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Sample records for saltillo coahuila mexico

  1. Feasibility study, conceptual design and bid package preparation for the treatment and effluent reuse of domestic wastewater discharges from saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico. Final report. Volume 2. Export trade information; Fideicomiso para la ampliacion de infraestructura y eficientizacion del agua potable, drenaje sanitario y saneamiento de aguas residuales para la ciudad de saltillo, coahuila

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The study, conducted by Freese and Nichols, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of the State of Coahuila, Mexico. The report presents the findings of the feasibility study and conceptual design for the treatment and effluent reuse of wastewater from Saltillo, Coahuila. The main objective of the study is to determine the most feasible alternative for wastewater treatment. This is the second of two volumes. It contains the appendices and is divided into the following sections: (1) Appendix A - Wastewater Treatment and Reuse Regulations; (2) Appendix B - Flow Monitoring Program Results; (3) Appendix C - Partial Results for the First Monitoring Period; (4) Appendix D - Characterization Program; (5) Appendix E - Characterization Program Results; (6) Appendix F - Preliminary Treatment Unit Design and Cost Estimation; (7) Appendix G - List of Threatened and Endangered Species; (8) Appendix H - Cost Estimation for the Wastewater Treatment Plant; (9) Appendix I - Hydraulic and Cost Calculations for Interceptors; (10) Appendix J - Financial Feasibility Worksheets.

  2. Amphibians and reptiles of the state of Coahuila, Mexico, with comparison with adjoining states

    PubMed Central

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A.; Smith, Geoffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compiled a checklist of the amphibians and reptiles of the state of Coahuila, Mexico. The list comprises 133 species (24 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 27 families (9 amphibians, 18 reptiles) and 65 genera (16 amphibians, 49 reptiles). Coahuila has a high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Coahuila has relatively few state endemics, but has several regional endemics. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Coahuila and bordering states is fairly extensive. Of the 132 species of native amphibians and reptiles, eight are listed as Vulnerable, six as Near Threatened, and six as Endangered in the IUCN Red List. In the SEMARNAT listing, 19 species are Subject to Special Protection, 26 are Threatened, and three are in Danger of Extinction. Coahuila is home to several species of conservation concern, especially lizards and turtles. Coahuila is an important state for the conservation of the native regional fauna. PMID:27408554

  3. Amphibians and reptiles of the state of Coahuila, Mexico, with comparison with adjoining states.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A; Smith, Geoffrey R

    2016-01-01

    We compiled a checklist of the amphibians and reptiles of the state of Coahuila, Mexico. The list comprises 133 species (24 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 27 families (9 amphibians, 18 reptiles) and 65 genera (16 amphibians, 49 reptiles). Coahuila has a high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Coahuila has relatively few state endemics, but has several regional endemics. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Coahuila and bordering states is fairly extensive. Of the 132 species of native amphibians and reptiles, eight are listed as Vulnerable, six as Near Threatened, and six as Endangered in the IUCN Red List. In the SEMARNAT listing, 19 species are Subject to Special Protection, 26 are Threatened, and three are in Danger of Extinction. Coahuila is home to several species of conservation concern, especially lizards and turtles. Coahuila is an important state for the conservation of the native regional fauna.

  4. Flash Flood Trail near Parras, Coahuila, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Evidence of a recent flash flood can be seen in the form of light brown sediment that flowed down gullies and mountain sides forming ponds of debris over agricultural areas in the broad valley near the town of Parras (26.5N, 102.5W). This part of Mexico has extensive vineyards, orchards and both dry land and irrigated agriculture. Based on the photo, it appears that flash flood waters damaged some 300 square miles of property in this area alone.

  5. Renewable energy load assessment for Boquillas Del Carmen Coahuila, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, R.

    1995-08-01

    This report outlines the estimates that were made in 1992 of the potential load requirements for Boquillas del Carmen, a small Mexican village on the northern border of the state of Coahuila, Mexico near Big Bend National Park in southern Texas. The study was made to help determine the possibility that village might be electrified by solar or wind energy. Various estimates of are given of the potential load based on estimates ranging from basic use of lights, radio, television, and small household appliances to microwave ovens, refrigerators, and direct evaporative coolers. The low-energy consumption case was estimated to be at 23.0 kWh/month per residence per month, and the high-energy consumption case (with cooling) was 140.7 kWh/month per residence. On average, the typical residence is occupied by five individuals.

  6. Red cell acid phosphatase types and GC polymorphisms in Mérida, Oaxaca, León, and Saltillo, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lisker, R; Ramírez, E; Peñaloza, R; Salamanca, F

    1994-12-01

    Red cell acid phosphatase types and GC polymorphisms were studied in Mérida and Oaxaca, Mexico. GC polymorphisms were also investigated in León and Saltillo. The ACP*A, ACP*B, and ACP*C gene frequencies were 0.215, 0.770, and 0.015 respectively, in Mérida and 0.205, 0.788, and 0.002, respectively, in Oaxaca. In Oaxaca the ACP*R gene had a frequency of 0.005. The results are similar to other Mestizo groups studied in Mexico; it is concluded that the ACP*C and ACP*R genes were introduced by admixture of native Amerindians with whites and blacks, respectively. The GC*1S, GC*1F, and GC*2 gene frequencies were 0.489, 0.289 and 0.222, respectively, in León; 0.500, 0.272, and 0.228, respectively, in Mérida; 0.454, 0.337, and 0.209, respectively, in Oaxaca; and 0.505, 0.356, and 0.139, respectively, in Saltillo. These results are similar to what has been obtained in other Mestizo populations and Indian groups in Mexico, probably because the main ethnic component in both is Amerindian.

  7. Evolution of Cupido and Coahuila carbonate platforms, early Cretaceous, northeastern Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehmann, C.; Osleger, D.A.; Montanez, I.P.; Sliter, W.; Arnaud-Vanneau, A.; Banner, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Cupido and Coahuila platforms of northeastern Mexico are part of the extensive carbonate platform system that rimmed the ancestral Gulf of Mexico during Barremian to Albian time. Exposures of Cupido and Coahuila lithofacies in several mountain ranges spanning an ???80 000 km2 area reveal information about platform morphology and composition, paleoenvironmental relations, and the chronology of platform evolution. New biostratigraphic data, integrated with carbon and strontium isotope stratigraphy, significantly improve chronostratigraphic relations across the region. These data substantially change previous age assignments of several formations and force a revision of the longstanding stratigraphy in the region. The revised stratigraphy and enhanced time control, combined with regional facies associations, allow the construction of cross sections, isopach maps, and timeslice paleogeographic maps that collectively document platform morphology and evolution. The orientation of the Cupido (Barremian-Aptian) shelf margin was controlled by the emergent Coahuila basement block to the northwest. The south-facing margin is a high-energy grainstone shoal, whereas the margin facing the ancestral Gulf of Mexico to the east is a discontinuous rudist-coral reef. A broad shelf lagoon developed in the lee of the Cupido margin, where as much as 660 m of cyclic peritidal deposits accumulated. During middle to late Aptian time, a major phase of flooding forced a retrograde backstep of the Cupido platform, shifting the locus of shallow-marine sedimentation northwestward toward the Coahuila block. This diachronous flooding event records both the demise of the Cupido shelf and the consequent initiation of the Coahuila ramp. The backstepped Coahuila ramp (Aptian-Albian) consisted of a shallow shoal margin separating an interior evaporitic lagoon from a low-energy, muddy deep ramp. More than 500 m of cyclic carbonates and evaporites accumulated in the evaporitic lagoon during early to

  8. New records of bee flies (Diptera, Bombyliidae) from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Avalos-Hernández, Omar; Kits, Joel; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón

    2014-01-01

    Forty one new records of species of Bombyliidae are reported for Coahuila in northeastern Mexico. Nine of these species are reported for the first time for the country. The specimens were collected in the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin and Sierra La Madera mountains during 2007-2013. The modified distributions of species are discussed. The gaps in the distribution of many species suggest an undersampling of this group of insects in the north of Mexico.

  9. New records of bee flies (Diptera, Bombyliidae) from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ávalos-Hernández, Omar; Kits, Joel; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Forty one new records of species of Bombyliidae are reported for Coahuila in northeastern Mexico. Nine of these species are reported for the first time for the country. The specimens were collected in the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin and Sierra La Madera mountains during 2007–2013. The modified distributions of species are discussed. The gaps in the distribution of many species suggest an undersampling of this group of insects in the north of Mexico. PMID:25061389

  10. Phytolaccaceae infructescence from Cerro del Pueblo Formation, Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian), Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Ferriz, Sergio R S; Estrada-Ruiz, Emilio; Pérez-Hernández, Balam Rodrigo

    2008-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian) Cerro del Pueblo Formation, Coahuila, Mexico, contains a diverse group of angiosperms represented mainly by their reproductive structures. Among these, a new permineralized infructescence is recognized based on its morphological and anatomical characters. It is a multiple infructescence composed of berry fruits with six locules, each containing a single seed with a curved embryo developed from a campylotropous ovule with pendulous placentation; integumentary anatomy is similar to that of Phytolacca spp. (Phytolaccaceae). Though this new plant from Coahuila shares reproductive characters with Phytolacca, the constant number (six) of carpels per fruit and pendulous placentation strongly support the recognition of a new taxon, Coahuilacarpon phytolaccoides Cevallos-Ferriz, Estrada-Ruiz, et Pérez-Hernández (Phytolaccaceae, Caryophyllales). This new record adds to the known plant diversity of low latitude North America (northern Mexico) and demonstrates the long geologic history of the group.

  11. A Centrosaurine (Dinosauria: Ceratopsia) from the Aguja Formation (Late Campanian) of Northern Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Sylva, Héctor E; Hedrick, Brandon P; Dodson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    While centrosaurines and ceratopsids in general are abundant in the Late Campanian of northern Laramidia, they are much less commonly found in southern Laramidia. This has supported hypotheses of dinosaur provinciality and endemism in the Late Cretaceous with the delineation of at least two separate faunal zones, north and south Laramidia. There have been 12 genera of centrosaurines recognized from northern Laramidia while two genera, Diabloceratops and Nasutoceratops, have been named from southern Laramidia. We present an osteological description and taphonomic outline for a new centrosaurine ceratopsid from the Aguja Formation of northern Coahuila, Mexico that is not currently diagnosable to the generic level, but likely represents a new taxon. Further, we have included three-dimensional surface scans of all material attributed to this animal. Considering the large number of centrosaurines from northern Laramidia, it is likely that cladistic analyses are biased towards this faunal zone. New findings of southern centrosaurines are needed to correct this bias. This discovery expands the range of centrosaurines south to Coahuila, Mexico and adds new information to better characterize the morphology and taxonomy of centrosaurines from southern Laramidia and their evolution in comparison to their northern counterparts.

  12. A Centrosaurine (Dinosauria: Ceratopsia) from the Aguja Formation (Late Campanian) of Northern Coahuila, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Sylva, Héctor E.; Hedrick, Brandon P.; Dodson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    While centrosaurines and ceratopsids in general are abundant in the Late Campanian of northern Laramidia, they are much less commonly found in southern Laramidia. This has supported hypotheses of dinosaur provinciality and endemism in the Late Cretaceous with the delineation of at least two separate faunal zones, north and south Laramidia. There have been 12 genera of centrosaurines recognized from northern Laramidia while two genera, Diabloceratops and Nasutoceratops, have been named from southern Laramidia. We present an osteological description and taphonomic outline for a new centrosaurine ceratopsid from the Aguja Formation of northern Coahuila, Mexico that is not currently diagnosable to the generic level, but likely represents a new taxon. Further, we have included three-dimensional surface scans of all material attributed to this animal. Considering the large number of centrosaurines from northern Laramidia, it is likely that cladistic analyses are biased towards this faunal zone. New findings of southern centrosaurines are needed to correct this bias. This discovery expands the range of centrosaurines south to Coahuila, Mexico and adds new information to better characterize the morphology and taxonomy of centrosaurines from southern Laramidia and their evolution in comparison to their northern counterparts. PMID:27073969

  13. Upper Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) cephalopods from the Parras Shale near Saucedas, Coahuila, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifrim, Christina; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Espinosa, Belinda; Ventura, José Flores

    2015-12-01

    72 specimens of ammonites and the nautilid Eutrephoceras, collected from the upper Cretaceous Parras Shale at Saucedas in southern Coahuila, Mexico, are here assigned to twelve genera and fourteen species. The assemblage represents three to four upper Campanian biozones reaching from the Western Interior lower upper Campanian Exiteloceras jenneyi to the uppermost Campanian Tethyan Nostoceras hyatti biozone. Eutrephoceras irritilasi and Trachyscaphites sp. are endemic taxa, while Baculites taylorensis is restricted to the northern Gulf of Mexico Coast and E. jenneyi, Oxybeloceras crassum and Solenoceras elegans are Western Interior Seaway elements. Didymoceras donezianum is a southern Euramerican species, while Bostrychoceras polyplocum and N. hyatti occur throughout lower and middle latitudes. Diplomoceras cylindraceum and Phyllopachyceras forbesianum are cosmopolitan taxa with their main occurrences in the Maastrichtian; their record at Saucedas is the oldest of these species in North America. A clear paleobiogeographic signal is identified in the upper Campanian ammonite assemblages at Saucedas by a change from restricted towards geographically widespread faunas. This suggests gradual disappearence of faunal barriers which separated the Gulf Coast from the rest of the world.

  14. Ambient air monitoring plan for Ciudad Acuna and Piedra Negras, Coahuila, Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Winberry, J.; Henning, L.; Crume, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Cities of Ciudad Acuna and Piedras Negras and the State of Coahuila in Mexico are interested in improving ambient air quality monitoring capabilities in the two cities through the establishment of a network of ambient air monitors. The purpose of the network is to characterize population exposure to potentially harmful air contaminants, possibly including sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), ozone (O{sub 3}), carbon monoxide (CO), total suspended particulate matter (TSP), particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 100 micrometers PM-10, and lead. This report presents the results of an evaluation of existing air quality monitoring equipment and facilities in Ciudad Acuna and Piedras Negras. Additionally, the report presents recommendations for developing an air quality monitoring network for PM-10, SO{sub 2}, lead, and ozone in these cities, using a combination of both new and existing equipment. The human resources currently available and ultimately needed to operate and maintain the network are also discussed.

  15. The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin in Coahuila, Mexico: An Astrobiological Precambrian Park

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Janet L.; Escalante, Ana E.; Elser, James J.; Eguiarte, Luis E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) is a rare oasis in the Chihuahuan Desert in the state of Coahuila, Mexico. It has a biological endemism similar to that of the Galapagos Islands, and its spring-fed ecosystems have very low nutrient content (nitrogen or phosphorous) and are dominated by diverse microbialites. Thus, it has proven to be a distinctive opportunity for the field of astrobiology, as the CCB can be seen as a proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history, in particular the late Precambrian, the biological frontier when prokaryotic life yielded at least partial dominance to eukaryotes and multicellular life. It is a kind of ecological time machine that provides abundant opportunities for collaborative investigations by geochemists, geologists, ecologists, and population biologists in the study of the evolutionary processes that structured Earth-based life, especially in the microbial realm. The CCB is an object of investigation for the identification of biosignatures of past and present biota that can be used in our search for extraterrestrial life. In this review, we summarize CCB research efforts that began with microbial ecology and population biology projects and have since been expanded into broader efforts that involve biogeochemistry, comparative genomics, and assessments of biosignatures. We also propose that, in the future, the CCB is sanctioned as a “Precambrian Park” for astrobiology. Key Words: Microbial mats—Stromatolites—Early Earth—Extremophilic microorganisms—Microbial ecology. Astrobiology 12, 641–647. PMID:22920514

  16. Zinc bioleaching from an iron concentrate using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain from Hercules Mine of Coahuila, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-Ramírez, Diola Marina; Solís-Soto, Aquiles; López-Miranda, Javier; Pereyra-Alférez, Benito; Rutiaga-Quiñónes, Miriam; Medina-Torres, Luis; Medrano-Roldán, Hiram

    2011-10-01

    The iron concentrate from Hercules Mine of Coahuila, Mexico, which mainly contained pyrite and pyrrhotite, was treated by the bioleaching process using native strain Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ( A. ferrooxidans) to determine the ability of these bacteria on the leaching of zinc. The native bacteria were isolated from the iron concentrate of the mine. The bioleaching experiments were carried out in shake flasks to analyze the effects of pH values, pulp density, and the ferrous sulfate concentration on the bioleaching process. The results obtained by microbial kinetic analyses for the evaluation of some aspects of zinc leaching show that the native bacteria A. ferrooxidans, which is enriched with a 9K Silverman medium under the optimum conditions of pH 2.0, 20 g/L pulp density, and 40 g/L FeSO4, increases the zinc extraction considerably observed by monitoring during15 d, i.e., the zinc concentration has a decrease of about 95% in the iron concentrate.

  17. The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin in Coahuila, Mexico: an astrobiological Precambrian Park.

    PubMed

    Souza, Valeria; Siefert, Janet L; Escalante, Ana E; Elser, James J; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2012-07-01

    The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) is a rare oasis in the Chihuahuan Desert in the state of Coahuila, Mexico. It has a biological endemism similar to that of the Galapagos Islands, and its spring-fed ecosystems have very low nutrient content (nitrogen or phosphorous) and are dominated by diverse microbialites. Thus, it has proven to be a distinctive opportunity for the field of astrobiology, as the CCB can be seen as a proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history, in particular the late Precambrian, the biological frontier when prokaryotic life yielded at least partial dominance to eukaryotes and multicellular life. It is a kind of ecological time machine that provides abundant opportunities for collaborative investigations by geochemists, geologists, ecologists, and population biologists in the study of the evolutionary processes that structured Earth-based life, especially in the microbial realm. The CCB is an object of investigation for the identification of biosignatures of past and present biota that can be used in our search for extraterrestrial life. In this review, we summarize CCB research efforts that began with microbial ecology and population biology projects and have since been expanded into broader efforts that involve biogeochemistry, comparative genomics, and assessments of biosignatures. We also propose that, in the future, the CCB is sanctioned as a "Precambrian Park" for astrobiology.

  18. Fluid Origin of the Stratabound Fluorite and Celestite Deposits in Coahuila, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritlla, J.; Gonzalez-Partida, E.; Banks, D.; Levresse, G.; Baca-Gasca, S.; Rodriguez-Santos, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Mesozoic units that outcrop north of Coahuila State in northern Mexico host numerous celestite, celestite-fluorite and fluorite deposits, mainly enclosed in the Cretaceous limestone units. Celestite and celestite-fluorite deposits are lens-shaped bodies, up to 2 m thick and a total length exceeding 500 meters, intercalated within the carbonates of the Cupido Formation (Aptian) or equivalents. Celestite-free fluorite bodies, mainly enclosed in the Aurora Formation (Albian-Cenomanian), appear as sub-concordant lenses with abundant evidences of hydraulic fracturing, usually near low-angle fractures. The celestite brine halogen composition on a Cl/Br vs Na/Br molar ratio plot on the trend defined by the evaporation of seawater, while in a ppm Cl vs Cl/Br plot away from the seawater evaporation line but parallel to it, indicating that the solution was mainly modified by dilution. The fluids involved in the genesis of the La Encantada fluorite deposit probably are evolved seawater that undergone some degree of evaporation. Mixing of fluids is clearly delineated by both microthemometric and halogen data, where salinities calculated are too low for the halogen ratios found, indicating a mixing with a low-salinity end-member. Hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions repeatedly show the presence of solid bitumen trapped along with heavy oils, indicative of thermal degradation. Both, mixing and thermal degradation of hydrocarbon-rich fluids along with hydraulic fracture of the host rock points to an "in situ" organic matter maturation, due to the mixing of a saline, oxidant, sulphate and CaCl2-rich "bittern", which probably transported fluorite, with an organic-matter rich fluid present in the cretaceous carbonates. It is noteworthy that these previous results suggest that both celestite and fluorite-dominated deposits formed from brines from similar origin, showing the same halogen systematics. Strontium enrichment can be explained by leaching of Sr from the carbonate series

  19. Regional flow system delineation in arid karstic basins with sparse hydrogeologic data: Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Coahuila, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolaver, B. D.; Sharp, J. M.; Rodriguez, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    We develop procedures for the delineation of regional groundwater flow systems in arid, karstic basins with sparse hydrogeologic data using surface topography data, geologic mapping, permeability data, chloride concentrations of groundwater and precipitation, and measured discharge data. Aquifers are characterized using geographic information systems (GIS) for groundwater catchment delineation, an analytical model for interbasin flow evaluation, a chloride balance approach for recharge estimation, and a water budget for mapping contributing catchments over a 160,000 km2 region (24.87° to 28.70° north latitude and 100.68° west to 104.75° west longitude). The study area includes the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB) of Coahuila, Mexico, a National Biosphere Reserve containing springs that support groundwater-dependent ecosystems and irrigated agriculture. Sustainable groundwater development is a key issue on the U.S. Mexico border. However, these procedures may be applicable in similar settings globally. We delineate groundwater catchments that contribute local and regional groundwater discharge to CCB springs and identify a large regional flow system includes mountain recharge from as both the Sierra Madre Oriental and Occidental.

  20. Velafrons coahuilensis, a new labeosaurine haddrosaurid (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) from the Late Campanian Cerro del Pueblo formation, Coahuila, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, Terry A.; Sampson, Scott D.; de Jesus, Carlos R. Delgado; Zanno, Lindsay E.; Eberth, David; Hernandez-Rivera, Rene; Aguillon-Martinez, Martha C.; Kirkland, James I.

    2007-01-01

    A new lambeosaurine hadrosaurid, Velafrons coahuilensis, is described as the first lambeosaurine from the Cerro del Pueblo Formation of Coahuila, Mexico, and the first lambeosaurine genus to be named from North America in more than 70 years. Although the holotype specimen is a juvenile individual—as evidenced by its incomplete crest development and relative size compared to other North American lambeosaurines—ontogeny independent autapomor-phies have been identified including quadrate with narrow quadratojugal notch and a postorbital with well developed, dorsally positioned squamosal process. Additionally, this taxon is unique in that the prefrontal is not dorsally deflected and anteroposteriorly expanded as in other lambeosaurine taxa of its size, but rather retains the frontal-prefrontal “clamp” present in smaller individuals of other taxa. Phylogenetic analysis places Velafrons in a polytomy with numerous other fan-crested lambeosaurines. The crest structure of Velafrons more closely resembles that of Corythosaurus and Hypacrosaurus because it possesses an anteriorly projecting nasal process over the dorsal premaxilla process. Biogeo-graphically, Velafrons is one of three distinct hadrosaurids known from approximately 73.5 Ma—two lambeosaurines and one hadrosaurine—all restricted to the southern region of the Western Interior Basin of North America.

  1. SEROPREVALENCE OF T. cruzi INFECTION IN BLOOD DONORS AND CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY IN PATIENTS FROM THE COAL MINING REGION OF COAHUILA, MEXICO

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Tovar, José Gerardo; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A.; Salas, Ildefonso Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Context and Objective: Chagas disease is considered a worldwide emerging disease; it is endemic in Mexico and the state of Coahuila and is considered of little relevance. The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in blood donors and Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients from the coal mining region of Coahuila, Mexico. Design and Setting: Epidemiological, exploratory and prospective study in a general hospital during the period January to June 2011. Methods: We performed laboratory tests ELISA and indirect hemagglutination in three groups of individuals: 1) asymptomatic voluntary blood donors, 2) patients hospitalized in the cardiology department and 3) patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results: There were three levels of seroprevalence: 0.31% in asymptomatic individuals, 1.25% in cardiac patients and in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy in 21.14%. Conclusions: In spite of having detected autochthonous cases of Chagas disease, its importance to local public health remains to be established as well as the details of the dynamics of transmission so that the study is still in progress. PMID:24626421

  2. Helminth parasites of freshwater fishes from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, in the Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico: inventory and biogeographical implications.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Aguilar, Rogelio; Martínez-Aquino, Andrés; Espinosa-Pérez, Héctor; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2014-06-01

    As part of an ongoing inventory of the helminth parasites of freshwater fishes in Mexico, 570 individual fish were collected between Apr 2008 and Oct 2011 in 26 localities along the Cuatro Ciénegas region in Coahuila State, northern Mexico. Seventeen species of hosts, mostly corresponding to Nearctic freshwater elements, were studied. A total of 8324 individual worms were collected during this survey, representing 25 species of helminths, of which 9 were digeneans, 3 monogeneans, 3 acanthocephalans, 9 nematodes and 1 cestode. Most of the records in this checklist represent new host or locality records. The information provided in this checklist may be helpful for our understanding of the biodiversity and historical biogeography of this host-parasite system, because in the Cuatro Ciénegas region occur a Nearctic freshwater fish fauna, along with Neotropical and endemic elements, and from a biogeographical point of view, this may represent a transitional area.

  3. Diversity and Resource Use Patterns of Anthophile Insects in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ávalos-Hernández, Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar

    2016-12-01

    Bees and flies are the main pollinators responsible for the maintenance of plant diversity and crop production. Studies of pollinator communities have focused on bees; however, community structures may vary among groups of pollinators. We describe and compare the diversity and resource use patterns of six Apoidea and two Diptera anthophile families in Cuatro Ciénegas in the northeast of Mexico. We sampled insects in two distinct geographic units (valley and mountains) and two seasons (rainy and dry). Spatial and temporal patterns in species composition and abundance of these families were identified and the diversity in each family compared. The spatial and temporal patterns in species composition, diversity, and resource use were different for each family. Overall, diversity was higher during the rainy season. Only fly families and the Andrenidae presented season-specific differences in species composition, in contrast with the other Apoidea. Two bee families visited more plant species per insect species during the rainy season, whereas flies visited the same number of plant species in both seasons. Apidae, Megachilidae, and Bombyliidae visited more plant species in the mountains, while the other families exhibited no differences between the mountains and the valley. The variation in the community structures of each group may reflect distinct life histories, resources needs during larval stages, and foraging behaviors. These differences are relevant in management and conservation programs that could benefit one group of pollinators while harming others with different characteristics. The traits of some families indicate their potential value as pollinators.

  4. Diversity and Resource Use Patterns of Anthophile Insects in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ávalos-Hernández, Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar

    2016-09-15

    Bees and flies are the main pollinators responsible for the maintenance of plant diversity and crop production. Studies of pollinator communities have focused on bees; however, community structures may vary among groups of pollinators. We describe and compare the diversity and resource use patterns of six Apoidea and two Diptera anthophile families in Cuatro Ciénegas in the northeast of Mexico. We sampled insects in two distinct geographic units (valley and mountains) and two seasons (rainy and dry). Spatial and temporal patterns in species composition and abundance of these families were identified and the diversity in each family compared. The spatial and temporal patterns in species composition, diversity, and resource use were different for each family. Overall, diversity was higher during the rainy season. Only fly families and the Andrenidae presented season-specific differences in species composition, in contrast with the other Apoidea. Two bee families visited more plant species per insect species during the rainy season, whereas flies visited the same number of plant species in both seasons. Apidae, Megachilidae, and Bombyliidae visited more plant species in the mountains, while the other families exhibited no differences between the mountains and the valley. The variation in the community structures of each group may reflect distinct life histories, resources needs during larval stages, and foraging behaviors. These differences are relevant in management and conservation programs that could benefit one group of pollinators while harming others with different characteristics. The traits of some families indicate their potential value as pollinators.

  5. Variation in the gene frequencies of three generations of humans from Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Flores, R M; Garza-Chapa, R

    1989-04-01

    Allele frequencies for the ABO, Rh, MNSs, Duffy, Kidd, Lutheran, P and Lewis blood group systems in 207 persons whose 4 grandparents were born in the Monterrey Metropolitan area (MMA), grouped into 3 generations, were ascertained along with other related population from the MMA, Mestizos from Saltillo, Coahuila and Tlaxcala, and from the populations thought to have contributed to their genetic constitution (native Mexican Indians and Spanish). Genetic admixture and distance estimates were calculated. Gene frequencies of the three generations from MMA are intermediate to those of the ancestral populations, indicating that they are Mestizo but with a genetic structure different from Mestizos of Saltillo and Tlaxcala. Both genetic admixture and distance estimates indicate that the oldest generation exhibits the greatest Spanish influence which decreases in the youngest generation and in the other MMA populations as a result of the immigration from the central states of Mexico.

  6. Environmental and developmental controls of morphological diversity in a thermal spring gastropod from Coahuila, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roopnarine, P. D.; Tang, C. M.

    2001-12-01

    Isolated thermal springs and associated aquatic environments near Cuatro Ciénegas, in north-central Mexico provide an opportunity to study patterns of evolutionary diversification under extreme conditions. Significant differences in temperature, seasonality, pH, and salinities among other variables may allow for high levels of differentiation and endemism. Biological studies of the unique faunas in this type of environment may serve as analogues for extreme and/or evaporitic environments as targeted by astrobiological research. The endemic hydrobiid gastropod \\textit{Mexipyrgus} is widely distributed in a variety of aquatic environments within the Cuatro Cienégas basin. Original description of this genus by Taylor listed six distinct species reflecting shell and anatomical features. Later revision by Hershler suggests that this diversity be reduced to one single, highly-variable species, based mainly on the morphology of reproductive structures. The systematic conflict emphasizes the need to understand the bases of morphological variation at small scales and in environmentally unusual settings. Shells of \\textit{Mexipyrgus} were collected from six localities and the following species were identified based on Taylor's classification: \\textit{M. carranzae}, \\textit{M. escobedae}, \\textit{M. multilineatus}, and specimens intermediate in character between \\textit{M. carranzae}, \\textit{M. lugoi} and \\textit{M. mojarralis}. All specimens consisted of 4-6 whorls. Shell shape was archived by the digitization of geometrically homologous landmarks on the spire (apex, whorl sutures in apertural view) and aperture. Shell size was calculated as Centroid Size. Data were analyzed using uniform and principal warp analysis of raw landmark coordinates, followed by relative warp analysis of uniform and partial warp scores. Three separate analyses were performed for 4, 5 and 6 whorled specimens. Results indicate two different levels of variation based on individual age

  7. The Cretaceous sediment-hosted copper deposits of San Marcos (Coahuila, Northeastern Mexico): An approach to ore-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Alonso, Donají; Canet, Carles; González-Partida, Eduardo; Villanueva-Estrada, Ruth Esther; Prol-Ledesma, Rosa María; Alfonso, Pura; Caballero-Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lozano-Santa Cruz, Rufino

    2011-04-01

    In the San Marcos ranges of Cuatrociénegas, NE Mexico, several sediment-hosted copper deposits occur within the boundary between the Coahuila Block, a basement high mostly granitic in composition and Late Paleozoic to Triassic in age, and the Mesozoic Sabinas rift basin. This boundary is outlined by the regional-scale synsedimentary San Marcos Fault. At the basin scale, the copper mineralization occurs at the top of a ˜1000 m thick red-bed succession (San Marcos Formation, Berrisian), a few meters below a conformable, transitional contact with micritic limestones (Cupido Formation, Hauterivian to Aptian). It consists of successive decimeter-thick roughly stratiform copper-rich horizons placed just above the red-beds, in a transitional unit of carbonaceous grey-beds grading to micritic limestones. The host rocks are fine- to medium-grained arkoses, with poorly sorted and subangular to subrounded grains. The detrital grains are cemented by quartz and minor calcite; besides, late iron oxide grain-coating cement occurs at the footwall unmineralized red-beds. The source area of the sediments, indicated by their modal composition, is an uplifted basement. The contents of SiO 2 (40.70-87.50 wt.%), Al 2O 3 (5.91-22.00 wt.%), K 2O (3.68-12.50 wt.%), Na 2O (0.03-2.03 wt.%) and CaO (0.09-3.78 wt.%) are within the ranges expected for arkoses. Major oxide ratios indicate that the sedimentary-tectonic setting was a passive margin. The outcropping copper mineralization essentially consists in a supergene assemblage of chrysocolla, malachite and azurite. All that remains of the primary mineralization are micron-sized chalcocite grains shielded by quartz cement. In addition, pyrite subhedral grains occur scattered throughout the copper-mineralized horizons. In these weathered orebodies copper contents range between 4.24 and 7.72 wt.%, silver between 5 and 92 ppm, and cobalt from 8 to 91 ppm. Microthermometric measurements of fluid inclusions in quartz and calcite crystals from

  8. Synthesis of Chromophores for Nonlinear Optics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-12

    Investigacion de Quimica Aplicada Blvd. Enrique reyna, No. 140 Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico 25253 AFOSR FA9550-09-1-0017 12 March 2010...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER CENTRO DE INVESTIGACION EN QUIMICA APLICADA BLVD ENRIQUE REYNA NO 140 SALTILLO 25253 MEXICO...APPLICATIONS Eduardo Arias, Ivana Moggio and Ronald F. Ziolo Centro de Investigacion de Quimica Aplicada Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico 25253

  9. Bacillus coahuilensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic species from a desiccation lagoon in the Cuatro Ciénegas Valley in Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cerritos, René; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Alcaraz-Peraza, Luis D; Arvizu-Gómez, Jackeline L; Olmedo, Gabriela; Ramirez, Enrique; Siefert, Janet L; Souza, Valeria

    2008-04-01

    A moderately halophilic, Gram-positive and rod-shaped bacterium, strain m4-4T, was isolated from a Chihuahuan desert lagoon in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico. Strain m4-4T was found to grow optimally at 30-37 degrees C, pH 7.0-8.0 and 5 % NaCl and to tolerate from 0.5 % to 10 % NaCl. It was shown to be aerobic. The genomic DNA G+C content was about 37 mol%. Strain m4-4T exhibited minimal or no growth on most sugars tested. Its major cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1. Based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences, we observed that the closest relatives of the isolate are moderately halophilic Bacillus species, with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity ranging from 96.6 to 97.4 % (Bacillus marisflavi, Bacillus aquimaris and Bacillus vietnamensis). Additionally, using genomic data it was determined that the type strain contains a total of nine rRNA operons with three slightly different sequences. On the basis of phenotypic and molecular properties, strain m4-4T represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus coahuilensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain m4-4T (=NRRL B-41737T =CECT 7197T).

  10. Hemipelagic cephalopods from the Maastrichtian (late Cretaceous) Parras Basin at La Parra, Coahuila, Mexico, and their implications for the correlation of the lower Difunta Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifrim, Christina; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Garza, Rufino Rodríguez; Ventura, José Flores

    2010-04-01

    Few biostratigraphic data exist from the Parras and La Popa basins, mainly due to the absence of index fossils. This paper describes 19 ammonoid species from 15 genera and 1 nautilid from La Parra, southeastern Coahuila, Mexico. The assemblage consists of Tethyan [( Baculites ovatus, Brahmaites ( Anabrahmaites) vishnu, Fresvillia constricta, Hauericeras rembda, Pachydiscus ( P.) ex gr. neubergicus, Solenoceras reesidei, Tetragonites cf. superstes], cosmopolitan ( Anagaudryceras politissimum, Desmophyllites diphylloides, Diplomoceras cylindraceum, Gaudryceras kayei, Phyllopachyceras forbesianum, Pseudophyllites indra), and cold water taxa [ Fresvillia teres, Hypophylloceras ( Neophylloceras) surya, H. ( N.) hetonaiense, Pachydiscus ( P.) cf. egertoni]. Eutrephoceras sp. and Menuites juv. sp. were not determined to species level. A similar assemblage was recently described from the coeval Méndez Formation at Cerralvo, Nuevo León. Species endemic to North America, particularly the Western Interior Seaway, are absent at La Parra. The ammonoid assemblage and associated planktonic foraminifers allow for precise biostratigraphic assignation to the early Maastrichtian planktonic foraminiferal zone CF 5, and thus provide an important marker level for correlation of the lower Difunta Group. The new biostratigraphic data presented herein allow for the first time precise dating of the Cañon del Tule Formation of the Difunta Group. Their combination with existing sequence- and magnetostratigraphic data improve the correlation of the lower Difunta Group with time-equivalent lithostratigraphic units such as the Cárdenas Formation in Mexico. They also provide new insight into ammonoid migration patterns induced by sea-level changes. Baculites ovatus migrated into the La Popa Basin as a result of the sea-level highstand documented at La Parra.

  11. 470 Relationship of Blood Lead Levels with Total Ige in Teenagers with Environmental Exposure in Torreon Coahuila, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Velazquez, Rocío; Goytia Acevedo, Raquel Concepción; García-Arenas, Guadalupe; Calderon Aranda, Emma S.; Gonzalez, Manuel Rosales; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Maravilla-Domínguez, Aurora; Cebrian, Mariano Enrique; Rosado, Jorge Luis; Stoltzfus, Rebeca; García Vargas, Gonzalo Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    Background There are precedents that suggest gender differences in the relationship of lead in blood with serum total IgE. The aim of this study was to evaluate in a population of teenagers attending 9 schools in Torreon, Coahuila, the relationship of lead in blood with total IgE and their dependence on gender. Methods We included 230 teenagers (105 females, 125 males) between 11 and 14 years of age, from a cohort of children evaluated for its history of lead exposure since 2000. Clinical diagnosis was performed to detect allergies; skin tests were applied for 47 common allergens in the region. IgE levels were quantified in serum by chemiluminescence and the blood lead levels by spectrophotometry AAS. Results The average blood lead levels in allergic group were of 4.86 ± 2.9 μg/dL and in the non-allergic group 5.1 ± 2.7 μg/dL. There were not gender differences between allergic group versus non allergic group, however, among the types of allergic diseases, a higher percentage of males had rhinitis, conjunctivitis and asthma, compared with the females. The blood lead level in males was significantly higher (5.61 ± 3.3 mg/dL) compared with females (4.22 ± 2.1 mg/dL) and the regression analysis between blood lead levels with total IgE was significant in males and not in females. Conclusions Gender differences observed appear to be explained by blood lead levels, however, we should consider the contribution of other variables in the model.

  12. Geophysical analysis of the Salmon Peak Formation near Amistad Reservoir Dam, Val Verde County, Texas, and Coahuila, Mexico, March 2006, to aid in piezometer placement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Gregory P.; Kress, Wade H.; Teeple, Andrew; Greenslate, Michael L.; Clark, Allan K.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1992, numerous sinkholes have developed northwest of the Amistad Reservoir dam on the Rio Grande. Increases in the discharge of springs south of the dam, on the western side of the Rio Grande, in Coahuila, Mexico, have been documented. In 1995 the Mexico Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) completed a study of the western embankment (Coahuila, Mexico) of the dam that included surface geophysics, borehole geophysics, and installation of piezometers to learn more about subsurface conditions. As part of a 5-year safety inspection in 2005, technical advisors recommended that one line of similarly constructed piezometers be installed on the eastern embankment (Val Verde County, Texas) of the dam for comparison of water levels (potentiometric head) on both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. To provide technical assistance for the horizontal and vertical placement of piezometers on the eastern embankment of Amistad Reservoir dam, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Section of the IBWC, conducted a study along both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. The study involved an integrated approach using surface and borehole geophysical methods. In the western embankment investigation, geological and geophysical characteristics that indicate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation were identified. The direct-current (DC) resistivity method was selected as the surface geophysical reconnaissance technique to correlate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation, identified from analysis of borehole geophysical logs, with variations in subsurface resistivity. The dipole-dipole array and the reciprocal Schlumberger array were selected as the most applicable DC resistivity arrays. Two resistivity units were identified in both the dipole-dipole array data and the reciprocal Schlumberger array data along DC resistivity

  13. Preliminary investigation of the nature and origin of the Sierra Mojada Non-sulfide Zn deposits, Coahuila, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H.; Kyle, J.; Gilg, H.; Kolvoord, R.

