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Sample records for salton sea solar

  1. Status report - Salton Sea solar pond power plant

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.L.; Lin, E.I.H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of constructing salt gradient solar pond commercial power plants in the Salton Sea has been confirmed by a study completed in May 1981. The Salton Sea is an inland salt lake located in the Imperial Valley of Southern California. 600 MW/sub e/ of base load power can be generated if 15% of the sea's 932-km/sup 2/ (360-square mile) surface area is converted to solar ponds. 3 refs.

  2. Salton Sea Project, Phase 1. [solar pond power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peelgren, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    A feasibility study was made for a salt gradient solar pond power plant in or near the Salton Sea of California. The conclusions support continuance 5-MWe proof-of-concept experiment, and ultimate construction by an electric utility company of a 600-MWe plant. The Solar Pond concept would be an environmental benefit to the Salton Sea by reversing the increasing salinity trend. The greatest cost drivers are the lake dike construction and pond sealing. Problems to be resolved include method of brine production from Salton Sea water for the first unit (which requires evaporation pond area and time), the high turbidity and color content of the Salton Sea water (which requires pretreatment), and other questions related to pond permeability, bio-activity and soil/brine chemical reactions. All technical and environmental problems appear solvable and/or manageable if care is taken in mitigating impacts.

  3. Salt-gradient solar ponds in the Salton Sea - brine optical quality and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, H.E.; DeFranco, D.M.; Haack, R.F.; McMurrin, J.C.; Reilly, W.W.; Singer, M.J.; Wu, Y.C.

    1981-01-01

    In a joint project, the Southern California Edison Company, Ormat Turbines, Ltd., of Israel, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are studying the feasibility of solar pond power plants in the Salton Sea. Spectrographic measurements made of Salton Sea water revealed the presence of dissolved matter, thought to be organic, and trace ions, which absorb light in the blue and of the spectrum. 9 refs.

  4. Site-specific research conducted in support of the Salton Sea Solar Pond Project. FY 1982 report

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.L.; Marsh, H.E.; Roschke, E.J.; Wu, Y.C.

    1984-09-01

    The design and operation of a salt-gradient solar pond power plant at the Salton Sea presents problems not encountered at small research ponds that have been built in the United States. The specific characteristics of the Salton Sea site and the desire to construct the pond using the local clay as a sealant represent major deviations from previous solar pond experience. This document reports on the site-specific research conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in support of the plant design. The research activity included validation of the spectrophotometric light transmission measurement technique, a search for options for clarifying the turbid and colored water of the Salton Sea, development of water clarification specifications in terms common to industry practice, quantification of gas production from microbiological reactions in the ground, a determination of the combined effects of temperature and salinity on the permeation of the local clays, and a preliminary evaluation of material corrosion.

  5. Site-Specific Research Conducted in Support of the Salton Sea Solar Pond Project - FY 1982 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. L.; Marsh, H. E.; Roschke, E. J.; Wu, Y. C.

    1984-01-01

    The design and operation of a salt-gradient solar pond power plant at the Salton Sea presents problems not encountered at small research ponds that were built in the United States. The specific characteristics of the Salton Sea site and the desire to construct the pond using the local clay as a sealant represent major deviations from previous solar pond experience. The site-specific research in support of the plant design is described. The research activity included validation of the spectrophotometric light transmission measurement technique, a search for options for clarifying the turbid and colored water of the Salton Sea, development of water clarification specifications in terms common to industry practice, quantification of gas production from microbiological reactions in the ground, a determination of the combined effects of temperature and salinity on the permeation of the local clays, and a preliminary evaluation of material corrosion.

  6. The USGS Salton Sea Science Office

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Case, Harvey Lee; Barnum, Douglas A.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Salton Sea Science Office (SSSO) provides scientific information and evaluations to decisionmakers who are engaged in restoration planning and actions associated with the Salton Sea. The primary focus is the natural resources of the Salton Sea, including the sea?s ability to sustain biological resources and associated social and economic values.

  7. Salton Sea Project: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peelgren, M.L.

    1982-01-15

    A feasibility study was made for a salt gradient solar pond power plant in or near the Salton Sea of California. The conclusions are very supportive of continuing the project into the next phase; design and construction of a 5-MWe proof-of-concept experiment, and ultimate construction by an electric utility company of a 600-MWe plant. The Solar Pond concept will provide an environmental benefit to the Salton Sea by reversing the increasing salinity trend that, if unchecked, will eventually kill all life in the sea. The greatest cost drivers determined for the 5-MWe plant are the lake dike construction and pond sealing. Problems remaining to be resolved include method of brine production from Salton Sea water for the first unit (which will require evaporation pond area and time), the high turbidity and color content of the Salton Sea water (which will require pre-treatment), and other questions related to pond permeability, bio-activity and soil/brine chemical reactions. All technical and environmental problems appear solvable and/or manageable if care is taken in mitigating impacts.

  8. Salton sea minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The long-held notion that precious metals, minerals, and other useful substances can be extracted from natural waters is starting to become realized at several locations of geothermal brines. In a recent study by A. Maimoni of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory it was determined that there is a high potential for minerals recovery from the hot brines of a 1000-MWe geothermal power station at the Salton Sea geothermal field in southern California. The study estimated that the revenue from the minerals could substantially exceed that from the power station (Geothermics, 11, 239-258, 1982).According to the study, ‘A 1000-MWe power plant could recover 14-31% of the U.S. demand for manganese.’ In the example of lithium production, such a geothermal plant could produce 5-10 times the annual world output of lithium. Large quantities of lead and zinc could be extracted, as well as significant amounts of gold, platinum, and silver. The chemical composition of the brines is incredibly complex, however, for reasons not currently understood.

  9. Salton Sea Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miles, A. Keith; Ricca, Mark A.; Meckstroth, Anne; Spring, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    The Salton Sea is critically important for wintering and breeding waterbirds, but faces an uncertain future due to water delivery reductions imposed by the Interstate and Federal Quantification Settlement Agreement of 2003. The current preferred alternative for wetland restoration at the Salton Sea is saline habitat impoundments created to mitigate the anticipated loss of wetland habitat. In 2006, a 50-hectare experimental complex that consisted of four inter-connected, shallow water saline habitat ponds (SHP) was constructed at the southeastern shoreline of the Salton Sea and flooded with blended waters from the Alamo River and Salton Sea. The present study evaluated ecological risks and benefits of the SHP concept prior to widespread restoration actions. This study was designed to evaluate (1) baseline chemical, nutrient, and contaminant measures from physical and biological constituents, (2) aquatic invertebrate community structure and colonization patterns, and (3) productivity of and contaminant risks to nesting waterbirds at the SHP. These factors were evaluated and compared with those of nearby waterbird habitat, that is, reference sites.

  10. Metagenomic Sequencing of Two Salton Sea Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Erik R.; Schackwitz, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    The Salton Sea is the largest inland body of water in California, with salinities ranging from brackish freshwater to hypersaline. The lake experiences high nutrient input, and its surface water is exposed to temperatures up to 40°C. Here, we report the community profiles associated with surface water from the Salton Sea. PMID:24459270

  11. Metagenomic sequencing of two salton sea microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Erik R; Schackwitz, Wendy; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The Salton Sea is the largest inland body of water in California, with salinities ranging from brackish freshwater to hypersaline. The lake experiences high nutrient input, and its surface water is exposed to temperatures up to 40°C. Here, we report the community profiles associated with surface water from the Salton Sea. PMID:24459270

  12. 78 FR 44144 - Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea... Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) Complex, which includes the Sonny Bono Salton Sea NWR and the Coachella Valley NWR. The Draft CCP/EA, prepared under...

  13. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) was the first large-scale drilling project undertaken by the U.S. Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The objectives of the SSSDP were (1) to drill a deep well into the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in the Imperial Valley of California, (2) to retrieve a high percentage of core and cuttings along the entire depth of the well, (3) to obtain a comprehensive suite of geophysical logs, (4) to conduct flow tests at two depths (and to take fluid samples therefrom), and (5) to carry out several downhole experiments. These activities enabled the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating agencies to study the physical and chemical processes involved in an active hydrothermal system driven by a molten-rock heat source. The SSSDP exceeded its target depth of 10,000 feet, and a comprehensive set of cuttings, cores, and downhole logs was obtained. Two flow tests at different depths were successfully completed. Hydrologic connection between the different producing horizons, however, made the data from the deeper test difficult to interpret. Temperature logging by the Geological Survey and Sandia National Laboratories to establish the equilibrium profile continued until August of 1987. The SSSDP provides a model for scientific cooperation among government agencies, universities, and private industry.

  14. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) was the first large-scale drilling project undertaken by the U.S Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The objectives of the SSSDP were (1) to drill a deep well into the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in the Imperial Valley of California, (2) to retrieve a high percentage of core and cuttings along the entire depth of the well, (3) to obtain a comprehensive suite of geophysical logs, (4) to conduct flow tests at two depths  (and to take fluid samples therefrom), and (5) to carry out several downhole experiments. These activites enabled the U.S Geological Survey and cooperating agencies to study the physical and chemical processes involved in an active hydrothermal system driven by a molten-rock heat source. This program, orginally conceived by Wilfred A. Elders, professor of geology at the University of California at Riverside, was coordinated under an inter-agency accord among the Geological Survey, the U.S Department of Energy, and the National Science Foundation. 

  15. Salton Sea ecosystem monitoring and assessment plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Case(compiler), H. L.; Boles, Jerry; Delgado, Arturo; Nguyen, Thang; Osugi, Doug; Barnum, Douglas A.; Decker, Drew; Steinberg, Steven; Steinberg, Sheila; Keene, Charles; White, Kristina; Lupo, Tom; Gen, Sheldon; Baerenklau, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    The Salton Sea, California’s largest lake, provides essential habitat for several fish and wildlife species and is an important cultural and recreational resource. It has no outlet, and dissolved salts contained in the inflows concentrate in the Salton Sea through evaporation. The salinity of the Salton Sea, which is currently nearly one and a half times the salinity of ocean water, has been increasing as a result of evaporative processes and low freshwater inputs. Further reductions in inflows from water conservation, recycling, and transfers will lower the level of the Salton Sea and accelerate the rate of salinity increases, reduce the suitability of fish and wildlife habitat, and affect air quality by exposing lakebed playa that could generate dust. Legislation enacted in 2003 to implement the Quantification Settlement Agreement (QSA) stated the Legislature’s intent for the State of California to undertake the restoration of the Salton Sea ecosystem. As required by the legislation, the California Resources Agency (now California Natural Resources Agency) produced the Salton Sea Ecosystem Restoration Study and final Programmatic Environmental Impact Report (PEIR; California Resources Agency, 2007) with the stated purpose to “develop a preferred alternative by exploring alternative ways to restore important ecological functions of the Salton Sea that have existed for about 100 years.” A decision regarding a preferred alternative currently resides with the California State Legislature (Legislature), which has yet to take action. As part of efforts to identify an ecosystem restoration program for the Salton Sea, and in anticipation of direction from the Legislature, the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established a team to develop a monitoring and assessment plan (MAP). This plan is the product of that effort. The

  16. 75 FR 55600 - Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge and Coachella Valley National Wildlife Refuge), Imperial and Riverside Counties... (EA) for the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) Complex, which consists of the...

  17. Imperial Valley and Salton Sea, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Southern California's Salton Sea is a prominent visual for astronauts. This large lake supports the rich agricultural fields of the Imperial, Coachella and Mexicali Valleys in the California and Mexico desert. The Salton Sea formed by accident in 1905 when an irrigation canal ruptured, allowing the Colorado River to flood the Salton Basin. Today the Sea performs an important function as the sink for agricultural runoff; water levels are maintained by the runoff from the surrounding agricultural valleys. The Salton Sea salinity is high-nearly 1/4 saltier than ocean water-but it remains an important stopover point for migratory water birds, including several endangered species. The region also experiences several environmental problems. The recent increased demands for the limited Colorado River water threatens the amount of water allowed to flow into the Salton Sea. Increased salinity and decreased water levels could trigger several regional environmental crises. The agricultural flow into the Sea includes nutrients and agricultural by-products, increasing the productivity and likelihood of algae blooms. This image shows either a bloom, or suspended sediment (usually highly organic) in the water that has been stirred up by winds. Additional information: The Salton Sea A Brief Description of Its Current Conditions, and Potential Remediation Projects and Land Use Across the U.S.-Mexico Border Astronaut photograph STS111-E-5224 was taken by the STS-111 Space Shuttle crew that recently returned from the International Space Station. The image was taken June 12, 2002 using a digital camera. The image was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  18. Cyanobacteria toxins in the Salton Sea

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Wayne W; Li, RenHui

    2006-01-01

    Background The Salton Sea (SS) is the largest inland body of water in California: surface area 980 km2, volume 7.3 million acre-feet, 58 km long, 14–22 km wide, maximum depth 15 m. Located in the southeastern Sonoran desert of California, it is 85 m below sea level at its lowest point. It was formed between 1905 and 1907 from heavy river flows of the Colorado River. Since its formation, it has attracted both people and wildlife, including flocks of migratory birds that have made the Salton Sea a critical stopover on the Pacific flyway. Over the past 15 years wintering populations of eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) at the Salton Sea, have experienced over 200,000 mortalities. The cause of these large die-offs remains unknown. The unique environmental conditions of the Salton Sea, including salinities from brackish freshwater at river inlets to hypersaline conditions, extreme daily summer temperatures (>38°C), and high nutrient loading from rivers and agricultural drainage favor eutrophic conditions that encourage algal blooms throughout the year. A significant component of these algal blooms are the prokaryotic group – the Cyanophyta or blue-green algae (also called Cyanobacteria). Since many Cyanobacteria produce toxins (the cyanotoxins) it became important to evaluate their presence and to determine if they are a contributing factor in eared-grebe mortalities at the Salton Sea. Results From November 1999 to April 2001, 247 water and sediment samples were received for phytoplankton identification and cyanotoxin analyses. Immunoassay (ELISA) screening of these samples found that eighty five percent of all water samples contained low but detectable levels of the potent cyclic peptide liver toxin called microcystins. Isolation and identification of cyanobacteria isolates showed that the picoplanktonic Synechococcus and the benthic filamentous Oscillatoria were dominant. Both organisms were found to produce microcystins dominated by microcystin-LR and YR. A

  19. The Potential for Renewable Energy Development to Benefit Restoration of the Salton Sea. Analysis of Technical and Market Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, Douglas; Haase, Scott; Oakleaf, Brett; Hurlbut, David; Akar, Sertac; Wall, Anna; Turchi, Craig; Pienkos, Philip; Melius, Jennifer; Melaina, Marc

    2015-11-01

    This report summarizes the potential for renewable energy development in the Salton Sea region, as well as the potential for revenues from this development to contribute financially to Salton Sea restoration costs. It considers solar, geothermal, biofuels or nutraceutical production from algae pond cultivation, desalination using renewable energy, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.


  20. Salton Sea solar pond power plant design study and regional applicability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, R. L.

    1984-08-01

    Ormat collected and organized the data base and conducted conceptual plant design, performance, and cost analysis. JPL conducted site-specific studies related to solar pond chemistry, soil biological activity, and dike design and construction. WESTEC conducted environmental investigation studies and performed an environmental assessment. SCE provided planning support for licensing and permitting and technical evaluations of the system design and cost estimate.

  1. Salton Sea Solar Pond Power Plant Design Study and Regional Applicability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Ormat collected and organized the data base and conducted conceptual plant design, performance, and cost analysis. JPL conducted site-specific studies related to solar pond chemistry, soil biological activity, and dike design and construction. WESTEC conducted environmental investigation studies and performed an environmental assessment. SCE provided planning support for licensing and permitting and technical evaluations of the system design and cost estimate.

