control nucleation and growth of inorganic materials, but also how this activity can be controlled in vitro. In previous work, we have demonstrated how peptides can be selected from a combinatorial library that possesses catalytic activity with respect to inorganic nucleation and deposition. We have engineered some of these peptide sequences into self-assembling protein structures. The goal of the project was to create an organic/inorganic hybrid that retained the "memory" properties of the organic, but possessed the superior optical and electronic properties of the inorganic.

  16. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Treesearch

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  17. Survival strategies of microorganisms in extreme saline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, J. F.

    Halophilic representatives are found in all main lines of evolutionary descendence of microbes: in archaebacteria, Gram-negative and Gram-positive eubacteria, and also in eucaryotes. In principe all halophilic microorganisms have to adapt their surface and membrane structures to their highly ionic environments. Concerning their intracellular compartment two different strategies have been developed: Inorganic ions are largely excluded in some microorganisms while such ions are actively accumulated in others. In particular the second group of organisms has to adapt the whole metabolic machinery to the highly ionic conditions of several molar salts, whereas in the first group only the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane and the extracytoplasmic structures are in contact with high concentrations of inorganic ions. In this latter group, a variety of organic solutes is accumulated in response to increases of the salinity of the environment.

  18. Removal of high-salinity matrices through polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration for the detection of trace levels of REEs using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hualing; Lin, Jijun; Gong, Zhenbin; Huang, Jiahua; Yang, Shifeng

    2015-10-01

    The polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration (PCUF) technique was applied to separate trace levels of rare earth elements (REEs), including scandium, yttrium and the lanthanides, from high-salinity matrices prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The REEs were converted into REE-polymer complexes using the water-soluble polymer polyacrylic acid (PAA) at a specified pH, retained on the ultrafiltration membrane of centrifugal filter units, and finally eluted using diluted nitric acid to achieve separation from matrices with relatively high levels of various inorganic ions, such as sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chlorine ions. Numerous factors affecting the PCUF efficiency were optimized. The optimal conditions included the addition of 30 mg L(-1) of PAA, a pH of 7.5, a reaction time of 40 min at room temperature, and 5.0 mL of 3% nitric acid (v/v) eluent. Under these conditions, the analytes were quantitatively separated and recovered, with a resulting relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 4.0% (0.05 µg L(-1), n=5) and standard addition recoveries between 89.2% (La) and 95.8% (Sm) for matrices of various salinities. The blank samples for the method ranged from 0.0003 µg L(-1) (Dy) to 0.0031 µg L(-1) (Sc), and the limits of quantification (LOQs, 10σ) were between 0.0006 µg L(-1) (Dy) and 0.0026 µg L(-1) (Sc). Furthermore, the salinity of the sample exhibited no effect on the REE-polymer complex formation process. Finally, the method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of dissolved Sc, Y, and lanthanides in coastal and estuarine seawater samples.

  19. Inorganic metal oxide/organic polymer nanocomposites and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

    2004-03-30

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal inorganic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophillic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the composite material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  20. Speciation and distribution of cadmium and lead in salinized horizons of antrosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgariu, D.; Bulgariu, L.; Astefanei, D.

    2009-04-01

    The utilization of intensive technologies for the vegetable cultivation in glass houses by the administration of high doses of organic fertilizes, the supra-dimensional irrigation and the maintaining of soil at high humidity state, in special in case of vicious drainage have as result the rapid degradation of morphological, chemical and physical characteristics of soils, concretized by: (i) decrease of structural aggregates stability; (ii) more dense packing of soil; (iii) accumulation of easy soluble salts (in special at superior horizons level); (iv) limitation of organic compounds and micro-elements biodisponibility. All these determined a significant reduction of productivity and of exploitation duration of soils from glass houses. These phenomena modified continuously the dynamic of speciation processes and inter-phases distribution, of heavy metals in soils from glass houses, and can determined a non-controlled accumulation of heavy metals, in special as mobile forms with high biodisponibility. Ours studied have been performed using soil profiles drawing from Copou-glass house, Iasi (Romania). Has been followed the modification of distribution for speciation forms of cadmium and lead (two heavy metals with high toxicity degree), between hortic antrosol horizons, and between chemical-mineralogical components of this, with the progressive salinization of superior horizons, in 2007-2008 period. The separation, differentiation and determination of cadmium and lead speciation forms was done by combined solid-liquid sequential extraction (SPE) and extraction in aqueous polymer-inorganic salt two-phase systems (ABS) procedure, presented in some of ours previous studies. After extraction, the total contents of the two heavy metals and fractions from these differential bonded by mineral and organic components of hortic antrosol have been determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The specific interaction mechanisms of Cd and Pb with organic-mineral components of

  1. Management of dryland saline seeps

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Discussed is the identification, diagnosis, control, and reclamation of dryland saline seep problems as found in the North American Great Plains. Saline seeps develop because of geologic stratifications within the soil profile and insufficient use of precipitation by crops used in dryland farming s...

  2. Distribution of inorganic species in two Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C G; Vestal, J R

    1989-01-01

    Chemical differences were noted between two Antarctic cryptoendolithic (hidden within rock) microenvironments colonized by different microbial communities. Microenvironments dominated by cyanobacteria (BPC) had a higher pH (pH 7-8) than those dominated by lichen (LTL) (pH 4.5-5.5). In order to understand the interactions between the microbiota and the inorganic environment, the inorganic environment was characterized. Water-soluble, carbonate-bound, metal-oxide, organically bound, and residual inorganic species were sequentially extracted from rock samples by chemical means. Each fraction was then quantified using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. BPC contained much more water-soluble and carbonate-bound Ca and Mg than LTL. Metal-oxide species of Al, Fe, and Mn were more abundant in LTL than BPC. Metal oxides appeared to be mobilized (in the order Mn > Fe > Al) from the LTL lichen zone but remained immobile in BPC sandstone. The distribution of K and P bound to metal oxide reflected the distribution of iron oxide in LTL, an indication of the importance of iron in controlling the availability of nutrients in this ecosystem. Metal oxides in turn were likely controlled or influenced by organic matter associated with the lichen community. Despite overall depletion of Fe, Al, and K in the lichen zone, SEM X-ray analysis showed that they were enriched in fungal hyphae. Water-soluble P was present despite the presence of metal oxides, which sequester phosphate. This has biological relevance since P is an essential nutrient.

  3. Distribution of inorganic species in two Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbial communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, C. G.; Vestal, J. R.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Chemical differences were noted between two Antarctic cryptoendolithic (hidden within rock) microenvironments colonized by different microbial communities. Microenvironments dominated by cyanobacteria (BPC) had a higher pH (pH 7-8) than those dominated by lichen (LTL) (pH 4.5-5.5). In order to understand the interactions between the microbiota and the inorganic environment, the inorganic environment was characterized. Water-soluble, carbonate-bound, metal-oxide, organically bound, and residual inorganic species were sequentially extracted from rock samples by chemical means. Each fraction was then quantified using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. BPC contained much more water-soluble and carbonate-bound Ca and Mg than LTL. Metal-oxide species of Al, Fe, and Mn were more abundant in LTL than BPC. Metal oxides appeared to be mobilized (in the order Mn > Fe > Al) from the LTL lichen zone but remained immobile in BPC sandstone. The distribution of K and P bound to metal oxide reflected the distribution of iron oxide in LTL, an indication of the importance of iron in controlling the availability of nutrients in this ecosystem. Metal oxides in turn were likely controlled or influenced by organic matter associated with the lichen community. Despite overall depletion of Fe, Al, and K in the lichen zone, SEM X-ray analysis showed that they were enriched in fungal hyphae. Water-soluble P was present despite the presence of metal oxides, which sequester phosphate. This has biological relevance since P is an essential nutrient.

  4. Distribution of inorganic species in two Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbial communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, C. G.; Vestal, J. R.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Chemical differences were noted between two Antarctic cryptoendolithic (hidden within rock) microenvironments colonized by different microbial communities. Microenvironments dominated by cyanobacteria (BPC) had a higher pH (pH 7-8) than those dominated by lichen (LTL) (pH 4.5-5.5). In order to understand the interactions between the microbiota and the inorganic environment, the inorganic environment was characterized. Water-soluble, carbonate-bound, metal-oxide, organically bound, and residual inorganic species were sequentially extracted from rock samples by chemical means. Each fraction was then quantified using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. BPC contained much more water-soluble and carbonate-bound Ca and Mg than LTL. Metal-oxide species of Al, Fe, and Mn were more abundant in LTL than BPC. Metal oxides appeared to be mobilized (in the order Mn > Fe > Al) from the LTL lichen zone but remained immobile in BPC sandstone. The distribution of K and P bound to metal oxide reflected the distribution of iron oxide in LTL, an indication of the importance of iron in controlling the availability of nutrients in this ecosystem. Metal oxides in turn were likely controlled or influenced by organic matter associated with the lichen community. Despite overall depletion of Fe, Al, and K in the lichen zone, SEM X-ray analysis showed that they were enriched in fungal hyphae. Water-soluble P was present despite the presence of metal oxides, which sequester phosphate. This has biological relevance since P is an essential nutrient.

  5. Polymer coating for immobilizing soluble ions in a phosphate ceramic product

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Patel, Kartikey D.

    2000-01-01

    A polymer coating is applied to the surface of a phosphate ceramic composite to effectively immobilize soluble salt anions encapsulated within the phosphate ceramic composite. The polymer coating is made from ceramic materials, including at least one inorganic metal compound, that wet and adhere to the surface structure of the phosphate ceramic composite, thereby isolating the soluble salt anions from the environment and ensuring long-term integrity of the phosphate ceramic composite.

  6. Polymer Coating for Immobilizing Soluble Ions in a Phosphate Ceramic Product

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Patel, Kartikey D.

    1999-05-05

    A polymer coating is applied to the surface of a phosphate ceramic composite to effectively immobilize soluble salt anions encapsulated within the phosphate ceramic composite. The polymer coating is made from ceramic materials, including at least one inorganic metal compound, that wet and adhere to the surface structure of the phosphate ceramic composite, thereby isolating the soluble salt anions from the environment and ensuring long-term integrity of the phosphate ceramic composite.

  7. Effect of soil salinity on cold tolerance of mangrove Kandelia candel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengchang; Li, Yunbo; Lin, Peng

    2005-03-01

    Analysis of cold tolerance on mangrove Kandelia candel leaf growing in different soil salinity along Jiulong River Estuary in South China showed that the cold tolerance decreased as the increase of soil salinity. The lethal temperatures of K. candel leaf were -10.4, -9.9 and -8.6 °C in Liaodong, Baijiao and Aotou, respectively. Under 1 2°C cold stress treatment on detached leaves of K. candel, their caloric value gradually decreased, while electrolyte leakage gradually increased. The leaf's caloric value and electrolyte leakage in Aotou with higher soil salinity varied more largely than those in Liaodong with lower soil salinity. In K. candel leaf, total water content lowered a little, bound water content rose significantly and free water content dropped significantly with duration of cold stress. At the same time, reduction sugar, soluble sugar and starch content gradually decreased and sucrose content gradually increased. Bound water, free water and sucrose content in K. candel leaf from Aotou with higher soil salinity changed more slowly than those from Liaodong with lower soil salinity, but reduction sugar, soluble sugar and starch content in K. candel leaf from Aotou had faster variations than those from Liaodong. These data indicated that soil salinity can reduce cold tolerance of K. candel leaf by increasing negative effect of salt ions in cell membrane, inhibiting variations of water content, and aggravating consumption of material and energy.

  8. Carbon-13 variations in the dissolved inorganic carbon in estuarine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, William M.; Netratanawong, Toedsit; Holmes, M. Elizabeth

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon [DIC] was measured in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay. The dependence of isotopic composition was evaluated in terms of atmospheric CO2 exchange, carbon exchange between fresh water and seawater (i.e. salinity) and DIC derived from the reaction between calcium carbonate and organically derived CO2.The extent of organic carbon oxidation and the magnitude of organic carbon loading [pollution] in an estuary have implications for variations in the δ13C of DIC and its use as an indicator of the relative amounts of land and marine derived organic and inorganic carbon in paleogeographic studies.

  9. The Mediterranean salinity crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, K.J.

    1988-08-01

    That the Mediterranean Sea underwent a salinity crisis during the Miocene (Messinian) is proven by the 1970 JOIDES deep sea drilling expedition. Subsequent work by ocean drilling and by studies on land have recorded the history of this crisis. Based upon the deep desiccated-basin model, the use of event-stratigraphy, calibrated by strontium-isotope dating and magnetostratigraphy, has enabled them to decipher the following events between 6.0 and 5.1 Ma: (1) deposition of marine diatom-rich sediments in a partially restricted basin, (2) first desiccation of the Mediterranean when Calcare di base was deposited at a time of isolation from the Atlantic because of a glacial eustatic drop of sea level, (3) influx of marine waters through southern Spanish basins to furnish brines for the deposition of the main salt, (4) Intra-Messinian desiccation, as evidenced by the erosional unconformity above the lower evaporite, (5) Intra-Messinian denudation, when reefs grew on Cyprus and marine sediments were deposited in basins, (6) frequency isolations due to oscillating sea level, when the upper evaporite was deposited, (7) Lago mare, formation of freshwater and brackish lakes due to influx of Paratethys water, (8) opening of the Gibraltar and Pliocene inundation of the Mediterranean.

  10. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the maize primary, crown and seminal root in response to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maolin; Kong, Xiangpei; Xu, Xiangbo; Li, Cuiling; Tian, Huiyu; Ding, Zhaojun

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to crop growth and yield. The primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis thaliana are known to respond differentially to a number of environmental stresses, including salinity. Although the maize root system as a whole is known to be sensitive to salinity, whether or not different structural root systems show differential growth responses to salinity stress has not yet been investigated. The maize primary root (PR) was more tolerant of salinity stress than either the crown root (CR) or the seminal root (SR). To understand the molecular mechanism of these differential growth responses, RNA-Seq analysis was conducted on cDNA prepared from the PR, CR and SR of plants either non-stressed or exposed to 100 mM NaCl for 24 h. A set of 444 genes were shown to be regulated by salinity stress, and the transcription pattern of a number of genes associated with the plant salinity stress response differed markedly between the various types of root. The pattern of transcription of the salinity-regulated genes was shown to be very diverse in the various root types. The differential transcription of these genes such as transcription factors, and the accumulation of compatible solutes such as soluble sugars probably underlie the differential growth responses to salinity stress of the three types of roots in maize.

  11. [Study on solubility of Chinese herbal compound by solubility parameter].

    PubMed

    Wu, Dezhi; Chen, Lihua; Wang, Sen; Zhu, Weifeng; Guan, Yongmei

    2010-02-01

    To demonstrate the solubility of Chinese herbal compound with solubility parameters. The solubility parameters of Liangfu effective components and Liangfu compound were determined by inverse gas chromatograph (IGC) and group contribution. Hansen ball was plotting by HSPiP, which could be used to investigate the solubility of Liangfu effective components and Liangfu compound in different solvents. And the results were verified by approximate solubility. Liangfu effective components and Liangfu compound could be dissolved in chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, octanol and ether, and were slightly soluble in glycerol, methanol, ethanol and propanediol, but could not be dissolved in water. They were all liposoluble, and the results were the same as the test results of the approximate solubility. The solubility of Chinese herbal compound can be expressed by solubility parameters, and it is accurate, convenient and visual.

  12. In vitro dynamic solubility test: influence of various parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Thélohan, S; de Meringo, A

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses the dissolution of mineral fibers in simulated physiological fluids (SPF), and the parameters that affect the solubility measurement in a dynamic test where an SPF runs through a cell containing fibers (Scholze and Conradt test). Solutions simulate either the extracellular fluid (pH 7.6) or the intracellular fluid (pH 4.5). The fibers have various chemical compositions and are either continuously drawn or processed as wool. The fiber solubility is determined by the amount of SiO2 (and occasionally other ions) released in the solution. Results are stated as percentage of the initial silica content released or as dissolution rate v in nm/day. The reproducibility of the test is higher with the less soluble fibers (10% solubility), than with highly soluble fibers (20% solubility). The influence of test parameters, including SPF, test duration, and surface area/volume (SA/V), has been studied. The pH and the inorganic buffer salts have a major influence: industrial glasswool composition is soluble at pH 7.6 but not at pH 4.5. The opposite is true for rock- (basalt) wool composition. For slightly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate v remains constant with time, whereas for highly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate decreases rapidly. The dissolution rates believed to occur are v1, initial dissolution rate, and v2, dissolution rate of the residual fibers. The SA of fibers varies with the mass of the fibers tested, or with the fiber diameter at equal mass. Volume, V, is the chosen flow rate. An increase in the SA/V ratio leads to a decrease in the dissolution rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7882964

  13. Protein-inorganic hybrid nanoflowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jun; Lei, Jiandu; Zare, Richard N.

    2012-07-01

    Flower-shaped inorganic nanocrystals have been used for applications in catalysis and analytical science, but so far there have been no reports of `nanoflowers' made of organic components. Here, we report a method for creating hybrid organic-inorganic nanoflowers using copper (II) ions as the inorganic component and various proteins as the organic component. The protein molecules form complexes with the copper ions, and these complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of copper phosphate. Interaction between the protein and copper ions then leads to the growth of micrometre-sized particles that have nanoscale features and that are shaped like flower petals. When an enzyme is used as the protein component of the hybrid nanoflower, it exhibits enhanced enzymatic activity and stability compared with the free enzyme. This is attributed to the high surface area and confinement of the enzymes in the nanoflowers.

  14. Principles of Inorganic Materials Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalena, John N.; Cleary, David

    2005-04-01

    A unique interdisciplinary approach to inorganic materials design Textbooks intended for the training of chemists in the inorganic materials field often omit many relevant topics. With its interdisciplinary approach, this book fills that gap by presenting concepts from chemistry, physics, materials science, metallurgy, and ceramics in a unified treatment targeted towards the chemistry audience. Semiconductors, metal alloys and intermetallics, as well as ceramic substances are covered. Accordingly, the book should also be useful to students and working professionals in a variety of other disciplines. This book discusses a number of topics that are pertinent to the design of new inorganic materials but are typically not covered in standard solid-state chemistry books. The authors start with an introduction to structure at the mesoscopic level and progress to smaller-length scales. Next, detailed consideration is given to both phenomenological and atomistic-level descriptions of transport properties, the metal-nonmetal transition, magnetic and dielectric properties, optical properties, and mechanical properties. Finally, the authors present introductions to phase equilibria, synthesis, and nanomaterials. Other features include: Worked examples demonstrating concepts unfamiliar to the chemist Extensive references to related literature, leading readers to more in-depth coverage of particular topics Biographies introducing the reader to great contributors to the field of inorganic materials science in the twentieth century With their interdisciplinary approach, the authors have set the groundwork for communication and understanding among professionals in varied disciplines who are involved with inorganic materials engineering. Armed with this publication, students and researchers in inorganic and physical chemistry, physics, materials science, and engineering will be better equipped to face today's complex design challenges. This textbook is appropriate for senior

  15. Salinity Effects on Leaf Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Longstreth, David J.; Nobel, Park S.

    1979-01-01

    Increasing salinity led to substantially higher ratios of mesophyll surface area to leaf area (Ames/A) for Phaseolus vulgaris and Gossypium hirsutum and a smaller increase for Atriplex patula, a salt-tolerant species. The increase in internal surface for CO2 absorption did not lead to higher CO2 uptake rates, since the CO2 resistance expressed on the basis of mesophyll cell wall area (rcell) increased even more with salinity. The differences among species in the sensitivity of photosynthesis to salinity in part reflect the different Ames/A and rcell responses. PMID:16660795

  16. Isohaline Salinity Budget of the North Atlantic Salinity Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, F.; Bachman, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study (SPURS) field experiment was designed as a multi-scale investigation of the processes that give rise to the North Atlantic subtropical salinity maximum. The choice of control volume influences the processes that dominate budgets of ocean properties. In this study we analyze the salinity budget of the North Atlantic subtropical salinity maximum region for control volumes bounded by isohaline surfaces. We provide closed budgets based on output from a high-resolution numerical simulation, and partial budgets based on climatological analyses of observations. With this choice of control volume, advection is eliminated from the instantaneous volume integrated salt budget, and time mean advection eliminated from the budget evaluated from time-averaged data. In this way, the role of irreversible mixing processes in the maintenance and variability of the salinity maximum are more readily revealed. By carrying out the analysis with near instantaneous and time-filtered model output, the role of mesoscale eddies in stirring and mixing for this region is determined. We find that the small-scale mixing acting on enhanced gradients generated by the mesoscale eddies is approximately equal to that acting on the large-scale gradients estimated from climatological mean conditions. The isohaline salinity budgets can be related to water mass transformation rates associated with surface forcing and mixing processes in a straightforward manner. We find that the surface net evaporation in the North Atlantic salinity maximum region accounts for a transformation of 7 Sv of water into the salinity maximum in the simulation, whereas the estimate based on climatological observations is 10 Sv.

  17. Inorganic composites for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malmendier, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The development of inorganic composite materials for space applications is reviewed. The composites do not contain any organic materials, and therefore, are not subject to degradation by ultraviolet radiation, volatilization of constituents, or embrittlement at low temperatures. The composites consist of glass, glass/ceramics or ceramic matrices, reinforced by refractory whiskers or fibers. Such composites have the low thermal expansion, refractories, chemical stability and other desirable properties usually associated with the matrix materials. The composites also have a degree of toughness which is extraordinary for refractory inorganic materials.

  18. Toxicological review of inorganic phosphates.

    PubMed

    Weiner, M L; Salminen, W F; Larson, P R; Barter, R A; Kranetz, J L; Simon, G S

    2001-08-01

    Inorganic phosphate salts are widely used as food ingredients and in a variety of commercial applications. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers inorganic phosphates "Generally Recognized As Safe" (GRAS) (FDA, 1973a, 1979) [FDA: Food and Drug Administration 1973a. GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) food ingredients-phosphates. NTIS PB-221-224, FDA, Food and Drug Administration, 1979. Phosphates; Proposed Affirmation of and Deletion From GRAS Status as Direct and Human Food Ingredients. Federal Register 44 (244). 74845-74857, 18 December (1979)] and the European Union (EU) allows inorganic phosphates to be added directly to food (EU Directive 95/2/EC as amended by 98/72/EC). In this review, data on the acute, subchronic and chronic toxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity and reproductive toxicity from the published literature and from unpublished studies by the manufacturers are reviewed. Based on the toxicity data and similar chemistry, the inorganic phosphates can be separated into four major classes, consisting of monovalent salts, divalent salts, ammonium salts and aluminum salts. The proposed classification scheme supports the use of toxicity data from one compound to assess the toxicity of another compound in the same class. However, in the case of eye and skin irritation, the proposed classification scheme cannot be used because a wide range of responses exists within each class. Therefore, the eye and skin hazards associated with an individual inorganic phosphate should be assessed on a chemical-by-chemical basis. A large amount of toxicity data exists for all four classes of inorganic phosphates. The large and comprehensive database allows an accurate assessment of the toxicity of each class of inorganic phosphate. Overall, all four classes of inorganic phosphates exhibit low oral, inhalation and dermal toxicities. Based on these data, humans are unlikely to experience adverse effects when the daily phosphorus consumption remains

  19. The inorganic carbon distribution in Irish coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Triona; Cave, Rachel; McGovern, Evin; Kivimae, Caroline

    2014-05-01

    Despite their relatively small surface area, coastal and shelf waters play a crucial role in the global climate through their influence on major biogeochemical cycles. Due to growing concern about ocean acidification as a result of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, measurements of inorganic carbon parameters (dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), pH and pCO2) have been made with increasing regularity over the past two decades. While it is clear that open ocean surface waters are acidifying at a fairly uniform rate ( -0.02 pH units per decade), less is known about changes in coastal waters due to the high complexity and spatial variability in these regions. Large spatial and temporal variability in coastal CO2 parameters is mainly due to nutrient inputs, biological activity, upwelling and riverine inputs of alkalinity and inorganic and organic carbon. The inorganic carbon system in Irish coastal waters is presented here, gathered from 9 surveys around the Irish coastline between 2009 and 2013. There are striking contrasts in the CO2 system between different areas, largely attributed to the bedrock composition of the nearby rivers. Freshwater end-member concentrations of TA, calculated from TA-salinity relationships in outer estuarine and nearshore coastal water, were supported by riverine TA data from the Irish Environmental Protection Agency. A large portion of Ireland is covered with limestone bedrock and as a result, many of the rivers have extremely high TA (>5000μmol/kg) due to the carbonate mineral content of the underlying bedrock. While such high TA has resulted in elevated pH and calcium carbonate saturation states in some coastal waters, (e.g. Galway Bay and Dublin Bay), the high TA in other areas was accompanied by particularly high DIC (e.g. River Shannon on the west coast), resulting in lower pH and aragonite/calcite saturation states and even CO2 degassing in the Shannon estuary. Due to non-limestone lithology in many parts

  20. Inorganic carbon availability in benthic diatom communities: photosynthesis and migration.

    PubMed

    Marques da Silva, Jorge; Cruz, Sónia; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2017-09-05

    Diatom-dominated microphytobenthos (MPB) is the main primary producer of many intertidal and shallow subtidal environments, being therefore of critical importance to estuarine and coastal food webs. Owing to tidal cycles, intertidal MPB diatoms are subjected to environmental conditions far more variable than the ones experienced by pelagic diatoms (e.g. light, temperature, salinity, desiccation and nutrient availability). Nevertheless, benthic diatoms evolved adaptation mechanisms to these harsh conditions, including the capacity to move within steep physical and chemical gradients, allowing them to perform photosynthesis efficiently. In this contribution, we will review present knowledge on the effects of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) availability on photosynthesis and productivity of diatom-dominated MPB. We present evidence of carbon limitation of photosynthesis in benthic diatom mats and highly productive MPB natural communities. Furthermore, we hypothesize that active vertical migration of epipelic motile diatoms could overcome local depletion of DIC in the photic layer, providing the cells alternately with light and inorganic carbon supply. The few available longer-term experiments on the effects of inorganic carbon enrichment on the productivity of diatom-dominated MPB have yielded inconsistent results. Therefore, further studies are needed to properly assess the response of MPB communities to increased CO2 and ocean acidification related to climate change.This article is part of the themed issue 'The peculiar carbon metabolism in diatoms'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Uranium, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , soluble salts ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Nickel, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel , soluble salts ; CASRN Various Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  3. Fluorine (soluble fluoride)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fluorine ( soluble fluoride ) ; CASRN 7782 - 41 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  4. Effect of hydrotalcite-like compounds on the aqueous solubility of some poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Ambrogi, Valeria; Fardella, Giuseppe; Grandolini, Giuliano; Nocchetti, Morena; Perioli, Luana

    2003-07-01

    A new approach of improving drug dissolution properties is described. This method exploits the property of a carrier owing to the hydrotalcite-type anionic clays (HTlc). HTlc is an inorganic layered solid that lodges anionic compounds among its layers. As HTlc dissolves at acidic pH values (pH < 4), the anions intercalated among the layers are promptly released in the medium. In this article some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were chosen as models of poorly water-soluble drugs. They were intercalated in HTlc and solubility measurements in acidic medium were performed. A remarkable improvement of drug solubility was observed especially in the case of indomethacin. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  5. Inorganic Fullerenes, Onions, and Tubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Andrew P. E.

    2004-01-01

    Buckminsterfullerene, which is in the shape of a soccer-ball was first discovered in 1985, has many applications as a good lubricant, or as a new superconductor. The synthesis of these inorganic fullerenes involves a great deal of interdisciplinary research between physicists, material scientists, engineers and chemists from various fields.

  6. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  7. Inorganic Fullerenes, Onions, and Tubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Andrew P. E.

    2004-01-01

    Buckminsterfullerene, which is in the shape of a soccer-ball was first discovered in 1985, has many applications as a good lubricant, or as a new superconductor. The synthesis of these inorganic fullerenes involves a great deal of interdisciplinary research between physicists, material scientists, engineers and chemists from various fields.

  8. Inorganic nanomedicine--part 1.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Bhupinder S; Kamboj, Seema R

    2010-08-01

    Inorganic nanomedicine refers to the use of inorganic or hybrid nanomaterials and nanosized objects to achieve innovative medical breakthroughs for drug and gene discovery and delivery, discovery of biomarkers, and molecular diagnostics. Potential uses for fluorescent quantum dots include cell labeling, biosensing, in vivo imaging, bimodal magnetic-luminescent imaging, and diagnostics. Biocompatible quantum dot conjugates have been used successfully for sentinel lymph node mapping, tumor targeting, tumor angiogenesis imaging, and metastatic cell tracking. Magnetic nanowires applications include biosensing and construction of nucleic acids sensors. Magnetic cell therapy is used for the repair of blood vessels. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are important for magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery, cell labeling, and tracking. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used for hyperthermic treatment of tumors. Multifunctional MNPs applications include drug and gene delivery, medical imaging, and targeted drug delivery. MNPs could have a vital role in developing techniques to simultaneously diagnose, monitor, and treat a wide range of common diseases and injuries. From the clinical editor: This review serves as an update about the current state of inorganic nanomedicine. The use of inorganic/hybrid nanomaterials and nanosized objects has already resulted in innovative medical breakthroughs for drug/gene discovery and delivery, discovery of biomarkers and molecular diagnostics, and is likely to remain one of the most prolific fields of nanomedicine.

  9. Infrared Spectrometry of Inorganic Salts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackermann, Martin N.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a general chemistry experiment which uses infrared spectroscopy to analyze inorganic ions and thereby serves to introduce an important instrumental method of analysis. Presents a table of eight anions and the ammonium ion with the frequencies of their normal modes, as well as the spectra of three sulfate salts. (RR)

  10. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  11. Effect of exogenous spermidine on polyamine content and metabolism in tomato exposed to salinity-alkalinity mixed stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yi; Shi, Yu; Zhang, Zhi; Zou, Zhirong; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Jiuzhou

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the effects of seeds pretreatment with exogenous spermidine (Spd) on the polyamine content and metabolism in the roots of two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), Jinpengchaoguan and Zhongza No. 9 grown under conditions of mixed salinity-alkalinity stress. These cultivars differ in their tolerance to salinity stress, with the former more tolerant than the latter. PA content, whether in its free forms, soluble conjugated forms, or insoluble bound forms, increased significantly during salinity-alkalinity stress. The activities of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) and diamine oxidase (DAO), concentrations of free Spd, soluble conjugated forms of Spd and spermine (Spm), and insoluble bound form of Spd in the roots were enhanced to a greater extent in cv. Jinpengchaoguan roots than in cv. Zhongza No.9 in response to salinity-alkalinity stress. Interestingly, Spd application to seeds markedly suppressed the accumulation of free Put, but promoted an increase in free Spd and Spm concentrations, as well as soluble conjugated forms of Spd and insoluble bound forms of Put in both cultivars. From these data, we deduced that exogenous Spd promotes the conversion of free Put into free Spd and Spm, and soluble conjugated forms and insoluble bound forms of PAs under salinity-alkalinity stress. Furthermore, under salinity-alkalinity stress conditions, exogenous Spd enhanced the activities of ODC, SAMDC and DAO, and reduced the activities of ADC and polyamine oxidase (PAO) in cv. Zhongza No.9 roots. In addition, exogenous Spd reduced the activities of ADC and ODC, and increased the activities of DAO and SAMDC in cv. Jinpengchaoguan roots under salinity-alkalinity stress conditions. These results suggest that exogenous Spd treatment can regulate the metabolic status of polyamines caused by salinity-alkalinity stress, and eventually enhance tolerance of tomato plants to salinity-alkalinity stress. Additionally, Spd treatments have varying effects on

  12. Detection, identification and formation of new iodinated disinfection byproducts in chlorinated saline wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tingting; Zhang, Xiangru

    2015-01-01

    The use of seawater for toilet flushing introduces high levels of inorganic ions, including iodide ions, into a city's wastewater treatment systems, resulting in saline wastewater effluents. Chlorination is widely used in disinfecting wastewater effluents owing to its low cost and high efficiency. During chlorination of saline wastewater effluents, iodide may be oxidized to hypoiodous acid, which may further react with effluent organic matter to form iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Iodinated DBPs show significantly higher toxicity than their brominated and chlorinated analogues and thus have been drawing increasing concerns. In this study, polar iodinated DBPs were detected in chlorinated saline wastewater effluents using a novel precursor ion scan method. The major polar iodinated DBPs were identified and quantified, and their organic precursors and formation pathways were investigated. The formation of iodinated DBPs under different chlorine doses and contact times was also studied. The results indicated that a few polar iodinated DBPs were generated in the chlorinated saline primary effluent, but few were generated in the chlorinated saline secondary effluent. Several major polar iodinated DBPs in the chlorinated saline primary effluent were proposed with structures, among which a new group of polar iodinated DBPs, iodo-trihydroxybenzenesulfonic acids, were identified and quantified. The organic precursors of this new group of DBPs were found to be 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene, and the formation pathways of these new DBPs were tentatively proposed. Both chlorine dose and contact time affected the formation of iodinated DBPs in the chlorinated saline wastewater effluents.