    2009-05-01

    The Sierra Mojada district consists of multiple types of mineral concentrations ranging from polymetallic sulfide deposits, 'non-sulfide Zn' deposits (separate smithsonite and hemimorphite zones), and a Pb carbonate manto hosted by Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous carbonates. The district is typically grouped with other polymetallic carbonate replacement deposits of southwestern North America, but the intrusive rocks that commonly are associated with these types of deposits are not known at Sierra Mojada. The Sierra Mojada district located near the boundary of the Coahuila Platform and the Sabinas Basin that formed during Late Jurassic and Cretaceous tectonic extension. The east-trending San Marcos fault runs through the Sierra Mojada district and is thought to have acted as the major conduit for basinal fluids, responsible for local dolomitization, sulfide mineralization, and petroleum in the region. The polymetallic sulfides are the stratigraphically and structurally highest ore zone and occur north of the San Marcos fault. Non-sulfide Zn (hemimorphite, smithsonite and sauconite) and lead (cerussite) concentrations occur south of the fault in the Aurora and La Pena Formations. The Iron Oxide Manto consists of stratabound zones of dominantly of hemimorphite pore-filling in Fe-oxide rich dolostones giving the ore a distinct red to orange color. The Smithsonite Manto has distinct karst features, including internal sediments interbanded with smithsonite in the lower part of the orebody. The non-sulfide Zn ores are being studied to document their morphologies, growth patterns, and paragenetic relationships using conventional petrography, SEM, and CL-based ESEM. In the Smithsonite Manto, banded and colloform smithsonite consists of aggregates of rhombohedral crystals that grew into open space and also occurs within internal sediment bands with hemimorphite or Zn clays and Zn oxides. Black dendrites of Mn oxides with Fe oxides are encased in banded smithsonite

  14. Did tropical rainforest vegetation exist during the Late Cretaceous? New data from the late Campanian to early Maastrichtian Olmos Formation, Coahuila, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upchurch, G. R.; Estrada-Ruiz, E.; Cevallos-Ferriz, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    A major problem in paleobotany and paleoclimatology is the origin of modern tropical and paratropical rainforests. Studies of leaf macrofossils, beginning with those of Wolfe and Upchurch, have suggested that tropical and paratropical (i.e., megathermal) rainforests with dominant angiosperms are of Cenozoic origin, and that comparable vegetation was either absent or greatly restricted during the Late Cretaceous. Earth System modeling studies, in contrast, predict the existence of megathermal rainforest vegetation during the mid- and Late Cretaceous, though with less areal extent than during the Late Cenozoic and Recent. Megathermal climate with year-round precipitation is simulated along the paleoequator and along the northern margin of the Tethys Ocean, and tends to occur in highly focused regions, in contrast to the more latitudinally zoned pattern of the Recent. Low-resolution climatic indicators, such as the distribution of coals and tree fern spores, are consistent with evidence from climate modeling for megathermal wet climates during the Late Cretaceous, and by extension megathermal rainforest vegetation. However, corroborative data from plant macrofossil assemblages is needed, because the physiognomy of leaves and woods directly reflects plant adaptation to the environment and can estimate climate independently of the generic and familial affinities of the paleoflora. Newly collected plant macrofossil assemblages from the late Campian to early Maastrichtian Olmos Formation of Coahuila, Mexico, provide evidence for megathermal rainforest vegetation on the northern margin of the Tethys Ocean at approximately 35 degrees paleolatitude. The newly collected leaf flora is 72 percent entire- margined and has abundant palms, features typical of modern megathermal rainforests. Thirty percent of the species have large leaves, and 50 percent of the species have drip tips, features indicative of wet conditions. Simple and multiple regression functions based on the

  15. Pseudomonas cuatrocienegasensis sp. nov., isolated from an evaporating lagoon in the Cuatro Cienegas valley in Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Ana E; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Verdugo, Alejandra; González-González, Andrea; Toribio-Jiménez, Jeiry; Souza, Valeria

    2009-06-01

    Nine Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming isolates with identical or very similar repetitive-sequence-based PCR profiles were recovered from an evaporative lagoon in Mexico. Two strains, designated 1N(T) and 3N, had virtually identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and, on the basis of these sequences, were identified as members of the genus Pseudomonas, with Pseudomonas peli R-20805(T) as the closest relative. All nine isolates had practically identical whole-cell protein profiles. The major fatty acids [C(16 : 0,) C(18 : 1)omega7c and summed feature a (C(16 : 1)omega7 and/or C(16 : 1)omega6c)] of strains 1N(T) and 3N supported their affiliation with the genus Pseudomonas. The DNA-DNA reassociation values with respect to P. peli LMG 23201(T) and other closely related Pseudomonas species were <15 %. Physiological and biochemical tests allowed phenotypic differentiation of the strains analysed, including strain 1N(T), from the five phylogenetically closest Pseudomonas species. On the basis of the data obtained by using this polyphasic taxonomic approach, the nine strains represent a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas cuatrocienegasensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 1N(T) (=LMG 24676(T)=CIP 109853(T)).

  16. New Meta and Nanomaterials for Photorefractive Enhancement and Photorefractive Two-Beam Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-12

    Centro de Investigacion de Quimica Aplicada Blvd. Enrique reyna, No. 140 Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico 25253 AFOSR FA9550-09-1-0023 12 March 2010...ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER CENTRO DE INVESTIGACION EN QUIMICA APLICADA BLVD ENRIQUE REYNA NO 140 SALTILLO 25253...Photorefractive Two-Beam Coupling Ronald F. Ziolo Centro de Investigacion de Quimica Aplicada Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico 25253 Grant

  17. 469 Levels of IL-4, INF-&GAMMA; Total IGE and IGG4 in Serum of Allergic Children within Areas of Risk of Lead Exposure in Torreon Coahuila, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Chavez Villarreal, Karen Giselle; Hernandez, Jahzeel Avila; Goytia Acevedo, Raquel Concepción; Velazquez, Rocio Meza; Guillen, Mario Rivera; Jurado, Michelle Gomez; García-Arenas, Guadalupe; Maravilla-Domínguez, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    Background There are precedents to suggest that lead exposure may increase the severity of allergic disease in children. In Torreon Coahuila is known the problem of lead contamination and its association with the body burden in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and biochemical characteristics of allergic disease in children living in areas at risk of lead exposure. Methods We included children between 6 and 11 years old with clinical diagnosis of allergy, who were attending by allergic consultation in the Center of attention Heavy Metals in Torreon, Coahuila, Mexico. Medical evaluation was performed following the diagnostic criteria described by ARIA, Global Initiative for Asthma and the Hanifin and Rajka criteria for atopic dermatitis. Skin tests were applied to 47 common allergens in the region. Were quantified in serum, the levels of IL-4, IFN-γ and IgG4 by ELISA, total IgE levels by chemiluminescence and lead in blood by spectrophotometry AA. Results We present the results of 33 patients (16 girls/17 boys) aged 8 ± 1.38. The main risk factors for allergy were current animal contact (66.7%), past animal exposure (60.6%) and passive smoking (51.5%). The predominant allergy diseases: rhinitis (97%), conjunctivitis (43.8%) and atopic dermatitis (33.3%). The allergens with the higher prevalence of responses were: thickets (91.2%) and grass (88.2%). The average blood lead level was 4.36 μg/dL ± 2.13 and median total IgE 660 IU/mL. We present the analysis of the levels of cytokines, total IgE and IgG4 according to the types of allergy, severity and frequency of the disease. Conclusions IgE levels according to the type of allergic disease, severity and frequency seem to be related to the balance IL-4/INF g. The IgG4 seems to be positively related to total IgE levels in rhinitis, conjunctivitis and dermatitis and negatively with Asthma and other allergies. No association was found between blood lead levels and total IgE.

  18. Border Environmental Education Resource Guide: Southern New Mexico, South Texas, Northern Chihuahua, Northern Coahuila, Northern Nuevo Leon, Northern Tamaulipas = Guia de Recursos de Educacion Ambiental en la Frontera: Sur de Nuevo Mexico, Sur de Texas, Norte de Chihuahua, Norte de Coahuila, Norte de Nuevo Leon, Norte de Tamaulipas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meissner, David, Comp.

    This guide provides educators and residents of the border with useful information about environmental education program offerings along the eastern half of the United States-Mexico border. The programs listed in the guide represent a broad range of educational efforts focused on understanding the environment and solving environmental problems in…

  19. Meeting Adjunct Faculty Teaching Needs through a Faculty Development Program: It is Possible!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovando, Martha N.

    A program successful in developing the teaching skills of both experienced and new faculty members at The Autonomous University of the North East (Universidad Autonoma del Noreste) at Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico, is described. The program has incorporated several literature-based features of effective programs: presentation of supportive theory of…

  20. Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semaan, Leslie

    The text explores Mexico's history, geography, art, religion, and lifestyles in the context of its complex economy. The text focuses on Mexico's economy and reasons for its current situation. Part I of this teaching unit includes: Teacher Overview, Why Study Mexico, Mexico Fact Sheet, Map of Mexico, the Land and Climate, History, Government,…

  1. Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Mexico was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. In areal extent, Mexico is the third largest country on the continent of North America (not counting Greenland, which is a province of Denmark), comprised of almost 2 million square kilometers (756,000 square miles) of land. Home to roughly 100 million people, Mexico is second only to the United States in population, making it the world's largest Spanish-speaking nation. To the north, Mexico shares its border with the United States-a line that runs some 3,100 kilometers (1,900 miles) east to west. About half of this border is defined by the Rio Grande River, which runs southeast to the Gulf of Mexico (partially obscured by clouds in this image) and marks the dividing line between Texas and Mexico. Toward the upper left (northwest) corner of this image is the Baja California peninsula, which provides the western land boundary for the Gulf of California. Toward the northwestern side of the Mexican mainland, you can see the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains (brownish pixels) running southeast toward Lake Chapala and the city of Guadalajara. About 400 km (250 miles) east and slightly south of Lake Chapala is the capital, Mexico City. Extending northward from Mexico City is the Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains, the irregular line of brownish pixels that seem to frame the western edges of the bright white cumulus clouds in this image. Between these two large mountain ranges is a large, relatively dry highland region. To the south, Mexico shares borders with Guatemala and Belize, both of which are located south of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Image courtesy Reto Stockli, Brian Montgomery, and Robert Simmon, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  2. Mexico.

    PubMed

    1988-02-01

    Focus in this discussion of Mexico is on the following: geography; the people; history; political conditions; the economy; foreign relations; and relations between the US and Mexico. As of July 1987, the population of Mexico numbered 81.9 million with an estimated annual growth rate of 2.09%. 60% of the population is Indian-Spanish (mestizo), 30% American Indian, 9% white, and 1% other. Mexico is the most populous Spanish-speaking country in the world and the 2nd most populous country in Latin America. Education is decentralized and expanded. Mexico's topography ranges from low desert plains and jungle-like coastal strips to high plateaus and rugged mountains. Hernan Cortes conquered Mexico in 1919-21 and founded a Spanish colony that lasted for almost 300 years. Independence from Spain was proclaimed by Father Miguel Hidalgo on September 16, 1810; the republic was established on December 6, 1822. Mexico's constitution of 1917 provides for a federal republic with a separation of powers into independent executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government. Significant political themes of the administration of President Miguel de la Madrid Hurtado, who began his 6-year term in 1982, have been restructuring the economy, liberalizing trade practices, decentralizing government services, and eliminating corruption among public servants. In 1987, estimates put the real growth of the Mexican economy at 1.5%; the gross domestic product (GDP) had shrunk by 3.5% in 1986. Yet, on the positive side, Mexico's international reserves increased to record levels in 1987 (to about $15 billion), and its current account surplus reached more than $3 billion. Mexico has made considerable progress in moving to restructure its economy. It has substantially reduced impediments to international trade and has moved to reduce the number of parastatal firms. 1987 was the 2nd consecutive year in which Mexico recorded triple-digit inflation; inflation reached 158.8%. Other problems include

  3. Mexico.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    The background notes on Mexico provide text and recent statistical information on the geography, population, government, economy, and foreign relations, specifically the North American Free Trade Agreement with US. The 1992 population is estimated at 89 million of which 60% are mestizo (Indian-Spanish), 30% are American Indian, 9% are Caucasian, and 1% are other. 90% are Roman Catholic. There are 8 years of compulsory education. Infant mortality is 30/1000 live births. Life expectancy for males is 68 years and 76 years for females. The labor force is comprised of 30% in services, 24% in agriculture and fishing, 19% in manufacturing, 13% in commerce, 7% in construction, 4% in transportation and communication, and .4% in mining. There are 31 states and a federal district. Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was $3200 in 1991. Military expenditures were .5% of GDP in 1991. The average inflation rate is 19%. Mexico City with 20 million is the largest urban center in the world. In recent years, the economy has been restructured with market oriented reforms; the result has been a growth of GDP of 3.6% in 1991 from 2% in 1987. Dependence on oil exports has decreased. There has been privatization and deregulation of state-owned companies. Subsidies to inefficient companies have been stopped. Tariff rates were reduced. The financial debt has been reduced and turned into a surplus of .8% in 1992. Mexico's foreign debt has been reduced from its high in 1987 of $107 billion. Agricultural reforms have been ongoing for 50 years. Land was redistributed, but standards of living and productivity have improved only slightly. Rural land tenure regulations have been changed, and other economic reforms are expected. Mexico engages in ad hoc international groups and is selective about membership in international organizations.

  4. [Epidemics and disease during the Revolution Period in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo-Borrás, José

    2010-01-01

    The health condition in Mexico was bad around de beginning of the revolutionary period. The movement of troops led the development of epidemics like yellow fever, typhus, smallpox, and influenza that were enhance with natural disasters and hunger in whole country, from cost to cost and in the north big cities like Monterrey, Guadalajara and Saltillo. Doctor Liceaga conducted a well planned campaign against yellow fever eradicating water stagnant deposits in order to combat the vector transmission, the Aedes aegypti, mosquito with satisfactory results. The first smallpox epidemic in the XX Century in Mexico was in 1916. The Mexican physicians used the smallpox vaccine against this epidemic. An American physician named Howard Taylor Ricketts arrived to Mexico for studying the typhus transmission. Accidentally he had been infected and finally, he died from typhus. Definitively, the epidemics predominate along de revolutionary period in Mexico.

  5. Structure and tectonics of the Sierra Madre oriental fold-thrust belt near Monterrey, northeastern Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.A.; Gray, G.G.; Goldhammer, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The Monterrey salient was examined using Landsat TM and MSS images to determine factors controlling the development, distribution, and exposure of Laramide structures. Lateral Mesozoic facies changes influence structural styles and distribution. Exposure of deep foreland structures north of Monterrey is partly related to the location of the Cupido reef trend. Structure along the front of the salient changes abruptly from tectonic wedging to normal overthrusting where deltaic clastics of the Difunta Group grade into incompetent Mendez shale. Salt thickness is an important factor controlling structural development. Areas without evaporites are usually persistent basement highs characterized by less severe deformation. Areas with thin evaporites have complex structural styles, depending on stratigraphy, depth of exposure, and distance from the Sierra Madre thrust front. Thick salt, apparently in a Jurassic rift beneath the salient, facilitated the northward transport of thrust sheets. Late Cretaceous salt movement influenced stratigraphy in La Popa basin where limestone lenses developed in the clastic Difunta Group. Basement topography is the major factor controlling development, style, distribution of structures, and areal distribution of salt and lateral facies changes. The authors propose a tectonic model that explains the large scale structural styles in the region. The Coahuila basement-high block acted as a buttress during Laramide shortening, limiting northward progression of deformation west of Saltillo. East, in the Monterrey salient, the effect of deeper basement and thick salt permitted thrusts to transport material much farther north, resulting in development of a north-south zone of distributed left-lateral shear in the region of Saltillo.

  6. Occurrence of Entomopathogenic Fungi from Agricultural and Natural Ecosystems in Saltillo, México, and their Virulence Towards Thrips and Whiteflies

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Peña, Sergio R.; Lara, Jorge San-Juan; Medina, Raúl F.

    2011-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi were collected from soil in four adjacent habitats (oak forest, agricultural soil, pine reforestation and chaparral habitat) in Saltillo, México using the insect bait method with Tenebrio molitor (L.) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae as bait. Overall, of the larvae exposed to soil, 171 (20%) hosted Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae), 25 (3%) hosted Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and 1 (0.1%) hosted lsaria (=Paecilomyces) sp. (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae). B. bassiana was significantly more frequent on larvae exposed to oak forest soil. M. anisopliae was significantly more frequent on larvae exposed to agricultural soil. From the infected bait insects, 93 isolates of B. bassiana and 24 isolates of M. anisopliae were obtained. Strains were tested for their infectivity against Cuban laurel thrips, Gynaikothrips uzeli Zimmerman (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) and the greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). B. bassiana isolates caused the highest mortality on thrips (some causing 88% mortality after 6 days); both fungal species caused similarly high mortality levels against whiteflies (75%) after 6 days. Large amounts of germplasm of entomopathogenic fungi, fundamentally B. bassiana and M. anisopliae, exist in the habitats sampled; pathogenicity varied among strains, and some strains possessed significant virulence. Soils in these habitats are reservoirs of diverse strains with potential for use in biocontrol. PMID:21521145

  7. Prevalence of infectious agents in free-ranging white-tailed deer in northeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cantu, Antonio; Ortega-S, J Alfonso; Mosqueda, Juan; Garcia-Vazquez, Zeferino; Henke, Scott E; George, John E

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of antibodies against brucellosis, leptospirosis, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in northeastern Mexico. Deer (n=521) were captured from helicopter using a netgun on 15 ranches covering 62,114 ha in the states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas during spring 2004. The prevalence of antibodies against Leptospira, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, BVDV, and brucellosis were 5.6, 41.1, 63.5, and 0%, respectively, indicating that white-tailed deer and cattle may share disease agents when cohabiting in northeastern Mexico.

  8. Hydrochemical Investigation of Groundwaters of The Cuatro CiÉnegas Bolson, Coahuila, MÉxico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Alejandra; Johannessona, Kevin H.; Kilroy, Kathryn C.; Barron, Luis E.

    Water samples were collected from a series of springs, pools, and canals within the Cuatro Ciénegas Bolson, Coahuila, México and analyzed for stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. The ?oxigen-18 values of these waters ranged from a low of -8.2 up to -5.7 , with a mean (+/- standard deviation) of -6.5 +/- 0.82 , whereas ?deuterium ranged from -52 to -43 , with a mean (+/- standard deviation) of - 46.6 +/- 3.2 . The majority of the water samples plot sub-parallel and beneath the local meteoric water line, with those sample collected furthest from spring-line exhibiting the most enriched ?oxigen-18 values. The stable isotope data indicate isotopic enrichment of groundwaters by evaporation following discharge and subsequent surface flow. The isotope data suggests that a considerable fraction of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwaters originate via local recharge. Those springs that issue from the western base of the Sierra de San Marcos mountain range are chiefly recharged within these mountains, whereas groundwaters discharging from Laguna Anteojo in the northern part of the bolson are more likely recharged within the higher San de la Madera mountain range. A preliminary water balance estimate, however, that interbas in flow must also contributes to the considerable groundwater discharge within the bolson.

  9. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexico: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Hernández, Gerardo; Roldán, Jesús Felipe González; Milan, Néstor Saúl Hernández; Lash, R Ryan; Behravesh, Casey Barton; Paddock, Christopher D

    2017-03-29

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a tick-borne zoonosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is among the most lethal of all infectious diseases in the Americas. In Mexico, the disease was first described during the early 1940s by scientists who carefully documented specific environmental determinants responsible for devastating outbreaks in several communities in the states of Sinaloa, Sonora, Durango, and Coahuila. These investigators also described the pivotal roles of domesticated dogs and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (brown dog ticks) as drivers of epidemic levels of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. After several decades of quiescence, the disease re-emerged in Sonora and Baja California during the early 21st century, driven by the same environmental circumstances that perpetuated outbreaks in Mexico during the 1940s. This Review explores the history of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexico, current epidemiology, and the multiple clinical, economic, and social challenges that must be considered in the control and prevention of this life-threatening illness.

  10. Reconnaissance isotopic and hydrochemical study of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwater, Coahuila, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Karen H.; Cortés, Alejandra; Kilroy, Kathryn C.

    2004-10-01

    The springs of the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson (Four Marshes basin), Coahuila, México, support more than 70 endemic species of biota. The specifics of the groundwater flow regime, however, remain a mystery. Water samples were collected from a series of springs and pools and one canal in the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson and analyzed for field parameters (temperature, pH, conductivity, alkalinity) and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in an attempt to begin a systematic study of the hydrogeology of the region. Groundwaters discharging directly along a fault-controlled spring line in Cretaceous carbonate rocks of the Cupido-Aurora aquifer are the most dilute (lowest conductivities) and warmest of those sampled. Cuatro Ciénegas waters are characterized by circumneutral pH (6.9-7.7) and reasonably low alkalinity (160-215 mg/kg as HCO 3). The δ18O values of Cuatro Ciénegas waters range from -8.2 to -5.7‰, with a mean of -6.5±0.82‰, whereas δD ranges from -52 to -43‰, with a mean of -46.6±3.2‰. The majority of the water samples plot subparallel and beneath the local meteoric water line; those samples collected farthest from the spring line exhibit the most enriched δ18O and δD values. The stable isotope data indicate that isotopic enrichment of groundwaters by evaporation following discharge and subsequent surface flow is an important process within the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson. The isotope data also suggest that a fraction of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwater originates with local recharge in mountains surrounding the bolson. Those springs that issue from the western base of the Sierra de San Marcos mountain range are recharged in part in these mountains, whereas groundwaters discharging from Laguna Anteojo in the northern part of the bolson are more likely recharged in the higher San de la Madera mountain range. An estimate of the water balance suggests that interbasin flow also may contribute to the considerable groundwater discharge.

  11. Reproductive structures of Rhamnaceae from the Cerro del Pueblo (Late Cretaceous, Coahuila) and Coatzingo (Oligocene, Puebla) Formations, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Calvillo-Canadell, Laura; Cevallos-Ferriz, Sergio R S

    2007-10-01

    Recently discovered fossil flowers from the Cretaceous Cerro del Pueblo and flowers and fruits from the Oligocene Coatzingo Formations are assigned to the Rhamnaceae. The Cretaceous flower, Coahuilanthus belindae Calvillo-Canadell and Cevallos-Ferriz, gen. et sp. nov., is actinomorphic with fused perianth parts forming a slightly campanulate to cupulate floral cup, with sepals slightly keeled and spatulate clawed petals. The Oligocene fossils include Nahinda axamilpensis Calvillo-Canadell and Cevallos-Ferriz, gen. et sp. nov. (characterized by its campanulate bisexual flower with stamens opposite, adnate to and enfolded by petals; and with the ovary ripening into a drupe), and a winged fruit assigned to Ventilago engoto Calvillo-Canadell and Cevallos-Ferriz, sp. nov. The flowers and drupe features indicate closer affinity to Zizipheae and/or Rhamneae, while the single samaroid fruit suggests the presence of Ventilagineae. However, the unique character combination in the fossil flowers precludes placing them in extant genera. Nevertheless, the history of the family is long and can be traced back to the Campanian. A detailed phylogenetic revision of the group that uses morphological characters from both extant and fossil plants is needed to better understand the significance of these records as well as other important fossils of the family.

  12. The first educational interferometer in Mexico (FEYMANS): A novel project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villicana Pedraza, Ilhuiyolitzin; Guesten, Rolf; Saucedo Morales, Julio Cesar; Carreto, Francisco; Valdes Estrada, Erik; Wendolyn Blanco Cardenas, Monica; Rodríguez Garza, Carolina B.; Pech Castillo, Gerardo A.; Ángel Vaquerizo, Juan

    2016-07-01

    An interferometer is composed of several radio telescopes (dishes) separated by a defined distance and used in synchrony. This kind of array produces a superior angular resolution, better than the resolution achieved by a single dish of the same combined area. In this work we propose the First Educational Youth Mexican Array North South, FEYMANS. It consists of an educational interferometer with initially four dishes. This array harvests Mexico's geography by locating each dish at the periphery of the country; creating new scientific links of provincial populations with the capital. The FEYMANS project focus in high school students and their projects on physics, chemistry and astronomy as a final project. Also, it can be used for bachelor theses. The initial and central dish-node is planed to be in Mexico City. After its construction, the efforts will focus to build subsequent nodes, on the Northwest region, Northeast, or Southeast. Region Northwest will give service to Baja California, Sonora and Chihuahua states. Region Northeast will cover Coahuila, Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas. Finally, region Southeast will give access to Yucatan, Quintana Roo, Campeche, Tabasco and Chiapas. This project has been conceived by young professional astronomers and Mexican experts that will operate each node. Also, we have the technical support of the "Max Planck Institute fuer Radioastronomy in Bonn Germany" and the educational model of the "PARTNeR" project in Spain. This interferometer will be financed by Mexico's Federal Congress and by Mexico City's Legislative Assembly (ALDF).

  13. A new species of Libellula Linnaeus, 1758, from the Cuatro Ciénegas basin, Coahuila, México (Anisoptera: Libellulidae).

    PubMed

    Ortega-Salas, Héctor; González-Soriano, Enrique

    2015-10-12

    A new species of Libellula is described from specimens collected in the most interesting area of Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, México. Libellula coahuiltecana sp. nov. is similar in color and morphology to L. needhami Westfall with which it co-occurs locally. It differs from the latter by having conspicuous orange spots on base of wings and nodal area, and costal, subcostal, and wing tip areas slightly infumated with the same color. Other differences exist in the morphology of the secondary genitalia of males and the shape of the vulvar plate of female.

  14. Mexico City, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    In this rare clear view of Mexico City, Mexico (19.5N, 99.0W), the network of broad avenues and plazas of the capital city are very evident. The city, built on the remnants of a lake in the caldera of a tremendous extinct volcano, is home to over twenty million people and is slowly sinking as subsidence takes it's toll on the lakebed.

  15. Resource allocation equity in northeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Georgina Mayela Núñez; Martínez, Ana María Salinas; Ríos, Enrique Villarreal; Elizondo, Ma Eugenia Garza

    2004-12-01

    Currently, the population health needs are unlimited, but allocation of financial resources is not in accordance with these needs, probably due to the lack of specific information. In this work, we propose a new approach to allocate resources with equity as a tool for decision-making in planning. The grade of equity in resource allocation in decentralized management medical areas (DMMAs (AMGD, for its initials in Spanish)) was determined; these are limited geographical areas of a social security institution in three states of the northeastern region of Mexico. The areas with more health needs in the global index were DMMA no. 12 in Tamaulipas with a Z-score (ZS) of -5; area no. 3 in Coahuila with -4; and area no. 9 in Nuevo Leon, no. 16 and no. 17 in Tamaulipas with -2. Equity was measured according to the degree of concordance between the health needs index and the per capita health expenditure of each area: (r = 0.19, P > 0.05). Low concordance was found between these variables in the studied medical areas.

  16. Aquatic bacterial assemblage structure in Pozas Azules, Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico: Deterministic vs. stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Asuar, Laura; Escalante, Ana Elena; Gasca-Pineda, Jaime; Blaz, Jazmín; Peña, Lorena; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the contributions of stochastic vs. deterministic processes in the distribution of microbial diversity in four ponds (Pozas Azules) within a temporally stable aquatic system in the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, State of Coahuila, Mexico. A sampling strategy for sites that were geographically delimited and had low environmental variation was applied to avoid obscuring distance effects. Aquatic bacterial diversity was characterized following a culture-independent approach (16S sequencing of clone libraries). The results showed a correlation between bacterial beta diversity (1-Sorensen) and geographic distance (distance decay of similarity), which indicated the influence of stochastic processes related to dispersion in the assembly of the ponds' bacterial communities. Our findings are the first to show the influence of dispersal limitation in the prokaryotic diversity distribution of Cuatro Cienegas Basin.

  17. Tree Ring Chronologies in Mexico and Dendroclimatic and Ecological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Diaz, J.; Cerano-Paredes, J.; Stahle, D. W.; Therrell, M. D.; Luckman, B. H.

    2007-05-01

    The understanding of historic hydroclimate variability is basic to determine the impact of atmospheric circulatory patterns and to plan for a proper management of limited water resources and ecosystem conservation purposes. The objective of this study was to develop a network of tree-ring chronologies for climate reconstruction and to analyze the influence of the ENSO warm phase in northern Mexico by using the Tropical Rainfall Index. Climatic sensitive tree-ring chronologies were developed in mountain ranges and riparian ecosystems of the Sierras Madre Oriental and Occidental, and central Mexico. A grid of over 30 new Douglas-fir, baldcypress, and pinyon pine chronologies were developed and seasonal winter-spring and summer precipitation reconstructions have been produced for northern and central Mexico. The seasonal winter-spring precipitation reconstructions extended 353 years (1450 - 2002) and 530 years (1472 - 2002) for Chihuahua, 228 years (1765 - 1993) and 504 years (1500 - 2003) for Durango, 602 years (1400 - 2002) for Nuevo Leon, 522 years (1474 - 1995) for Tamaulipas; and 342 years (1659 - 2001) and 410 years (1595 - 2004) for Coahuila. Some of the low frequency events were specific for each reconstruction, but common low frequency events (decadal resolution) were present in most of the reconstructions; specific cases are the droughts of the 1780s, 1810s, 1860s, 1870s, 1950s, and 1990s; and the wet episodes of the 1820s, 1830s, and 1890s.Trends in dry or wet periods were disrupted by above or below normal precipitation as affected by the ENSO phenomena, especially in the winter- spring period when this circulatory pattern produced in times abundant rains in northern Mexico. However, the ENSO influence on winter-spring precipitation has fluctuated through time. Cold fronts and hurricanes impacting the Gulf of Mexico may explain some of the hydrological behavior detected for northeastern Mexico. These results indicate that winter-spring hydroclimate

  18. Another Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Carlin

    2009-01-01

    A Mexican saying holds that "Como Mexico no hay dos"--There is only one Mexico. American media these days interpret that notion with a vengeance. Story after story depicts a country overrun by out-of-control drug wars and murder, where corrupt police officers trip over beheaded victims more often than they nab perpetrators. South of the…

  19. Diversity of culturable thermo-resistant aquatic bacteria along an environmental gradient in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, México.

    PubMed

    Cerritos, René; Eguiarte, Luis E; Avitia, Morena; Siefert, Janet; Travisano, Michael; Rodríguez-Verdugo, Alejandra; Souza, Valeria

    2011-02-01

    At the desert oasis of Cuatro Ciénegas in Coahuila, México, more than 300 oligotrophic pools can be found and a large number of endemic species of plants and animals. The most divergent taxa of diatoms, snail and fishes are located in the Churince hydrological system, where we analyzed the local diversification of cultivable Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. The Churince hydrological system is surrounded by gypsum dunes and has a strong gradient for salinity, temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen. In August 2003, surface water samples were taken in 10 sites along the Churince system together with the respective environmental measurements. 417 thermo-resistant bacteria were isolated and DNA was extracted to obtain their BOX-PCR fingerprints, revealing 55 different patterns. In order to identify similarities and differences in the diversity of the various sampling sites, an Ordination Analysis was applied using Principal Component Analysis. This analysis showed that conductivity is the environmental factor that explains the distribution of most of the microbial diversity. Phylogenetic reconstruction from their 16S rRNA sequences was performed for a sample of 150 isolates. Only 17 sequences had a 100% match in the Gene Bank (NCBI), representing 10 well known cosmopolitan taxa. The rest of the sequences cluster in 22 clades for Firmicutes and another 22 clades for Actinobacteria, supporting the idea of high diversity and differentiation for this site.

  20. Egade, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubany, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Presents a business school design in Mexico, whose spiral building sits atop a parking structure creating a compact, symbolic form for an arid urban landscape. Includes seven photographs, a floor plan, and sectional drawing. (GR)

  1. Inorganic arsenic exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Coronado-González, José Antonio; Del Razo, Luz María; García-Vargas, Gonzalo; Sanmiguel-Salazar, Francisca; Escobedo-de la Peña, Jorge

    2007-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic exposure in drinking water has been recently related to diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this relationship the authors conducted in 2003, a case-control study in an arseniasis-endemic region from Coahuila, a northern state of Mexico with a high incidence of diabetes. The present analysis includes 200 cases and 200 controls. Cases were obtained from a previous cross-sectional study conducted in that region. Diagnosis of diabetes was established following the American Diabetes Association criteria, with two fasting glucose values > or = 126 mg/100 ml (> or = 7.0 mmol/l) or a history of diabetes treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. The next subject studied, subsequent to the identification of a case in the cross-sectional study was taken as control. Inorganic arsenic exposure was measured through total arsenic concentrations in urine, measured by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Subjects with intermediate total arsenic concentration in urine (63.5-104 microg/g creatinine) had two-fold higher risk of having diabetes (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.79), but the risk was almost three times greater in subjects with higher concentrations of total arsenic in urine (odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 4.92). This data provides additional evidence that inorganic arsenic exposure may be diabetogenic.

  2. Inorganic arsenic exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Coronado-Gonzalez, Jose Antonio; Razo, Luz Maria del; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo; Sanmiguel-Salazar, Francisca; Escobedo-de la Pena, Jorge . E-mail: jorgeep@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-15

    Inorganic arsenic exposure in drinking water has been recently related to diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this relationship the authors conducted in 2003, a case-control study in an arseniasis-endemic region from Coahuila, a northern state of Mexico with a high incidence of diabetes. The present analysis includes 200 cases and 200 controls. Cases were obtained from a previous cross-sectional study conducted in that region. Diagnosis of diabetes was established following the American Diabetes Association criteria, with two fasting glucose values {>=}126 mg/100 ml ({>=}7.0 mmol/l) or a history of diabetes treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. The next subject studied, subsequent to the identification of a case in the cross-sectional study was taken as control. Inorganic arsenic exposure was measured through total arsenic concentrations in urine, measured by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Subjects with intermediate total arsenic concentration in urine (63.5-104 {mu}g/g creatinine) had two-fold higher risk of having diabetes (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.79), but the risk was almost three times greater in subjects with higher concentrations of total arsenic in urine (odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 4.92). This data provides additional evidence that inorganic arsenic exposure may be diabetogenic.

  3. Occurrence and treatment of arsenic in groundwater and soil in northern Mexico and southwestern USA.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Lucy Mar; Gutiérrez, Mélida; Alarcón-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Villalba, Maria de Lourdes; Deng, Shuguang

    2011-04-01

    This review focuses on the occurrence and treatment of arsenic (As) in the arid region of northern Mexico (states of Chihuahua and Coahuila) and bordering states of the southwestern US (New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas), an area known for having high As concentrations. Information assembled and assessed includes the content and probable source of As in water, soil, and sediments and treatment methods that have been applied in the area. High As concentrations were found mainly in groundwater, their source being mostly from natural origin related to volcanic processes with significant anthropogenic contributions near mining and smelting of ores containing arsenic. The affinity of As for solid phases in alkaline conditions common to arid areas precludes it from being present in surface waters, accumulating instead in sediments and shifting its threat to its potential remobilization in reservoir sediments and irrigation waterways. Factors such as oxidation and pH that affect the mobility of As in the subsurface environment are mentioned. Independent of socio-demographic variables, nutritional status, and levels of blood lead, cognitive development in children is being affected when exposed to As. Treatments known to effectively reduce As content to safe drinking water levels as well as those that are capable of reducing As content in soils are discussed. Besides conventional methods, emergent technologies, such as phytoremediation, offer a viable solution to As contamination in drinking water.

  4. Paleocene decapod Crustacea from northeastern Mexico: Additions to biostratigraphy and diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Díaz, José Luis; Aguillón-Martínez, Martha Carolina; Luque, Javier; Vega, Francisco J.

    2017-03-01

    New decapod specimens from mid-Paleocene shallow marine deposits of NE Mexico represents an important addition to the diversity, paleobiogeography and evolution of the Crustacea record. In this work, we describe additions to the decapod assemblage from the Paleocene (Selandian) Rancho Nuevo Formation (Difunta Group, Parras Basin, Coahuila). Due to the evident size differences with other decapod assemblages, we compare the new assemblage with those from the Lower Paleocene (Danian) Mexia Clay Member of the Wills Point Formation, Texas, and the Lower Eocene (Ypresian) El Bosque Formation in Chiapas. Species reported from the mid-Paleocene (Selandian) assemblage of the Porters Creek Formation (Alabama), are correlatable to the decapod species from NE Mexico in age, size and systematic composition. The erymid lobster Enoploclytia gardnerae (Rathbun, 1935) is represented by several carapaces and chelae remains. One isolated palm of Callianassidae is included. Numerous carapaces of Linuparus wilcoxensis Rathbun, 1935 are described, representing the most abundant lobster. A new record for the raninid Notopoides sp., and presence of Quasilaeviranina sp. cf. arzignagnensis and Quasilaeviranina ovalis are here reported. New raninids, Claudioranina latacantha sp. nov. and Claudioranina sp. (Cyrtorhininae) are also part of this assemblage. Paraverrucoides alabamensis (Rathbun, 1935), and Tehuacana americana (Rathbun, 1935) are represented by several carapaces exhibiting intraspecific morphological variation. Different sizes among the Early and Middle Paleocene and Early Eocene decapod populations suggests a possible effect of variation in seawater temperatures and/or a Lilliput effect after the K/Pg event.

  5. [Vaccination against measles. The situation in Mexico and America. Advances in the method of aerosol immunization].

    PubMed

    Fernández de Castro, J; Kumate, J

    1990-07-01

    We present general comments on the epidemiology of measles considering the pre-vaccine era as well as the post-vaccine period in which some changes can be observed: the decrease in morbidity and mortality, the extension of the inter-epidemic interval, the increase in the mean age of infection, etc. We make some estimations about the vaccine coverage and the ideal age of immunization for the goal of eradication (assuming a lifelong immunity for the vaccinees). The technical problems in measles immunization are also revised explaining why no continental country has been able to eliminate the disease. We describe the epidemiological situation in North America, Mexico and Latin American countries. Lastly we present the Mexican experience with the inhaled aerosolised vaccine: the studies in Monterrey (Sabin et al, 1982), other investigation in Mexico, D.F. and in the State of Jalisco, as well as the mass campaigns in Aguascalientes in 1988 and in Coahuila and Nuevo León in 1989. We propose it as an effective, harmless, simple, inexpensive and practical method.

  6. Mexico City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... Two small brighter patches within the hazy area indicate low fog. In the left-hand panel, the city basin appears significantly clearer, but ... very high altitudes, in contrast to the low-lying haze and fog near Mexico City. When the stereo retrieval determines that a location is ...