  2. Salton Sea sampling program: baseline studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tullis, R.E.; Carter, J.L.; Langlois, G.W.

    1981-04-13

    Baseline data are provided on three species of fish from the Salton Sea, California. The fishes considered were the orange mouth corvina (Cynoscion xanthulus), gulf croaker (Bairdiella icistius) and sargo (Anisotremus davidsonii). Morphometric and meristic data are presented as a baseline to aid in the evaluation of any physiological stress the fish may experience as a result of geothermal development. Analyses were made on muscle, liver, and bone of the fishes sampled to provide baseline data on elemental tissue burdens. The elements measured were: As, Br, Ca, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Mn, Mi, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, Zn, and Zr. These data are important if an environmentally sound progression of geothermal power production is to occur at the Salton Sea.

  3. Avian disease at the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, M.

    2002-01-01

    A review of existing records and the scientific literature was conducted for occurrences of avian diseases affecting free-ranging avifauna within the Salton Sea ecosystem. The period for evaluation was 1907 through 1999. Records of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Biological Survey and the scientific literature were the data sources for the period of 1907a??1939. The narrative reports of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Sonny Bono National Wildlife Refuge Complex and the epizootic database of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center were the primary data sources for the remainder of the evaluation. The pattern of avian disease at the Salton Sea has changed greatly over time. Relative to past decades, there was a greater frequency of major outbreaks of avian disease at the Salton Sea during the 1990s than in previous decades, a greater variety of disease agents causing epizootics, and apparent chronic increases in the attrition of birds from disease. Avian mortality was high for about a decade beginning during the mid-1920s, diminished substantially by the 1940s and was at low to moderate levels until the 1990s when it reached the highest levels reported. Avian botulism (Clostridium botulinum type C) was the only major cause of avian disease until 1979 when the first major epizootic of avian cholera (Pasteurella multocidia) was documented. Waterfowl and shorebirds were the primary species affected by avian botulism. A broader spectrum of species have been killed by avian cholera but waterfowl have suffered the greatest losses. Avian cholera reappeared in 1983 and has joined avian botulism as a recurring cause of avian mortality. In 1989, avian salmonellosis (Salmonella typhimurium) was first diagnosed as a major cause of avian disease within the Salton Sea ecosystem and has since reappeared several times, primarily among cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis). The largest loss from a single epizootic occurred in 1992, when an estimated

  4. Trace elements and pesticides in Salton Sea area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Roy A.; Setmire, James G.; Wolfe, John C.

    1988-01-01

    Concentrations of numerous potentially toxic trace elements and pesticides were determined in water, sediment, and biota from the Salton Sea area in southestern California. Comparison of results with data from other studies in this area and from other areas, and with various water-quality standards or criteria, indicate that selenium probably is the principal contaminant of concern in the Salton Sea basin and that it probably is related to agricultural practices. Selenium is mobilized in the subsurface drainwater produced by agricultural irrigation and transported in ditches and rivers, some of which pass through or near the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge before entering the Salton Sea. Some selenium apparently is incorporated into the food chain. In response to the finding of elevated selenium residues in fish from the area by State agencies, the Imperial County Health Department has issued a health advisory restricting or prohibiting human consumption of fish from the Salton Sea and drains.

  5. 75 FR 59285 - Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge and Coachella Valley National Wildlife Refuge), Imperial and Riverside...

  6. Integrated Science Investigations of the Salton Sea, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, D.

    2006-12-01

    The Salton Sea is the latest waterbody to be formed by Colorado River floodwaters within the Salton Trough. Over the past 100 years, floodwaters have been replaced by agricultural drainage water and municipal discharges so that today, most of the water reaching the Salton Sea is agricultural drainwater flowing down the New, Alamo and Whitewater Rivers. An evaporation of about 6 feet per year and inputs of more than 4 million tons of salt per year have increased salinity of the waters of the Salton Sea. The current salinity level of approximately 46 parts per thousand is about 25% more saline than ocean water. Diverting water from the Imperial Valley agricultural lands to urban Southern California, and anticipated loss of inflows from Mexico and increasing water conservation activities will result in less water flowing into the Salton Sea. A Restoration Program is being conducted to evaluate the effects of diminished inflows on the Salton Sea Ecosystem and recommend alternatives to avoid or minimize those effects. The Salton Sea has become increasingly important as habitat for migratory birds because of wetland losses. California has lost approximately 91% of interior wetland acreage from pre-settlement until the mid-1980's. The Salton Sea provides critical habitat linking distant wetlands of Pacific and Central Flyways to wintering habitats in Mexico and Central and South America. More than 400 species of birds have been observed in the Salton Sea Ecosystem. Large percentages of the populations for several bird species such as the endangered Yuma Clapper Rail, the Eared Grebe, Snowy Plover and American White Pelican utilize the Salton Sea. Approximately 20 species of conservation concern utilize the Salton Sea ecosystem. Fish-eating birds such as Great Blue Herons, California Brown Pelicans, Double-crested Cormorants and several species of egrets are highly dependent upon the fishery of the Salton Sea. The Salton Sea fishery is now primarily comprised of tilapia

  7. SALTON SEA SCIENTIFIC DRILLING PROJECT: SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Elders, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, was spudded on 24 October 1985, and reached a total depth of 10,564 ft. (3. 2 km) on 17 March 1986. There followed a period of logging, a flow test, and downhole scientific measurements. The scientific goals were integrated smoothly with the engineering and economic objectives of the program and the ideal of 'science driving the drill' in continental scientific drilling projects was achieved in large measure. The principal scientific goals of the project were to study the physical and chemical processes involved in an active, magmatically driven hydrothermal system. To facilitate these studies, high priority was attached to four areas of sample and data collection, namely: (1) core and cuttings, (2) formation fluids, (3) geophysical logging, and (4) downhole physical measurements, particularly temperatures and pressures.

  8. Developmental defects in fish embryos from Salton Sea, California

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, M.; Hose, J.E.; Garrahan, P.; Jordan, G.A.

    1992-06-01

    The Salton Sea is the largest inland body of water in California. It currently supports a sportfishery for orangemouth corvina (Cynoscion xanthulus). Other species of importance are the bairdiella (Bairdiella icistius) and sargo (Anisotremus davidsonii). The future status of the fishery is uncertain for several reasons including possible impacts from chemical contaminants entering the Sea via agricultural drains and rivers. There are also relatively large inputs of sewage from the New River and the Alamo River. Although these rivers discharge into the south end, strong currents and winds create rapid dispersion throughout the Salton Sea. Responding to environmental concerns, the State of California Department of Fish and Game supported a study on the population dynamics of Salton Sea fishes. Ichthyoplankton samples were collected for three spawning seasons, and fish embryos were evaluated for normal development. The development of fish embryos has been used for monitoring the effects of pollution in the New York Bight and in northern Europe, where malformation rates of up to 50% were found in embryos collected near highly contaminated rivers and waste dumping areas. This report describes significant incidences of malformed fish embryos collected from the Salton Sea. However, because of extreme hydrographical conditions present at the Sea which might be at least partially responsible for the observed malformations, supporting information on embryonic development was obtained in this study by controlled spawning of Salton Sea fishes in the laboratory. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Evaluation of options for reclamation of the Salton Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Hardie, R.W.

    1998-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, was asked last May by the Congressional Salton Sea Task Force to provide technical support for the remediation of the ecological problems in the Salton Sea. The results of their work in evaluating various concepts for addressing high salinity and variable water levels of the Sea relate to H.R. 3267 is presented. The results are preliminary and in some cases qualitative, but they can be used to help guide decision-makers in their deliberations. Ultimately, selecting the best solution for reclaiming the Salton Sea will have to integrate performance, economic, ecological, and institutional factors into the decision.

  10. World's deepest geothermal well proposed at Salton Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    A proposal to drill the world's deepest well (18,000 ft) into the Salton Sea geothermal anomaly near Niland in the Imperial Valley of California was submitted to the National Science Foundation. The three project phases and the proposed budget are outlined.

  11. Ecotoxicologial model for energy development and the Salton Sea, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dritschilo, W.; Vander Pluym, D.

    1984-07-01

    An ecotoxicological model is developed to facilitate evaluation of impacts from energy development to the Salton Sea, California. Energy development is expected to change the water budget of the Salton Sea, and thus modify the salinity of the sea. The model developed combines predictions of salinity changes resulting from a number of energy development scenarios with equations for fish population dynamics and saline toxicity data. The modeling approach is a useful case study of the development of a predictive preliminary ecological model in the absence of substantial empirical data. Full predictive capability will require validation and calibration against data currently being collected. Even without predictive ablity, the model functions in organizing the necessary data collection. 35 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Isotopic composition and origin of the red sea and salton sea geothermal brines.

    PubMed

    Craig, H

    1966-12-23

    Abstract. Deuterium and oxygen-18 measurements show that the Red Sea and Salton Sea brines are the results of a single process, the leaching of sediments by surface water circulating downward to a geothermal reservoir. The Salton Sea brine is derived from local precipitation but the Red Sea brine originates 1000 kilometers south of its basin, on the shallow sill which controls the circulation of the Red Sea. On this sill sea water penetrates a thick evaporite sequence to a depth of 2000 meters, and, driven by its increased density relative to sea water, flows northward to emerge in the brine-filled deeps. PMID:17807292

  13. Isotopic composition and origin of the red sea and salton sea geothermal brines.

    PubMed

    Craig, H

    1966-12-23

    Abstract. Deuterium and oxygen-18 measurements show that the Red Sea and Salton Sea brines are the results of a single process, the leaching of sediments by surface water circulating downward to a geothermal reservoir. The Salton Sea brine is derived from local precipitation but the Red Sea brine originates 1000 kilometers south of its basin, on the shallow sill which controls the circulation of the Red Sea. On this sill sea water penetrates a thick evaporite sequence to a depth of 2000 meters, and, driven by its increased density relative to sea water, flows northward to emerge in the brine-filled deeps.

  14. The Salton Sea 10 MWe power plant, unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W.E.; Whitescarver, O.D.; Yamasaki, R.N.

    1982-10-01

    The Southern California Edison Company's Salton Sea Geothermal Electric Project is the second of two flashsteam projects located in the Imperial Valley of California to successfully demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing steam from highly saline geothermal fluids for electric power generation. The objective of Edison's Power Plant Unit 1 program at the Salton Sea KGRA is to develop design, operating, and economic criteria for commercial geothermal developments in the Imperial Valley of California. The Edison plant is designed specifically for utilization of geothermal steam and employs principles found in conventional fossil-fueled electric generating plants. This plant serves as a model of a full scale commercial plant, using systems and components which likely will be utilized in large scale follow-on units.

  15. Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1982-01-26

    The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

  16. Materials of construction for Salton Sea geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.P. ); Cramer, S.D. )

    1989-01-01

    The high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal brines of the Salton Sea KGRA are a valuable source of energy and minerals. However, these brines are also very corrosive and cause early failure of many common materials of construction. Ferritic steels containing less than 18 wt pct chromium and austenitic steels perform poorly in these environments. This paper reports that the most acceptable materials of construction are the high-chromium ferritic stainless steels, nickel alloys, and titanium alloys.

  17. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project Archival Reference, Final Draft

    SciTech Connect

    1991-03-13

    This report provides an archival reference to the scientific information and other pertinent documents and materials associated with the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSDP). This archiving process ensures that valuable technical data and information obtained during the life of the project can be retrieved, organized and maintained as a historical record for future reference. This paper describes the background of the project and the process used for archiving the materials. [DJE-2005

  18. Analyses of organic and inorganic contaminants in Salton Sea fish.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Ralf; Schlenk, Daniel; Frank, Donnell; Costa-Pierce, Barry

    2002-05-01

    Chemical contamination of fish from the Salton Sea, a quasi-marine lake in Southern California, could adversely impact millions of birds using the Pacific Flyway and thousands of humans using the lake for recreation. Bairdiella icistia (bairdiella), Cynoscion xanthulus (orangemouth corvina), and Oreochromis spp. (tilapia) were sampled from two river mouths and two nearshore areas of the Salton Sea. Muscle tissues were analyzed for a complete suite of 14 trace metals and 53 pesticides. Fish muscle tissues had concentrations of selenium ranging between 1.89 and 2.73 microg/g wet weight. 4,4'-DDE accounted for 94% of the total DDT metabolites. Total DDTs ranged between 17.1 and 239.0 and total PCBs between 2.5 and 18.6 ng/g wet weight. PCB congeners 132, 138, 153, 168, and 180 comprised over 50% of the total PCBs. Given the potential implementation of a commercial fishing at the Salton Sea in the future, the presence of persistent organic pollutants and selenium warrants further research into the effects of these mixtures on fish populations, and on wildlife and humans consuming fish. PMID:12146823

  19. Possible importance of algal toxins in the Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reifel, K.M.; McCoy, M.P.; Rocke, T.E.; Tiffany, M.A.; Hurlbert, S.H.; Faulkner, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    In response to wildlife mortality including unexplained eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) die-off events in 1992 and 1994 and other mortality events including large fish kills, a survey was conducted for the presence of algal toxins in the Salton Sea. Goals of this survey were to determine if and when algal toxins are present in the Salton Sea and to describe the phytoplankton composition during those times. A total of 29 samples was collected for toxicity analysis from both nearshore and midlake sites visited biweekly from January to December 1999. Dinoflagellates and diatoms dominated most samples, but some were dominated by a prymnesiophyte (Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis) or a raphidophyte (Chattonella marina). Several types of blooms were observed and sampled. The dinoflagellate Gyrodinium uncatenum formed an extensive, dense (up to 310 000 cells ml-1) and long-lasting bloom during the winter in 1999. A coccolithophorid, Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis, occurred at high densities in surface films and nearshore areas during the spring and summer of 1999. These surface films also contained high densities of one or two other species (an unidentified scrippsielloid, Heterocapsa niei, Chattonella marina). Localized blooms were also observed in the Salton Sea. An unknown small dinoflagellate reached high densities (110 000 cells ml-1) inside Varner Harbor, and an unidentified species of Gymnodinium formed a dense (270 000 cells ml-1) band along part of the southern shoreline during the summer. Three species known to produce toxins in other systems were found. Protoceratium reticulatum (=Gonyaulax grindleyi) and Chattonella marina were found in several samples taken during summer months, and Prorocentrum minimum was found in low densities in several samples. Extracts of most samples, including those containing known toxic species, showed a low level (<10% mortality across all concentrations) of activity in the brine shrimp lethality assay and were not considered

  20. Proposed scientific activities for the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP) has been organized for the purpose of investigating a hydrothermal system at depths and temperatures greater than has been done before. Plans are to deepen an existing well or to drill a new well for research purposes for which temperatures of 300/sup 0/C will be reached at a depth of less than 3.7 km and then deepen that well a further 1.8 km. This report recounts the Congressional history of the appropriation to drill the hole and other history through March 1984, gives a review of the literature on the Salton Sea Geothermal Field and its relationship to other geothermal systems of the Salton Trough, and describes a comprehensive series of investigations that have been proposed either in the well or in conjunction with the SSSDP. Investigations in geophysics, geochemistry and petrology, tectonics and rock mechanics, and geohydrology are given. A tabulation is given of current commercial and state-of-the-art downhole tools and their pressure, temperature, and minimum hole size limitations.

  1. Initial operating results 10 MW Salton Sea Geothermal Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, E.

    1983-09-01

    The initial operating results of the 10 MW Salton Sea Geothermal Pilot Plant are discussed. The plant has been on line 84% of the time since initial startup in July of 1982. During this time, the plant has been able to provide essentially full load steam making it possible to achieve a capacity factor of over 80%. The forced and scheduled outages of the plant for the first 9 months operation are listed. During this initial operation, over 50 million kWhs of energy have been delivered to the Imperial Irrigation District. The operating costs for operations and maintenance have been running at a rate of $1 M/year.