  13. Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals: Nucleation, growth and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Jared James

    nanocrystals can be realized. Finally, a novel phase transfer process is demonstrated using inorganic salts, such as sodium arsenite, to make water soluble metal oxide nanocrystals. The water soluble iron oxide nanocrystals are fully characterized by several complementary techniques and then used in cellular studies. The arsenite-coated iron oxide composite nanocrystals (AICN) are shown to be effective cancer therapy agents.

  14. Rapid screening of water soluble arsenic species in edible oils using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    López-García, Ignacio; Briceño, Marisol; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2015-01-15

    A methodology for the non-chromatographic screening of the main arsenic species present in edible oils is discussed. Reverse dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was used to extract water soluble arsenic compounds (inorganic arsenic, methylarsonate, dimethylarsinate and arsenobetaine) from the edible oils into a slightly acidic aqueous medium. The total arsenic content was measured in the extracts by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using palladium as the chemical modifier. By repeating the measurement using cerium instead of palladium, the sum of inorganic arsenic and methylarsonate was obtained. The detection limit was 0.03 ng As per gram of oil. Data for the total and water-soluble arsenic levels of 29 samples of different origin are presented. Inorganic arsenic was not found in any of the samples marketed as edible oils.

  15. A Perspective on Solubility Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Manus; Abrams, Karl

    1984-01-01

    Presents four generalizations about solubilities. These generalizations (rules), are useful in introducing the dynamic topics of solubility and in helping high school and introductory college chemistry students make some order out of the tremendous number of facts available. (JN)

  16. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  17. A Perspective on Solubility Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Manus; Abrams, Karl

    1984-01-01

    Presents four generalizations about solubilities. These generalizations (rules), are useful in introducing the dynamic topics of solubility and in helping high school and introductory college chemistry students make some order out of the tremendous number of facts available. (JN)

  18. Role of xylo-oligosaccharides in protection against salinity-induced adversities in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Guo, Chen; Hussain, Saddam; Zhu, Bingxin; Deng, Fang; Xue, Yan; Geng, Mingjian; Wu, Lishu

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a stringent abiotic constraint limiting crop growth and productivity. The present study was carried out to appraise the role of xylo-oligosaccharides (XOSs) in improving the salinity tolerance of Chinese cabbage. Salinity stress (0.5% NaCl solution) and four levels (0, 40, 80, 120 mg L(-1)) of XOSs were imposed on 20-day-old plants cultured under controlled conditions. Salinity stress decreased the aboveground fresh biomass, photosynthesis, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, internal CO2 concentration, water use efficiency, and chlorophyll contents but increased the stomatal limitation value of Chinese cabbage compared with control. Such physiological interferences, disturbances in plant water relations, and visually noticeable growth reductions in Chinese cabbage were significantly alleviated by the addition of XOSs under salinity stress. Under salinity stress, application of XOSs significantly enhanced the activities of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbate, carotene) antioxidants and reduced the malondialdehyde content in the leaves of Chinese cabbage. The XOS-applied plants under salinity stress also recorded higher soluble sugars, proline, and soluble protein content in their leaves. Exposure of salinity stress increased the ratio of Na(+)/K(+), Na(+)/Ca(2+), and Na(+)/Mg(2+) in shoot as well as root of Chinese cabbage, however, XOS application significantly reduced these ratios particularly in shoot. Lower levels of XOSs (40 or 80 mg L(-1)) were more effective for most of the studied attributes. The greater salinity tolerance and better growth in these treatments were related with enhanced antioxidative defense system, reduced lipid peroxidation, increased osmolyte accumulation, and maintenance of ionic balance.

  19. Salinity effects on the bioavailability of aqueous metals for the estuarine killifish Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Jessica; Fisher, Nicholas S

    2011-09-01

    Estuarine organisms experience varying salinity conditions on a daily and seasonal basis, and these fluctuations could influence the amount of metal accumulated from the aqueous phase. The present study experimentally assessed the role of salinity (0, 2, 6, 12, and 25 ppt) on the uptake of As, Cd, Cr, inorganic Hg [Hg(II)], and methylmercury (MeHg) into the euryhaline killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from the aqueous phase using gamma-emitting radioisotopes. Patterns of metal uptake as a function of salinity varied by metal. Chromium showed no relationship with salinity; Cd, which was most affected by salinity, showed an inverse relationship; and As, Hg(II), and MeHg uptake increased as salinity increased from 0 ppt to 25 ppt. Arsenic (salinities ≤ 6 ppt) and Cr were regulated by the fish, whereas Cd, Hg(II), and MeHg were not. Cadmium, Hg(II), and MeHg are chloro-complexed, increasing bioavailability for Hg(II) and MeHg, and reducing bioavailability for Cd. Concentration factors (CFs) were >1 at all salinities for Cd, Hg(II), and MeHg, indicating that the fish were more enriched in the metal than the surrounding water, whereas As and Cr CFs were <1 at all salinities. Uptake rate constants (k(u)s) were highest for MeHg (0.79-2.29 L g(-1) d(-1)), followed by Hg(II), Cd, Cr, and lowest for As (0.0004-0.0008 L g(-1) d(-1)). Tissue distribution of each metal was determined by dissections. Data for Cd showed that as salinity increased, the concentration of this metal increased in the viscera, whereas it decreased in the head and gills, suggesting that drinking to osmoregulate may account for a portion of Cd uptake from the aqueous phase in marine fish.

  20. Golden alga presence and abundance are inversely related to salinity in a high-salinity river ecosystem, Pecos River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Israël, Natascha M.D.; VanLandeghem, Matthew M.; Denny, Shawn; Ingle, John; Patino, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Prymnesium parvum (golden alga, GA) is a toxigenic harmful alga native to marine ecosystems that has also affected brackish inland waters. The first toxic bloom of GA in the western hemisphere occurred in the Pecos River, one of the saltiest rivers in North America. Environmental factors (water quality) associated with GA occurrence in this basin, however, have not been examined. Water quality and GA presence and abundance were determined at eight sites in the Pecos River basin with or without prior history of toxic blooms. Sampling was conducted monthly from January 2012 to July 2013. Specific conductance (salinity) varied spatiotemporally between 4408 and 73,786 mS/cm. Results of graphical, principal component (PCA), and zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression analyses indicated that the incidence and abundance of GA are reduced as salinity increases spatiotemporally. LOWESS regression and correlation analyses of archived data for specific conductance and GA abundance at one of the study sites retrospectively confirmed the negative association between these variables. Results of PCA also suggested that at <15,000 mS/cm, GA was present at a relatively wide range of nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) concentrations whereas at higher salinity, GA was observed only at mid-to-high nutrient levels. Generally consistent with earlier studies, results of ZIP regression indicated that GA presence is positively associated with organic phosphorus and in samples where GA is present, GA abundance is positively associated with organic nitrogen and negatively associated with inorganic nitrogen. This is the first report of an inverse relation between salinity and GA presence and abundance in riverine waters and of interaction effects of salinity and nutrients in the field. These observations contribute to a more complete understanding of environmental conditions that influence GA distribution in inland waters.

  1. Biochemical effects of salinity on oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Patricia V; Sternberg, Leonel S L

    2014-05-01

    The current isotope tree ring model assumes that 42% of the sucrose oxygen exchanges with stem water during cellulose synthesis and that the oxygen isotope biochemical fractionation is c. 27‰. However, previous studies have indicated that this model can overestimate the cellulose oxygen isotope ratio of plants under salinity or water stress. Saline stress increases soluble carbohydrates and osmolytes, which can alter exchange and biochemical fractionation during cellulose synthesis. To test the effect of salinity as well as the synthesis of osmolytes on exchange and biochemical fractionation, we grew wild-type and a transgenic mannitol synthesizer Arabidopsis thaliana hydroponically with fresh and saline water. We then measured the oxygen isotope ratios of leaf water, stem water and stem cellulose to determine the effects on exchange and biochemical fractionation. Biochemical fractionation did not change, but oxygen isotope exchange was twice as high for plants grown in saline water relative to freshwater-treated plants (0.64 and 0.3, respectively). Mannitol (osmolyte) synthesis did not affect exchange or biochemical fractionation regardless of salinity. Increases in salinity increased oxygen isotope exchange during cellulose synthesis, which may explain the overestimation of cellulose δ(18) O values under saline conditions.

  2. Salinity is Reduced Below the Evaporation Front During Soil Salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, M.; Carrera, J.; Olivella, S.; Massana, J.; Saaltink, M. W.; Ayora, C.; Lloret, A.

    2009-04-01

    Nearly 50% of irrigated lands in arid and semi-arid regimes have salinization problems. Salinization is generally caused by salts carried to the soil surface by capillary rising water and occurs under very dry conditions, when vapor fluxes become the main water flux mechanism. Despite its global importance, actual salinization mechanisms are only poorly understood. Soil salinization is generally studied by means of water and salt balances without entering on small scale processes. This may suffice for explaining large scale behavior but hardly for designing remediation practices. The objective of this work is to study the solute transport under evaporation conditions. We have performed laboratory experiments and modelled them. We have built open sand columns initially saturated with an epsomite (MgSO4•7H2O) solution. Evaporation was driven by an infrared lamp and proceeded until the overall saturation fell down to 0.32. Results imply that water vapor flows not only upwards above the evaporation front, but also downwards beneath this front, where it condensates. Condensation causes the dilution of the solution. That is, concentrations fall below the initial values. The experiments have been modelled with the program Retraso-CodeBright, which couples non isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport. Reproducing the observations required modifying the standard retention and relative permeability functions to include oven dry conditions. The model reproduces the observed concentration, water content and temperature profiles along the column and confirms the existence of condensation and decrease of salt concentration below the evaporation front. The model also allows us to distinguish the relevance between the advective and diffusive vapor fluxes, showing that the latter is, by far, the largest. The mechanism displays positives feedbacks, as condensation will be most intense in areas of highest salinity, thus diluting saline water that may have infiltrated.

  3. Salinity is Reduced Below the Evaporation Front During Soil Salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, M.; Carrera, J.; Olivella, S.; Massana, J.; Saaltink, M. W.; Ayora, C.; Lloret, A.

    2008-12-01

    Nearly 50% of irrigated lands in arid and semi-arid regimes have salinization problems. Salinization is generally caused by salts carried to the soil surface by capillary rising water and occurs under very dry conditions, when vapor fluxes become the main water flux mechanism. Despite its global importance, actual salinization mechanisms are only poorly understood. Soil salinization is generally studied by means of water and salt balances without entering on small scale processes. This may suffice for explaining large scale behavior but hardly for designing remediation practices. The objective of this work is to study the solute transport under evaporation conditions. We have performed laboratory experiments and modelled them. We have built open sand columns initially saturated with an epsomite (MgSO4-7H2O) solution. Evaporation was driven by an infrared lamp and proceeded until the overall saturation fell down to 0.32. Results imply that water vapor flows not only upwards above the evaporation front, but also downwards beneath this front, where it condensates. Condensation causes the dilution of the solution. That is, concentrations fall below the initial values. The experiments have been modelled with the program RetrasoCodeBright, which couples non isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport. Reproducing the observations required modifying the standard retention and relative permeability functions to include oven dry conditions. The model reproduces the observed concentration, water content and temperature profiles along the column and confirms the existence of condensation and decrease of salt concentration below the evaporation front. The model also allows us to distinguish the relevance between the advective and diffusive vapor fluxes, showing that the latter is, by far, the largest. The mechanism displays positives feedbacks, as condensation will be most intense in areas of highest salinity, thus diluting saline water that may have infiltrated.

  4. Osmotic adaptation in Ulva lactuca under fluctuating salinity regimes.

    PubMed

    Dickson, D M; Wyn Jones, R G; Davenport, J

    1982-09-01

    A study has been made of the osmotic responses of the green intertidal alga, Ulva lactuca, under two fluctuating salinity regimes; sinusoidal and square-wave fluctuations between 30 and 100% sea water in a 12 h cycle. These regimes closely resemble the tidal fluctuation of salinity encountered by the alga in its natural estuarine habitat. Data on changes in the inorganic ions, potassium, sodium, chloride and sulphate; in the organic solute, dimethylsulphoniopropionate; in the total sugar levels and estimated osmotic and turgor pressures under the two salinity regimes are reported. Significant differences in the solute responses under these different conditions were detected. In general, better control of ion fluxes appeared to be exercised under the sinusoidal conditions which also buffered changes in dimethylsulphoniopropionate levels. Influxes of potassium were highly light-dependent. Chloride levels conspicuously failed to reach the steady-state levels in the 6-h-hyper-osmotic part of either the abrupt or gradual cycle. The possible significance of these data, which may better reflect osmotic changes in the natural environment, and some of the problems encountered, particularly in accounting for charge balance under some conditions, are discussed.

  5. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  6. Reactions of inorganic nitrogen species in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Dell`Orco, P.C.

    1994-12-31

    Redox reactions of nitrate salts with NH3 and methanol were studied in near-critical and supercritical water at 350 to 530 C and constant pressure of 302 bar. Sodium nitrate decomposition reactions were investigated at similar conditions. Reactions were conducted in isothermal tubular reactor under plug flow. For kinetic modeling, nitrate and nitrite reactants were lumped into an NO{sub x}{sup -} reactant; kinetic expressions were developed for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X and sodium nitrate decomposition reactions. The proposed elementary reaction mechanism for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X reaction indicated that NO{sub 2} was the primary oxidizing species and that N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O selectivities could be determined by the form of MNO{sub 3} used. This suggest a nitrogen control strategy for use in SCWO (supercritical water oxidation) processes; nitrate or NH3 could be used to remove the other, at reaction conditions far less severe than required by other methods. Reactions of nitrate with methanol indicated that nitrate was a better oxidant than oxygen in supercritical water. Nitrogen reaction products included NH3 and nitrite, while inorganic carbon was the major carbon reaction product. Analysis of excess experiments indicated that the reaction at 475 C was first order in methanol concentration and second order in NO{sub x}{sup -} concentration. In order to determine phase regimes for these reactions, solubility of sodium nitrate was determined for some 1:1 nitrate electrolytes. Solubilities were measured at 450 to 525 C, from 248 to 302 bar. A semi-empirical solvation model was shown to adequately describe the experimental sodium nitrate solubilities. Solubilities of Li, Na, and K nitrates revealed with cations with smaller ionic radii had greater solubilities with nitrate.

  7. Inorganic semiconductors for flexible electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Rogers, J. A.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Univ. of Illinois

    2007-08-03

    This article reviews several classes of inorganic semiconductor materials that can be used to form high-performance thin-film transistors (TFTs) for large area, flexible electronics. Examples ranging from thin films of various forms of silicon to nanoparticles and nanowires of compound semiconductors are presented, with an emphasis on methods of depositing and integrating thin films of these materials into devices. Performance characteristics, including both electrical and mechanical behavior, for isolated transistors as well as circuits with various levels of complexity are reviewed. Collectively, the results suggest that flexible or printable inorganic materials may be attractive for a range of applications not only in flexible but also in large-area electronics, from existing devices such as flat-panel displays to more challenging (in terms of both cost and performance requirements) systems such as large area radiofrequency communication devices, structural health monitors, and conformal X-ray imagers.

  8. Gas separations using inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, B.Z.; Singh, S.P.N.; Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results from a research and development program to develop, fabricate, and evaluate inorganic membranes for separating gases at high temperatures and pressures in hostile process environments encountered in fossil energy conversion processes such as coal gasification. The primary emphasis of the research was on the separation and recovery of hydrogen from synthesis gas. Major aspects of the program included assessment of the worldwide research and development activity related to gas separations using inorganic membranes, identification and selection of candidate membrane materials, fabrication and characterization of membranes using porous membrane technology developed at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and evaluation of the separations capability of the fabricated membranes in terms of permeabilities and fluxes of gases.

  9. Bioconcentration factors and lipid solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S. ); Baughman, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The log-log relationship between bioconcentration and hydrophobicity breaks down for several medium and high molecular weight solutes that bioconcentrate either to a small extent or not at all. Much of the failure is attributed to the relatively low solubility of these compounds in lipid. Inclusion of a term in octanol solubility (in place of lipid solubility, which is generally unavailable) considerably improves the quality of the relationship (r = 0.95). It is speculated that the octanol solubility term compensates for the relatively low solubility of large compounds in lipid.

  10. Inorganic yellow-red pigments without toxic metals

    PubMed

    Jansen; Letschert

    2000-04-27

    Inorganic pigments have been utilized by mankind since ancient times, and are still widely used to colour materials exposed to elevated temperatures during processing or application. Indeed, in the case of glasses, glazes and ceramics, there is no alternative to inorganic pigments for colouring. However, most inorganic pigments contain heavy metals or transition metals that can adversely effect the environment and human health if critical levels are exceeded. Cadmium-based pigments in particular are a cause of concern: although the pigments are not toxic due to their very low solubility in water and dilute mineral acids, cadmium itself is toxic and can enter the environment in a bioavailable form through waste-disposal sites and incineration plants. This has led to regulations, based on the precautionary principle, that strongly restrict the use of cadmium pigments. And even though recent assessments have concluded that the risk to humans or the environment might be not as significant as originally feared, a strong demand for inherently safer substitutes remains. Here we demonstrate that solid solutions of the perovskites CaTaO2N and LaTaON2 constitute promising candidates for such substitutes: their brilliance, tinting strength, opacity, dispersability, light-fastness and heat stability rival that of the cadmium pigments, while their colour can be tuned through the desired range, from yellow through orange to deep red, by simple composition adjustments. Because all the constituent elements are harmless, this perovskite-based inorganic pigment system seems a promising replacement that could eliminate one of the sources for cadmium emissions to the environment and some of the remaining concerns about pigment safety.

  11. Inorganic yellow-red pigments without toxic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, M.; Letschert, H. P.

    2000-04-01

    Inorganic pigments have been utilized by mankind since ancient times, and are still widely used to colour materials exposed to elevated temperatures during processing or application. Indeed, in the case of glasses, glazes and ceramics, there is no alternative to inorganic pigments for colouring. However, most inorganic pigments contain heavy metals or transition metals that can adversely effect the environment and human health if critical levels are exceeded. Cadmium-based pigments in particular are a cause of concern: although the pigments are not toxic due to their very low solubility in water and dilute mineral acids, cadmium itself is toxic and can enter the environment in a bioavailable form through waste-disposal sites and incineration plants. This has led to regulations, based on the precautionary principle, that strongly restrict the use of cadmium pigments. And even though recent assessments have concluded that the risk to humans or the environment might be not as significant as originally feared, a strong demand for inherently safer substitutes remains. Here we demonstrate that solid solutions of the perovskites CaTaO 2N and LaTaON2 constitute promising candidates for such substitutes: their brilliance, tinting strength, opacity, dispersability, light-fastness and heat stability rival that of the cadmium pigments, while their colour can be tuned through the desired range, from yellow through orange to deep red, by simple composition adjustments. Because all the constituent elements are harmless, this perovskite-based inorganic pigment system seems a promising replacement that could eliminate one of the sources for cadmium emissions to the environment and some of the remaining concerns about pigment safety.

  12. Solubility and Solubility Product Determination of a Sparingly Soluble Salt: A First-Level Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonomo, Raffaele P.; Tabbi, Giovanni; Vagliasindi, Laura I.

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment was devised to let students determine the solubility and solubility product, "K"[subscript sp], of calcium sulfate dihydrate in a first-level laboratory. The students experimentally work on an intriguing equilibrium law: the constancy of the product of the ion concentrations of a sparingly soluble salt. The determination of…

  13. Solubility and Solubility Product Determination of a Sparingly Soluble Salt: A First-Level Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonomo, Raffaele P.; Tabbi, Giovanni; Vagliasindi, Laura I.

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment was devised to let students determine the solubility and solubility product, "K"[subscript sp], of calcium sulfate dihydrate in a first-level laboratory. The students experimentally work on an intriguing equilibrium law: the constancy of the product of the ion concentrations of a sparingly soluble salt. The determination of…

  14. Henry Taube: inorganic chemist extraordinaire.

    PubMed

    Creutz, Carol; Ford, Peter C; Meyer, Thomas J

    2006-09-04

    The numerous innovative contributions of Henry Taube to modern inorganic chemistry are briefly reviewed. Highlights include the determination of solvation numbers and lability, elucidation of substitution mechanisms, discovery and documentation of inner-sphere electron transfer, and discovery of the remarkable coordination chemistry of ruthenium and osmium ammine complexes with unsaturated ligands and mixed-valence complexes and their fundamental relationship to intramolecular electron transfer.

  15. Sealed Lithium Inorganic Electrolyte Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    revere side it necoeery and idM,1117 "~ bfoh numiber) Inorganic Electrolyte Battery Carbon Cathode Evaluation Thionyl Chloride Gas Generation Lithium ...hardware corrosion in cold rolled steel cans, due to cathodic protection of the cans by the lithium . Recent data 4 showed that thionyl chloride is reduced...very slowly on the surface of nickel and stainless steel, when these materials were in contact with a lithium anode in the thionyl chloride

  16. Structural characterization of inorganic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Irene M

    Composite materials with unique architectures are ubiquitous in nature, e.g., marine shells, sponge spicules, bones, and dentine. These structured organic-inorganic systems are generated through self-assembly of organic matter (usually proteins or lipids) into scaffolds, onto which the inorganic component is deposited in organized hierarchical structures of sizes spanning several orders of magnitude. The development of bio-inspired materials is possible through the design of synthetic bottom-up self-assembly methods. Knowledge of the structure is required in order to assess the efficiency of their design and evaluate their properties. This chapter reviews the main methods used for structure determination of natural and synthetic inorganic biomaterials, namely, X-ray diffraction and scattering and electron diffraction and microscopy (TEM, SEM), as well as the AFM and CSLM microscopy methods. Moreover, spectroscopic (IR, NMR, and Raman) and thermal methods are presented. Examples of biomimetic synthetic materials are used to show the contribution of single or multiple techniques in the elucidation of their structure.

  17. Salinity and the discharge of salts from catchments in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, A. J.; Hatton, Tom

    2003-03-01

    Discharge of soluble salts from catchments following clearing of native vegetation for dryland agriculture is a serious environmental and economic problem affecting soil and water resources in Australia. The fundamental challenges are: To identify areas of soil at risk of becoming saline. To relate soil and water salinity risk to options for management of land in the area that contributes to the risk, and thereby contribute to the evaluation of management options. These challenges are faced in an environment where native vegetation has roots that extend to depths of order 10 m in soil profiles that are formed by in situ weathering of granitic rocks and dolerite dykes to depths of about 20 m. The profiles typically contain 1-100 kg m -2 of salt (primarily sodium chloride) in solution in the pore water. The distribution of soluble salts, and the movement of water within most of the unsaturated zone of these soils results from a combination of matrix flow and flow through remnant root channels and larger-scale structures with geologic origins. Recognized options for management of salinity risk, or to reduce existing areas of saline soil, are revegetation of part of the cleared land with alternative species, pumping to lower the watertable in selected areas, and construction of ditch drains for control of surface water and shallow groundwater. All options are constrained by the economics of dryland farming, and pumping or drainage is further constrained by possible environmental impacts of disposal of saline water. Application of soil physics/hydrology to salinity in Australia has contributed to understanding, but generally it has proven to be inadequate to aid the development of effective management strategies. A classic approach to soil water movement at the primary catchment scale (areas of order 10 6 m 2 or more) will always be limited by errors of measurement at each site within the catchment, those arising from the method of estimation of soil characteristics

  18. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    DOEpatents

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  19. The use of freshwater and saltwater animals to distinguish between the toxic effects of salinity and contaminants in irrigation drain water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Burch, S.A.; Nelson, M.K.; Buckler, D.R.; Hunn, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Irrigation drain waters entering Stillwater Wildlife Management Area (SWMA) in south-western Nevada contain elevated levels of salinity and several inorganic contaminants (As, B, Cu, Li, Mo, and Sr). Mortalities of fish and waterfowl at the management area are believed to be associated with the poor water quality of the drains. The objective of the present study was to use fresh-water and saltwater animals to distinguish between the toxic effects of salinity and contaminants in effluent samples collected from irrigation drain waters. Static acute effluent tests were conducted with water collected from four sites at SWMA. Animals acclimated or cultured in fresh water (fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas; amphipods, Hyalella azteca; cladocerans, Daphnia magna) and salt water (striped bass, Morone saxatilis; amphipods, Hyalella azteca; and cladocerans, Daphnia magna) were used to separate toxic effects of salinity from the effects of inorganic contaminants in the drain water. One drain water (TJ drain, salinity 19 parts per thousand (grams per liter), osmolality 503 mmol/kg, hardness 3,780 mg/L as CaCO3) was toxic only to freshwater animals and saltwater cultured daphnids; water from a receiving pond (Pintail Bay, salinity 23 g/L, osmolality 542 mmol/kg, hardness 830 mg/L as CaCO3) was toxic to both freshwater and saltwater animals. Acute tests conducted with reconstituted waters representative of the Pintail Bay sample indicated that atypical ion ratios were toxic to striped bass and amphipods, even without the addition of inorganic contaminants. However, the addition of inorganic contaminants representative of the Pintail Bay sample increased the toxicity of this reconstituted water. These findings indicate that the toxicity of the TJ drain sample was related mainly to elevated salinity and that the toxicity of the Pintail Bay sample was a function of inorganic contamination and atypical ion ratios in combination with elevated salinity.

  20. Effects of inorganic salts on denitrifying granular sludge: The acute toxicity and working mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ru; Zheng, Ping; Ding, A-qiang; Zhang, Meng; Ghulam, Abbas; Yang, Cheng; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-03-01

    It is highly significant to investigate the toxicity of inorganic salts to denitrifying granular sludge (DGS) and its mechanism since the application of high-rate denitrification is seriously limited in the treatment of saline nitrogen-rich wastewaters. The batch experiments showed that the IC50 (half inhibition concentration) and LC50 (half lethal concentration) of NaCl, Na2SO4 and Na3PO4 on DGS were 11.46, 21.72, 7.46 g/L and 77.35, 100.58, 67.92 g/L respectively. Based on the analysis of specific denitrifying activity, the live cell percentage, the cell structure, and the DNA leakage, the toxicity of low salinity was ascribed to the inhibition of denitrifying activity and the toxicity of high salinity was ascribed to both the inhibition of denitrifying activity and the lethality of denitrifying cell.

  1. Mirabilite solubility in equilibrium sea ice brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Benjamin Miles; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Santoro, Anna; Kennedy, Hilary

    2016-06-01

    The sea ice microstructure is permeated by brine channels and pockets that contain concentrated seawater-derived brine. Cooling the sea ice results in further formation of pure ice within these pockets as thermal equilibrium is attained, resulting in a smaller volume of increasingly concentrated residual brine. The coupled changes in temperature and ionic composition result in supersaturation of the brine with respect to mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) at temperatures below -6.38 °C, which consequently precipitates within the sea ice microstructure. Here, mirabilite solubility in natural and synthetic seawater derived brines, representative of sea ice at thermal equilibrium, has been measured in laboratory experiments between 0.2 and -20.6 °C, and hence we present a detailed examination of mirabilite dynamics within the sea ice system. Below -6.38 °C mirabilite displays particularly large changes in solubility as the temperature decreases, and by -20.6 °C its precipitation results in 12.90% and 91.97% reductions in the total dissolved Na+ and SO42- concentrations respectively, compared to that of conservative seawater concentration. Such large non-conservative changes in brine composition could potentially impact upon the measurement of sea ice brine salinity and pH, whilst the altered osmotic conditions may create additional challenges for the sympagic organisms that inhabit the sea ice system. At temperatures above -6.38 °C, mirabilite again displays large changes in solubility that likely aid in impeding its identification in field samples of sea ice. Our solubility measurements display excellent agreement with that of the FREZCHEM model, which was therefore used to supplement our measurements to colder temperatures. Measured and modelled solubility data were incorporated into a 1D model for the growth of first-year Arctic sea ice. Model results ultimately suggest that mirabilite has a near ubiquitous presence in much of the sea ice on Earth, and illustrate the

  2. Strong Attractions with Controllable Size between Hydrophilic Inorganic Macroanions and Reversible Supramolecular Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistler, Melissa; Bhatt, Anish; Liu, Guang; Liu, Tianbo

    2007-03-01

    The polyoxometalate (POM) hydrophilic macroionic solutions, offer a direct connection between traditional fields of simple inorganic ions, colloidal suspensions, polyelectrolytes, particularly proteins and DNAs. Many types of POM macroanions are highly soluble, but undergo reversible self-assembly to form uniform, stable, soft, single-layer vesicle-like ``blackberry'' structures containing >1000 individual POMs in dilute solutions. Blackberry structures represent a new state of soluble inorganic ions. The driving forces of the POM self-assembly are unlike those of surfactant micelles or colloid aggregates. The POM driving forces are most likely counterion-mediated attraction (like-charge attraction). Blackberry size is controlled by the solvent quality, or the charge density of macroions. Blackberry structures may be analogous to virus shell structures formed by capsid proteins. Unexpected phenomena have been observed in the novel POM systems. References: JACS. 2005, 127, 6942; 2003, 125, 312; 2002, 124, 10942. Nature, 2003, 426, 59. J. Clust. Sci, 2006, 17, 427.

  3. Solubility of methane in water under natural conditions: a laboratory study. Final report, April 1, 1978-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, C.W.; Price, L.C.

    1982-06-01

    The solubility of methane in aqueous solutions has been determined over a broad range of temperature, pressure and salinities. The effect of dissolved carbon dioxide and ethane on methane solubility has been determined at 302{sup 0}F. Also the solubility of crude oil and water in methane has been determined over a broad range of temperatures and pressures. The solubility of methane is raised by increasing pressure and temperature (above about 170{sup 0}F). There is a solubility minimum near 170{sup 0}F at constant pressure and salinity. Ionic salts effectively salt methane out of solution at all concentrations investigated. The effect of the addition of small amounts of carbon dioxide or ethane to the gas dissolved in aqueous solutions is to enhance methane solubility compared to solutions without other gases. Higher concentrations of dissolved gases, depending upon the salinity and the gas involved, decrease aqueous methane solubility. The addition of carbon dioxide always increased total gas content even when reducing the concentration of methane. With increasing concentration of ethane in the dissolved gases the total gas content reaches a maximum and then both methane and total gas content decrease. Comparison of experimental methane solubilities with gas/water ratios, salinities, bottom hole temperatures and pressures of geopressure test wells suggests that some formation fluids may be near saturation, while many others seem to be undersaturated. Petroleum is soluble in methane. Increasing pressure increases the solubility of crude oil in methane gas. At an elevated pressure, which depends upon the temperature, oil and gas form a single fluid phase.

  4. Impacts of Low Salinity on Growth and Calcification in Baltic Sea Mytilus edulis x trossulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, T.; Melzner, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Baltic Sea is characterized by a steep salinity gradient (25 psu - <5 psu) which is predicted to increase in the future due to increased precipitation. This provides an excellent biological system to study the effects of salinity and inorganic carbon supply on animal physiology. Mytilus edulis x trossulus is adapted to the low saline Baltic Sea, at the cost of slow body growth and reduced shell thickness. The explanation for the small size of Baltic mytilids has been attributed to tradeoffs in energy partitioning due to high energetic costs associated with osmoregulation. However, salinity may effect calcification mechanisms and reduce calcification and thus, body size and growth. To understand the mechanistic effects salinity has on calcification, energy budgets were quantified in larvae, juveniles and adults from 3 populations of Baltic Sea Mytilus spp. at different salinities (6, 11 and 16 psu). Net CaCO3 production at varying salinities and bicarbonate concentrations was also measured. Larvae from low salinity adapted populations (6 psu) had a 3-fold higher respiration rate compared to higher salinity populations. This was also accompanied by a delay of 48 hours in early shell formation. Reductions in growth and increases in metabolism were largest between 11 psu and 6 psu indicating that the predicted desalination of the Baltic will go along with huge energetic costs for mussel populations, potentially leading to loss of reefs in the Eastern Baltic. To investigate the mechanisms behind increased metabolic cost and decreased allocation to growth, energy budgets are presently being constrained in our three populations using modulations in food supply and temperature.