  7. Regional stratigraphy and distribution of epigenetic stratabound celestine, fluorite, barite and Pb-Zn deposits in the MVT province of northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sánchez, Francisco; Camprubí, Antoni; González-Partida, Eduardo; Puente-Solís, Rafael; Canet, Carles; Centeno-García, Elena; Atudorei, Viorel

    2009-04-01

    Northeastern Mexico hosts numerous epigenetic stratabound carbonate-hosted low-temperature hydrothermal deposits of celestine, fluorite, barite and zinc-lead, which formed by replacement of Mesozoic evaporites or carbonate rocks. Such deposits can be permissively catalogued as Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits. The deposits studied in the state of Coahuila are associated with granitic and metasedimentary basement highs (horsts) marginal or central to the Mesozoic Sabinas Basin. These horsts controlled the stratigraphy of the Mesozoic basins and subsequently influenced the Laramide structural pattern. The Sabinas Basin consists of ~6,000-m-thick Jurassic to Cretaceous siliciclastic, carbonate and evaporitic series. The MVT deposits are mostly in Barremian and in Aptian-Albian to Cenomanian formations and likely formed from basinal brines that were mobilized during the Laramide orogeny, although earlier diagenetic replacement of evaporite layers (barite and celestine deposits) and lining of paleokarstic cavities in reef carbonates (Zn-Pb deposits) is observed. Fluid inclusion microthermometry and isotopic studies suggest ore formation due to mixing of basinal brines and meteoric water. Homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions range from 45°C to 210°C; salinities range from 0 to 26 wt.% NaCl equiv., and some inclusions contain hydrocarbons or bitumen. Sulfur isotope data suggest that most of the sulfur in barite and celestine is derived from Barremian to Cenomanian evaporites. Regional geology and a compilation of metallogenic features define the new MVT province of northeastern Mexico, which comprises most of the state of Coahuila and portions of the neighboring states of Nuevo León, Durango and, perhaps extends into Zacatecas and southern Texas. This province exhibits a regional metal zonation, with celestine deposits to the south, fluorite deposits to the north and barite and Zn-Pb deposits mostly in the central part.

  8. Revision of Poa L. (Poaceae, Pooideae, Poeae, Poinae) in Mexico: new records, re-evaluation of P. ruprechtii, and two new species, P. palmeri and P. wendtii

    PubMed Central

    Soreng, Robert J.; Peterson, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A revision and key to the 23 species and eight subspecies of Poa (including Dissanthelium) known to occur in Mexico is provided. All voucher specimens seen are cited for accepted taxa, except Poa annua for which one voucher per state is provided. Taxa not previously known from, or poorly understood in, Mexico are discussed.Poa palmeri sp. nov. is endemic to forested slopes of the Sierra Madre Oriental, and we distinguished it from Poa ruprechtii s.s., a species of central Mexico that is here emended to include Poa sharpii (syn. nov.). Poa wendtii sp. nov. is described from the Sierra Santa Rosa in northern Coahuila. Poa tacanae is placed in synonymy in Poa seleri. Poa gymnantha and Poa occidentalis are newly reported for Mexico, and material historically identified as Poa villaroelii areplaced in Poa chamaeclinos.The genus Dissanthelium is considered to belong within Poa, and the Mexican taxa, Dissanthelium calycina subsp. mathewsii and Dissanthelium californicum, are treated as Poa calycina var. mathewsii and Poa thomasii, respectively. Poa subsect. Papillopoa subsect. nov. is erected for Poa mulleri. Lectotypes are designated for Poa conglomerata and Poa seleri. PMID:23185125

  9. Molecular identification and characterization of Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Almazán, Consuelo; González-Álvarez, Vicente H; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Martínez, Rafael; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    The tick-borne pathogens Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys are the causative agents of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) and canine cyclic thrombocytopenia (CCT). Although molecular evidence of E. canis has been shown, phylogenetic analysis of this pathogen has not been performed and A. platys has not been identified in Mexico, where the tick vector Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.) is common. The aim of this research was to screen, identify and characterize E. canis and A. platys by PCR and phylogenetic analysis in dogs from La Comarca Lagunera, a region formed by three municipalities, Torreon, Gomez-Palacio and Lerdo, in the Northern states of Coahuila and Durango, Mexico. Blood samples and five engorged R. sanguineus s.l. ticks per animal were collected from 43 females and 57 male dogs presented to veterinary clinics or lived in the dog shelter from La Comarca Lagunera. All the sampled dogs were apparently healthy and PCR for Anaplasma 16S rRNA, Ehrlichia 16S rRNA, and E. canis trp36 were performed. PCR products were sequenced and used for phylogenetic analysis. PCR products were successfully amplified in 31% of the samples using primers for Anaplasma 16S rRNA, while 10% and 4% amplified products using primers for Ehrlichia 16S rRNA and E. canis trp36 respectively. Subsequent sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of these products showed that three samples corresponded to A. platys and four to E. canis. Based on the analysis of trp36 we confirmed that the E. canis strains isolated from Mexico belong to a conservative clade of E. canis and are closely related to strains from USA. In conclusion, this is the first molecular identification of A. platys and the first molecular characterization and phylogenetic study of both A. platys and E. canis in dogs in Mexico.

  10. HAWC @ Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carramiñana, Alberto; González, María Magdalena; Salazar, Humberto; Alfaro, Ruben; Medina Tanco, Gustavo; Valdés Galicia, José; Delepine, David; Zepeda, Arnulfo; Villaseñor, Luis; Mendoza, Eduardo; Nava, Janina; Vázquez, Lilí; Tenorio Tagle, Guillermo; Carrasco, Luis; Silich, Sergey; Rogríguez Liñán, Gustavo; de la Fuente, Eduardo; Page, Dany; Lee, William; Dultzin, Deborah; Benitez, Erika; Ávila Reese, Vladimir; Mendoza, Sergio; Martos, Marco; Hernández Toledo, Héctor; Valenzuela, Octavio; Martínez, Oscar; Fernández, Arturo; Álvarez Ochoa, Cesar; Díaz, Lorenzo; Rosado, Alfonso; Ramírez, Cupatitzio; Menchaca, Arturo; Belmont, Ernesto; Sandoval, Andrés; Martínez, Arnulfo; Grabski, Varlen; Nellen, Lukas; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Lara, Alejandro; Caballero, Rogelio; Moreno, Gerardo; Napsuciale, Mauro; Ureña, Luis; Reyes, Marco; Migénes, Victor; Herrera, Gerardo; Saavedra, Oscar; Carrillo, Alejandro; Carrasco Nuñez, Gerardo; Vargas, Carlos

    The High Altitude Water Cerenkov detector HAWC will be a powefull instrument to survey the TeV sky. Mexico has proposed to locate this experiment in the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, between Citlaltepetl and Tliltepetl, host of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). The region has a sizeable technical infrastructure related to the LMT and we recently studied a 4100m location in terms of its feasibility to host HAWC. We present the proposed site location and extension, its water acquisition, experimental and complementary infrastructures.

  11. Trace gases and particulate matter emissions from wildfires and agricultural burning in Northeastern Mexico during the 2000 fire season.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Alberto; Garcia, Marisa R; Vela, Patricia; Lozano, D Fabian; Allen, David

    2005-12-01

    An inventory of air pollutants emitted from forest and agricultural fires in Northeastern Mexico for the period of January to August of 2000 is presented. The emissions estimates were calculated using an emissions factor methodology. The inventory accounts for the emission of carbon monoxide (CO), methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, ammonia, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter (PM). Particulate matter emissions include estimates for fine PM and coarse PM. A total of 2479 wildfires were identified in the domain for the period of interest, which represented approximately 810,000 acres burned and 621,130 short tons emitted (81% being CO). The main source of information used to locate and estimate the extent of the fires came from satellite imagery. A geographic information system was used to determine the type of vegetation burned by each fire. More than 54% of the total area burned during the period of study was land on the State of Tamaulipas. However, >58% of the estimated emissions came from the State of Coahuila. This was because of the mix of vegetation types burned in each state. With respect to the temporal distribution, 76.9% of the fires occurred during the months of April and May consuming almost 78% of the total area burned during the period of study. Analysis of wind forward trajectories of air masses passing through the burned areas and 850-mb wind reanalyses indicate possible transboundary transport of the emissions from Mexico to the United States during the occurrence of the major wildfires identified.

  12. Serosurvey of antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in white-tailed deer from Northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Olamendi-Portugal, María; Caballero-Ortega, Heriberto; Correa, Dolores; Sánchez-Alemán, Miguel A; Cruz-Vázquez, Carlos; Medina-Esparza, Leticia; Ortega-S, J Alfonso; Cantu, Antonio; García-Vázquez, Zeferino

    2012-10-26

    The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in white-tailed deer from Northern Mexico. Sera from 532 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from three Northern states of Mexico were assayed for antibodies to T. gondii by ELISA and western blot. From these samples, 368 were available to test for N. caninum antibodies by ELISA. The overall prevalence for T. gondii antibodies was 13.9% (74/532; CI(95) 11-17) and for N. caninum 8.4% (31/368; CI(95) 6-12). There was a significant association between positive ELISA results for T. gondii, with management factors within ranches, such number of deer per hectare and geographic location of deer, but none for N. caninum. T. gondii infection in the deer from Guerrero, Coahuila had an increased risk than those from Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas (OR, 8.3; CI(95) 1.9-35.4; P<0.05) and ranches with one deer in 15 ha had increased risk of positive association (OR, 2.61; CI(95) 1.5-4.4; P<0.05). These findings may have environmental or public health implications because venison can be an important meat source of T. gondii infections for humans and feral cats.

  13. Microbial secondary succession in soil microcosms of a desert oasis in the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Lozano, Nguyen E; Heidelberg, Karla B; Nelson, William C; García-Oliva, Felipe; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Ecological succession is one of the most important concepts in ecology. However for microbial community succession, there is a lack of a solid theoretical framework regarding succession in microorganisms. This is in part due to microbial community complexity and plasticity but also because little is known about temporal patterns of microbial community shifts in different kinds of ecosystems, including arid soils. The Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB) in Coahuila, Mexico, is an arid zone with high diversity and endemisms that has recently been threatened by aquifer overexploitation. The gypsum-based soil system of the CCB is one of the most oligotrophic places in the world. We undertook a comparative 16S rRNA 454 pyrosequencing study to evaluate microbial community succession and recovery over a year after disturbance at two sites. Results were related to concurrent measurements of humidity, organic matter and total C and N content. While each site differed in both biogeochemistry and biodiversity, both present similar pattern of change at the beginning of the succession that diverged in later stages. After one year, experimentally disturbed soil was not similar to established and undisturbed adjacent soil communities indicating recovery and succession in disturbed soils is a long process.

  14. Microbial secondary succession in soil microcosms of a desert oasis in the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    López-Lozano, Nguyen E.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Nelson, William C.; García-Oliva, Felipe; Eguiarte, Luis E.

    2013-01-01

    Ecological succession is one of the most important concepts in ecology. However for microbial community succession, there is a lack of a solid theoretical framework regarding succession in microorganisms. This is in part due to microbial community complexity and plasticity but also because little is known about temporal patterns of microbial community shifts in different kinds of ecosystems, including arid soils. The Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB) in Coahuila, Mexico, is an arid zone with high diversity and endemisms that has recently been threatened by aquifer overexploitation. The gypsum-based soil system of the CCB is one of the most oligotrophic places in the world. We undertook a comparative 16S rRNA 454 pyrosequencing study to evaluate microbial community succession and recovery over a year after disturbance at two sites. Results were related to concurrent measurements of humidity, organic matter and total C and N content. While each site differed in both biogeochemistry and biodiversity, both present similar pattern of change at the beginning of the succession that diverged in later stages. After one year, experimentally disturbed soil was not similar to established and undisturbed adjacent soil communities indicating recovery and succession in disturbed soils is a long process. PMID:23638384

  15. Stratigraphy, geochronology, geochemistry and tectonic setting of the Mesozoic Nazas Formation, north-central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, Claudio

    Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic volcanic-sedimentary sequences that were part of the Mesozoic continental-margin of western North America are exposed in northern and central Mexico. These sequences have been grouped into the Nazas Formation and crop out in the states of Durango, Coahuila, Zacatecas, and San Luis Potosi. The Nazas Formation consists of 2,500 m or more of volcanic and pyroclastic rocks and interbedded clastic sedimentary rocks that were deposited in alluvial fan and fluvial depositional systems that developed in intra-arc basins, mainly fault-bound grabens and topographic depressions within an extending Mesozoic volcanic arc. Major and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks suggests that the volcanic suite is calc-alkaline and includes rhyolite, dacite, rhyodacite, andesite, trachyandesite and rare basalt. Pyroclastic rocks are basically air-fall tuffs and volcanic breccias. The sedimentary strata include conglomerate, sandstone, shale, and siltstone, locally red in color. Geochronology (Ar-Ar, K-Ar and Rb-Sr) and field evidence indicate that the age of the Nazas Formation ranges from Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic, but the peak of arc volcanism appears to be Early and Middle Jurassic. The Mesozoic magmatic arc in Mexico has a northwest trend and extends from Sonora to Chiapas. The arc structure is more than 2,000 km long, and possibly up to 150 km wide. The width of the arc is uncertain due to the limited number of surface outcrops, however, it did not extend east into the Gulf of Mexico. Arc-related magmatism began in latest Triassic time, but the peak of arc evolution occurred during the Early and Middle Jurassic. By Oxfordian time, the arc was deeply dissected and eroded, and magmatic activity had ceased. A marine transgression from the Gulf of Mexico covered most of the Nazas arc, depositing the initial sediments of the Oxfordian Zuloaga Limestone in the Mexican Geosyncline. Jurassic crustal extension in the Gulf of Mexico was

  16. Soil-geomorphology and “wet” cycles in the Holocene record of North-Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butzer, Karl W.; Abbott, James T.; Frederick, Charles D.; Lehman, Paul H.; Cordova, Carlos E.; Oswald, John F.

    2008-10-01

    The distinction between the impact of climatic periodicities or land-use practices on soil erosion is an important issue for Pre-Hispanic and Colonial Mexico. That question can best be addressed by first documenting the dynamics of changing "wet" cycles during the Holocene in the central Mexican region between the northern limits of Pre-Hispanic agriculture and its southern margins in northwestern Chihuahua. Consequently the Laguna Project targeted a 125,000 km 2 sector of North-Central Mexico, 250 km from north to south and 500 km from east to west, from Saltillo to Durango. Some 40 sedimentary profiles with multiple cumulic soils were studied in the field and laboratory, supported by 163 conventional 14C and AMS dates on charcoal and soil humates. We distinguish: (1) wet floodplains (with humic paleosols, redox phenomena reflecting high water tables, channel-ponding sequences, and interbedded tufas) that imply aquifer recharge, sustained base flow, and mainly low-energy conditions; and (2) high-energy pulses of discharge that mobilized cobble gravels or forced channel entrenchment ("gullying") and were tied to episodic, excessive rains that promoted valley and slope instability. In between such "wet" cycles and recurrent disequilibrium events, climate was similar to today, probably less humid, with limited geomorphologic change or slow soil formation. "Wet" cycles were rare at the end of the Pleistocene, but prominent during the Holocene. Disequilibrium proxies became common and dramatic after 2500 BP. The drainages from the Eastern and Western Sierra Madres responded in phase, but varied in detail. Around AD 1050-1200 "natural" erosion led to loss of soil organic carbon, as alternating severe droughts and heavy rains destroyed the ground cover and led to ecological aridification, well before arrival of Spanish miners and settlers. The evidence that human activity triggered Pre-Hispanic or Colonial erosion in Central Mexico should therefore be re

  17. EPA Collaboration with Mexico

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA works with our Mexican neighbors on the U.S.-Mexico Environmental Program, a collaboration between the United States and Mexico to improve the environment and protect the health of the nearly 12 million people living along the border.

  18. English Teaching in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Discusses teaching English in Mexico, a country with important social, cultural, and economic ties to the United States. Looks at the various English teaching situations as well as teacher education for teachers in Mexico. Concludes that the English teaching situation in Mexico reflects great diversity and growth, and that the knowledge of English…

  19. Psychology in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Eleonora Rubio

    2011-01-01

    The first formal psychology course taught in Mexico was in 1896 at Mexico's National University; today, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM in Spanish). The modern psychology from Europe and the US in the late 19th century were the primary influences of Mexican psychology, as well as psychoanalysis and both clinical and experimental…

  20. Religious Syncretism in Mexico. Project Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, David

    This document is an outline for a three-week unit of study focusing on religious syncretism in Mexico as part of a community college course in comparative religions or philosophy of religion. While this outline is intended to give information and direction to the instructor wishing to use Mexico as an example of religious syncretism, unit goals…

  1. Pathogenic Landscape of Transboundary Zoonotic Diseases in the Mexico-US Border Along the Rio Grande.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria Dolores; Pérez de León, Adalberto A; Romero-Salas, Dora; Feria-Arroyo, Teresa P; Patino, Ramiro; Castro-Arellano, Ivan; Gordillo-Pérez, Guadalupe; Auclair, Allan; Goolsby, John; Rodriguez-Vivas, Roger Ivan; Estrada-Franco, Jose Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Transboundary zoonotic diseases, several of which are vector borne, can maintain a dynamic focus and have pathogens circulating in geographic regions encircling multiple geopolitical boundaries. Global change is intensifying transboundary problems, including the spatial variation of the risk and incidence of zoonotic diseases. The complexity of these challenges can be greater in areas where rivers delineate international boundaries and encompass transitions between ecozones. The Rio Grande serves as a natural border between the US State of Texas and the Mexican States of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas. Not only do millions of people live in this transboundary region, but also a substantial amount of goods and people pass through it everyday. Moreover, it occurs over a region that functions as a corridor for animal migrations, and thus links the Neotropic and Nearctic biogeographic zones, with the latter being a known foci of zoonotic diseases. However, the pathogenic landscape of important zoonotic diseases in the south Texas-Mexico transboundary region remains to be fully understood. An international perspective on the interplay between disease systems, ecosystem processes, land use, and human behaviors is applied here to analyze landscape and spatial features of Venezuelan equine encephalitis, Hantavirus disease, Lyme Borreliosis, Leptospirosis, Bartonellosis, Chagas disease, human Babesiosis, and Leishmaniasis. Surveillance systems following the One Health approach with a regional perspective will help identifying opportunities to mitigate the health burden of those diseases on human and animal populations. It is proposed that the Mexico-US border along the Rio Grande region be viewed as a continuum landscape where zoonotic pathogens circulate regardless of national borders.

  2. Mapping of Basement Faults with Gravity and Magnetic Data at NE Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yutsis, V.; Krivosheya, K.; Tamez Ponce, A.

    2012-04-01

    Northeast Mexico is essentially the juncture of two distinctly different tectono-stratigraphic provinces, the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Coastal Plane, Sierra Madre Oriental) province and the western Pacific Mexico (Rivera plate, Meso-American trench, Sierra Madre Occidental) province (Goldhammer & Johnson, 2001). Tectonic evolution in northeast Mexico is dominated by divergent-margin development associated with the opening of the Gulf of Mexico and overprinted by non-igneous Laramide orogenic effects (Pindell et al., 1988). The structural grain of northeast Mexico consists of Triassic to Liassic fault-controlled basement blocks, the development of which reflects in part late Paleozoic orogenic patterns of metamorphism and igneous intrusion (Wilson, 1990). There are different tectonic provinces which are recognized interpreting the basement and sediment cover of this area: Coahuila block, La Popa sub-basin, Sabinas basin, Burgos basin, Sierra Madre Oriental (Monterrey trough), and Parras basin. Mojave-Sonora megashear and San Marcos fault (Chavez-Cabello et al., 2007) are two principal fault zones crossing the northeast Mexico in NW-SE direction. This paper is presented the integral analysis of the gravity and magnetic data in the northeast Mexico. Complementing with a Digital Model of Elevations (DME) that combined with the review of previous geological studies it serves to compare the surface structures and blocks of basement in this area. Also the separation of the most important tectonic blocks was done, and 2.5D geological-geophysical model was finally developed. This model represents in a general way the principal structural characteristics of northeast Mexico. Gravity and magnetic data analysis was used with purpose to study the structure of the substrata in order to allow modeling of the basement structure and its relation with the sedimentary cover features. The Bouguer gravity and the total field aeromagnetic data were supplied by Geological Survey of Mexico

  3. Mexico: The Accidental Narco?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-30

    2011, Small Wars Foundation June 30, 2011 Mexico: The Accidental Narco ? by Paul Rexton Kan The Obama Administration’s National Security...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mexico: The Accidental Narco ? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Accidental Narco In the face of stalemate, there is the danger of an “accidental narco ” syndrome developing in Mexico. Unlike the balloon effect of

  4. Bacterial communities and the nitrogen cycle in the gypsum soils of Cuatro Ciénegas Basin, coahuila: a Mars analogue.

    PubMed

    López-Lozano, Nguyen E; Eguiarte, Luis E; Bonilla-Rosso, Germán; García-Oliva, Felipe; Martínez-Piedragil, Celeste; Rooks, Christine; Souza, Valeria

    2012-07-01

    The OMEGA/Mars Express hyperspectral imager identified gypsum at several sites on Mars in 2005. These minerals constitute a direct record of past aqueous activity and are important with regard to the search of extraterrestrial life. Gale Crater was chosen as Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity's landing site because it is rich in gypsum, as are some desert soils of the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) (Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico). The gypsum of the CCB, which is overlain by minimal carbonate deposits, was the product of magmatic activity that occurred under the Tethys Sea. To examine this Mars analogue, we retrieved gypsum-rich soil samples from two contrasting sites with different humidity in the CCB. To characterize the site, we obtained nutrient data and analyzed the genes related to the N cycle (nifH, nirS, and nirK) and the bacterial community composition by using 16S rRNA clone libraries. As expected, the soil content for almost all measured forms of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were higher at the more humid site than at the drier site. What was unexpected is the presence of a rich and divergent community at both sites, with higher taxonomic diversity at the humid site and almost no taxonomic overlap. Our results suggest that the gypsum-rich soils of the CCB host a unique microbial ecosystem that includes novel microbial assemblies.

  5. Drought Studies For Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magana, V.

    2007-05-01

    Drought constitutes one of the major threats for a number of socioeconomic sectors in Mexico. Meteorological drought occurs in various temporal and spatial scales that range from a few weeks in the tropical Mexico to decades in northern Mexico. Historically, these long term droughts have had a negative impact, not only in economic activities, but in the lives of Mexicans as well. In general, short term droughts over central southern Mexico are related to El Niño conditions. However, drought may also occur when an anomalously low number of easterly waves reach the Caribbean and Mexico. El Niño and easterly wave activity may be related by the intensification of the Caribbean Low Level Jet. However, the role of this form of transient activity as a drought trigger in Mexico has not been explored in depth. The present analysis explores the possibility of more than one form of forcing to explain drought in Mexico on various spatial and temporal scales, as well as in various regions. Such approach to the study of drought may prove useful to diagnose why certain general circulation models are unable of reproducing drought patterns over Mexico.

  6. English Teaching Profile: Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    This profile of the English language teaching situation in Mexico examines the role of English in society and in the educational system. It is noted that the extent to which English is used in Mexico is affected by the country's proximity to the United States. The educational system is described, with emphasis on English instruction which begins…

  7. Graduate Education in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Enrico N.; Gomez, Roman

    1982-01-01

    The needs, deficiencies, and possible solutions for undergraduate education of chemical engineers in Mexico were discussed in Volume XVI (Number 3) of this journal. In this paper, the authors extend their comments to the status of graduate education of chemical engineers in Mexico, focusing on the masters program. (Author/JN)

  8. The Tarahumara of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paciotto, Carla

    This paper reviews factors contributing to the loss of language and culture of the Tarahumara people of Mexico and describes a program aimed at preserving Tarahumara language and culture. The Tarahumara people reside in the Sierra Tarahumara in the northern state of Chihuahua, Mexico. Although the Tarahumara people successfully avoided…

  9. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... article title:  Continued Spread of Gulf of Mexico Oil Slick       View Larger ... on NASA's Terra spacecraft passed over the Deepwater Horizon oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico on May 8, 2010, at approximately 16:50 UTC ...

  10. Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This view of the Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico (26.5N, 102.0W) west of Monclova, shows a mining region of northern Mexico. Mine tailings can be seen on the mountain slopes and in the valley floor. In addition to mining activity, several irrigated agricultural areas supporting the local communities can be seen in the area.

  11. Petroleum and Mexico's future

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Addressing the effects of the 1982 crisis, through the late 1980s, on Mexico's economic and political systems and assessing the country's potential for entering a period of strong economic growth, contributors to this volume focus on oil, the primary source of Mexico's foreign exchange earnings, and on trade with the U.S., the primary means for earning foreign exchange. The authors argue that the problems Mexico faced during the crisis period are not over; indeed, the most difficult challenges lie ahead. For the remainder of the century Mexico must earn adequate revenue to service a substantial debt and to permit the economy to grow at a rate that provides opportunity for a labor force already enduring a high rate of unemployment and rising inflation. Contributors agree that the key to Mexico's economic and political stability will be control of inflation, unemployment, and large public sector deficits.

  12. Bacterial Communities and the Nitrogen Cycle in the Gypsum Soils of Cuatro Ciénegas Basin, Coahuila: A Mars Analogue

    PubMed Central

    López-Lozano, Nguyen E.; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Bonilla-Rosso, Germán; García-Oliva, Felipe; Martínez-Piedragil, Celeste; Rooks, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The OMEGA/Mars Express hyperspectral imager identified gypsum at several sites on Mars in 2005. These minerals constitute a direct record of past aqueous activity and are important with regard to the search of extraterrestrial life. Gale Crater was chosen as Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity's landing site because it is rich in gypsum, as are some desert soils of the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) (Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico). The gypsum of the CCB, which is overlain by minimal carbonate deposits, was the product of magmatic activity that occurred under the Tethys Sea. To examine this Mars analogue, we retrieved gypsum-rich soil samples from two contrasting sites with different humidity in the CCB. To characterize the site, we obtained nutrient data and analyzed the genes related to the N cycle (nifH, nirS, and nirK) and the bacterial community composition by using 16S rRNA clone libraries. As expected, the soil content for almost all measured forms of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were higher at the more humid site than at the drier site. What was unexpected is the presence of a rich and divergent community at both sites, with higher taxonomic diversity at the humid site and almost no taxonomic overlap. Our results suggest that the gypsum-rich soils of the CCB host a unique microbial ecosystem that includes novel microbial assemblies. Key Words: Cuatro Ciénegas Basin—Gale Crater—Gypsum soil microbial diversity—Molecular ecology—Nitrogen cycle. Astrobiology 12, 699–709. PMID:22920518

  13. Orientational data on the state of stress in northeastern Mexico as inferred from stress-induced borehole elongations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Max

    1987-03-01

    Preferential elongation directions are presented from 46 subvertical wells in northeastern Mexico from depth intervals ranging from 161 to 4,912 m. The measurements document a remarkably consistent west-east to northwest-southeast direction of the contemporary least horizontal stress in the upper crust of this intraplate region. In the regional neotectonic framework, the data suggest that Mexico north of the trans-Mexican volcanic belt is being stretched in west-east to northwest-southeast direction. The measurements from the area of the Laramide Chihuahua and Coahuila fold-thrust belts define the southern extend of the Basin and Range—Rio Grande rift stress province of the southwestern United States into northern Mexico. The least horizontal in situ stress directions recorded in the Gulf Coastal Plain (Burgos and Tampico-Misantla Basins) are oblique to the continental margin of the Gulf of Mexico, but subparallel to the direction measured in the area of the Basin and Range—Rio Grande rift stress province. This suggests that the stress distribution in these basins is not mainly the result of gravitational loading as in the Gulf Coast stress province of the United States, but is controlled by the same lithospheric stress system that characterizes the Basin and Range—Rio Grande rift stress province. This is also supported by the north-south trending zone of Oligocene-Quaternary alkaline volcanism that crosses the Tampico-Misantla Basin. Furthermore, the data indicate that the active deformation of the Mexican Ridges fold belt, east of the study area in the Gulf of Mexico cannot be caused by a compressional external tectonic load. The direction of the least horizontal in situ stress measured in the area of the Laramide Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt in Hidalgo and San Luis Potosí States is consistent with that of the other zones. However, wellbore elongations were recorded less frequently and show a rather large circular variance, which suggests that

  14. Mexico and Central America.

    PubMed

    Bronfman, M

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on migration and HIV/AIDS in Mexico and Central America, including Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. Most migrants travel to the US through Mexico. US-Mexico trade agreements created opportunities for increased risk of HIV transmission. The research literature focuses on Mexico. Most countries, with the exception of Belize and Costa Rica, are sending countries. Human rights of migrants are violated in transit and at destination. Migration policies determine migration processes. The Mexican-born population in the US is about 3% of US population and 8% of Mexico's population. About 22% arrived during 1992-97, and about 500,000 are naturalized US citizens. An additional 11 million have a Mexican ethnic background. Mexican migrants are usually economically active men who had jobs before leaving and were urban people who settled in California, Texas, Illinois, and Arizona. Most Mexican migrants enter illegally. Many return to Mexico. The main paths of HIV transmission are homosexual, heterosexual, and IV-drug-injecting persons. Latino migrants frequently use prostitutes, adopt new sexual practices including anal penetration among men, greater diversity of sexual partners, and use of injectable drugs.

  15. Preservation and analysis of footprint evidence within the archaeological record: examples from Valsequillo and Cuatrocienegas, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, M.; Huddart, D.; Gonzalez, S.

    2008-05-01

    Human footprints provide a direct record of human occupation and can be used to make a range of biometric inferences about the individuals which left them. In this paper we describe the application of three-dimensional optical laser scanning in the preservation and analysis both human and animal footprints. Optical laser scanning provides a digital elevation model of a print or surface with a vertical accuracy typically less than + 0.01 mm. Not only does this provide a procedure for recording fragile footprint evidence but allows digital measurements to be made. It is also possible to use the techniques developed for rapid proto-typing to recreate the print as solid models for visualisation. The role of optical laser scanning in the preservation of footprint evidence is explored with specific reference to the controversial footprints of the Valsequillo Basin in Central Mexico which may provide some of the earliest evidence of human colonization of the Americas. More importantly, digital footprint scans provide a basis for the numerical analysis of footprints allowing the tools of geometric morphometrics to be applied. These tools have been widely developed in the fields of biology and physical anthropology and used to explore the anatomical significance of shape. One key question that can be addressed using this approach is to develop a statistical approach to the objective recognition of a human footprint thereby helping to verify their interpretation and archaeological significance. Using footprint data from sites across the World a statistical model for the recognition of human footprints is presented and used to evaluate the controversial footprint site of Valsequillo, (Puebla State) preserved in volcanic ash and those in the Cuatrocienegas Basin, (Coahuila State) preserved in travertine.

  16. Forests of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, M.A.; Dirzo, R.; Zadroga, F.

    1995-07-01

    Forest of Mexico as elsewhere provide essential goods and services for both local citizens and the international community. Benefits include climate regulation, biodiversity, and wood and nonwood products for local consumption and economic activity. Deforestation is a matter of great environmental and economic concern. This article assesses rates of deforestation, the present status of forest in Mexico, and the major factors responsible for deforestation in the tropical southeastern region.

  17. Mexico: Paving the way

    SciTech Connect

    Erckert, C.

    1993-02-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) signed last year by the presidents of Mexico and the United States and the Canadian prime minister will pave the way for increased outside participation in Mexico's growing energy sector. In its penultimate session of 1992, the Mexican Congress approved a bill which would enact the treaty provisions into domestic law and expand upon the details of previously enacted liberalization plans.

  18. Living Longer in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Aguila, Emma; Diaz, Claudia; Fu, Mary Manqing; Kapteyn, Arie; Pierson, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This analysis of aging and income security in Mexico establishes that the older population in Mexico is increasing quickly and that this population is especially vulnerable to poverty. Mexican citizens are living longer and overall have experienced an improvement in the quality of life compared to that of prior generations. However, this study demonstrates that social improvements are not affecting the daily lives of all persons equally. The authors attempt to uncover and highlight those differences. One of the primary challenges facing Mexico is a growing older population. The demographic transition in Mexico combined with the lack of formal sources of income in retirement place many older persons in a state of financial insecurity. The information contained in this study and the proposed policy research areas are intended to enlarge the portfolio of options for older Mexicans. The authors analyze wealth and sources of income during retirement, the relationship between health and wealth, urban and rural disparities, and the impact of migration spells to the United States on wealth accumulation and health insurance in Mexico. PMID:28083208

  19. New Mexico and Cultural Pluralism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Thomas R., Jr.

    In this paper, the cultural pluralism which exists in New Mexico is discussed. Most citizens of New Mexico have been placed in 1 of 3 categories: Indians, Anglo-Americans, and Spanish Americans. Since Spanish and English are the official languages of New Mexico, making it the only officially bilingual state, the Spanish American culture is…

  20. Characterization of drought patterns through remote sensing over The Chihuahua Desert, Mexico"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, J. M.; Lopez, A.; Garatuza, J.

    2013-12-01

    Drought is a phenomenon that has intensified during the last few decades in the arid and semi-arid zones of northern Mexico. In the Chihuahua desert, across Chihuahua, Durango and Coahuila states has caused loss of food sustainability (agriculture, livestock), an increase in human health problems, and detriment of ecosystem services as well as important economic losses. In order to understand this phenomenon, it is necessary to create tools that allow monitoring the territory's spatial heterogeneity and multi-temporality. With this purpose we propose the implementation of a drought model which includes the traditional indexes of climatic drought, such as the Palmer Drought Severity Index PDSI, the Standardized Index of Rainfall SPI, data from meteorological stations and biophysical variations obtained from the MODIS sensors product MOD13 NDVI from 2001 to 2010, as well as biophysical variables characteristic of the environment, such as land use and vegetation coverage, Eco-regions, soil moisture, digital elevation model and irrigate agriculture districts. With the MODIS images, a spatially coherent time series was created analyzing the study area's phenology (TIMESAT) created the Seasonal Greenness (SG) and Start of Season Anomaly (SOSA) for the mentioned nine years. Through this, the annual cycles were established. With a decision tree model, all the previously mentioned proposed variables were integrated. The proposed model produces a general map which characterizes the vegetation condition (extreme drought, severe drought, moderate drought, near normal). Even though different techniques have been proposed on the monitoring of droughts, most of them generate drought indexes with a spatial resolution of 1km (Wardlow, B. et. al 2008; Levent T. et al. 2013). One of the main concerns of researchers on the matter is on improving the spatial information content and on having a better representation of the phenomenon. We use the normalized difference vegetation index

  1. Groundwater Recharge Evaluation in Semi-Arid Northeast Mexico in Response to Projected Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolaver, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    This research evaluates the effects of projected climate change on mountain recharge in the semi-arid Cuatrocinegas Basin (CCB) of northeast Mexico. The CCB UNESCO Biosphere Reserve is located in Coahuila, Mexico (~27° N, ~102° W) and includes > 500 springs that discharge from a regional flow system to wetlands with > 70 endemic species and to an irrigation network. This study tests the hypothesis that projected climate changes will reduce CCB recharge. In CCB, ~75% of annual precipitation (~220 mm at 700 m, ~400 mm at 2350 m) falls between May and October and ~40% falls during the North American Monsoon in June, July, and August. Environmental isotopes indicate aquifer residence times of > 50 years. Stable isotopes (O and H) show that mountain precipitation (at an elevation of ~1170 to 2350 m) dominates groundwater recharge. Recharge is insignificant at lower- elevation valleys that cover the majority of the study area due to high evapotranspiration rates. A Cl--balance water-budget recharge analysis estimates a spatially distributed recharge rate of ~1 to 3% of precipitation to provide at least 35x106 m3/year spring discharge (as measured in canals that drain dozens of springs). IPCC AR4 climate projections predict an annual temperature increase of 3.0 to 3.5°C and an annual precipitation decrease of 5 to 10% for Subregion CNA (located adjacent to CCB) by 2099. During June to August, models project a temperature increase of 3.5 to 4.0°C and a precipitation increase of 0 to 5%. Although global and regional circulation models evaluate mountain regions poorly, a first-order evaluation of climate projections on CCB recharge is needed input to develop effective long-term groundwater management policies. Climate projections suggest that the minimum elevation at which recharge occurs in CCB may increase by ~615 m to 1785 m, which would limit recharge to the highest mountain elevations. If annual precipitation is reduced by 5 to 10% and temperatures increase as

  2. Teledermatology in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Brown, Megan

    2016-12-01

    The Health Frontiers in Tijuana (HFiT) clinic is a binational partnership between the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine (San Diego, California); the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California School of Medicine (Tijuana, Mexico); and Desayunador Salesiano Padre Chava, a community grassroots organization in Tijuana, Mexico. Health Frontiers in Tijuana provides accessible quality health care for the underserved in Tijuana's Zona Norte. This article is a narrative meant to share my clinical experience as a dermatology resident who worked with HFiT to establish teledermatology services at this clinic.

  3. [Dermatophytoses in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Arenas, Roberto

    2002-06-01

    The dermatophytic infections are superficial mycoses common in Mexico, they have an estimated frequency of 5% in dermatological outpatients. In this review we present a global view of these mycoses as well as their etiological agents in tinea capitis, tinea pedis, tinea corporis, tinea cruris and onychomycosis and also uncommon infections such as tinea imbricata and epidermophytosis of the diaper area. We also analyze these infections in diabetic patients, healthy carriers and dermatophytic infections in pets and laboratory animals. The most important publications about dermatophytosis in Mexico in the dermatological, epidemiological or mycological area are reviewed, specially those published in the last ten years.

  4. Mexico's first domestic satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Ruiz, M. E.; Elbert, B. R.

    The principal features of the Morelos communications satellite program, providing Mexico with C-band and Ku-band TV and telephone services beginning in 1985, are reviewed. Two satellites, modified versions of the Hughes HS-376 dual-spin bus, will be launched by STS and controlled from a tracking, telemetery, and command station near Mexico City; the 184-station ground network currently operating with Intelsat-IV will be expanded to about 1000 C-band stations (plus numerous small Ku-band receivers) by 1990. The spacecraft design, communications-subsystem performance, repeater equipment, antennas, and coverage pattern are presented in tables, drawings, diagrams, photographs and maps and discussed.

  5. Avian influenza in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, C

    2009-04-01

    The outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N2 in Mexico in 1994 led to a clear increase in biosecurity measures and improvement of intensive poultry production systems. The control and eradication measures implemented were based on active surveillance, disease detection, depopulation of infected farms and prevention of possible contacts (identified by epidemiological investigations), improvement of biosecurity measures, and restriction of the movement of live birds, poultry products, by-products and infected material. In addition, Mexico introduced a massive vaccination programme, which resulted in the eradication of HPAI in a relatively short time in two affected areas that had a high density of commercial poultry.