  2. Crystallizer clarifier process spells success for first Salton Sea project

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.N.

    1983-03-01

    This power plant project represents a milestone in geothermal technology because a method now exists to handle the high dissolved solids brine of the Imperial Valley. Presently, the sales price of the power supplied by the new plant is approximately one-half the cost to produce it. Although this project is not economically competitive, newer brine-handling systems are in the offing that will be more efficient and effective. This plant is paving the way for the development of the 3000 to 4000 MW potential of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

  3. Shallow Drilling In The Salton Sea Region, The Thermal Anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R. L.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Younker, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09 C/m) to extreme (0.83 C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is >600 mW/m{sup 2} and in some areas exceeds 1200 mW/m{sup 2}. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes. These observations of the thermal anomaly provide important constraints for models of the circulation of the hydrothermal system. Thermal budgets based on a simple model for this hydrothermal system indicate that the heat influx rate for local ''hot spots'' in the region may be large enough to account for the rate of heat flux from the entire Salton Trough.

  4. Groundwater Availability Within the Salton Sea Basin Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tompson, A; Demir, Z; Moran, J; Mason, D; Wagoner, J; Kollet, S; Mansoor, K; McKereghan, P

    2008-01-11

    It is widely recognized that increasing demands for water in Southern California are being affected by actions to reduce and redirect the amount of water imported from the Colorado River. In the Imperial Valley region, for example, import reductions will not only affect agricultural users but also could produce significant collateral impacts on the level and quality of water in the Salton Sea, its regional ecology, or even the long term air quality in the greater basin. The notion of using groundwater in the Imperial Valley as an additional source for agricultural or domestic needs, energy production, or Salton Sea restoration efforts, so as to offset reductions in imported water, is not a new concept. Even though it has been discussed recently (e.g., LLNL, 2002), the idea goes back, in part, to several studies performed by the US Department of Interior and other agencies that have indicated that there may be substantial, usable amounts of groundwater in some portions of the Imperial Valley. It has been estimated, for example, that between 1.1 and 3 billion acre-feet (AF) of groundwater lie within the extended, deep basin underlying the valley and Salton Sea region, even though much of it may be unrecoverable or too poor in its quality (Imperial County, 1997). This is a significant volume with respect to the total annual precipitation volume received in California, whose average is close to 200 million (or 0.2 billion) AF per year (DWR, 1998), and especially with respect to the total annual precipitation received in the Salton Sea watershed itself, which we estimate (Appendix A) to be approximately 2.5 million acre feet (MAF) per year. Clearly, a thorough appraisal of the groundwater resources in the Imperial Valley and Salton Sea region--i.e., an assessment of their overall physical availability--will be needed to determine how they can be used and managed to suit new or redirected demands in the region. Development of an improved or updated groundwater assessment

  5. Evaporation and radiation measurements at Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturrock, Alex M.

    1977-01-01

    Evaporation from the Salton Sea, Calif., was computed for a 539-day period between July 14, 1967, and January 2, 1969, by use of energy-budget, mass-transfer, and water budget methods. The total evaporation computed by the three methods agreed within 5 percent. The values of heat transfer to and from the bed were used in the energy-budget computations. Monthly evaporation computed by the energy-budget method for 1968 showed that the Salton Sea exhibited a double wave evaporation similar to that of oceans in the same latitude. Weekly and montly comparisons were made to determine if radiation measured by the flat-plate radiometer is seasonally biased. These comparisons indicate that the measurements of radiation by the flat-plate radiometer are not seasonally biased, and that the Cummings Radiation Integrator gives reliable measurements of radiation for periods as short as 1 week. An empirical mass-transfer coefficient, N, as determined from energy-budget measurements. The value of this coefficient to give evaporation in inches per day is 0.00245 when the windspeed is expressed in miles per hour and the vapor pressure expressed in millibars. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Predicting impacts from water conservation and energy development on the Salton Sea, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kratzer, C.R.; Dritschilo, W.; Hannah, L.J.; Broutman, M.A.

    1985-08-01

    An input-output model was developed to predict changes in Salton Sea salinity and water level until the year 2000 due to proposed water conservation efforts and geothermal and solar pond energy developments. The model SALINP provided good agreement with the observed salinities for 1960-80. While SALINP was not overly sensitive to one-year changes in any of the major inputs, a change in the historical means of the Imperial Valley runoff and evaporative loss inputs produced a significant effect on future predictions. The proposed water conservation measures caused the predicted Salton Sea salinity for 2000 to greatly exceed 40,000 ppm, the level at which adverse effects to wildlife are believed to occur. The possible geothermal development also produced predicted salinities considerably above 40,000 ppm. The salinity predictions for solar ponds by themselves and in conjunction with geothermal development were below 45,000 ppm for 2000. The solar pond and geothermal combination also resulted in a predicted lowering of the natural water level by 5 to 7 feet by 2000.

  7. Evaporation and radiation measurements at Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturrock, Alex M.

    1978-01-01

    Evaporation from Salton Sea, Calif. was computed for a 539-day period between duly 14, 1967, and January 2, 1969, by use of energy-budget, mass-transfer, and water-budget methods. The total evaporation computed by the three methods agreed within 5 percent. For computing evaporation by the mass-transfer method, vapor pressure measured at raft stations on the sea was considered to be more representative of the conditions over the sea than vapor pressure measured at land stations. The values of heat transfer to and from the bed were used in energy-budget computations. The inclusion of these heat transfer values improved the correlation of evaporation computed by the energy-budget and water-budget methods. Monthly evaporation computed by the energy budget method for 1968 showed that the Salton Sea exhibited a double-wave evaporation similar to that of oceans in the same latitude. Weekly and monthly comparisons were made to determine if radiation measured by the flat-plate radiometer is seasonally biased. Weekly totals of radiation from three flat-plate radiometers were compared to values of a Cummings Radiation Integrator. Monthly totals of radiation for each of the two types of instruments were compared to an empirical method for determining radiation. These comparisons indicate that the measurements of radiation by the flat-plate radiometer are not seasonally biased, and that the Cummings Radiation Integrator gives reliable measurements of radiation for periods as short as 1 week. The net incoming radiation was measured at three stations around the Salton Sea. The areal variation was less than 1 percent on an annual basis and the largest weekly variation was less than 6 percent. An empirical mass-transfer coefficient, N, was determined from energy-budget measurements. The value of this coefficient to give evaporation in inches per day is 0.00245 when the windspeed is expressed in miles per hour and vapor pressure is expressed in millibars. The coefficient is valid

  8. Downhole fluid sampling at the SSSDP (Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project) California State 2-14 well, Salton Sea, California

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Grigsby, C.O.; Dennis, B.

    1987-07-01

    In situ fluid sampling activities were conducted at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP) well during late December 1985 and late March 1986 to obtain unflashed samples of Salton Sea brine. In late December, three sampling runs were made to depths of approximately 1800 m and temperatures of 300/sup 0/C. In late March, 10 sampling runs were made to depths of approximately 3150 m and temperatures of 350/sup 0/C. In brief, the Los Alamos tool obtained samples from four of eight runs; the Lawrence Berkeley tool obtained samples from one of one run; the Leutert Instruments, Inc., tool obtained samples from zero of three runs; and the USGS quartz crystal experiment was lost in the well. The most complete sample was obtained from run No. 11, using the Los Alamos sampler and Sandia battery pack/controller on a wireline. About 1635 ml of brine, two noble gas samples, and two bulk gas samples were collected from this run. Samples of brine and gas from productive runs have been distributed to about 15 researchers for various types of analyses. Chemical analyses by the Los Alamos and US Geological Survey analytical teams are presented in this report, although they are not corrected for flashing and precipitation.

  9. Proposed resource evaluation plan. Salton Sea scientific drilling program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    The report presents a plan for evaluating the deep geothermal resource in the Salton Sea area of Imperial County, California. The plan is divided into two testing programs, followed by the modeling and evaluation of the underground geothermal resource. The testing program related to geological data collection includes acquiring and analyzing the core, running geophysical and temperature/pressure logs in both the deep well and the injection well, and carrying out extensive mud-logging activities. The flow testing program includes temperature, pressure, and flow measurements made in the well and surface facilities. Sampling and analysis of fluid and scale both in the well and at the surface facilities will also be carried out. 6 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  10. Field procedures manual: Sample handling, Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.; Mehegan, J.; Michels, D.

    1989-02-01

    This Field Procedures Manual is the comprehensive operations guide that was used to curate samples obtained from the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP). It is being published in the form used on site by the curation team. Samples recovered from the SSSDP were curated following the Policy Guidelines established for the Department of Energy/Office of Basic Energy Sciences (DOE/OBES) Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP)/Thermal Regimes effort, which recognizes the uniqueness and site-specific nature of each drilling project. The SSSDP is a rotary drilling project that has provided cuttings and spot cores as well as liquid and gas samples. This manual provides details on handling all of these sample types. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Shallow drilling in the Salton Sea region: The thermal anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R.L.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

    1988-11-10

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The central thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09 /sup 0/C/m) to extreme (0.83 /sup 0/C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is greater than 600 mW/m/sup 2/ and in the two local anomalies exceeds 1200 mW/m/sup 2/. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes.

  12. Chemical evolution of the Salton Sea, California: Nutrient and selenium dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, R.A.; Orem, W.H.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    2002-01-01

    The Salton Sea is a 1000-km2 terminal lake located in the desert area of southeastern California. This saline (???44 000 mg l-1 dissolved solids) lake started as fresh water in 1905-07 by accidental flooding of the Colorado River, and it is maintained by agricultural runoff of irrigation water diverted from the Colorado River. The Salton Sea and surrounding wetlands have recently acquired substantial ecological importance because of the death of large numbers of birds and fish, and the establishment of a program to restore the health of the Sea. In this report, we present new data on the salinity and concentration of selected chemicals in the Salton Sea water, porewater and sediments, emphasizing the constituents of concern: nutrients (N and P), Se and salinity. Chemical profiles from a Salton Sea core estimated to have a sedimentation rate of 2.3 mm yr-1 show increasing concentrations of OC, N, and P in younger sediment that are believed to reflect increasing eutrophication of the lake. Porewater profiles from two locations in the Sea show that diffusion from bottom sediment is only a minor source of nutrients to the overlying water as compared to irrigation water inputs. Although loss of N and Se by microbial-mediated volatilization is possible, comparison of selected element concentrations in river inputs and water and sediments from the Salton Sea indicates that most of the N (from fertilizer) and virtually all of the Se (delivered in irrigation water from the Colorado River) discharged to the Sea still reside within its bottom sediment. Laboratory simulation on mixtures of sediment and water from the Salton Sea suggest that sediment is a potential source of N and Se to the water column under aerobic conditions. Hence, it is important that any engineered changes made to the Salton Sea for remediation or for transfer of water out of the basin do not result in remobilization of nutrients and Se from the bottom sediment into the overlying water.

  13. Results from shallow research drilling at Inyo Domes, Long Valley Caldera, California and Salton Sea geothermal field, Salton Trough, California

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, L.W.; Eichelberger, J.C.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Newmark, R.L.; Vogel, T.A.

    1987-09-01

    This report reviews the results from two shallow drilling programs recently completed as part of the United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The purpose is to provide a broad overview of the objectives and results of the projects, and to analyze these results in the context of the promise and potential of research drilling in crustal thermal regimes. The Inyo Domes drilling project has involved drilling 4 shallow research holes into the 600-year-old Inyo Domes chain, the youngest rhyolitic event in the coterminous United States and the youngest volcanic event in Long Valley Caldera, California. The purpose of the drilling at Inyo was to understand the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of silicic magma as it intrudes the upper crust. This behavior, which involves the response of magma to decompression and cooling, is closely related to both eruptive phenomena and the establishment of hydrothermal circulation. The Salton Sea shallow research drilling project involved drilling 19 shallow research holes into the Salton Sea geothermal field, California. The purpose of this drilling was to bound the thermal anomaly, constrain hydrothermal flow pathways, and assess the thermal budget of the field. Constraints on the thermal budget links the local hydrothermal system to the general processes of crustal rifting in the Salton Trough.

  14. 78 FR 28834 - Salton Sea Power L.L.C.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Salton Sea Power L.L.C.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate...-referenced proceeding of Salton Sea Power L.L.C.'s application for market-based rate authority, with...

  15. 78 FR 28835 - Salton Sea Power Generation Company; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Salton Sea Power Generation Company; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Salton Sea Power Generation Company's application for...

  16. Double Difference Earthquake Locations at the Salton Sea Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, K L; Hutchings, L J; Bonner, B P; Foxall, W; Kasameyer, P W

    2007-08-08

    The purpose of this paper is to report on processing of raw waveform data from 4547 events recorded at 12 stations between 2001 and 2005 by the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) seismic network. We identified a central region of the network where vertically elongated distributions of hypocenters have previously been located from regional network analysis. We process the data from the local network by first autopicking first P and S arrivals; second, improving these with hand picks when necessary; then, using cross-correlation to provide very precise P and S relative arrival times. We used the HypoDD earthquake location algorithm to locate the events. We found that the originally elongated distributions of hypocenters became more tightly clustered and extend down the extent of the study volume at 10 Km. However, we found the shapes to depend on choices of location parameters. We speculate that these narrow elongated zones of seismicity may be due to stress release caused by fluid flow.

  17. Experimental evaluation of atmospheric effects on radiometric measurements using the EREP of Skylab. [Salton Sea and Great Salt Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D. T. (Principal Investigator); Isaacs, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Test sites were located near the Great Salt Lake and the Salton Sea. Calculations were performed for a set of atmospheric models corresponding to the test sites, in addition to standard models for summer and winter midlatitude atmospheres with respective integrated water vapor amount of 2.4 g/sq cm and 0.9 g/sq cm. Each atmosphere was found to contain an average amount of continental aerosol. Computations were valid for high solar elevation angles. Atmospheric attenuation quantities were computed in addition to simulated EREP S192 radiances.

  18. ANALYSES OF ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SALTON SEA FISH. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical contamination of fish from the Salton Sea, a quasi-marine lake in Southern California, could adversely impact millions of birds using the Pacific Flyway and thousands of humans using the lake for recreation. Bairdiella icistia (bairdiella), Cynoscion xanthul...

  19. Salton Sea and Imperial Valley, California as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Salton Sea and Imperial Valley area of southern California, including a portion of northern Baja California, Mexico, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 17th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 125 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 27 hours.

  20. REVIEW OF THE FISHERIES OF THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA, USA: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Salton Sea is an endorheic, 980-km2 salt lake in the Sonoran Desert of southern California. The historical fish community switched from freshwater to marine species as salinity increased due to evaporation and brackish water inflows. Three species, bairdiella (<...

  1. Tectonic tilt rates derived from lake-level measurements, Salton Sea, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.E.; Wood, S.H.

    1980-01-11

    Tectonic tilt at the Salton Sea was calculated by differencing lake-level measurements from two points on the sea. During the past 26 years, tilting was down toward the southeast. By 1970 differential vertical movement amounted to 110 millimeters between two gages situated 38 kilometers apart on the southwest shore. A reversal in tilt direction in late 1972 has diminished the net differential vertical movement to 60 millimeters.