  5. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na+], and [Cl−] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  6. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na(+)], and [Cl(-)] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  7. Spatial assessment of soil salinity in the Harran Plain using multiple kriging techniques.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Ali V

    2013-01-01

    The Harran Plain is located in the southeastern part of Turkey and has recently been developed for irrigation agriculture. It already faces soil salinity problems causing major yield losses. Management of the problem is hindered by the lack of information on the extent and geography of the salinization problem. A survey was carried out to delineate the spatial distribution of salt-affected areas by randomly selecting 140 locations that were sampled at two depths (0 to 30 and 30 to 60 cm) and analyzed for soil salinity variables: soil electrical conductivity (EC), soluble cations (Ca(2+,) Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+)), soluble anions (SO (4) (2-) , Cl(-)), exchangeable Na(+) (me 100 g(-1)) and exchangeable sodium percentage. Terrain attributes (slope, topographical wetness index) were extracted from the digital elevation model of the study area. Variogram analyses after log transformation and ordinary kriging (OK) were applied to map spatial patterns of soil salinity variables. Multivariate geostatistical methods-regression kriging (RK) and kriging with external drift (KED)-were used using elevation and soil electrical conductivity data as covariates. Performances of the three estimation methods (OK, RK, and KED) were compared using independent validation samples randomly selected from the main dataset. Soils were categorized into salinity classes using disjunctive kriging (DK) and ArcGIS, and classification accuracy was tested using the kappa statistic. Results showed that soil salinity variables all have skewed distribution and are poorly correlated with terrain indices but have strong correlations among each other. Up to 65 % improvement was obtained in the estimations of soil salinity variables using hybrid methods over OK with the best estimations obtained with RK using EC(0-30) as covariate. DK-ArcGIS successfully classified soil samples into different salinity groups with overall accuracy of 75 % and kappa of 0.55 (p < 0.001).

  8. Nanoscale precipitation coating: the deposition of inorganic films through step-by-step spray-assembly.

    PubMed

    Popa, Gabriela; Boulmedais, Fouzia; Zhao, Peng; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Vidal, Loïc; Mathieu, Eric; Félix, Olivier; Schaaf, Pierre; Decher, Gero; Voegel, Jean-Claude

    2010-08-24

    Thin films and surface coatings play an important role in basic and applied research. Here we report on a new, versatile, and simple method ("precipitation coating") for the preparation of inorganic films, based on the alternate spraying of complementary inorganic salt solutions against a receiving surface on which the inorganic deposit forms. The method applies whenever the solubility of the deposited material is smaller than that of the salts in the solutions of the reactants. The film thickness is controlled from nanometers to hundreds of micrometers simply by varying the number of spraying steps; 200 spray cycles, corresponding to less than 15 min deposition time, yield films with thicknesses exceeding one micrometer and reaching tens of micrometers in some cases. The new solution-based process is also compatible with conventional layer-by-layer assembly and permits the fabrication of multimaterial sandwich-like coatings.

  9. Effects of salinity build-up on biomass characteristics and trace organic chemical removal: implications on the development of high retention membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenhai; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nghiem, Long D

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of salinity build-up on the performance of membrane bioreactor (MBR), specifically in terms of the removal and fate of trace organic chemicals (TrOCs), nutrient removal, and biomass characteristics. Stepwise increase of the influent salinity, simulating salinity build-up in high retention MBRs, adversely affected the metabolic activity in the bioreactor, thereby reducing organic and nutrient removal. The removal of hydrophilic TrOCs by MBR decreased due to salinity build-up. By contrast, with the exception of 17α-ethynylestradiol, the removal of all hydrophobic TrOCs was not affected at high salinity. Moreover, salinity build-up had negligible impact on the residual accumulation of TrOCs in the sludge phase except for a few hydrophilic compounds. Additionally, the response of the biomass to salinity stress also dramatically enhanced the release of both soluble microbial products (SMP) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), leading to severe membrane fouling.

  10. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  11. Mycelial bacteria of saline soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2008-10-01

    The actinomycetal complexes of saline soils comprise the representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, the number of which are hundreds and thousands of CFU/g soil. Complexes of mycelial bacteria in saline soils are poorer in terms of number (by 1-3 orders of magnitude) and taxonomic composition than the complexes of the zonal soil types. A specific feature of the actinomycetal complexes of saline soils is the predominance of halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes that well grow at pH 8-9 and concentrations of NaCl close to 5%. Actinomycetes in saline soils grow actively, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m in 1 gram of soil. The haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes grow fast and inhibit the formation of spores at pH 9 and high concentrations of salts (Na2SO4 and MgCl2, 5%) as compared to their behavior on a neutral medium with a salt concentration of 0.02%. They are characterized by the maximal radial growth rate of colonies on an alkaline medium with 5% NaCl.

  12. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  13. Experimental and theoretical studies on physico-chemical parameters affecting the solubility of phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Papanicolaou, Fanos; Antoniou, Stella; Pashalidis, Ioannis

    2009-10-01

    Phosphogypsum is a waste by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industry, which is usually disposed in the environment because of its restricted use in industrial applications. Physico-chemical conditions existing in stack fluids and leachates are of major importance and determine solubility and redox stability of phosphogypsum, as well as radionuclide release from stacks to terrestrial environments. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of key parameters (e.g. ionic strength, temperature, pH) on the solubility of phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out at a coastal stack in Cyprus, solubility experiments were performed in simulated laboratory systems and thermodynamic calculations by means of MINTEQA2, an equilibrium speciation model. Generally, increasing ionic strength and temperature leads to increased phosphogypsum solubility, with the former being much more effective. The increased solubility of phosphogypsum in saline solutions is attributed solely to ionic strength effects on the activity of ionic species in solution and no solid phase transformations could be observed. The effect of pH on phosphogypsum solubility seems to be insignificant at least in a pH range between 4 and 8. Regarding uranium levels, there is a strong correlation between salinity and uranium concentration and linear correlation between phosphogypsum solubility and uranium levels in stack solutions, indicating the incorporation of uranium into the gypsum lattice and the formation of a solid solution.

  14. Comparison of Carbon Dioxide Solubility Models in Brine for Use in Carbon Sequestration Reservoir Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamalidis, A.; Wang, Z.; Small, M.; Dilmore, R. M.; Goodman, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon sequestration into deep geological formations, such as saline formations and oil and gas fields, is a promising method to mitigate global warming. Estimating carbon dioxide solubility (TPX) in brine under carbon sequestration conditions with high temperature, pressure and salinity is crucial in choosing suitable carbon sequestration reservoirs and determining the carbon dioxide storage capacity of each. Multiple mathematical models are available for predicting the solubility of CO2 in brine. Although comparisons of each model with a particular experimental data set collected under certain TPX conditions have been published by the model developers, few studies have been done to compare these models using a comprehensive experimental data set and rigorous statistical methods. In this study, available CO2 solubility experimental data and nine mathematical models for the prediction of CO2 solubility in brine were collected. Five of these predictive models are empirical or semi-empirical and the remainders are based on different equations of state. Statistical criteria, such as the AIC and BIC were employed to determine the goodness of fit of each mathematical model with the CO2 solubility experimental data set. Results of this analysis determine the best mathematical predictive model for the calculation of carbon dioxide solubility under carbon sequestration conditions. Preliminary analysis shows that simplified models with fewer variables perform equally well with those having more. The study also presents a quantitative approach to determine the best CO2 solubility predictive model through use of a regression tree.

  15. Saline-water bioleaching of chalcopyrite with thermophilic, iron(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Watling, Helen R; Collinson, David M; Corbett, Melissa K; Shiers, Denis W; Kaksonen, Anna H; Watkin, Elizabeth L J

    2016-09-01

    The application of thermoacidophiles for chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) bioleaching in hot, acidic, saline solution was investigated as a possible process route for rapid Cu extraction. The study comprised a discussion of protective mechanisms employed for the survival and/or adaptation of thermoacidophiles to osmotic stress, a compilation of chloride tolerances for three genera of thermoacidophiles applied in bioleaching and an experimental study of the activities of three species in a saline bioleaching system. The data showed that the oxidation rates of iron(II) and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (tetrathionate) were reduced in the presence of chloride levels well below chloride concentrations in seawater, limiting the applicability of these microorganisms in the bioleaching of CuFeS2 in saline water.

  16. Bony fish and their contribution to marine inorganic carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Michael; Perry, Chris; Wilson, Rod; Harborne, Alistair

    2016-04-01

    Conventional understanding of the marine inorganic carbon cycle holds that CaCO3 (mostly as low Mg-calcite and aragonite) precipitates in the upper reaches of the ocean and sinks to a point where it either dissolves or is deposited as sediment. Thus, it plays a key role controlling the distribution of DIC in the oceans and in regulating their capacity to absorb atmospheric CO2. However, several aspects of this cycle remain poorly understood and have long perplexed oceanographers, such as the positive alkalinity anomaly observed in the upper water column of many of the world's oceans, above the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons. This anomaly would be explained by extensive dissolution of a carbonate phase more soluble than low Mg-calcite or aragonite, but major sources for such phases remain elusive. Here we highlight marine bony fish as a potentially important primary source of this 'missing' high-solubility CaCO3. Precipitation of CaCO3 takes place within the intestines of all marine bony fish as part of their normal physiological functioning, and global production models suggest it could account for up to 45 % of total new marine CaCO3 production. Moreover, high Mg-calcite containing >25 % mol% MgCO3 - a more soluble phase than aragonite - is a major component of these precipitates. Thus, fish CaCO3 may at least partially explain the alkalinity anomaly in the upper water column. However, the issue is complicated by the fact that carbonate mineralogy actually varies among fish species, with high Mg-calcite (HMC), low Mg-calcite (LMC), aragonite, and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) all being common products. Using data from 22 Caribbean fish species, we have generated a novel production model that resolves phase proportions. We evaluate the preservation/dissolution potential of these phases and consider potential implications for marine inorganic carbon cycling. In addition, we consider the dramatic changes in fish biomass structure that have resulted

  17. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  18. Saline aerosol: some effects on the physiology of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Petolino, J.F.; Leone, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine some of the chemical and physiological changes accompanying exposure of bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Topcrop') to saline aerosol. Plants were exposed to various dosages of salt (0-150 ..mu..g Cl/sup -//cm/sup 2/) when the primary leaves were approximately one-quarter expanded (7-8 days old). Respiration, photosynthesis, and transpiration rates were determined after salt exposure. There was an increase in the respiration rate of salted plants as compared to the unsalted controls. Photosynthesis rate increased when expressed on a unit chlorophyll basis. Transpiration rate decreased with exposure to saline aerosol. When the primary leaves were fully expanded (15-17 days old) they were analyzed for contents of chloride, water, total nitrogen, total chlorophyll, total free amino acids, soluble sugar, and starch. The chloride content increased linearly with increased exposure. As the chloride content increased, the total nitrogen content decreased. Chlorophyll and amino acid contents increased until symptoms appeared, then they decreased. With increased exposure to salt total soluble sugar content increased.

  19. SIGNIFICANCE OF SOIL SALINITY ON THE ECOLOGY OF COCCIDIOIDES IMMITIS

    PubMed Central

    Elconin, Ann F.; Egeberg, Roger O.; Egeberg, Margaret C.

    1964-01-01

    Elconin, Ann F. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles), Roger O. Egeberg, and Margaret C. Egeberg. Significance of soil salinity on the ecology of Coccidioides immitis. J. Bacteriol. 87:500–503. 1964.—An 8-year study of the soil in a small parcel of land where coccidioidomycosis is endemic was conducted. Over 5,000 samples collected from the surface of the soil at monthly intervals were tested for the presence of Coccidioides immitis. These samples were also analyzed to determine their major chemical composition. During the first 3 years, C. immitis was recovered in profusion from the spring samples, but during the next 4 years the fungus virtually disappeared from this endemic area. C. immitis reappeared in the spring of the final year of this study. There had been no significant deviation in the climatic conditions, flora, or fauna of the region. Chemical analysis of soils showed a marked elevation of the soluble salts (principally Na, Ca, SO4, and Cl) during those years when C. immitis was recovered. The soluble salts, expressed in terms of the saturation extract conductivity, ranged from 11 to 27 in those spring seasons when C. immitis was recovered, and from 3.5 to 8.8 when it was not found. This degree of correlation indicates that the high level of surface salinity encouraged the growth of C. immitis, and could be a factor in accounting for the spotty distribution of this fungus within endemic areas. PMID:14127564

  20. Bacillus safensis with plant-derived smoke stimulates rice growth under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Hafeez Ullah; Khattak, Jabar Zaman Khan; Jamil, Muhammad; Malook, Ijaz; Khan, Shahid Ullah; Jan, Mehmood; Din, Ismail; Saud, Shah; Kamran, Muhammad; Alharby, Hesham; Fahad, Shah

    2017-09-03

    Salinity is a worldwide environmental problem of agricultural lands. Smoke and plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPR) are individually used to improve plant growth, but the combined effects of these have not been studied yet under saline conditions. The combined effect of plant growth-promoting bacteria Bacillus safensis and plant-derived smoke Cymbopogon jwarancusa was studied under different salinity level as 50, 100, and 150 mM on rice (cv. Basmati-385). Smoke dilutions of C. jwarancusa (C-500 and C-1000) and bacterial culture of B. safensis were used to soak seeds for 10 h. It was observed that the salt concentration decreases the germination percentage, vegetative growth, ion contents (K(+) and Ca(2+)), and photosynthetic pigments (Chl "a," Chl "b," and carotene) while an increase occurred in Na(+), total soluble protein (TSP), proline, total soluble sugar, catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) contents. The combined effect of B. safensis and smoke primed seeds increased the germination percentage, seedling growth, ion contents (K(+), Ca(2+)), and photosynthetic pigments (Chl "a," Chl "b," carotene) and reduced the Na(+) ion content, total soluble protein, proline content, total soluble sugar, CAT, and POD activity by lowering the drastic effect of salt stress. It was concluded that combined effect of smoke and PGPR is more effective than individual effect.

  1. Inorganic Nanoparticles in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Kudgus, Rachel A.; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an evolving field with enormous potential for biomedical applications. The growing interest to use inorganic nanoparticles in medicine is due to the unique size and shape-dependent optoelectronic properties. Herein, we will focus on gold, silver and platinum nanoparticles, discussing recent developments for therapeutic applications with regard to cancer in terms of nanoparticles being used as a delivery vehicle as well as therapeutic agents. We will also discuss some of the key challenges to be addressed in future studies. PMID:21104301

  2. The inorganic constituents of echinoderms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, F.W.; Wheeler, W.C.

    1915-01-01

    In a recent paper on the composition of crinoid skeletons we showed that crinoids contain large quantities of magnesia, and that its proportion varies with the temperature of the water in which the creatures live. This result was so novel and surprising that it seemed desirable to examine other echinoderms and to ascertain whether they showed the same characteristics and regularity. A number of sea urchins and starfishes were therefore studied, their inorganic constituents being analyzed in the same manner as those of the crinoids

  3. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  4. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Feeman, James F.; Field, George F.

    1998-01-01

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula I are provided ##STR1## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.4 are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R.sup.1 -R.sup.2 or R.sup.2 -R.sup.4 form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R.sup.2 is hydrogen or joined with R.sup.1 or R.sup.4 as described above; R.sup.3 is --(CH.sub.2).sub.m --SO.sub.3.sup.-, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or ##STR2## where Y is 2 --SO.sub.3.sup.- ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO.sub.3.sup.-. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  5. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, P.R.; Feeman, J.F.; Field, G.F.

    1998-08-11

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula 1 are provided by the formula described in the paper wherein R{sup 1} and R{sup 4} are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R{sup 1}--R{sup 2} or R{sup 2}--R{sup 4} form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R{sup 2} is hydrogen or joined with R{sup 1} or R{sup 4} as described above; R{sup 3} is --(CH{sub 2}){sub m}--SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or formula 2 given in paper where Y is 2 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  6. Runoff quality impacts of dust suppression using saline water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Rob J.; Squires, Helen

    2010-05-01

    In mining and gas operations, dust generation from unsealed roads is a major problem. Commonly, road watering is used to suppress dust, with the lowest water quality available generally being selected for that purpose. Whilst minimising water usage for the site, that practice does create concerns with respect to potential environmental impacts if runoff from the treated roads has significantly elevated salinity. For coal seam gas operations, the water extracted concurrently with the gas contains predominantly sodium bicarbonate. Therefore, where coal seam gas water is sprayed onto roads, there is potential for elevated sodium in runoff to impact on soil adjoining the roads, but there is no information on the rates of dissolution and mobilisation of soluble salt from the surface of roads that have been sprayed with low quality water to reduce dust. Therefore a rainfall simulator study was carried out to investigate rates of mobilisation of sodium bicarbonate from compacted soil surfaces simulating an unsealed road. The study considered effects of the amount of precipitated sodium bicarbonate on the soil surface and variations in rainfall intensity. Because the soil surfaces were compacted, runoff commenced almost immediately following application of rain. For all treatments with applied surface salt, runoff quality data showed a peak in salt concentration in the first flush of runoff, and relatively rapid reduction through time in those initial concentrations. The magnitude and duration of peak concentrations depended on both rainfall rate and the quantity of salt present on the soil surface. The flush of salts in run-off from the roads occurred very early in the run-off event, when none of the surrounding area would have commenced to run off. Consequently, the relatively small volume of run-off produced directly by the road could be expected to predominantly infiltrate in the table drain adjoining the road. The initial flush of saline water would then be leached to

  7. The Aquarius Mission: Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, Chester; Chao, Y.; deCharon, A.; Edelstein, W.; Hildebrand, P.; Lagerloef, G.; LeVine, D.; Pellerano, F.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Ruf, C.

    2001-01-01

    Aquarius is a new satellite mission concept to study the impact of the global water cycle on the ocean, including the response of the ocean to buoyancy forcing and the subsequent feedback of the ocean on the climate. The measurement objective of Aquarius is sea surface salinity, which reflects the concentration of freshwater at the ocean surface. Salinity affects the dielectric constant of sea water and, consequently, the radiometric emission of the sea surface to space. Rudimentary space observations with an L-band radiometer were first made from Skylab in the mid-70s and numerous aircraft missions of increasing quality and improved technology have been conducted since then. Technology is now available to carry out a global mission, which includes both an accurate L band (1.413 Ghz) radiometer and radar system in space and a global array of in situ observations for calibration and validation, in order to address key NASA Earth Science Enterprise questions about the global cycling of water and the response of the ocean circulation to climate change. The key scientific objectives of Aquarius examine the cycling of water at the ocean's surface, the response of the ocean circulation to buoyancy forcing, and the impact of buoyancy forcing on the ocean's thermal feedback to the climate. Global surface salinity will also improve our ability to model the surface solubility chemistry needed to estimate the air-sea exchange of CO2. In order to meet these science objectives, the NASA Salinity Sea Ice Working Group over the past three years has concluded that the mission measurement goals should be better than 0.2 practical salinity units (psu) accuracy, 100 km resolution, and weekly to revisits. The Aquarius mission proposes to meet these measurement requirements through a real aperture dual-polarized L band radiometer and radar system. This system can achieve the less than 0.1 K radiometric temperature measurement accuracy that is required. A 3 m antenna at approx. 600km

  8. Force-controlled inorganic crystallization lithography.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chao-Min; LeDuc, Philip R

    2006-09-20

    Lithography plays a key role in integrated circuits, optics, information technology, biomedical applications, catalysis, and separation technologies. However, inorganic lithography techniques remain of limited utility for applications outside of the typical foci of integrated circuit manufacturing. In this communication, we have developed a novel stamping method that applies pressure on the upper surface of the stamp to regulate the dewetting process of the inorganic buffer and the evaporation rate of the solvent in this buffer between the substrate and the surface of the stamp. We focused on generating inorganic microstructures with specific locations and also on enabling the ability to pattern gradients during the crystallization of the inorganic salts. This approach utilized a combination of lithography with bottom-up growth and assembly of inorganic crystals. This work has potential applications in a variety of fields, including studying inorganic material patterning and small-scale fabrication technology.

  9. Some physiological responses of wheat and bean to soil salinity at low matric suctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatar, Mahnaz; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Shekari, Farid

    2017-01-01

    The effect of soil matric suction (2-33 kPa) and salinity (soil solution electrical conductivity 0.7-8 dS m-1 for bean and 2-20 dS m-1 for wheat) on some physiological characteristics of bean and wheat in a clay loam soil under greenhouse condition was investigated. The results showed that the leaf chlorophyll content index and potassium concentration decrease under salinity stress and increase with matric suction from 2 to 33 kPa suction for both plants. The wheat chlorophyll content index declines during the stress spell but bean chlorophyll content index remains nearly constant. The lowest values of the content of soluble sugars and the highest values of leaf proline content are observed at2 kPa matric suction (highest aeration stress) for bean and wheat. As matric suction increases from 2 to 6 kPa, the soluble sugars increases and proline content decreases significantly and then soluble sugars decreases and proline content increases until 10 kPa suction, and the soluble sugars remains nearly constant at the higher matric suctions for both plants. While the electrical conductivity effect on the soluble sugars is not significant, the values of proline content for both crop increase significantly with electrical conductivity. It was shown that the aeration stress can result in more considerable and rapid physiological responses, in comparison with salinity stress. There is a strong correlation between wheat and bean chlorophyll content index and potassium concentration under salinity and aeration stresses.

  10. Perfect Strangers: Inorganic Photochemistry and Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Pamela J.; Ciftan, Suzanne A.; Sistare, Mark F.; Holden Thorp, H.

    1997-06-01

    The applications of inorganic photochemistry to nucleic acid chemistry are discussed. A brief review of nucleic acid structure is given. Methods for probing DNA using emissive inorganic complexes are discussed. Photoreactions that damage DNA by hydrogen atom transfer from sugar or electron abstraction from guanine are presented. The method of photochemical footprinting using a diplatinum photocatalyst is described. The final section discusses advances in combinatorial selection experiments that increase the urgency for rapid screening methods such as those derived from inorganic photochemistry.

  11. The solubility of noble gases in crude oil at 25-100°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Specht, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    The solubility of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe was measured in two typical crude oils at temperatures of 25–100°C. The oil samples were obtained from the Elk Hills oil field located in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. The experimental procedure consisted of placing a known amount of gas with a known volume of crude oil in a stainless steel hydrothermal pressure vessel. The vessel was housed inside an oven and the entire unit rotates providing continuous mixing. The amount of gas dissolved in oil at a measured temperature and partial pressure of gas was used to calculate the solubility constants for these gases. Results show that the solubility of He and Ne in both oils is approximately the same; solubility then increases with atomic mass, with the solubility of Xe at 25°C being two orders of magnitude higher than that of He. The gas solubilities are somewhat higher in the lower density (higher API gravity) oil. The solubility of Ar is approximately constant in the range of temperatures of this study. The solubilities of He and Ne increase, but those of Kr and Xe decrease with increasing temperatures. Solubilities of noble gases in crude oil are significantly higher than their solubilities in water. For example, the solubilities of He and Xe at 25°C in the light oil of this study are, respectively, 3 and 24 times higher than their solubilities in pure water, and they are 15 and 300 times higher than in a brine with a salinity of 350,000 mg/l dissolved solids. These large and variable differences in the solubilities of noble gases in oil and water indicate that, in sedimentary basins with oil, these gases must be partitioned between oil, water and natural gas before they are used to deduce the origin and residence time of these fluids.

  12. Ozone pollution effects on gas exchange, growth and biomass yield of salinity-treated winter wheat cultivars.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanhai; Cheng, Da; Simmons, Matthew

    2014-11-15

    A sand-culture experiment was conducted in four Open-Top-Chambers to assess the effects of O3 on salinity-treated winter wheat. Two winter wheat cultivars, salt-tolerant Dekang961 and salt-sensitive Lumai15, were grown under saline (100 mM NaCl) and/or O3 (80±5 nmol mol(-1)) conditions for 35 days. Significant (P<0.05) O3-induced decreases were noted for both cultivars in terms of gas exchange, relative water content, growth and biomass yield in the no-salinity treatment. Significant (P<0.01) corresponding decreases were measured in Dekang961 but not in Lumai15 in the salinity treatment. Soluble sugar and proline contents significantly increased in both cultivars in combined salinity and O3 exposure. O3-induced down-regulation in the gradients of A-C(i) and A-PPFD response curves were much larger in Dekang961 than in Lumai15 under saline conditions. Significant (P<0.05) interactions were noted in both salinity×cultivars and salinity×O3 stresses. The results clearly demonstrated that O3 injuries were closely correlated with plant stomatal conductance (g(s)); the salt-tolerant wheat cultivar might be damaged more severely than the salt-sensitive cultivar by O3 due to its higher g(s) in saline conditions.

  13. Biodegradable and Renal Clearable Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.

    2015-01-01

    Personalized treatment plans for cancer therapy have been at the forefront of oncology research for many years. With the advent of many novel nanoplatforms, this goal is closer to realization today than ever before. Inorganic nanoparticles hold immense potential in the field of nano‐oncology, but have considerable toxicity concerns that have limited their translation to date. In this review, an overview of emerging biologically safe inorganic nanoplatforms is provided, along with considerations of the challenges that need to be overcome for cancer theranostics with inorganic nanoparticles to become a reality. The clinical and preclinical studies of both biodegradable and renal clearable inorganic nanoparticles are discussed, along with their implications. PMID:27429897

  14. Inorganic Phosphor Materials for Lighting.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Chih; Karlsson, Maths; Bettinelli, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This chapter addresses the development of inorganic phosphor materials capable of converting the near UV or blue radiation emitted by a light emitting diode to visible radiation that can be suitably combined to yield white light. These materials are at the core of the new generation of solid-state lighting devices that are emerging as a crucial clean and energy saving technology. The chapter introduces the problem of white light generation using inorganic phosphors and the structure-property relationships in the broad class of phosphor materials, normally containing lanthanide or transition metal ions as dopants. Radiative and non-radiative relaxation mechanisms are briefly described. Phosphors emitting light of different colors (yellow, blue, green, and red) are described and reviewed, classifying them in different chemical families of the host (silicates, phosphates, aluminates, borates, and non-oxide hosts). This research field has grown rapidly and is still growing, but the discovery of new phosphor materials with optimized properties (in terms of emission efficiency, chemical and thermal stability, color, purity, and cost of fabrication) would still be of the utmost importance.

  15. Infrared Spectra of Simple Inorganic Ion Pairs in Solid Solution: A Physical Inorganic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Philip J.; Tong, William G.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a physical inorganic experiment in which large single crystals of the alkali halides doped with divalent ion impurities are prepared easily. Demonstrates the ion pairing of inorganic ions in solid solution. (CS)

  16. Infrared Spectra of Simple Inorganic Ion Pairs in Solid Solution: A Physical Inorganic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Philip J.; Tong, William G.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a physical inorganic experiment in which large single crystals of the alkali halides doped with divalent ion impurities are prepared easily. Demonstrates the ion pairing of inorganic ions in solid solution. (CS)

  17. Investigations of inorganic and hybrid inorganic-organic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Kinson Chihang

    This thesis focuses on the exploratory synthesis and characterization of inorganic and hybrid inorganic-organic nanomaterials. In particular, nanostructures of semiconducting nitrides and oxides, and hybrid systems of nanowire-polymer composites and framework materials, are investigated. These materials are characterized by a variety of techniques for structure, composition, morphology, surface area, optical properties, and electrical properties. In the study of inorganic nanomaterials, gallium nitride (GaN), indium oxide (In2O3), and vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanostructures were synthesized using different strategies and their physical properties were examined. GaN nanostructures were obtained from various synthetic routes. Solid-state ammonolysis of metastable gamma-Ga2O 3 nanoparticles was found to be particularly successful; they achieved high surface areas and photoluminescent study showed a blue shift in emission as a result of surface and size defects. Similarly, In2O3 nanostructures were obtained by carbon-assisted solid-state syntheses. The sub-oxidic species, which are generated via a self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, resulted in 1D nanostructures including nanowires, nanotrees, and nanobouquets upon oxidation. On the other hand, hydrothermal methods were used to obtain VO2 nanorods. After post-thermal treatment, infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that these nanorods exhibit a thermochromic transition with temperature that is higher by ˜10°C compared to the parent material. The thermochromic behavior indicated a semiconductor-to-metal transition associated with a structural transformation from monoclinic to rutile. The hybrid systems, on the other hand, enabled their properties to be tunable. In nanowire-polymer composites, zinc oxide (ZnO) and silver (Ag) nanowires were synthesized and incorporated into polyaniline (PANI) and polypyrrole (PPy) via in-situ and ex-situ polymerization method. The electrical properties of these composites are

  18. Crystal orientations in nacreous layers of organic-inorganic biocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Woo

    2009-09-15

    Abalone shell comprises a bio-composite material, combining the properties of inorganic calcite intergrown with organic nacre. This paper reports about the microstructure of this composite. By examining the Kikuchi patterns obtained for nacre (Haliotis discus hannai) using transmission electron microscopy, we have shown that the tiles within nacre have specific orientations. The stereographic projection spheres for the tiles of nacre can be divided into two main types, namely a right oriented region and a left oriented region with respect to the c axis as a reference plane (001). The cluster character of nacre can be explained in terms of the growth mechanism of the 'Christmas tree' pattern. The orientation of the c-axis in the nacreous layer is elucidated for the first time. We demonstrate the use of the soluble protein obtained from the tiles of nacre in in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization.

  19. Inorganic Metal Oxide/Organic Polymer Nanocomposites And Method Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

    2004-11-16

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal in organic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophilic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  20. Contribution of fish to the marine inorganic carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R W; Millero, F J; Taylor, J R; Walsh, P J; Christensen, V; Jennings, S; Grosell, M

    2009-01-16

    Oceanic production of calcium carbonate is conventionally attributed to marine plankton (coccolithophores and foraminifera). Here we report that marine fish produce precipitated carbonates within their intestines and excrete these at high rates. When combined with estimates of global fish biomass, this suggests that marine fish contribute 3 to 15% of total oceanic carbonate production. Fish carbonates have a higher magnesium content and solubility than traditional sources, yielding faster dissolution with depth. This may explain up to a quarter of the increase in titratable alkalinity within 1000 meters of the ocean surface, a controversial phenomenon that has puzzled oceanographers for decades. We also predict that fish carbonate production may rise in response to future environmental changes in carbon dioxide, and thus become an increasingly important component of the inorganic carbon cycle.

  1. Lung retention and toxicity of some inorganic arsenic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pershagen, G.; Lind, B.; Bjorklund, N.E.

    1982-12-01

    Hamsters were given weekly intratracheal instillations of arsenic trioxide, arsenic trisulfide, or calcium arsenate dust suspensions. Animals were killed at weekly intervals and the concentration of arsenic was determined in lung, liver, and hair by atomic absorption spectrophotometry following wet digestion and arsine generation. Animals treated with calcium arsenate had concentrations of arsenic in the lung about 100 times higher than that of animals given arsenic trisulfide and 1000 times higher than that of animals receiving arsenic trioxide. Arsenic trioxide was more soluble in vitro than arsenic trisulfide and calcium arsenate. Animals treated with arsenic trioxide had As concentrations in liver higher than that of animals in the other exposure groups. The substantial differentiation in lung retention between these inorganic arsenic compounds is of importance for the design and interpretation of animal carcinogenicity tests involving the respiratory tract and could also have significance in human exposure situations.

  2. Salinity: Electrical conductivity and total dissolved solids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The measurement of soil salinity is a quantification of the total salts present in the liquid portion of the soil. Soil salinity is important in agriculture because salinity reduces crop yields by reducing the osmotic potential making it more difficult for the plant to extract water, by causing spe...