  6. Identification of Salmonella serotypes isolated from cantaloupe and chile pepper production systems in Mexico by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Robles, Miguel A; Morales-Loredo, Alberto; Alvarez-Ojeda, Genoveva; Vega-P, Adrián; Chew-M, Yazmín; Velarde, Sixto; Fratamico, Pina

    2008-11-01

    A study was conducted in 2006 to determine the prevalence of Salmonella on three cantaloupe farms in Matamoros, Coahuila, Mexico, and on one farm that cultivates chile peppers var. Bell in Culiacán, Sinaloa, Mexico. Samples from cantaloupe farms consisted of cantaloupe rinses, irrigation water, water from furrows in the field, and workers' hands. Samples from the chile pepper farm consisted of rinses of chile peppers obtained at the field, pepper rinses obtained at the packing house, and irrigation water from the field. A total of 55 samples were obtained from both production systems. Twelve and 10 samples from the cantaloupe and chile pepper production systems, respectively, tested positive for Salmonella according to a traditional culture method. The difference between the proportion of Salmonella-positive samples from the cantaloupe production system (12 of 28 = 0.43) and the chile pepper production system (10 of 27 = 0.37) was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). A PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method based on the fliC gene was used to determine the serotype of the isolates. Salmonella Typhimurium was the only serotype found associated with the cantaloupe production system, whereas both Salmonella Typhimurium and Enteritidis serotypes were found associated with the chile pepper production system. Results showed that 91% (20 of 22) and 9% (2 of 22) of the isolates from both agricultural systems matched with the Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis reference strain restriction profiles, respectively. This study demonstrates the utility of the PCR-RFLP technique for determining the serotypes of Salmonella isolates obtained from cantaloupe and chile pepper production systems.

  7. Indians of New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The booklet gives a general introduction to American Indians in New Mexico. Covering historical background and present status, reports are given for these tribes: the 19 Pueblos (i.e., Acoma, Cochiti, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, and Zuni), the Jicarilla and Mescalero Apaches, and the Navajos. Also included are 26 places of interest such as Acoma…

  8. The Art of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saccardi, Marianne

    1997-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of books for grades K and up which explores the folklore, poetry, fiction, and art of Mexico, and focuses on the Mayans and Aztecs and Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. Also suggests various research, reading, drama, music, social studies, physical education, and art activities and lists related videos and Internet…

  9. Mexico: Yesterday and Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koscielny, Mary Patrice

    This guide features Mexican history, culture, and the environment in the years past and present. This guide discusses five periods of Mexican history, including: (1) Indian Period; (2) Colonial Period; (3) Independence Movement; (4) The Revolution; and (5) Mexico Today. Each section has goals for the students, background readings, and activities…

  10. Many Faces of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Octavio Madigan; And Others

    This resource book braids together the cultural, political and economic realities which together shape Mexican history. The guiding question for the book is that of: "What do we need to know about Mexico's past in order to understand its present and future?" To address the question, the interdisciplinary resource book addresses key…

  11. [Food security in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Urquía-Fernández, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    An overview of food security and nutrition in Mexico is presented, based on the analysis of the four pillars of food security: availability, access, utilization of food, and stability of the food supply. In addition, the two faces of malnutrition in Mexico were analyzed: obesity and undernourishment. Data were gathered from the food security indicators of the United Nations's Food and Agriculture Organization, from the Mexican Scale of Food Security, and from the National Health and Nutrition Survey. Mexico presents an index of availability of 3 145 kilocalories per person per day, one of the highest indexes in the world, including both food production and imports. In contrast, Mexico is affected by a double burden of malnutrition: whereas children under five present 14% of stunt, 30% of the adult population is obese. Also, more than 18% of the population cannot afford the basic food basket (food poverty). Using perception surveys, people reports important levels of food insecurity, which concentrates in seven states of the Mexican Federation. The production structure underlying these indicators shows a very heterogeneous landscape, which translates in to a low productivity growth across the last years. Food security being a multidimensional concept, to ensure food security for the Mexican population requires a revision and redesign of public productive and social policies, placing a particular focus on strengthening the mechanisms of institutional governance.

  12. Sierra University in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celis, Francisco Manuel Orozco

    2003-01-01

    Sierra University was designed to promote the development of the mountain communities in the State of Sonora, Mexico. The university offers high school graduates an opportunity to pursue their studies in their home region, in order to stimulate economic development and contribute to social cohesion in the highlands area. The university is equipped…

  13. Broadcasting in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Noriega, Luis Antonio; Leach, Frances

    This monograph traces the growth of Mexico's broadcasting services against the background of that country's geographical, cultural, demographic, economic, and political structures. Specific areas dealt with within the six chapters of the monograph are: (1) the national environment for broadcasting; (2) the advent and development of broadcasting in…

  14. Mexico: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerren, Margaret

    A survey of the status of language usage in Mexico begins with an overview of language distribution among the population, mono- and multilingualism, changes in patterns of usage between the 1970 and 1980 censuses, and linguistic issues related to assimilation of the Indian population and the role and philosophy of the Instituto Nacional…

  15. Christmas in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    The Christmas season in Mexico starts on December 16 with "las posadas," a series of religious processions in which families or neighbors reenact Joseph's search for shelter for Mary en route to Bethlehem. Those representing pilgrims travel from home to home until they are finally accepted by those representing innkeepers at a home with…

  16. Workforce: New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In New Mexico, the demand for well-educated employees will only increase over the next several years. In the decade leading up to 2012, healthcare occupations will see growth of 32 percent. Teachers will be in high demand: nearly 12,380 educators (including librarians) will need to be hired. Managers will see their ranks swell by 21 percent; when…

  17. Integrated geographic information systems (IGIS) analysis and definition of the tectonic framework of northern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Pina, Carlos Manuel

    Crustal rupture structures reactivated in the course of the tectonic history of northern Mexico are the surface expressions of planes of weakness, in the form of simple or composite rectilinear features or slightly curved, defined as lineaments. Unless otherwise defined as strike-slip faults, lineaments are part of parallel and sub-parallel oblique convergent or oblique divergent tectonic zones cross cutting the Sierra Madre Occidental and northern Mexico, in a NW trend. These shear zones are the response to the oblique subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America. Kinematic analysis of five selected sites in northern Mexico, three basins and two compressional shear zones, proved possible a combination of shear mechanism diagram and models from analogue materials, with satellite imagery and geographic information systems, as an aid to define strike-slip fault motion. This was done using a reverse engineering process by comparing geometries. One of the sites assessed, involving the Parras Basin, Coahuila Block (CB), San Marcos fault, a postulated PBF-1 fault, allowed for palinpastic reconstruction of the CB that corroborated the results of the vector motion defined, in addition to an extension of ˜25% in a northwest southeast direction. A GIS-based compilation and georeferenced regional structural studies by several researchers were used as ground control areas (GCA); their interpolation and interpretation, resulted in a tectonic framework map of northern Mexico. In addition, shaded relief models overlaid by the lineaments / fault layer allowed structural analyses of basins related to these major structures. Two important results were obtained from this study: the Tepehuanes-San Luis-fault (TSL) and the Guadalupe fault, named herein, displaces the Villa de Reyes graben, and the Aguascalientes graben, respectively, to the SE, confirming their left lateral vector motion; afterwards TSL was displaced south by the right lateral strike slip Taxco-San Miguel de

  18. [Dietary changes in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Mayans, J A; García Campos, M; Cervantes Bustamante, R; Mata Rivera, N; Zárate Mondragón, F; Mason Cordero, T; Villarreal Espinosa, A

    2003-06-01

    Although the Mexican population has traditionally been malnourished, the prevalence of obesity in children and adults has increased by almost 50 % in the last 10 years. Recent studies show substantial changes in the nutritional status of Mexicans, especially in the pediatric population. Among the factors associated with the development of obesity are overeating, sedentariness, and genetics. The apparent economic development in Mexico, as well as the influence of dietary patterns from other countries, have contributed to modifying lifestyle. Despite measures taken by the health system, iron- and zinc-deficiency anemia continue to be prevalent. The present review aims to describe the changes that have taken place in Mexico in the last few decades leading to a generation of short and obese children, as well as to determine the associated factors in order to promote healthier eating patterns among the Mexican population.

  19. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  20. Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Sunglint on the water's surface reveals the complex pattern of currents in the Gulf of California in the vicinity of Tiburon and Angel de la Guarda Islands (29.0N, 113.0W). Mexico's state of Sonora and the Sonora Desert is on the mainland and the state of Baja California consists of the entire peninsula. The Pacific Ocean is under the coastal cloud cover on the Baja peninsula.

  1. Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An interesting view down the axis of Baja California, Mexico (26.5N, 113.0W). At the center of the Scene is Laguna Ojo de Liebre (Bay of Whales) which is a breeding area for the Pacific Grey Whale. The Sea of Cortez, also known as the Gulf of California, is to the left and the Pacific Ocean is to the right.

  2. Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sunglint on the surface of the Sea of Cortez near the island of Tiburon (28.5 N, 112.5W) reveals intricate patterns of internal waves under the placid surface. Mexico's state of Sonora and the Sonora Desert is on the mainland and the state of Baja California consists of the entire peninsula. The large bay on the Pacific side of Baja is Laguna Ojo de Libre (Bay of Whales) which is a breeding area for the Pacific Grey Whales.

  3. MANZANO WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, C.H.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the extreme southwestern part of the Manzano Wilderness, New Mexico has a probable mineral-resource potential for the occurrence of gold. A sample from one inactive mine in this area yielded concentrations of gold and silver. Other mines and prospects and associated geologic terrane have little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral resources. No other mineral or energy resource potential was identified in the study.

  4. New Mexico Clean Energy Initiatives

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation addresses New Mexico oil and gas development, brownfields, mining development, renewable energy development, renewable resources, renewable standards, solar opportunities, climate change, and energy efficiency.

  5. [Obesity in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Dávila-Torres, Javier; González-Izquierdo, José Jesús; Barrera-Cruz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Excess body weight (overweight and obesity) is currently recognized as one of the most important challenges of public health in the world, given its size, speed of growth and the negative effect it has on the health of the population that suffers. Overweight and obesity significantly increases the risk of chronic no communicable diseases, premature mortality and the social cost of health. An estimated 90 % of cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus attributable to overweight and obesity. Today, Mexico is second global prevalence of obesity in the adult population, which is ten times higher than that of countries like Japan and Korea. With regard to children, Mexico ranks fourth worldwide obesity prevalence, behind Greece, USA and Italy. In our country, over 70 % of the adult population, between 30 and 60 years are overweight. The prevalence of overweight is higher in men than females, while the prevalence of obesity is higher in women than men. Until 2012, 26 million Mexican adults are overweight and 22 million obese, which represents a major challenge for the health sector in terms of promoting healthy lifestyles in the population and development of public policies to reverse this scenario epidemiology. Mexico needs to plan and implement strategies and action cost effective for the prevention and control of obesity of children, adolescents and adults. Global experience shows that proper care of obesity and overweight, required to formulate and coordinate multisectoral strategies and efficient for enhancing protective factors to health, particularly to modify individual behavior, family and community.

  6. Firearms in New Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Wiktor, S Z; Gallaher, M M; Baron, R C; Watson, M E; Sewell, C M

    1994-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of firearm ownership and storage practices in New Mexico, we did a random-digit-dialing survey of New Mexico residents in October 1991. Of 200 households surveyed, 79 (40%) had 1 or more firearms in the home. Rural households were more likely than urban households to have firearms (44% versus 30%), and households with annual incomes of greater than $25,000 were more likely to have a firearm than households with incomes of $25,000 or less (41% versus 33%). Household firearm ownership did not vary with the presence of young (< 15 years old) children (38% with children versus 41% without). Handguns were generally owned for self-protection, and rifles were owned for hunting. Of households with firearms, 24% stored them unsafely (unlocked and loaded or unloaded but with ammunition nearby), including 21% of households with young children. Of the households with handguns only, 40% stored these firearms unsafely compared with 13% of those with rifles only. The prevalence of gun ownership in New Mexico is similar to that reported in national surveys; handguns are stored less safely than rifles; and the presence of young children in the home does not appear to improve firearm storage safety. Images PMID:7941530

  7. Environmental lead in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Albert, L A; Badillo, F

    1991-01-01

    From the data presented here, it can be concluded that environmental exposure to lead is a particularly severe problem in Mexico. As has been shown, there are very important sources of exposure to this metal: (a) for rural populations who manufacture and/or utilize lead-glazed pottery, (b) for urban populations who are exposed to high air lead concentrations due to the continued use of lead fuel additives, (c) for workers of several industries, mainly those of batteries and pigments, (d) for consumers who routinely eat canned foods such as hot peppers and fruit products, and (e) for the general population living in the vicinity of smelters, refineries and other industries that emit lead. Therefore, in Mexico only those native populations living in very primitive communities, far away from all civilized life, could be expected to be free from this exposure. At the same time, and despite the relatively few data available, it can be stated that the exposure to lead of populations in Mexico could be approaching levels that might be highly hazardous, in particular for the neuropsychological health of children. Regarding the presence of lead in the environment, despite the fact that the available studies are not enough, it is evident that pollution by this metal is widespread and that there is a serious lack of studies for most regions of the country, including several that might be expected to be highly polluted. At the same time, it is evident that the official attention paid to the problem, either in regulations, support of further studies, or implementation of effective control measures has been far from the level needed according to the available data. Lead in gasoline is still used at very high concentrations in all the country, with the exception of Mexico City and its surrounding area, while no studies have been carried out to determine the potential health and environmental impact of this practice in regions outside Mexico City. Despite the fact that the Torre

  8. Mexico: Rasgos de Su Historia. (Mexico: Highlights of Its History).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orozco, Cecilio

    Intended for both teachers and students, this publication, written in Spanish, briefly traces Mexico's history from its Conquest in 1519 to the overthrow of Porfirio Diaz in 1910. The following are briefly discussed: Mexico's Conquest in 1519; events immediately after the fall of Tenochtitlan; the War for Independence; Texas' separation from…

  9. Mexico 1996. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad 1996 (Mexico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Salvador

    This paper shares the impressions of a participant from the 1996 Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program in Mexico. These impressions address several current interest topics about international relations with Mexico including: (1) immigration; (2) politics; (3) education; (4) the economy; (5) the environment; (6) the media; (7) religion; and…

  10. Mexico: Democracy and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    During most of the twentieth century, Mexico was governed by one of the longest-ruling authoritarian parties in the contemporary world. Even as most Latin American countries democratized in the 1980s, Mexico remained under the control of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). It was not until the 2000 presidential election that a two-party…

  11. Curbing Cartel Influence in Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-28

    Mexico back from achieving its potential in the global market place. Cartel influence hampers legitimate business competition. Violence, combined...system is holding Mexico back from achieving its potential in the global market place. Cartel influence hampers legitimate business competition...east and west coast organizations. However, cartel allegiances are for business first, as they share risks and markets only to protect profits.20

  12. Mosses new to New Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bryophyte inventory was conducted in the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP), New Mexico, from 2009 to 2011. Specimens representing 113 species of bryophytes were collected. Of those bryophytes, seven of the mosses were new to New Mexico: Atrichum tenellum (Rohling) Bruch & Schimper, Dicranum ...

  13. New Mexico Educational Perspective 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. Assessment, Evaluation, and Information Services Unit.

    This fold-out chart provides information about educational achievement in New Mexico for 1988-89. Demographic and educational indicators are summarized for the 88 school districts with over 292,450 students in 633 public schools in the state. The New Mexico Assessment System measures student achievement in language arts, social studies, science,…

  14. 76 FR 58772 - Safety & Security Trade Mission; Mexico City and Monterrey, Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... International Trade Administration Safety & Security Trade Mission; Mexico City and Monterrey, Mexico AGENCY... Safety and Security trade mission to Mexico City and Monterrey, Mexico, for January 30-February 2, 2012... sectors of the Mexican market. Given its dominance in this sector, Mexico City is the main stop on...

  15. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology of Cambrian to Triassic miogeoclinal and eugeoclinal strata of Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gehrels, G.E.; Stewart, John H.

    1998-01-01

    One hundred and eighty two individual detrital zircon grains from Cambrian through Permian miogeoclinal strata, Ordovician eugeoclinal rocks, and Triassic post-orogenic sediments in northwestern Sonora have been analyzed. During Cambrian, Devonian, Permian, and Triassic time, most zircons accumulating along this part of the Cordilleran margin were shed from 1.40-1.45 and 1.62-1.78 Ga igneous rocks that are widespread in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Zircons with ages of approximately 1.11 Ga are common in Cambrian strata and were apparently shed from granite bodies near the sample site. The sources of 225-280 Ma zircons in our Triassic sample are more problematic, as few igneous rocks of these ages are recognized in northwestern Mexico. Such sources may be present but unrecognized, or the grains could have been derived from igneous rocks of the appropriate ages to the northwest in the Mojave Desert region, to the east in Chihuahua and Coahuila, or to the south in accreted(?) arc-type terranes. Because the zircon grains in our Cambrian and Devonian to Triassic samples could have accumulated in proximity to basement rocks near their present position or in the Death Valley region of southern California, our data do not support or refute the existence of the Mojave-Sonora megashear. Ordovician strata of both miogeoclinal and eugeoclinal affinity are dominated by >1.77 Ga detrital zircons, which are considerably older than most basement rocks in the region. Zircon grains in the miogeoclinal sample were apparently derived from the Peace River arch area of northwestern Canada and transported southward by longshore currents. The eugeoclinal grains may also have come from the Peace River arch region, with southward transport by either sedimentary or tectonic processes, or they may have been shed from off-shelf slivers of continents (perhaps Antarctica?) removed from the Cordilleran margin during Neoproterozoic rifting. It is also possible that the

  16. Ferric Tourmaline from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mason, B; Donnay, G; Hardie, L A

    1964-04-03

    Dark brown crystals, up to 10 mm long, occur in rhyolite at Mexquitic, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. They are short prismatic, showing {1120}, {3030}, {1011}, {0221}, with c/a 0.4521, measured with a goniometer, and distinct {1120} cleavage. With an unusual combination of cell dimensions, high density, high refractive indices, and extreme birefringence, this tourmaline falls outside the known elbaite-schorl and schorl-dravite series. A chemical analysis, recalculated on the basis of cell volume and density, gives close to the theoretical 150 atoms per cell, whether the iron is ferrous or ferric, but the physical properties indicate a ferric tourmaline.

  17. GILA WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratte, James C.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical and geophysical indicators delineated during a study of the Gila Wilderness, New Mexico indicate that there are areas of probable and substantiated mineral-resource potential for gold, silver, tellurium, molybdenum, copper, lead, zinc, and fluorite. The areas which have resource potential lie along both sides of the western and southwestern boundaries of the wilderness, and adjacent to the access corridor to the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument in the eastern part of the wilderness. Areas marked by geothermal springs along Turkey Creek and Middle Fork of the Gila River have a probable potential for geothermal energy. No other energy-resource potential was identified within the study area.

  18. [Psychiatry in ancient Mexico].

    PubMed

    Calderón Narváez, G

    1992-12-01

    Using studies on prehispanic and early post-conquest documents of Ancient Mexico--such as the Badianus Manuscript, also known as Libellus de Medicinalibus Indorum Herbis, and Brother Bernardino de Sahagún's famous work History of the Things of the New Spain, a description of some existing medical and psychiatric problems, and treatments Ancient Aztecs resorted to, is presented. The structure of the Aztec family, their problems with the excessive ingestion of alcoholic beverages, and the punishments native authorities had implemented in order to check alcoholism up are also described.

  19. Merida, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This rare cloud free view of the city of Merida (21.0N, 90.0W) on the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico was taken as an experiment with color infrared film to determine the best applications of this unique film. Color film presents an image as it appears to the eye but color infrared film eliminates haze and better defines vegetation and its vitality by the shade of red or pink. Note that much of the native forests have been cut down for farm lands.

  20. 21 CFR 808.81 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New Mexico. 808.81 Section 808.81 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.81 New Mexico. The following New Mexico medical device requirement is... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: New Mexico Statutes Annotated, section 67-36-16(F)....

  1. 21 CFR 808.81 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false New Mexico. 808.81 Section 808.81 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.81 New Mexico. The following New Mexico medical device requirement is... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: New Mexico Statutes Annotated, section 67-36-16(F)....

  2. 21 CFR 808.81 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false New Mexico. 808.81 Section 808.81 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.81 New Mexico. The following New Mexico medical device requirement is... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: New Mexico Statutes Annotated, section 67-36-16(F)....

  3. 21 CFR 808.81 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false New Mexico. 808.81 Section 808.81 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.81 New Mexico. The following New Mexico medical device requirement is... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: New Mexico Statutes Annotated, section 67-36-16(F)....

  4. 21 CFR 808.81 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false New Mexico. 808.81 Section 808.81 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.81 New Mexico. The following New Mexico medical device requirement is... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: New Mexico Statutes Annotated, section 67-36-16(F)....

  5. Mexico City Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoglu, B.; Dixon, T. H.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Wdowinski, S.

    2008-12-01

    Many parts of Mexico City are undergoing rapid subsidence due to extraction of ground water in excess of natural recharge. We use PSInSAR (Persistent Scatterer InSAR) to investigate the link between surface deformation and ground water withdrawal. From 23 Envisat acquisitions, we obtain a time-series of surface deformation between January 2004 and July 2006 showing that the eastern part of Mexico City presents a high subsidence rate as high as 30 cm/year. This subsidence is clearly tied to declining ground water levels. We use TU Delft's Doris and PSI Toolbox for interferogram generation and PS processing. Assuming constant subsidence rates, we have obtained a dense, coherent deformation map throughout the area. Comparison between GPS and PSInSAR inferred rates show agreement in the longer term signal; we will also show initial results of GPS/PSInSAR comparison on shorter time scales. The high density of persistent scatterers allows us to detect differential deformation of urban infrastructure. Our analysis indicates that in some cases the rate of an individual persistent scatterer can differ about 3-4 cm/yr from local deformation. While some bigger buildings show slower subsidence, others have faster rates. It is important to note that in some large buildings we detected differential vertical motion, suggesting that these buildings are subject to shear stresses associated with local deformation.

  6. Nested Gulf of Mexico Modeling with HYCOM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-29

    Gulf of Mexico Modeling with HYCOM Patrick J. Hogan1 Alan J. Wallcraft1 Ole Martin Smedstad2 1Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center...2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nested Gulf of Mexico Modeling with HYCOM 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Running Nested Gulf of Mexico • 1/12° Assimilative Nested Gulf of Mexico 1/25° Free-Running Nested Gulf of Mexico

  7. Mexico Wind Resource Assessment Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    A preliminary wind energy resource assessment of Mexico that produced wind resource maps for both utility-scale and rural applications was undertaken as part of the Mexico-U.S. Renewable Energy Cooperation Program. This activity has provided valuable information needed to facilitate the commercialization of small wind turbines and windfarms in Mexico and to lay the groundwork for subsequent wind resource activities. A surface meteorological data set of hourly data in digital form was utilized to prepare a more detailed and accurate wind resource assessment of Mexico than otherwise would have been possible. Software was developed to perform the first ever detailed analysis of the wind characteristics data for over 150 stations in Mexico. The hourly data set was augmented with information from weather balloons (upper-air data), ship wind data from coastal areas, and summarized wind data from sources in Mexico. The various data were carefully evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. The preliminary assessment has identified many areas of good-to-excellent wind resource potential and shows that the wind resource in Mexico is considerably greater than shown in previous surveys.

  8. 75 FR 28555 - Executive Green ICT & Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Mexico City, Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... International Trade Administration Executive Green ICT & Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Mexico City, Mexico... Commercial Service are organizing an Executive Green ICT & Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Mexico City... ``Green Information & Communication Technology (ICT)'' solutions, as well as energy...

  9. Mexico City, Mexico as seen from STS-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This image is the clearest photo of Mexico City, Mexico taken from U.S. Manned Spacecraft. North is to the upper right. Mexico City sits in a basin surrounded by large volcanoes. The restricted atmospheric circulation in the basin, coupled with the inevitable air emissions produced by a city of 20 million people has created a critical air pollution problem for the city. In most photographs of the region, Mexico City is obscured by haze. The clarity of the photograph allows many key cultural features to be identified, including all of the major boulevards, the horse track (western part of the city), the university (south of the city), and the museum areas. Large, man-made ponds east of the city also stand out.

  10. Surgical education in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Surgical education in Mexico basically follows the same model as in the United States, with a selection process resembling the matching program. There is a 4-year training period during which residents in their third year spend 4 months as the sole surgeon in a rural community. During the senior year they are entitled to an elective period in a place of their choosing. After completion of the 4 years, residents have to present a thesis and undergo an oral examination before getting a university diploma. They are then encouraged to pass the written and oral examination of the Mexican Board of Surgery before they are fully certified to enter practice in a public or private hospital.

  11. Aseismic Slip Observed on the Faults in Mexicali Valley, Baja California, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.; Suarez, F.; Nava, F.; Farfan, F.; Cossio Battani, G. D.; Guzman, M.

    2007-05-01

    The Mexicali Valley, which is part of the Salton Trough, is located within an active tectonic region, in the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates; a region featuring a wide zone of transform faults associated with San Andreas fault system, and a zone of distributed deformation in the pull-apart center of Cerro Prieto. Since 1996, geotechnical instruments have operated in the Valley, for continuous recording of deformation phenomena. To date, the network includes three crackmeters, eight tiltmeters, and seven piezometers installed in the shallow aquifer; all instruments have sampling intervals in the 1 to 20 minutes range. The mainly vertical displacement at Saltillo fault (known before as southernmost part of Imperial fault) has been measured on a continuous basis since February 1996 by a crackmeter installed in Ejido Saltillo (Glowacka 1996; Nava and Glowacka, 1999). In 1998 a tiltmeter was installed on the fault and a second crackmeter , in a horizontal direction, about 60° from the fault strike, was installed about 1 km south of ES. Another crackmeter in the vertical plane crossing Morelia fault and a 3D Witness on the Cerro Prieto fault were installed in 2004. In 2003 seven digital water level meters were installed at depths up to 500 meters in the local piezometric wells, with the purpose of recording aquifer level changes. The observed deformation rates measured on the Saltillo fault are 6 cm/yr and 2 cm/yr for the vertical and horizontal components, respectively and occurs in steps (creep events), separated by months of quiescence, and large events account for 70 percent of the vertical displacement. Aseismic creep events have amplitudes of 1-3 cm and durations of 1-3 days. Much less precise measurements from the Cerro Prieto fault show vertical deformation on the fault with velocity around 3.1 cm/yr , and the rate does not depend on the local seismicity. Horizontal rates change slightly with the presence of seismicity when very small

  12. Transportation energy use in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinbaum, C.; Meyers, S.; Sathaye, J.

    1994-07-01

    This report presents data on passenger travel and freight transport and analysis of the consequent energy use in Mexico during the 1970--1971 period. We describe changes in modal shares for passenger travel and freight transport, and analyze trends in the energy intensity of different modes. We look in more detail at transportation patterns, energy use, and the related environmental problems in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area, and also discuss policies that have been implemented there to reduce emissions from vehicles.

  13. Manitos and Chicanos in Nuevo Mexico Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Flaviano Chris

    1974-01-01

    The article briefly reviews New Mexico's political history, surveys the present socio-political status of its Spanish speaking population, and examines the effects of the Chicano Movimiento on Manitos in New Mexico. (NQ)

  14. New Mexico Campaigns Against Hunger and Malnutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubin, Shami

    1972-01-01

    Describes the nutritional needs of individuals in New Mexico, and the efforts of the Nutrition Improvement Program (NIP) of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine at Albuquerque to remove hunger and malnutrition. (DM)

  15. Libraries in New Mexico: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/newmexico.html Libraries in New Mexico To use the sharing features on this ... Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center University of New Mexico ILL MSC09 5100 1 University of New ...

  16. Rabies control in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C H Alvarez; Pino, F Vargas; Baer, G; Morales, P Kuri; Cedillo, V Gutiérrez; Blanco, M A Llanas; Avila, M Hernández

    2008-01-01

    Rabies in dogs was unknown in the Americas before the arrival of the Spanish "Conquistadores". Until the mid-1980s rabies in animals and, in turn in humans, changed little from year to year, with the number of dog vaccinations reported annually rarely reaching one million. In Mexico, the national rabies control programme using mass parenteral vaccination of dogs started in 1990 with about seven million dogs vaccinated the same year. The number of vaccinated dogs exceeded 10 and 15 million in 1995 and 2005, respectively. Modern cell culture-based inactivated rabies virus vaccines were used. A key factor for the success of the dog rabies control program was the supply of potent canine rabies vaccines. Between 1990 and 2005, more than 150 million vaccine doses from 300 lots were administered. Each lot was tested for potency prior to use in the field. The required minimum content of rabies virus antigen for vaccines was 2 IU, in accord with WHO standards. Testing revealed antigen contents ranging from 3.28 to 5.59 IU. As a result of the mass dog vaccination campaigns, human rabies cases due to dog-mediated rabies decreased from 60 in 1990 to 0 in 2000. The number of rabies cases in dogs decreased from 3,049 in 1990 to 70 cases last year.

  17. Biological pest control in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Williams, Trevor; Arredondo-Bernal, Hugo C; Rodríguez-del-Bosque, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Mexico is a megadiverse country that forms part of the Mesoamerican biological corridor that connects North and South America. Mexico's biogeographical situation places it at risk from invasive exotic insect pests that enter from the United States, Central America, or the Caribbean. In this review we analyze the factors that contributed to some highly successful past programs involving classical biological control and/or the sterile insect technique (SIT). The present situation is then examined with reference to biological control, including SIT programs, targeted at seven major pests, with varying degrees of success. Finally, we analyze the current threats facing Mexico's agriculture industry from invasive pests that have recently entered the country or are about to do so. We conclude that despite a number of shortcomings, Mexico is better set to develop biological control-based pest control programs, particularly on an area-wide basis, than many other Latin American countries are. Classical and augmentative biological control and SIT-based programs are likely to provide effective and sustainable options for control of native and exotic pests, particularly when integrated into technology packages that meet farmers' needs across the great diversity of production systems in Mexico.

  18. 77 FR 4461 - New Mexico Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 931 New Mexico Regulatory Program AGENCY.... SUMMARY: We are approving an amendment to the New Mexico regulatory program (the ``New Mexico program'') under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (``SMCRA'' or ``the Act''). New...

  19. New Mexico Charter Schools Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Public Education Department, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, the New Mexico legislature passed changes to the Charter School Act that provided more accountability for both charters and authorizers in New Mexico. As part of that law, the Public Education Department (PED) is asked to submit an annual report on the status of charter schools in New Mexico. This is the first report submitted under that…

  20. Gender Differences in Education in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Susan Wendy; Pederzini, Carla

    This paper concentrates on the determinants of education in Mexico. Mexico is an interesting case study for education as it represents a country which has experienced growth in educational attainments over the last decades. Nevertheless, given its level of gross domestic product (GDP), Mexico actually does very poorly in terms of education, with…

  1. Working without a Union in New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adele, Niame; Rack, Christine

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a description of the academic climate in New Mexico. Like many other places in the world today, New Mexico is trying to find an identity in an environment that the authors label "increasingly privatized, corporatized, and militarized." New Mexico's higher education salaries are lower than those in…

  2. Aztec Mexico: Discovery of Templo Mayor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslav, Marc

    1982-01-01

    Describes the Aztec archaeological artifacts shown in the American Museum of Natural History exhibit: "Aztec Mexico: Discovery of Templo Mayor." More than 100 objects, ranging from human skulls to jewelry, found in the excavation of the Great Temple of Mexico located under the center of Mexico City, were displayed. (AM)

  3. First Record of the Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus in Hidalgo State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Morales, Aldo I; Cueto-Medina, Sarai M; Rodríguez, Quetzaly K Siller

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus , has been reported in the Mexican states of Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Coahuila (northeastern), Veracruz, Chiapas, Quintana Roo (southeastern), Morelos, San Luis Potosí (middle), and Sinaloa (northwestern). In April and September 2012, Ae. albopictus was collected in a variety of habitats and landing/biting on the collecting personnel in 12 counties of Hidalgo state (middle). This is the first record of the occurrence of this species in Hidalgo state.

  4. Epidermolysis bullosa care in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Liy-Wong, Carmen; Cepeda-Valdes, Rodrigo; Salas-Alanis, Julio Cesar

    2010-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) in Mexico continues to be a rare genodermatosis that is still unknown for most of the health care professionals in the country. The spirit of DebRA MEXICO was born in 1994 when the Mexican health care team started to see patients with the main purpose to provide medical care, genetic counseling, and advice to patients with EB and their families; to promote collaboration and exchange information among people with EB; to research and find new therapeutic approaches; and finally, to diffuse knowledge and raise awareness of the issues of EB in general public and health care professionals.

  5. New Mexico GPW Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2002-04-01

    N e w M e x i c o New Mexico holds considerable reserves of this clean, reliable form of energy that to date have barely been tapped. New Mexico has more acres of geothermally heated greenhouses than any other state, and aquaculture, or fish farming, is a burgeoning enterprise for state residents. Several electric power generation opportunities also have been identified. G e o t h e r m a l ? W h y Homegrown Energy It's here, right beneath our feet! No need to import! Current Development New Mex

  6. Astronomy for teachers in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, J.

    2006-08-01

    Mexico has added five more years of compulsory education to its national education system. In the past it only included six year of elementary (grammar) school. Now three years of pre school (kinder garden) and three years of middle school are being implemented. At present an optional course on astronomy if offered in high school (pre college). During my presentation I shall discuss problems concerning education in Mexico; mainly the lack of continuity in different levels of education, the lack of teacher training in science in general and the few topics of astronomy that are addressed. I shall mention for teacher training and public education, which includes books, lectures and videos.

  7. Air quality management in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bremauntz, Adrián

    2008-01-01

    Several significant program and policy measures have been implemented in Mexico over the past 15 yr to improve air quality. This article provides an overview of air quality management strategies in Mexico, including (1) policy initiatives such as vehicle use restrictions, air quality standards, vehicle emissions, and fuel quality standards, and (2) supporting programs including establishment of a national emission inventory, an air pollution episodes program, and the implementation of exposure and health effects studies. Trends in air pollution episodes and ambient air pollutant concentrations are described.

  8. Indians on the Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamail, Milton H.

    1977-01-01

    Although the Kickapoo have actively sought to preserve their culture at Nacimiento in Coahuila, Mexico, evidence of an eroding culture is found at Eagle Pass, Texas where American Indian migrant workers reside temporarily. (JC)

  9. Opportunity for America: Mexico`s coal future

    SciTech Connect

    Loose, V.W.

    1993-09-01

    This study examines the history, current status and future prospects for increased coal use in Mexico. Environmental implications of the power-generation capacity expansion plans are examined in general terms. Mexican environmental law and regulations are briefly reviewed along with the new sense of urgency in the cleanup of existing environmental problems and avoidance of new problems as clearly mandated in recent Mexican government policy initiatives. It is expected that new capital facilities will need to incorporate the latest in process and technology to comply with existing environmental regulation. Technology developments which address these issues are identified. What opportunities have new initiatives caused by the recent diversification of Mexico`s energy economy offered US firms? This report looks at the potential future use of coal in the Mexican energy economy, examining this issue with an eye toward identifying markets that might be available to US coal producers and the best way to approach them. Market opportunities are identified by examining new developments in the Mexican economy generally and the energy economy particularly. These developments are examined in light of the current situation and the history which brought Mexico to its present status.

  10. Las Tierras de Nuevo Mexico. [The Lands of New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swadesh, Frances Leon; And Others

    New Mexico was inhabited thousands of years ago. Each group of settlers saw the land in distinct ways. For some, its beauty consisted of its quality, the abundance of water, and the hope of a good harvest. For others, its beautiful sites were of more importance. Thus, each group established its own manner of living on the land and of using it.…

  11. The Geography Olympiad in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Garcia, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The formal organisation of science Olympiads in Mexico dates from 1987, when a national contest on Mathematics was held in order to identify a team to represent the country in the International Mathematics Olympiad. In 1991, the Mexican Academy of Sciences ("Academia Mexicana de Ciencias"-AMC) created the National Science Olympiads…

  12. "Mexico in Transition." Curriculum Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Foreign Language Resource Center.

    These curriculum units were developed in a National Endowment for the Humanities 1994 summer seminar "Mexico in Transition." The 23 lessons are written in Spanish. Lessons are entitled: (1) "La Migracion Mexicana Vista a Traves del Cuento 'Paso del Norte' de Juan Rulfo" (Jose Jorge Armendariz); (2) "Los Grupos Indigenas de…

  13. My Fulbright Experience in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Tzymei Alexasia

    This packet shares general impressions and interpretations of Mexico offered by a participant in a 5-week Fulbright-Hays Seminar. Included are suggestions on how to use this information to open up communication between the school and Mexican students and their parents. In addition to the background information and statistics, the material also has…

  14. Sports Facilities, Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amelar, Sarah

    2001-01-01

    Highlights a new K-12 school gymnasium in Mexico that changes and reacts to weather conditions, requires no air conditioning, and, on typical days, uses sunlight filtering through its ample clerestory as the sole source of illumination. Includes numerous photographs, a section drawing, and a site plan. (GR)

  15. Implementing Competence Frameworks in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Anda, Maria Luisa

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on the Mexican case study undertaken as part of the comparative study of the implementation and impact of National Qualifications Frameworks (NQF). Even though Mexico does not have a comprehensive NQF, the country has considerable experience in the development of labour competence technical standards; these share some aims…

  16. Alternative Education Spaces in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Chloe

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the architecture of the Red de Innovacion y Aprendizaje (RIA), or Learning and Innovation Network, which is a group of education centres that provide access to computers, the Internet and quality education to low-income communities in Mexico. The RIA began in May 2009 when ten pilot centres were opened in four municipalities…

  17. The Scholarship Project: Puebla, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta, Irina Arroyo

    1987-01-01

    The Carmen Millan School (Puebla, Mexico) was established to meet the high intellectual faculties of gifted students through development of willingness to learn, oral expression, talent, and the ability to plan systematically. Special education teachers act as monitors of learning contracts developed for students during school and during…

  18. The Language Situation in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terborg, Roland; Landa, Laura Garcia; Moore, Pauline

    2006-01-01

    This monograph will cover the language situation in Mexico; a linguistically very complex country with 62 recognised indigenous languages, the "de facto" official language, Spanish, and some immigrant languages of lesser importance. Throughout the monograph, we will concentrate on three distinct challenges which we consider relevant for…

  19. The Educational System of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Clark C.

    Education in Mexico has been controlled by the Federal government since the 1930s, and has focused on increasing vocational/technical education to meet the growing demands of the nation's economy. Finances and guidelines regarding curriculums and standards come from the Federal government. The official language of instruction is Spanish, although…

  20. Eastern New Mexico University. Exemplars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannozzi, Maria

    This report describes efforts by Eastern New Mexico University (ENMU) to recast its mission more narrowly while at the same time reducing the sense of remoteness and disconnection, as well as geographic isolation, between the main campus and its branch campuses. In the early 1980s, ENMU suffered from mission drift, in part as a result of its…

  1. Revitalizing Communities in New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitzl, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    The New Mexico Rural Revitalization Initiative (NMRRI), an innovative program to enhance the growth and development of rural communities, involves schools and students as part of a holistic approach. The program requires community members to take responsibility for revitalizing their economy and fosters an entrepreneurial spirit among students.