  2. Tectonic tilt rates derived from lake-level measurements, salton sea, california.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Wood, S H

    1980-01-11

    Tectonic tilt at the Salton Sea was calculated by differencing lake-level measurements from two points on the sea. During the past 26 years, tilting was down toward the southeast. By 1970 differential vertical movement amounted to 110 millimeters between two gages situated 38 kilometers apart on the southwest shore. A reversal in tilt direction in late 1972 has diminished the net differential vertical movement to 60 millimeters. PMID:17809103

  3. Tectonic evolution of the Salton Sea inferred from seismic reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, D.S.; Driscoll, N.W.; Kent, G.M.; Harding, A.J.; Babcock, J.M.; Baskin, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Oblique extension across strike-slip faults causes subsidence and leads to the formation of pull-apart basins such as the Salton Sea in southern California. The formation of these basins has generally been studied using laboratory experiments or numerical models. Here we combine seismic reflection data and geological observations from the Salton Sea to understand the evolution of this nascent pull-apart basin. Our data reveal the presence of a northeast-trending hinge zone that separates the sea into northern and southern sub-basins. Differential subsidence (10 mm yr 1) in the southern sub-basin suggests the existence of northwest-dipping basin-bounding faults near the southern shoreline, which may control the spatial distribution of young volcanism. Rotated and truncated strata north of the hinge zone suggest that the onset of extension associated with this pull-apart basin began after 0.5 million years ago. We suggest that slip is partitioned spatially and temporally into vertical and horizontal domains in the Salton Sea. In contrast to previous models based on historical seismicity patterns, the rapid subsidence and fault architecture that we document in the southern part of the sea are consistent with experimental models for pull-apart basins. ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  4. Simulation of Wind-Driven Circulation in the Salton Sea: Implications for Indigenous Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Chris B.; Orlob, Gerald T.; Huston, David W.

    2002-04-01

    The Salton Sea Authority is seeking methods for reducing water levels and controlling salinity within ranges that will protect beneficial uses of the Sea, its adjacent lands, and its indigenous ecosystems. Proposed solutions include various physical changes in the bathymetry and configuration of the Sea. Because circulation in the Sea is driven primarily by wind stresses imposed on the water surface, and circulation changes are likely to affect the Sea?s quality and ecology, a methodology for quantifying the effects of specific alternatives is required. For this purpose a mathematical model for simulation of the hydrodynamic behavior of the Sea has been developed, calibrated to data gathered by a field investigation conducted in 1997, and applied to alternative schemes that will isolate sections of the southern basin. The Salton Sea Hydrodynamic/Water Quality Model is constructed using the finite element method to represent the bathymetry of the Sea in a three-dimensional grid. Given certain boundary conditions, for example wind stresses imposed on the surface, the model solves the three-dimensional equations of motion and continuity, the advection-dispersion equation, and an equation of state dependent upon temperature and salinity, to obtain temporal and spatial descriptions of velocities and temperatures over a specified period of time. The model successfully replicated principal features of the Sea's behavior, especially the persistence of a counterclockwise gyre in the southern basin and seasonal stratification. Once calibrated, the model was applied to evaluate the possible effects of changing water surface elevations in the Sea and altering its configuration to isolate sections for evaporative concentration of salts. These effects, evident in changes in velocity, were quantified with regard to their possible impacts on the aquatic habitat and the health of the Salton Sea ecology. A comparative evaluation of alternatives is presented.

  5. Curie Depth Analysis of the Salton Sea Region, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickus, Kevin; Hussein, Musa

    2016-02-01

    Aeromagnetic data were analyzed to determine the bottom of magnetic bodies that might be related to the Curie point depth (CPD) by 2D spectral and 3D inversion methods within the Salton Trough and the surrounding region in southern California. The bottom of the magnetic bodies for 55 × 55 km windows varied in depth between 11 and 23 km in depth using 2D spectral methods. Since the 55 × 55 km square window may include both shallow and deep source, a 3D inversion method was used to provide better resolution of the bottom of the magnetic bodies. The 3D models indicate the depth to the bottom of the magnetic bodies varied between 5 and 23 km. Even though both methods produced similar results, the 3D inversion method produced higher resolution of the CPD depths. The shallowest depths (5-8 km) occur along and west of the Brawley Seismic Zone and the southwestern portion of the Imperial Valley. The source of these shallow CPD values may be related to geothermal systems including hydrothermal circulation and/or partially molten material. Additionally, shallow CPD depths (7-12 km) were found in a northwest-trending zone in the center of the Salton Trough. These depths coincide with previous seismic analyses that indicated a lower crustal low velocity region which is believed to be caused by partially molten material. Lower velocity zones in several regions may be related to fracturing and/or hydrothermal fluids. If the majority of these shallow depths are related to temperature, they are likely associated with the CPD, and the partially molten material extends over a wider zone than previously known. Greater depths within the Salton Trough coincide with the base of basaltic material and/or regions of intense metamorphism intruded by mafic material in the middle/lower crust.

  6. Minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines: a literature review and proposed cementation process

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1982-01-01

    The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant. However, the precious metal content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead and tin present in the brines.

  7. Borehole gravity measurements in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project well State 2--14

    SciTech Connect

    Kasameyer, P.W.; Hearst, J.R.

    1988-11-10

    Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m and the vertical gradient of gravity above ground were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project well State 2--14. Uncorrected borehole gravimetric densities match values from gamma-gamma logs, indicating that the high densities seen in State 2--14 in the depth range 0.5--3 km extend for a few kilometers from the well. The aboveground gradient was found to be 4.1 ..mu..Gal/m higher than expected; correcting for this value increases the gravimetric density in the borehole. Combining the borehole gravity and estimated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, we find that this densified zone coincides with much of a broad thermal anomaly that has been found to the northeast of the Salton Sea geothermal field. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  8. Borehole Gravity Measurements In The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program Well State 2-14

    SciTech Connect

    Kasameyer, P. W.; Hearst, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m, and the vertical gradient of gravity were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program well State 2-14. The borehole gravimetric densities matched the well logs, but the surface gradient was found to be 0.0040 mgal/m higher than expected. When the borehole observations are corrected for the observed free air gradient above ground, they produce densities which are nearly uniformly higher than log densities by about 0.07 gm/cm{sup 3}. These measurements require densities in the depth range .5 to 3 km, for a radius of a few kilometers around State 2-14 to be as dense as those found in State 2-14. Combining the borehole gravity and calculated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, we find that this densified zone covers much of a broad thermal anomaly to the northeast of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

  9. Borehole Gravity Measurements in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program Well State 2-14

    SciTech Connect

    Kasameyer, P. W.; Hearst, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m, and the vertical gradient of gravity above ground were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program well State 2-14. Uncorrected borehole gravimetric densities match values from gamma-gamma logs, indicating that the high densities seen in State 2-14 in the depth range 0.5 to 3 km extend for a few kilometers from the well. The above-ground gradient was found to be 4.1 {micro}gal/m higher than expected; correcting for this value increases the gravimetric density in the borehole. Combining the borehole gravity and estimated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, they find that this densified zone coincides with much of a broad thermal anomaly that has been found to the northeast of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

  10. Backgrounder: Geothermal resource production, steam gathering, and power generation at Salton Sea Unit 3, Calipatria, California

    SciTech Connect

    1989-04-01

    The 10,000-kilowatt Salton Sea Unit 1 power plant was designed to demonstrate that electrical power generation, using the highly saline brines from the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir, was technically and economically feasible. Unit 1, owned by Earth Energy, a Unocal subsidiary, began operating in 1982, initiating an intensive testing program which established the design criteria necessary to construct the larger 47,500-kilowatt Unit 3 power plant, unit 3 contains many of the proprietary or patented technological innovations developed during this program. Design, construction and start-up of the Unit 3 power generating facility began in December, 1986, and was completed in 26 months. By the end of 1988, the brine handling system was in full operation, and the turbine had been tested at design speed. Desert Power Company, a Unocal subsidiary, owns the power generating facility. Unocal owns the brine resource production facility. Power is transmitted by the Imperial Irrigation District to Southern California Edison Company.

  11. Borehole Gravity Measurements in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program Well State 2-14

    SciTech Connect

    Kasameyer, P. W.; Hearst, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Borehole gravity measurements over a depth range from 1737 to 1027 m, and the vertical gradient of gravity above ground were measured at the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program well State 2-14. Uncorrected borehole gravimetric densities match values from gamma-gamma logs, indicating that the high densities seen in State 2-14 in the depth range 0.5 to 3 km extend for a few kilometers from the well. The above-ground gradient was found to be 0.0040 mgal/m higher than expected; correcting for this value increases the gravimetric density in the borehole. Combining the borehole gravity and estimated vertical gravity gradients on the surface, they find that this densified zone coincides with much of a broad thermal anomaly that has been found to the northeast of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

  12. Unusual dominance by desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius) in experimental ponds within the Salton Sea Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; Anderson, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    In October 2006, months after shallow experimental ponds in the Salton Sea Basin were filled with water from the Alamo River and Salton Sea, fish were observed in several ponds, although inlets had been screened to exclude fish. During October 2007November 2009, nine surveys were conducted using baited minnow traps to document species and relative abundance of fish. Surveys yielded 3,620 fish representing five species. Desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), the only native species encountered, was the most numerous and comprised >93% of the catch. Nonnative species included western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis, 4.1%), sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna, 2.8%), and tilapia (a mixture of hybrid Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus ?? O. urolepis and redbelly tilapia Tilapia zillii, <0.1%). Dominance by desert pupfish, which persisted over our 2 years of study, was unusual because surveys conducted in nearby agricultural drains yielded relatively few desert pupfish.

  13. Analyses of operational times and technical aspects of the Salton Sea scientific drilling project: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The Deep Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (DSSSDP) was conducted in Imperial County of California at the Southeastern edge of the Salton Sea. Emphasis was on the acquisition of scientific data for the evaluation of the geological environment encountered during the drilling of the well. The scientific data acquisition activities consisted of coring, running of numerous downhole logs and tools in support of defining the geologic environment and conducting two full scale flow tests primarily to obtain pristine fluid samples. In addition, drill cuttings, gases and drilling fluid chemistry measurements were obtained from the drilling fluid returns concurrent with drilling and coring operations. The well was drilled to 10,564 feet. This report describes the field portions of the project and presents an analysis of the time spent on the various activities associated with the normal drilling operations, scientific data gathering operations and the three major downhole problem activities - lost circulation, directional control and fishing.

  14. Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis (Prymnesiophyceae) blooms on the surface of the Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reifel, K.M.; McCoy, M.P.; Tiffany, M.A.; Rocke, T.E.; Trees, C.C.; Barlow, S.B.; Faulkner, D.J.; Hurlbert, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Dense populations of the coccolithophore Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis were found in surface films at several locations around the Salton Sea in Februarya??August, 1999. An unidentified coccolithophorid was also found in low densities in earlier studies of the lake (1955a??1956). To our knowledge, this is the first record of this widespread marine species in any lake. Samples taken from surface films typically contained high densities of one or two other phytoplankton species as well as high densities of the coccolithophore. Presence or absence of specific algal pigments was used to validate direct cell counts. In a preliminary screen using a brine shrimp lethality assay, samples showed moderate activity. Extracts were then submitted to a mouse bioassay, and no toxic activity was observed. These results indicate that blooms of P. pseudoroscoffensis are probably not toxic to vertebrates and do not contribute to the various mortality events of birds and fish that occur in the Salton Sea.

  15. Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis (Prymnesiophyceae) blooms on the surface of the Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reifel, K.M.; McCoy, M.P.; Tiffany, M.A.; Rocke, T.E.; Trees, C.C.; Barlow, S.B.; Faulkner, D.J.; Hurlbert, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Dense populations of the coccolithophore Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis were found in surface films at several locations around the Salton Sea in February-August, 1999. An unidentified coccolithophorid was also found in low densities in earlier studies of the lake (1955-1956). To our knowledge, this is the first record of this widespread marine species in any lake. Samples taken from surface films typically contained high densities of one or two other phytoplankton species as well as high densities of the coccolithophore. Presence or absence of specific algal pigments was used to validate direct cell counts. In a preliminary screen using a brine shrimp lethality assay, samples showed moderate activity. Extracts were then submitted to a mouse bioassay, and no toxic activity was observed. These results indicate that blooms of P. pseudoroscoffensis are probably not toxic to vertebrates and do not contribute to the various mortality events of birds and fish that occur in the Salton Sea.

  16. STS-49 Earth observation of the Salton Sea and the Gulf of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Earth observation taken aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, shows the Salton Sea and the Gulf of California. The nearly cloud-free view follows the Colorado River Delta from the Gulf of California (Mexico) to the Salton Sea (California). The Colorado River enters its delta from the right (east), then turns directly south to form saline tidal flats at the edge of the gulf. Nearly all the water is used for irrigation. The United States (U.S.) / Mexican border shows clearly in the different field patterns and the intensity of the greenish color. The irrigated agricultural area offers a sharp contrast to the surrounding desert. The crew used a handheld HASSELBLAD camera with a 100-mm lens to record the image.

  17. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program: Seventh quarterly progress report, April-June 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    The progress and direction of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) is outlined. This reporting period, from April 1 through June 30, 1986, began with initiation of the 6-month shut-in period. Emphasis was placed upon conducting experiments such as downhole temperature and pressure surveys, distribution of samples to researchers, reporting and disseminating data thus far analyzed, and planning future operations in the SSSDP well.

  18. Accounting for the effect of TDS and NCG on Salton Sea reservoir response

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    The Salton Sea reservoir, located in Imperial County, Ca., is unique in several ways from most liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that have been developed to date. One of these differences is the presence of hyper-saline brines containing up to 28% TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) and up to 0.2% NCG (Non-Condensible Gas). A simple material and energy balance model has been developed to study the effect of TDS and NCG on Salton Sea reservoir response. This study demonstrated that during the development of a two-phase system the partitioning of the NCG into the vapor phase and the consequential concentration of the TDS in the brine drastically alters the reservoir fluid properties. In modeling pressure depletion of hyper-saline reservoirs, such as the Salton Sea, these changes in reservoir fluid composition were shown to seriously affect the simulation results. As a result of these findings, a compositional fluid property package was developed using published data on H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl mixtures. This fluid property package was then incorporated into the simulation program used by Unocal. Validation of the fluid property package in this simulation program was made using measured reservoir temperature, surface enthalpy, and surface flash data. The development of a compositional simulation program for geothermal applications has advanced our ability to study depletion mechanisms that are sensitive to compositional changes. This program is currently being used to study the effect of injection and steam cap development on long term operations and to develop a field model of the Salton Sea reservoir.

  19. Selenium Concentrations in Irrigation Drain Inflows to the Salton Sea, California, October 2006 and January 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Mike W.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents raw data on selenium concentrations in samples of water, sediment, detritus, and selected food-chain matrices collected from selected agricultural drains in the southern portion of the Salton Sea during October 2006 and January 2007. Total selenium and selenium species were determined in water samples, whereas total selenium was determined in sediment, detritus, algae, plankton, midge larvae (Family Chironomidae), and two fish species (western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, and sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna).

  20. Seismic response to fluid injection at the Salton Sea geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, L. J.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2012-12-01

    California hosts both the largest geothermal resource capacity and highest seismicity rate in the nation. With plans to increase geothermal output, and proven earthquake triggering in the vicinity of geothermal power plants worldwide, it is important to determine the local and regional effects of geothermal power production. This study examines the link between fluid injection and seismicity at the Salton Sea geothermal field in southern California by attempting to answer three motivating questions: 1) Does fluid injection at the geothermal field change local seismicity in a measurable way? 2) Are aftershocks triggered at the same rate inside and outside of the field? 3) How do the triggered aftershocks interact with regional fault networks, specifically, could these aftershocks trigger a societally significant event on the southern San Andreas fault? We use monthly fluid injection and production data from 1980 to 2012 for 88 wells at the Salton Sea geothermal field and seismic data for the same time span from the relocated Hauksson, Yang, and Shearer earthquake catalog for southern California to evaluate these issues. We find that seismicity is correlated in both time and space in the Salton Sea geothermal field to injection. The observations strongly suggest triggering in the field. We also find that earthquakes within the field trigger aftershocks at a higher rate than most earthquakes elsewhere in California. The combination of observations suggest that aftershocks from induced seismicity could extend beyond the edges of the field into the neighboring tectonic system.