  3. Salinity management in the Rio Grande Bosque

    Treesearch

    Jan M. H. Hendrickx; J. Bruce J. Harrison; Jelle Beekma; Graciela Rodriguez-Marin

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses management options for salinity control in the Rio Grande Bosque. First, salt sources are identified and quantified. Capillary rise of ground water is the most important cause for soil salinization in the bosque. Next, a riparian salt balance is presented to explain the different mechanisms for soil salinization. Finally, the advantages and...

  4. The Aquarius Salinity Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank; Hilburn, Kyle; Lagerloef, Gary; Le Vine, David

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this presentation gives an overview over the Aquarius salinity retrieval algorithm. The instrument calibration [2] converts Aquarius radiometer counts into antenna temperatures (TA). The salinity retrieval algorithm converts those TA into brightness temperatures (TB) at a flat ocean surface. As a first step, contributions arising from the intrusion of solar, lunar and galactic radiation are subtracted. The antenna pattern correction (APC) removes the effects of cross-polarization contamination and spillover. The Aquarius radiometer measures the 3rd Stokes parameter in addition to vertical (v) and horizontal (h) polarizations, which allows for an easy removal of ionospheric Faraday rotation. The atmospheric absorption at L-band is almost entirely due to molecular oxygen, which can be calculated based on auxiliary input fields from numerical weather prediction models and then successively removed from the TB. The final step in the TA to TB conversion is the correction for the roughness of the sea surface due to wind, which is addressed in more detail in section 3. The TB of the flat ocean surface can now be matched to a salinity value using a surface emission model that is based on a model for the dielectric constant of sea water [3], [4] and an auxiliary field for the sea surface temperature. In the current processing only v-pol TB are used for this last step.

  5. Salinity-mediated cyanogenesis in white clover (Trifolium repens) affects trophic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ballhorn, Daniel J.; Elias, Jacob D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Increasing soil salinity poses a major plant stress in agro-ecosystems worldwide. Surprisingly little is known about the quantitative effect of elevated salinity on secondary metabolism in many agricultural crops. Such salt-mediated changes in defence-associated compounds may significantly alter the quality of food and forage plants as well as their resistance against pests. In the present study, the effects of soil salinity on cyanogenesis in white clover (Trifolium repens), a forage crop of international importance, are analysed. Methods Experimental clonal plants were exposed to five levels of soil salinity, and cyanogenic potential (HCNp, total amount of accumulated cyanide in a given plant tissue), β-glucosidase activity, soluble protein concentration and biomass production were quantified. The attractiveness of plant material grown under the different salt treatments was tested using cafeteria-style feeding trials with a generalist (grey garden slug, Deroceras reticulatum) and a specialist (clover leaf weevil, Hypera punctata) herbivore. Key Results Salt treatment resulted in an upregulation of HCNp, whereas β-glucosidase activity and soluble protein concentration showed no significant variation among treatments. Leaf area consumption of both herbivore species was negatively correlated with HCNp, indicating bottom-up effects of salinity-mediated changes in HCNp on plant consumers. Conclusions The results suggest that soil salinity leads to an upregulation of cyanogenesis in white clover, which results in enhanced resistance against two different natural herbivores. The potential implications for such salinity-mediated changes in plant defence for livestock grazing remain to be tested. PMID:25006176

  6. The Ksp-Solubility Conundrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Roy W.; Bonicamp, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that there are only a few cases in which solubility and Ksp are related in a simple way. States that illustrations of the solubility product principle for one-to-one salts are adequate for students. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  7. Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as acetamide, Nmethylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  8. The Ksp-Solubility Conundrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Roy W.; Bonicamp, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that there are only a few cases in which solubility and Ksp are related in a simple way. States that illustrations of the solubility product principle for one-to-one salts are adequate for students. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  9. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  10. Inorganic photovoltaic devices fabricated using nanocrystal spray deposition.

    PubMed

    Foos, Edward E; Yoon, Woojun; Lumb, Matthew P; Tischler, Joseph G; Townsend, Troy K

    2013-09-25

    Soluble inorganic nanocrystals offer a potential route to the fabrication of all-inorganic devices using solution deposition techniques. Spray processing offers several advantages over the more common spin- and dip-coating procedures, including reduced material loss during fabrication, higher sample throughput, and deposition over a larger area. The primary difference observed, however, is an overall increase in the film roughness. In an attempt to quantify the impact of this morphology change on the devices, we compare the overall performance of spray-deposited versus spin-coated CdTe-based Schottky junction solar cells and model their dark current-voltage characteristics. Spray deposition of the active layer results in a power conversion efficiency of 2.3 ± 0.3% with a fill factor of 45.7 ± 3.4%, Voc of 0.39 ± 0.06 V, and Jsc of 13.3 ± 3.0 mA/cm(2) under one sun illumination.

  11. Novel inorganic photoresists for three-dimensional microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Matthew C.

    Inorganic photoresists that can be directly patterned in three dimensions via both 3D laser direct writing and 3D interference lithography based fabrication approaches are attractive materials for the fabrication of complex microfluidic and micro-optical components such as chaotic mixing elements or 3D photonic crystals. Several inorganic photoresist systems have been developed or adapted for these purposes. The first resist system is based on silica microspheres with various polymer brush coatings that impart interesting solubility changes. These changes drive assembly processes or impart resistance to development, allowing for 2D and 3D fabrication of unique structures. The second system consist of custom organosilicon resists based on either a mesoporous sol gel formulation or a resin of poly(methysilsesquioxane) and various photosensitizing components. The structures formed with this system have a low index of refraction, but are stable at high temperature, which imparts compatibility with certain high temperature semiconductor manufacturing processes. The third set of resists consists of chalcogenide glass based amorphous semiconductors from the As-S-Se ternary system. The structures formed using this system have a high index of refraction and strongly non-linear optical properties, making them attractive candidates for engineered photonic crystal based devices.

  12. Sources of dissolved inorganic carbon to the Canada Basin halocline: A multitracer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kristina A.; McLaughlin, Fiona; Tortell, Philippe D.; Yamamoto-Kawai, Michiyo; Francois, Roger

    2016-05-01

    We examine the dissolved inorganic carbon maximum in the Canada Basin halocline using a suite of geochemical tracers to gain insight into the factors that contribute to the persistence of this feature. Hydrographic and geochemical samples were collected in the upper 500 m of the southwestern Canada Basin water column in the summer of 2008 and fall of 2009. These observations were used to identify conservative and nonconservative processes that contribute dissolved inorganic carbon to halocline source waters, including shelf sediment organic matter remineralization, air-sea gas exchange, and sea-ice brine export. Our results indicate that the remineralization of organic matter that occurs along the Bering and Chukchi Sea shelves is the overwhelming contributor of dissolved inorganic carbon to Pacific Winter Water that occupies the middle halocline in the southwestern Canada Basin. Nonconservative contributions from air-sea exchange and sea-ice brine are not significant. The broad salinity range associated with the DIC maximum, compared to the narrow salinity range of the nutrient maximum, is due to mixing between Pacific and Atlantic water and not abiotic addition of DIC.

  13. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo transfer...

  14. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo transfer...

  15. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo transfer...

  16. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo transfer...

  17. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo transfer...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical...

  1. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  5. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical...

  8. Inorganic dual-layer microporous supported membranes

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Tsai, Chung-Yi; Lu, Yungfeng

    2003-03-25

    The present invention provides for a dual-layer inorganic microporous membrane capable of molecular sieving, and methods for production of the membranes. The inorganic microporous supported membrane includes a porous substrate which supports a first inorganic porous membrane having an average pore size of less than about 25 .ANG. and a second inorganic porous membrane coating the first inorganic membrane having an average pore size of less than about 6 .ANG.. The dual-layered membrane is produced by contacting the porous substrate with a surfactant-template polymeric sol, resulting in a surfactant sol coated membrane support. The surfactant sol coated membrane support is dried, producing a surfactant-templated polymer-coated substrate which is calcined to produce an intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane. The intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane is then contacted with a second polymeric sol producing a polymeric sol coated substrate which is dried producing an inorganic polymeric coated substrate. The inorganic polymeric coated substrate is then calcined producing an inorganic dual-layered microporous supported membrane in accordance with the present invention.

  9. Inorganic nanotubes and fullerene-like materials.

    PubMed

    Tenne, Reshef

    2002-12-02

    Following the discovery of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, it was shown that nanoparticles of inorganic layered compounds, like MoS2, are unstable in the planar form and they form closed cage structures with polyhedral or nanotubular shapes. Various issues on the structure, synthesis, and properties of such inorganic fullerene-like structures are reviewed, together with some possible applications.

  10. Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) in PM2.5 and PM10 at a subtropical site of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Puja; Baruah, B. P.; Rao, P. G.

    2011-11-01

    PM2.5 and PM10 samples collected at a suburban site of northeastern part of India have been analysed for particle mass, total carbon (TC), water-soluble total carbon (WSTC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water-soluble inorganic carbon (WSIC), organic acids (formic, acetic, proponoic and oxalic acids) along with inorganic ions (NO3-, SO42- and NH4-). Most of the PM10 consists of PM2.5 in the present site (ratio 54-74%). WSTC content in PM2.5 and PM10 corresponds to 21% and 16%, respectively, of their total particle masses. Thermo gravimetric analysis showed the presence of humic-like substances (16-22%) in particulate samples. Domestic heating and stagnant atmospheric conditions enhanced the levels of these carbonaceous compounds in PM2.5 and PM10 in winter. Qualitative estimation of various functional groups by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis indicates the presence of carboxylic, hydroxyl, aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, amines and sulphurous compounds in these aerosols. Absolute principal component analysis applied on the aerosol data resolves four factors. These factors are associated with carbonaceous aerosols released from combustion of coal and wood, secondary inorganic and organic aerosols and water-soluble inorganic fraction.

  11. The solubility of quartz in aqueous sodium chloride solution at 350°C and 180 to 500 bars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, Robert O.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Bischoff, James L.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of quartz in 2, 3, and 4 molal NaCl was measured at 350°C and pressures ranging from 180 to 500 bars. The molal solubility in each of the salt solutions is greater than that in pure water throughout the measured pressure range, with the ratio of solubility in NaCl solution to solubility in pure water decreasing as pressure is increased. The measured solubilities are significantly higher than solubilities calculated using a simple model in which the water activity in NaCl solutions decreases either in proportion to decreasing vapor pressure of the solution as salinity is increased or in proportion to decreasing mole fraction of water in the solvent.

  12. Quantification of CO2 trapping and storage capacity in the subsurface: Uncertainty due to solubility models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerai, Biniam; Saylor, Beverly Z.; Allen, Douglas E.

    The purpose of this chapter is to examine how different solubility algorithms provide different estimates of storage capacity assessments and lead to different assessments of CO2 trapping mechanisms. Secure storage of carbon in deep saline aquifers requires CO2-brine-rock reactions to convert injected CO2 into dissolved species and solid carbonate minerals. Effective characterization of these reactions on the capacity and security of storage requires accurate representations of CO2 solubility in brine. Several widely used solubility models and the geochemical reaction simulator Geochemist's Workbench(GWB) were compared. These models incorporate various fugacity coefficients, interacting parameters, and corrections for nonideal behavior of the mixtures (H2O-CO2-salt). The solubility models of Duan and Sun [2003] and Spycher and Pruess [2005] agree well with experimental data both in pure water and in saline solutions. The model of Enick and Klara [1990] also produces results in agreement with experimental data if the fugacity coefficient is calculated based on Duan and Sun [2003]. The radius of formation necessary to store 3.3 × 1011 kg of CO2 (equivalent to 30 years of CO2 emissions from a 1000-MW coal-fired power plant) for the 60-m thick Rose Run Sandstone ranges from 6 to 28 km, depending on the solubility model used. Predictions of silicate mineral dissolution and the precipitation of CO2 trapping carbonate minerals also depend considerably on the choice of solubility model. The choice of solubility model has tremendous impact on sequestration evaluations, especially: predictions of the volume of a formation required for specific amounts of CO2, assessments of hydrodynamic, mineral, and solubility trapping mechanisms, and forecasts of density-driven flow patterns. Complementary to this study, the next chapter in this volume explores how simulations of flow and transport processes are impacted by choice of solubility model and other equation-of-state components.

  13. On some problems of inorganic supramolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pervov, Vladislav S; Zotova, Anna E

    2013-12-02

    In this study, some features that distinguish inorganic supramolecular host-guest objects from traditional architectures are considered. Crystalline inorganic supramolecular structures are the basis for the development of new functional materials. Here, the possible changes in the mechanism of crystalline inorganic supramolecular structure self-organization at high interaction potentials are discussed. The cases of changes in the host structures and corresponding changes in the charge states under guest intercalation, as well as their impact on phase stability and stoichiometry are considered. It was demonstrated that the deviation from the geometrical and topological complementarity conditions may be due to the additional energy gain from forming inorganic supramolecular structures. It has been assumed that molecular recognition principles can be employed for the development of physicochemical analysis and interpretation of metastable states in inorganic crystalline alloys. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Toxicity of inorganic nanomaterials in biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxia; Chang, Xueling; Chen, Xiaoxia; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Feng; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have shown promising potentials as novel biomedical imaging agents with high sensitivity, high spatial and temporal resolution. To translate the laboratory innovations into clinical applications, their potential toxicities are highly concerned and have to be evaluated comprehensively both in vitro and in vivo before their clinical applications. In this review, we first summarized the in vivo and in vitro toxicities of the representative inorganic nanoparticles used in biomedical imagings. Then we further discuss the origin of nanotoxicity of inorganic nanomaterials, including ROS generation and oxidative stress, chemical instability, chemical composition, the surface modification, dissolution of nanoparticles to release excess free ions of metals, metal redox state, and left-over chemicals from synthesis, etc. We intend to provide the readers a better understanding of the toxicology aspects of inorganic nanomaterials and knowledge for achieving optimized designs of safer inorganic nanomaterials for clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Groundwater and Reservoir Interaction in Salinity Distribution in a Saline Area in the Northeastern Part of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeboonruang, U.

    2012-12-01

    Salinity is a process by which the concentration of soluble salt in soil and water increases. Human activities can, however, disrupt this natural equilibrium by changing the distribution of salt in the environment. Reservoirs have played a number of crucial roles in the development of human civilization. The main purposes of reservoirs are to prevent floods, to supply water for domestic consumption, to generate electricity, and to irrigate farmlands. Despite various benefits, reservoirs could bring about adverse environmental and social impacts. Infiltration or leakage from man-made reservoirs or dams could cause the change of the groundwater level, thus forcing the deposited salt onto the soil surface and/or waterways. Until now, it is nevertheless unclear as to how the operation and maintenance of reservoirs could impact in a saline soil area physically, environmentally, and/or socially. The purpose of this research is therefore to assess the impacts of reservoirs on groundwater and salinity levels in a saline soil area in the northeastern part of Thailand. Saline soil can be found in many regions of Thailand, particularly in the northeast of Thailand where the Maha Sarakham Foundation, which is composed of imbedded salt rock layers, is the main source of salinity in the region. The salinity accumulation on the surface soil is influenced by the brackish groundwater upward flow and evaporation processes. The study area is located in Nakhon Panom Province in the northeastern part of Thailand along the Great Mekong River and has a total area of approximately 1,300 km2. The yearly evaporation rate in this region is as high as the annual evaporation rate. A reservoir was constructed in the low-lying floodplain area of the Nam Kam basin and started operation since a few years ago. The reservoir is located right in the middle of the floodplain where flood always occurs every rainy season. Groundwater levels are measured and groundwater samples are collected for p

  16. The potentiality of Trichoderma harzianum in alleviation the adverse effects of salinity in faba bean plants.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Baki, G K; Mostafa, Doaa

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between sodium chloride and Trichoderma harzianum (T24) on growth parameters, ion contents, MDA content, proline, soluble proteins as well as SDS page protein profile were studied in Vicia faba Giza 429. A sharp reduction was found in fresh and dry mass of shoots and roots with increasing salinity. Trichoderma treatments promoted the growth criteria as compared with corresponding salinized plants. The water content and leaf area exhibited a marked decrease with increasing salinity. Trichoderma treatments induced a progressive increase in both parameters. Both proline and MDA contents were increased progressively as the salinity rose in the soil. Trichoderma treatments considerably retarded the accumulation of both parameters in shoots and roots. Both Na+ and K+ concentration increased in both organs by enhancing salinity levels. The treatment with Trichoderma harzianum enhanced the accumulation of both ions. Exposure of plants to different concentrations of salinity, or others treated with Trichoderma harzianum produced marked changes in their protein pattern. Three types of alterations were observed: the synthesis of certain proteins declined significantly, specific synthesis of certain other proteins were markedly observed and synthesis of a set specific protein was induced de novo in plant treated with Trichoderma harzianum.

  17. Organic matter and salinity modify cadmium soil (phyto)availability.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Lana; Romić, Marija; Romić, Davor; Filipović, Vilim; Ondrašek, Gabrijel

    2017-09-26

    Although Cd availability depends on its total concentration in soil, it is ultimately defined by the processes which control its mobility, transformations and soil solution speciation. Cd mobility between different soil fractions can be significantly affected by certain pedovariables such as soil organic matter (SOM; over formation of metal-organic complexes) and/or soil salinity (over formation of metal-inorganic complexes). Phytoavailable Cd fraction may be described as the proportion of the available Cd in soil which is actually accessible by roots and available for plant uptake. Therefore, in a greenhouse pot experiment Cd availability was observed in the rhizosphere of faba bean exposed to different levels of SOM, NaCl salinity (50 and 100mM) and Cd contamination (5 and 10mgkg(-1)). Cd availability in soil does not linearly follow its total concentration. Still, increasing soil Cd concentration may lead to increased Cd phytoavailability if the proportion of Cd(2+) pool in soil solution is enhanced. Reduced Cd (phyto)availability by raised SOM was found, along with increased proportion of Cd-DOC complexes in soil solution. Data suggest decreased Cd soil (phyto)availability with the application of salts. NaCl salinity affected Cd speciation in soil solution by promoting the formation of CdCln(2-n) complexes. Results possibly suggest that increased Cd mobility in soil does not result in its increased availability if soil adsorption capacity for Cd has not been exceeded. Accordingly, chloro-complex possibly operated just as a Cd carrier between different soil fractions and resulted only in transfer between solid phases and not in increased (phyto)availability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Students' mental models on the solubility and solubility product concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmi, Chusnur; Katmiati, Siti; Wiji, Mulyani, Sri

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to obtain some information regarding profile of students' mental models on the solubility and solubility product concept. A descriptive qualitative method was the method employed in the study. The participants of the study were students XI grade of a senior high school in Bandung. To collect the data, diagnostic test on mental model-prediction, observation, explanation (TDM-POE) instrument was employed in the study. The results of the study revealed that on the concept of precipitation formation of a reaction, 30% of students were not able to explain the precipitation formation of a reaction either in submicroscopic or symbolic level although the microscopic have been shown; 26% of students were able to explain the precipitation formation of a reaction based on the relation of Qsp and Ksp, but they were not able to explain the interaction of particles that involved in the reaction and to calculate Qsp; 26% of students were able to explain the precipitation formation of a reaction based on the relation of Qsp and Ksp, and determine the particles involved, but they did not have the knowledge about the interactions occured and were uncapable of calculating Qsp; and 18% of students were able to explain the precipitation formation of a reaction based on the relation of Qsp and Ksp, and determine the interactions of the particles involved in the reactions but they were not able to calculate Qsp. On the effect of adding common ions and decreasing pH towards the solubility concept, 96% of students were not able to explain the effect of adding common ions and decreasing pH towards the solubility either in submicroscopic or symbolic level although the microscopic have been shown; while 4% of students were only able to explain the effect of adding common ions towards the solubility based on the chemical equilibrium shifts and predict the effect of decreasing pH towards the solubility. However, they were not able to calculate the solubility before and after

  19. Interaction of warm acclimation, low salinity, and trophic fluoride on plasmatic constituents of the Antarctic fish Notothenia rossii Richardson, 1844.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, E; Feijó-Oliveira, M; Vani, G S; Suda, C N K; Carvalho, C S; Donatti, L; Lavrado, H P; Rodrigues, E

    2013-12-01

    The adaptive evolution of the Notothenia rossii occurred under the selective pressure of stable and low temperatures. It is an opportunistic feeder of Antarctic krill and the fluoride in the krill carapace is apparently not toxic. We investigated the interactive effect of fluoride, elevated temperatures, and low salinity on the plasmatic constituents of this Antarctic fish. The experiments were conducted at the Brazilian Antarctic Station Comandante Ferraz (EACF), located on King George Island. The Antarctic fish N. rossii was acclimatized to eight thermo-saline-trophic conditions, combining two temperatures (0 and 4 °C), two salinities (35 and 20), and two trophic conditions (with/without fluoride) for an 11-day period. Trophic fluoride was not able to alter the plasmatic levels of glucose, cholesterol, plasmatic protein, Cl⁻, Mg²⁺, Ca²⁺, and inorganic phosphate, but induced an acute elevation of triglycerides at 0 °C and salinity of 35. At low salinity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypocalcemia were observed. The thermo-saline interaction at 4 °C was able to minimize the effects of fluoride and low salinity on the plasmatic constituents levels.

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increased growth, nutrient uptake and tolerance to salinity in olive trees under nursery conditions.

    PubMed

    Porras-Soriano, Andrés; Soriano-Martín, María Luisa; Porras-Piedra, Andrés; Azcón, Rosario

    2009-09-01

    Inoculating olive plantlets with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices or Glomus claroideum increased plant growth and the ability to acquire nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium from non-saline as well as saline media. AMF-colonized plants also increased in survival rate after transplant. Osmotic stress caused by NaCl supply reduced stem diameter, number of shoots, shoot length and nutrients in olive plants, but AMF colonization alleviated all of these negative effects on growth. G. mosseae was the most efficient fungus in reducing the detrimental effects of salinity; it increased shoot growth by 163% and root growth by 295% in the non-saline medium, and by 239% (shoot) and by 468% (root) under the saline conditions. AMF colonization enhanced salt tolerance in terms of olive growth and nutrient acquisition. Mycorrhizal olive plants showed the lowest biomass reduction under salinity (34%), while growth was reduced by 78% in control plants. This G. mosseae effect seems to be due to increased K acquisition; K content was enhanced under salt conditions by 6.4-fold with G. mosseae, 3.4-fold with G. intraradices, and 3.7-fold with G. claroideum. Potassium, as the most prominent inorganic solute, plays a key role in the osmoregulation processes and the highest salinity tolerance of G. mosseae-colonized olive trees was concomitant with an enhanced K concentration in olive plants.

  1. Phenylated Polyimides With Greater Solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    In experiments, 3,6-diphenylpyromellitic dianhydride monomer prepared and polymerized with several different diamines. Polyimides with pendent phenyl groups along polymer backbones considerably more soluble than PMDA-based materials. Increased solubility eases processing, providing increased potential use in variety of applications. Because most polymers soluble in organic solvents, usable in microelectronics applications. Excellent thermal stabilities and high transition temperatures make them ideally suited. Many polymers extremely rigid and useful as reinforcing polymers in molecular composites. More flexible compositions useful as matrix resins in carbon-reinforced composites.

  2. Effect of salinity on mercury methylating benthic microbes and their activities in Great Salt Lake, Utah.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Yu, Ri-Qing; Barkay, Tamar; Hamilton, Trinity L; Baxter, Bonnie K; Naftz, David L; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Surface water and biota from Great Salt Lake (GSL) contain some of the highest documented concentrations of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in the United States. In order to identify potential biological sources of MeHg and controls on its production in this ecosystem, THg and MeHg concentrations, rates of Hg(II)-methylation and MeHg degradation, and abundances and compositions of archaeal and bacterial 16 rRNA gene transcripts were determined in sediment along a salinity gradient in GSL. Rates of Hg(II)-methylation were inversely correlated with salinity and were at or below the limits of detection in sediment sampled from areas with hypersaline surface water. The highest rates of Hg(II)-methylation were measured in sediment with low porewater salinity, suggesting that benthic microbial communities inhabiting less saline environments are supplying the majority of MeHg in the GSL ecosystem. The abundance of 16S rRNA gene transcripts affiliated with the sulfate reducer Desulfobacterium sp. was positively correlated with MeHg concentrations and Hg(II)-methylation rates in sediment, indicating a potential role for this taxon in Hg(II)-methylation in low salinity areas of GSL. Reactive inorganic Hg(II) (a proxy used for Hg(II) available for methylation) and MeHg concentrations were inversely correlated with salinity. Thus, constraints imposed by salinity on Hg(II)-methylating populations and the availability of Hg(II) for methylation are inferred to result in higher MeHg production potentials in lower salinity environments. Benthic microbial MeHg degradation was also most active in lower salinity environments. Collectively, these results suggest an important role for sediment anoxia and microbial sulfate reducers in the production of MeHg in low salinity GSL sub-habitats and may indicate a role for salinity in constraining Hg(II)-methylation and MeHg degradation activities by influencing the availability of Hg(II) for methylation.

  3. Effect of salinity on mercury methylating benthic microbes and their activities in Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Eric S.; Yu, Ri-Qing; Barkay, Tamar; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Naftz, David L.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Surface water and biota from Great Salt Lake (GSL) contain some of the highest documented concentrations of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in the United States. In order to identify potential biological sources of MeHg and controls on its production in this ecosystem, THg and MeHg concentrations, rates of Hg(II)-methylation and MeHg degradation, and abundances and compositions of archaeal and bacterial 16 rRNA gene transcripts were determined in sediment along a salinity gradient in GSL. Rates of Hg(II)-methylation were inversely correlated with salinity and were at or below the limits of detection in sediment sampled from areas with hypersaline surface water. The highest rates of Hg(II)-methylation were measured in sediment with low porewater salinity, suggesting that benthic microbial communities inhabiting less saline environments are supplying the majority of MeHg in the GSL ecosystem. The abundance of 16S rRNA gene transcripts affiliated with the sulfate reducer Desulfobacterium sp. was positively correlated with MeHg concentrations and Hg(II)-methylation rates in sediment, indicating a potential role for this taxon in Hg(II)-methylation in low salinity areas of GSL. Reactive inorganic Hg(II) (a proxy used for Hg(II) available for methylation) and MeHg concentrations were inversely correlated with salinity. Thus, constraints imposed by salinity on Hg(II)-methylating populations and the availability of Hg(II) for methylation are inferred to result in higher MeHg production potentials in lower salinity environments. Benthic microbial MeHg degradation was also most active in lower salinity environments. Collectively, these results suggest an important role for sediment anoxia and microbial sulfate reducers in the production of MeHg in low salinity GSL sub-habitats and may indicate a role for salinity in constraining Hg(II)-methylation and MeHg degradation activities by influencing the availability of Hg(II) for methylation.

  4. Inorganic polymers: morphogenic inorganic biopolymers for rapid prototyping chain.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Shen, Zhijian; Feng, Qingling; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, considerable progress has been achieved towards the development of customized scaffold materials, in particular for bone tissue engineering and repair, by the introduction of rapid prototyping or solid freeform fabrication techniques. These new fabrication techniques allow to overcome many problems associated with conventional bone implants, such as inadequate external morphology and internal architecture, porosity and interconnectivity, and low reproducibility. However, the applicability of these new techniques is still hampered by the fact that high processing temperature or a postsintering is often required to increase the mechanical stability of the generated scaffold, as well as a post-processing, i.e., surface modification/functionalization to enhance the biocompatibility of the scaffold or to bind some bioactive component. A solution might be provided by the introduction of novel inorganic biopolymers, biosilica and polyphosphate, which resist harsh conditions applied in the RP chain and are morphogenetically active and do not need supplementation by growth factors/cytokines to stimulate the growth and the differentiation of bone-forming cells.

  5. Water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Konings, Erik J M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous Determination of Vitamins.--Klejdus et al. described a simultaneous determination of 10 water- and 10 fat-soluble vitamins in pharmaceutical preparations by liquid chromatography-diode-array detection (LC-DAD). A combined isocratic and linear gradient allowed separation of vitamins in 3 distinct groups: polar, low-polar, and nonpolar. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations, fortified powdered drinks, and food samples, for which results were in good agreement with values claimed. Heudi et al. described a separation of 9 water-soluble vitamins by LC-UV. The method was applied for the quantification of vitamins in polyvitaminated premixes used for the fortification of infant nutrition products. The repeatability of the method was evaluated at different concentration levels and coefficients of variation were <6.5%. The concentrations of vitamins found in premixes with the method were comparable to the values declared. A disadvantage of the methods mentioned above is that sample composition has to be known in advance. According to European legislation, for example, foods might be fortified with riboflavin phosphate or thiamin phosphate, vitamers which are not included in the simultaneous separations described. Vitamin B2.--Viñas et al. elaborated an LC analysis of riboflavin vitamers in foods. Vitamin B2 can be found in nature as the free riboflavin, but in most biological materials it occurs predominantly in the form of 2 coenzymes, flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Several methods usually involve the conversion of these coenzymes into free riboflavin before quantification of total riboflavin. According to the authors, there is growing interest to know flavin composition of foods. The described method separates the individual vitamers isocratically. Accuracy of the method is tested with 2 certified reference materials (CRMs). Vitamin B5.-Methods for the determination of vitamin B5 in foods are limited

  6. Physico-chemical characteristics, nutrient composition and consumer acceptability of wheat varieties grown under organic and inorganic farming conditions.

    PubMed

    Nitika; Punia, Darshan; Khetarpaul, N

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the investigation was to analyse physico-chemical characteristics, nutrient composition and consumer acceptability of wheat varieties grown under organic and inorganic farming conditions. The seeds of five varieties of wheat (C-306, WH-283, WH-711, WH-896 and WH-912) grown under organic and inorganic farming conditions were ground in a Junior Mill to pass through 60-mesh sieves and were stored in air-tight containers until use. Standard methods were used to estimate the physico-chemical characteristics and nutrient composition. Consumer acceptability was studied by carrying out the organoleptic evaluation of wheat chapatis, a common item in diets of the Indian population. The results of study revealed that inorganically grown wheat varieties had significantly higher 1,000-grain weight and more grain hardness as compared with organically grown wheat varieties, and a non-significant difference was observed in their gluten content, water absorption capacity and hydration capacity. On average, wheat varieties grown under inorganic conditions contained significantly higher protein and crude fibre content as compared with varieties grown under organic conditions. WH-711 variety had maximum protein content. Protein fractions (i.e. albumin, globulin, prolamin and glutelin) were significantly higher in varieties grown under inorganic conditions than those of varieties grown under organic conditions. The variety WH-711 had the highest total soluble sugars and variety WH-912 had the highest starch content. Phytic acid and polyphenol contents were significantly higher in inorganically grown wheat varieties as compared with organically grown wheat varieties. The wheat varieties grown under organic conditions had significantly higher protein and starch digestibility than the wheat grown under inorganic conditions. The data revealed that there were significant differences in total calcium and phosphorus contents of wheat varieties grown under organic and inorganic

  7. Synergistic and Antagonistic Effects of Salinity and pH on Germination in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Quanzhen; Zhang, Yunwei; Cui, Jian; Chen, Guo; Xie, Bao; Wu, Chunhui; Liu, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    The effects of salt-alkaline mixed stress on switchgrass were investigated by evaluating seed germination and the proline, malondialdehyde (MDA) and soluble sugar contents in three switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) cultivars in order to identify which can be successfully produced on marginal lands affected by salt-alkaline mixed stress. The experimental conditions consisted of four levels of salinity (10, 60, 110 and 160 mM) and four pH levels (7.1, 8.3, 9.5 and 10.7). The effects of salt-alkaline mixed stress with equivalent coupling of the salinity and pH level on the switchgrass were explored via model analyses. Switchgrass was capable of germinating and surviving well in all treatments under low-alkaline pH (pH≤8.3), regardless of the salinity. However, seed germination and seedling growth were sharply reduced at higher pH values in conjunction with salinity. The salinity and pH had synergetic effects on the germination percentage, germination index, plumular length and the soluble sugar and proline contents in switchgrass. However, these two factors exhibited antagonistic effects on the radicular length of switchgrass. The combined effects of salinity and pH and the interactions between them should be considered when evaluating the strength of salt-alkaline mixed stress. PMID:24454834

  8. Method for estimating solubility parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Ingham, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Semiempirical correlations have been developed between solubility parameters and refractive indices for series of model hydrocarbon compounds and organic polymers. Measurement of intermolecular forces is useful for assessment of material compatibility, glass-transition temperature, and transport properties.