  2. Cooperative Education in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Commission on Higher Education.

    In 1988, the State Legislature created the New Mexico Cooperative Program to develop and expand cooperative education (co-op) programs. The Commission on Higher Education (CHE) was designated to help institutions establish and expand programs and collect information. For reporting purposes, CHE required that, in order to be considered co-op, work…

  3. 7 CFR 319.8-13 - From Northwest Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false From Northwest Mexico. 319.8-13 Section 319.8-13... for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-13 From Northwest Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of Northwest Mexico and of the West Coast of Mexico from infestations of the pink...

  4. 7 CFR 319.8-13 - From Northwest Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false From Northwest Mexico. 319.8-13 Section 319.8-13... for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-13 From Northwest Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of Northwest Mexico and of the West Coast of Mexico from infestations of the pink...

  5. 7 CFR 319.8-13 - From Northwest Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false From Northwest Mexico. 319.8-13 Section 319.8-13... for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-13 From Northwest Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of Northwest Mexico and of the West Coast of Mexico from infestations of the pink...

  6. 7 CFR 319.8-13 - From Northwest Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false From Northwest Mexico. 319.8-13 Section 319.8-13... for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-13 From Northwest Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of Northwest Mexico and of the West Coast of Mexico from infestations of the pink...

  7. Anaglyph, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This anaglyph (stereoscopic view) of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula was generated entirely from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data, and shows a subtle but distinctive indication of the Chicxulub impact crater. Most scientists now agree that this impact was the cause of the Cretatious-Tertiary extinction, the event 65 million years ago that marked the demise of the dinosaurs as well as the majority of life then on Earth. The crater's rim is marked by a shallow semicircular depression arcing about an offshore center point in the upper left of the picture. (The arcing depression is just above the blue line, when viewed with the naked eye.) This depression, or trough, only about 3 to 5 meters (10 - 15 feet) deep and about 5 kilometers (3 miles) wide, was likely caused by collapse of limestone caverns preferentially above the crater rim, resulting in an arcing chain of sinkholes. The limestone that covers most of the Yucatan Peninsula post-dates the impact crater. However, the crater pattern apparently controls the subsidence pattern just enough to show through.

    This anaglyph was created by deriving a shaded relief image from the SRTM data, draping it back over the SRTM elevation model, and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. Illumination is from the north (top). When viewed through special glasses, the anaglyph is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. The total relief (range of elevations) across this entire image is less than 300 meters (1000 feet).

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM

  8. 76 FR 23909 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery; 2011 Accountability Measures for Greater Amberjack and Closure of the 2011 Gulf of Mexico Commercial Sector for Greater Amberjack AGENCY... Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico (FMP). The FMP was prepared by the Gulf of Mexico......

  9. Natural Hazards In Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Vera, M.

    2001-12-01

    Around the world more than 300 natural disasters occur each year, taking about 250,000 lives and directly affecting more than 200 million people. Natural hazards are complex and vary greatly in their frequency, speed of onset, duration and area affected. They are distinguished from extreme natural events, which are much more common and widespread, by their potential impacts on human societies. A natural disaster is the occurrence of a natural hazard on a large scale, involving great damage and, particularly in developing countries, great loss of life. The Basin of Mexico, whose central and southwestern parts are occupied by the urban area of Mexico City at the average altitude of 2,240 m above the sea level, is located on the southern edge of the Southern Plateau Central, on a segment of the Trans-Mexican Neovolcanic Belt that developed during Pliocene-Holocene times. The Basin of Mexico is a closed basin, which was created with the closing of the former Valley of Mexico because of basaltic-andesitic volcanism that formed the Sierra de Chichinautzin south of the city. The south-flowing drainage was obstructed and prompted the development of a lake that became gradually filled with sediments during the last 700,000 years. The lake fill accumulated unconformably over a terrain of severely dissected topography, which varies notably in thickness laterally. The major part of the urban area of Mexico City is built over these lake deposits, whereas the rest is built over alluvial material that forms the transition zone between the lake deposits and what constitutes the basement for the basin fill. In the present study, the effect of rain, fire and earthquakes onto Mexico City is evaluated. Rain risk was calculated using the most dangerous flood paths. The fire risk zones were determined by defining the vegetation areas with greater probability to catch fires. Earthquake hazards were determined by characterization of the zones that are vulnerable to damages produced by

  10. 75 FR 30431 - Carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... COMMISSION Carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden AGENCY: United States... on carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden. SUMMARY: The Commission... carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden would be likely to lead to continuation...

  11. 77 FR 20690 - Environmental Impact Statement: Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Albuquerque, New Mexico AGENCY... the Interstate 25 and Paseo del Norte Interchange in Albuquerque, New Mexico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Greg Heitmann, Environmental Specialist, Federal Highway Administration, New Mexico...

  12. Otomi de San Andres Cuexcontitlan, Estado de Mexico (Otomi of San Andres Cuexcontitlan, State of Mexico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lastra, Yolanda

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken by the Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Otomi, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in San Andres Cuexcontitlan, in the state of Mexico. The objective of collecting such a representative…

  13. The state of HVAC in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    With the chartering of the Manual de Anda ASHRAE Chapter in Mexico City, the first chapter in Latin America, and with increasing cross-border trade and investment as a result of NAFTA, it`s important for US and Canadian engineers to understand the state of HVAC technology in Mexico. The goal of this article is to introduce the reader to some industry leaders in Mexico and to show their creative design and installation expertise by reviewing some recent projects.

  14. Perspectives of hadron therapy in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, J. G.

    2008-08-11

    The need for a hadron therapy center in Mexico is presented. The question if such a facility is affordable in Mexico is discussed, addressing the economical factor as well as the expertise and know how available in both the private and the public sector. To conclude, a possible path, and the first steps on it, to move forward towards a medical facility in Mexico devoted to proton therapy are sketched.

  15. The Lands of New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swadesh, Frances Leon; And Others

    New Mexico, the fifth largest state, measures 390 miles from north to south and 350 miles from east to west. Six of the 7 life zones found in the U.S. are represented within the State's 77,866,240 acres. Its population has tended to congregate at altitudes of 7,000 feet and below, especially in areas where water is available. This booklet,…

  16. Elimination of Onchocerciasis from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Fernández-Santos, Nadia A.; Orozco-Algarra, María E.; Rodríguez-Atanacio, José A.; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Morales, Kristel B.; Real-Najarro, Olga; Prado-Velasco, Francisco G.; Cupp, Eddie W.; Richards, Frank O.; Hassan, Hassan K.; González-Roldán, Jesús F.; Kuri-Morales, Pablo A.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mexico is one of the six countries formerly endemic for onchocerciasis in Latin America. Transmission has been interrupted in the three endemic foci of that country and mass drug distribution has ceased. Three years after mass drug distribution ended, post-treatment surveillance (PTS) surveys were undertaken which employed entomological indicators to check for transmission recrudescence. Methodology/Principal findings In-depth entomologic assessments were performed in 18 communities in the three endemic foci of Mexico. None of the 108,212 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected from the three foci were found to contain parasite DNA when tested by polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA), resulting in a maximum upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95%-ULCI) of the infective rate in the vectors of 0.035/2,000 flies examined. This is an order of magnitude below the threshold of a 95%-ULCI of less than one infective fly per 2,000 flies tested, the current entomological criterion for interruption of transmission developed by the international community. The point estimate of seasonal transmission potential (STP) was zero, and the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval for the STP ranged from 1.2 to 1.7 L3/person/season in the different foci. This value is below all previous estimates for the minimum transmission potential required to maintain the parasite population. Conclusions/Significance The results from the in-depth entomological post treatment surveillance surveys strongly suggest that transmission has not resumed in the three foci of Mexico during the three years since the last distribution of ivermectin occurred; it was concluded that transmission remains undetectable without intervention, and Onchocerca volvulus has been eliminated from Mexico. PMID:26161558

  17. Mal del pinto in Mexico*

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Francisco; Rein, Charles R.; Arias, Oswaldo

    1955-01-01

    This report deals with the geographical distribution, prevalence, epidemiology, etiology, serological, clinical, and histopathological features, and treatment of mal del pinto, or pinta, in Mexico. Repository penicillin preparations (PAM and Panbiotic) have been found highly effective in the treatment of this endemic, non-venereal treponematosis. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:13260889

  18. Mexico and the Triple Threat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-20

    to give an observer whiplash . The signals are conflicting to say the least. On the one hand, there are horrific accounts of the most brutal violence...originate in Mexico, but migrated there in force after Colombia cracked down on its own drug lords. As Mexican authorities attempt to put on the squeeze...groups undertaken a range of illicit activities, including smuggling and kidnapping, to fill their coffers and further their own ends. After all, at the

  19. GIS application on modern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Bharath

    This is a GIS based tool for showcasing the history of modern Mexico starting from the post-colonial era to the elections of 2012. The tool is developed using simple language and is flexible so as to allow for future enhancements. The application consists of numerous images and textual information, and also some links which can be used by primary and high school students to understand the history of modern Mexico, and also by tourists to look for all the international airports and United States of America consulates. This software depicts the aftermaths of the Colonial Era or the Spanish rule of Mexico. It covers various topics like the wars, politics, important personalities, drug cartels and violence. All these events are shown on GIS (Geographic information Science) maps. The software can be customized according to the user requirements and is developed using JAVA and GIS technology. The user interface is created using JAVA and MOJO which contributes to effective learning and understanding of the concepts with ease. Some of the user interface features provided in this tool includes zoom-in, zoom-out, legend editing, location identifier, print command, adding a layer and numerous menu items.

  20. FUEL CELL BUS DEMONSTRATION IN MEXICO CITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the performance of a cull-size, zero-emission, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel-cell-powered transit bus in the atmospheric environment of Mexico City. To address the air quality problems caused by vehicle emissions in Mexico City, a seminar on clean vehic...

  1. 40 CFR 81.421 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New Mexico. 81.421 Section 81.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.421 New Mexico. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  2. Indian Employment in New Mexico State Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Ernest J.; And Others

    Examining employment of American Indians in New Mexico state government, the New Mexico Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights found little change between small numbers of Indian employees in 1972 and 1974 figures. Though the State Personnel Office has made efforts to institute new programs and policies related to Indian…

  3. Area Handbook for Mexico. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John Morris; And Others

    This volume on Mexico is one of a series of handbooks prepared by the Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of the American University. It is designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political, and military institutions and practices of Mexico. The emphasis is on…

  4. A History of Distance Education in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castaneda, Manuel Moreno

    2005-01-01

    Research on distance education in Mexico is still in the embryonic stage, in spite of its long history. One indication is that among the lines of research defined by the Mexican Council on Educational Research, the leading organization in the field in Mexico, distance education does not even appear. Only recently, in the last few years, has an…

  5. Assessing American Indian Needs in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence; And Others

    This paper focuses on New Mexico's high-risk Indian children and programs. Specifically, Western New Mexico University has been involved with the Gallup/McKinley public school district, the largest school district (5,000 square miles) in the United States (larger than New Jersey) with a school population that is 73% Indian. This paper examines…

  6. Postgraduate Professional Pedagogical Education in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhyzhko, Olena

    2015-01-01

    This article is the result of scientific comparative-pedagogical research, which purpose was to highlight the main features of postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico. The author found that the postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico is performed by public and private higher education institutions: higher…

  7. Facing NAFTA: Literacy and Work in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Gloria Hernandez; Lankshear, Colin

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the deep and complex challenge faced by Mexico in its quest for closer economic integration with so-called advanced economies. Discusses extensive poverty and illiteracy, and the systematic exclusion of many people from access to the very kinds of learning required by Mexico's economic project. Argues that extraordinary efforts and…

  8. New Mexico Adolescent Health Risks Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antle, David

    To inform students of health risks (posed by behavior, environment, and genetics) and provide schools with collective risk appraisal information as a basis for planning/evaluating health and wellness initiatives, New Mexico administered the Teen Wellness Check in 1985 to 1,573 ninth-grade students from 7 New Mexico public schools. Subjects were…

  9. Nursing and Substance Use Disorders in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Pantoja, Miguel A; Mendez-Ruiz, Martha D

    2016-04-01

    The authors of this article see substance use disorders as a major public health problem in Mexico in which nursing is taking on an increasingly important role in addressing. The authors discuss some the challenges and opportunities nurse researchers, educators, and clinicians face in the prevention and treatment of substance use disorders in Mexico.

  10. China in Mexico: More Opportunity than Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-17

    Marca Pais, “Mexican Automotive Manufacturing Market Attracting Global Investments,” Imagen de Mexico, August 25, 2011, http://www.sacbee.com/2011/08...Manufacturing Market Attracting Global Investments.” Imagen de Mexico. August 25, 2011. http://www.sacbee.com/2011/08/25/3861742/mexican

  11. OCEANOGRAPHY IN THE GULF OF MEXICO.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report gives a summary of oceanographic research in the Gulf of Mexico supported by the Office of Naval Research during the period 1 May 1961...15 December 1969. This research involved theoretical studies in ocean dynamics; currents in the Gulf of Mexico , Cayman Sea, western tropical Atlantic

  12. Gulf of Mexico Ocean Monitoring System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    between our own participants within the Ocean Monitoring System (OMS) Program and also with other research efforts in the Gulf of Mexico whose...prepare the most complete possible analysis and summary of the prevailing oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of Mexico and make it available to

  13. 40 CFR 81.421 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false New Mexico. 81.421 Section 81.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.421 New Mexico. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  14. 40 CFR 81.421 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New Mexico. 81.421 Section 81.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.421 New Mexico. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  15. 40 CFR 81.421 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false New Mexico. 81.421 Section 81.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.421 New Mexico. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  16. 40 CFR 81.421 - New Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false New Mexico. 81.421 Section 81.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.421 New Mexico. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  17. Petroleum and Political Change in Mexico,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    34 Ejnaagij Iij~p.’ August 30, 1979, ISLA 778. For the announcement on the increase in proouction,. see ŕMexico Hacia una Nueva Etapa de su Historia...published in Mexico is Marco Antonio Michel and Leopoldo Allub, "Petr~leo y Cambio Social en el Sureste de Mixico," iL In~smar.1.nalp XVIII, April

  18. 76 FR 4266 - New Mexico Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 931 New Mexico Regulatory Program AGENCY...). You can also find later actions concerning New Mexico's program and program amendments at 30 CFR 931.10, 931.11, 931.13, 931.15, 931.16, and 931.30. II. Description of the Proposed Amendment By...

  19. Temporal Planning and Management Decision under Risk and Uncertainty.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-02

    relevance to operations research of a military nature. Many of these are identical or closely similar in form to situations in industry , engineering, and...scheduled for Guadalajara, Mexico at the annual meeting of Academia Nacional de Ingenieria de Mexico, September 22-24, 1987, also at Belgrade...Policy Analysis, Proceedings. XE Congreso de la Academia Nacional de Ingenieria , Saltillo, Mexico, September 23-26, 1986. (CCS 535) "S lLfs tvxI1__d4

  20. Petrographic Evidence of Microbial Mats in the Upper Cretaceous Fish-Bearing, Organic-Rich Limestone, Agua Nueva Formation, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Hernández-Ávila, J.; Ángeles-Trigueros, S. A.; García-Cabrera, M. E.

    2013-05-01

    We document petrographic evidence of microbial mats in the Upper Cretaceous Agua Nueva Formation in the area of Xilitla (San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico), located in the southern part of the Tampico-Misantla basin. The sequence consists predominantly of alternating decimeter-thick beds of fossiliferous dark laminated limestone (C-org > 1.0wt%), and light gray, bioturbated limestone (C-org < 1.0wt%), with occasional brown shale and green bentonite layers. Well-preserved fossil-fish assemblages occur in the laminated dark limestone beds, which include shark teeth (cf. Ptychodus), scales of teleosteans (Ichthyodectiformes), as well as skeletal remains of holosteans (Nursallia. sp), and teleosteans (cf. Rhynchodercetis, Tselfatia, and unidentified Enchodontids). Thin section and SEM analyses of the laminated, dark limestones, reveal a micritic matrix consisting of dark and light sub-parallel wavy laminae, continuous and discontinuous folded laminae with shreds of organic matter, filaments, oncoids, and interlocking structures. The structures are identical to those previously described for the Cenomanian-Turonian Indidura Fm at Parras de la Fuente (Coahuila state) demonstrated to be of microbial origin (Duque-Botero and Maurrasse, 2005; 2008). These structures are also analogous to microbial mats in present environments, and Devonian deposits (Kremer, 2006). In addition, the laminae at Xilitla include filamentous bacterial structures, as thin and segmented red elements. In some thin sections, filaments appear to be embedded within the crinkly laminae and shreds showing the same pattern of folding, suggestive of biomorphic elements that represent the main producers of the organic matter associated with the laminae. Thus, exceptional bacterial activity characterizes sedimentation during the accumulation of the Agua Nueva Formation. Oxygen-deficient conditions related to the microbial mats were an important element in the mass mortality and preservation of the fish

  1. Mexico`s economic reform: Energy and the Constitution

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, L.

    1993-12-31

    Oil is a fundamental component of nationhood in Mexico. The 1938 expropriation of oil resources concluded a process of internal political consolidation and thus became the most important symbol of nationalism. Mexico has been undergoing a process of economic reform that has altered the country`s economic structure and has subjected it to international competition. Oil in particular and energy in general have been left untouched. There is recognition that without an equal reform of the energy industry, the potential for success will be significantly limited. While the Constitution allows private investment in the industry--with the exception of the resource properties themselves--the Regulatory Law bans any private participation. Because of its political sensitivity, however, amending the law in order to reform the oil industry will necessitate a domestic initiative rather than foreign pressure. In this perspective, NAFTA served to slow and postpone the reform of the industry, rather than the opposite. Once NAFTA is well in place, the industry will have to face competition.

  2. SANDIA MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedlund, D.C.; Kness, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and mineral-resource investigations in the Sandia Mountains in New Mexico indicate that a small part of the area has a probable mineral-resource potential. Most of the mineral occurrences are small barite-fluorite veins that occur along faults on the eastern slope of the range. The barite veins in the Landsend area and in the Tunnel Spring area are classed as having a probable mineral-resource potential. Fluorite veins which occur at the La Luz mine contain silver-bearing galeana and the area near this mine is regarded as having a probable resource potential for silver. No energy resources were identified in this study.

  3. The Heritage of Mexico. Volume 1: The Indian Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Paul C.

    The first in a series of three books designed to aid teachers of grades 4-12 in the presentation of key aspects of the culture and history of Mexico addresses Mexico's Indian period, from the beginning of human life in Mexico to the final conquest of Mexico by the Spanish in 1521. The bilingual English and Spanish book, which lends itself to the…

  4. 9 CFR 93.325 - Horses from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses from Mexico. 93.325 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Mexico 18 § 93.325 Horses from Mexico. Horses offered for entry from Mexico shall be inspected as provided in §§ 93.306 and 93.323; shall be accompanied by...

  5. 40 CFR 62.7855 - New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New Mexico Environmental Improvement... Mexico Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7855 New Mexico... as described in 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cc, under the jurisdiction of the New Mexico...

  6. 40 CFR 62.7855 - New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false New Mexico Environmental Improvement... Mexico Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7855 New Mexico... as described in 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cc, under the jurisdiction of the New Mexico...

  7. 40 CFR 62.7855 - New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false New Mexico Environmental Improvement... Mexico Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7855 New Mexico... as described in 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cc, under the jurisdiction of the New Mexico...

  8. 40 CFR 62.7855 - New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New Mexico Environmental Improvement... Mexico Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7855 New Mexico... as described in 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cc, under the jurisdiction of the New Mexico...

  9. 40 CFR 62.7855 - New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false New Mexico Environmental Improvement... Mexico Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7855 New Mexico... as described in 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cc, under the jurisdiction of the New Mexico...

  10. 9 CFR 93.325 - Horses from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Horses from Mexico. 93.325 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Mexico 18 § 93.325 Horses from Mexico. Horses offered for entry... § 93.324: Provided, That horses offered for importation from tick-infected areas of Mexico shall...

  11. 9 CFR 93.325 - Horses from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Horses from Mexico. 93.325 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Mexico 18 § 93.325 Horses from Mexico. Horses offered for entry... § 93.324: Provided, That horses offered for importation from tick-infected areas of Mexico shall...

  12. 9 CFR 93.325 - Horses from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Horses from Mexico. 93.325 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Mexico 18 § 93.325 Horses from Mexico. Horses offered for entry... § 93.324: Provided, That horses offered for importation from tick-infected areas of Mexico shall...

  13. 9 CFR 93.325 - Horses from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Horses from Mexico. 93.325 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Mexico 18 § 93.325 Horses from Mexico. Horses offered for entry... § 93.324: Provided, That horses offered for importation from tick-infected areas of Mexico shall...

  14. [Asthma mortality trends in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Salas Ramírez, M; Segura Méndez, N H; Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate mortality and morbidity from asthma in Mexico by federative entity (state) of residence, age, and sex during the period between 1960 and 1988. Statistics published by the National Institute of Statistics, Geography, and Information Science were reviewed, as were vital statistics and information from other sources. Data were selected on mortality, hospital admissions, and outpatient visits, as well as population by federative entity, age, and sex. Mortality and morbidity rates were adjusted for age using the direct method. From 1960 to 1987, mortality decreased for both sexes. The groups with the highest asthma mortality were those under 4 years of age and those over 50. From 1960 to the present, the state with the highest mortality was Tlaxcala. Hospitalizations increased from 10 to 140 per 100,000 population for the country as a whole. When both outpatient visits and hospitalizations were considered, the morbidity rates rose from 180 to 203.4 per 100,000 between 1960 and 1970. In 1970, hospital morbidity was higher among males than females. From 1960 up to the 1990s, the highest rates of hospitalization and outpatient visits were registered among those under 4 and those over 60. The states with the highest asthma hospitalization rates were Morelos, Baja California Sur, Nuevo León, Durango, and Tamaulipas. It is concluded that asthma mortality in Mexico is showing a downward trend, while morbidity is increasing considerably, especially among adolescents.

  15. 75 FR 27372 - University of New Mexico; University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor; Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... COMMISSION University of New Mexico; University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor; Environmental Assessment and... considering issuance of a renewed Facility Operating License No. R-102, to the University of New Mexico (the licensee), which would authorize continued operation of the University of New Mexico AGN-201M...

  16. In Brief: Gulf of Mexico hypoxia plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-06-01

    On 16 June, the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force released an action plan to reduce, mitigate, and control hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The plan builds upon a 2001 plan by including more accountability through an annual operating plan, better tracking of progress, and state and federal nutrient reduction strategies. ``Our improved plan unites governments and citizens across the country to take action upstream and along the coast to reduce river nutrient pollution and increase Gulf of Mexico health,'' said U.S. Environmental Protection Agency assistant administrator for water Benjamin Grumbles. For more information, visit http://www.epa.gov/msbasin/.

  17. Nested Gulf of Mexico Modeling with HYCOM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-08

    Nested Gulf of Mexico Modeling with HYCOM Patrick J. Hogan Alan J. Wallcraft Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center, MS HYCOM Meeting...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE DEC 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nested Gulf of Mexico Modeling...topography is from NRL-DBDB2 • Integrated over 2000-2001 1/25° (~4 km) non-assimilative Nested Gulf of Mexico Possible cross-shelf transport

  18. Mexico, A Neighbor not to be Ignored.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    MEXICO A NEIGHBOR NOT TO BE IGNORED(J) AIR COMMAND AND - 1/1STAFF COLL MAXWdELL AFB AL M J MCNAMARA APR 88 1 ACSC-88-1775...g ~ ~ P~pa~’~ (FIL Tm AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE STUDENT REPORT MEXICO , A NEIGHBOR NOT TO BE IGNORED MAJOR MARTIN J. MCNAMARA, USAFR 88-1775...8217--:,. ,-,.-.-- ,-,-.-,-,’, ..,,_, ’’,, , -. ,._".. . " , - -. ,"-’. J -, -" "", ""’"’, . , . . " ’ ’ %.’.,.’’ PREFACE If you were a public school student in Mexico in

  19. Mexico: perspectives in school health.

    PubMed

    Allensworth, D M; Greene, A G

    1990-09-01

    The school health program in Mexico, directed by the Office of School Hygiene (la Unidad de Higiene Escolar), is in a state of flux. The program will change substantially if an initiative between the national offices of health and education is enacted. The initiative would establish a national commission to be replicated at state, county, and district levels. Commissions would oversee integration of the health services component, social participation, and research into the school health program which currently only focuses on health instruction and a healthy school environment. The initiative would restore and improve a former model that incorporated health services as a part of the school health program. The history of the school health program, which can trace its roots to 1861 and President Benito Juarez, is provided.

  20. [Diseases of hunger: Mexico 1915].

    PubMed

    Viesca-Treviño, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    1915 was a terrible year for Mexican people. After dictator Huerta’s fall, fratricide fighting involved diverse revolutionary groups. Mexico City was assaulted and occupied successively by different armies and, following the war came hunger and epidemics. Many people died from starvation, 30 to 40 every day in July and August. In this paper I review the medical texts written by physicians involved in the treatment of these patients. The main were E. Landa, M. Torroella and F. de P. Miranda and all of them concurred in the observation of important edema increasing to become generalized, important anemia and a watery aspect of the blood, facts that determine the term edema employed to characterize this disease.

  1. [Health policy polarization in Mexico].

    PubMed

    López-Arellano, O; Blanco-Gil, J

    2001-01-01

    In the last 17 years, health policy in Mexico has been shifted from a conception of integrated health care and a gradually extended coverage as a major responsibility of the State and health care public institutions, to in the one hand, a very active promotion of market and private profit in health services and in the other, poverty relief programs. In this paper we identify different periods corresponding to the last three presidential terms. Each clearly represent different stages of health sector reform: transitional (1982-1988), mercantilisation and poverty relief (1988-1994) and, strengthening of the so called health markets (1994-2000). The analyzed transformation is part of the set of secondary reforms subordinated to the structural adjustment and the economic and social megaprojects imposed by the international financial institutions.

  2. Middle Rio Grande/Albuquerque (New Mexico)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Middle Rio Grande/Albuquerque (New Mexico) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  3. Historical account of venereal diseases in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Glez, C J; Calderón, E; Juárez-Figueroa, L; Hernández-Avila, M

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of sexually acquired diseases in Mexico. It is divided into four major chronological sections which discuss social attitudes and values, the development of services and of official policy, and historical epidemiology. Images PMID:8282302

  4. SW New Mexico BHT geothermal gradient calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shari Kelley

    2015-07-24

    This file contains a compilation of BHT data from oil wells in southwestern New Mexico. Surface temperature is calculated using the collar elevation. An estimate of geothermal gradient is calculated using the estimated surface temperature and the uncorrected BHT data.

  5. West Nile virus infection of birds, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Sánchez, Sergio; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Nemeth, Nicole M; Trujillo-Olivera, María Teresa Jesús; Worwa, Gabriella; Dupuis, Alan; Brault, Aaron C; Kramer, Laura D; Komar, Nicholas; Estrada-Franco, José Guillermo

    2011-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has caused disease in humans, equids, and birds at lower frequency in Mexico than in the United States. We hypothesized that the seemingly reduced virulence in Mexico was caused by attenuation of the Tabasco strain from southeastern Mexico, resulting in lower viremia than that caused by the Tecate strain from the more northern location of Baja California. During 2006-2008, we tested this hypothesis in candidate avian amplifying hosts: domestic chickens, rock pigeons, house sparrows, great-tailed grackles, and clay-colored thrushes. Only great-tailed grackles and house sparrows were competent amplifying hosts for both strains, and deaths occurred in each species. Tecate strain viremia levels were higher for thrushes. Both strains produced low-level viremia in pigeons and chickens. Our results suggest that certain avian hosts within Mexico are competent for efficient amplification of both northern and southern WNV strains and that both strains likely contribute to bird deaths.

  6. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    SciTech Connect

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  8. Mexico: a model for success.

    PubMed

    Potter, J E

    1986-03-01

    In Mexico, a 40 year period of political stability and economic advancement, hailed for its high rates of growth in income per capita, rapid urbanization, and impressive gains in indicators of health and education, seemed to come to a halt in the early 1980s. Since the early 1970s, fertility has declined sharply in chronological association with a new population policy and the implementation of a national family planning program. If in 1940 there was no apparent reason for the Mexican state to have much interest in limiting fertility, such was no longer the case by 1970. The General Law of Population that had been passed in 1947 was laced with the expansionist ideology that dominated demographic issues for more that a century; its pro-natalism had been reinforced by health regulations prohibiting the sale and use of contraceptives and by a penal code that made abortion a crime. Between 1970 and 1981 the total fertility rate fell by about 39%. Since 1975, change in contraceptive practice accounts for the bulk of the measured fertility decline. Between 1976 and 1982 there was a 66% increase in contraceptive prevalence. The government's involvement in family planning activities helped to: 1) develop an effective contraceptive distribution system; 2) circulate extensive information, education, and communication publicizing fertility and images of the small family; and 3) mobilize health practitioners in public institutions to counsel and persuade their clients to accept and practice contraception. The emerging debate over population policy in Brazil may well prefigure debates in other Latin American countries; the recent democratization in Brazil is the vocalization of a demand from women's groups and the left for government provided family planning services. Overall, Mexico's willingness to take the long view tackle the birth rate issue head on is likely to remain an exception in Latin America.

  9. The National Security of Mexico for 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Mexicano", (New Mexican International Activism), Reforma, (Mexico, DF.), 23 September 2001. 60 Grupo Reforma, "Propone Fox nuevo proyecto de...34Proponen redefinir Seguridad Nacional", Reforma, Mexico, D.F., 14 September 2001. Grupo Reforma, "Propone Fox Nuevo proyecto de Seguridad", 7...Armed Forces participate in peace operations to support by the UN), El Universal, 2 November 2001, 14. 59 Jorge Castafieda, " Nuevo Activismo Internacional

  10. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotype Distribution in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. PMID:24850349

  11. Prophylaxis of endemic goitre in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Stacpoole, Herbert H.

    1953-01-01

    The results of a survey carried out in eight States of Mexico are discussed by the author. The administrative, budgetary, and psychological difficulties encountered when attempting goitre prophylaxis by means of iodized salt are outlined. The author examines the efficacy of iodized sweets given to 50,000 schoolchildren in the Federal District and in the State of Morelos. Recent experiments in Mexico with iodated salt confirm previous statements concerning its stability. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:13094516

  12. Neurocysticercosis is still prevalent in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Agnès; Sciutto, Edda; Larralde, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we report the published cases of human and porcine cysticercosis, as well as Taenia solium taeniasis diagnosed in Mexico during the last 10 years. Numerical data allow us to state that this disease remains as a public health problem in our country. Whereas efficient tools have been developed for the diagnosis and prevention of cysticercosis, we strongly recommend further measures allowing the control and eventual eradication of this parasite in Mexico.

  13. Big Bend National Park, TX, USA, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Sierra del Carmen of Mexico, across the Rio Grande River from Big Bend National Park, TX, (28.5N, 104.0W) is centered in this photo. The Rio Grande River bisects the scene; Mexico to the east, USA to the west. The thousand ft. Boquillas limestone cliff on the Mexican side of the river changes colors from white to pink to lavender at sunset. This severely eroded sedimentary landscape was once an ancient seabed later overlaid with volcanic activity.

  14. Success in Mexico Requires a Military Solution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-27

    hour per response, including the time fo r reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...34Legislative Oversight of the Armed Forces in Mexico," Mexican Studies/ Estudios Mexicano 24, no. 1 (2008), 127. 85 Juan Forero, "Colombia stepping...Google] Diez, Jordi. "Legislative Oversight of the Armed Forces in Mexico." Mexican Studies/ Estudios Mexicano 24, no. 1 (2008): 113-145. Diez

  15. Extending U.S. Medicare to Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Haims, Marla C.; Dick, Andrew W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is a lack of hard data on the exact number of Medicare-eligible retirees residing in Mexico, but it is at least in the tens of thousands and is certainly rising as the baby boom generation reaches retirement. Because Medicare does not cover health services received outside the United States, these retirees must travel to the United States for health care or purchase alternative coverage for health services received in Mexico. There are several arguments for extending Medicare to Mexico—that is, allowing Medicare-eligible beneficiaries to receive their Medicare benefits in Mexico. Medicare-eligible retirees living in Mexico would certainly benefit, and Mexico might benefit from improved quality of care and an expanded health economy. Moreover, American taxpayers might benefit from a reduced total cost of Medicare: To the extent that extending Medicare to Mexico induces Medicare beneficiaries to substitute higher-cost U.S. health care services with lower-cost Mexican services, overall Medicare expenditures might be reduced. The authors outline four options for how this policy change might be implemented and describe a conceptual model that could be used to assess the effects of each option. PMID:28083264

  16. The History of Soil Science in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, J. M.; Ventura, E., Jr.; Castellanos, J. Z.; Brevik, E. C.

    2012-04-01

    There is a lack of information concerning the history of soil science in developing countries such as Mexico. Soil knowledge in the pre-Colombian era was a notable attribute of indigenous people in Mexico. Mayas and Aztecs classified soils based on properties and land use and developed a terminology still used by locals. International organizations and institutions advocating modern agricultural practices have played an important role in the development of soil science in Mexico, in conjunction with the Green Revolution in which the use of fertilizers for crop production was implemented. Soil fertility, as an area of study, has developed significantly in the country. One of the most significant impacts of the Green Revolution on the development of soil science in Mexico was through academic exchange, in which Mexican soil scientists obtained graduate-level degrees in the United States and later returned to Mexico to conduct research programs. Although Mexico has a long history of soil knowledge, soil scientists are facing several challenges today, including a lack of communication between farmers and scientists, soil erosion, soil contamination, and water usage. Some researchers have suggested that ethnopedological knowledge should be incorporated into modern Mexican soil science.

  17. Activities toward Understanding Mexico's Transition to Democracy. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad 1996 (Mexico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, Teresa Turnbow

    This unit for high school social studies and Spanish language students deals with Mexico's transition toward democracy. Lesson activities include: (1) "What Is An Early Democratic Family Incident That You Remember?"; (2) "What is Democracy?"; (3) "Locating the Five Nations of Mexico"; (4) "Scenes from the Five…

  18. Where Do Mexico and Chile Stand on Inclusive Education? Short Title: Inclusion in Mexico and Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Cedillo, Ismael; Romero-Contreras, Silvia; Ramos-Abadie, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the background, current situation and challenges of educational integration and inclusive education in Mexico and Chile. These countries obtained similar low results on the academic achievement of their students (Mexico last and Chile second last) among OECD countries; and above average scores, among Latin-American countries.…

  19. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in 167 mammals in 3 zoos in Mexico City, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 89 (53.3%) of the 167 animals tested. Antibodies were found in 35 of 43 wild Felidae: 2 of 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus...

  20. 76 FR 76801 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... Mexico Disaster NM-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a... New Mexico (FEMA- 4047-DR), dated 11/23/2011. Incident: Flooding. Incident Period: 08/19/2011...

  1. The 'Anglo' Revolution in New Mexico Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Thomas K.

    1978-01-01

    First in a three-part series of case studies tracing the impact of the "Anglo Revolution" on New Mexico, this article deals with copper mining in New Mexico, particularly the Santa Rita del Cobre copper mine. (NQ)

  2. MEASURED AND PREFORMED PHOSPHATE IN THE GULF OF MEXICO REGION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Measured and preformed phosphate-phosphorous versus depth are presented for three recent cruises to the Gulf of Mexico region. Phosphate...are discussed for a hypothetical idealized station in the Gulf of Mexico . (Author)

  3. Geothermal Field Development in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Hector Alonso

    1983-12-15

    Mexico is a Country characterized by its diversified means of Power Gerneration. Actual installed capacity is almost 19000 MW, of which 205 MW corresponds to Geothermal Plants, that is, 180 MW in Cerro Prieto and 25 MW of Portable Plants in Los Azufres. To date, 346 area with exploitation possibilites, are known. They are mainly distributed along the Volcanic Belt where the most prominent are, Los Azufres, La Primavera, Los Humeros, Ixtlan De Los Hervores and Los Negritos, among others. Proved reserves are 920 MW, and the accessible resource base are 4600 MW identified and 6000 MW undiscovered. The long range construction studies intends to achieve a total installed capacity of 100000 MW, by the end of this century, including 2000 MW Geothermal, through conventional and Portable Plants. It is not a definite program but a development strategy. The carrying out of a definite program, will depend upon the confirmation of Hypothesis made in previous studies, and the economic decisions related to the financial sources availability, and techologies to be used in the future as well.

  4. Trends of renewables in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Vera, J.

    1996-12-31

    The Mexican Federal Government through its Secretaria de Energia and the Federal Government owned electrical utilities, Comision Federal de Electricidad and Luz y Feurza del Centro, are doing very important efforts in order to give electric power to remote villages in Mexico via PV stand alone systems and hybrid systems with PV modules, wind generators, batteries and a back up diesel electric generator. Nowadays they are trying to take advantage of municipal solid waste in order to get power from the biogas generated in landfills. The main reason for this is, after NAFTA was signed, the municipal authorities in charge of final disposal of MSW will not be allowed any longer to throw away MSW in open fields. Besides, municipal authorities are also in charge of street lighting systems and they have to pay to the utilities a very high rate (12 cents/kWH). The main idea of this paper is how to dispose properly of MSW, fulfilling what is written in the new Environmental Law, and how to take advantage of this process in order to get power from landfill gas at marginal cost. A power wheeling agreement must be reached with the utility in order to send the power generated at the biogas facility to the street lighting lamps, avoiding the high rate for this purpose.

  5. New Mexico renewable development study

    SciTech Connect

    Toole, Gasper; Bent, Russell; Ewers, Mary

    2010-09-17

    Since the early 1990s, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has applied electric grid models and simulation software to problems of national significance. This effort continues with a variety of other projects funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), other federal and state agencies and private companies. Critical to the success of these programs is the ability to integrate regional-scale models of the electric grid, to assess the propagation of grid impacts, and to present interactively the effect of potential mitigating actions required to stabilize the grid. All of these capabilities are applied in this study, to accomplish the following goals and objectives: (1) Develop an AC power flow model representing future conditions within New Mexico's electric grid, using commercial tools accepted by the utility industry; (2) Conduct a 'screening' analysis of options for accelerating potential renewable energy development through the addition of a statewide transmission collector system; (3) Estimate total revenue needed, jobs created (temporary and permanent) plus indirect and direct impacts to the state's economy; (4) Evaluate potential cost allocation methodology; and (5) Issue a project report that will provide information for policy direction by state regulators, project developers, and legislators.