  1. Microearthquake Study of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California: Evidence of Stress Triggering - Masters Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Austin Adams

    2002-02-01

    A digital network of 24 seismograph stations was operated from September 15, 1987 to September 30, 1988, by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Unocal as part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project to study seismicity related to tectonics and geothermal activity near the drilling site. More than 2001 microearthquakes were relocated in this study in order to image any pervasive structures that may exist within the Salton Sea geothermal field. First, detailed velocity models were obtained through standard 1-D inversion techniques. These velocity models were then used to relocate events using both single event methods and Double-Differencing, a joint hypocenter location method. An anisotropic velocity model was built from anisotropy estimates obtained from well logs within the study area. During the study period, the Superstition wills sequence occurred with two moderate earthquakes of MS 6.2 and MS 6.6. These moderate earthquakes caused a rotation of the stress field as observed from the inversion of first motion data from microearthquakes at the Salton Sea geothermal field. Coulomb failure analysis also indicates that microearthquakes occurring after the Superstition Hills sequence are located within a region of stress increase suggesting stress triggering caused by the moderate earthquakes.

  2. Diversity of terrestrial avifauna in response to distance from the shoreline of the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendelsohn, M.B.; Boarman, W.I.; Fisher, R.N.; Hathaway, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Large aquatic bodies influence surrounding terrestrial ecosystems by providing water and nutrients. In arid landscapes, the increased primary productivity that results may greatly enhance vertebrate biodiversity. The Salton Sea, a large saline lake in the Colorado Desert of southern California, provides nutrients in the form of hundreds of thousands of dead fish carcasses, brine flies, and chemical compounds through windborne salt sea spray. We performed point counts for landbirds and shorebirds monthly or every other month between March 2001 and February 2002 across a sampling grid of 35 points along the west edge of Salton Sea. We found that avian diversity (numbers of species and numbers per species) was dependent on proximity to the Sea. Diversity was at a maximum nearest the shore, and was significantly lower away from the Sea's edge, at all surveyed distances up to 1 km from the shore. Cover by the dominant shrubs on the study site also corresponded to proximity to the water's edge. Whereas one may hypothesize that the avian diversity patterns are caused by these differences in vegetation structure, our data did not support this. Future studies should further investigate this potential correlation between vegetation and bird patterns. Until more is understood about the relationship between elevated avian diversity and the physical environment of the land-shore interface, our results suggest that the Sea's surface be stabilized near its present level. Future management schemes at the Salton Sea that include reductions of water sources should be carefully analyzed, so as to not jeopardize the terrestrial avifauna at this unique ecosystem. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Formation of the Salton Sea: A numerical model of fault interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, J.; Liu, M.; Wang, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Salton Sea is an active rifting zone located in the San Andreas Fault-Imperial Fault (SAF-IMF) transtensional stepover, initiated since 0.5~0.1 Ma. By that time the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) had already developed, and the step-over between the SJF and the IMF is narrower and shorter than the SAF-IMF step-over. Why the IMF did not connect with the SJF, which would have resulted in a restraining bend, but connected with the SAF to form a releasing bend (pull-apart basin)? To address this question and explore the SAF-SJF-IMF interactions over the strike-slip step-overs, we have built a three-dimensional viscoelasto-plastic finite element model that includes the first order fault geometry and lithospheric rheological structures. Our results show that, given the same fault strength for the SAF and the SJF, plastic strain would preferably localize in the SAF-IMF step-over. In other words, nature would prefer the formation of a releasing bend to a restraining bend. Weakening of the SAF relative to the SJF, as indicated by the high heat flow under the Salton Trough and the accelerated slip rate of the southern SAF since 90 ka, would help to explain why the Salton Sea rifting activated in the past ~0.5-1 Ma.

  4. Born from a flood: The Salton Sea and its story of survival

    DOE PAGES

    Tompson, Andrew F. B.

    2016-02-02

    The Salton Sea is a terminal lake located in the deepest point of the topographically closed Salton Trough in southeastern California. It is currently the largest lake in area in the state. It was created by a flooding event along the Colorado River in 1905–1907, similar to the way historical floods over past centuries created ephemeral incarnations of ancient Lake Cahuilla in the same location. Its position at the center of today’s Imperial Valley, a hot and arid locale home to some of the most productive irrigated agricultural lands in the United States, has ensured its ongoing survival through amore » delicate balance between agricultural runoff, its principal form of input, and vast evaporation losses. Nevertheless, its parallel role as a recreational resource and important wildlife habitat, established over its first century of existence, is threatened by increasing salinity decreasing water quality, and reduced water allocations from the Colorado River that feeds the valley’s agriculture. Furthermore, the Salton Sea faces an increasingly uncertain future that will be influenced by reduced water imports from the Colorado River, demands for additional water sources to support farming and energy industries in the valley, and needs to stabilize the lake salinity, maintain recreational resources, and preserve what have become important ecosystems and wildlife habitats.« less

  5. Shallow sediment and upper crustal structure beneath the Salton Sea as imaged by active source marine seismic refraction in conjunction with the Salton Seismic Imaging Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, A. M.; Sahakian, V. J.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    In the spring of 2011 we expanded a campaign of marine seismic reflection efforts in the Salton Sea in conjunction with the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) to collect active-source marine refraction data using Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) and a marine airgun. The Salton Trough presents an opportunity to study rifting processes similar to those seen in the Gulf of California, as well as the seismic hazards associated with the southern terminus of the San Andreas Fault (SAF). An areal array, comprised of 78 OBS deployments, was focused in the southern part of the sea but also included a line parallel to the San Andreas Fault (SAF) , line 1, extending then length of the sea, and a line perpendicular to the SAF, crossing the northern basin, line 7. These lines are collinear with high-resolution reflection profiles and existing chirp profiles. The OBS array was concentrated in the southern Salton Sea to investigate the pull-apart deformation reported by Brothers et al. (2009). Using the methods of Van Avendonk (2004) we seek to constrain upper crustal velocities in this region by travel-time tomography. Beginning with P-wave arrival times we trace the ray paths through the model space and invert for seismic velocities. By iterating from the forward picking to the inversion, we reduce the chi-squared error to produce a 2D depth profile of the seismic velocities while maintaining a stable model. Line 1 uses 38 OBSs and 470 shots from a 210 cu. in. airgun to model the upper 4 km beneath the Salton Sea. Velocities vary from 1.5 km/s in the upper 1 km to an apparent 4 km deep basement velocity of 5.5 km/s. Velocity variations with depth agree with major boundaries in the co-linear seismic reflection profiles and the divergence toward the south/fault structure is also captured in these early models. Preliminary results for line 7 show similarly varying velocities - 1.5 to 3 km/s in the upper 2 kilometers of the crust, to slightly over 4 km/s at 4 km depth. Further

  6. Pesticides and PCBs in sediments and fish from the Salton Sea, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Sapozhnikova, Yelena; Bawardi, Ola; Schlenk, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    The Salton Sea, the largest manmade lake in California, is officially designated by the State of California as an agricultural drainage reservoir. The purpose of this study was to determine organochlorine and organophosphorous pesticides, as well as polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in sediments and fish tissues in the Salton Sea and evaluate the relative ecological risk of these compounds. Sediment samples were taken during 2000-2001 and fish tissues (Tilapia mossambique, Cynoscion xanthulu) were collected in May 2001. All samples were analyzed for 12 chlorinated pesticides, 6 organophosphorus pesticides, and 55 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. SigmaDichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (SigmaDDT) and total PCB concentrations observed in sediments ranged from 10 to 40 and 116 to 304 ng/g dry wt, respectively. DDT/DDD ratios in sediments and fish tissues of the northern Sea in 2001 indicated recent DDT exposure. Lindane, dieldrin, dichlorodiphenylethane (DDE) and total PCB concentrations detected in sediments exceeded probable effect levels established for freshwater ecosystems, and pp-DDE and total PCB concentrations were higher than effect range-median values developed for marine and estuarine sediments. In fish liver, concentrations of endrin and SigmaDDT exceeded threshold effect level established for invertebrates. SigmaDDT concentrations detected in fish tissues were higher than threshold concentrations for the protection of wildlife consumers of aquatic biota. DDE concentrations in fish muscles tissues were above the 50 ng/g concentration threshold for the protection of predatory birds. Dimethoate, diazinon, malathion, chlorpyrifos, disulfoton varied from < or = 0.15 to 9.5 ng/g dry wt in sediments and from < or = 0.1 to 80.3 ng/g wet wt in fish tissues. Disulfoton was found in relatively high concentrations (up to 80.3 ng/g) in all organs from Tilapia and Corvina. These results demonstrate continued contamination of specific organochlorine

  7. The epizootiology of type C botulism in fish-eating birds at Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nol, P.

    2002-01-01

    During 1996, type C avian botulism killed over 15,000 fish-eating birds at the Salton Sea in southern California. Amont those affected were nearly 10,000 western white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) and over 1,200 endangered California brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis californicus). Since 1996, smaller epizootics have occurred every year. Type C botulism is not typically associated with fish-eating birds. In the case of the Salton Sea, Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) are the suspected source of type C toxin, although the mechanism by which the fish acquire the toxin is still unknown. The goals of this study were to: 1) Determine presence/absence of active Clostridium botulinum type C and type C botulinum toxin in tilapia in the Salton Sea. 2) Use geospatial analyses to evaluate relationships between patterns of mortality in birds and fish and presence/absence of toxin and/or toxin-producing bacteria in sediments and fish. We investigated a method of detecting C. botulinum type C cells in the intestinal contents of Mozambique tilapia. This method involved extraction of predominantly cellular DNA and uses a polymerase chain reaction assay to detect presence of type C toxin gene. We collected sick, dead and healthy fish from various sites throughout the Sea during the summers of 1999 to 2001 in order to test them for the presence of active C. botulinum type C by PCR and for the presence of type C toxin by ELISA and mouse test. The results demonstrate that the tilapia population in the Salton Sea harbors C. botulinum type C cells within their gastrointestinal tract and the prevalence of this organism varies from year to year. The total number of fish with toxin-producing bacteria was significantly greater in 2000 than in 2001. No difference in the numbers of positives was detected between sick and dead fish compared to live fish, and there were no differences noted with regard to location of fish collection. The prevalence of active type C

  8. (Sulfide-oxide-silicate phase equilibria and associated fluid inclusion properties in the Salton Sea geothermal system, California)

    SciTech Connect

    McKibben, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    Our studies involved petrographic, fluid inclusion, geochemical and stable isotopic studies of drillcores and fluids from the Salton Sea geothermal system. Our initial studies revealed the presence of previously-unrecognized evaporitic anhydrite at depth throughout the geothermal system. The high salinity of the Salton Sea geothermal brines previously had been attributed to low-temperature dissolution of surficial evaporitic deposits by meteoric waters. Our microthermometric studies of halite--containing fluid inclusions in the meta-evaporites indicated that the high salinity of the geothermal brines is derived in part from the hydrothermal metamorphism of relatively deeply-buried salt and evaporites. In addition, our research concentrated on mineralized fractures in drillcores.

  9. Development of downhole instruments for use in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia developed high temperature logging instruments for use in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project. These tools - Kuster mechanical tools for measuring temperature, pressure, and flow; a temperature and pressure tool built around an electronic memory; and a timing and control unit to power a downhole sampler - were all designed for slickline operation to temperatures up to 400/sup 0/C. The drilling of the scientific well and the application of these tools in it were successful. The technology advances made in the development of these tools have been transferred to industry. These advances should prove valuable in future scientific and commercial applications.

  10. Comparison of methods for recovering metal values from Salton Sea KGRA Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

    1982-10-01

    As part of its program for developing plentiful domestic resources, the Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, is investigating methods for recovering metal values from geobrines. Two precipitation techniques were evaluated for recovering selected metal values from Salton Sea KGRA brines. Lime addition precipitates more than 95 pct of the iron, manganese, lead, and zinc, while sulfide addition precipitates more than 90 pct of the lead and zinc and lesser amounts of iron and manganese. A comparison of these techniques and a discussion of the respective advantages and disadvantages are presented.

  11. Iron silicate scale formation and inhibition at the Salton Sea geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, D.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Iron silicate is the most prevalent scale deposited from Salton Sea geothermal brine during processing to recover its heat content. The scale has been characterized by elemental analysis and by infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, Mossbauer and electron diffraction spectroscopy. Analysis of the scale characterization data assists in assigning a chemical structure and supports a proposed formation mechanism. Based on this mechanism, iron silicate scale deposition is shown to be inhibited by the addition of acid to the brine, forming the basis of Unocal's patented scale control technology.

  12. Total Selenium in Irrigation Drain Inflows to the Salton Sea, California, April 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Saiki, Michael K.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results for the final sampling period (April 2009) of a 4-year monitoring program to characterize selenium concentrations in selected irrigation drains flowing into the Salton Sea, California. Total selenium and total suspended solids were determined in water samples. Total selenium, percent total organic carbon, and particle size were determined in sediments. Mean total selenium concentrations in water ranged from 0.98 to 22.9 micrograms per liter. Total selenium concentrations in sediment ranged from 0.078 to 5.0 micrograms per gram dry weight.

  13. Occurrence of west nile virus infection in raptors at the Salton Sea, California.

    PubMed

    Dusek, Robert J; Iko, William M; Hofmeister, Erik K

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the prevalence of West Nile virus (WNV)-neutralizing antibodies and infectious virus, and the occurrence of overwinter transmission in two raptor species during January and March 2006 at the Salton Sea, Imperial County, California. We captured 208 American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) (January, n=100; March, n=108) and 116 Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia) (January, n=52; March, n=64). Laboratory analysis revealed that 83% of American Kestrels and 31% of Burrowing Owls were positive for WNV-neutralizing antibodies. Additionally, two seroconversions were detected in Burrowing Owls between January and March. Infectious WNV, consistent with acute infection, was not detected in any bird. PMID:20688694

  14. Occurrence of west nile virus infection in raptors at the Salton Sea, California.

    PubMed

    Dusek, Robert J; Iko, William M; Hofmeister, Erik K

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the prevalence of West Nile virus (WNV)-neutralizing antibodies and infectious virus, and the occurrence of overwinter transmission in two raptor species during January and March 2006 at the Salton Sea, Imperial County, California. We captured 208 American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) (January, n=100; March, n=108) and 116 Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia) (January, n=52; March, n=64). Laboratory analysis revealed that 83% of American Kestrels and 31% of Burrowing Owls were positive for WNV-neutralizing antibodies. Additionally, two seroconversions were detected in Burrowing Owls between January and March. Infectious WNV, consistent with acute infection, was not detected in any bird.

  15. Type C botulism in pelicans and other fish-eating birds at the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Nol, P.; Pelizza, C.; Sturm, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    In 1996, type C avian botulism killed over 10,000 pelicans and nearly 10,000 other fish-eating birds at the Salton Sea in southern California. Although botulism had been previously documented in waterbirds at the Sea, this die-off was unusual in that it involved primarily fish-eating birds. The American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorynchos) was the species with the greatest mortality in 1996. Since 1996, mortality has recurred every year but losses have declined (<2,000 birds/year), with relatively more Brown Pelicans (P. occidentalis) than White Pelicans afflicted. In 2000, morbidity and mortality of Brown Pelicans with type C botulism (1311) approached the numbers afflicted in 1996 (2034). In recent years, mortality reached a peak earlier in the summer, July and August, in contrast to 1996 when mortality reached a peak in September. An exotic fish species, tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), has been implicated as the source of toxin for birds at Salton Sea, but the source of toxin for fish is unknown.