  9. Mineral oil soluble borate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, J.

    1981-09-15

    Alkali metal borates are reacted with fatty acids or oils in the presence of a low hlb value surfactant to give a stable mineral oil-soluble product. Mineral oil containing the borate can be used as a cutting fluid.

  10. water-soluble fluorocarbon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanelli, P.

    1979-01-01

    Water-soluble fluorocarbon proves durable nonpolluting coating for variety of substrates. Coatings can be used on metals, masonry, textiles, paper, and glass, and have superior hardness and flexibility, strong resistance to chemicals fire, and weather.

  11. Inorganic membranes and solid state sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cot, Louis; Ayral, André; Durand, Jean; Guizard, Christian; Hovnanian, Nadine; Julbe, Anne; Larbot, André

    2000-05-01

    The latest developments in inorganic membranes are closely related to recent advances in solid state science. Sol-gel processing, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hydrothermal synthesis are methods that can be used for inorganic membrane preparation. Innovative concepts from material science (templating effect, nanophase materials, growing of continuous zeolite layers, hybrid organic-inorganic materials) have been applied by our group to the preparation of inorganic membrane materials. Sol-gel-derived nanophase ceramic membranes are presented with current applications in nanofiltration and catalytic membrane reactors. Silica membranes with an ordered porosity, due to liquid crystal phase templating effect, are described with potential application in pervaporation. Defect-free and thermally stable zeolite membranes can be obtained through an original synthesis method, in which zeolite crystals are grown inside the pores of a support. Hybrid organic-inorganic materials with permselective properties for gas separation and facilitated transport of solutes in liquid media, have been successfully adapted to membrane applications. Potential membrane developments offered by CVD deposition techniques are also illustrated through several examples related to the preparation of purely inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic membrane materials.

  12. Shape control of inorganic nanoparticles from solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Shuanglei; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-21

    Inorganic materials with controllable shapes have been an intensely studied subject in nanoscience over the past decades. Control over novel and anisotropic shapes of inorganic nanomaterials differing from those of bulk materials leads to unique and tunable properties for widespread applications such as biomedicine, catalysis, fuels or solar cells and magnetic data storage. This review presents a comprehensive overview of shape-controlled inorganic nanomaterials via nucleation and growth theory and the control of experimental conditions (including supersaturation, temperature, surfactants and secondary nucleation), providing a brief account of the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles during wet-chemistry synthetic processes. Subsequently, typical mechanisms for shape-controlled inorganic nanoparticles and the general shape of the nanoparticles formed by each mechanism are also expounded. Furthermore, the differences between similar mechanisms for the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles are also clearly described. The authors envision that this review will provide valuable guidance on experimental conditions and process control for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles with tunable shapes in the solution state.

  13. Shape control of inorganic nanoparticles from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Shuanglei; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic materials with controllable shapes have been an intensely studied subject in nanoscience over the past decades. Control over novel and anisotropic shapes of inorganic nanomaterials differing from those of bulk materials leads to unique and tunable properties for widespread applications such as biomedicine, catalysis, fuels or solar cells and magnetic data storage. This review presents a comprehensive overview of shape-controlled inorganic nanomaterials via nucleation and growth theory and the control of experimental conditions (including supersaturation, temperature, surfactants and secondary nucleation), providing a brief account of the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles during wet-chemistry synthetic processes. Subsequently, typical mechanisms for shape-controlled inorganic nanoparticles and the general shape of the nanoparticles formed by each mechanism are also expounded. Furthermore, the differences between similar mechanisms for the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles are also clearly described. The authors envision that this review will provide valuable guidance on experimental conditions and process control for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles with tunable shapes in the solution state.

  14. The effect of salinity on waste activated sludge alkaline fermentation and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Baodan; Wang, Shuying; Xing, Liqun; Li, Baikun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-05-01

    The effect of salinity on sludge alkaline fermentation at low temperature (20°C) was investigated, and a kinetic analysis was performed. Different doses of sodium chloride (NaCl, 0-25g/L) were added into the fermentation system. The batch-mode results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) increased with salinity. The hydrolysate (soluble protein, polysaccharide) and the acidification products (short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), NH4(+)-N, and PO4(3-)-P) increased with salinity initially, but slightly declined respectively at higher level salinity (20g/L or 20-25g/L). However, the hydrolytic acidification performance increased in the presence of salt compared to that without salt. Furthermore, the results of Haldane inhibition kinetics analysis showed that the salt enhanced the hydrolysis rate of particulate organic matter from sludge particulate and the specific utilization of hydrolysate, and decreased the specific utilization of SCFAs. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis indicated that the importance of polysaccharide on the accumulation of SCFAs was reduced with salt addition, but the importance of protein and NH4(+)-N on SCFA accumulation was increased.

  15. Stabilising nanofluids in saline environments.

    PubMed

    Al-Anssari, Sarmad; Arif, Muhammad; Wang, Shaobin; Barifcani, Ahmed; Iglauer, Stefan

    2017-12-15

    Nanofluids (i.e. nanoparticles dispersed in a fluid) have tremendous potential in a broad range of applications, including pharmacy, medicine, water treatment, soil decontamination, or oil recovery and CO2 geo-sequestration. In these applications nanofluid stability plays a key role, and typically robust stability is required. However, the fluids in these applications are saline, and no stability data is available for such salt-containing fluids. We thus measured and quantified nanofluid stability for a wide range of nanofluid formulations, as a function of salinity, nanoparticle content and various additives, and we investigated how this stability can be improved. Zeta sizer and dynamic light scattering (DLS) principles were used to investigate zeta potential and particle size distribution of nanoparticle-surfactant formulations. Also scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the physicochemical aspects of the suspension. We found that the salt drastically reduced nanofluid stability (because of the screening effect on the repulsive forces between the nanoparticles), while addition of anionic surfactant improved stability. Cationic surfactants again deteriorated stability. Mechanisms for the different behaviour of the different formulations were identified and are discussed here. We thus conclude that for achieving maximum nanofluid stability, anionic surfactant should be added. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  17. Phosphorus in manure and sewage sludge more recyclable than in soluble inorganic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Kahiluoto, H; Kuisma, M; Ketoja, E; Salo, T; Heikkinen, J

    2015-02-17

    Phosphorus (P) flow from deposits through agriculture to waterways leads to eutrophication and depletion of P reserves. Therefore, P must be recycled. Low and unpredictable plant availability of P in residues is considered to be a limiting factor for recycling. We identified the determinants for the plant-availability of P in agrifood residues. We quantified P in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and in field soil fractions with different plant availabilities of P as a response to manure and sewage sludge with a range of P capture and hygienization treatments. P was more available in manure and in sludge, when it was captured biologically or with a moderate iron (Fe)/P (1.6), than in NPK. Increasing rate of sludge impaired P recovery and high Fe/P (9.8) prevented it. Anaerobic digestion (AD) reduced plant-availability at relevant rates. The recovery of P was increased in AD manure via composting and in AD sludge via combined acid and oxidizer. P was not available to plants in the sludge hygienized with a high calcium/P. Contrary to assumed knowledge, the recyclability of P in appropriately treated residues can be better than in NPK. The prevention of P sorption in soil by organic substances in fertilizers critically enhances the recyclability of P.

  18. Experimental Studies on Rutile Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Klemme, S.; Butler, I. B.; Harley, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Rutile (TiO2) is an important high field strength element (HFSE) sequestering mineral, and has been implicated in the observed depletion of HFSE in arc magmas. It is thought that rutile is insoluble in slab-derived fluids, and remains residual in the subducted slab. Indeed, experimental data indicates a very low solubility of rutile in pure H2O (Tropper and Manning, 2005), and this low solubility may result in HFSE depleted fluids imparting a depleted signature to arc magmas. However, there is scant experimental data available on rutile solubility in fluids of more complex compositions (Ayers and Watson, 1993). We are carrying out a systematic experimental study into the effect of specific chemical components on rutile solubility in fluids and also silicate melts. This should further our understanding of HFSE mobility in metamorphic rocks within subduction zones. References: J. C. Ayers and E. B. Watson (1993) Rutile solubility in supercritical aqueous fluids and the high P-T mobility of elements it concentrates. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 114, 321-330. P. Tropper and C. E. Manning (2005) Very low solubility of rutile in H2O at high pressure and temperature, and its implications for Ti mobility in subduction zones. American Mineralogist 90(2-3), 502-505.

  19. Supplementation of inorganic phosphate enhancing the removal efficiency of tannery sludge-borne Cr through bioleaching.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guanyu; Zhou, Lixiang

    2011-10-15

    Four inorganic mineral nutrients including NH4+, K+, Mg2+ and soluble inorganic phosphate (Pi) were investigated to reveal the potential limiting nutrients for tannery sludge bioleaching process driven by Acidithiobacillus species, and the feasibility of supplementing the limiting nutrients to accelerate tannery sludge bioleaching was studied in the present study. It was found that the concentration of Pi was lower than 3.5 mg/L throughout the whole bioleaching process, which is the most probable restricting nutrient for tannery sludge bioleaching. Further experiments revealed that the deficiency of Pi could seriously influence the growth of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and lower its oxidization capacity for S0, and the limiting concentration of Pi for the growth of A. thiooxidans was 6 mg/L. The low concentration of soluble Pi in sludge matrix was resulted from the extremely strong sorbing/binding capacity of tannery sludge for phosphate. The supplementation of more than 1.6 g/L KH2PO4 into tannery sludge bioleaching system could effectively stimulate the growth of Acidithiobacillus species, enhance Cr removal rate and further shorten tannery sludge bioleaching period from 10 days to 7 days. Therefore, inorganic phosphate supplementation is an effective and feasible method to accelerate tannery sludge bioleaching process, and the optimum dosage of KH2PO4 was 1.6 g/L for tannery sludge with 5.1% of total solids.

  20. Nanocomposites Derived from Polymers and Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, In-Yup; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2010-01-01

    Polymers are considered to be good hosting matrices for composite materials because they can easily be tailored to yield a variety of bulk physical properties. Moreover, organic polymers generally have long-term stability and good processability. Inorganic nanoparticles possess outstanding optical, catalytic, electronic and magnetic properties, which are significantly different their bulk states. By combining the attractive functionalities of both components, nanocomposites derived from organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles are expected to display synergistically improved properties. The potential applications of the resultant nanocomposites are various, e.g. automotive, aerospace, opto-electronics, etc. Here, we review recent progress in polymer-based inorganic nanoparticle composites.

  1. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    DOE PAGES

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; ...

    2015-10-02

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo nSm - and WnSm - clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. Moreover, the species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. The structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy.more » All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Likewise, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.« less

  2. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Ganteför, Gerd E-mail: ydkim91@skku.edu; Park, Eun Ji; Kim, Young Dok E-mail: ydkim91@skku.edu; Seo, Hyun Ook; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-10-07

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo{sub n}S{sub m}{sup −} and W{sub n}S{sub m}{sup −} clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. The species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. Here, the structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy. All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Accordingly, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.

  3. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Park, Eun Ji; Ganteför, Gerd; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Young Dok; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-10-02

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo nSm - and WnSm - clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. Moreover, the species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. The structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy. All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Likewise, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.

  4. Inorganic constituents in American lignites

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M. E.; Jenkins, R. G.; Walker, P. L.

    1980-04-01

    Both the discrete mineral phases and the ion-exchangeable inorganic components of lignites from Texas, North Dakota, and Montana have been studied. The ion-exchangeable cations and the carboxyl groups with which they are associated were characterized by ion exchange methods utilizing ammonium acetate and barium acetate, respectively. Na, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba were found to be present in all three coals. It was found that Ca and Mg were the most abundant cations and that 40 to 60% of the carboxyl groups in the raw coals were exchanged with cations. Also, significant variations in the relative and absolute concentrations of all the cations were observed. The discrete mineral phases in these lignites were studied by semiquantitative x-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The importance of the cations in this analysis was shown when the mineralogical analyses of the low temperature ash of the coals with the cations removed and the raw coals were compared. Results show that up to 50% of the low temperature ash of these raw coals can be attributed to the existence of metal cations and that fixation of sulfur, carbon, and oxygen to form sulfates and carbonates is the major reason for this contribution.

  5. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  6. The SMOS ocean salinity retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, J.

    2009-04-01

    SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) will be, from spring 2009, the first space mission attempting the determination of sea surface salinity using microwave L-band radiometry. The SMOS aperture synthesis technique poses strict requirements to instrument calibration and stability for a successful brightness temperature image reconstruction. Besides this, the low sensitivity of Tb to salinity, even at L-band, and the still not fully developed/validated emissivity models at this frequency taking into account all the physical processes that impact on it, mainly the effects of surface roughness, plus the need of removing from the recorded signal the contributions of scattered radiation from external sources (sun, galaxy) result in a really challenging salinity determination by SMOS. In this presentation we review the approach implemented in SMOS for salinity retrieval from the calibrated brightness temperature maps. The different processing steps are summarily described, as well as their implementation status and validation in the SMOS level 2 salinity processor.

  7. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  8. Estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation on the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay are discussed. The sources of fresh water, the variations in salinity, and the circulation patterns created by temperature and salinity changes are analyzed. The application of remote sensors for long term observation of water temperatures is described. The sources of sediment and the biological effects resulting from increased sediments and siltation are identified.

  9. Saline-water resources of Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winslow, Allen George; Kister, Lester Ray

    1956-01-01

    Most of the aquifers in Texas contain saline water in some parts, and a few are capable of producing large quantities of saline water. Of the early Paleozoic formations, the Hickory sandstone member of the Riley formation of Cambrian age and the Ellenburger group of Ordovician age are potential sources of small to moderate supplies of saline water in parts of central and west-central Texas.

  10. Compositional Analysis of Water-Soluble Materials in Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. F.; Mowery, R. A.; Scarlata, C. J.; Chambliss, C. K.

    2007-01-01

    Corn stover is one of the leading feedstock candidates for commodity-scale biomass-to-ethanol processing. The composition of water-soluble materials in corn stover has been determined with greater than 90% mass closure in four of five representative samples. The mass percentage of water-soluble materials in tested stover samples varied from 14 to 27% on a dry weight basis. Over 30 previously unknown constituents of aqueous extracts were identified and quantified using a variety of chromatographic techniques. Monomeric sugars (primarily glucose and fructose) were found to be the predominant water-soluble components of corn stover, accounting for 30-46% of the dry weight of extractives (4-12% of the dry weight of feedstocks). Additional constituents contributing to the mass balance for extractives included various alditols (3-7%), aliphatic acids (7-21%), inorganic ions (10-18%), oligomeric sugars (4-12%), and a distribution of oligomers tentatively identified as being derived from phenolic glycosides (10-18%).

  11. Response of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to inorganic nitrogen fluctuations in temperate estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Joye, Samantha B.; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) highlighted the importance of alternative metabolic pathways to inorganic nitrogen removal in natural environments, particularly in those subjected to increased nitrate inputs, such as estuaries. Laboratory enrichment experiments were used to test the effect of increasing loads of nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and ammonium (NH4+) on the anammox process. Three Atlantic temperate estuaries (NW Portugal) were investigated along a salinity gradient, and anammox activity was measured under different NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ treatments, using the isotope pairing technique. Obtained results showed that NO3- stimulated denitrification but not anammox, whereas NO2- additions had a positive effect on anammox activity, confirming its role as a key environmental control. On the other hand, increasing NH4+ concentrations seemed to inhibit anammox for low salinity sites. Our findings suggested an important role of the natural availability of nitrogen compounds in regulating anammox and the magnitude of anammox versus denitrification in estuarine environments.

  12. Soil Salinity Mapping Using Multitemporal Landsat Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azabdaftari, A.; Sunar, F.

    2016-06-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most important problems affecting many areas of the world. Saline soils present in agricultural areas reduce the annual yields of most crops. This research deals with the soil salinity mapping of Seyhan plate of Adana district in Turkey from the years 2009 to 2010, using remote sensing technology. In the analysis, multitemporal data acquired from LANDSAT 7-ETM+ satellite in four different dates (19 April 2009, 12 October 2009, 21 March 2010, 31 October 2010) are used. As a first step, preprocessing of Landsat images is applied. Several salinity indices such as NDSI (Normalized Difference Salinity Index), BI (Brightness Index) and SI (Salinity Index) are used besides some vegetation indices such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), RVI (Ratio Vegetation Index), SAVI (Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index) and EVI (Enhamced Vegetation Index) for the soil salinity mapping of the study area. The field's electrical conductivity (EC) measurements done in 2009 and 2010, are used as a ground truth data for the correlation analysis with the original band values and different index image bands values. In the correlation analysis, two regression models, the simple linear regression (SLR) and multiple linear regression (MLR) are considered. According to the highest correlation obtained, the 21st March, 2010 dataset is chosen for production of the soil salinity map in the area. Finally, the efficiency of the remote sensing technology in the soil salinity mapping is outlined.

  13. Relating river discharges to salinity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Liu, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    New river discharge data are brought together with spacebased sea surface salinity measurements by Aquarius and SMOS to demonstrate the role of river discharge in salinity changes near three river mouths: the Mississippi, the Ganges, and the Amazon. The characteristics of the seasonal cycle and the year-to-year changes of the river runoff are described. Various versions of the satellite salinity data are compared. The relative roles of river discharge, surface water flux, and horizontal advection in changing surface salinity in regions near the river mouths are examined. Satellite measurements of SSS clearly track movements of the fresh water from river discharges. Besides the river discharge, E-P plays an important role in the seasonal salinity variation near the Ganges and Irrawaddy River mouths. For the Mississippi and Amazon river mouths, central and eastern ITCZ, E-P contributes very little to the salinity seasonal change. In the central and eastern ITCZ, contribution of advection to the salinity tendency is clearly identified. Both salinity and salinity tendency are dominated by semi-annual cycle in the Atlantic ITCZ between 5ºN to 9ºN, whereas annual cycle dominates at other latitudes.

  14. Mg/Ca Ratios in Planktonic Foraminifera Across a Strong Salinity Gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. E.; Henderson, G. M.; Kucera, M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea provides an ideal environment to conduct a field study of the effect of salinity on Mg incorporation into planktonic foraminifera. Its semi-enclosed nature results in the development of a considerable gradient (5 psu) in salinity while its west to east alignment leads to relatively small sea surface temperature gradients (a maximum of 8° C in the summer). Eleven box core tops were sampled from across the Mediterranean Sea. Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides ruber (white) and (pink) and Globigerinella siphonifera, were picked and thoroughly cleaned using standard techniques for trace-metal work. Samples were analysed for Mg/Ca, Cd/Ca, U/Ca, Sr/Ca, Fe/Ca, Al/Ca and Mn/Ca. Samples were screened for contamination using Mn/Ca ratios for ferro-manganese crusts and Fe/Ca and Al/Ca for clays. SEM images and sequential dissolution experiments indicated that most samples did not feature inorganic encrusting high-Mg calcite (which has previously been found in some high salinity regions such as the Red Sea). After rejecting samples that failed these screening tests, Mg/Ca ratios in all species are higher, for their calcification temperatures, than seen in previous studies. There is an overall increase in Mg/Ca from west to east and percentage increases per ° C are unusually high. Mg/Ca ratios are particularly high in samples from the high-salinity eastern Mediterranean. We present arguments to suggest that these high values are not the result of nutrient or carbonate ion changes, with both of these variables being similar to those in the open ocean. Correlations of Mg/Ca with salinity are generally more significant than with temperature, with Mg/Ca increases per salinity unit of 15-60% - much higher than suggested in previous culture studies. Our results suggest that salinity may act as a significant secondary control on Mg/Ca ratios in addition to the dominant temperature control. A re-analysis of previous calibrations from other settings also suggests

  15. Inorganic Nanomaterials as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Hao, Xiaohong; Liang, Xingjie; Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Cuimiao; Zhou, Guoqiang; Shen, Shigang; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-01-01

    For safe and effective therapy, drugs must be delivered efficiently and with minimal systemic side effects. Nanostructured drug carriers enable the delivery of small-molecule drugs as well as nucleic acids and proteins. Inorganic nanomaterials are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their unique physicochemical properties, such as facile preparation, good storage stability and biocompatibility. Many inorganic nanostructure-based drug delivery platforms have been prepared. Although there are still many obstacles to overcome, significant advances have been made in recent years. This review focuses on the status and development of inorganic nanostructures, including silica, quantum dots, gold, carbon-based and magnetic iron oxide-based nanostructures, as carriers for chemical and biological drugs. We specifically highlight the extensive use of these inorganic drug carriers for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the most important areas in the field that urgently require further study.

  16. Making Pure Fine-Grained Inorganic Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    Sustained arc plasma chemical reactor fabricates very-fine-grained inorganic solids having low thermal conductivity. Powder fabrication method, based on plasma tube technique produces pure solids without contamination commonly produced by grinding.

  17. How Much Inorganic Spectroscopy and Photochemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Harry B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes three levels of courses to treat adequately the ground state electronic structures, the spectroscopy, and the photochemistry of inorganic molecules. Suggests sequences for the courses without repeating material taught in previous courses. (Author/JN)

  18. How Much Inorganic Spectroscopy and Photochemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Harry B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes three levels of courses to treat adequately the ground state electronic structures, the spectroscopy, and the photochemistry of inorganic molecules. Suggests sequences for the courses without repeating material taught in previous courses. (Author/JN)

  19. Aquarius Instrument and Salinity Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius has been designed to map the surface salinity field of the global ocean from space a parameter important for understanding ocean circulation and its relationship to climate and the global water cycle. Salinity is measured remotely from space by measuring the thermal emission from the ocean surface. This is done at the low frequency end of the microwave spectrum (e.g. 1.4 GHz) where the emission is sufficiently sensitive to changes in salinity to be detected with sophisticated radiometers. The goal is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean by providing maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. These are challenging requirements that have led to some unique features of the instrument. These include: a) The addition of a co-located scatterometer to help provide a correction for roughness; b) The addition of a polarimetric channel (third Stokes parameter) to the radiometer to help correct for Faraday rotation; c) Asun-synchronous orbit with a 6 pm ascending equatorial crossing to minimize Faraday rotation and with the antennas looking away from the sun toward the nighttime side to minimize contamination by radiation from the sun; and d) An antenna designed to limit side lobes in the direction of rays from the sun. In addition, achieving the accuracy goal of 0.2 psu requires averaging over one month and to do this requires a highly stable radiometer. Aquarius has three separate radiometers that image in pushbroom fashion with the three antenna beams looking across track. The antenna is a 2.5-m diameter, offset parabolic reflector with three feed horns and the three beams are arranged to image with the boresight aligned to look across track, roughly perpendicular to the spacecraft heading and pointing away from the Sun. The three beams point at angles of theta = 25.8 deg., 33.8 deg. and 40.3 deg. with respect to the spacecraft

  20. Soil salinity detection from satellite image analysis: an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Md Manjur; Islam, Md Tazmul; Jamil, Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This paper attempts to detect soil salinity from satellite image analysis using remote sensing and geographic information system. Salinity intrusion is a common problem for the coastal regions of the world. Traditional salinity detection techniques by field survey and sampling are time-consuming and expensive. Remote sensing and geographic information system offer economic and efficient salinity detection, monitoring, and mapping. To predict soil salinity, an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data was used to develop a multiple regression equation. The correlations between different indices and field data of soil salinity were calculated to find out the highly correlated indices. The best regression model was selected considering the high R (2) value, low P value, and low Akaike's Information Criterion. About 20% variation was observed between the field data and predicted EC from the satellite image analysis. The precision of this salinity detection technique depends on the accuracy and uniform distribution of field data.

  1. (Inorganic carbon surveys of oceanic basins)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, R.J.

    1991-04-25

    Measurements were made aboard the F. S. Meteor, along the 19 degree South cruise track of the following chemical parameters: total dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, pCO2, CFC-12, CFC-11, CFC-113, CC14. This was the first cruise of OASD's newly formed CO2 group. The purpose was to survey World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) line A9 for inorganic carbon for the Department of Energy's Office of CO2 Research. 1 fig.

  2. Natural and artificial chitosan-inorganic composites.

    PubMed

    Muzzarelli, Corrado; Muzzarelli, Riccardo A A

    2002-11-11

    Taking inspiration from many chitin-inorganic composites in nature, a number of recent articles throw light on the manufacture of such composites based on calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate and silica. These novel materials are important in the field of blood-compatible materials, bone substitutes, and cements for bone repair and reconstruction. This approach provides an attractive alternative to the processing of inorganic thin films, especially in applications where substrates cannot be exposed to high temperatures.

  3. Aquifer Salinization by Storm Overwash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. P.; Evans, D. G.

    2001-12-01

    Overwash processes not only affect the morphology of barrier islands, they also introduce saltwater to surficial coastal aquifers by infiltration (saltwater intrusion from the top). Hatteras Island, North Carolina, USA is particularly susceptible to saltwater overwash because of its geography and the frequency with which tropical and extra-tropical storms strike the area. Hurricane Emily inundated the island in 1993 with saline water from Pamlico Sound. The floodwaters from overwash reached as far as 1000 meters into the interior of the island and recharged the shallow Buxton Woods Aquifer, raising salinity levels from approximately 40 mg/L prior to flooding to nearly 280 mg/L within several weeks of flooding. By 1997, chloride levels still had not returned to pre-storm levels. We use one-dimensional analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation to simulate chloride transport within the aquifer utilizing a pulse source with linear superposition. We calibrate this model using chloride breakthrough curves observed from water wells on the island. Initial simulations show that a pulse duration of five days provides the best fit to the data. Simulation of chloride breakthrough at two locations demonstrates that higher gradients advect chloride further into the aquifer, causing higher chloride concentrations and increasing the duration of contamination. The Cape Hatteras region historically is susceptible to several hurricanes in a single season. In order to analyze the effect of multiple overwash events on water quality, we use predictive simulations to show the effect of two overwash events separated by different time lags. Simulations indicate that higher gradients and short time lags between overwash events result in chloride MCL violations that persist for more than four months.

  4. Synergistic effects of inorganic salt and surfactant on phenanthrene removal from aqueous solution by sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yaoguo; Hu, Sihai; Lu, Cong

    2014-01-01

    The economic and effective application of surfactant enhanced remediation (SER) technology in a sediment-freshwater/saline water system was investigated by batch method using the combined effects of inorganic salt (sodium chloride, NaCl) and anionic surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)) on phenanthrene (PHE) removal via sorption by sediment. In all cases, PHE sorption followed a linear equation and partition as the main mechanism for PHE removal from aqueous solution. Separate addition of SDBS (2 mmol L(-1)) and NaCl (2-100 mmol L(-1)) moderately enhanced PHE removal, while with their combined addition the enhancement was substantial, and the removal efficiency achieved a peak of 92.8%. The combined effect expressed a synergy, and the sorption enhancement increased by factors of 2.7, 3.2 and 3.4 when compared with the sum of the separate entities at elevated salinity. This was because the sorbed SDBS, with increasing amount and a high packing conformation at elevated salinity, outcompeted aqueous SDBS for PHE partition. Moreover, a combination of 2 mmol L(-1) SDBS and 2 mmol L(-1) NaCl was optimal for PHE removal. Therefore, SER technology appears more effective for PHE removal in saline water than in freshwater, and preliminary water quality monitoring is essential for economic and efficient SER application.

  5. The components of an inorganic physiological buffer for Penaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Song, X L; Yu, J; Zhang, L J

    1999-01-01

    Shrimp Penaeus chinensis, 5--8 cm in body-length were held in laboratory aquaria after collection from culture ponds at Laoshan in Qingdao in 1992. The osmotic pressure and the concentration of inorganic components of hemolymph in the shrimp were measured. The optimum pH and osmolarity of the buffer were determined from tests on primary cultures of hepatopancreatocytes in vitro. The results indicate that the hemolymph is homoiosmotic to 27 ppt seawater at 870 mOsm/L; osmotic regulation of shrimp is strong in low-salinity seawater, but weak in high-salinity seawater; the concentration of Mg(2+) ions in hemolymph is much less than that in seawater, while [K(+)] and [Ca(2+)] are much higher; hepatopancreatocytes in vitro have optimal survival at osmolarity range of 780-1, 100 mOsm/L and pH 6.5. Accordingly, an inorganic physiological buffer for P. chinensis (PPB, Penaeid Physiological Buffer) was prepared and contains NaCl, 23.0 g/L; K(2)SO(4), 1.1 g/L; CaCl(2), 1.6 g/L; MgSO(4).7H(2)O, 1.6 g/L; NaH(2)PO(4).2H(2)O, 0.35 g/L; NaHCO(3), 0. 05 g/L; pH 6.5; osmolarity, 867.9 mOsm/L. For storage of PPB, 4 stock buffers are made: 1) 10x PPB-A, which contains 230 g/L NaCl, 11 g/L K(2)SO(4), and 3.5 g/L NaH(2)PO(4).2H(2)O; 2) 40x PPB-B, which contains 64 g/L MgSO(4).7H(2)O; 3) 40x PPB-C, which contains 64 g/L CaCl(2); and 4) 100x PPB-D, which contains 50 g/L NaHCO(2). In order to increase the buffering capacity, PPB may be modified (to His-PPB), in which 5 g/L Histidine.HCl is used as the buffer reagent in place of NaH(2)PO(4) and NaHCO(3).

  6. Microalgal bacterial floc properties are improved by a balanced inorganic/organic carbon ratio.

    PubMed

    Van Den Hende, Sofie; Vervaeren, Han; Saveyn, Hans; Maes, Guy; Boon, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Microalgal bacterial floc (MaB-floc) reactors have been suggested as a more sustainable secondary wastewater treatment. We investigated whether MaB-flocs could be used as tertiary treatment. Tertiary influent has a high inorganic/organic carbon ratio, depending on the efficiency of the secondary treatment. In this study, the effect of this inorganic/organic carbon ratio on the MaB-flocs performance was determined, using three sequencing batch photobioreactors. The MaB-flocs were fed with synthetic wastewater containing 84, 42, and 0 mg L(-1) C-KHCO(3) supplemented with 0, 42, 84 mg L(-1) C-sucrose, respectively, representing inorganic versus organic carbon. Bicarbonate significantly decreased the autotrophic index of the MaB-flocs and resulted in poorly settling flocs. Moreover, sole bicarbonate addition led to a high pH of 9.5 and significant lower nitrogen removal efficiencies. Sucrose without bicarbonate resulted in good settling MaB-flocs, high nitrogen removal efficiencies and neutral pH levels. Despite the lower chlorophyll a content of the biomass and the lower in situ oxygen concentration, 92-96% of the soluble COD-sucrose was removed. This study shows that the inorganic/organic carbon ratio of the wastewater is of major importance and that organic carbon is requisite to guarantee a good performance of the MaB-flocs for wastewater treatment.

  7. Inorganic fouling control in reverse osmosis wastewater reclamation by purging carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad Kashif; Pyo, Minsu; Choi, Young-Gyun

    2017-04-21

    Inorganic fouling on the membrane surface is one of the major prevalent issues affecting the performance and cost of reverse osmosis system. Chemical dosage is a widely adopted method for the inhibition of inorganic scale on the membrane surface. In this study, CO2 was used to control inorganic scale formation on surface of reverse osmosis (RO) membrane in wastewater reclamation. The pH of influent could be lowered by purging CO2. It caused an increase in solubility of inorganic salts in water resulting in discharge of principle ions in concentrate stream. A pilot plant study was conducted with four different RO modules including control, with dosage of antiscalant, with purging CO2 and with co-addition of antiscalant and CO2. The effectiveness of CO2 purging was assessed on the basis of operational analysis, in-line analysis and morphological results. Ryznar stability index was used to determine the scaling potential of system. The examined data indicated that CO2 purging was successful to inhibit scale formation on the membrane surface. Moreover, CO2 was found more eco-friendly than antiscalant, as no by-products were generated in concentrate stream.