  6. Seroepidemiology of giardiasis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cedillo-Rivera, Roberto; Leal, Yelda A; Yépez-Mulia, Lilián; Gómez-Delgado, Alejandro; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Muñoz, Onofre

    2009-01-01

    Prevalence of antibodies against Giardia duodenalis was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum samples from a national serologic survey of Mexico that included all geographic areas and socioeconomic and demographic data for each person sampled. The country was divided into four regions on the basis of development (high, medium high, medium low, and low). Of 3,461 serum samples tested, 1,914 (55.3%) were positive for IgG antibodies against Giardia duodenalis. Seropositivity was age-specific; the probability of seropositivity increased 4.9-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.16-7.64) in adolescents 10-19 years of age, 8.0-fold (95% CI = 5.19-12.53) in young adults 20-39 years of age, and 12.6-fold (95% CI = 7.93-20.28) in adults more than 40 years of age. Giardia duodenalis seropositivity was associated with male sex (odds ratio = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.22-1.61). No association was found between seropositivity and socioeconomic variables or regional development status.

  7. Ediacaran biota from Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, M A

    1996-01-01

    The Ediacaran biota is the earliest diverse community of macroscopic animals and protoctists. Body and trace fossils in the Clemente Formation of northwestern Sonora extend downward the geologic range of Ediacaran forms. Taxa present in the Clemente Formation include cf. Cyclomedusa plana, Sekwia sp., an erniettid (bearing an air mattress-like "pneu" body construction), and the trace fossils Lockeia ichnosp. and Palaeophycus tubularis. The trace fossils confirm the presence of sediment-dwelling animals in this shallow marine community. The body fossils are headless, tailless, and appendageless. Some may be body fossils of animals but others may be fossils of large protoctists. These body and trace fossils, recovered from thinly bedded sandstones and siltstones, occur 75 meters lower in the Sonoran stratigraphic section than a distinctive Clemente Formation oolite. The stratigraphic position of the fossils below this oolite permits long-distance correlation between fossiliferous Proterozoic strata of Mexico and the United States. Correlations utilizing both the Clemente Formation oolite and a trace fossil (Vermiforma antiqua) confirm the antiquity (600 million years or more) of this body fossil-rich community of macroscopic eukaryotes. The recently discovered body fossils are the oldest known remains of the Ediacaran biota. Images Fig. 2 PMID:11607679

  8. Ceboruco Volcano Gravimetric Analysis, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Cordoba, J.; Espindola, J. M.; Gutierrez, Q. J.; Garcia Serrano, A.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Pinzon, J. I.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a late Quaternary dacitic-andesitic stratovolcano, is located in the Tepic-Zacoalco graben in the western part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) near to Ahuacatlan and Jala towns in Mexico. There have been at least eight eruptions from this volcano in the last thousand years, and for this reason Ceboruco must be considered an active volcano whit the possibility of erupting again in the future. This work aims to contribute with a regional density contrasts model from gravity measurements of volcano area. 163 observations were measured every 500 meters with a Scintrex CG-5 gravimeter. We corrected data were measured in the area to filter information dependent of external gravitational fields or outside to object of study. Post-filtering of data, we obtained gravity anomalies distribution and with other supporting data (aeromagnetic and geological data) we made 8 profiles around Ceboruco to build an approximate model of density changes in the lithological units under the volcano.

  9. Verification of the Gulf of Mexico Hindcast Wave Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    The Wave Information Study (WIS) for the Gulf of Mexico (WIS Report 18) provides a wave climate for the US shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico based on...conditions. In 1991, CERC conducted a 1-year hindcast of the Gulf of Mexico for the year 1988 and evaluated the model results against extensive wind and wave...and guidance on the use of the earlier WIS study.... Gulf of Mexico , Hindcast, Waves.

  10. Reminiscences of cosmic ray research in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Peraza, Jorge

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic ray research in Mexico dates from the early 1930s with the work of the pioneering physicist, Manuel Sandoval Vallarta and his students from Mexico. Several experiments of international significance were carried out during that period in Mexico: they dealt with the geomagnetic latitude effect, the north-south and west-east asymmetry of cosmic ray intensity, and the sign of the charge of cosmic rays. The international cosmic ray community has met twice in Mexico for the International Cosmic Ray Conferences (ICRC): the fourth was held in Guanajuato in 1955, and the 30th took place in Mérida, in 2007. In addition, an international meeting on the Pierre Auger Collaboration was held in Morelia in 1999, and the International Workshop on Observing UHE Cosmic Rays took place in Metepec in 2000. A wide range of research topics has been developed, from low-energy Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) to the UHE. Instrumentation has evolved since the early 1950s, from a Simpson type neutron monitor installed in Mexico City (2300 m asl) to a solar neutron telescope and an EAS Cherenkov array, (within the framework of the Auger International Collaboration), both at present operating on Mt. Sierra La Negra in the state of Puebla (4580 m asl). Research collaboration has been undertaken with many countries; in particular, the long-term collaboration with Russian scientists has been very fruitful.

  11. Growth through conservation: DSM in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, I.; Wolcott, D.

    1993-08-01

    Mexico's electricity consumption is expected to grow at an average annual rate of about 6 percent between 1992 and 2000; a slightly higher growth rate is anticipated in the industrial sector. To meet this demand, the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Mexico's national utility, plans to build almost 14,000 MW of additional generating capacity, which is to come on line between 1993 and 2000 at an estimated cost of US $34 billion (including additional transmission and distribution investments). In 2000, such a capacity expansion would represent a 78-percent increase over 1990. As a result, CFE faces substantial increases in its external indebtedness in the 1990s, and unattractive option for a utility that had already accumulated nearly $1 billion in external debt as of the end of 1991. Significant growth in CFE's indebtedness would represent a setback for a nation that has worked diligently over several years to contain and reduce nearly unmanageable levels of external public-sector debt. Additionally, there are large, competing capital requirements in Mexico for other public services, such as roads, water, and sewage systems. It is in this context that Mexico is considering alternatives to the conventional approach to capacity expansion and is exploring a complementary alternative: demand-side management (DSM). Compared to other countries in Latin America, Mexico is well ahead in implementing both innovative tariff mechanisms and pilot projects.

  12. Mexico`s basins could provide niches for various sized firms

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.; Wilson, J.L.

    1996-11-18

    The recent Shell Oil Co.-led exploratory well in 7,000 ft of water in the Gulf of Mexico off Brownsville, Texas, and close to Mexican territory, initially provoked a controversy in Mexico. The announcement of the Baha well reminded Mexicans that the US Senate has not yet ratified the draft treaty to define territorial and resource boundaries. News of the well was portrayed in mexico as poaching and old-fashioned American imperialism. Although subsequent reports confirmed that the well is unequivocally in US waters, the initial confusion added to a growing dilemma in professional geological circles and with a few federal, state, and local officials. In this discussion, which is part of a larger study, the authors wish to clarify some of the issues in the upstream policy debate in Mexico. They do this by visualizing a counter-factual condition: that worldwide E and P patterns and norms exist in Mexico. The discussion will not treat the implementation of such patterns or norms (e.g., by reference to the Venezuelan or Argentine models). For this discussion they assume simply that worldwide production practices and agreements exist in Mexico. Just as important, they assume that industrial efficiencies, by producer type, are the principal drivers of the allocation of E and P resources in Mexico. The authors discuss the illustrative areas and fields of hydrocarbon production, actual and potential, from the perspective of the advantages and limitations associated with the various categories of explorationists and producers.

  13. Una Crisis para la Educacion Bilingue en Nuevo Mexico. (A Crisis for Bilingual Education in New Mexico)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavides, Ezequiel

    1976-01-01

    Written in Spanish and English, this article briefly reviews the bilingual picture in New Mexico. If New Mexico is to succeed in attracting Federal monies for bilingual education, it must strive for unity in its efforts and objectives. (NQ)

  14. Cyanobacteria/Foraminifera Association from Anoxic/Dysoxic Beds of the Agua Nueva Formation (Upper Cretaceous - Cenomanian/Turonian) at Xilitla, San Luis Potosi, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Piñón, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Rojas-León, A.; Duque-Botero, F.

    2008-05-01

    The Agua Nueva Formation in the vicinity of Xilitla, State of San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico, consists of interbedded brown shale (Grayish orange 10YR 7/4 to Moderate yellowish brown 10YR 5/4) and dark-gray fossiliferous limestone (Bluish gray 5B 6/1 to Dark bluish gray 5B 4/1), varying between 10 and 20 cm in thickness. The sequence also includes 2 to 4 cm- thick intermittent bentonite layers (Moderate greenish yellow 10Y 7/4, to dark greenish yellow 10Y 6/6 and Light olive 10Y 5/4). At the field scale, shaly intervals show no apparent internal structures, whereas most limestone beds show primary lamination at the millimeter scale (1-2 mm), and intermittent layers of black chert of about 5 cm thick. Pyrite is present as disseminated crystals and as 2 cm-thick layers. Bioturbation or macrobenthic organisms other than inoceramids do not occur in the Agua Nueva Formation at Xilitla. Unusual macrofossils are present only in limestone strata, and consist of well- preserved diverse genera of fishes such as sharks, Ptychodus sp. and teleosteans, Rhynchodercetis sp., Tselfatia sp., Goulmimichthys sp., and scales of Ichtyodectiformes, as well as ammonites and inoceramids (Blanco et al., 2006). The presence of Inoceramus (Mytyloides) labiatus (Maldonado-Koederll, 1956) indicates an Early Turonian age for the sequence. Total carbonate content (CaCO3 = TIC) varies between 62 and 94% in the Limestone beds, which yield Total Organic Carbon (TOC) from 0.4% to 2.5%; the shale intervals contain TIC values consistently lower than 33% and TOC lower than 0.8% Microscopically the limestone beds vary from mudstone to packstone composed essentially of coccoid cyanobacteria similar to coeval deposits in northeastern Mexico, Coahuila State, at Parras de La Fuente (Duque- Botero 2006). Similarly, the microspheroids are spherical to sub-spherical, and occur as isolated elements or aggregates forming series of chains of parallel-packed light lamina 1-2 mm thick. Filamentous cyanobacteria

  15. ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF ESTUARIES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Mexico is a vast natural resource that encompasses the coastal areas of western Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, as well as a portion of Mexico. Many estuaries flow into the Gulf of Mexico and serve as nursery grounds for fish, habitat for a wide va...

  16. 78 FR 72141 - New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4148-DR), dated 09/30/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New Mexico, dated 09/30/2013, is hereby amended...

  17. 76 FR 55345 - Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Forest Service Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee (NNM RAC) will meet in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The committee is authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community...

  18. 75 FR 47259 - Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... Forest Service Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and...

  19. 75 FR 80788 - Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Forest Service Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee (NNMRAC) will meet in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural...

  20. 76 FR 16603 - Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... Forest Service Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Socorro, New Mexico. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and...

  1. 77 FR 49776 - Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Forest Service Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Socorro, New Mexico. The purpose of the committee is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice...

  2. 75 FR 30772 - Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Forest Service Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Socorro, New Mexico. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community...

  3. 75 FR 69916 - Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Forest Service Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Socorro, New Mexico. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and...

  4. 76 FR 31299 - Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Forest Service Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Correct FR Doc. 2011-12588; Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee (NNM RAC) will meet in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The committee is authorized under the Secure...

  5. 76 FR 46722 - Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Forest Service Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Socorro, New Mexico. The committee is authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination...

  6. 76 FR 81553 - New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4047-DR), dated 11/23/2011. Incident: Flooding. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of New Mexico, dated 11/23/2011, is hereby amended to...

  7. 77 FR 63409 - New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4079-DR), dated 08/24/2012. Incident: Flooding. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of NEW MEXICO, dated 08/24/2012, is hereby amended to...

  8. 76 FR 19118 - New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-1962-DR), dated March 24, 2011, and related... have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of New Mexico resulting from a...

  9. 75 FR 39655 - Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... Forest Service Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Southern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Socorro, New Mexico. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and...

  10. 78 FR 73581 - New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00035

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00035 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4152-DR), dated 10/29/2013. Incident: Severe Storms... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New Mexico, dated 10/29/2013,...

  11. 76 FR 2431 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-1936-DR), dated 09/13/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of NEW MEXICO, dated 09/13/2010, is hereby amended...

  12. 76 FR 29722 - Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... Forest Service Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Committee (NNMRAC) will meet in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The committee is authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community...

  13. 7 CFR 352.29 - Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. 352....29 Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. Avocados from Mexico may be moved through the.... Before moving the avocados through the United States, the owner must obtain a formal permit in...

  14. 7 CFR 352.29 - Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. 352....29 Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. Avocados from Mexico may be moved through the.... Before moving the avocados through the United States, the owner must obtain a formal permit in...

  15. 7 CFR 352.29 - Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. 352....29 Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. Avocados from Mexico may be moved through the.... Before moving the avocados through the United States, the owner must obtain a formal permit in...

  16. 7 CFR 352.29 - Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. 352....29 Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. Avocados from Mexico may be moved through the.... Before moving the avocados through the United States, the owner must obtain a formal permit in...

  17. 7 CFR 352.29 - Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. 352....29 Administrative instructions: Avocados from Mexico. Avocados from Mexico may be moved through the.... Before moving the avocados through the United States, the owner must obtain a formal permit in...

  18. 77 FR 45653 - Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ...)] Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico Institution of five-year reviews concerning the suspended investigations on lemon juice from Argentina and Mexico. AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... the suspended investigations on lemon juice from Argentina and Mexico would be likely to lead...

  19. [The metropolitan character of urbanization in Mexico, 1900-1988].

    PubMed

    Garza, G

    1990-01-01

    The author analyzes trends in urbanization in Mexico during the twentieth century, with a focus on the impact of rapid industrialization since 1982. Sections are included on the interrelations among economic development, industrialization, and urbanization; stages, levels, and measures of urbanization; the development of the city system in Mexico; and stages in the growth of Mexico City. (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  20. [Cremation. A public health chapter in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ramos-de Viesca, Mariblanca; Avila, María Eugenia; Chiapas, Miriam G; de los Angeles González, María; Pérez, Leticia

    2002-01-01

    Cremation was a part of the funeral ceremony in prehispanic Mexico. When the Spanish conquerors came, this practice was prohibited. In 1877, the Uppu Health Council authorized animal incineration to avoid consumption by indigents or transformation in putrid emanation. Creamation was welcome in Mexico because of the knowledge of hygienic at the time, whose adepts had evaluated toxic exhalations of cadavers and the cemeteries of Mexico City, with incomplete destruction of the cadaver and filtration of contaminants into the subsoil. Three were the reasons against cremation; religious beliefs, lawmaker medical preoccupation with the disappearance of legal evidence, and the newly born science of anthropology, with loss of material for laboratory. The first crematorium was inaugurated by Dr. Eduardo Liceaga in February 1909 in the Dolores Cemetery.

  1. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  2. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  3. Renewable energy for productive uses in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, C.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a USAID/USDOE sponsored program to implement renewable energy in Mexico for productive uses. The objectives are to expand markets for US and Mexican industries, and to combat global climate change - primarily greenhouse gas emissions. The focus is on off-grid applications, with an emphasis on developing the institution structure to support the development of these industries within the country. Agricultural development is an example of the type of industry approached, where photovoltaic and wind power can be used for water pumping. There are hundreds of projects under review, and this interest has put renewables as a line item in Mexico`s rural development budget. Village power projects are being considered in the form of utility partnerships.

  4. Donation transplants and tissue banking in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Luna-Zaragoza, D; Reyes-Frías, M L

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge about transplants in Mexico goes back to the Aztec period. Today the need for organ and tissue transplants in Mexico is high; the estimated number is 100,000 patients, but there are only 2 donors per million population, for corneas. The organ, tissue and cell transplantation law which was modified in 2,000, establishes that when a person dies, he will be a potential donor of organs and tissues. This new law will give hope to many patients, since it is expected to increase significantly the amount of organs and tissues for transplants. At present Mexico has 178 hospitals that are authorized to carry out organ and tissue transplants, and 53 Tissue Banks.

  5. Coronaviruses in bats from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Anthony, S J; Ojeda-Flores, R; Rico-Chávez, O; Navarrete-Macias, I; Zambrana-Torrelio, C M; Rostal, M K; Epstein, J H; Tipps, T; Liang, E; Sanchez-Leon, M; Sotomayor-Bonilla, J; Aguirre, A A; Ávila-Flores, R; Medellín, R A; Goldstein, T; Suzán, G; Daszak, P; Lipkin, W I

    2013-05-01

    Bats are reservoirs for a wide range of human pathogens including Nipah, Hendra, rabies, Ebola, Marburg and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (CoV). The recent implication of a novel beta (β)-CoV as the cause of fatal respiratory disease in the Middle East emphasizes the importance of surveillance for CoVs that have potential to move from bats into the human population. In a screen of 606 bats from 42 different species in Campeche, Chiapas and Mexico City we identified 13 distinct CoVs. Nine were alpha (α)-CoVs; four were β-CoVs. Twelve were novel. Analyses of these viruses in the context of their hosts and ecological habitat indicated that host species is a strong selective driver in CoV evolution, even in allopatric populations separated by significant geographical distance; and that a single species/genus of bat can contain multiple CoVs. A β-CoV with 96.5 % amino acid identity to the β-CoV associated with human disease in the Middle East was found in a Nyctinomops laticaudatus bat, suggesting that efforts to identify the viral reservoir should include surveillance of the bat families Molossidae/Vespertilionidae, or the closely related Nycteridae/Emballonuridae. While it is important to investigate unknown viral diversity in bats, it is also important to remember that the majority of viruses they carry will not pose any clinical risk, and bats should not be stigmatized ubiquitously as significant threats to public health.

  6. Rural telemedicine project in northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, S.; Hahn, H.; Rudnick, J.; Snell, J.; Forslund, D.; Martinez, P.

    1998-12-31

    A virtual electronic medical record system is being deployed over the Internet with security in northern New Mexico using TeleMed, a multimedia medical records management system that uses CORBA-based client-server technology and distributed database architecture. The goal of the NNM Rural Telemedicine Project is to implement TeleMed into fifteen rural clinics and two hospitals within a 25,000 square mile area of northern New Mexico. Evaluation of the project consists of three components: job task analysis, audit of immunized children, and time motion studies. Preliminary results of the evaluation components are presented.

  7. The USGS and the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dausman, Alyssa M.; Spear, Kate

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is committed to mapping, monitoring, and conducting research in the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent watersheds. Through a network of science centers in the five Gulf States and across the Nation, the USGS applies its biologic, geologic, geographic, and hydrologic expertise to provide unbiased scientific findings to decisionmakers, particularly members and supporters of the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (Gulf Alliance). The overarching goal of USGS Gulf Coast activities is to provide the scientific information, knowledge, and tools required to facilitate management decisions that promote restoration, increase coastal resilience, and mitigate risks associated with both artificial and natural hazards.

  8. Test and Demonstration Assets of New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-31

    This document was developed by the Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a DOE/NNSA grant. The NSPP has three primary components: business incubation, workforce development, and technology demonstration and validation. The document contains a survey of test and demonstration assets in New Mexico available for external users such as small businesses with security technologies under development. Demonstration and validation of national security technologies created by incubator sources, as well as other sources, are critical phases of technology development. The NSPP will support the utilization of an integrated demonstration and validation environment.

  9. Empire: New Mexico's First Television Program

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, Roger Allen

    2016-11-14

    In recent years, New Mexico has hosted television and motion picture film crews working on both famous and not-so-famous productions. Perhaps the most famous of these productions was the television hit Breaking Bad. Perhaps the least famous production, which almost certainly no one remembers, is the 1962-1963 television series Empire. Empire was an hour long western that chronicled the lives of 1960s ranchers in New Mexico. The series starred Richard Egan, Ryan O’Neal, Denver Pyle, and Charles Bronson. Guest stars included Robert Vaughn (The Man from Uncle), Inger Stevens (The Farmer’s Daughter), Robert Culp (I Spy), and Telly Savalas (Kojak).

  10. Star formation in the "Gulf of Mexico"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armond, T.; Reipurth, B.; Bally, J.; Aspin, C.

    2011-04-01

    We present an optical/infrared study of the dense molecular cloud, L935, dubbed "The Gulf of Mexico", which separates the North America and the Pelican nebulae, and we demonstrate that this area is a very active star forming region. A wide-field imaging study with interference filters has revealed 35 new Herbig-Haro objects in the Gulf of Mexico. A grism survey has identified 41 Hα emission-line stars, 30 of them new. A small cluster of partly embedded pre-main sequence stars is located around the known LkHα 185-189 group of stars, which includes the recently erupting FUor HBC 722.

  11. Threat Posed by Mounting Vigilantism in Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Perro’s body was found in the trunk of a vehicle occu- pied by Ismael Quintero Oliver, 32, and Marcos Érik Pérez Mora, 21, who belonged to a”Drivers...POSED BY MOUNTING VIGILANTISM IN MEXICO George W. Grayson U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE ,....~ .... :!iO.L STRATEGIC STUDIES INSTITUTE Report...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Threat Posed by Mounting Vigilantism in Mexico 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  12. Mexico and the 21st Century Power Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    The 21st Century Power Partnership's program in Mexico (21CPP Mexico) is one initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial, carried out in cooperation with government and local stakeholders, drawing upon an international community of power system expertise. The overall goal of this program is to support Mexico's power system transformation by accelerating the transition to a reliable, financially robust, and low-carbon system. 21CPP Mexico activities focus on achieving positive outcomes for all participants, especially addressing critical questions and challenges facing policymakers, regulators, and system operators. In support of this goal, 21CPP Mexico taps into deep networks of expertise and professional connections.

  13. New Mexico: Northwest New Mexico Council of Governments / Connections, Inc. (A Former EPA CARE Project)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Northwest New Mexico Council of Governments is the recipient of a Level I CARE cooperative agreement to address the contamination of soil, air, and water from uranium mining, oil and gas development, and power plant emissions.

  14. First report of Stegomyia aegypti (= Aedes aegypti) in Mexico City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Kuri-Morales, P; Correa-Morales, F; González-Acosta, C; Sánchez-Tejeda, G; Dávalos-Becerril, E; Fernanda Juárez-Franco, M; Díaz-Quiñonez, A; Huerta-Jimenéz, H; Mejía-Guevara, M D; Moreno-García, M; González-Roldán, J F

    2017-01-20

    Stegomyia aegypti (= Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae) is a species of mosquito that is currently widespread in Mexico. Historically, the mosquito has been distributed across most tropical and subtropical areas lower than 1700 m a.s.l. Currently, populations that are found at higher altitudes in regions with cold and dry climates suggest that these conditions do not limit the colonization and population growth of S. aegypti. During a survey of mosquitoes in September 2015, larvae of S. aegypti mosquitoes were found in two different localities in Mexico City, which is located at about 2250 m a.s.l. Mexico City is the most populous city in Mexico and has inefficient drainage and water supply systems. These factors may result in the provision of numerous larval breeding sites. Mosquito monitoring and surveillance are now priorities for the city.

  15. Mexico's Loss of Land: Perspectives from Mexico and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Octavio Madigan; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the situations surrounding, and events involved in, the United States's massive western land acquisition from Mexico in 1845 and 1848. Presents a challenging, thorough, and insightful lesson plan that includes numerous background materials, learning activities, maps, and handouts. (MJP)

  16. First Report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter Solanacearum' Naturally Infecting Tomatoes in the State of Mexico, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants exhibiting stunting, yellow mosaic, short, chlorotic leaves, aborted flowers and reduced-size fruits, symptoms similar to those exhibited by plants infected by Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso), were observed in greenhouses in Jocotitlan, Mexico. In addi...

  17. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Tuberculosis in the State of Mexico, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza Bastida, Adrian; Hernández Tellez, Marivel; Bustamante Montes, Lilia P.; Medina Torres, Imelda; Jaramillo Paniagua, Jaime Nicolás; Mendoza Martínez, Germán David; Ramírez Durán, Ninfa

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the oldest human diseases that still affects large population groups. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there were approximately 9.4 million new cases worldwide in the year 2010. In Mexico, there were 18,848 new cases of TB of all clinical variants in 2010. The identification of clusters in space-time is of great interest in epidemiological studies. The objective of this research was to identify the spatial and temporal distribution of TB during the period 2006–2010 in the State of Mexico, using geographic information system (GIS) and SCAN statistics program. Nine significant clusters (P < 0.05) were identified using spatial and space-time analysis. The conclusion is that TB in the State of Mexico is not randomly distributed but is concentrated in areas close to Mexico City. PMID:22919337

  18. New Mexico Play Fairway Analysis: Gamma Ray Logs and Heat Generation Calculations for SW New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-23

    For the New Mexico Play fairway Analysis project, gamma ray geophysical well logs from oil wells penetrating the Proterozoic basement in southwestern New Mexico were digitized. Only the portion of the log in the basement was digitized. The gamma ray logs are converted to heat production using the equation (Bucker and Rybach, 1996) : A[µW/m3] = 0.0158 (Gamma Ray [API] – 0.8).

  19. Illegal sales of cigarettes to minors--Mexico City, Mexico, 1997.

    PubMed

    1997-05-23

    Because of the increasing prevalence of tobacco use among youth in the United States and Mexico, in 1996 the United States-Mexico Binational Commission (US-MBC) Health Working Group identified prevention of tobacco use, with an emphasis on adolescents, as one of its four priority health concerns. From 1970 to 1990, annual death rates for the leading causes of smoking-related deaths in Mexico nearly tripled and, in 1992, an estimated 10,253 persons in Mexico died as a result of smoking-related diseases, 9% of all deaths that year. In addition, from 1988 to 1993, the prevalence of current smoking among minors aged 12-17 years increased from 6.6% to 9.6%, respectively (in Mexico City, the 1993 prevalence was 12.8%), and in 1993, 72% of adult smokers in Mexico reported becoming regular smokers before age 18 years. Although since 1984 the General Health Law of Mexico has prohibited the sale of tobacco products to minors aged < 18 years, compliance with this law has not been assessed. As part of the Mexican national program to reduce the prevalence of cigarette smoking among children and adolescents and in support of the goals of the US-MBC, during 1997 the General Directorate of Epidemiology (GDE) in the Secretariat of Health (SOH) conducted a survey of tobacco outlets in Mexico City to assess the percentage of retailers willing to sell cigarettes to minors. This report summarizes the results of the survey, which indicate that virtually no surveyed retailers asked minors attempting to purchase cigarettes about their age and that most retailers sold cigarettes to minors.

  20. 75 FR 39089 - Notice of Receipt of Request To Amend the Presidential Permit for an International Bridge on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Border at Eagle Pass, Texas and Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION... Eagle Pass, Texas, a request to amend the Presidential permit that the Department issued in 1996 for the Eagle Pass II International Bridge on the U.S.-Mexico border at Eagle Pass, Texas and Piedras...

  1. Gifted Education Moves Ahead in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Debra M.; Saenz, Janet

    1990-01-01

    This article examines the role of the University of the Americas in establishing public school programs for gifted children in Mexico, developing a teacher education program called Programa Latinoamericano Universitario para ninos Sobredotados (PLUS), sponsoring conferences, and producing television programs. (JDD)

  2. The Divorced Chicana of Northern New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Mary Lou; Casaus, Luis

    County demographic records and the voluntary responses of 80 Chicanas to a questionnaire and a self-concept examination were analyzed to identify the patterns, problems, and dynamics in the lives of divorced Northern New Mexico Chicanas. The women, half of whom were divorced and most of whom were Roman Catholics, were from urban Bernalillo County…

  3. Facing the Knowledge Society: Mexico's Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela-Petito, Gonzalo

    2010-01-01

    Public higher education in Mexico faces major challenges vis-a-vis its position within the modern knowledge society, sparking concern among educational authorities. In the second half of the 20th century Mexican universities ceased to be selective, elitist schools, becoming, instead, massive institutions that reflect social and intellectual…

  4. Intercultural Universities in Mexico: Progress and Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmelkes, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the problem of the very limited representation of indigenous groups in higher education in Mexico, as well as some of its causes, namely: the poor quality of education received by indigenous populations at earlier educational levels; racism and discrimination which are still prevalent in Mexican society and limit options and…

  5. Evaluating Public Higher Education in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela-Petito, Gonzalo

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to ensure accountability, and in order to prepare students for a globalised world, the higher education sector in Mexico is seeking to implement an evaluation of public higher education. Higher education institutions (HEIs) need to balance this goal against the need to protect their autonomy. This would be preserved if each…

  6. Indigenous Education in Mexico: Indigenous Students' Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Despagne, Colette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate whether, despite a shift in political and educational discourses over the last decades that suggests that Indigenous cultures and languages are recognized, any real change has occurred in terms of Indigenous education in Mexico. It is possible that official bilingual intercultural education is still…

  7. Aspects of Teacher Accountability in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Carroll L.

    The term "accountability" involves more than the recent demand by the public that schools justify the academic levels achieved by their students. Such aspects of accountability as teacher certification, school accreditation, educational evaluation, and student testing have existed for years. The New Mexico State Department of Education…

  8. Education in Mexico. Bulletin, 1956, No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Marjorie C.

    1956-01-01

    "Education in Mexico," one of the series of basic studies on education in the American Republics undertaken by the Office of Education, has been prepared with the interests of the following groups in mind: (1) Persons working in the field of Inter-American educational relations; (2) Those specializing in Latin American area and language…

  9. GULF OF MEXICO AQUATIC MORTALITY NETWORK (GMNET)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five U.S. states share the northern coast of the Gulf, and each has a program to monitor mortalities of aquatic organisms (fish, shellfish, birds). However, each state has different standards, procedures, and documentation of mortality events. The Gulf of Mexico Aquatic Mortality...

  10. Crustal Structure beneath Mexico from Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, V.; Quintanar, L.; Espindola, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Servicio Sismológico Nacional (SSN) is Mexico's official organism in charge of the observation of seismicity in the country. Operated by the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, it counts with 32 broadband stations deployed throughout the country. The coverage includes most of the geologic provinces of the territory, which vary widely in their geologic characteristics. The availability of records from teleseisms at those stations makes feasible to obtain sound and homogeneous estimates of the structure of the crust in the Mexican territory through the analysis of receiver functions (RF). In this work we present the results of the analysis of RF obtained from events registered from 1998 to 2009 in the 32 stations of the SSN. The RF technique, which uses converted phases at major velocity discontinuities, is a well established technique to infer the velocity contrasts and thickness of the underlying crust. Using this method we were able to infer the depth of the Moho, a major intracrustal discontinuity and in some cases the depth to the base of the subducting plate. We present maps of crustal thickness in Mexico, which varies between about 29 km in the Yucatan peninsula to more than 40 km in central Mexico. Poisson's coefficient varies between 0.19 and 0.30. The position of the descending slab shows a large variation in the subduction angle (from about 6° in the SE margin of the Pacific coast to about 60° in the NW ) as has been found from other techniques.

  11. Return Migration to Mexico: Does Health Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Erika; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R.; Teruel, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    We use data from three rounds of the Mexican Family Life Survey to examine whether migrants in the United States returning to Mexico in the period 2005–2012 have worse health than those remaining in the United States. Despite extensive interest by demographers in health-related selection, this has been a neglected area of study in the literature on U.S.-Mexico migration, and the few results to date have been contradictory and inconclusive. Using five self-reported health variables collected while migrants resided in the United States and subsequent migration history, we find direct evidence of higher probabilities of return migration for Mexican migrants in poor health as well as lower probabilities of return for migrants with improving health. These findings are robust to the inclusion of potential confounders reflecting the migrants’ demographic characteristics, economic situation, family ties, and origin and destination characteristics. We anticipate that in the coming decade, health may become an even more salient issue in migrants’ decisions about returning to Mexico, given the recent expansion in access to health insurance in Mexico. PMID:26385111

  12. Comparative U.S.-Mexico Border Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Ellwyn R., Ed.

    Four United States universities, one from each American state having a common boundary with Mexico, organized the Border-State University Consortium for Latin America. The organization emerged as an attempt to focus collectively on problems and situations immediately accessible for study in a series of publications entitled "Occasional…

  13. Reflections: Mexico and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paz, Octavio

    1980-01-01

    Illustrates how Mexico and the United States represent two versions of Western civilization that are profoundly different from one another. Concludes that the United States has always ignored minorities in foreign and domestic policy. Suggests that, to conquer its enemies, the United States must first conquer its historical attitude toward…

  14. Wildlife of New Mexico: A Coloring Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCarter, Don L.; Oldham, Pat

    This coloring book showing 31 of New Mexico's wild animals was prepared in conjunction with Project WILD, an environmental and conservation education program for elementary and secondary school students. Each page contains a large line drawing of a wild animal, a brief description of its habitat and behavior, and a range map that indicates the…

  15. On-Line Databases in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Enzo

    1986-01-01

    Use of online bibliographic databases in Mexico is provided through Servicio de Consulta a Bancos de Informacion, a public service that provides information retrieval, document delivery, translation, technical support, and training services. Technical infrastructure is based on a public packet-switching network and institutional users may receive…

  16. America = Las Americas. Canada, United States, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Leonor; And Others

    Written for teachers to use with migrant children in elementary grades and to highlight the many Americas, three magazines provide historical and cultural background information on Canada, the United States, and Mexico and feature biographies of Black and Hispanic leaders. Each edition has a table of contents indicating the language--Spanish…

  17. Keep New Mexico Beautiful, Recycling Project Successful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Victor R.

    1975-01-01

    Through the efforts of community groups, the support of local industries, and the state government, Keep New Mexico Beautiful, Inc. (KNMB) is now operating a large-scale recycling business. KNMB has been able to save tons of natural resources, provide local employment, and educate the public to this environmental concern. (MA)

  18. The International Higher Education Market: Mexico's Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andere, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    For years student scholarship programs to promote knowledge or international cooperation have functioned without question in Mexico. Economics of education literature has questioned the validity of similar programs, and the paradigm is shifting from scholarship support to loan schemes and from merit- to need-based grants. This article, based on…

  19. The Modernisation of Higher Education in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Roberto Rodriguez

    1999-01-01

    Higher education reform in Mexico since World War II is examined at both the institutional and national level. Changes have included updating the curriculum; overhauling administrative, managerial, and planning mechanisms; changing the components of the system; shifting the territorial distribution of access to education; and revising resource…

  20. Rain Rate Statistics in Southern New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulic, Frank J., Jr.; Horan, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    The methodology used in determining empirical rain-rate distributions for Southern New Mexico in the vicinity of White Sands APT site is discussed. The hardware and the software developed to extract rain rate from the rain accumulation data collected at White Sands APT site are described. The accuracy of Crane's Global Model for rain rate predictions is analyzed.

  1. Transnational Teachers of English in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petron, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Much has been written on the effects of Mexican immigration in the U.S., but little exists regarding the ways in which transnationals, who have returned to Mexico, have adapted to and/or transformed Mexican society and the education system. This article is based on a descriptive qualitative study of five transnational teachers of English in Mexico…

  2. Return Migration to Mexico: Does Health Matter?

    PubMed

    Arenas, Erika; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R; Teruel, Graciela

    2015-12-01

    We use data from three rounds of the Mexican Family Life Survey to examine whether migrants in the United States returning to Mexico in the period 2005-2012 have worse health than those remaining in the United States. Despite extensive interest by demographers in health-related selection, this has been a neglected area of study in the literature on U.S.-Mexico migration, and the few results to date have been contradictory and inconclusive. Using five self-reported health variables collected while migrants resided in the United States and subsequent migration history, we find direct evidence of higher probabilities of return migration for Mexican migrants in poor health as well as lower probabilities of return for migrants with improving health. These findings are robust to the inclusion of potential confounders reflecting the migrants' demographic characteristics, economic situation, family ties, and origin and destination characteristics. We anticipate that in the coming decade, health may become an even more salient issue in migrants' decisions about returning to Mexico, given the recent expansion in access to health insurance in Mexico.

  3. Genotyping of Canine parvovirus in western Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Roldán, César; Páez-Magallan, Varinia; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin; De Cervantes-Mireles, Raúl Leonel; López-Amezcua, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common infectious agents related to high morbidity rates in dogs. In addition, the virus is associated with severe gastroenteritis, diarrhea, and vomiting, resulting in high death rates, especially in puppies and nonvaccinated dogs. To date, there are 3 variants of the virus (CPV-2a, CPV-2b, and CPV-2c) circulating worldwide. In Mexico, reports describing the viral variants circulating in dog populations are lacking. In response to this deficiency, a total of 41 fecal samples of suspected dogs were collected from October 2013 through April 2014 in the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Guadalajara in western Mexico. From these, 24 samples resulted positive by polymerase chain reaction, and the viral variant was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Five positive diagnosed samples were selected for partial sequencing of the vp2 gene and codon analysis. The results demonstrated that the current dominant viral variant in Mexico is CPV-2c. The current study describes the genotyping of CPV strains, providing valuable evidence of the dominant frequency of this virus in a dog population from western Mexico.

  4. Constructing an Identity: Environmental Educators in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaya, Silvia Fuentes

    2004-01-01

    The environmental education field in Mexico is a relatively new social space characterized by wide discursive proliferation and organized by regional hegemonies. In this context, a plurality of identification processes has taken place. There is not a singular environmental educator identity but a multiplicity of local definitions. In this paper, I…

  5. GULF OF MEXICO HYPOXIA MONITORING AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greene, Richard M. and Russell G. Kreis. In press. Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Monitoring and Modeling (Abstract). To be presented at the EPA Science Forum: Healthy Communities and Ecosystems, 1-3 June 2004, Washington, DC. 1 p. (ERL,GB R990).

    Oxygen-depleted or hypoxic bottom...

  6. Learning by Televised "Plaza Sesamo" in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Guerrero, Rogelio; Holtzman, Wayne H.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were administered pre, during, and post telecast of Plaza Sesamo to children in lower class day-care centers in Mexico City. Results indicate significant differences between control and experimental groups in general knowledge, numbers, letters, and words as taught by Plaza Sesamo. (Author/BJG)

  7. Fatal Monocytic Ehrlichiosis in Woman, Mexico, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Gutierrez, Carolina G.; Solorzano-Santos, Fortino; Walker, David H.; Torres, Javier; Serrano, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is a febrile illness caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks. In Mexico, a case of E. chaffeensis infection in an immunocompetent 31-year-old woman without recognized tick bite was fatal. This diagnosis should be considered for patients with fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzyme levels. PMID:27088220

  8. Rickettsia rickettsii in Rhipicephalus ticks, Mexicali, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Eremeeva, Marina E; Zambrano, Maria L; Anaya, Luis; Beati, Lorenza; Karpathy, Sandor E; Santos-Silva, Maria Margarida; Salceda, Beatriz; MacBeth, Donald; Olguin, Hector; Dasch, Gregory A; Aranda, Celia Alpuche

    2011-03-01

    Circulation of a unique genetic type of Rickettsia rickettsii in ticks of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus complex was detected in Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico. The Mexican R. rickettsii differed from all isolates previously characterized from the endemic regions of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in northern, central, and southern Americas. Rhipicephalus ticks in Mexicali are genetically different from Rh. sanguineus found in the United States.

  9. New Mexico Boating Education Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Margaret, Comp.; Herrera, Orlando, Comp.