  16. A linked hydrodynamic and water quality model for the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung, E.G.; Schladow, S.G.; Perez-Losada, J.; Robertson, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    A linked hydrodynamic and water quality model was developed and applied to the Salton Sea. The hydrodynamic component is based on the one-dimensional numerical model, DLM. The water quality model is based on a new conceptual model for nutrient cycling in the Sea, and simulates temperature, total suspended sediment concentration, nutrient concentrations, including PO4-3, NO3-1 and NH4+1, DO concentration and chlorophyll a concentration as functions of depth and time. Existing water temperature data from 1997 were used to verify that the model could accurately represent the onset and breakup of thermal stratification. 1999 is the only year with a near-complete dataset for water quality variables for the Salton Sea. The linked hydrodynamic and water quality model was run for 1999, and by adjustment of rate coefficients and other water quality parameters, a good match with the data was obtained. In this article, the model is fully described and the model results for reductions in external phosphorus load on chlorophyll a distribution are presented. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  17. Body and Surface-wave ambient noise seismic interferometry in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabey, L.; Hole, J. A.; Han, L.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data were acquired as a part of the Salton Seismic Imaging Project in March 2011. Alongside traditional explosive source recording, a dense array of 486 seismometers across the Salton Sea Geothermal Field and Brawley Seismic Zone recorded 135 hours of natural noise sources. The geothermal field is located within the Imperial Valley in Southern California and is bordered by the southern end of the Salton Sea. There is abundant microseismicity recorded in the area, including over 100-recorded earthquakes, wave action, geothermal pumping operations, a railroad, and two highways. Volcanism associated with rifting processes provides a prolific heat source to the system marking the Salton Sea Geothermal Field as one of the largest and hottest geothermal fields in California. Seismic interferometry is a technique that uses continuous recordings of natural noise to create a 'virtual source' by cross-correlation of receiver pairs followed by stacking. This method has been highly successful for surface waves and a few previous studies have shown evidence of body waves and reflections. As anticipated the abundant tectonic and induced noise sources within our study area produced visible surface and body waves. Inclusion of the earthquakes with normalized amplitudes improved overall data quality. The virtual shots from our data our compare well to our twelve explosive shots at near offsets. The highest quality virtual source gathers are produced near anthropogenic noise sources. In particular, one large geothermal plant acted as a sufficiently strong point source producing a gather similar to what we would see from an explosive source. Surface waves recorded on 4.5-Hz geophones were retrievable from 1-6Hz after cross-correlation and stacking. Up to 30km of body waves were also observed in the 25-30Hz range. Future studies will include surface wave dispersion analysis and attempt body wave reflection imaging. The 100-meter spacing of our

  18. Thermal and petrologic constraints on the lower crustal melt accumulation in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, O.; Dufek, J.; Mangan, M.; Wright, H. M. N.

    2014-12-01

    Heat transfer in active volcanic areas is governed by complex coupling between tectonic and magmatic processes. These two processes provide unique imprints on the petrologic and thermal evolution of magma by controlling the geometry, depth, longevity, composition, and fraction of melt in the crust. The active volcanism, tectonic extension, and significantly high surface heat flow in Salton Sea Geothermal Field, CA, provides information about the dynamic heat transfer processes in its crust. The volcanism in the area is associated with tectonic extension over the last 500 ka, followed by subsidence and sedimentation at the surface level and dike emplacement in the lower crust. Although significant progress has been made describing the tectonic evolution and petrology of the erupted products of the Salton Buttes, their coupled control on the crustal heat transfer and feedback on the melt evolution remain unclear. To address these concepts, we develop a two-dimensional finite volume model and investigate the compositional and thermal evolution of the melt and crust in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field through a one-way coupled thermal model that accounts for tectonic extension, lower crustal magma emplacement, sedimentation, and subsidence. Through our simulations, we give quantitative estimates to the thermal and compositional evolution and longevity of the lower crustal melt source in the crustal section. We further compare the model results with petrologic constraints. Our thermal balance equations show that crustal melting is limited and the melt is dominated by mantle-derived material. Similarly, petrologic work on δ18O isotope ratios suggests fractional crystallization of basalt with minor crustal assimilation. In addition, we suggest scenarios for the melt fraction, composition, enthalpy release, geometry and depth of magma reservoirs, their temporal evolution, and the timescales of magmatic storage and evolution processes. These parameters provide the source

  19. Connecting Anthropogenic Seismicity Rates To Operational Parameters At The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Southern California (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Lajoie, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Geothermal power is generated at several major volcanic fields in California. As efforts to monitor seismicity increase, methods to understand the anthropogenic component need to improve. Ideally, induced earthquake rate should be forecast based on publicly-reported volumes of fluid injection or other operational parameters. At the flash facilities in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the total volume of fluid extracted or injected tracks the long-term evolution of seismicity. However, for recent years net fluid volume (extracted-injected) is better correlated with seismicity. After correcting for the variable aftershock rate using an Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence model (ETAS), we fit the background earthquake rate with a linear combination of injection and net production rate that allows us to track the secular evolution of the field. The number of earthquakes per fluid volume injected decreases gradually over time. In the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the new analysis of induced seismicity provides a template for future evaluation of hazard directly based on measureable, controllable operational quantities. The interactions of these anthropogenic events with the larger-scale tectonic and volcanic systems remains to be investigated. Results of the linear model of seismicity based on a combination of net production and injection. (a) Example of observed seismicity rate and model prediction using the reported fluid data and the best-fit linear model. (b) Number of earthquakes triggered per net volume of fluid extracted or total fluid injection.

  20. Potential impacts of geothermal development on outdoor recreational use of the Salton Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Twiss, R.; Sidener, J.; Bingham, G.; Burke, J.E.; Hall, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study analyzes the consequences that full-field development of geothermal resources may have on recreational industry and aesthetic resources in Imperial Valley. Significant changes in the level of the Salton Sea and extensive development of outlying desert areas, such as East Mesa, resulting from geothermal development will significantly affect fishing and water-oriented sports, wildlife refuges, and off-road vehicle activity in East Mesa. The aesthetic impacts are illustrated by the use of pencil sketches of views organized in sectors around the Salton Sea. The sketches allow selection and emphasis of important detail not obtainable with the use of photographs or viewshed analyses. Generally, the aesthetic impacts of geothermal development are superimposed on an environment already affected by rural development, some industrialization, and highly intensive agricultural activity. Power plant structures, transmission lines, and, to some extent, water and steam pipelines are a noticeable addition to the local visual scene but do not significantly alter the aesthetics now dominated by man's activity. In the wildlife refuge areas of Niland and on exposed ridgelines, however, there is a potential for significant aesthetic impact. The aesthetic impacts can be mitigated to some extent in these areas by location and design choices and by clustering the geothermal plants. In addition, housing and commercial development to support direct and indirect population growth will create a variety of aesthetic impacts of varying beneficial and detrimental character in different locales throughout the valley. Several community design concepts are proposed to accommodate this residential development.

  1. Microscopic studies of hydrothermally metamorphosed shales from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Y.C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Scanning, transmission, and analytical electron microscopy have been used to study textural and chemical changes of minerals, including phyllosilicates, chain silicates and titanium oxides, in argillaceous sediments from the depth (temperature) interval of 256 m (115 C) to 1547 m (330 C) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, which have been subjected to low grade burial and hydrothermal metamorphism. The phyllosilicates progress from an illite zone (115-220 C), through a chlorite zone (220-310 C) and a biotite zone (310-330 C). Authigenic anatase occurred in the temperature range 115-120 C whereas titanite occurred in 300-330 C. Phyllosilicate stability relations indicate that either increase in temperature of changing ion concentrations in solution with depth are capable of explaining the observed mineral-depth zoning. The uniform crystal size of all authigenic phyllosilicate crystals, homogeneity of composition of individual crystals and the lack of replacement or dissolution textures of the pre-existing phases are all compatible with hydrothermal alteration having occurred in a single event rather than over a large time interval. Textural, chemical and microstructural relations observed in this study imply that reactions involve dissolution of detrital phases, material transport through fluid, and precipitation from solution. Such a dissolution/precipitation mechanism is compatible with an open system such as Salton Sea shales characterized by high water/rock ratio and permeability. In contrast, diffusion along edge dislocations or grain boundaries concomitant with gradual replacement of reactants by products across the reaction front dominate relatively closed systems.

  2. Restoration and recovery of damaged eco-epidemiological systems: application to the Salton Sea, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Raw, S N; Roy, P; Rai, Vikas

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we have proposed and analysed a mathematical model to figure out possible ways to rescue a damaged eco-epidemiological system. Our strategy of rescue is based on the realization of the fact that chaotic dynamics often associated with excursions of system dynamics to extinction-sized densities. Chaotic dynamics of the model is depicted by 2D scans, bifurcation analysis, largest Lyapunov exponent and basin boundary calculations. 2D scan results show that μ, the total death rate of infected prey should be brought down in order to avoid chaotic dynamics. We have carried out linear and nonlinear stability analysis and obtained Hopf-bifurcation and persistence criteria of the proposed model system. The other outcome of this study is a suggestion which involves removal of infected fishes at regular interval of time. The estimation of timing and periodicity of the removal exercises would be decided by the nature of infection more than anything else. If this suggestion is carefully worked out and implemented, it would be most effective in restoring the health of the ecosystem which has immense ecological, economic and aesthetic potential. We discuss the implications of this result to Salton Sea, California, USA. The restoration of the Salton Sea provides a perspective for conservation and management strategy. PMID:23403372

  3. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K.

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  4. Subsidence rates at the southern Salton Sea consistent with reservoir depletion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbour, Andrew; Evans, Eileen; Hickman, Stephen H.; Eneva, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Space geodetic measurements from the Envisat satellite between 2003 and 2010 show that subsidence rates near the southeastern shoreline of the Salton Sea in Southern California are up to 52mmyr−1 greater than the far-field background rate. By comparing these measurements with model predictions, we find that this subsidence appears to be dominated by poroelastic contraction associated with ongoing geothermal fluid production, rather than the purely fault-related subsidence proposed previously. Using a simple point source model, we suggest that the source of this proposed volumetric strain is at depths between 1.0 km and 2.4 km (95% confidence interval), comparable to generalized boundaries of the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir. We find that fault slip on two previously imaged tectonic structures, which are part of a larger system of faults in the Brawley Seismic Zone, is not an adequate predictor of surface velocity fields because the magnitudes of the best fitting slip rates are often greater than the full plate boundary rate and at least 2 times greater than characteristic sedimentation rates in this region. Large-scale residual velocity anomalies indicate that spatial patterns predicted by fault slip are incompatible with the observations.

  5. Developing a process for commercial silica production from Salton Sea brines

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W; McCutcheon, M; Leif, R; Bruton, C

    2000-09-25

    The goal of this joint LLNL-CalEnergy project is to develop a method for precipitating marketable silica from spent Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) brines. Many markets for silica exist. We have initially targeted production of silica as a rubber additive. Silica reinforced rubber gives tires less rolling resistance, greater tear strength, and better adhesion to steel belts. Previous silica precipitates produced by CalEnergy from Salton Sea brines were not suitable as rubber additives. They did not to disperse well in the rubber precursors and produced inferior rubber. CalEnergy currently minimizes silica scaling in some of their production facilities by acidifying the brine pH. The rate of silica precipitation slows down as the pH is lowered, so that energy extraction and brine reinfection are possible without unacceptable amounts of scaling even with more than 700 ppm SiO{sub 2} in solution. We are adding a step in which a small amount of base is added to the acidified brine to precipitate silica before reinfection. By carefully controlling the type, rate, and amount of base addition, we can optimize the properties of the precipitate to approach those of an ideal rubber additive.

  6. Preliminary report on shallow research drilling in the Salton Sea region

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R.L.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

    1988-01-14

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The central thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09/degree/C/m) to extreme (0.83/degree/C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is greater than 600 mW/m/sup 2/ and in some areas exceeds 1200 mW/m/sup 2/. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes.

  7. Ecological Risk Assessment for Selenium in the Evaluation of Restoration Alternatives for Salton Sea, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, H. M.; Pulley, T. S.; Sample, B. E.; Long, S. P.; Byron, E. R.; Nielsen, K. J.

    2006-12-01

    Selenium is a chemical of ecological concern at the Salton Sea because it occurs at elevated concentrations in water, sediment, and biota of this terminal lake in southern California. The State of California is required to evaluate alternatives for restoration of long-term stable aquatic and shoreline habitats for the historic levels and diversity of fish and wildlife that depend on the Salton Sea and for protection of water quality. Ecological risks associated with selenium were evaluated under eight restoration alternatives (as well as current conditions and no action) in a programmatic-level environmental impact report. Varying types and configurations of marine, estuarine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats would exist under the different alternatives. Ecological risks were associated primarily with existing and future selenium concentrations in sediment and inflow waters. In addition to completing an ecological risk assessment for each of the habitat types in each of the alternatives, we developed an approach for ranking risk among alternatives based on the combination of habitats, representative receptors evaluated, and area of each habitat. Results of the ranking enable a comparison of alternatives with respect to their expected selenium-associated risks for fish and aquatic birds (the main receptors of concern).

  8. Corrosion in geothermal brines of the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.D.; Carter, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion research is being conducted by the Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, to determine suitable construction materials for geothermal resource recovery plants. High chromium-molybdenum iron-base alloys, nickel-base and titanium-base alloys, and a titanium-zirconium-molybdenum alloy (TZM) exhibited good resistance to general, crevice, pitting, and weld corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in laboratory tests in deaerated brines of the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area (KGRA) type at 232 /degree/C and in brine containing dissolved carbon dioxide and methane. Only titanium-base alloys were resistant to corrosion in oxygenated Salton Sea KGRA-type brine. Copper adversely affected the resistance to general corrosion of low-alloy steels in deaerated brine, whereas chromium, nickel, silicon, and titanium improved it. Carbon steel, Type 4130 steel, and Types 410 and 430 stainless steels exhibited poor corrosion resistance in field tests in five brine and steam process streams produced from geothermal well Magmamax No. 1. These alloys were highly susceptible to pitting and crevice corrosion. General corrosion rates were high for the carbon and Type 4130 steels. 24 refs.

  9. Corrosion in geothermal brines of the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.D.; Carter, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion research is being conducted by the Bureau of Mines to determine suitable construction materialls for geothermal resource recovery plants. High chromium-molybdenum iron-base alloys, nickel- and titanium-base alloys, and titanium-zirconium-molybdenum alloy exhibited good resistance to general, crevice, pitting, and weld corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in laboratory tests in deaerated brines of the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) type at 232/sup 0/C and in brine containing dissolved carbon dioxide and methane. Only titanium-base alloys were resistant to corrosion in oxygenated Salton Sea KGRA-type brine. Copper adversely affected the resistance to general corrosion of low-alloy steels in deaerated brine, whereas chromium, nickel, silicon, and titanium improved it. Carbon steel, type 4130 steel, and types 410 and 430 stainless steels exhibited poor corrosion resistance in field tests in five brine and steam process streams produced from geothermal well Magmamax 1. These alloys were highly susceptible to pitting and crevice corrosion. General corrosion rates were high for carbon and type 4130 steels.