  8. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L−1) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na+/K+–ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  9. Inorganic Arsenic and Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We critically evaluated the etiologic role of inorganic arsenic in human prostate cancer. Data sources We assessed data from relevant epidemiologic studies concerning environmental inorganic arsenic exposure. Whole animal studies were evaluated as were in vitro model systems of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in the prostate. Data synthesis Multiple studies in humans reveal an association between environmental inorganic arsenic exposure and prostate cancer mortality or incidence. Many of these human studies provide clear evidence of a dose–response relationship. Relevant whole animal models showing a relationship between inorganic arsenic and prostate cancer are not available. However, cellular model systems indicate arsenic can induce malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in vitro. Arsenic also appears to impact prostate cancer cell progression by precipitating events leading to androgen independence in vitro. Conclusion Available evidence in human populations and human cells in vitro indicates that the prostate is a target for inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis. A role for this common environmental contaminant in human prostate cancer initiation and/or progression would be very important. PMID:18288312

  10. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging. PMID:26366081

  11. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging.

  12. Organic-Inorganic Composites Toward Biomaterial Application.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Sugawara-Narutaki, Ayae; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics are known to exhibit specific biological affinities and are able to show direct integration with surrounding bone when implanted in bony defects. However, their inadequate mechanical properties, such as low fracture toughness and high Young's modulus in comparison to natural bone, limit their clinical application. Bone is a kind of organic-inorganic composite where apatite nanocrystals are precipitated onto collagen fibre networks. Thus, one way to address these problems is to mimic the natural composition of bone by using bioactive ceramics via material designs based on organic-inorganic composites. In this chapter, the current research on the development of the various organic-inorganic composites designed for biomaterial applications has been reviewed. Various compounds such as calcium phosphate, calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate can be used for the inorganic phases to design composites with the desired mechanical and biological properties of bone. Not only classical mechanical mixing but also coating of the inorganic phase in aqueous conditions is available for the fabrication of such composites. Organic modifications using various polymers enable the control of the crystalline structure of the calcium carbonate in the composites. These approaches on the fabrication of organic-inorganic composites provide important options for biomedical materials with novel functions. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Mechanisms of high salinity tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra

    2007-01-01

    Among abiotic stresses, high salinity stress is the most severe environmental stress, which impairs crop production on at least 20% of irrigated land worldwide. In response to high salinity stress, various genes get upregulated, the products of which are involved either directly or indirectly in plant protection. Some of the genes encoding osmolytes, ion channels, receptors, components of calcium signaling, and some other regulatory signaling factors or enzymes are able to confer salinity-tolerant phenotypes when transferred to sensitive plants. Overall, the susceptibility or tolerance to high salinity stress in plants is a coordinated action of multiple stress responsive genes, which also cross talk with other components of stress signal transduction pathways. High salinity exerts its negative impact mainly by disrupting the ionic and osmotic equilibrium of the cell. In saline soils, high levels of sodium ions lead to plant growth inhibition and even death; therefore, mechanisms of salinity tolerance involve sequestration of Na(+) and Cl(-) in vacuoles of the cells, blocking of Na(+) entry into the cell, Na(+) exclusion from the transpiration stream, and some other mechanisms that help in salinity tolerance. Understanding these mechanisms of stress tolerance, along with a plethora of genes involved in the stress signaling network, is important to improve high salinity stress tolerance in crops plants. This chapter first describes the adverse effect of salinity stress and general pathway for the plant stress response, followed by roles of various ion pumps, calcium, SOS pathways, ABA, transcription factors, mitogen-activated protein kinases, glycine betaine, proline, reactive oxygen species, and DEAD-box helicases in salinity stress tolerance. The cross-tolerance between stresses is also mentioned.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580... Systems § 862.1580 Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. (a) Identification. A phosphorus (inorganic) test system is a device intended to measure inorganic phosphorus in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580... Systems § 862.1580 Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. (a) Identification. A phosphorus (inorganic) test system is a device intended to measure inorganic phosphorus in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580... Systems § 862.1580 Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. (a) Identification. A phosphorus (inorganic) test system is a device intended to measure inorganic phosphorus in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580... Systems § 862.1580 Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. (a) Identification. A phosphorus (inorganic) test system is a device intended to measure inorganic phosphorus in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1580 - Phosphorus (inorganic) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. 862.1580... Systems § 862.1580 Phosphorus (inorganic) test system. (a) Identification. A phosphorus (inorganic) test system is a device intended to measure inorganic phosphorus in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements...

  19. The predominance of inorganic arsenic species in plants from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, I.; Wang, L.; Ollson, C.A.; Cullen, W.R.; Reimer, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    Elevated levels of arsenic in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada, from historic and recent gold mine operations, are of increasing concern to Yellowknife residents. The study of arsenic in Yellowknife plants is a part of ongoing bioavailability and food chain research. A variety of plants from Yellowknife were analyzed for total arsenic and water soluble arsenic species. The plants included vascular plants and bryophytes (mosses). Total amounts of arsenic were greatest in mosses and varied greatly within specimens of the same plant species from different locations. Mostly inorganic arsenic species were extracted from plants using methanol/water (1:1). This result is very important from a toxicological point of view, since inorganic species are relatively toxic arsenic species. Small amounts of methylated arsenic species, as well as arsenosugars, were present in some plants. On average, greater than 50% of arsenic in these plants was not extracted; the chemical and toxicological characteristics of this fraction remain a topic for further study.

  20. Composite block copolymer stabilized nanoparticles: simultaneous encapsulation of organic actives and inorganic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Gindy, Marian E; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2008-01-01

    We describe the preparation and characterization of hybrid block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) for use as multimodal carriers for drugs and imaging agents. Stable, water-soluble, biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) NPs simultaneously co-encapsulating hydrophobic organic actives (beta-carotene) and inorganic imaging nanostructures (Au) are prepared using the flash nanoprecipitation process in a multi-inlet vortex mixer. These composite nanoparticles (CNPs) are produced with tunable sizes between 75 nm and 275 nm, narrow particle size distributions, high encapsulation efficiencies, specified component compositions, and long-term stability. The process is tunable and flexible because it relies on the control of mixing and aggregation timescales. It is anticipated that the technique can be applied to a variety of hydrophobic active compounds, fluorescent dyes, and inorganic nanostructures, yielding CNPs for combined therapy and multimodal imaging applications.

  1. Hyperbranched polymers and dendrimers as templates for organic/inorganic hybrid nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinhua; Zheng, Sudan; Kim, Il

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and development of hyperbranched polymers (HPs) and dendrimers, and their use as templates for organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. Hyperbranched polymers (HPs) are highly branched macromolecules with three-dimensional globular structures featuring unique properties such as low viscosity, high solubility, and a large number of terminal functional groups compared to their linear analogs. They are easily prepared by (1) condensation polymerization, (2) self-condensing vinyl copolymerization (SCVCP), and (3) ring-opening multibranch polymerization methods. Organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials are synthesized by a template approach using HPs/dendrimers. Monometallic, bimetallic (alloy and core/shell), semiconductor, and metal oxide nanoparticles have been prepared by this route. The dendrimer component of these composites serves not only as a template for preparing the nanoparticles but also as a stabilizer for the nanoparticles.

  2. Inorganic and carbonaceous components in indoor/outdoor particulate matter in two residential houses in Oslo, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Mihalis; Aleksandropoulou, Victoria; Hanssen, Jan Erik; Dye, Christian; Eleftheriadis, Kostantinos; Katsivela, Eleftheria

    2008-03-01

    A detailed analysis of indoor/outdoor physicochemical aerosol properties has been performed. Aerosol measurements were taken at two dwellings, one in the city center and the other in the suburbs of the Oslo metropolitan area, during summer/fall and winter/spring periods of 2002-2003. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the chemical characteristics (water-soluble ions and carbonaceous components) of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) particles and their indoor/outdoor relationship. Results demonstrate that the carbonaceous species were dominant in all fractions of the PM10 particles (cut off size: 0.09-11.31 microm) during all measurement periods, except winter 2003, when increased concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions were predominant because of sea salt transport. The concentration of organic carbon was higher in the fine and coarse PM10 fractions indoors, whereas elemental carbon was higher indoors only in the coarse fraction. In regards to the carbonaceous species, local traffic and secondary organic aerosol formation were, probably, the main sources outdoors, whereas indoors combustion activities such as preparation of food, burning of candles, and cigarette smoking were the main sources. In contrast, the concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions were higher outdoors than indoors. The variability of water-soluble inorganic ion concentrations outdoors was related to changes in emissions from local anthropogenic sources, long-range transport of particles, sea salt emissions, and resuspension of roadside and soil dusts. In the indoor environment the infiltration of the outdoor air indoors was the major source of inorganic ions.

  3. Progress Toward Clonable Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Thomas W.; Staicu, Lucian C.; Nemeth, Richard S.; Schwartz, Cindi; Crawford, David; Seligman, Jeffrey D.; Hunter, William J.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth; Ackerson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas moraviensis stanleyae was recently isolated from the roots of the Selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plant Stanleya pinnata. This bacterium tolerates normally lethal concentrations of SeO32− in liquid culture, where it also produces Se nanoparticles. Structure and cellular ultrastructure of the Se nanoparticles as determined by cellular electron tomography shows the nanoparticles as intracellular, of narrow dispersity, symmetrically irregular and without any observable membrane or structured protein shell. Protein mass spectrometry of a fractionated soluble cytosolic material with selenite reducing capability identified nitrite reductase and glutathione reductase homologues as NADPH dependent candidate enzymes for the reduction of selenite to zerovalent Se nanoparticles. In vitro experiments with commercially sourced glutathione reductase revealed that the enzyme can reduce SeO32− (selenite) to Se nanoparticles in an NADPH-dependent process. The disappearance of the enzyme as determined by protein assay during nanoparticle formation suggests that glutathione reductase is associated with or possibly entombed in the nanoparticles whose formation it catalyzes. Chemically dissolving the nanoparticles releases the enzyme. The size of the nanoparticles varies with SeO32− concentration, varying in size form 5nm diameter when formed at 1.0 μM [SeO32−] to 50nm maximum diameter when formed at 100 μM [SeO32−]. In aggregate, we suggest that glutathione reductase possesses the key attributes of a clonable nanoparticle system: ion reduction, nanoparticle retention and size control of the nanoparticle at the enzyme site. PMID:26350616

  4. Interactions between salinity and boron toxicity in tomato plants involve apoplastic calcium.

    PubMed

    Bastías, Elizabeth; Alcaraz-López, Carlos; Bonilla, Ildefonso; Martínez-Ballesta, M Carmen; Bolaños, Luis; Carvajal, Micaela

    2010-01-01

    The lack of consensus about the mutual relations between salinity and boron (B) toxicity with respect to the physiological response of plants necessitates investigation of the interactions of soluble B with salinity. In this investigation, the effect of B was compared with Ca in order to elucidate whether the two nutrients have similar effects and/or to elucidate a relationship under salinity. Following addition of B or Ca, salinity was applied to tomato plants and the cell wall and plasma membrane permeability, measured as water permeability and electrolyte leakage, in relation to amino acid and ion cell wall composition, were determined. As the relationship between B and salinity was complex, several hypotheses are established. The increase of aquaporin functionality due to the presence of B and Ca compared with NaCl-treated plants could be the most feasible, whereas there is currently no satisfactory explanation for the results for the cell wall amino acid composition. In addition, the elemental composition results revealed that, in addition the known interactions between B and Ca with respect to cell wall stability, Mg and Mn were also increased in NaCl+B and NaCl+Ca treatments, suggesting their possible involvement in the cell wall function necessary for plant growth.

  5. Salinity effects on photosynthesis and growth in Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart. ) Griseb

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreth, D.J.; Bolanos, J.A.; Smith, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Alternanthera philoxeroides, alligator weed, was grown at five different NaCl concentrations to determine the effect of salinity on factors related to the net rate of CO/sub 2/ uptake (P/sub n/). Over the range of 0 to 400 millimolar NaCl, P/sub n/ declined 51%. Stomatal conductance declined in parallel with P/sub n/ and as a result there was no reduction in intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentrations and therefore no reduction in the amount of CO/sub 2/ available for photosynthesis. The CO/sub 2/ compensation point did not change with salt stress. Increases in leaf thickness tended to compensate slightly for the negative effects of salinity on leaf cell metabolism, at least in relation to P/sub n/. On a mesophyll cell area basis, soluble protein was relatively constant in leaves developed at 100 to 400 millimolar NaCl while total chlorophyll decreased at all salinities. Dry weight production and P/sub n/ were closely correlated in alligator weed grown at different salinities. Plants produced less leaf area per unit dry weight as salinity increased, which may aid in water conservation. 26 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Saline-seep development in the Hailstone Basin, northern Stillwater County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Barney D.; Custer, Stephen G.; Miller, Marvin R.

    1979-01-01

    As a result of an increase in saline seep occurrence in Montana, a study was begun in 1974 to determine the hydrogeology of saline seeps in the Hailstone basin. The aquifer is composed of colluvium of Holocene age. The impermeable Cretaceous Niobrara Formation underlies the saturated zone basinwide. The ground-water system is shallow, unconfined, and locally recharged. Ground-water levels and size of the saline seeps respond rapidly to precipitation in the basin. The appearance and growth of saline seeps are related to precipitation patterns; the agricultural practice of summer follow; topography; the presence of a shallow, unconfined, and locally recharged ground-water system; and a soluble salt source. Continuous cropping could reduce the amount of water percolating beneath local recharge areas, and thus minimize the water available for seep formation and growth. The lateral variation in chemical quality of water from wells suggests a shallow flow system. The field specific conductance of 29 ground-water samples collected in 1976 ranged from 2,160 to 14,000 micromhos per centimeter and averaged 6,660 micromhos per centimeter. Water from saline seeps in the study area contains principally sodium, magnesium, calcium, and sulfate. Nitrate is present in the ground water in concentrations of as much as 855 milligrams per liter. The high nitrate concentrations are interpreted to originate primarily from oxidation of organic material once native sod is broken by cultivation. (USGS).

  7. Speciation and equilibrium relations of soluble aluminum in a headwater stream at base flow and during rain events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    In the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, the short-term dynamics of soluble aluminum in stream water sampled during rain events differed significantly from stream water sampled during base flow conditions. Three fractions of dissolved aluminum were measured. The inorganic monomeric fraction made up approximately two thirds of the total reactive aluminum at base flow, followed by the acid-soluble and organic monomeric fractions, respectively. Equilibrium modeling showed that hydroxide complexes were the most abundant form of inorganic monomeric aluminum followed by fluoride, free aluminum ion, and sulfate. The activity of inorganic monomeric aluminum at base flow appears to be in equilibrium with an Al(OH)3 phase with solubility intermediate between microcrystalline gibbsite and natural gibbsite. During two rain events, the concentration of all three aluminum fractions increased significantly. The primary cause of the transient increase in the Al(OH)3 saturation index appears to have been the neutralization of excess H+ added by soil water through reaction with stream water HCO3- at a more rapid rate than excess inorganic monomeric aluminum could be removed from solution by hydroxide mineral precipitation. -from Author

  8. Experiments of CO2 Solubility in the Synthetic Brine from the Erdos Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Yu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Solubility trapping of CO2 in saline aquifers is accepted to be the promising method in terms of carbon capture and storage (CCS). CO2 solubility at geological sequestration conditions is of great significance in evaluating the carbon capture potential of brine formation. Unfortunately, most CO2 solubility studies focus mainly on single-salt solutions, and only sparse literature exist for the data of CO2 solubility in aqueous solutions containing the mixture of K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. To fill the research gap, an experimental investigation on the CO2 solubility in the synthetic brine is carried out. The samples were extracted through the injection wells of the Shenhua Carbon Capture and Storage project in the Erdos Basin located in northern China. The proportion of K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ was determined by chemical analysis of the samples in the aquifers. The synthetic brine is used in this study, and the experimental process were improved to lower the risk of penetration of the supercritical fluid. Solubility data were measured over the temperature and pressure ranges of 318-348 K and 8-11 MPa. In the range studied, the average absolute deviation of CO2 solubility between literature and experimental results was 2.7%, and the maximum absolute deviation was less than 5.4%. Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky (KK) equation was established to analyze the experimental data and the effect of different ions on CO2 solubility was quantified using an optimization process. The liner fit between the CO2 solubility and mixed ion concentration is satisfied with correlation coefficient of 0.91. The proposed model and experimental data therefore possess broad adaptability to geological carbon storage. This ambiguity in the mechanism of the ion effect drives our efforts toward a better understanding of the factors controlling CO2 solubility in formation brine.

  9. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Salinity II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Presented is a science activity in which the student investigates methods of calibration of a simple conductivity meter via a hands-on inquiry technique. Conductivity is mathematically compared to salinity using a point slope formula and graphical techniques. Sample solutions of unknown salinity are provided so that the students can sharpen their…

  10. The Solubility Rules: Why Are All Acetates Soluble?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sluys, William G.

    2001-01-01

    According to the solubility rules presented in many introductory chemistry texts, all (or most) acetate salts are soluble in aqueous solution. The thermodynamic factors that contribute to the solubility of acetates are compared with those of other slightly basic anions. In particular, the hydration enthalpy of acetate is calculated using the Born-Haber approach, from lattice energies, heats of solution, and the hydration energies of several cations. The hydration enthalpy of acetate (-375 kJ/mol) is similar to that of chloride ({355 kJ/mol), nitrite ({383 kJ/mol), and nitrate ({370 kJ/mol), which are all considerably less exothermic than fluoride ({497 kJ/mol). This was somewhat unexpected, since hydration enthalpies generally correlate well with the acid-base properties of an ion, and acetate is more basic than fluoride. Factors influencing the solubility and acid-base properties of acetates, such as the electron donating and hydrophobic nature of the methyl group, are discussed in light of the thermodynamic data.

  11. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  12. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Brian P

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  13. Halophyte filter beds for treatment of saline wastewater from aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Webb, J M; Quintã, R; Papadimitriou, S; Norman, L; Rigby, M; Thomas, D N; Le Vay, L

    2012-10-15

    The expansion of aquaculture and the recent development of more intensive land-based marine farms require efficient and cost-effective systems for treatment of highly nutrient-rich saline wastewater. Constructed wetlands with halophytic plants offer the potential for waste-stream treatment combined with production of valuable secondary plant crops. Pilot wetland filter beds, constructed in triplicate and planted with the saltmarsh plant Salicornia europaea, were evaluated over 88 days under commercial operating conditions on a marine fish and shrimp farm. Nitrogen waste was primarily in the form of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (TDIN) and was removed by 98.2 ± 2.2% under ambient loadings of 109-383 μmol l(-1). There was a linear relationship between TDIN uptake and loading over the range of inputs tested. At peak loadings of up to 8185 ± 590 μmol l(-1) (equivalent to 600 mmol N m(-2) d(-1)), the filter beds removed between 30 and 58% (250 mmol N m(-2) d(-1)) of influent TDIN. Influent dissolved inorganic phosphorus levels ranged from 34 to 90 μmol l(-1), with 36-89% reduction under routine operations. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) loadings were lower (11-144 μmol l(-1)), and between 23 and 69% of influent DON was removed during routine operation, with no significant removal of DON under high TDIN loading. Over the 88-day study, cumulative nitrogen removal was 1.28 mol m(-2), of which 1.09 mol m(-2) was retained in plant tissue, with plant uptake ranging from 2.4 to 27.0 mmol N g(-1) dry weight d(-1). The results demonstrate the effectiveness of N and P removal from wastewater from land-based intensive marine aquaculture farms by constructed wetlands planted with S. europaea.

  14. Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

    2005-11-23

    Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

  15. Response of Stream Biodiversity to Increasing Salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, C. P.; Vander Laan, J. J.; Olson, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We used a large data set of macroinvertebrate samples collected from streams in both reference-quality (n = 68) and degraded (n = 401) watersheds in the state of Nevada, USA to assess relationships between stream biodiversity and salinity. We used specific electrical conductance (EC)(μS/cm) as a measure of salinity, and applied a previously developed EC model to estimate natural, baseflow salinity at each stream. We used the difference between observed and predicted salinity (EC-Diff) as a measure of salinization associated with watershed degradation. Observed levels of EC varied between 22 and 994 μS/cm across reference sites and 22 to 3,256 uS/cm across non-reference sites. EC-Diff was as high as 2,743 μS/cm. We used a measure of local biodiversity completeness (ratio of observed to expected number of taxa) to assess ecological response to salinity. This O/E index decreased nearly linearly up to about 25% biodiversity loss, which occurred at EC-Diff of about 300 μS/cm. Too few sites had EC-Diff greater than 300 μS/cm to draw reliable inferences regarding biodiversity response to greater levels of salinization. EC-Diff increased with % agricultural land use, mine density, and % urban land use in the watersheds implying that human activities have been largely responsible for increased salinization in Nevada streams and rivers. Comparison of biological responses to EC and other stressors indicates that increased salinization may be the primary stressor causing biodiversity loss in these streams and that more stringent salinity water quality standards may be needed to protect aquatic life.

  16. Solubility and partition coefficients for gases in rabbit brain and blood.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y; Ar, A; Farhi, L E

    1979-06-01

    Solubility and partition coefficients for argon, methane, neon, nitrogen, and sulfur hexafluoride in normal saline, rabbit blood, and exsanguinated rabbit brain were determined in a two-step process that involved equilibration of the various aliquots, and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography. Brain-blood partition coefficient was specifically higher than one for argon, neon, and sulfur hexafluoride, and questionably significant (P less than 0.025) for nitrogen.

  17. Effect of soluble polymer binder on particle distribution in a drying particulate coating.

    PubMed

    Buss, Felix; Roberts, Christine C; Crawford, Kathleen S; Peters, Katharina; Francis, Lorraine F

    2011-07-01

    Soluble polymer is frequently added to inorganic particle suspensions to provide mechanical strength and adhesiveness to particulate coatings. To engineer coating microstructure, it is essential to understand how drying conditions and dispersion composition influence particle and polymer distribution in a drying coating. Here, a 1D model revealing the transient concentration profiles of particles and soluble polymer in a drying suspension is proposed. Sedimentation, evaporation and diffusion govern particle movement with the presence of soluble polymer influencing the evaporation rate and solution viscosity. Results are summarized in drying regime maps that predict particle accumulation at the free surface or near the substrate as conditions vary. Calculations and experiments based on a model system of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), silica particles and water reveal that the addition of PVA slows the sedimentation and diffusion of the particles during drying such that accumulation of particles at the free surface is more likely.

  18. Increased solubility of quartz in water due to complexing by organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, P.; Siegel, D.I.

    1987-01-01

    Quartz is the most stable natural solid phase of silica. It weathers extremely slowly at the Earth's surface1, and often resists weathering even after all other silicate minerals have been degraded. However, there is ample evidence from both ancient and modern environments indicating enhanced dissolution and mobility of silica under conditions that cannot easily be explained by the inorganic controls of quartz solubility2. Increased solubility of quartz has been observed particularly in soils rich in organic material; however, no direct link between dissolved organic carbon and dissolved silica has been identified3. Here we present evidence for an increase in the solubility of quartz in a natural water brought about by dissolved organic compounds. These compounds were produced by the biodegradation of petroleum, and consist largely of a complex mixture of organic acids. We propose that silica is being complexed and mobilized by these organic acids in waters having close to neutral pH.

  19. Calcium sulfate solubility in organic-laden wastewater. Progress report, September 1981-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Banz, I.; Luthy, R.G.

    1982-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the solubility of calcium sulfate in wastewaters, and to examine the effect of organic constituents in wastewater and in synthetic waters on calcium sulfate solubility. The study entailed both laboratory experiments and chemical equilibria computer modeling. The calcium sulfate solubility product in a solvent-extracted, ammonia-stripped coal gasification wastewater was found to be 3.65 x 10/sup -5/ M/sup 2/; this is 45% higher than that observed in clean water. Wastewater treated further by activated carbon adsorption showed the solubility product of calcium sulfate to be 2.87 x 10/sup -5/ M/sup 2/. This is only 14% higher than that observed in clean water; this indicates that organic material removed in the adsorption process may be responsible for enhanced solubility in wastewater. Synthetic wastewaters were prepared using humic-like organic compounds, since it was believed that humic-like material accounted for a major fraction of the residual organic carbon content of solvent-extracted coal gasification wastewater. Calcium sulfate solubility in oxidized samples of resorcinol, catechol, and tannic acid showed little difference from that in clean water. In humic acid, however, the calcium sulfate solubility product was 47% higher than in clean water; this increase in solubility product was similar to that observed in pretreated wastewater, indicating that a complex organic material is responsible for the increase in solubility. These results imply that calcium and organic constituents in wastewater form a chemical complex which has the effect of increasing total calcium in solution without preciptating calcium sulfate. Thus higher levels of calcium and sulfate may be maintained in wastewaters destined for reuse in recirculating cooling waters than would be indicated by considering only inorganic chemical interactions. 51 references, 18 figures, 40 tables.

  20. Progress toward clonable inorganic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Thomas W.; Staicu, Lucian C.; Nemeth, Richard S.; Schwartz, Cindi L.; Crawford, David; Seligman, Jeffrey D.; Hunter, William J.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.; Ackerson, Christopher J.

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas moraviensis stanleyae was recently isolated from the roots of the selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plant Stanleya pinnata. This bacterium tolerates normally lethal concentrations of SeO32- in liquid culture, where it also produces Se nanoparticles. Structure and cellular ultrastructure of the Se nanoparticles as determined by cellular electron tomography shows the nanoparticles as intracellular, of narrow dispersity, symmetrically irregular and without any observable membrane or structured protein shell. Protein mass spectrometry of a fractionated soluble cytosolic material with selenite reducing capability identified nitrite reductase and glutathione reductase homologues as NADPH dependent candidate enzymes for the reduction of selenite to zerovalent Se nanoparticles. In vitro experiments with commercially sourced glutathione reductase revealed that the enzyme can reduce SeO32- (selenite) to Se nanoparticles in an NADPH-dependent process. The disappearance of the enzyme as determined by protein assay during nanoparticle formation suggests that glutathione reductase is associated with or possibly entombed in the nanoparticles whose formation it catalyzes. Chemically dissolving the nanoparticles releases the enzyme. The size of the nanoparticles varies with SeO32- concentration, varying in size form 5 nm diameter when formed at 1.0 μM [SeO32-] to 50 nm maximum diameter when formed at 100 μM [SeO32-]. In aggregate, we suggest that glutathione reductase possesses the key attributes of a clonable nanoparticle system: ion reduction, nanoparticle retention and size control of the nanoparticle at the enzyme site.Pseudomonas moraviensis stanleyae was recently isolated from the roots of the selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plant Stanleya pinnata. This bacterium tolerates normally lethal concentrations of SeO32- in liquid culture, where it also produces Se nanoparticles. Structure and cellular ultrastructure of the Se nanoparticles as determined by cellular

  1. Foundation Coursework in Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry: Results from a National Survey of Inorganic Chemistry Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Smith, Sheila R.; Stewart, Joanne L.; Crane, Johanna L.; Pesterfield, Les; Sobel, Sabrina G.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey of inorganic chemists explored the self-reported topics covered in foundation-level courses in inorganic chemistry at the postsecondary level; the American Chemical Society's Committee on Professional Training defines a foundation course as one at the conclusion of which, "a student should have mastered the vocabulary,…

  2. Foundation Coursework in Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry: Results from a National Survey of Inorganic Chemistry Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Smith, Sheila R.; Stewart, Joanne L.; Crane, Johanna L.; Pesterfield, Les; Sobel, Sabrina G.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey of inorganic chemists explored the self-reported topics covered in foundation-level courses in inorganic chemistry at the postsecondary level; the American Chemical Society's Committee on Professional Training defines a foundation course as one at the conclusion of which, "a student should have mastered the vocabulary,…

  3. Illinois basin coal fly ashes. 1. Chemical characterization and solubility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Griffin, R.A.; Dickerson, D.R.; Schuller, R.M.; Martin, S.M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve precipitator-collected fly ash samples (nine derived from high-sulfur Illinois Basin coals and three from Western U.S. coals) were found to contain a variety of paraffins, aryl esters, phenols, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons including phenanthrene, pyrene, and chrysene but all at very low concentrations. Less than 1% of the organic carbon in the samples was extractable into benzene. Solubility studies with a short-term (24-h) extraction procedure and a long-term (20-week) procedure indicate that the inorganic chemical composition of some types of fly ash effluent is time dependent and may be most toxic to aquatic ecosystems when initially mixed with water and pumped to disposal ponds. Some acidic, high-Cd fly ashes would be classified as hazardous wastes if coal ash was included in this waste category by future RCRA revisions. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  4. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase: Potential Role in Mineral Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Weidong; Moe, Orson W.

    2007-04-01

    The conversion of a signal of inorganic ion concentration to a second messenger is of fundamental biologic significance. The soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) serves such a purpose by transducing divalent cation concentrations and bicarbonate concentrations into intracellular cyclic AMP levels. sAC is widely expressed and may represent a generic bicarbonate sensor providing the afferent pathway to bicarbonate-regulated biologic processes. The best described action of sAC to date is in the mediation of bicarbonate-induced changes in sperm motility. Since a number of processes in mineral metabolism—such as bone formation, bone resorption, intestinal calcium absorption, and renal calcium transport in the distal convoluted tubule—are regulated by bicarbonate, sAC may play a role at multiple levels in mineral metabolism.

  5. Salinity Effects on Superhydrophobic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochanda, F. O.; Samaha, M. A.; Vahedi Tafreshi, H.; Tepper, G. C.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2011-11-01

    Experiments are carried out to investigate the effect of NaCl concentrations on degree of hydrophobicity and longevity of polystyrene fibrous coating. A rheological study using salt water as a test fluid is performed to observe the generated drag reduction from the coating with increasing salt concentration compared to deionized water. Contact-angle measurements of droplets of solutions on the surface are used to validate the results from the rheometer. In situ noninvasive optical spectroscopy system is used to measure the time-dependent loss of entrapped air within the submerged fibrous coating. water for comparison. The superhydrophobic coating used is made of polystyrene fibers that are deposited using DC-biased AC-electrospinning. Such fabrication methods are far less expensive than ordered-microstructured fabrications, bringing the technology closer to large-scale submerged bodies such as submarines and ships. The present study sheds some light on how properties of a superhydrophobic coating could be influenced by water salinity. Financial support from DARPA, contract number W91CRB-10-1-0003, is acknowledged.