    Resources for individuals and organizations interested in teaching and promoting boating safety are listed in this directory of films, speakers, publications, and boating courses. Although some information is specific to New Mexico, most is of general interest. An annotated list of 40 films provides sources for obtaining the films, all free of…

  10. Special Education in Mexico: One Community's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Terry L.; Contreras, Diana; Brown, Randel

    2002-01-01

    This article looks at the history of special education in Mexico, discusses the emergence of special education programs, and examines a school for special education in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas. The school provides vocational training for students with a variety of disabilities and has a partnership with the local maquiladora industry. (Contains 5…

  11. NASA Spacecraft Images New Mexico Wildfire

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Right, View Larger Image   Lightning ignited the Silver Fire in western New Mexico on June 7, 2013. It has since consumed more ... techniques. The plots in Figure 1 show the height of Silver Fire smoke along a line marked by the red arrow in the image. The ...

  12. New Mexico: The Land of Enchantment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    New Mexico, a state of brown plains and sand deserts, is nicknamed "The Land of Enchantment." One reason is that the very starkness of the land adds to its enchantment. Another reason is that the rich history of the state has resulted in a landscape filled with remnants of the Pueblo people, Spanish colonizers, and Mexican settlers.

  13. Myths and Gods of Ancient Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rascon, Vincent P.

    Intended to help Americans of Mexican descent understand their rich cultural heritage, this portfolio contains 12 full-color drawings of the myths and gods of the Olmecs and Toltecs of Ancient Mexico. These original drawings are by Vincent P. Rascon. Information captions in English and Spanish are given for each drawing which is printed on heavy…

  14. Mexico: Failing State or Emerging Democracy?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Angel Guadalupe Aguilar Villatoro in Tijuana, 15 October 2010. Aguilar Villatoro was killed during a shootout with gunmen in that border city. (AP...of murder, Mexico ranks sixth in the world after India, Russia, Colombia, South Africa, and the United States.46 Luis de la Barreda of the

  15. Astronomy and Rock Art in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, William Breen

    Many traditions involving sky observation among the Amerindian cultures of prehistoric Mexico are associated with rock art. This relation appears in the form of iconographic representations of celestial objects, graphic images which are culturally associated with these sky objects, and the location and orientation of rock art images within the natural landscape.

  16. Fatal Monocytic Ehrlichiosis in Woman, Mexico, 2013.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Gutierrez, Carolina G; Solorzano-Santos, Fortino; Walker, David H; Torres, Javier; Serrano, Carlos A; Gordillo-Perez, Guadalupe

    2016-05-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is a febrile illness caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks. In Mexico, a case of E. chaffeensis infection in an immunocompetent 31-year-old woman without recognized tick bite was fatal. This diagnosis should be considered for patients with fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzyme levels.

  17. [Typhus in Mexico City in 1915].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Martha Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The year 1915 was particularly difficult; it was characterized by droughts, famines, and outbreaks of diseases including typhus.This text exposes its spread in Mexico City as well as the measures implemented to combat it, carried out before knowing the etiology of the illness, focused on cleaning up the environment and the measures undertaken afterwards with the aim of delousing people.

  18. Education Reform Sparks Teacher Protest in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Bradley A.

    2014-01-01

    The current tumult in the Mexican education arena has deep roots in politics and tradition, but it is latter-day global competition and international measures of student performance that are driving reform efforts. Teacher strikes and demonstrations are not new in Mexico, but issues raised by today's protesting teachers represent a combination of…

  19. The Labor Market and Education in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez Medina, Alberto

    1979-01-01

    Problems in employment and education in Mexico will remain in spite of the rapid economic growth expected from the expanding petroleum industry. The structural problems of the job market and education are analyzed with particular reference to higher education. Commentary by Michael Olivas accompanies this article. (JMF)

  20. THE SPANISH AMERICANS IN NEW MEXICO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KNOWLTON, CLARK S.

    THE SPANISH AMERICANS IN NEW MEXICO ARE UNDERGOING GREAT SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CHANGE. THEIR VILLAGE CULTURE, FORMED IN ISOLATION NEAR IRRIGATED LAND WHICH HAD REMAINED REMARKABLY STABLE FOR SEVERAL HUNDRED YEARS, IS BREAKING DOWN. THE SPANISH AMERICANS ARE LEAVING THEIR VILLAGES AND MIGRATING TO INDUSTRIAL CENTERS. FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO THIS…

  1. Bilingual Education for New Mexico Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascual, Henry W.

    Bilingual education (BE) has long been established in Mexico, Peru, the U.S.S.R., the Philippines, and a number of other nations in order to teach both the vernacular and official languages. In the United States, BE has received increased attention since the passage of the National Bilingual Education Act and Title VII legislation. Evaluation…

  2. Air Pollution in the Mexico Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Suarez, L. G.

    2007-05-01

    Mexico City is a megacity whose metropolitan area includes the country federal district, 18 municipalities of the State of Mexico. In year 1992, only 16 municipalities of the State of Mexico were part of MCMA. In year 1940 the Mexico City population was 1.78 millions in an area of 118 km2, in year 2000 the population was 17.9 millions in an area of 1,500 km2. Population has grown a ten fold whereas population density has dropped 20%. Total number of private cars has grown from 2,341,731 in year 1998 to 2,967,893 in year 2004. Nowadays, people and goods travel longer at lower speed to reach school, work and selling points. In addition highly efficient public transport lost a significant share of transport demand from 19.1 in 1986 to 14.3 in 1998. Air pollution is a public concern since early eighties last century; systematic public efforts have been carried out since late eighties. Energy consumption has steadily increased in the MCMA whereas emissions have also decreased. From year 2000 to 2004, the private cars fleet increased 17% whereas CO, NOx and COV emissions decreased between 20-30%. Average concentrations of criteria pollutants have decreased The number of days that the one-hour national standard for bad air quality was exceeded in year 1990 was 160. In year 2005 was 70. Research efforts and public policies on air pollution have been focused on public health. We are now better able to estimate the cost in human lives due to air pollution, or the cost in labor lost due to illness. Little if none at all work has been carried out to look at the effect of air pollution on private and public property or onto the cultural heritage. Few reports have can be found on the impact of air pollution in rural areas, including forest and crops, around the mega city. Mexico City is in the south end of a Valley with mountain ranges higher than 1000 m above the average city altitude. In spite the heavy loss of forested areas to the city, the mountains still retain large

  3. 7 CFR 319.8-12 - From the West Coast of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false From the West Coast of Mexico. 319.8-12 Section 319.8... Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-12 From the West Coast of Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of the West Coast of Mexico and of Northwest Mexico from infestations...

  4. 7 CFR 319.8-12 - From the West Coast of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false From the West Coast of Mexico. 319.8-12 Section 319.8... Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-12 From the West Coast of Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of the West Coast of Mexico and of Northwest Mexico from infestations...

  5. 7 CFR 319.8-12 - From the West Coast of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false From the West Coast of Mexico. 319.8-12 Section 319.8... Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-12 From the West Coast of Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of the West Coast of Mexico and of Northwest Mexico from infestations...

  6. 7 CFR 319.8-12 - From the West Coast of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false From the West Coast of Mexico. 319.8-12 Section 319.8... Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-12 From the West Coast of Mexico. Contingent upon continued freedom of the West Coast of Mexico and of Northwest Mexico from infestations...

  7. Reloading Continuous GPS in Northwest Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, J. J.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Gonzalez-Ortega, J. A.

    2007-05-01

    For more than 10 years we try to follow the steps of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) and the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) in USA, this gives us the opportunity to be in position to contribute to develop a modern GPS Network in Mexico. During 1998 and 2001, three stations were deployed in Northwest Mexico in concert with the development of SCIGN: SPMX in north central Baja California state at the National Astronomical Observatory, UNAM in the Sierra San Pedro Martir; CORX in Isla Coronados Sur, offshore San Diego, Ca./Tijuana, Mexico and GUAX in Guadalupe island 150 miles offshore Baja California peninsula, which provide a unique site on the Pacific plate in the Northamerica/Pacific boundary zone in Las Californias. The former IGS station in CICESE, Ensenada, CICE installed in 1995, was replaced by CIC1 in 1999. In 2004 and 2005 with partial support from SCIGN and UNAVCO to University of Arizona a volunteer team from UNAVCO, Caltech, U.S. Geological Survey, Universidad de la Sierra at Moctezuma Sonora and CICESE built two new shallow-braced GPS sites in northwest Mexico. The first site USMX is located at east-central Sonora and the second YESX is located high in the Sierra Madre Occidental at Yecora near the southern border of Sonora and Chihuahua. All data is openly available at SOPAC and/or UNAVCO. The existing information has been valuable to resolve the "total" plate motion between the Pacific plate (GUAX) and the Northamerica plate (USMX and YESX) in the north- central Gulf of California. Since the last year we have the capability of GPS data processing using GAMIT/GLOBK, and after gain some practice with survey mode data processing we can convert us in a GPS processing center in Mexico. Currently only 2 sites are operational: CIC1 and USMX. With new energy we are ready to contribute to the establishment of a modern GPS network in Mexico for science, hazard monitoring and infrastructure.

  8. Many Mexicos: An Artifact Exhibit on 7 Geographical and Cultural Regions of Mexico. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Mexico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain, Victoria Snow

    This project includes an assortment of artifacts designed to inform high school students about the variety of geographical and cultural regions of Mexico. The artifacts, derived from seven different geographical/cultural regions of Mexico, include maps, posters, objects that symbolize the regional culture, and typical regional costumes, music, and…

  9. 76 FR 29194 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Mexico and Sweden: Revocation of Antidumping Duty Orders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... International Trade Administration Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Mexico and Sweden: Revocation of... duty orders on purified carboxymethylcellulose from Mexico and Sweden. Pursuant to section 751(c) of... of the existing antidumping duty orders on purified carboxymethylcellulose from Mexico and...

  10. 75 FR 57815 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... COMMISSION Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden AGENCY: United... antidumping duty orders on purified carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden... antidumping duty orders on purified carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden...

  11. 75 FR 29577 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey, New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... officially filed in the New Mexico State Office, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Santa Fe, New Mexico... Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Copies may be obtained from this office upon payment....

  12. Mexico's petroleum and US policy: implications for the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Ronfeldt, D.; Nehring, R.; Gandara, A.

    1980-06-01

    This report examines selected factor affecting Mexico's future petroleum policies, and then assesses various implications of Mexico's petroleum for US interests and policies. After a brief introduction, the report is divided into three sections. The first offers a detailed analysis of Mexico's petroleum resources and production possibilities. The second considers petroleum as a symbolic issue of profound significance for Mexican nationalism. The final section provides an assessment of these and other factors for US interests, objectives, and policy options during the 1980s.

  13. Parental psychopathology and offspring suicidality in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Borges, Guilherme; Borges, Rebeca; Medina Mora, Maria-Elena; Benjet, Corina; Nock, Matthew K

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the extent to which parental psychopathology may confer increased risk of suicide ideation and attempts among their offspring in Mexico. Data from a representative sample of 5,782 respondents participating in the Mexican National Comorbidity Survey (2001-2002) to examine the unique associations between parental psychopathology and offspring suicidality were used. Parental disorders (major depression, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, substance dependence, and antisocial personality disorder) were comorbid and after controlling for comorbidity and number of disorders only parental panic and antisocial personality disorder remained associated with ideation and attempts in the total sample. Those with more parental disorders were at increased risk of ideation and attempt, as well as increased risk to transition from suicide ideation to an attempt. These findings may help inform clinical and public health efforts aimed at suicide prevention in Mexico and other developing countries.

  14. Epidemiology of diabetes mellitus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bello-Chavolla, Omar Y; Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is the main health problem in Mexico. The large and growing number of cases and the remarkable economic impact of the disease support this statement. The condition is expressed at an earlier age and at a lower body mass index in Mexican mestizos compared with the age and body mass index reported in Caucasians. In addition, Mexican mestizos have an increased susceptibility to developing diabetic nephropathy. The Mexican health system needs major adjustments in order to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes. Treatment is not currently based on the needs and expectations of the patient. As a result, it is insufficient, belated, and costly. Close to 20% of the preventable deaths in Mexico are caused by diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Even a small decrease in this rate could result in substantial savings for the Mexican healthcare system.

  15. Determinants of occupational disease incidence in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Idrovo, Alvaro J; Pérez-Núñez, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Most occupational health researchers have studied individual determinants, tending to forget those causes that are universally present. To explore some determinants of occupational disease incidence in Mexico, the authors carried out an ecological study with data from 32 Mexican states. Using ordinary least squares regression, they explored associations between occupational disease incidence and the Gini coefficient, the percentage of small and median enterprises, and migration. Income inequality and the combined percentage of small and median enterprises were negatively associated with the incidence of occupational disease. In Mexico, the "population strategy" of the prevention of occupational disease suggests that big enterprises' contexts are related to a higher occurrence of occupational diseases. Further studies using multilevel approaches are needed to establish whether these occupational diseases are related to exposures present in big or in small and median enterprises.

  16. Minerals yearbook, 1992: New Mexico. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Dupree, J.A.; Eveleth, R.W.

    1994-02-01

    In national standing, the Land of Enchantment dropped in 1992 from 10th to 13th in total mineral value. Dropping 12% from 1991, New Mexico's 1992 nonfuel mineral production was valued at $871 million, 2.72% of U.S. total value. New Mexico continued to lead the Nation in potash and perlite output. It ranked second in the country in production of mica and pumice, third in U.S. copper production, and fourth in natural gas production. Values of copper and potash continued to lead other State mineral commodities by about a factor of 10. Relative to 1991 State performance, value of portland and masonry cement, common clay, crude gypsum, mica, perlite, potash, pumice, sand and gravel, crushed stone, and zeolites increased in 1992.

  17. DNA barcoding in Mexico: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Elías-Gutiérrez, M; León-Regagnon, V

    2013-11-01

    DNA barcoding has become an important current scientific trend to the understanding of the world biodiversity. In the case of mega-diverse hot spots like Mexico, this technique represents an important tool for taxonomists, allowing them to concentrate in highlighted species by the barcodes instead of analyzing entire sets of specimens. This tendency resulted in the creation of a national network named Mexican Barcode of Life (MEXBOL) which main goals are to train students, and to promote the interaction and collective work among researchers interested in this topic. As a result, the number of records in the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) for some groups, such as the Mammalia, Actinopterygii, Polychaeta, Branchiopoda, Ostracoda, Maxillopoda, Nematoda, Pinophyta, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota place Mexico among the top ten countries in the generation of these data. This special number presents only few of the many interesting findings in this region of the world, after the use of this technique and its integration with other methodologies.

  18. Deep Crustal Structure Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, G. L.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Eddy, D. R.; Norton, I. O.; Karner, G. D.; Johnson, C. A.; Kneller, E. A.; Snedden, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of the GUMBO (GUlf of Mexico Basin Opening) project that constrains seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Data were acquired in 2010 along four profiles 300-500 km in length, using the industry vessel R/V Iron Cat and ocean bottom seismometers at 10-12 km spacing. Plate tectonic models for the Gulf of Mexico region have rifting initiating in the Late Triassic or Early Jurassic, with seafloor spreading beginning ~166-154 Ma in the western Gulf, propagating to the eastern Gulf, and ending ~154-135 Ma. Many models include transform motion along the Florida margin during initiation of continental rifting. We observe a strong change in rifting style from west to east across the ocean basin. Our western profile, offshore Texas, images highly heterogeneous crust with sediment velocities directly overlying Moho in some locations. These observations are consistent with either sedimentary basins within rifted continental crust or ultra-slow-spreading oceanic crust. The profile offshore Lousiana images thicker, faster, and more homogeneous crust. This could suggest an eastward increase in magmatic output during rifting. The eastern profiles offshore Alabama and Florida image the ocean-continent boundary and extensive regions of oceanic crust. The thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to 6-7 km over a horizontal distance of 150 km in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The profile offshore Alabama, near a region where syn-rift volcanism has been interpreted on seismic reflection data, has

  19. Teaching of GIS in Mexico's Engineering Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez C., Miguel A.; Ventura R., Eusebio

    2008-05-01

    Application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Mexico for the solution of territorial-based problems has been widely extended in the last decade. However, teaching and learning have been mainly based on short training courses or workshops focused on software knowledge acquiring, but without the basic background of geographical sciences that allow the understanding of fundamentals principles related to geographical information management, theory, methods of analysis and modeling, as well as the study of interactions between the different processes across the land surface. In spite of the explosive growth of the GIS use, the teaching of fundamental principles still is limited to formal courses taught in universities. The goal of this study is to analyze the role of GIS technology as generator of territorial knowledge, its evolution and use by companies, as well as its presence in curricular plans of study in the different engineering programs in Mexico.

  20. [Supply of medical equipment in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Arredondo, A; Cruz, C; Faba, G; Sánchez, E; Hernández, B; Damián, T

    1992-01-01

    This article covers the report on Supply of Medical Equipment in Mexico, presented during the Second National Congress of Public Health. The results are part of an investigation that dealt with the general conditions that currently prevail in the production and distribution of medical equipment. The information was obtained by means of a survey applied to 208 companies that comprised the sample study. The facts indicate that of the companies that correspond to this industrial sector in Mexico, 3.8 per cent are manufacturers, 69.7 per cent distributors, 19.2 per cent manufacturer-distributors, and the remaining 7.2 per cent correspond to corrective and preventive maintenance. Also, these companies pose serious problems of external dependence with regard to production costs and the commercialization of products. Furthermore, it became evident that there is a substantial need for financial support to optimally satisfy the demands of various institutions in the country's health sector.

  1. Northwestern Mexico as photographed from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An oblique view of northwestern Mexico (30.0N, 113.5W), as photographed from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit by one of the Skylab 4 crewmen. This photograph was taken on a seep down the coast to document the fault patterns of southern California and northwest Mexico. The specific reason for the picture was to see of the Agua Blanca Fault in Baja California extends to the east toward the Gulf of California. No such extension was found. The fault appeard to disappear into an area of sand and heavily eroded material that obscured any feature that might be present deeper. This area of sand and loose material is the light-colored area in the center of Baja at the extreme north part of the photograph.

  2. Social networks among Indigenous peoples in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Skoufias, Emmanuel; Lunde, Trine; Patrinos, Harry Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We examine the extent to which social networks among indigenous peoples in Mexico have a significant effect on a variety of human capital investment and economic activities, such as school attendance and work among teenage boys and girls, and migration, welfare participation, employment status, occupation, and sector of employment among adult males and females. Using data from the 10 percent population sample of the 2000 Population and Housing Census of Mexico and the empirical strategy that Bertrand, Luttmer, and Mullainathan (2000) propose, which allows us to take into account the role of municipality and language group fixed effects, we confirm empirically that social network effects play an important role in the economic decisions of indigenous people, especially in rural areas. Our analysis also provides evidence that better access to basic services such as water and electricity increases the size and strength of network effects in rural areas.

  3. [Evolution of the health system in Mexico].

    PubMed

    García-Junco Machado, David

    2012-01-01

    This text is a summary of how the health system evolves in Mexico since the first institutions to date. Primarily addresses the problems that led to the creation of the Social Protection in Health System or Seguro Popular in 2003, as well as its objectives, performance, challenges faced and strategies that have been implemented over the past eight years. Also shown are the main results that have been achieved in health since the creation of Seguro Popular: membership of vulnerable groups, universal coverage, medical coverage and impact on out of pocket expenses and catastrophic expenses. The text concludes with the current vision of the health system; by which means, the objectives set out in the long run to Mexico.

  4. Old-Age Wealth in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rebeca; DeGraff, Deborah S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined relationships between the wealth of older adults and their early-life decisions regarding investment in human capital, family formation, and work activities in Mexico, using the 2001 Mexican Health and Aging Study. The authors examined correlates of accumulated financial wealth by gender and across three age cohorts: 50 to 59, 60 to 69, and 70 years or older. The authors outline the changing context these cohorts experienced during their lifetimes; describe patterns of net financial worth by main covariates across groups defined by age, sex, and marital status; and present the results of multivariate models of net worth. Simulations were conducted to illustrate patterns of net worth associated with alternative scenarios depicting differing representative combinations of life-course characteristics by age cohort. The findings suggest that old-age financial wealth in Mexico is more closely associated with family formation and human capital decisions than with employment decisions over the lifetime. PMID:20694054

  5. American Visceral Leishmaniasis in Chiapas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Santiago, Jorge A.; Chávez-López, Susana; Guzmán-Bracho, Carmen; Flisser, Ana; Olivo-Díaz, Angélica

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a study conducted during 1990–2006 with 89 cases of American visceral leishmaniasis in Chiapas State in southeastern Mexico and a seroprevalence study performed with 726 persons and 224 dogs that lived near cases of American visceral leishmaniasis. Clinical aspects, epidemiologic profiles, and risk factors are described. Most cases were in children ≤ 5 years of age, the prevalence of seropositive persons was 77%. The main risk factors associated with this disease were having 1–3 rooms in a house compared with ≥ 4 rooms, having a roof that was not made of cement, and having domestic animals. In contrast, only 19% of dogs were seropositive, suggesting that this species is not important in the transmission cycle of Leishmania. These data indicate that active transmission is taking place in the central valley of Chiapas State, Mexico, in communities located < 1,000 meters above sea level near the Grijalva River. PMID:22232459

  6. An Overall View of English in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Grace C.

    At pre-primary and primary levels in Mexico there are 50,000 schools, where English is not required. There are about 3,000 bilingual private English/Spanish schools, but no overall standards apply for the English program. At the secundaria (junior high) level, 2,200,000 students attend 6,500 schools, and are required to study English or French…

  7. The Zapatista Social Netwar in Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    manifesto calling people to arms, "El Despertador Mexicano " (The Mexican Awakening), issued December 1, 1993, the EZLN describes itself as having a...troops, if engaged, may overstep, 15Quote from a statement by Roderic Camp, El Financiero , 25 September, 1997, as posted on the Internet. 16In many...March 1995 (as posted on the Internet, De- cember 20, 1995). Orozco Zuarth, Marco A., Sintesis de Chiapas, Mexico City: Ediciones y Sistemas

  8. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  9. Age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Hautaniemi, Susan I

    2003-04-01

    Comparisons of age at menopause are made difficult by the different methodologies applied across populations. This study extended an opportunity to apply different methodologies to the same data to draw some preliminary conclusions about age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico. Among 755 women aged 28 to 70 interviewed in the capital city of Puebla, Mexico, 447 (59.6%) were naturally or surgically postmenopausal. Mean recalled age at natural menopause in Puebla (46.7 years) appears to be similar to mean recalled age at menopause in Mexico City (46.5 years), suggesting that age at menopause is similar in urban Mexican populations. However, median age at menopause computed by probit analysis was later in the city of Puebla (49.6 years) compared to the median age computed by the same method in the capital city of León, Guanajuato, Mexico (48.2 years). Median age at menopause computed by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis suggests that age at menopause in Puebla (50.0 years) is older still, and close to that of the United States (51.1 years). The differences in median ages at menopause in Puebla are solely due to methodological choices and highlight the difficulty inherent in making inferences across studies of age at menopause between biological and/or cultural groups. Factors associated with age at menopause offer another avenue for comparing and understanding variation in this basic biological process. In Puebla, smoking, low levels of education, and nulliparity are associated with an earlier age at menopause.

  10. Inventory of nanotechnology companies in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Richard; Zayago Lau, Edgar; Foladori, Guillermo; Parker, Rachel; Vazquez, Laura Liliana Villa; Belmont, Eduardo Robles; Figueroa, Edgar Ramón Arteaga

    2016-02-01

    This study presents an inventory of 139 nanotechnology companies in Mexico, identifying their geographic distribution, economic sector classification, and position in the nanotechnology value chain. We find that the principal economic sector of nanotechnology-engaged firms involves the manufacture of chemical products, which largely serve as means of production (primary or intermediate materials; instruments and equipment) for industrial processes. The methodology used in this analysis could be replicated in other countries without major modifications.

  11. Chiapas Forest, Mexico and Guatemala border

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This color infrared view of the Chiapas Forest, Mexico and Guatemala border (17.0N, 92.0W) illustrates the usefulness of this type of film in determining vegetated vs non vegetated areas. As can be seen, most of this part of Guatemala remains in closed canopy woodland (dark red), while most of the Mexican land to the north has been cleared for pasture and farmland (pink). The pale green areas north of the river are bare soil or fallow fields.

  12. Whither Elite Cohesion in Mexico: A Comment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    the problem of elite cohesion, including the mechanisms-- especially the camarilla system--whereby balance and equilibrium, control and cooptation...Generacicnes: Los Protagonistas de Ia Reforma y la Revoluci(n Mexicana, Secretaria de Educacion Pblica, Consejo Nacional de Fomento Educat ivo, Mexico City...loyalty and discipline toward the system as a whole, and especially its apex, the president, and its key institution, the PRI. All this looks different

  13. Comorbidity of paraphilia and depression in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Haasen, Christian

    2010-01-25

    The comorbidity of paraphilia-related disorders and other psychiatric disorders is high, but the paraphilia-related disorder often remains untreated until patients seek help for the comorbid disorder. A case of a patient in Mexico with comorbid paraphilia and depressive disorder, who was effectively treated with antidepressive medication and psychotherapy, is reported. The effect of stigmatization of homosexuality on the access to care of persons with sexual disorders is discussed.

  14. Comorbidity of paraphilia and depression in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Haasen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The comorbidity of paraphilia-related disorders and other psychiatric disorders is high, but the paraphilia-related disorder often remains untreated until patients seek help for the comorbid disorder. A case of a patient in Mexico with comorbid paraphilia and depressive disorder, who was effectively treated with antidepressive medication and psychotherapy, is reported. The effect of stigmatization of homosexuality on the access to care of persons with sexual disorders is discussed. PMID:25478091

  15. Illegal abortion in Mexico: client perceptions.

    PubMed Central

    de Weiss, S P; David, H P

    1990-01-01

    An exploratory study of the perceptions of 156 abortion clients in Mexico suggests that perceived quality of service was the main reason for choosing physicians while cost and anonymity were the major reasons for choosing nonphysicians. "Too young" was the most often cited reason for pregnancy termination, followed by economic situation and having too many children already. Cost was, on average, equivalent to three to four weeks minimum wage; physicians' charges were about three times higher than those of nonphysicians. PMID:2343958

  16. OCEANOGRAPHY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Gulf of Mexico which has been carried on during the past year. Included are reviews of work in physical oceanography, geophysics, geology, geo-chemistry, chemistry, instrumentation, and biofouling. Attention is called to the fact that several special reports have been issued by individual investigators that discuss specific research activities in greater detail. The field work carried out aboard the R/V ALAMINOS is summarized, and publications, papers, and reports resulting from the work are presented.

  17. Merida Initiative: The Answer for Mexico?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prior to September 11, 2001, internal strife and drug trafficking increased immensely in Colombia ...Plan Colombia should be the model for Mexico as the Mérida Initiative is still in its infancy. It concludes with recommendations for strengthening the...Mérida Initiative. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Plan Colombia ; Mérida Initiative 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18

  18. Mexico-U.S. Harmful Algal Bloom Monitoring Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin; Muller-Karger, Frank E.

    2008-06-01

    Workshop on Taxonomy of Harmful Algal Blooms; Veracruz, Mexico, 18-22 February 2008; A workshop on harmful algal bloom (HAB) taxonomy, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Health of the state of Veracruz, Mexico, was held at the Aquarium of Veracruz and focused on standardizing methods to detect HABs that affect coastal waters in the Gulf of Mexico. This binational effort was established under the umbrella of the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA), initially formed in 2004 by the five U.S. Gulf states (Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas) with participation from U.S. federal agencies and other stakeholders.

  19. Educating Transformational Leaders in Mexico at Universidad De Monterrey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantón, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Mexico faces numerous social, economic, and political challenges. Higher education institutions provide opportunity for change by educating socially responsible leaders to become civically engaged citizens.

  20. The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Peach, James; Starbuck, C.

    2009-06-01

    The economic impact of coal mining in New Mexico is examined in this report. The analysis is based on economic multipliers derived from an input-output model of the New Mexico economy. The direct, indirect, and induced impacts of coal mining in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment, and labor income for calendar year 2007. Tax, rental, and royalty income to the State of New Mexico are also presented. Historical coal production, reserves, and price data are also presented and discussed. The impacts of coal-fired electricity generation will be examined in a separate report.

  1. Degeneration and the origins of Mexico's war on drugs.

    PubMed

    Campos, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, the concept of “degeneration” helped to turn “drugs” into a problem of national importance in Mexico. By invoking this concept, Mexico's sanitary authorities secured provisions in the Constitution of 1917 which specifically authorized a newly constituted Department of Public Sanitation to lead a nation-wide campaign against drug abuse. That Department then inaugurated Mexico's modern war on drugs when, in 1920, it declared a law governing the import and distribution of the opiates, cocaine, and marijuana nationwide. This essay examines the idea of degeneration and how it came to play this crucial role in the foundation of Mexico's modern war on drugs.

  2. [Distribution of butterflies (Lepidoptera: Hesperioidea and Papilionoidea) from Mexico State, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mejía, Claudia; Vargas-Fernández, Isabel; Luis-Martínez, Armando; Llorente-Bousquets, Jorge

    2008-09-01

    The State of Mexico is a region with great biological diversity, owing to its geographical and ecological features. Regarding Hesperioidea and Papilionoidea, 15% of the Mexican species are recorded in the State of Mexico, 17% of which are endemic to the country. A checklist of the two superfamilies for the State of Mexico was integrated, based on published literature and databases at the Museo de Zoología of the Facultad de Ciencias, UNAM. The checklist is composed by six families, 22 subfamilies, 197 genera and 325 species (95 Hesperiidae, 19 Papilionidae, 35 Pieridae, 54 Lycaenidae, 20 Riodinidae, and 102 Nymphalidae). A list of each species is presented, including collecting localities, flight month, and whether data correspond to scientific collection records or literature.

  3. A trend of climate change in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravilla, Dolores

    The goal of this work is to investigate what are the climate change effects at the Eastern region of Mexico. A spectral analysis of minimum extreme temperature (MET) series of 5 locations is done using the Wavelet Method covering a period of 72 years, they correspond to Atzalan, Campeche, Jalapa, Merida and Progreso meteorological stations that are located at the Eastern Mexico. The spectral analysis has been organized by seasons: spring, summer, autumn and winter for each MET series. The seasonal data have been spectrally compared with the AMO (Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation), the sunspots and the cosmic rays series in order to look for some periodicities related to both atmospheric and solar activity on Mexican territory. According to the results, several important periodicities related to solar activity and terrestrial atmospheric phenomena appear in the seasonal spectral analysis as is the case of the 3.2, 7.2 and 11 yrs signals. The periodicity around 3.2 yrs could be related to storm sudden commencements (SSĆs) and La Nĩa, the periodicity at 7.2 yrs possibly has a relation with n the sunspots cycle, the magnetic flux emergence and El Nĩo, meanwhile the periodicity around n at 11 yrs, as we know, is associated with the solar cycle. We suggest that the climate in Mexico could be modulated by the influence of solar activity in combination with some atmospheric terrestrial phenomena.

  4. Sources of lead exposure in Mexico City.

    PubMed Central

    Romieu, I; Palazuelos, E; Hernandez Avila, M; Rios, C; Muñoz, I; Jimenez, C; Cahero, G

    1994-01-01

    Many countries, including Mexico, are facing a largely unrecognized epidemic of low-level lead poisoning. Mexico is the sixth largest lead-producing country in the world, and 40% of its production is used locally in different industrial processes that cause lead contamination of the environment. The major sources and pathways of lead exposure among the Mexican population are gasoline emissions, lead-glazed ceramics, leaded paint, and lead in canned foods and beverages. In this paper we present evidence for the presence of lead in different environmental media and its impact on blood lead levels of the Mexican population. Although during the last few years important measures have been implemented to decrease lead exposure, our findings suggest that lead poisoning is still an important problem in Mexico. There is an urgent need for regulatory policies that implement stricter control to protect the Mexican population. There is also a need to develop adequate programs to reduce the lead burden and the associated health effects in the population that has been chronically exposed. Images Figure 1. PMID:7523102

  5. ENDEMIC ORTHOPOXVIRUS CIRCULATING IN PROCYONIDS IN MEXICO.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Emerson, Ginny L; Martínez-Martínez, Flor O; Doty, Jeffrey B; Nakazawa, Yoshinori J; Rendón-Franco, Emilio; Muñoz-García, Claudia I; Villanueva-García, Claudia; Ramírez-Cid, Citlali; Gama-Campillo, Lilia M; Gual-Sill, Fernando; Aguilar-Setién, Álvaro; Carroll, Darin S

    2016-07-01

    Limited serosurveillance studies suggested that orthopoxviruses (OPXV) are widespread in the US (e.g., Raccoonpox virus, Skunkpox virus, Volepox virus) and Brazil (Vaccinia virus); however, their animal reservoir(s) remain unconfirmed. Mexican mammal diversity includes several species related to those in which evidence for OPXV infections has been found (Oryzomys, Peromyscus, Microtus, and Procyonidae). The presence of these groups of mammals in Mexico and the evidence of their possible involvement in the maintenance of OPXV in nature suggest the same or similar OPXV are circulating in Mexico. We tested 201 sera from 129 procyonids via modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot (WB) to estimate OPXV antibody prevalence in these animals. We detected a prevalence of 16.67% in Nasua narica (white-nosed coati), 35% in Procyon lotor (raccoon), and 30.4% in Bassariscus astutus (ring-tailed cat) when tested by either ELISA or WB. Western blot results presented protein bands consistent with the size of some OPXV immunodominant bands (14, 18, 32, 36, and 62 kDa). These results support the hypothesis that OPXV circulate in at least three genera of Procyonidae in Central and Southeast Mexico.

  6. Sources of lead exposure in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Romieu, I; Palazuelos, E; Hernandez Avila, M; Rios, C; Muñoz, I; Jimenez, C; Cahero, G

    1994-04-01

    Many countries, including Mexico, are facing a largely unrecognized epidemic of low-level lead poisoning. Mexico is the sixth largest lead-producing country in the world, and 40% of its production is used locally in different industrial processes that cause lead contamination of the environment. The major sources and pathways of lead exposure among the Mexican population are gasoline emissions, lead-glazed ceramics, leaded paint, and lead in canned foods and beverages. In this paper we present evidence for the presence of lead in different environmental media and its impact on blood lead levels of the Mexican population. Although during the last few years important measures have been implemented to decrease lead exposure, our findings suggest that lead poisoning is still an important problem in Mexico. There is an urgent need for regulatory policies that implement stricter control to protect the Mexican population. There is also a need to develop adequate programs to reduce the lead burden and the associated health effects in the population that has been chronically exposed.

  7. Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1998-06-01

    This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Burden of serious fungal infections in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Corzo-León, D E; Armstrong-James, D; Denning, D W

    2015-10-01

    Serious fungal infections (SFIs) could be more frequent than are recognised. Estimates of the incidence and prevalence of SFIs are essential in order to identify public health problems. We estimated the rates of SFIs in Mexico, following a methodology similar to that used in prior studies. We obtained information about the general population and populations at risk. A systematic literature search was undertaken to identify epidemiological reports of SFIs in Mexico. When Mexican reports were unavailable, we based our estimates on international literature. The most prevalent SFIs in Mexico are recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (5999 per 100,000) followed by allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (60 per 100,000), chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (15.9 per 100,000), fungal keratitis (10.4 per 100,000), invasive candidiasis (8.6 per 100,000) and SFIs in HIV (8.2 per 100,000); coccidioidomycosis (7.6 per 100,000), IA (4.56 per 100,000). These correspond to 2,749,159 people affected in any year (2.45% of the population), probably >10,000 deaths and 7000 blind eyes. SFIs affect immunocompromised and healthy populations. Most are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Validation of these estimates with epidemiological studies is required. The burdens indicate that an urgent need to improve medical skills, surveillance, diagnosis, and management of SFIs exists.

  9. Effective access to health care in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective access measures are intended to reflect progress toward universal health coverage. This study proposes an operative approach to measuring effective access: in addition to the lack of financial protection, the willingness to make out-of-pocket payments for health care signifies a lack of effective access to pre-paid services. Methods Using data from a nationally representative health survey in Mexico, effective access at the individual level was determined by combining financial protection and effective utilization of pre-paid health services as required. The measure of effective access was estimated overall, by sex, by socioeconomic level, and by federal state for 2006 and 2012. Results In 2012, 48.49% of the Mexican population had no effective access to health services. Though this represents an improvement since 2006, when 65.9% lacked effective access, it still constitutes a major challenge for the health system. Effective access in Mexico presents significant heterogeneity in terms of federal state and socioeconomic level. Conclusions Measuring effective access will contribute to better target strategies toward universal health coverage. The analysis presented here highlights a need to improve quality, availability, and opportuneness (location and time) of health services provision in Mexico. PMID:24758691

  10. Manufacturing poverty: the maquiladorization of Mexico.

    PubMed

    La Botz, D

    1994-01-01

    Based on interviews with social workers, attorneys, feminists, union activists, and factory workers, the author argues that the maquiladora free trade zone of Northern Mexico portends developments under the North American Free Trade Agreement. Today some 500,000 Mexican workers labor in 2,000 factories for $4.50 a day in Mexico's maquiladoras. Two-thirds of the workers are women, many single women who head their households. These women work in the new, modern manufacturing plants in industrial parks, but live in squalid shantytowns without adequate water, sewage, or electricity. On the job, workers face exposures to toxic chemicals and dangerous work processes. The Mexican government does not have the political will, the trained personnel, or the equipment to monitor these occupational health problems. While Mexico's Constitution and labor laws guarantee workers the right to organize, bargain collectively, and strike, in practice the state controls the unions and opposes worker activism. In the face of employer and state repression workers are forced to organize secretly to fight for higher wages and safer conditions.

  11. Fighting Narcotraffic in Latin America: Mexico and El Salvador - A Comparative Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    QUESTION ......................................................................1 B . SIGNIFICANCE OF THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN MEXICO AND EL...15 B . MEXICO .........................................................................................................17 1. The...Relations ..................................................47 B . EL SALVADOR

  12. Geothermal energy from deep sedimentary basins: The Valley of Mexico (Central Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, Nils; Götz, Annette E.

    2015-04-01

    The geothermal potential of the Valley of Mexico has not been addressed in the past, although volcaniclastic settings in other parts of the world contain promising target reservoir formations. A first assessment of the geothermal potential of the Valley of Mexico is based on thermophysical data gained from outcrop analogues, covering all lithofacies types, and evaluation of groundwater temperature and heat flow values from literature. Furthermore, the volumetric approach of Muffler and Cataldi (1978) leads to a first estimation of ca. 4000 TWh (14.4 EJ) of power generation from Neogene volcanic rocks within the Valley of Mexico. Comparison with data from other sedimentary basins where deep geothermal reservoirs are identified shows the high potential of the Valley of Mexico for future geothermal reservoir utilization. The mainly low permeable lithotypes may be operated as stimulated systems, depending on the fracture porosity in the deeper subsurface. In some areas also auto-convective thermal water circulation might be expected and direct heat use without artificial stimulation becomes reasonable. Thermophysical properties of tuffs and siliciclastic rocks qualify them as promising target horizons (Lenhardt and Götz, 2015). The here presented data serve to identify exploration areas and are valuable attributes for reservoir modelling, contributing to (1) a reliable reservoir prognosis, (2) the decision of potential reservoir stimulation, and (3) the planning of long-term efficient reservoir utilization. References Lenhardt, N., Götz, A.E., 2015. Geothermal reservoir potential of volcaniclastic settings: The Valley of Mexico, Central Mexico. Renewable Energy. [in press] Muffler, P., Cataldi, R., 1978. Methods for regional assessment of geothermal resources. Geothermics, 7, 53-89.