  10. Thermal regime of the State 2-14 well, Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Priest, S.S.; Duda, L.E.; Carson, C.C.; Hendricks, J.D.; Robison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature logs were made repeatedly during breaks in drilling and both during and after flow tests in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project well (State 2-14). The purpose of these logs was to assist in identifying zones of fluid loss or gain and to characterize reservoir temperatures. At the conclusion of the active phase of the project, a series of logs was begun in an attempt to establish the equilibrium temperature profile. Thermal gradients decrease from about 250 mK m-1 in the upper few hundred meters to just below 200 mK m-1 near the base of the conductive cap. Using one interpretation, thermal conductivities increase with depth (mainly because of decreasing porosity), resulting in component heat flows that agree reasonably well with the mean of about 450 mW m-2. This value agrees well with heat flow data from the shallow wells within the Salton Sea geothermal field. A second interpretation, in which measured temperature coefficients of quartz- and carbonate-rich rocks are used to correct thermal conductivity, results in lower mean conductivities that are roughly constant with depth and, consequently, systematically decreasing heat flux averaging about 350 mW m-2 below 300 m. This interpretation is consistent with the inference (from fluid inclusion studies) that the rocks in this part of the field were once several tens of degrees Celsius hotter than they are now. The age of this possible disturbance is estimated at a few thousand years. -from Authors

  11. Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

    1988-10-04

    The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Restoration and recovery of damaged eco-epidemiological systems: application to the Salton Sea, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Raw, S N; Roy, P; Rai, Vikas

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we have proposed and analysed a mathematical model to figure out possible ways to rescue a damaged eco-epidemiological system. Our strategy of rescue is based on the realization of the fact that chaotic dynamics often associated with excursions of system dynamics to extinction-sized densities. Chaotic dynamics of the model is depicted by 2D scans, bifurcation analysis, largest Lyapunov exponent and basin boundary calculations. 2D scan results show that μ, the total death rate of infected prey should be brought down in order to avoid chaotic dynamics. We have carried out linear and nonlinear stability analysis and obtained Hopf-bifurcation and persistence criteria of the proposed model system. The other outcome of this study is a suggestion which involves removal of infected fishes at regular interval of time. The estimation of timing and periodicity of the removal exercises would be decided by the nature of infection more than anything else. If this suggestion is carefully worked out and implemented, it would be most effective in restoring the health of the ecosystem which has immense ecological, economic and aesthetic potential. We discuss the implications of this result to Salton Sea, California, USA. The restoration of the Salton Sea provides a perspective for conservation and management strategy.

  13. Fault Architecture of the Salton Sea through multi-scale Seismic Reflection Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, A. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Baskin, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Two sets of seismic reflection images collected in the Salton Sea, California in May 2010 and April 2011 highlight a longstanding episode of extension-related deformation within the Salton Sea pull-apart system. These data are part of a continued multi-scale network of seismic studies of the faults within the Salton Trough. In 2010, we collected ~350 line-km of data using a 75-m-long, 24-channel streamer and a 1.6kJ "sparker" source fired at 1.2 sec intervals. These images document a series of south-east dipping normal faults that are related to the current pull-apart geometry; this configuration appears to persist for only the past 20-40 ka. Newly acquired low fold images (~150 line-km) collected using a 300-m-long, 48-channel streamer and a Generator Injector (GI) airgun source firing at 1 min intervals show that the same structures seen in the higher resolution (2010) data as well as high-resolution seismic CHIRP images collected in 2007 (Brothers et al., 2009, 2010) continue to depths of >2.5 km. From this deeper imagery, we infer that the structures seen in the very shallow CHIRP data are through-going to seismogenic depths and play a dominant role in strain partitioning from the Imperial Fault to the San Andreas Fault through the Brawley Seismic Zone. The 2011 reflection and refraction data are part of a larger collaborative project involving Cal Tech, Virginia Tech, the USGS, University of Nevada, Reno and Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Within this study we seek to understand the mechanisms of how crustal thinning and rifting develops. The fault dip imaged at both scales is ~50-60° and show vertical offsets (sub-meter to tens of meters) distinguishable to the limits of our imaging resolution. These multi-scale data offer a unique opportunity to calculate the timing and mode of motion in the most actively deforming portion of the Salton Trough. The insights gained through these data allow a greater understanding of the tectonics and seismic hazards

  14. Progress and future directions in chemical methods for the control of scale at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Harrar, J.E.

    1980-04-01

    Using a pilot-sized brine handling system at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, a series of field tests have been conducted in which various chemical compounds were examined as possible scale control agents. Results of these tests are mentioned with reference to publications on them. (MHR)

  15. Physical, chemical, and biological data for detailed study of irrigation drainage in the Salton Sea area, California, 1988-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, R.A.; Rivera, Mick

    1993-01-01

    This report contains physical, chemical, and biological data associated with irrigation drainage in the Salton Sea area collected during the late 1980's. The data were collected in support of the u.S. Department of the Interior's National Irrigation Water Quality Program in the Western United States to evaluate effects on the environment from potential toxics in irrigation-induced drainage. The data have been used to support interpretations in several recent publications. This data report is the companion to a comprehensive U.S. Geological Survey interpretive report that describes the geochemical and biological pathways of potential toxics, especially selenium, in the study area. The report contains data on concentra- tions of a broad suite of trace elements in soil, irrigation (Colorado River) water, drainwater, surface water (including the Salton Sea), ground- water, aquatic plants, invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, fish, birds, bird eggs, and turtle eggs. Included, also, are light stable isotope (hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur), tritium, and radiocarbon data for selected aqueous samples and organochlorine-pesticide concentrations in biota. Geochemical samples were collected from more than 100 drainwater-collection sites, several surface- water locations, 15 fields, 3 multiple-depth lysimeter and piezometer installations, and the Alamo River Delta on the southeastern shore of the Salton Sea, and from laboratory evaporations of Colorado River water. Biological samples were collected from 39 sites, including 16 Salton Sea shore locations, 5 streams, 7 freshwater impound- ments, 11 drainwater ditches, and 2 additional locations in the Imperial Valley. (USGS)

  16. Chemical Data for Detailed Studies of Irrigation Drainage in the Salton Sea Area, California, 1995?2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present all chemical data from the Salton Sea area collected by the U.S. Geological Survey between 1995 and 2001. The data were collected primarily for the Department of the Interior's National Irrigation Water Quality Program (NIWQP). The report also contains a brief summary and citation to investigations done for the NIWQP between 1992 and 1995. The NIWQP began studies in the Salton Sea area in 1986 to evaluate effects on the environment from potential toxins, especially selenium, in irrigation-induced drainage. This data report is a companion to several reports published from the earlier studies and to interpretive publications that make use of historical and recent data from this area. Data reported herein are from five collection studies. Water, bottom material, and suspended sediment collected in 1995-96 from the New River, the lower Colorado River, and the All-American Canal were analyzed for elements, semi-volatile (extractable) organic compounds, and organochlorine compounds. Sufficient suspended sediment for chemical analyses was obtained by tangential-flow filtration. A grab sample of surficial bottom sediment collected from near the deepest part of the Salton Sea in 1996 was analyzed for 44 elements and organic and inorganic carbon. High selenium concentration confirmed the effective transfer (sequestration) of selenium into the bottom sediment. Similar grab samples were collected 2 years later (1998) from 11 locations in the Salton Sea and analyzed for elements, as before, and also for nutrients, organochlorine compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Nutrients were measured in bottom water, and water-column profiles were obtained for pH, conductance, temperature, and dissolved oxygen. Element and nutrient concentrations were obtained in 1999 from cores at 2 of the above 11 sites, in the north subbasin of the Salton Sea. The most-recent study reported herein was done in 2001 and contains element data on

  17. Loading of the San Andreas fault by flood-induced rupture of faults beneath the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel; Kilb, Debi; Luttrell, Karen; Driscoll, Neal W.; Kent, Graham

    2011-01-01

    The southern San Andreas fault has not experienced a large earthquake for approximately 300 years, yet the previous five earthquakes occurred at ~180-year intervals. Large strike-slip faults are often segmented by lateral stepover zones. Movement on smaller faults within a stepover zone could perturb the main fault segments and potentially trigger a large earthquake. The southern San Andreas fault terminates in an extensional stepover zone beneath the Salton Sea—a lake that has experienced periodic flooding and desiccation since the late Holocene. Here we reconstruct the magnitude and timing of fault activity beneath the Salton Sea over several earthquake cycles. We observe coincident timing between flooding events, stepover fault displacement and ruptures on the San Andreas fault. Using Coulomb stress models, we show that the combined effect of lake loading, stepover fault movement and increased pore pressure could increase stress on the southern San Andreas fault to levels sufficient to induce failure. We conclude that rupture of the stepover faults, caused by periodic flooding of the palaeo-Salton Sea and by tectonic forcing, had the potential to trigger earthquake rupture on the southern San Andreas fault. Extensional stepover zones are highly susceptible to rapid stress loading and thus the Salton Sea may be a nucleation point for large ruptures on the southern San Andreas fault.

  18. Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial Valley, California as a site for continental scientific drilling. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1983-03-01

    The Salton Trough, where seafloor spreading systems of the East Pacific Rise transition into the San Andreas transform fault system, is the site of such continental rifting and basin formation today. The largest thermal anomaly in the trough, the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), is of interest to both thermal regimes and mineral resources investigators. At this site, temperatures >350/sup 0/C and metal-rich brines with 250,000 mg/L TDS have been encountered at <2 km depth. Republic Geothermal Inc. will drill a new well to 3.7 km in the SSGF early in 1983; we propose add-on experiments in it. If funded, we will obtain selective water and core samples and a large-diameter casing installed to 3.7 km will permit later deepening. In Phase 2, the well would be continuously cored to 5.5 km and be available for scientific studies until July 1985. The deepened well would encounter hydrothermal regimes of temperature and pressure never before sampled.

  19. Mining geothermal resources in the Salton Sea KGRA: products and values

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.R.

    1984-12-01

    Exploration for and production of geothermal resources closely parallels mining ventures. The winning of energy from geothermal resources is mining steam, or in other cases mining the resource to upgrade secondary (binary) fluid streams. The techniques and expertise of those familiar with mining, the turning of a resource to a reserve for beneficial use, are necessary to enable production from which the benefits of geothermal resources may be realized. There is no better identified resource illustrating these observations than the high temperature and highly mineralized Salton Sea KGRA in the Imperial Valley of California. A review of the development history of this resource together with the successes and failures evident today reveals a lack of cooperation among the industrial segments necessary for its successful development.

  20. Recent geothermal developments in the Imperial Valley: Brawley, Salton Sea, Heber

    SciTech Connect

    Papay, L.T.

    1983-01-01

    Imperial Valley programs in geothermal energy are reviewed. The Brawley plant has had a relatively high availability on line since its startup in 1980. The startup at Salton Sea plant was surprisingly smooth. Using these research projects, all of the technical parameters for commercial development of geothermal energy will be known in a year or two. Native brine handling processes, casing materials and configurations, and turbine modifications are being studied. The PUC's decision on the Heber plant was a temporary setback. PUC ruled that projects will not be approved unless they yield competitive busbar costs. The Avoided Cost concept has become the benchmark at PUC. But Avoided Cost does not account for the higher initial design costs and unknown parameters of startup as opposed to mature plant costs. Avoided Cost is seen as the only obstacle to commercial developement in all areas.

  1. Development And Application Of A Hydrothermal Model For The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kasameyer, P.; Younker, L.; Hanson, J.

    1984-01-01

    A simple lateral flow model adequately explains many of the features associated with the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Earthquake swarms, a magnetic anomaly, and aspects of the gravity anomaly are all indirect evidence for the igneous activity which is the ultimate source of heat for the system. Heat is transferred from this area of intrusion by lateral spreading of hot water in a reservoir beneath an impermeable cap rock. A two dimensional analytic model encompassing this transport mechanism matches general features of the thermal anomaly and has been used to estimate the age of the presently observed thermal system. The age is calculated by minimizing the variance between the observed surface heat-flow data and the model. Estimates of the system age for this model range from 3,000 to 20,000 years.

  2. Evolution of the thermal cap in two wells from the Salton Sea geothermal system, California

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Joseph N.; Adams, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    The Salton Sea geothermal system is overlain by a thermal cap of low permeability rocks that restricts the upward movement of the high-temperature reservoir brines. Petrographic and fluid inclusion data from two wells show that the thermal cap in the southern part of the field consists of an upper layer of lacustrine and evaporite deposits with low initial permeabilities and a lower layer of deltaic sandstones. The sandstones were incorporated into the thermal cap as downward percolating fluids deposited anhydrite and calcite in the pore space of the rocks, reducing their permeabilities. During development of the thermal cap, base-metal sulfides, potassium feldspar and quartz veins were deposited by brines from higher temperature portions of the system.

  3. Field stress corrosion tests in brine environments of the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.P.; Cramer, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion research is being conducted to determine suitable construction materials for geothermal resource recovery plants. As part of this research, a 30-day stress corrosion test was conducted at the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource Area on seven iron- and nickel-base alloys in four brine and steam process streams using wellhead brine from geothermal well Magmamax 1. The tests showed transgranular cracking of AISI 316L stainless steel and intergranular and transgranular cracking of AISI 430 stainless steel in all four process streams. E-Brite 26-1 exhibited intergranular and transgranular cracking in three of the four process streams. Carbon steel, Inconel 625 and Hastelloys G and C-276 show no evidence of stress corrosion cracking.

  4. Seismic monitoring of a flow test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Johnston, C.

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface, using both conventional seismic network techniques and relatively newer array techniques. These methods allowed us to detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous sources of seismic energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. We have observed some continuous seismic noise sources that may be attributed to the flow test. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Anthropogenic seismicity rates and operational parameters at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Emily E; Lajoie, Lia J

    2013-08-01

    Geothermal power is a growing energy source; however, efforts to increase production are tempered by concern over induced earthquakes. Although increased seismicity commonly accompanies geothermal production, induced earthquake rate cannot currently be forecast on the basis of fluid injection volumes or any other operational parameters. We show that at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the total volume of fluid extracted or injected tracks the long-term evolution of seismicity. After correcting for the aftershock rate, the net fluid volume (extracted-injected) provides the best correlation with seismicity in recent years. We model the background earthquake rate with a linear combination of injection and net production rates that allows us to track the secular development of the field as the number of earthquakes per fluid volume injected decreases over time.

  6. Data release on the Salton Sea Quadrangle, California and Arizona. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, R.T. III; Antrim, D.R.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) was to delineate and evaluate all geologic environments favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. A favorable environment was defined as having the potential to contain an occurrence of at least 100 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at an average grade of not less than 0.01% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. In the Salton Sea Quadrangle, reported uranium occurrences were evaluated, and geologic environments thought to be favorable were examined. This report includes the field data collected during that work and a summary of the quadrangle geology and uranium favorability. This is the final report to be prepared on this quadrangle under the NURE program.

  7. Corrosion tests in brine and steam from the Salton Sea KGRA

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.P.; McCawley, F.X.

    1982-03-01

    The Bureau of Mines tested 13 alloys for resistance to general corrosion, pitting corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking in the brine and steam environments produced from geothermal well Magmamax 1 in the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resources Area in California. The tests provided seven process environments. The alloys most resistant to corrosion in all environments were Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, and stainless steel alloy 29-4. Hastelloys G and S were highly resistant to all types of corrosion decreases with time. The stainless steel alloys 430, E-Brite 26-1, and 6X had good resistance to general corrosion but were susceptible to pitting. Unstressed type 316 L stainless steel exhibited severe cracking. The 1020 carbon and 4130 alloy steels were the least resistant.