  6. Surface drifters measuring sea water salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdin, Gilles; Centurioni, Luca; Sena-Martins, Meike; Garcia-Ladona, Emilio; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Salvador, Joaquin; Sommer, Anna; Boutin, Jacqueline

    2017-04-01

    Surface drifters have been introduced in the early 1990s by P.P. Niiler to measure the salinity of the near-surface water as well as its temperature. First, they were deployed to document large scale advection of surface salinity fronts, such as during TOGA-COARE (1991). More recently, salinity drifter data were used for three purposes: 1 - provide in situ data coverage for validation of sea surface (SSS) products, such as provided by band-L microwave radiometry from satellite missions, Aquarius, SMOS, SMAP 2 - provide data for better understanding upper ocean response to air-sea interactions, such as during rainfall, or near-surface warming during low wind events 3 - provide estimates of surface advection of salinity features and their contribution to ocean freshwater budget We will review the drifters that have been deployed and where data were collected, the challenges encountered in correcting the data, ongoing plans and future developments. A comparison of salinity data of more than 60 SVP drifters to SMOS and Aquarius SSS fields in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre illustrates the potential for validating products from satellite missions over more than a year (SPURS-1 2012-2013 experiment). Data collocated during tropical rain events illustrate a short-term response of near-surface salinity and temperature that can be quantified, although we lack precise collocated wind data. It is rather consistent with independently-derived surface salinity response to rain based on SMOS salinity retrievals, and model estimations. An extreme case of close to 10 psu near-surface salinity drop due to rainfall is presented. Recent salinity drifter deployments in the rainy region of the eastern Pacific ITCZ (SPURS-2 2016 experiment) illustrate the small time and space scale variability associated with freshwater lenses in this region. Some data from a new tag (surpact) will be presented with simultaneous estimates of sea state, rain rate, temperature and salinity during rain

  7. Stability of Ampicillin in Normal Saline and Buffered Normal Saline.

    PubMed

    Maher, Moureddine; Jensen, Kara J; Lee, David; Nix, David E

    2016-01-01

    Ampicillin is reported to be stable for only 8 hours in 0.9% sodium chloride with concentrations up to 30 g/L. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if the stability of ampicillin in 0.9% sodium chloride could be extended by adding sodium phosphate for injection using modern highperformance liquid chromatographic methods. Ampicillin was prepared at concentrations of 12 g/L with and without 10 mM sodium phosphate for injection. Stability was assessed under room temperature using a validated, stability- indicating high-performance liquid chromatography assay. The admixtures with added buffer were studied under refrigerated storage as well. Ampicillin 12 g in 1 L normal saline intravenous bags, without buffer addition, was stable for at least 24 hours when stored at room temperature. The time to 90% potency (T90) ranged from 32.0 hours to 41.7 hours. The addition of 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer extended the stability to at least 48 hours with a T90 of 57.6 hours. Ampicillin 12 g/L stored under refrigeration was stable for at least 72 hours. Considering cumulative loss during refrigerated storage and subsequent use at room temperature, the data supports up to 48 hours storage under refrigeration and then up to 24 hours during use at room temperature. Using a stabilityindicating high-performance liquid chromatographic assay, ampicillin 12 g/L in 0.9% sodium chloride is stable for at least 24 hours at room temperature. The addition of 10 mM sodium phosphate for injection extends the stability to at least 48 hours at room temperature. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  8. Filterable water-soluble organic nitrogen in fine particles over the southeastern USA during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Neeraj; Zhang, Xiaolu; Edgerton, Eric S.; Ingall, Ellery; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-10-01

    Time integrated high-volume PM 2.5 samples were collected separately during day and night from 1 August to 10 September 2008 at a paired urban (Atlanta)-rural (Yorkville) sites as part of the August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS). Selected filters ( n = 96, 48 for each site) were analyzed for a suite of water-soluble chemical species, including major inorganic ions, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water-soluble total and inorganic nitrogen (WSTN and WSIN), and levoglucosan. Semi-continuous analyses of PM 2.5 mass, soluble ions, WSOC, and gaseous O 3, SO 2, NO, NO 2, NO y, CO, and meteorological parameters were also carried out in parallel. This study focuses on the characteristics of filterable water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON), estimated by the difference in the measured concentrations of WSTN and WSIN, determined from aqueous filter extracts. At both sites, WSON varied from below the limit of detection (25 ng-N m -3) to ˜600 ng-N m -3 and on average contributed ˜10% to WSTN mass, with the majority of soluble nitrogen being ammonium (˜82%). WSON:WSOC (or N:C) mass ratios ranged between 0 and 27% at both the sites with a median value of ˜5%, similar to what has been reported in another study in the southeastern USA. At both the urban and rural sites median nighttime levels of WSON and N:C were observed to be consistently higher than daytime values. Based on correlation analyses, daytime WSON sources appeared different than nighttime sources, especially at the urban site. Overall, the data suggest the importance of coal-combustion (e.g., link to SO 2), vehicle emissions, soil dust and biomass burning as WSON sources, and that nitrogenous organic compounds are likely a fairly small fraction of the secondary organic aerosol for this location during summer.

  9. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  10. Inorganic Janus particles for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Isabel; Lorenz, Steffen; Gehrig, Dominik; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Fischer, Karl; Strand, Dennis; Laquai, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Summary Based on recent developments regarding the synthesis and design of Janus nanoparticles, they have attracted increased scientific interest due to their outstanding properties. There are several combinations of multicomponent hetero-nanostructures including either purely organic or inorganic, as well as composite organic–inorganic compounds. Janus particles are interconnected by solid state interfaces and, therefore, are distinguished by two physically or chemically distinct surfaces. They may be, for instance, hydrophilic on one side and hydrophobic on the other, thus, creating giant amphiphiles revealing the endeavor of self-assembly. Novel optical, electronic, magnetic, and superficial properties emerge in inorganic Janus particles from their dimensions and unique morphology at the nanoscale. As a result, inorganic Janus nanoparticles are highly versatile nanomaterials with great potential in different scientific and technological fields. In this paper, we highlight some advances in the synthesis of inorganic Janus nanoparticles, focusing on the heterogeneous nucleation technique and characteristics of the resulting high quality nanoparticles. The properties emphasized in this review range from the monodispersity and size-tunability and, therefore, precise control over size-dependent features, to the biomedical application as theranostic agents. Hence, we show their optical properties based on plasmonic resonance, the two-photon activity, the magnetic properties, as well as their biocompatibility and interaction with human blood serum. PMID:25551063

  11. Growth responses of Phragmites karka - a candidate for second generation biofuel from degraded saline lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer Ahmed, Muhammad; Shoukat, Erum; Abideen, Zainul; Aziz, Irfan; Gulzar, Salman; Ajmal Khan, M.

    2017-04-01

    Global changes like rapidly increasing population, limited fresh water resources, increasing salinity and aridity are the major causes of land degradation. Increasing feed production for bioenergy through direct and indirect land use cause major threat to biodiversity besides competing with food resources. Growing halophytes on saline lands would provide alternate source of energy without compromising food and cash crop farming. Phragmites karkahas recently emerged as a potential bio-fuel crop, which maintains optimal growth at 100 mM NaCl with high ligno-cellulosic biomass. However, temporal and organ specific plant responses under salinity needs to be understood for effective management of degraded saline lands. This study was designed to investigate variation in growth, water relations, ion-flux, damage markers, soluble sugars, stomatal stoichiometry and photosynthetic responses of P. karka to short (0-7 days) and long (15-30 days) term exposure with 0 (control), 100 (moderate) and 300 (high) mM NaCl. A reduced shoot growth ( 45%) during earlier (within 7 days) phase was observed in 300 mM NaCl compared to control and moderate salinity. Reduced leaf elongation rate and leaf senescence from 7th day in 300 mM NaCl (and later in moderate salinity) correspond to increasing hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde contents. Leaf turgor loss represents the osmotic effect of NaCl at both concentrations, however turgor recovered completely in moderate salinity within a week. Plant appeared to use both organic solutes (soluble sugars) and ions (Na++K++Cl-) for osmotic adjustment along with improved water use efficiency under saline conditions. Turgor loss in high salinity (300 mM NaCl) was related to increased bulk elastic modulus and decreased hydraulic capacitance which ultimately resulted in low water potential. Leaf Na+ and Cl- accumulation increased earlier (from 7th day) in 300 mM NaCl and later in 100 mM. Higher ion sequestration in different organs was found in the

  12. Monitoring The Dynamics Of Hyper-Saline Environments With Polarimetric SAR: Death Valley, California Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasne, Y.; McDonald, K.; Paillou, P.; Freeman, A.; Chapman, B.; Farr, T.; Ruffié, G.; Malézieux, J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil salinization in arid and semi-arid regions still remains one of the most important threats not only for socio-economical issues when dealing with water ressources management, but also for ecological matters such as: desertification, climate changes, and biomass reduction. Then, monitoring and mapping of soil salinity distribution represent today a key challenge in our understanding of such environmental processes. Being highly dependent on the dielectric properties of soils, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) appears to be an efficient tool for the remote sensing of hyper-saline environments. More precisely, the influence of saline deposits on SAR imagery lies in the solubility and ionic properties of the minerals which strongly influence both real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity of such deposits, and thus the radar backscattering coefficient. Based on temporal series acquired with spaceborne SAR systems (ALOS/PALSAR, SIR-C) over the Death Valley (CA), we show that the copolarized backscattering ratio and phase difference derived from SAR data can be used as suitable indicators to monitor the dynamics of hyper-saline deposits. In particular, we propose these copolar parameters to follow the variations in the dielectric properties of moistened and salt-affected soils on a seasonal time scale because of the close relationship between the salinity (governed by the soil moisture content) and the complex permittivity of the soils. We also highlight a strong temporal correlation between the copolar parameters and weather data since precipitation events control the soil moisture and salinity. In order to allow for a better interpretation of the saline deposits signatures observed on SAR data, we also perform analytical simulations of the radar backscattering associated with saline deposits by means of the IEM scattering model. Using laboratory and in~ situ dielectric measurements as input parameters, we simulate the copolar ratio and phase difference as

  13. [Analysis of vitamins and inorganic elements in the water extracts of Radix Changii].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Wei; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Hou-Min

    2004-09-01

    To study the material basis of the tonifying effect of Radix Changii by observing its contents of nutrient elements. The contents of vitamins in Radix Changii and inorganic elements in the water extracts of it were tested by high performance liquid chromatography, fluorescence spectrophotography and scanning electron microanalysis. Radix Changii contains fat-soluble vitamins E and K 259.2 and 64.1 microg/kg respectively, and water-soluble vitamins C, B1 and B2 78.5, 0.6 and 0.7 mg/kg respectively. Its decoction contains abundant potassium and calcium ions. Radix Changii is rich in elements necessary for human body. It has the material basis for tonification.

  14. Estuarine Salinity Mapping From Airborne Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. P.; Gao, Y.; Cook, P. L. M.; Ye, N.

    2016-12-01

    Estuaries are critical ecosystems providing both ecological habitat and human amenity including boating and recreational fishing. Salinity gradients, caused by the mixing of fresh and salt water, exert an overwhelming control on estuarine ecology and biogeochemistry as well as being a key tracer for model calibration. At present, salinity monitoring within estuaries typically uses point measurements or underway boat-based methods, which makes sensing of localised phenomena such as upwelling of saline bottom water difficult. This study has pioneered the use of airborne radiometry (passive microwave) sensing as a new method to remotely quantify estuarine salinity, allowing rapid production of high resolution surface salinity maps. The airborne radiometry mapping was conducted for the Gippsland Lakes, the largest estuary in Australia, in February, July, October and November of 2015, using the Polarimetric L-band Microwave Radiometer (PLMR). Salinity was retrieved from the brightness temperature collected by PLMR with results validated against boat sampling conducted concurrently with each flight. Results showed that the retrieval accuracy of the radiative transfer model was better than 5 ppt for most flights. The spatial, temporal and seasonal variations of salinity observed in this study are also analysed and discussed.

  15. Effects of salinity build-up on the performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor regarding basic water quality parameters and removal of trace organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoye; McDonald, James; Price, William E; Khan, Stuart J; Hai, Faisal I; Ngo, Hao H; Guo, Wenshan; Nghiem, Long D

    2016-09-01

    The effects of elevated inorganic salt concentration on anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treatment regarding basic biological performance and trace organic contaminant (TrOC) removal were investigated. A set of 33 TrOCs were selected to represent pharmaceuticals, steroids, and pesticides in municipal wastewater. Results show potential adverse effects of increase in the bioreactor salinity to 15g/L (as NaCl) on the performance of AnMBR with respect to chemical oxygen demand removal, biogas production, and the removal of most hydrophilic TrOCs. Furthermore, a decrease in biomass production was observed as salinity in the bioreactor increased. The removal of most hydrophobic TrOCs was high and was not significantly affected by salinity build-up in the bioreactor. The accumulation of a few persistent TrOCs in the sludge phase was observed, but such accumulation did not vary significantly as salinity in the bioreactor increased.

  16. The Role of Low Salinity Fluids in Metal Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardley, B.

    2015-12-01

    In recent decades the importance of brines for ore-formation has been demonstrated for a wide range of deposit types and geological settings. Chloride can reach high concentrations in fluids of diverse origins and it complexes many metals in solution. Nevertheless, there are elements which are preferentially complexed by other ligands and are transported and concentrated in low-Cl fluids. Magmatic fluids normally have Cl as the dominant cation and may be very saline. Transition metal levels in magmatic brines from arc settings in particular are often very high, reflecting strong chloride complexing and associated mineralization is often dominated by metals such as Fe which reach high concentrations in brines. Not all magmatic hydrothermal fluids are brines however, and where Cl is less abundant the composition of the dissolved load can be very different. Because of "salting out" effects, highly saline fluids are relatively low in dissolved gases, whereas low salinity fluids can carry significant loads of CO2, H2S and other volatile species, including B, As, Sb and Hg. Of the volatile species with the potential to complex specific metals only H2S has been investigated in any detail. Arsenic is particularly abundant in some low-salinity fluids, however the possible role of As-complexing in transport of Au or other metals is not known. There is little evidence for enhancement of metal solubility by CO2 under upper crustal conditions, except through lowering of pH, but there is some evidence that CO2-saturated brines may mobilize Ni more effectively than brines alone. Sulfate is an important anion in a range of magmatic and hydrothermal fluids and may be primary or arise from oxidation of magmatic H2S in geothermal systems. Notably, sulfate preferentially forms aqueous complexes with the HREE, and may play a role in HREE-enrichment. Fluids in which Cl does not dominate the dissolved load have potential to cause enrichment in a diverse range of elements, but this is

  17. Hansen solubility parameter analysis on the dispersion of zirconia nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sho-Hsun; Liu, Jia-Hong; Pai, Chin-Tung; Chen, Chien-Wei; Chung, Pao-Tang; Chiang, Anthony Shiaw-Tseh; Chang, Shinn-Jen

    2013-10-01

    Nanoparticle dispersible in a broad range of solvents is desirable when preparing an organic/inorganic nanocomposite. In this report, the dispersion behavior of carboxylate-grafted zirconia nanoparticle in 25 solvents covering a wide range of polarity was analyzed based on their Hansen solubility parameters (HSP). Particles grafted with alkyl-chain longer than four carbons could only be dispersed in non-polar solvents, while that grafted with acetic acid was dispersible in polar ones. However, particle modified with methacrylic acid (MA) was compatible with both types of solvents, which was rather unexpected. Further NMR analysis showed that the carboxylate-grafted samples contained a trace amount of triethanolamine (TEA) due to the particular ZrO2 synthesis process employed. The combination of the hydrophilic TEA ligand with the short hydrophobic tail of methacrylate broadened the range of compatible solvents from benzene to methanol. Such an extended solvent compatibility was observed previously only for nanoparticles covered with large polymer surfactants having both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. Achieving this with two small molecules having separate functional groups is crucial when one needs to maximize the inorganic content in a composite.

  18. [Ecophysiological adaptability of tropical water organisms to salinity changes].

    PubMed

    Chung, K S

    2001-03-01

    Physiological response of tropical organisms to salinity changes was studied for some marine, estuarine and freshwater fishes (Astyanax bimaculatus, Petenia karussii, Cyprinodon dearborni, and Oreochromis mossambicus), marine and freshwater crustaceans (Penaeus brasiliensis, Penaeus schmitti and Macrobrachium carcinus), and marine bivalves (Perna perna, Crassostrea rhizophorae, and Arca zebra) collected from Northeast Venezuela. They were acclimated for four weeks at various salinities, and (1) placed at high salinities to determine mean lethal salinity, (2) tested by increasing salinity 5@1000 per day to define upper lethal salinity tolerance limit, or (3) observed in a saline gradient tank to determine salinity preference. Acclimation level was the most significant factor. This phenomenon is important for tropical aquatic organisms in shallow waters, where they can adapt to high salinity during the dry season and cannot lose their acclimation level at low salinity during abrupt rain. For saline adaptation of tropical organisms, this behavior will contribute to their proliferation and distribution in fluctuating salinity environments.

  19. Sea-surface salinity: the missing measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Erich F.; Koblinsky, Chester

    2003-04-01

    Even the youngest child knows that the sea is salty. Yet, routine, global information about the degree of saltiness and the distribution of the salinity is not available. Indeed, the sea surface salinity measurement is a key missing measurement in global change research. Salinity influences circulation and links the ocean to global change and the water-cycle. Space-based remote sensing of important global change ocean parameters such as sea-surface temperature and water-cycle parameters such as precipitation have been available to the research community but a space-based global sensing of salinity has been missing. In July 2002, the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) announced that the Aquarius mission, focused on the global measurement of sea surface salinity, is one of the missions approved under its ESSP-3 program. Aquarius will begin a risk-reduction phase during 2003. Aquarius will carry a multi-beam 1.4 GHz (L-band) radiometer used for retrieving salinity. It also will carry a 1.2 GHz (L-band) scatterometer used for measuring surface roughness. Aquarius is tentatively scheduled for a 2006 launch into an 8-day Sun-synchronous orbit. Aquarius key science data product will be a monthly, global surface salinity map at 100 km resolution with an accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units. Aquarius will have a 3 year operational period. Among other things, global salinity data will permit estimates of sea surface density, or buoyancy, that drives the ocean's three-dimensional circulation.

  20. Factors determining the formation of secondary inorganic aerosol: a case study in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squizzato, S.; Masiol, M.; Brunelli, A.; Pistollato, S.; Tarabotti, E.; Rampazzo, G.; Pavoni, B.

    2013-02-01

    Physicochemical properties of aerosol were investigated by analyzing the inorganic water soluble content in PM2.5 samples collected in the eastern part of the Po Valley (Italy). In this area the EU limits for many air pollutants are frequently exceeded as a consequence of local sources and regional-scale transport of secondary inorganic aerosol precursors. Nine PM2.5-bound major inorganic ions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+) were monitored over one year in three sites categorized as semi-rural background, urban background and industrial. The acidic properties of the PM2.5 were studied by applying the recently developed E-AIM thermodynamic model 4 (Extended Aerosol Thermodynamics Model). The experimental data were also examined in relation to the levels of gaseous precursors of secondary inorganic aerosol (SO2, NOx, NO, NO2) and on the basis of some environmental conditions having an effect on the secondary aerosols generation processes. A chemometric procedure using cluster analysis on experimental [NH4+]/[SO42-] molar ratio and NO3- concentration has been applied to determine the conditions needed for ammonium nitrate formation in different chemical environments. Finally, some considerations on the secondary inorganic aerosol formation and the most relevant weather conditions concerning the sulfate-nitrate-ammonium system were also discussed. The obtained results and discussion can help in understanding the secondary aerosol formation dynamics in the Po Valley, which is one of the most critical regions for air pollution in southern Europe.

  1. Isotopic composition of methane and inferred methanogenic substrates along a salinity gradient in a hypersaline microbial mat system.

    PubMed

    Potter, Elyn G; Bebout, Brad M; Kelley, Cheryl A

    2009-05-01

    The importance of hypersaline environments over geological time, the discovery of similar habitats on Mars, and the importance of methane as a biosignature gas combine to compel an understanding of the factors important in controlling methane released from hypersaline microbial mat environments. To further this understanding, changes in stable carbon isotopes of methane and possible methanogenic substrates in microbial mat communities were investigated as a function of salinity here on Earth. Microbial mats were sampled from four different field sites located within salterns in Baja California Sur, Mexico. Salinities ranged from 50 to 106 parts per thousand (ppt). Pore water and microbial mat samples were analyzed for the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved methane, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and mat material (particulate organic carbon or POC). The POC delta(13)C values ranged from -6.7 to -13.5 per thousand, and DIC delta(13)C values ranged from -1.4 to -9.6 per thousand. These values were similar to previously reported values. The delta(13)C values of methane ranged from -49.6 to -74.1 per thousand; the methane most enriched in (13)C was obtained from the highest salinity area. The apparent fractionation factors between methane and DIC, and between methane and POC, within the mats were also determined and were found to change with salinity. The apparent fractionation factors ranged from 1.042 to 1.077 when calculated using DIC and from 1.038 to 1.068 when calculated using POC. The highest-salinity area showed the least fractionation, the moderate-salinity area showed the highest fractionation, and the lower-salinity sites showed fractionations that were intermediate. These differences in fractionation are most likely due to changes in the dominant methanogenic pathways and substrates used at the different sites because of salinity differences.

  2. Solubility of Haloether Anesthetics in Human and Animal Blood

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Joao H. N.; Brosnan, Robert J.; Fukushima, Fabíola B.; Hodges, Joanne; Liu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Anesthetic blood solubility predicts pharmacokinetics for inhaled agents and is essential for determination of blood anesthetic concentrations from end-tidal gas concentrations using Henry’s Law. Though used to model anesthetic effects in humans, there are limited interspecies solubility comparisons that include modern haloethers. This study aimed to measure hematocrit-adjusted blood:gas anesthetic partition coefficients (λB:G) for desflurane, sevoflurane, isoflurane, and methoxyflurane in humans and animals. Methods Whole blood was collected from 20 rats, 8 horses, and 4 each of cats, cattle, humans, dogs, goats, pigs, rabbits, and sheep. Plasma or cell volume was removed to adjust all samples to a packed cell volume of 40%. A single agent calibration gas headspace was added to blood in a glass syringe and was mixed and equilibrated at 37°C for 2 hours. Agent concentrations in the calibration gas and syringe headspace were measured using gas chromatography. Anesthetic solubility in saline, citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine, and olive oil were similarly measured. Results Except for goats, all animal species had at least one λB:G measurement that differed significantly from humans. For each agent, λB:G positively correlated with serum triglyceride concentrations, but this only explained 25% of interspecies variability. Desflurane was significantly less soluble in blood than sevoflurane in some species (e.g., humans) but not in others (e.g., rabbits). Conclusions Anesthetic partition coefficients differ significantly between humans and most animals for haloether anesthetics. Because of their similar λB:G values, goats may be a better animal model for inhaled anesthetic pharmacokinetics in people. PMID:22510863

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Cancer) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On February 19, 2010, the draft IRIS Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Cancer) external review draft document and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for public review and comment. The draft document and the charge to external peer reviewers were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices before public release. In the new IRIS process, introduced by the EPA Administrator, all written comments on IRIS assessments submitted by other federal agencies and White House Offices will be made publicly available. Accordingly, interagency comments and the interagency science consultation draft of the Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic and the charge to external peer reviewers are posted on this site. This draft IRIS health assessment addresses only cancer human health effects that may result from chronic exposure to this chemical. An assessment of noncancer health effects of inorganic arsenic will be released for external peer review and public comment at a later date.

  4. Inorganic polymers for environmental protection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, K. J. D.

    2011-10-01

    Aluminosilicate inorganic polymers have been proposed as low-energy cements since, unlike Portland cement, their production does not require high temperatures or generate large quantities of greenhouse gases. Other environmental protection applications for inorganic polymers are to encapsulate hazardous mining or radioactive wastes for safe long-term storage and as fireproof components for buildings and vehicles. However, newly developed methods for synthesising these materials have opened up the possibility of other novel environmental protection applications. These include porous cladding material for passive cooling of buildings, cost-effective exchange materials for removing heavy metals from wastewater, bacteriocidal materials for purifying polluted drinking water and materials for photodegrading hazardous organic environmental pollutants. The nature and synthesis of inorganic polymers for these environmental applications will be discussed here.

  5. Environmental geophysics mapping salinity and water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, David

    2007-05-01

    Salinity and fresh water are two sides of the same coin, most conveniently measured by electrical conductivity; they can now be mapped rapidly in three dimensions using airborne electromagnetics (AEM). Recent developments in the calibration of airborne data against in-field measurements and additional information from radiometrics, magnetics and digital elevation models lend new insights into salinity, groundwater flow systems and water resources. Freshwater resources can be mapped, and salinity risk and the outcome of management interventions may be forecast, on the basis of the specific architecture of complete groundwater flow systems-enabling practical, cost-effective protection and development of water resources.

  6. Solubility of sparingly soluble drug derivatives of anthranilic acid.

    PubMed

    Domańska, Urszula; Pobudkowska, Aneta; Pelczarska, Aleksandra

    2011-03-24

    This work is a continuation of our systematic study of the solubility of pharmaceuticals (Pharms). All substances here are derivatives of anthranilic acid, and have an anti-inflammatory direction of action (niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, and diclofenac sodium). The basic thermal properties of pure Pharms, i.e., melting and glass-transition temperatures as well as the enthalpy of melting, have been measured with the differential scanning microcalorimetry technique (DSC). Molar volumes have been calculated with the Barton group contribution method. The equilibrium mole fraction solubilities of three pharmaceuticals were measured in a range of temperatures from 285 to 355 K in three important solvents for Pharm investigations: water, ethanol, and 1-octanol using a dynamic method and spectroscopic UV-vis method. The experimental solubility data have been correlated by means of the commonly known G(E) equation: the NRTL, with the assumption that the systems studied here have revealed simple eutectic mixtures. pK(a) precise measurement values have been investigated with the Bates-Schwarzenbach spectrophotometric method.

  7. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  8. Inorganic-organic hybrid white light phosphors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Sheng; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2016-11-03

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have brought about a revolution in lighting and display. A very hot field in recent years has been to develop white-light phosphors, aiming to achieve better colour stability, better reproducibility, and a simpler fabrication process for LEDs and OLEDs. This feature article reviews the development of inorganic-organic hybrid white-light phosphors, including coordination compounds of small organic molecules, organically templated inorganic compounds (phosphates, borates, sulfides, halides), metal-functionalized organic polymers, and organically coated nanoparticles.

  9. Torsional Resonators Based on Inorganic Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Divon, Yiftach; Levi, Roi; Garel, Jonathan; Golberg, Dmitri; Tenne, Reshef; Ya'akobovitz, Assaf; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2017-01-11

    We study for the first time the resonant torsional behaviors of inorganic nanotubes, specifically tungsten disulfide (WS2) and boron nitride (BN) nanotubes, and compare them to that of carbon nanotubes. We have found WS2 nanotubes to have the highest quality factor (Q) and torsional resonance frequency, followed by BN nanotubes and carbon nanotubes. Dynamic and static torsional spring constants of the various nanotubes were found to be different, especially in the case of WS2, possibly due to a velocity-dependent intershell friction. These results indicate that inorganic nanotubes are promising building blocks for high-Q nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  10. SAXS in inorganic and bioinspired research.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Tomasz M; Benning, Liane G

    2013-01-01

    In situ and time-resolved structural information about emergent microstructures that progressively develop during the formation of inorganic or biologically mediated solid phases from solution is fundamental for understanding of the mechanisms driving complex precipitation reactions, for example, during biomineralization. In this brief chapter, we present the use of small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) techniques and show how SAXS can be used to gather structural information on the nanoscale properties of the de novo-forming entities. We base the discussion on several worked examples of inorganic materials such as calcium carbonate, silica, and perovskite-type titanates.

  11. Overexpression of Soluble Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase by Using Solubility Tags: Effects on Activity and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Madison A.; Gonzalez, Jesica; Hussain, Anjum; Oldfield, Rachel N.; Johnston, Kathryn A.; Lopez, Karlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase is an important extracellular matrix enzyme that has not been fully characterized due to its low solubility. In order to circumvent the low solubility of this enzyme, three solubility tags (Nus-A, Thioredoxin (Trx), and Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)) were engineered on the N-terminus of mature lysyl oxidase. Total enzyme yields were determined to be 1.5 mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme (0.75 mg/L of media), 7.84 mg for the Trx tagged enzyme (3.92 mg/L of media), and 9.33 mg for the GST tagged enzyme (4.67 mg/L of media). Enzymatic activity was calculated to be 0.11 U/mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme and 0.032 U/mg for the Trx tagged enzyme, and no enzymatic activity was detected for the GST tagged enzyme. All three solubility-tagged forms of the enzyme incorporated copper; however, the GST tagged enzyme appears to bind adventitious copper with greater affinity than the other two forms. The catalytic cofactor, lysyl tyrosyl quinone (LTQ), was determined to be 92% for the Nus-A and Trx tagged lysyl oxidase using the previously reported extinction coefficient of 15.4 mM−1 cm−1. No LTQ was detected for the GST tagged lysyl oxidase. Given these data, it appears that Nus-A is the most suitable tag for obtaining soluble and active recombinant lysyl oxidase from E. coli culture. PMID:26942005

  12. Characteristics of size-fractionated atmospheric metals and water-soluble metals in two typical episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingqing; Ma, Yongliang; Tan, Jihua; Zheng, Naijia; Duan, Jingchun; Sun, Yele; He, Kebin; Zhang, Yuanxun

    2015-10-01

    The abundance and behaviour of metals and water-soluble metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba and Pb) in size-fractionated aerosols were investigated during two typical episodes in Beijing. Water-soluble inorganic ions (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, NH4+ , F-, Cl-, SO42- and NO3-) were also measured. Atmospheric metals and water-soluble metals were both found at high levels; for PM2.5, average As, Cr, Cd, Cu, Mn and Pb concentrations were 14.8, 203.3, 2.5, 18.5, 42.6 and 135.3 ng/m3, respectively, and their water-soluble components were 11.1, 1.7, 2.4, 14.5, 19.8 and 97.8 ng/m3, respectively. Daily concentrations of atmospheric metals and water-soluble metals were generally in accordance with particle mass. The highest concentrations of metals and water-soluble metals were generally located in coarse mode and droplet mode, respectively. The lowest mass of metals and water-soluble metals was mostly in Aitken mode. The water solubility of all metals was low in Aitken and coarse modes, indicating that freshly emitted metals have low solubility. Metal water solubility generally increased with the decrease in particle size in the range of 0.26-10 μm. The water solubility of metals for PM10 was: 50% ≤ Cd, As, Sb, Pb; 26% < V, Mn, Cu, Zn and Sr ≤ 50%; others ≤20%. Most metals, water-soluble metals and their water solubility increased when polluted air mass came from the near west, near north-west, south-west and south-east of the mainland, and decreased when clean air mass came from the far north-west and far due south. The influence of dust-storms and clean days on water-soluble metals and size distribution was significant; however, the influence of rainfall was negligible. Aerosols with high concentrations of SO42- , K+ and NH4+ might indicate increased potential for human health effects because of their high correlation with water-soluble metals. Industrial emissions contribute substantially to water-soluble metal pollution as water-soluble metals

  13. Flamingos and drought as drivers of nutrients and microbial dynamics in a saline lake.

    PubMed

    Batanero, Gema L; León-Palmero, Elizabeth; Li, Linlin; Green, Andy J; Rendón-Martos, Manuel; Suttle, Curtis A; Reche, Isabel

    2017-09-22

    Waterbird aggregations and droughts affect nutrient and microbial dynamics in wetlands. We analysed the effects of high densities of flamingos on nutrients and microbial dynamics in a saline lake during a wet and a dry hydrological year, and explored the effects of guano on prokaryotic growth. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, total phosphorus and total nitrogen in the surface waters were 2-3 fold higher during the drought and were correlated with salinity. Flamingos stimulated prokaryotic heterotrophic production and triggered cascading effects on prokaryotic abundance, viruses and dissolved nitrogen. This stimulus of heterotrophic prokaryotes was associated with soluble phosphorus inputs from guano, and also from sediments. In the experiments, the specific growth rate and the carrying capacity were almost twice as high after guano addition than in the control treatments, and were coupled with soluble phosphorus assimilation. Flamingo guano was also rich in nitrogen. Dissolved N in lake water lagged behind the abundance of flamingos, but the causes of this lag are unclear. This study demonstrates that intense droughts could lead to increases in total nutrients in wetlands; however, microbial activity is likely constrained by the availability of soluble phosphorus, which appears to be more dependent on the abundance of waterbirds.

  14. Soluble metals in residual oil fly ash alter innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses to bacterial infection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jenny R. . E-mail: jur6@cdc.gov; Young, Shih-Houng; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M.

    2007-06-15

    The soluble metals of the pollutant, residual oil fly ash (ROFA), have been shown to alter pulmonary bacterial clearance in rats. The goal of this study was to determine the potential effects on both the innate and adaptive lung immune responses after bacterial infection in rats pre-exposed to the soluble metals in ROFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally dosed (i.t.) at day 0 with ROFA (R-Total) (1.0 mg/100 g body weight), the soluble fraction of ROFA (R-Soluble), the soluble sample subject to a chelator (R-Chelex), or phosphate-buffered saline (Saline). On day 3, rats were administered an i.t. dose of 5 x 10{sup 4} Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, bacterial pulmonary clearance was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on days 3 (pre-infection), 6, 8, and 10. A concentrated first fraction of lavage fluid was retained for analysis of lactate dehydrogenase and albumin to assess lung injury. BAL cell number, phenotype, and production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) were assessed, and a variety of cytokines were measured in the BAL fluid. Rats pre-treated with R-Soluble showed elevated lung injury/cytotoxicity and increased cellular influx into the lungs. R-Soluble-treatment also altered ROS, RNS, and cytokine levels, and caused a degree of macrophage and T cell inhibition. These effects of R-Soluble result in increased pulmonary bacterial burden after infection. The results suggest that soluble metals in ROFA increase lung injury and inflammation, and alter both innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses.