  13. Subsidence Induced Faulting Hazard risk maps in Mexico City and Morelia, central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Solano-Rojas, D.; Hernández-Espriu, J.; Cigna, F.; Wdowinski, S.; Osmanoglu, B.; Falorni, G.; Bohane, A.; Colombo, D.

    2012-12-01

    Subsidence and surface faulting have affected urban areas in Central Mexico for decades and the process has intensified as a consequence of urban sprawl and economic growth. This process causes substantial damages to the urban infrastructure and housing structures and in several cities it is becoming a major factor to be considered when planning urban development, land use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies in the next decades. Subsidence is usually associated with aggressive groundwater extraction rates and a general decrease of aquifer static level that promotes soil consolidation, deformation and ultimately, surface faulting. However, local stratigraphic and structural conditions also play an important role in the development and extension of faults. Despite its potential for damaging housing, and other urban infrastructure, the economic impact of this phenomena is poorly known, in part because detailed, city-wide subsidence induced faulting risk maps have not been published before. Nevertheless, modern remote sensing techniques are most suitable for this task. We present the results of a risk analysis for subsidence induced surface faulting in two cities in central Mexico: Morelia and Mexico City. Our analysis in Mexico City and Morelia is based on a risk matrix using the horizontal subsidence gradient from a Persistent Scatterer InSAR (Morelia) and SqueeSAR (Mexico City) analysis and 2010 census population distribution data from Mexico's National Institute of Statistics and Geography. Defining subsidence induced surface faulting vulnerability within these urbanized areas is best determined using both magnitude and horizontal subsidence gradient. Our Morelia analysis (597,000 inhabitants with localized subsidence rates up to 80 mm/yr) shows that 7% of the urbanized area is under a high to very high risk level, and 14% of its population (11.7% and 2.3% respectively) lives within these areas. In the case of the Mexico City (15'490,000 inhabitants for the

  14. Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Virginia H

    2010-01-01

    Since 1985, scientists have been documenting a hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico each year. The hypoxic zone, an area of low dissolved oxygen that cannot support marine life, generally manifests itself in the spring. Since marine species either die or flee the hypoxic zone, the spread of hypoxia reduces the available habitat for marine species, which are important for the ecosystem as well as commercial and recreational fishing in the Gulf. Since 2001, the hypoxic zone has averaged 16,500 km{sup 2} during its peak summer months, an area slightly larger than the state of Connecticut, and ranged from a low of 8,500 km{sup 2} to a high of 22,000 km{sup 2}. To address the hypoxia problem, the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force (or Task Force) was formed to bring together representatives from federal agencies, states, and tribes to consider options for responding to hypoxia. The Task Force asked the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to conduct a scientific assessment of the causes and consequences of Gulf hypoxia through its Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (CENR). In 2000 the CENR completed An Integrated Assessment: Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (or Integrated Assessment), which formed the scientific basis for the Task Force's Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Action Plan, 2001). In its Action Plan, the Task Force pledged to implement ten management actions and to assess progress every 5 years. This reassessment would address the nutrient load reductions achieved, the responses of the hypoxic zone and associated water quality and habitat conditions, and economic and social effects. The Task Force began its reassessment in 2005. In 2006 as part of the reassessment, USEPA's Office of Water, on behalf of the Task Force, requested that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) convene an independent panel to

  15. Deep Crustal Structure Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, Gail; Eddy, Drew; van Avendonk, Harm; Norton, Ian; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Chris; Kneller, Erik; Snedden, John

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of two wide-angle seismic refraction profiles in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico that constrain seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin. Profile GUMBO 3 extends 523 km from offshore Alabama south-southwest via the De Soto Canyon to the central Gulf of Mexico, while GUMBO 4 extends 507 km from the northwestern Florida peninsula across the Florida Escarpment to the central Gulf of Mexico. On both profiles, ocean bottom seismometers were positioned at 12-km spacing, and recorded air gun shots at offsets >100 km. We use a tomographic inversion of first-arrival and secondary travel time picks from these data to build a layered velocity model (water, sediments, crystalline crust, mantle) along each profile. On GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4 the thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to ~7 km (GUMBO 4) or ~8 km (GUMBO 3) over a horizontal distance of ~150 km. Velocities of 7-7.5 km/s are observed at the base of the crust along most of GUMBO 3, while velocities of 6.5-7 km/s are observed at similar depths along GUMBO 4. We suggest that higher lower crustal velocities, and thicker oceanic crust, on GUMBO 3 compared to GUMBO 4 may be explained by elevated syn-rift mantle temperatures in the vicinity of the De Soto Canyon and South Georgia Rift during rifting and continental breakup. We have integrated seismic refraction, seismic reflection, and well data to interpret sequence stratigraphic units along GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4. We have constructed a geologic history of the late-Jurassic/early-Cretaceous, beginning first with Louann

  16. History of midwifery in New Mexico: partnership between curandera-parteras and the New Mexico Department of Health.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Felina Mychelle

    2005-01-01

    Curandera-parteras (traditional Hispanic midwives) have been in northern New Mexico since before its statehood. In the 1930s, the New Mexico Department of Health began a valuable relationship with the curandera-parteras through the Midwife Consultant Program. This article describes the relationship between the curandera-parteras and the New Mexico Department of Health originating in the 1920s. The amenable and effective working relationship achieved between curandera-parteras and public health during this time period helped create the positive support for midwifery that is apparent in New Mexico today.

  17. United States-Mexico cross-border health insurance initiatives: Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vargas Bustamante, Arturo; Laugesen, Miriam; Caban, Mabel; Rosenau, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    While U.S. health care reform will most likely reduce the overall number of uninsured Mexican-Americans, it does not address challenges related to health care coverage for undocumented Mexican immigrants, who will remain uninsured under the measures of the reform; documented low-income Mexican immigrants who have not met the five-year waiting period required for Medicaid benefits; or the growing number of retired U.S. citizens living in Mexico, who lack easy access to Medicare-supported services. This article reviews two promising binational initiatives that could help address these challenges-Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico; discusses their prospective applications within the context of U.S. health care reform; and identifies potential challenges to their implementation (legal, political, and regulatory), as well as the possible benefits, including coverage of uninsured Mexican immigrants, and their integration into the U.S. health care system (through Salud Migrante), and access to lower-cost Medicare-supported health care for U.S. retirees in Mexico (Medicare in Mexico).

  18. United States-Mexico cross-border health insurance initiatives: Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Arturo Vargas; Laugesen, Miriam; Caban, Mabel; Rosenau, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    While U.S. health care reform will most likely reduce the overall number of uninsured Mexican-Americans, it does not address challenges related to health care coverage for undocumented Mexican immigrants, who will remain uninsured under the measures of the reform; documented low-income Mexican immigrants who have not met the five-year waiting period required for Medicaid benefits; or the growing number of retired U.S. citizens living in Mexico, who lack easy access to Medicare-supported services. This article reviews two promising binational initiatives that could help address these challenges—Salud Migrante and Medicare in Mexico; discusses their prospective applications within the context of U.S. health care reform; and identifies potential challenges to their implementation (legal, political, and regulatory), as well as the possible benefits, including coverage of uninsured Mexican immigrants, and their integration into the U.S. health care system (through Salud Migrante), and access to lower-cost Medicare-supported health care for U.S. retirees in Mexico (Medicare in Mexico). PMID:22427168

  19. Mexico, Past and Present. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Mexico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamken, Mary

    This curriculum unit focuses on the Aztec settlement in Mesoamerica comparing it with present-day Mexico. The unit is oriented to teach basic communicative skills to beginning English language learners in small groups of approximately five students. It helps Mexican Spanish-speaking students embrace their own culture and build on their prior…

  20. Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in human blood samples from Mexico City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco; González-Vega, Carolina; Varela-Silva, José Antonio; Hernández-González, Lidia; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván

    2014-02-15

    Studies in Mexico have demonstrated exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in people living in different sites through the country. However, studies evaluating exposure to POPs in people living in Mexico City (one of most contaminated places in the world) are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolite dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) in the blood as exposure biomarkers in people living in Mexico City. A total of 123 participants (blood donors aged 20-60 years) were recruited during 2010 in Mexico City. Quantitative analyses of blood samples were performed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Levels of the assessed compounds ranged from non-detectable (

  1. Mexico in Transition. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad 1996 (Mexico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latzinger, Joel P.

    This one semester course syllabus entitled, "The Integration of Mexico and the United States: Societies in Transition," is interdisciplinary and taught by the Departments of Geography, Management, Foreign Language/Spanish, and Sociology/Archaeology at the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse Institute for Latin American Studies. The course…

  2. NM State Profile. New Mexico: New Mexico High School Competency Examination (NMHSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about New Mexico High School Competency Examination (NMHSCE), a minimum competency test. Its purpose is to meet a state mandate. It will be replaced by the Grade 11 Standards Based Assessment/High School Graduation Assessment (SBA/HSGA) in spring 2011 as the state's high school exit exam. The NMHSCE was administered…

  3. EC-LEDS Mexico: Advancing Clean Energy Goals

    SciTech Connect

    2016-07-01

    EC-LEDS works with the government of Mexico to help meet its goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the energy sector. The program targets specific, highly technical areas where Mexico has indicated the program can add value and make an impact.

  4. Mexico's "Telesecundaria" Program and Equitable Access to Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Dana; Etcheverry, Jose; Ferris, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This Note provides an analysis of Mexico's "Telesecundaria" program within the context of Mexico's new education reform framework offering a succinct background of the project, as well as key policy lessons that can be useful for other jurisdictions interested in the development of distance education programs. This Note uses a literature…

  5. Problem Gambling in New Mexico: 1996 and 1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starling, Randall; Blankenship, Jason; May, Philip; Woodall, Gill

    2009-01-01

    Included in both the 1996 and 1998 Survey of Gambling Behavior in New Mexico was a scale of individual problem gambling. To assess problems related to gambling behavior, questions were developed using the DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling. The purpose of this paper is to describe problem gamblers in New Mexico. Descriptive data indicate…

  6. Essays on the Economics of Education in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez Arce Novaro, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of three essays in the economics of education with an empirical focus on Mexico. The first two chapters study a college in Mexico whose admission decisions are made through a lottery. Some applicants are randomly assigned into a group that can immediately enroll and the rest into a group that can only do so after waiting…

  7. Status of geothermal electrical power development in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso E.H.; Manon M.A.

    1983-09-01

    A review of geothermal power generation in Mexico is given. The status of power plants on-line and under construction at Cerro Prieto, Los Azufres, and Los Humeros is presented. A forecast of generating capacity for the future is given along with the obstacles to geothermal energy development in Mexico.

  8. 78 FR 64522 - New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4148-DR), dated September 30, 2013, and... Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of New...

  9. 78 FR 67381 - New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4152-DR), dated October 29, 2013, and... Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of New...

  10. 77 FR 55523 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 4079-DR), dated 08/24/2012. Incident: Flooding. Incident Period:...

  11. 78 FR 61999 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 4148-DR), dated 09/30/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding....

  12. 78 FR 71565 - Secretarial Infrastructure Business Development Mission to Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Office of Business Liaison Secretarial Infrastructure Business Development Mission to Mexico AGENCY... Mission to Mexico originally scheduled for November 18-22, 2013, has been rescheduled for February...

  13. 75 FR 58419 - New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-1936-DR), dated September 13, 2010, and... Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of New...

  14. 75 FR 57538 - New Mexico Disaster # NM-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 1936-DR), dated 09/13/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding....

  15. 76 FR 76171 - New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4047-DR), dated November 23, 2011, and... Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of New...

  16. The Practice of Psychotherapy in Mexico: Past and Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Marcella D.; Frels, Rebecca K.; Chavez, Rafael Reyes; Sharma, Bipin

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the history of psychotherapy in Mexico and describes past and current practices of psychological services, training, and supervision for Mexican international students in the United States. Sample curricula, texts, and universities in Mexico are listed. Implications for training underscore the importance of collaboration and…

  17. 77 FR 54601 - New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... [Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-4079-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] New Mexico; Major Disaster and Related... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4079-DR), dated August 24, 2012... Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of New...

  18. 76 FR 18289 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00020

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00020 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 1962-DR), dated 03/24/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and Extreme...

  19. 78 FR 66982 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00035

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00035 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 4152-DR), dated 10/29/2013. Incident: Severe storms, flooding, and...

  20. A Study of Shared Services in New Mexico School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futrell, Colvin R.

    To determine if a state-supported program of educational cooperatives would be beneficial to New Mexico's small schools, a review of the literature from 1960 was conducted and questionnaires were sent to selected New Mexico educators, followed by interviews. Approaches to shared services used by Texas and New York were investigated through the…

  1. INTEGRATED COASTAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) Office in cooperation with Gulf State agencies, EPA Regions 4 and 6, EPA's Office of Water and Office of Research and Development (ORD), and the GMP principal partners are developing an integrated coastal monitoring program for the Gulf of Mexico....

  2. Agricultural Policy and Child Health in Rural Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Antoinette B.; Partridge, William L.

    1987-01-01

    Reports on the impact on malnutrition of Mexico's Sistema de Alementacion Mexicana (SAM) program, which tried to make the country self-sufficient in basic foods. Concludes that the food problem in Mexico is not so much one of production as it is a problem of distribution and consumption. (PS)

  3. EPA Improves U.S.-Mexico Border with Environmental Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Nov. 10, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is awarding more than $521,000 to 14 organizations in Texas, New Mexico and Mexico. The funds will support projects such as conservation, waste collection, water quality protect

  4. Economic Restructuring and Intra-Generational Class Mobility in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrado, Emilio A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares men's career opportunities and intra-generational class mobility across periods with markedly different development strategies in Mexico. Despite its significance for social stratification and inequality in Mexico, research on mobility has been relatively scant in recent decades. Using data from the National Retrospective…

  5. 77 FR 41874 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of New Mexico dated 07/09/2012. Incident: Little Bear Fire. Incident Period: 06/04/2012 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  6. 77 FR 47907 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of NEW MEXICO, dated 07/09/2012. Incident: Little Bear Fire. Incident Period: 06/04/2012 through 07/30/2012....

  7. Mexico's Program for Science and Technology, 1978 to 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Edmundo

    1979-01-01

    Describes briefly the National Council for Science and Technology (CONACYT) of Mexico, and outlines Mexico's Program for Science and Technology which includes 2,489 projects in basic and applied sciences at a cost of $260 million from 1978 to 1982. (HM)

  8. Onate's Foot: Remembering and Dismembering in Northern New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    This essay analyzes the historical construction of "Spanish" icons in northern New Mexico and the complex Hispanic and Chicano identities they both evoke and mask. It focuses on the January 1998 vandalism of a statue depicting New Mexico's first Spanish colonial governor, Don Juan de Onate. The removal of the Onate statue's foot…

  9. 77 FR 28404 - Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... COMMISSION Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... retarded, by reason of imports from China of galvanized steel wire, provided for in subheadings 7217.20.30... retarded, by reason of imports from Mexico of galvanized steel wire, provided for in subheadings...

  10. 76 FR 19382 - Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... COMMISSION Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... Mexico of galvanized steel wire, provided for in subheading 7217.20.30 and 7217.20.45 of the Harmonized...., Nashville, TN; National Standard, LLC, Niles, MI; and Oklahoma Steel and Wire Co., Inc., Madill,...

  11. 76 FR 29266 - Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... COMMISSION Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Mexico of galvanized steel wire, provided for in subheading...; National Standard, LLC/DW-National Standard-Niles, LLC, Niles, MI; and Oklahoma Steel & Wire Company,...

  12. 78 FR 71557 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Tohatchi, New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Tohatchi, New Mexico AGENCY: Federal Communications... filed by the Navajo Nation to amend the FM Table of Allotments, Section 73.202(b) of the Commission's Rules, by allotting FM Channel 268C2, Tohatchi, New Mexico, as a first local service under the...

  13. ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES IN THE AMBIENT AIR OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent and past use of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in Mexico has resulted in concentrations in ambient air that are 1-2 orders of magnitude above levels in the Great Lakes region. Atmospheric transport from Mexico and Central America may be contributing significant amounts ...

  14. Dispute at New Mexico State Worsens Amid New Claims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that two married professors, John Moraros and Yelena Bird, whose contracts were not renewed by New Mexico State University, in what they say was a case of discrimination and retaliation, now say they are also the victims of baseless allegations of plagiarism by the university's president. Administrators at New Mexico State,…

  15. EPA Reduces Health Risk from Radon in New Mexico

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (April 8, 2016) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently awarded $221,158 to the New Mexico Environment Department. The state will use the funds to protect residents of New Mexico-particularly school-age children-from harmful

  16. Why is Habitat Restoration Near the Gulf of Mexico Essential?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Restoration in the Gulf of MexicoWetlands in the coastal watersheds make up about 38 percent of total wetland area in the conterminous United States, and Gulf of Mexico Coastal Wetlands make up 37 percent of such wetlands in the United State

  17. Social Class in English Language Education in Oaxaca, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López-Gopar, Mario E.; Sughrua, William

    2014-01-01

    This article explores social class in English-language education in Oaxaca, Mexico. To this end, first, we discuss social class in Mexico as related to coloniality; second, for illustration, the paper presents the authors' own social-class analysis as language educators in Oaxaca; third, we discuss how social class impacts English education…

  18. Learning English in Mexico: Perspectives from Mexican Teachers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borjian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    ESL and Language Arts teachers have noted a growing population of transnational students who--because of family migration patterns--have complex educational histories that straddle both Mexico and the US. Yet US teachers know little about the English-language training that such students receive in Mexico. This study attempts to bridge that gap,…

  19. Examining Mexico's Values Education in a Globally Dynamic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatto, Maria Teresa; Arellano, Lilian Alvarez; Uribe, Medardo Tapia; Varela, Armando Loera; Rodriguez, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Describes a study designed to understand Mexico's values education as a part of a larger comparative project to explore values education in a globally dynamic context. Discusses Mexico's political economy. Presents findings from a survey of policymakers. Shows regional differences and similarities. Contrasts Mexican findings with findings from…

  20. Distance Education in the Educational System of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortera-Gutierrez, Fernando

    In Mexico, Distance Education (DE) is defined as an "extracurricular form of education" that offers great flexibility from the standpoints of space and time coupled with the official validation and accreditation enjoyed by the country's traditional educational system. In the past 50 years, DE in Mexico has evolved from an academic area…

  1. High Resolution Modeling of the Gulf of Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    circulation in the Gulf of Mexico . The resolution of the ocean model (approx. 4 kilometers) and revolutionary hybrid (quasi-isopycnic) vertical coordinate...relatively cold water near the Yucatan Peninsula, the dynamics of cold-core cyclones and their role in the separation of Loop Current Eddies, and shelf-break processes in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico .

  2. Satellite imagery tracks currents in Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, O.K. . Coastal Studies Inst.); Schaudt, K.J. )

    1990-05-07

    With the onset of drilling in the Gulf of Mexico at water depths in excess of 300m, detection and location of the boundaries of high speed current zones has become important in preventing downtime in drilling and production operations. This article reports on the use of satellite imagery to track currents in the Gulf of Mexico.

  3. EPA, Mexico Continue Partnership to Improve Environment on Border

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Sept. 23, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded more than $450,000 to fund environmental projects along the Texas and New Mexico U.S-Mexico border. The funds also supported the first biennial national coordinator

  4. Literacy Instruction in Mexico. International Studies in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert

    Beginning in 1978, a 20-year study charted the evolution of the public education system in Mexico, focusing on literacy instruction for various age groups and special populations. Drawing on descriptions of schools visited during the author's 13 visits to Mexico, this book describes Mexican educational practices, with the aim of helping U.S.…

  5. Children's Activity Book, New Mexico. 1992 Festival of American Folklife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies.

    This booklet was designed in conjunction with a Festival of American Folklife focusing on New Mexico, but can be used when teaching lessons on the culture of New Mexico. It introduces young children to activities adapting Santa Clara Pueblo pottery designs, adobe model making, Rio Grande blanket designs, tinwork picture frames, and ramilletes de…

  6. Annual Report on Higher Education in New Mexico, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Commission on Postsecondary Education, Santa Fe.

    The 1986 report of the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education first outlines responsibilities of the Commission and developments concerning the Board of Educational Finance and then considers the climate for higher education reform in New Mexico, including economic changes, career changes that require retraining and skill upgrading, and…

  7. 77 FR 51569 - Large Residential Washers From Korea and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Large Residential Washers From Korea and Mexico Scheduling of the final phase of countervailing... the United States is materially retarded, by reason of subsidized imports from Korea and less-than-fair-value imports from Korea and Mexico of large residential washers, provided for in subheading...

  8. 78 FR 46610 - Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... COMMISSION Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... suspended antidumping duty investigation on lemon juice from Argentina would be likely to lead to... investigation on lemon juice from Mexico would not be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  9. 78 FR 47006 - Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... suspended antidumping duty investigation on lemon juice from Argentina would be likely to lead to... investigation on lemon juice from Mexico would not be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  10. New Mexico Dropout Study. School Year 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe.

    Annually, a statewide school dropout study is conducted in New Mexico. The purpose of the study is to gather and publish information bearing on the extent and nature of the dropout problem in New Mexico public schools. Data on the grade, sex, ethnicity, and reason for dropping out were collected for students who prematurely discontinued their…

  11. New Mexico Case Records in School Administration, Volume A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohland, Paul A., Ed.

    In June 1988, 28 principals and assistant principals from public and private schools throughout New Mexico gathered for the first Summer Institute, sponsored by the New Mexico Principals' Center. The goals of the meeting were to share professional knowledge, to engage in "reflective practice," and to construct personal and professional…

  12. Susceptibility to aflatoxin contamination among maize landraces from Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize, the critical staple food for billions of people, was domesticated in Mexico about 9,000 YBP. Today, a great array of maize land races (MLRs) across rural Mexico is harbored in a living library that has been passed among generations since before establishment of the modern state. MLRs have bee...

  13. Tuberculosis Treatment Completion Rates in Southern New Mexico Colonias.

    PubMed

    Holden, Maria Arroyo; Huttlinger, Kathleen; Schultz, Pamela; Mullins, Iris; Forster-Cox, Sue

    2016-04-01

    TB medication completion treatment rates for active TB patients living in impoverished US-Mexico border communities called colonias in southern New Mexico counties are unknown. It might be suspected that residents of colonias have lower completion rates than those living in incorporated and medically more accessible areas. A retrospective record review of closed TB case records from 1993 to 2010 of southern New Mexico border counties, was conducted using a modified version of the New Mexico Department of Health Tuberculosis Targeted Health Assessment/History form (Appendix 1). Study findings reveal that despite their unincorporated status, poorer living conditions and questionable legal status, colonia TB patients had a higher medication completion rate than their non-colonia counterparts. A robust New Mexico TB treatment program contributed to high completion rates with death being the number-one reason for treatment non-completion in both colonia and non-colonias.

  14. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2010 Mexico and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhea, Susan; Dart, Richard L.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Hayes, Gavin P.; Tarr, Arthur C.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Benz, Harley M.

    2011-01-01

    Mexico, located in one of the world's most seismically active regions, lies on three large tectonic plates: the North American plate, Pacific plate, and Cocos plate. The relative motion of these tectonic plates causes frequent earthquakes and active volcanism and mountain building. Mexico's most seismically active region is in southern Mexico where the Cocos plate is subducting northwestward beneath Mexico creating the deep Middle America trench. The Gulf of California, which extends from approximately the northern terminus of the Middle America trench to the U.S.-Mexico border, overlies the plate boundary between the Pacific and North American plates where the Pacific plate is moving northwestward relative to the North American plate. This region of transform faulting is the southern extension of the well-known San Andreas Fault system.

  15. New Mexico statewide geothermal energy program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Icerman, L.; Parker, S.K.

    1988-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of geothermal energy resource assessment work conducted by the New Mexico Statewide Geothermal Energy Program during the period September 7, 1984, through February 29, 1988, under the sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy and the State of New Mexico Research and Development Institute. The research program was administered by the New Mexico Research and Development Institute and was conducted by professional staff members at New Mexico State University and Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. The report is divided into four chapters, which correspond to the principal tasks delineated in the above grant. This work extends the knowledge of the geothermal energy resource base in southern New Mexico with the potential for commercial applications.

  16. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; Hardin, Danny; Estes, Maury

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach; Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback; With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements; Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee; Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007; Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf; Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged; and Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications; Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems; Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs; Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning; Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability; Analyzed SAV

  17. A Hazy Day in Mexico City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mexico City has one of the world's most serious air pollution problems. The city is located atop a high plain at an altitude of 2200 meters, and is surrounded on three sides by mountains and snow-capped volcanoes. Since incident solar radiation does not vary significantly with season at tropical latitudes, photochemical smog is produced much of the year. In winter, air quality can worsen significantly when thermal inversions keep polluted air masses close to the surface.

    Atmospheric particulates (aerosols) are readily visible at oblique view angles, and differences in aerosol amount on two days are indicated by these images of central Mexico from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The images at left and center are natural color views acquired by MISR's 70-degree forward-viewing camera on April 9 and December 5, 2001, respectively. Mexico City can be identified in the center panel by the large area of haze accumulation above image center. Two small brighter patches within the hazy area indicate low fog. In the left-hand panel, the city basin appears significantly clearer, but some haze remains apparent across the Sierra Madre mountains in the lower portion of the images. On the right is an elevation field corresponding to the December 5 view. Automated MISR stereoscopic retrievals reveal the clouds at lower right to be at very high altitudes, in contrast to the low-lying haze and fog near Mexico City. When the stereo retrieval determines that a location is not covered by clouds, digital terrain elevation data are displayed instead. High clouds appear as the orange and red areas, and mountainous areas appear light blue and green. The position of the clouds within the 70-degree image are slightly southward of their location in the elevation map as a consequence of geometric parallax.

    Major sources of air pollutants within the basin enclosing the Mexico City urban area include exhaust from 3.5 million vehicles, thousands of industries, and

  18. Change in Mexico: Problems and Promise. Curriculum Project. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 1993 (Mexico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrum, Andrea

    This curriculum unit presents an overview of change in Mexico. The unit is not meant to be an in-depth study, but rather a survey of four areas traditionally important in Mexican life: the economy, politics, religion, and literature, with particular emphasis on the first two. The unit is designed as a module on contemporary Mexico in a Latin…

  19. 78 FR 14983 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ...Independent peer review of Gulf of Mexico Spanish Mackerel and Cobia stocks will be accomplished through written reviews because delays in completing the assessments prevented their consideration at the SEDAR 28 Review Workshop. This workshop is being held by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council to consider recommendations from the written reviews and develop recommendations for the......

  20. Mexico: Challenges and Opportunities in Education in the 21st Century. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad 1997 (Mexico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trapani, Lisa

    This paper introduces students to lesser known and traveled parts of Mexico. The text is intended to accompany a Power Point presentation that traces the trip a Fulbright-Hays group took through Mexico, highlighting places of cultural and historical interest. The paper includes a list of slide notes and realia for each slide to be shared with the…

  1. 76 FR 64327 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Fish, Shrimp, and Coral and Coral Reefs Fishery Management Plans (Generic ACL Amendment) for purposes..., and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery; South Atlantic Snapper-Grouper Fishery AGENCY... Management Plan for Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico (Reef Fish FMP). Subsequently, in a...

  2. 2014 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 4,761 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 14,000 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 8,000 to 20,000) – an “average year”. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 50 km3 (95% credible interval, 20 to 77).

  3. Magnetometry and archaeological prospection in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba Pingarron, L.; Laboratorio de Prospeccion Arqueologica

    2013-05-01

    Luis Barba Laboratorio de Prospección Arqueológica Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México The first magnetic survey in archaeological prospection was published in 1958 in the first number of Archaeometry, in Oxford. That article marked the beginning of this applications to archaeology. After that, magnetic field measurements have become one of the most important and popular prospection tools. Its most outstanding characteristic is the speed of survey that allows to cover large areas in short time. As a consequence, it is usually the first approach to study a buried archaeological site. The first attempts in Mexico were carried out in 196. Castillo and Urrutia, among other geophysical techniques, used a magnetometer to study the northern part of the main plaza, zocalo, in Mexico City to locate some stone Aztec sculptures. About the same time Morrison et al. in La Venta pyramid used a magnetometer to measure total magnetic field trying to find a substructure. Some years later Brainer and Coe made a magnetic survey to locate large stone Olmec heads in San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan, Veracruz. Technology development has provided everyday more portable and accurate instruments to measure the magnetic field. The first total magnetic field proton magnetometers were followed by differential magnetometers and more recently gradiometers. Presently, multiple sensor magnetometers are widely used in European archaeology. The trend has been to remove the environmental and modern interference and to make more sensitive the instruments to the superficial anomalies related to most of the archaeological sites. There is a close relationship between the geology of the region and the way magnetometry works in archaeological sites. Archaeological prospection in Europe usually needs very sensitive instruments to detect slight magnetic contrast of ditches in old sediments. In contrast, volcanic conditions in Mexico produce large magnetic contrast

  4. Small geothermal binary plants in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Diaz, M.

    1996-12-31

    In Mexico, Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE Federal Commission of Electricity) has identified several low enthalpy sites related with thermal water, at shallow depths. Some of those geothermal prospects are located far from the electrical national grid. In some cases, the population solve their electricity needs by internal combustion engines with very high operating costs. CFE has started a project oriented to use the energy contained in the thermal waters with off-grid binary plants. The two first projects are in the state of Chihuahua at the north of the country: San Antonio El Bravo and Maguarichic. At both places CFE will install a 300 kW, unattended binary power units.

  5. Geothermal production results and plans in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hiriart-Le Bert, G.; Gutierrez-Negrin, L.C.A.

    1997-12-31

    Almost 7,000 MWe of geothermal power plants are in operation in the world. There are estimations about this capacity could be almost 10,000 MWe in three more years. Mexico, with 743 MWe of geothermal-electric capacity, is developing more projects, taking into account the encouraging results of exploitation of these energy resources. In 1996, such results include production of 56.2 million tons of steam, generation of 5,737 gigawatts-hour (GWh) and an average capacity factor of 87.5%.

  6. NAFTA and gasoline: Canada, U. S. , Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-31

    The North American Free Trade Agreement has become a hotly debated topic all over the world, but especially in the countries involved: Mexico, United States, and Canada. Comments made by high ranking officials imply there are differences to reconcile before the agreement is passed. Toward seeing these countries in trio, this issue compares gasoline markets and some energy perspectives. The purpose of this article is to contribute to understanding of the three countries through their petroleum industry structure. Gasoline consumption and retail delivery infrastructure are compared and contrasted to illustrate the differences among the NAFTA countries.

  7. Mortality due to lung cancer in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Godoy, L; Rizo Rios, P; Sánchez Cervantes, F; Osornio-Vargas, A; García-Cuellar, C; Meneses García, A

    2007-11-01

    The highest mortality due to cancer worldwide for both genders corresponds to lung cancer (1,179,000 deaths). In Mexico, the crude mortality rate due to lung cancer was of 5.01 per 10(5) inhabitants in 1979. The most important risk factor is smoking. The present study was aimed at analyzing the mortality due to lung cancer in Mexico, assessing data from each of the states constituting the Mexican Republic during the 1998-2004 period. Data were obtained from the National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Informatics (INEGI, for its initials in Spanish) corresponding to deaths due to lung cancer (1998-2004). We estimated the mean annual mortality rate (MAMR) for each of the 32 states of Mexico. We used the "World Population Standard". The MAMR was standardized according to age (ARS) direct method, and the standard error was determined by Poisson's approximation at a 95% confidence interval. To know the excess risk due to mortality, we calculated the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of ARS for each federal state, using the national rate as reference. In this period, 397,400 deaths due to malignant neoplasms were recorded, corresponding 45,578 (11.5%) to lung cancer; for men, 31,025 (68.1%) with MAMR of 8.9 and the respective ARS of 13.2 both x10(5) inhabitants. For women, results were 4553 (31.9%) deaths with MAMR of 4.1 and ARS of 5.4 both x10(5) inhabitants. The highest mortality rates due to lung cancer in both genders were observed in the north of Mexico, whereas for women this was observed in the central states. Although smoking is the main risk for lung cancer, there are other factors such as environmental pollution or exposure to toxicants that could be associated to this cancer. The years potentially lost due to lung cancer were 258,550 for men and 133,315 for women, with a total of 391,865 according to histopathology registry neoplasm malignant RHNM (1985-1995). Studies focused on the characterization and measurement of polluting agents would be a

  8. Earthquake hazard assessment after Mexico (1985).

    PubMed

    Degg, M R

    1989-09-01

    The 1985 Mexican earthquake ranks foremost amongst the major earthquake disasters of the twentieth century. One of the few positive aspects of the disaster is that it provided massive quantities of data that would otherwise have been unobtainable. Every opportunity should be taken to incorporate the findings from these data in earthquake hazard assessments. The purpose of this paper is to provide a succinct summary of some of the more important lessons from Mexico. It stems from detailed field investigations, and subsequent analyses, conducted by the author on the behalf of reinsurance companies.

  9. The ABC daycare disaster of Hermosillo, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G; Chang, Philip; Maguina, Pirko; Combs, Elena; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina L

    2012-01-01

    On June 5, 2009, the ABC Daycare facility in Hermosillo, Mexico, caught on fire with an estimated 142 children and 6 adult caregivers inside. The purpose of this article is to describe the factors contributing to the disaster including care of the survivors, tertiary burn center triage, patient transport, and treatment for this international mass casualty event. Finally, the results of an investigation performed by the Mexican Government are reviewed. A summary of the Mexican Government's investigation of the circumstances of fire and an examination of prevention lapses in other Mexican daycare centers was obtained from their public Web site. The demographic and clinical characteristics of the children transported to the burn center were obtained from the patients' medical records and transport data sheets. The ABC Daycare had many fire safety breaches that contributed to the severity of the tragedy. Twenty-nine children died at the scene and more than 35 children were hospitalized throughout Mexico. A total of 12 children were transported to two Shriners Hospitals, 9 to Sacramento, and 3 to Cincinnati. The mean age of patients sent to the Shriners Hospitals was 2.9 ± 0.16 years (2-4 years), with 5 being male and 7 female. The mean duration between injury and arrival was 9.2 ± 2.1 days, the burn size was 43.0 ± 6.8% TBSA (6.5-80%), and there were 3.75 operations per patient. Four had fourth-degree burns requiring finger amputations (2), flaps to cover bone (1), or a through-knee amputation (1). Ten patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, and nine patients (seven with inhalation injury) required mechanical ventilation for a mean of 23.6 ± 10.3 days. All the surviving children were discharged after a mean length of stay of 45.9 ± 8.7 days. In the first year postinjury, seven children were readmitted a total of 11 times for reconstructive surgery, wound care, or rehabilitation. Ultimately, a total of 49 children died. A review of other daycare centers

  10. (abstract) Geological Tour of Southwestern Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Steven L.; Lang, Harold R.

    1993-01-01

    Nineteen Landsat Themic Mapper quarter scenes, coregistered at 28.5 m spatial resolution with three arc second digital topographic data, were used to create a movie, simulating a flight over the Guerrero and Mixteco terrains of southwestern Mexico. The flight path was chosen to elucidate important structural, stratigraphic, and geomorphic features. The video, available in VHS format, is a 360 second animation consisting of 10 800 total frames. The simulated velocity during three 120 second flight segments of the video is approximately 37 000 km per hour, traversing approximately 1 000 km on the ground.

  11. [Demographic Dynamics and Educational Inequality in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Giorguli Saucedo, Silvia E; Vargas Valle, Eunice D; Ulloa, Viviana Salinas; Hubert, Celia; Potter, Joseph E

    This paper seeks to explore the link between educational processes and Mexico's demographic dynamic. In the tradition of thought on population and development, it has been hypothesized that the population growth rate, family size and migration influence the accumulation of human capital among the school-age population. This study explores the link between the academic performance of youth between the age of 14 and 23 and the youth dependency ratio, teenage fertility and internal and international migration, using data aggregated at the municipal level for the year 2000. The analysis uses indicators on the educational supply at the municipal level based on the administrative statistics of the Public Education Secretariat (SEP).

  12. Is Mexico part of North America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime

    This question was raised by AGU Foreign Secretary Juan Roederer during an honors banquet at a recent AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. It is an interesting question, hard to answer, or perhaps with too many individual answers.We are not geographically a part of Central America or South America, although we do share language, Indian culture, Spanish heritage, and other characteristics, and these factors do play a role, as do economics and politics. However, geographically, Mexico is part of the North American continent.

  13. Shelf Circulation in the Gulf of Mexico.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Gulf of Mexico between 1990 and 1993, are used to describe the seasonal fluctuations in patterns of atmospheric variables from a contemporary set of measurements. Seasonal maps of wind stress based on these measurements resemble wind stress maps based on ship observations, as published by Elliot (1979), rather than maps based on analyses of numerical weather forecasts, as published by Rhodes et a. (1989), particularly near the western boundary of the Gulf. Seasonal maps of wind stress curl are characterized by positive curls over the western and southwestern

  14. 2013 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 7,316 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 18,900 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 13,400 to 24,200), the 7th largest reported and about the size of New Jersey. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 74.5 km3 (95% credible interval, 51.5 to 97.0), also the 7th largest on record.

  15. [Epidemiologic overview of smoking in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Tapia-Conyer, R; Kuri-Morales, P; Hoy-Gutiérrez, M J

    2001-01-01

    Smoking is one of the main preventable causes of disease and death worldwide; 3.5 million smokers die annually. This essay shows the progress made against this epidemic in our country and points out the relevance of implementing a comprehensive program to control smoking. Results from three national surveys conducted in Mexico in 1988, 1993, and 1998 are analyzed and compared. On the one hand, the strategies should include preventive actions, protection of non-smokers, smoking cessation, banning of smoking advertisement, and tax increases; on the other hand, controlling smoking and its consequences on health depend on all of us.

  16. 75 FR 9252 - Notice of Relocation/Change of Street Address for New Mexico State Office

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Mexico State Office located at 1474 Rodeo Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico has relocated to 301 Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico. DATES: Effective Date: November 2, 2009. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The office at... 6, 2009. The mailing address remains the same (P.O. Box 27115, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502-0115)....

  17. 78 FR 10612 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens... INFORMATION CONTACT: Menice Santistevan, Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board, 94 Cities of Gold...

  18. 19 CFR 123.28 - Merchandise remaining in or exported to Canada or Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Mexico. 123.28 Section 123.28 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Shipments in Transit Through Canada or Mexico § 123.28 Merchandise remaining in or exported to Canada or Mexico. (a) In-transit...

  19. 76 FR 11772 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens... Norte, Espanola, New Mexico 87532. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Menice Santistevan, Northern...

  20. 76 FR 18540 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens....m.-4 p.m. ADDRESSES: Holiday Inn Express and Suites, 60 Entrada Drive, Los Alamos, New Mexico...