  15. Soluble Manganese(III) in the Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, G. W., III; Oldham, V.; Madison, A.; Tebo, B.; Jones, M.; Jensen, L.; Owings, S.; Mucci, A.; Sundby, B.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies have confirmed the presence of soluble manganese(III), which along with Mn(II) passes through a 0.2 μm filter, in suboxic marine waters. Here we applied a spectrophotometric method using a soluble porphyrin as a competitive ligand to calculate the concentrations and kinetics of Mn(II) and Mn(III) recovery. Data will be presented from the suboxic porewaters of the Saint Lawrence estuary, the suboxic and anoxic waters of the Chesapeake Bay and the oxygenated surface waters of a coastal waterway bordered by wetlands and salt marshes in Delaware. Soluble Mn(III) accounts for up to 100% of the dissolved Mn pool with concentrations ranging from the detection limit of 50 nM to 80 μM at the oxic/anoxic interface of the non-sulfidic porewaters from the hemipelagic sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary. Data indicate weak-ligand complexation of Mn(III) formed from Mn(II) oxidation as well as reduction of MnO2. Complexation of Mn(III) in the anoxic waters of Chesapeake Bay appears stronger as the porphyrin could not outcompete the natural ligands binding Mn(III). Mn(III) complexes were reduced in the presence of hydroxylamine or hydrogen sulfide and detected as Mn(II). Soluble Mn(III) comprised up to 52 % of total dissolved Mn. Profiles over the course of a five day cruise showed that high Mn(III) concentrations (7.3 μM) were observed at low H2S (4.9 μM) whereas low Mn(III) (1.1 μM) was detected at high H2S (40 μM). The presence of Mn(III) in sulfidic waters indicated that it is kinetically stabilized in situ by strong ligands so reduction to Mn(II) was incomplete. One electron reductive dissolution of solid MnO2 particles formed at the oxic-anoxic interface appear to be the source of Mn(III). Lastly, soluble Mn(III) was detected in the oxygenated surface waters of a coastal waterway (salinity ranging from freshwater to 31) bordered by wetlands and salt marshes in Delaware. Soluble Mn(III) made up 0-49 % of the total dissolved Mn (maximum of 1.92

  16. [Study on the correlation between the quality of Cornus officinalis and the contents of the inorganic elements in the planting soil].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Li; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Sui-Qing; Shang, Chao-Li

    2011-08-01

    To analyze the correlation between the quality of Cornus officinalis and the contents of the inorganic elements in the planting soil. The contents of 11 kinds of inorganic elements including Zn, Mn, K, Fe, Mg, Ca, Cu, Cd, As, Pb and Hg in Cornus officinalis and the planting soil were determined; The contents of loganin, ursolic acid, polysaccharides, tannins, organic acid, water-soluble extractives and ethanol-soluble extractives in Cornus officinalis were determined; The correlation between the quality of Cornus officinalis and the contents of the inorganic elements in the planting soil was analyzed. There was no significant difference in the content of chemical components of Cornus officinalis produced in the three main areas. The contents of loganin and water-soluble extract complied with pharmacopoeial provisions. Especially, inorganic elements of Fe, Mn and K had significant effects on the quality of Cornus officinalis. The results provide the foundation for the selection of cultivating area and the reference for standard cultivation of Cornus officinalis.

  17. Space Radar Image of Saline Valley, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-15

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Saline Valley, about 30 km 19 miles east of the town of Independence, California created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry.

  18. Aquarius Observations of Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This visualization shows changes in global sea surface salinity, as measured by NASA’s Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft, from December 2011 through December 2012. Red repr...

  19. On observing acoustic backscattering from salinity turbulence.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Louis; Sastre-Cordova, Marcos M

    2011-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that at sufficiently high levels of oceanic salinity turbulence it should be possible to observe acoustic backscattering. However, there have been limited in situ measurements to confirm this hypothesis. Using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with upward and downward looking 1.2 MHz acoustic Doppler current profilers and with turbulence and fine scale sensors, measurements were performed in a region of intense turbulence and a strong salinity gradient. The approach taken was to correlate variations in the backscattered acoustic intensity, I, with a theoretical acoustic backscattering cross section per volume for salinity turbulence, σ(s), to obtain an estimated scattering cross section per volume, σ(e). Results indicated that of order 50% of the observed region was characterized by salinity turbulence induced backscattering.

  20. Soluble metalloendopeptidases and neuroendocrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Shrimpton, Corie N; Smith, A Ian; Lew, Rebecca A

    2002-10-01

    Peptidases play a vital and often highly specific role in the physiological and pathological generation and termination of peptide hormone signals. The thermolysin-like family of metalloendopeptidases involved in the extracellular processing of neuroendocrine and cardiovascular peptides are of particular significance, reflecting both their specificity for particular peptide substrates and their utility as therapeutic targets. Although the functions of the membrane-bound members of this family, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase, are well established, a role for the predominantly soluble family members in peptide metabolism is only just emerging. This review will focus on the biochemistry, cell biology, and physiology of the soluble metalloendopeptidases EC 3.4.24.15 (thimet oligopeptidase) and EC 3.4.24.16 (neurolysin), as well as presenting evidence that both peptidases play an important role in such diverse functions as reproduction, nociception, and cardiovascular homeostasis.

  1. Tough soluble aromatic thermoplastic copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. Alternatively, these copolyimides may be prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydiisocyanate. Also, the copolyimide may be prepared by reacting the corresponding tetra acid and ester precursors of 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride and 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride with 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  2. Cloning of a vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase gene from the halophyte Suaeda corniculata whose heterologous overexpression improves salt, saline-alkali and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Nan; Dong, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Xiu-Duo; Liu, Xiu-Ming; Yang, Jing; Li, Hai-Yan

    2011-09-01

    Salt, saline-alkali conditions, and drought are major environmental factors limiting plant growth and productivity. The vacuolar H(+)-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatase (V-H(+)-PPase) is an electrogenic proton pump that translocates protons into vacuoles in plant cells. Expression of V-H(+)-PPase increases in plants under a number of abiotic stresses, and is thought to have an important role in adaptation to abiotic stress. In this work, we report the isolation and characterization of the gene, ScVP, encoding a vacuolar inorganic pyrophosphatase (V-H(+)-PPase) from the halophyte, Suaeda corniculata. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that ScVP was induced in roots, stems and leaves under treatment with salt, saline-alkali and drought. Compared with wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, transgenic plants overexpressing ScVP accumulated more Na(+) in leaves and roots, and showed increased tolerance to high salinity, saline-alkali and drought stresses. The germination percentage of transgenic Arabidopsis seeds was higher than that of WT seeds under the abiotic stresses. The root length of transgenic plants under salt stress was longer than that of WT plants. Furthermore, the rate of water loss during drought stress was higher in WT than in transgenic plants. Collectively, these results indicate that ScVP plays an important role in plant tolerance to salt, saline-alkali and drought stress.

  3. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  4. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  5. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  6. A study on major inorganic ion composition of atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Salve, P R; Krupadam, R J; Wate, S R

    2007-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected from Akola and Buldana region covering around 40 sqkm area during October-November 2002 and were analyzed for ten major inorganic ions namely F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-), PO4(2-), Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and NH4+ using ion chromatographic technique. The average mass of aerosols was found to be 225.81 microg/m3 with standard deviation of 31.29 and average total water soluble load of total cations and anions was found to be 4.32 microg/m3. The concentration of ions in samples showed a general pattern as SO4(2-) > NO3- > Cl- > PO4(2-) > F- for anions and Na+ > Ca2+ > NH4+ > Mg2+ > K+ for cations. The overall composition of the aerosols was taken into account to identify the sources. The trend showed higher concentration of sodium followed by calcium, sulfate, nitrate, phosphate and ammoinum and found to be influenced by terrestrial sources. The presence of SO4(2-) and NO3- in aerosols may be due to re-suspension of soil particles. Ca2+, Mg2+ and Cl- are to be derived from soil materials. The presence of NH4+ may be attributed to the reaction of NH3 vapors with acidic gases may react or condense on an acidic particle surface of anthropogenic origin. The atmospheric aerosol is slightly acidic due to neutralization of basicity by SO2 and NO(x).

  7. Inorganic arsenic removal in rice bran by percolating cooking water.

    PubMed

    Signes-Pastor, Antonio J; Carey, Manus; Meharg, Andrew A

    2017-11-01

    Rice bran, a by-product of milling rice, is highly nutritious but contains very high levels of the non-threshold carcinogen inorganic arsenic (i-As), at concentrations around 1mg/kg. This i-As content needs to be reduced to make rice bran a useful food ingredient. Evaluated here is a novel approach to minimizing rice bran i-As content which is also suitable for its stabilization namely, cooking bran in percolating arsenic-free boiling water. Up to 96% of i-As removal was observed for a range of rice bran products, with i-As removal related to the volume of cooking water used. This process reduced the copper, potassium, and phosphorus content, but had little effect on other trace- and macro-nutrient elements in the rice bran. There was little change in organic composition, as assayed by NIR, except for a decrease in the soluble sugar and an increase, due to biomass loss, in dietary fiber. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel subfamily of monomeric inorganic pyrophosphatases in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-García, María R.; Losada, Manuel; Serrano, Aurelio

    2005-01-01

    Two sPPases (soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases, EC 3.6.1.1) have been isolated from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Both are monomeric proteins of organellar localization, the chloroplastic sPPase I [Cr (Ch. reinhardtii)-sPPase I, 30 kDa] is a major isoform and slightly larger protein than the mitochondrial sPPase II (Cr-sPPase II, 24 kDa). They are members of sPPase family I and are encoded by two different cDNAs, as demonstrated by peptide mass fingerprint analysis. Molecular phylogenetic analyses indicated that Cr-sPPase I is closely related to other eukaryotic sPPases, whereas Cr-sPPase II resembles its prokaryotic counterparts. Chloroplastic sPPase I may have replaced a cyanobacterial ancestor very early during plastid evolution. Cr-sPPase II orthologues are found in members of the green photosynthetic lineage, but not in animals or fungi. These two sPPases from photosynthetic eukaryotes are novel monomeric family I sPPases with different molecular phylogenies and cellular localizations. PMID:16313235

  9. Inorganic sulfur oxidizing system in green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Takuro; Shiga, Michiko; Inoue, Kazuhito

    2010-06-01

    Green sulfur bacteria use various reduced sulfur compounds such as sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate as electron donors for photoautotrophic growth. This article briefly summarizes what is known about the inorganic sulfur oxidizing systems of these bacteria with emphasis on the biochemical aspects. Enzymes that oxidize sulfide in green sulfur bacteria are membrane-bound sulfide-quinone oxidoreductase, periplasmic (sometimes membrane-bound) flavocytochrome c sulfide dehydrogenase, and monomeric flavocytochrome c (SoxF). Some green sulfur bacteria oxidize thiosulfate by the multienzyme system called either the TOMES (thiosulfate oxidizing multi-enzyme system) or Sox (sulfur oxidizing system) composed of the three periplasmic proteins: SoxB, SoxYZ, and SoxAXK with a soluble small molecule cytochrome c as the electron acceptor. The oxidation of sulfide and thiosulfate by these enzymes in vitro is assumed to yield two electrons and result in the transfer of a sulfur atom to persulfides, which are subsequently transformed to elemental sulfur. The elemental sulfur is temporarily stored in the form of globules attached to the extracellular surface of the outer membranes. The oxidation pathway of elemental sulfur to sulfate is currently unclear, although the participation of several proteins including those of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system etc. is suggested from comparative genomic analyses.

  10. Synthesis of water soluble graphene.

    PubMed

    Si, Yongchao; Samulski, Edward T

    2008-06-01

    A facile and scalable preparation of aqueous solutions of isolated, sparingly sulfonated graphene is reported. (13)C NMR and FTIR spectra indicate that the bulk of the oxygen-containing functional groups was removed from graphene oxide. The electrical conductivity of thin evaporated films of graphene (1250 S/m) relative to similarly prepared graphite (6120 S/m) implies that an extended conjugated sp (2) network is restored in the water soluble graphene.

  11. Soluble Precursor Route to Polyanilines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    goal of producing a processible form of the conducting polymer polyaniline ( PANI ), the Phase I program concentrated on development of the synthesis of... polyaniline , on the other hand, has not only been successful in every respect, but makes other attempts towards processing PAni seem awkward and obsolete...29/92 TITLE AND SUBTITLE .... 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Soluble Precursor Route to Polyanilines 6. AUTHOR(S) - 63218C 1602 0O Dr Floyd L. Klavetter 7

  12. Origin of the soluble species in the Tissint Mars meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberlin, Elizabeth; Kounaves, Samuel; Claire, Mark; Gabriel-Ori, Gian; Taj-Edine, Kamal

    2015-04-01

    The Tissint martian meteorite is a high magnesium olivine shergottite that was observed falling on 18 July 2011 near the Oued Drâa valley, Morocco [1]. Fragments collected over the next several months in the remote desert region should thus represent minimally contaminated fragments of martian surface and crustal material. We obtained interior fragments of Tissint from the Natural History Museum in London, and analyzed the soluble species using ion chromatography. Analyses showed trace levels of perchlorate (ClO4-) as well as several other species including nitrate (NO3-), chlorate (ClO3), and sulfate (SO42-). In order to differentiate the measured species in Tissint from possible terrestrial contamination, we collected soil samples from the Tissint strewn field, centered at approximately 50km ESE of Tata, and 48 km SSW of Tissint, near El Ga'ïdat plateau and both N and S of Oued El Gsaïb valley. Samples were collected from the surface and at depth from over 15 sites spanning the strewn field. The samples were then brought back to our laboratory and analyzed for a variety of soluble inorganic species. We also compare these values to those recently reported for the Mars meteorite EETA79001 [2], which shares similar lithology, elemental abundance, and cosmic ray exposure age, to the Tissint meteorite. [1] Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H., et al., (2012) Science 338, 785-788 [2] Kounaves, S.P., et al., (2014) Icarus, 229, 206-213

  13. Assessment of Halophyte Growth in Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, A.; Stracke, S.; Nowak, B.; Goehring, N.; Saito, L.; Verburg, P.

    2016-12-01

    Salinization of soil and water can pose a serious threat for irrigated agricultural lands in arid and semi-arid regions as high concentrations of salt negatively impacts crop production and, consequently, the agricultural economy. Highly salt-tolerant plants, or halophytes, may provide a viable option for saline areas, enabling economic production from previously unproductive land. Many halophytes can be used for human consumption, forage for livestock, or biofuel production. These plants may also remediate saline soils by taking up the salt from the soil, thereby improving conditions for conventional crop cultivation. This project aims to determine halophyte growth under different salt stresses. Two halophytic crops, AC Saltlander green wheatgrass (Elymus hoffmannii) and Rainbow quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa var. rainbow), were cultivated in a greenhouse with saline soil treatments (2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 dS/m) and saline irrigation treatments (1, 2, 4, and 6 dS/m), resulting in 20 different treatment combinations. Plant characteristics such as leaf area, number of tillers and branches, and leaf height were measured until harvest. A subset of harvested biomass (inflorescences, stems, leaves, and roots) and soil subsamples were analyzed for nutrient and salt content to determine relationships between salinity treatments, aboveground and belowground biomass, and nutrient content. Results from this experiment will be used to help parametrize models simulating different management scenarios for a variety of halophytic species.

  14. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated. PMID:20559495

  15. Fresh meteoric versus recirculated saline groundwater nutrient inputs into a subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Sadat-Noori, Mahmood; Santos, Isaac R; Tait, Douglas R; Maher, Damien T

    2016-10-01

    The role of groundwater in transporting nutrients to coastal aquatic systems has recently received considerable attention. However, the relative importance of fresh versus saline groundwater-derived nutrient inputs to estuaries and how these groundwater pathways may alter surface water N:P ratios remains poorly constrained. We performed detailed time series measurements of nutrients in a tidal estuary (Hat Head, NSW, Australia) and used radium to quantify the contribution of fresh and saline groundwater to total surface water estuarine exports under contrasting hydrological conditions (wet and dry season). Tidally integrated nutrient fluxes showed that the estuary was a source of nutrients to the coastal waters. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export was 7-fold higher than the average global areal flux rate for rivers likely due to the small catchment size, surrounding wetlands and high groundwater inputs. Fresh groundwater discharge was dominant in the wet season accounting for up to 45% of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and 48% of total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) estuarine exports. In the dry season, fresh and saline groundwater accounted for 21 and 33% of TDN export, respectively. The combined fresh and saline groundwater fluxes of NO3, PO4, NH4, DON, DOP, TDN and TDP were estimated to account for 66, 58, 55, 31, 21, 53 and 47% of surface water exports, respectively. Groundwater-derived nitrogen inputs to the estuary were responsible for a change in the surface water N:P ratio from typical N-limiting conditions to P-limiting as predicted by previous studies. This shows the importance of both fresh and saline groundwater as a source of nutrients for coastal productivity and nutrient budgets of coastal waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Variation in antioxidant enzyme activities, growth and some physiological parameters of bitter melon (Momordica charantia) under salinity and chromium stress.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Mahsa; Heidari, Mostafa; Ghorbani, Hadi

    2016-07-01

    In general, salinity and heavy metals interfere with several physiological processes and reduce plant growth. In order to evaluate of three levels of salinity (0, 4 and 8 ds m(-1)) and three concentration of chromium (0, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) soil) in bitter melon (Momordica charantia), a plot experiment was conducted in greenhouse at university of Shahrood, Iran. The results revealed that chromium treatment had no significant affect on fresh and dry weight, but salinity caused reduction of fresh and dry weight in growth parameter. Salinity and chromium enhanced antioxidant enzymes activities like catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and sodium content in leaves. However salinity and chromium treatments had no effect on potassium, phosphorus in leaves, soluble carbohydrate concentration in leaves and root, but decreased the carotenoid content in leaves. On increasing salinity from control to 8 ds m(-1) chlorophyll a, b and anthocyanin content decreased by 41.6%, 61.1% and 26.5% respectively but chromium treatments had no significant effect on these photosynthetic pigments.

  17. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  18. Electron Microscopy of Tungsten Disulphide Inorganic Nanomaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    cylindrical molecule similar to a carbon nanotube. Inorganic nanotubes have been observed in some mineral deposits. Linus Pauling suggested the...diffraction pattern was due to the carbon coating. Figure 6 SAED taken from the single nanotube shown in figure 5 REFERENCES 1. Pauling , L; "The

  19. Removing dissolved inorganic contaminants from water

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D.; Subramonian, S.; Sorg, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    This article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. These are precipitation, coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane separations by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis, and combinations of these processes. The general criteria for process selection are discussed, and the processes and their typical applications are described.

  20. All inorganic ambient temperature rechargeable lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, H. C.; Dey, A. N.; Schlaikjer, C.; Foster, D.; Kallianidis, M.

    Research and development was carried out on ambient-temperature rechargeable lithium batteries with inorganic SO2 electrolytes. The following solutes in SO2 were studied: tetrachloroaluminates, LiAlCl4, Li2B10Cl10, and LiGaCl4. Copper chloride (CuCl2) was used as one of the electrode materials.

  1. FRAMEWORK FOR INORGANIC METALS RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA has prepared a framework to guide risk assessors in assessing human and ecological risks of inorganic metals. Metals and metal compounds have properties not generally encountered with organic chemicals. For example, metals are neither created nor destroyed by biological a...

  2. INORGANIC ELEMENTS AND DISTRIBUTION OF EASTERN OYSTERS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher, William S. In press. Inorganic Elements and Distribution of Eastern Oysters (Abstract). To be presented at the 96th Annual Meeting (Aquaculture 2004) of the National Shellfisheries Association, 1-5 March 2004, Honolulu, HI. 1 p. (ERL,GB R962).

    For over a century w...

  3. Plasmonic sensors for identification of inorganic microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabunya-Klyachkovskaya, E. V.; Korza, E. V.; Trotsiuk, L. L.; Matsukovich, A. S.; Kulakovich, O. S.

    2017-01-01

    A method of applying giant stimulated electronic Raman scattering (SERS) by plasmonic gold nanoparticles for identification of inorganic microcrystals in the structure of works of art is presented. The high signal-to-noise ratio in the SERS spectra, along with the low luminescent background, makes the method promising for implementation in practice of technical expertise of objects of cultural heritage.

  4. INORGANIC ELEMENTS AND DISTRIBUTION OF EASTERN OYSTERS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher, William S. In press. Inorganic Elements and Distribution of Eastern Oysters (Abstract). To be presented at the 96th Annual Meeting (Aquaculture 2004) of the National Shellfisheries Association, 1-5 March 2004, Honolulu, HI. 1 p. (ERL,GB R962).

    For over a century w...

  5. Structural properties of scandium inorganic salts

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jeremiah M.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-16

    Here, the structural properties of reported inorganic scandium (Sc) salts were reviewed, including the halide (Cl, Br, and I), nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate salts. Additional analytical techniques used for characterization of these complexes (metrical data, FTIR and 45Sc NMR spectroscopy) were tabulated. A structural comparison of Sc to select lanthanide (La, Gd, Lu) salt complexes was briefly evaluated.

  6. Hybrid organic-inorganic polariton laser.

    PubMed

    Paschos, G G; Somaschi, N; Tsintzos, S I; Coles, D; Bricks, J L; Hatzopoulos, Z; Lidzey, D G; Lagoudakis, P G; Savvidis, P G

    2017-09-12

    Organic materials exhibit exceptional room temperature light emitting characteristics and enormous exciton oscillator strength, however, their low charge carrier mobility prevent their use in high-performance applications such as electrically pumped lasers. In this context, ultralow threshold polariton lasers, whose operation relies on Bose-Einstein condensation of polaritons - part-light part-matter quasiparticles, are highly advantageous since the requirement for high carrier injection no longer holds. Polariton lasers have been successfully implemented using inorganic materials owing to their excellent electrical properties, however, in most cases their relatively small exciton binding energies limit their operation temperature. It has been suggested that combining organic and inorganic semiconductors in a hybrid microcavity, exploiting resonant interactions between these materials would permit to dramatically enhance optical nonlinearities and operation temperature. Here, we obtain cavity mediated hybridization of GaAs and J-aggregate excitons in the strong coupling regime under electrical injection of carriers as well as polariton lasing up to 200 K under non-resonant optical pumping. Our demonstration paves the way towards realization of hybrid organic-inorganic microcavities which utilise the organic component for sustaining high temperature polariton condensation and efficient electrical injection through inorganic structure.

  7. Structural properties of scandium inorganic salts

    DOE PAGES

    Sears, Jeremiah M.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-16

    Here, the structural properties of reported inorganic scandium (Sc) salts were reviewed, including the halide (Cl, Br, and I), nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate salts. Additional analytical techniques used for characterization of these complexes (metrical data, FTIR and 45Sc NMR spectroscopy) were tabulated. A structural comparison of Sc to select lanthanide (La, Gd, Lu) salt complexes was briefly evaluated.

  8. Total and inorganic arsenic in Antarctic macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Farías, Silvia; Smichowski, Patricia; Vélez, Dinoraz; Montoro, Rosa; Curtosi, Antonio; Vodopívez, Cristian

    2007-10-01

    The Antarctic region offers unparalleled possibilities of investigating the natural distribution of metals and metalloids, such as arsenic. Total and inorganic As were analysed in nine species of Antarctic macroalgae collected during the 2002 summer season in the Potter Cove area at Jubany-Dallmann Station (South Shetland Islands, Argentinian Base). Total As was determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry after microwave-assisted acid digestion. Inorganic As was determined by acid digestion, solvent extraction, flow injection-hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry. Total As ranged from 5.8 microg g(-1) dry weight (dw) (Myriogramme sp.) to 152 microg g(-1)dw (Himantothallus grandifolius). Total As concentrations were higher in Phaeophytes (mean+/-SD: 71+/-44 microg g(-1)dw) than in Rhodophytes (mean+/-SD: 15+/-11 microg g(-1)dw). Inorganic As ranged from 0.12 microg g(-1) (Myriogramme sp.) to 0.84 microg g(-1)dw (Phaeurus antarcticus). The percentage of inorganic As with respect to total As was 0.7 for Phaeophytes, but almost 4 times higher for Rhodophytes (2.6). The work discusses possible causes for the presence of As in marine organisms in that pristine environment.

  9. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... protective equipment. Employee rotation is not required as a control strategy before respiratory protection...) Engineering plans and studies used to determine methods selected for controlling exposure to inorganic arsenic... study among employees at a copper-ore smelting works including investigations of skin reactions to...

  11. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... protective equipment. Employee rotation is not required as a control strategy before respiratory protection...) Engineering plans and studies used to determine methods selected for controlling exposure to inorganic arsenic... study among employees at a copper-ore smelting works including investigations of skin reactions to...

  12. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... protective equipment. Employee rotation is not required as a control strategy before respiratory protection...) Engineering plans and studies used to determine methods selected for controlling exposure to inorganic arsenic... study among employees at a copper-ore smelting works including investigations of skin reactions to...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... protective equipment. Employee rotation is not required as a control strategy before respiratory protection...) Engineering plans and studies used to determine methods selected for controlling exposure to inorganic arsenic... study among employees at a copper-ore smelting works including investigations of skin reactions to...

  14. Inorganic bonding of semiconductor strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, N. L.

    1970-01-01

    Inorganic bonding materials minimize outgassing and improve electrical and mechanical properties of semiconductor strain-gage transducers in high-vacuum and high-temperature operations. The two basic methods described are ceramic-glass-bonding and metallic bond formation between the strain gage and the substrate.

  15. [Investigation and canonical correspondence analysis of salinity contents in secondary salinization greenhouse soils in Shanghai suburb].

    PubMed

    Tang, Dong; Mao, Liang; Zhi, Yue-e; Zhang, Jin-Zhong; Zhou, Pei; Chai, Xiao-Tong

    2014-12-01

    The salinity characteristics of greenhouse soils with cropping obstacles in Shanghai suburb were investigated and analyzed. The salinity contents of the salinization greenhouse soils showed a trend of first increasing and then decreasing with the increasing cropping duration. The salinized soils mainly included slightly salted, mildly salted and salted soils, which accounted for 17.39%, 56.52% and 13.04%, respectively. Among them, the degree of salinity in greenhouse soil planted with asparagus in Chongming County was the highest. Among the salt ions in greenhouse soils, the cations were mainly Ca2+ and Na+, while the anions were mainly NO3- and SO4(2-). The degree of salinity was mainly influenced by fertilization mode, cropping duration, crop type and management level, which led to the great variation in the salinity contents and salt ions. Canonical correspondence analysis found that the contents of Ca2+, Mg2+ and NO3- in greenhouse soils were greatly affected by cropping duration, and the degree of salinity would be enhanced and attenuated with long-term application of single fertilizer and mixed application of chemical fertilizer and organic manure, respectively. The greenhouse soils in Shanghai suburb could be classified as four patterns influenced by the relationship between salinity ions and samples, and the most soils were influenced by Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3- and Cl-, which required to be primarily controlled.

  16. [Soluble of Metals within TSP in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan; Feng, Chong; Qu, Jian-guo; Zhang, Jing

    2015-04-01

    The dissolution of metals within aerosol particles is meaningful to evaluate the bioavailability and mobility of metals. Total suspended particles (TSP) samples were collected in Shanghai. We extracted the water soluble and acid soluble (pH = 2) metals by the mini-recirculation-leach-system and measured their concentrations by the high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The dissolution kinetics were rapid, the maximum solubility of metals could be reached in a few minutes. Overall, the average water-soluble concentrations were low for Co, Cr, Cd, V and Ni, median for Cu, Pb and Mn and high for Fe, Al, Zn and Mg. Combine the soluble metal concentrations with the back trajectory, the original air mass had significant impacts on water soluble metal concentrations. The water solubility and acid solubility were different for various metals, the water solubility of Fe was the lowest (2.0%), others followed an order: Al, Cr, V, Pb, Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, Mn, Mg, Zn. The metals' solubility was increased with the decrease of the solvent pH value. While the chemical speciation of metals was the internal cause of metals' solubility, the metals' ionic potential and the water solubility was negatively correlated.

  17. Estimation and characterization of physical and inorganic chemical indicators of water quality by using SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shareef, Muntadher A.; Toumi, Abdelmalek; Khenchaf, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Recently, remote sensing is considering one of the most important tools in studies of water scattering and water characterization. Traditional methods for monitoring pollutants depended on optical satellite rather than Radar data. Thus, many of Water Quality Parameters (WQP) from optical imagery are still limited. In this paper, a new approach based on the TerraSAR-X images has been presented which it is used to map the region of interest and to estimate physical and chemical WQPs. This approach based on a Small Perturbation Model (SPM) for the electromagnetic scattering is applied by using the Elfouhaily spectrum. A series of inversions have been included in this model started by finding the reflectivity from backscattering coefficients which are calculated from SAR images. Another inversion has been applied to find dielectric constant from the calculation models of the reflectivity (in HH and VV polarizations). Then, a Stogryn Debye formulation has been used to estimate temperature and salinity of water surface from SAR images. After many derivations we got a new model able to estimate temperature and salinity directly from backscattering coefficients obtained from radar images. Inorganic chemical parameters which are represented by Total Dissolved Salts (TDS) and the Electrical Conductivity (EC) are estimated directly from salinity. A tow dataset of instu data have been used to validate this work. The validation included a comparison between parameters measured in situ and those estimated from Terra SAR-X image.

  18. Impact of PGPR inoculation on growth and antioxidant status of wheat under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Sudhir Kumar; Singh, Jay Shankar; Saxena, Anil Kumar; Singh, Devendra Pratap

    2012-07-01

    Two plant growth-promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) strains, Bacillus subtilis SU47 and Arthrobacter sp. SU18, were found to tolerate 8% NaCl. Wheat co-inoculated with these two PGPR strains, and grown under different salinity regimes (2-6 dS m(-1) ), showed an increase in dry biomass, total soluble sugars and proline content. Wheat sodium content was reduced under co-inoculated conditions but not after single inoculation with either strain or in the control. The activity of antioxidant enzymes in wheat leaves decreased under salinity stress after PGPR co-inoculation, suggesting these PGPR species could be used for amelioration of stress in wheat plants. Activity of three antioxidant enzymes in wheat grown with both PGPR strains was reduced, most notably that of catalase activity at a salinity of 6 dS m(-1) , when compared with the control. The results indicate that co-inoculation with B. subtilis and Arthrobacter sp. could alleviate the adverse effects of soil salinity on wheat growth.

  19. Two Fixed Ratio Dilutions for Soil Salinity Monitoring in Hypersaline Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Juan; Weindorf, David C.; Castañeda, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Highly soluble salts are undesirable in agriculture because they reduce yields or the quality of most cash crops and can leak to surface or sub-surface waters. In some cases salinity can be associated with unique history, rarity, or special habitats protected by environmental laws. Yet in considering the measurement of soil salinity for long-term monitoring purposes, adequate methods are required. Both saturated paste extracts, intended for agriculture, and direct surface and/or porewater salinity measurement, used in inundated wetlands, are unsuited for hypersaline wetlands that often are only occasionally inundated. For these cases, we propose the use of 1:5 soil/water (weight/weight) extracts as the standard for expressing the electrical conductivity (EC) of such soils and for further salt determinations. We also propose checking for ion-pairing with a 1:10 or more diluted extract in hypersaline soils. As an illustration, we apply the two-dilutions approach to a set of 359 soil samples from saline wetlands ranging in ECe from 2.3 dS m-1 to 183.0 dS m-1. This easy procedure will be useful in survey campaigns and in the monitoring of soil salt content. PMID:26001130

  20. Beneficial effects of exogenous iodine in lettuce plants subjected to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Leyva, Rocio; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Eva; Ríos, Juan J; Rubio-Wilhelmi, María M; Romero, Luis; Ruiz, Juan M; Blasco, Begoña

    2011-08-01

    Salinity inhibits plant growth due to ionic and osmotic effects on metabolic processes and nutritional balance, leading to impaired physiological functions. Selenium (Se) and silicon (Si) can be partially alleviated by the effects wrought by NaCl on the plant metabolism. Iodine (I), applied as iodate (IO(3)(-)) in biofortification programmes, has been confirmed to improve the antioxidant response in lettuce plants. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether the application of IO(3)(-) can improve the response to severe salinity stress in lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. Philipus). In this work, the application of IO(3)(-) (20-80 μM) in lettuce plants under salinity stress (100mM of NaCl) exerted a significantly positive effect on biomass and raised the levels of soluble sugars while lowering the Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations as well as boosting the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, APX, DHAR and GR. Therefore, IO(3)(-) could be considered a possibly beneficial element to counteract the harmful effects of salinity stress.