  8. Chemistry and geothermometry of brine produced from the Salton Sea Scientific drill hole, Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.M.; Fournier, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    The December 29-30, 1985, flow test of the State 2-14 well, also known as the Salton Sea Scientific drill hole, produced fluid from a depth of 1865-1877 m at a reservoir temperature of 305????5??C. Samples were collected at five different flashing pressures. The brines are Na-Ca-K-Cl-type waters with very high metal and low SO4 and HCO3 contents. Compositions of the flashed brines were normalized relative to the 25??C densities of the solutions, and an ionic charge balance was achieved by adjusting the Na concentration. Calculated Na/K geothermometer temperatures, using equations suggested by different investigators, range from 326?? to 364??C. The Mg/K2 method gives a temperature of about 350??C, Mg/Li2 about 282??, and Na/Li 395??-418??C. -from Authors

  9. Dissolved pesticides in the Alamo River and the Salton Sea, California, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2002-01-01

    Water samples were collected from the Alamo River and the Salton Sea, California, in autumn 1996 and late winter/early spring 1997 and analyzed for dissolved pesticides. The two seasons chosen for sampling were during pesticide application periods in the Imperial Valley. Pesticide concentrations were measured in filtered water samples using solid-phase extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Generally, the highest concentrations were measured in the Alamo River. The concentrations of carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, cycloate, dacthal, diazinon, and eptam were highest in samples collected in autumn 1996. In contrast, the concentrations of atrazine, carbofuran, and malathion were highest in samples collected in late winter/early spring 1997. The highest concentrations measured of atrazine, carbofuran, dacthal, eptam, and malathion all exceeded 1,000 nanograms per liter.

  10. Anthropogenic seismicity rates and operational parameters at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Emily E; Lajoie, Lia J

    2013-08-01

    Geothermal power is a growing energy source; however, efforts to increase production are tempered by concern over induced earthquakes. Although increased seismicity commonly accompanies geothermal production, induced earthquake rate cannot currently be forecast on the basis of fluid injection volumes or any other operational parameters. We show that at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the total volume of fluid extracted or injected tracks the long-term evolution of seismicity. After correcting for the aftershock rate, the net fluid volume (extracted-injected) provides the best correlation with seismicity in recent years. We model the background earthquake rate with a linear combination of injection and net production rates that allows us to track the secular development of the field as the number of earthquakes per fluid volume injected decreases over time. PMID:23845943

  11. Massive infestation by Amyloodinium ocellatum (Dinoflagellida) of fish in a highly saline lake, Salton Sea, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, B I; Matey, V E

    1999-12-22

    Persistent fish infestation by the parasitic dinoflagellate Amyloodinium ocellatum was found at a highly saline lake, Salton Sea, California, USA. The seasonal dynamics of the infestation of young tilapia was traced in 1997-1998. First appearing in May, it became maximal in June-August, decreased in October and was not detectable in November. Outbreak of the infestation and subsequent mortality of young fish was registered at the Sea at a water temperature and salinity of 40 degrees C and 46 ppt, respectively. Some aspects of the ultrastructure of parasitic trophonts of A. ocellatum and their location on the fish from different size groups are considered. The interactions of parasitological and environmental factors and their combined effect upon fish from the Salton Sea are discussed. PMID:11407406

  12. Selenium in aquatic biota inhabiting agricultural drains in the Salton Sea Basin, California.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Michael K; Martin, Barbara A; May, Thomas W

    2012-09-01

    Resource managers are concerned that water conservation practices in irrigated farmlands along the southern border of the Salton Sea, Imperial County, California, could increase selenium concentrations in agricultural drainwater and harm the desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), a federally protected endangered species. As part of a broader attempt to address this concern, we conducted a 3-year investigation to collect baseline information on selenium concentrations in seven agricultural drains inhabited by pupfish. We collected water, sediment, selected aquatic food-chain taxa (particulate organic detritus, filamentous algae, net plankton, and midge [Chironomidae] larvae), and two poeciliid fishes (western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis and sailfin molly Poecilia latipinna) for selenium determinations. The two fish species served as ecological surrogates for pupfish, which we were not permitted to sacrifice. Dissolved selenium ranged from 0.70 to 32.8 μg/L, with selenate as the major constituent. Total selenium concentrations in other environmental matrices varied widely among drains, with one drain (Trifolium 18) exhibiting especially high concentrations in detritus, 5.98-58.0 μg Se/g; midge larvae, 12.7-50.6 μg Se/g; mosquitofish, 13.2-20.2 μg Se/g; and mollies, 12.8-30.4 μg Se/g (all tissue concentrations are based on dry weights). Although toxic thresholds for selenium in fishes from the Salton Sea are still poorly understood, available evidence suggests that ambient concentrations of this element may not be sufficiently elevated to adversely affect reproductive success and survival in selenium-tolerant poeciliids and pupfish. PMID:21915593

  13. Hydrogen sulfide production and volatilization in a polymictic eutrophic saline lake, Salton Sea, California.

    PubMed

    Reese, Brandi Kiel; Anderson, Michael A; Amrhein, Christopher

    2008-11-15

    The Salton Sea is a large shallow saline lake located in southern California that is noted for high sulfate concentrations, substantial algal productivity, and very warm water column temperatures. These conditions are well-suited for sulfide production, and sulfide has been implicated in summer fish kills, although no studies have been conducted to specifically understand hydrogen sulfide production and volatilization there. Despite polymictic mixing patterns and relatively short accumulation periods, the amount of sulfide produced is comparable to meromictic lakes. Sulfide levels in the Salton Sea reached concentrations of 1.2 mmol L(-1) of total free sulfide in the hypolimnion and 5.6 mmol L(-1) in the sediment pore water. Strong winds in late July mixed H2S into the surface water, where it depleted the entire water column of dissolved oxygen and reached a concentration of 0.1 mmol L(-1). Sulfide concentrations exceeded the toxicity threshold of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and combined with strong anoxia throughout the water column, resulted in a massive fish kill. The mixing of sulfide into the surface waters also increased atmospheric H2S concentrations, reaching 1.0 micromol m(-3). The flux of sulfide from the sediment into the water column was estimated to range from 2-3 mmol m(-2) day(-1) during the winter and up to 8 mmol m(-2) day(-1) during the summer. Application of the two-layer model for volatilization indicates that up to 19 mmol m(-2) day(-1) volatilized from the surface during the mixing event. We estimate that as much as 3400 Mg year(-1) or approximately 26% of sulfide that diffused into the water column from the deepest sediments may have been volatilized to the atmosphere. PMID:18760446

  14. Selenium in aquatic biota inhabiting agricultural drains in the Salton Sea Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; May, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Resource managers are concerned that water conservation practices in irrigated farmlands along the southern border of the Salton Sea, Imperial County, California, could increase selenium concentrations in agricultural drainwater and harm the desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), a federally protected endangered species. As part of a broader attempt to address this concern, we conducted a 3-year investigation to collect baseline information on selenium concentrations in seven agricultural drains inhabited by pupfish. We collected water, sediment, selected aquatic food-chain taxa (particulate organic detritus, filamentous algae, net plankton, and midge [Chironomidae] larvae), and two poeciliid fishes (western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis and sailfin molly Poecilia latipinna) for selenium determinations. The two fish species served as ecological surrogates for pupfish, which we were not permitted to sacrifice. Dissolved selenium ranged from 0.70 to 32.8 μg/L, with selenate as the major constituent. Total selenium concentrations in other environmental matrices varied widely among drains, with one drain (Trifolium 18) exhibiting especially high concentrations in detritus, 5.98–58.0 μg Se/g; midge larvae, 12.7–50.6 μg Se/g; mosquitofish, 13.2–20.2 μg Se/g; and mollies, 12.8–30.4 μg Se/g (all tissue concentrations are based on dry weights). Although toxic thresholds for selenium in fishes from the Salton Sea are still poorly understood, available evidence suggests that ambient concentrations of this element may not be sufficiently elevated to adversely affect reproductive success and survival in selenium-tolerant poeciliids and pupfish.

  15. Use of a nesting platform by Gull-billed Terns and Black Skimmers at the Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molina, Kathy C.; Ricca, Mark A.; Miles, A. Keith; Schoneman, Christian

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, we constructed an elevated nesting platform at the Salton Sea, California, and monitored its use by Gull-billed Terns and Black Skimmers over three subsequent breeding seasons. Black Skimmers were the first to colonize the platform with a total of five nests in 2006. In 2007 Gull-billed Terns colonized the platform with a total of 28 nests and the number of Black Skimmer nests increased to 20. Neither species nested on the platform in 2008. Low success for both species was probably influenced by at least two factors. First, when both species nested on the platform, nest densities were higher than is typical of their colonies on larger, earthen islands, and colony success may have been reduced by overcrowding. Second, lack of access to water may have reduced chicks' ability to thermoregulate effectively in the hot environment of the Salton Sea. Refinements to the size, design, and location of artificial nesting habitats are necessary to enhance productivity of colonial groundnesting birds at the Salton Sea successfully.

  16. Occurrence, distribution and transport of pesticides into the Salton Sea Basin, California, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, L.A.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Salton Sea is a hypersaline lake located in southeastern California. Concerns over the ecological impacts of sediment quality and potential human exposure to dust emissions from exposed lakebed sediments resulting from anticipated shrinking of shoreline led to a study of pesticide distribution and transport within the Salton Sea Basin, California, in 2001-2002. Three sampling stations-upriver, river mouth, and offshore-were established along each of the three major rivers that discharge into the Salton Sea. Large-volume water samples were collected for analysis of pesticides in water and suspended sediments at the nine sampling stations. Samples of the bottom sediment were also collected at each site for pesticide analysis. Sampling occurred in October 2001, March-April 2002, and October 2002, coinciding with the regional fall and spring peaks in pesticide use in the heavily agricultural watershed. Fourteen current-use pesticides were detected in water and the majority of dissolved concentrations ranged from the limits of detection to 151 ng/l. Diazinon, EPTC and malathion were detected at much higher concentrations (940-3,830 ng/l) at the New and Alamo River upriver and near-shore stations. Concentrations of carbaryl, dacthal, diazinon, and EPTC were higher in the two fall sampling periods, whereas concentrations of atrazine, carbofuran, and trifluralin were higher during the spring, which matched seasonal use patterns of these pesticides. Current-use pesticides were also detected on suspended and bed sediments in concentrations ranging from detection limits to 106 ng/g. Chlorpyrifos, dacthal, EPTC, trifluralin, and DDE were the most frequently detected pesticides on sediments from all three rivers. The number of detections and concentrations of suspended sediment-associated pesticides were often similar for the river upriver and near-shore sites, consistent with downstream transport of pesticides via suspended sediment. While detectable suspended sediment

  17. Differentiating static and dynamic triggering near Salton Sea following the 2010 Mw7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, X.; Peng, Z.; Zhao, P.

    2011-12-01

    Whether static or dynamic triggering is the dominant mechanism for triggering aftershocks in near field is currently under heated debate. Previous studies on earthquake triggering mostly examined seismicity rate changes around the occurrence time of large earthquakes based on existing earthquake catalogs. However, such catalogs could be incomplete immediately after the mainshock, which may cause apparent seismicity rate changes that are unrelated to stress changes. In this study, we examine seismicity rate changes around the Salton Sea geothermal region following the 2010 Mw7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. We focus on this region mainly because of its abundant background seismicity, dense network coverage, and being in the apparent stress shadow of the mainshock, which is the key factor to differentiate static and dynamic triggering. According to the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) catalog, the seismicity rate near Salton Sea clearly increased immediately after the mainshock and dropped below the pre-mainshock level within a few days. The seismicity remains low for another few months before returning back to the pre-mainshock level. To check whether such patterns are caused by catalog incompleteness, we are currently applying a waveform-based matched filter technique to detect possible missing events around Salton Sea that were masked by rigorous aftershock sequence around the mainshock rupture region. With more completed catalog, we can identify the genuine seismicity rate changes for better comparison with the static and dynamic stress changes. In addition to seismicity rate, static and dynamic stress changes could also affect seismic velocity in the upper crust, with a pattern that is somewhat similar to seismicity rate changes. Thus, monitoring seismic velocity changes can further help to differentiate the triggering mechanisms. In our preliminary study, we apply the ambient noise cross-correlation technique to continuously monitor

  18. Long-term changes in the phosphorus loading to and trophic state of the Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.M.; Schladow, S.G.; Holdren, G.C.

    2008-01-01

    The Salton Sea (Sea) is a eutrophic to hypereutrophic lake characterized by high nutrient concentrations, low water clarity, and high biological productivity. Based on dissolved phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) concentrations and N:P ratios, P is typically the limiting nutrient in the Sea and, therefore, should be the primary nutrient of concern when considering management efforts. Flows in the major tributaries to the Sea have been measured since 1965, whereas total P (TP) concentrations were only measured intermittently by various agencies since 1968. These data were used to estimate annual P loading from 1965 to 2002. Annual loads have increased steadily from ???940,000 kg around 1968 to ???1,450,000 kg in 2002 (???55% increase), primarily a result of increased TP concentrations and loads in the New River. Although the eutrophic condition of the Salton Sea is of great concern, only limited nutrient data are available for the Sea. It is difficult to determine whether the eutrophic state of the Sea has degraded or possibly even improved slightly in response to the change in P loading because of variability in the data and changes in the sampling and analytical methodologies. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  19. Microstructure and formation mechanism of phyllosilicates in hydrothermally metamorphosed Salton Sea Shales

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Y.C., Peacor, D.R.; McDowell, D.

    1985-01-01

    TEM/AEM study of authigenic phyllosilicates in a sequence of hydrothermally metamorphosed shales and siltstones from the temperature (depth) interval 115/degree/C (256 m) to 330/degree/C (1547 m) in the well IID No 2, Salton Sea Geothermal Field shows that the overall progression of mineral assemblages is consistent with that observed in the sandstone sequence of nearby wells, despite significant differences in the bulk chemistry between shale and sandstone. The phyllosilicates progress from an illite/muscovite zone at temperatures less than 260/degree/C, through a chlorite zone (220-305/degree/C) and a biotite zone (310-330/degree/C). By contrast with observations of shales in other burial metamorphic sequences, the Salton Sea samples contain significant proportions of pore space (estimated to be /approx/ 30%) even in shales. All phyllosilicates and other authigenic minerals occur as discrete euhedral crystals which partially fill pore space. The mixed-layering and structural/chemical heterogeneity, typical of phyllosilicates in shales subject to diagenesis, are generally absent. AEM analyses yield compositions of illite/muscovite as (K/sub 0.7/) (Al/sub 1.5/Mg/sub 0.2/Fe/sub 0.4/) (Si/sub 3.4/Al/sub 0.6/)O/sub 10/(OH)/sub 2/ at 220/degree/C, chlorite as (Mg/sub 2.9/Fe/sub 2/Al/sub 1/)(Al/sub 1/Si/sub 3/)O/sub 10/(OH)/sub 8/ at 300/degree/C and biotite as K(Fe/sub 1.6/Mg/sub 1.2/Al/sub 0.3/)(Al/sub 0.9/Si/sub 3.1/)O/sub 10/(OH)/sub 2/ at 330/degree/C. Texture and microstructure indicate that the mineral progression in the low grade hydrothermal metamorphic sequence involve complete dissolution of detrital phases, mass transport through interconnecting pore space, and direct crystallization of phyllosilicates from solution.

  20. Thermal regime of the State 2--14 well, Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Priest, S.S.; Duda, L.E.; Carson, C.C.; Hendricks, J.D.; Robison, L.C.

    1988-11-10

    Temperature logs were made repeatedly during breaks in drilling and both during and after flow tests in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project well (State 2--14). The purpose of these logs was to assist in identifying zones of fluid loss or grain and to characterize reservoir temperatures. At the conclusion of the active phase of the project, a series of logs was begun in an attempt to establish the equilibrium temperature profile. Initially, we were able to log to depths below 3 km, but beginning in late May of 1986, it was impossible to log below about 1.8 km owing to casing failure. Our best estimates of formation temperature below 1.8 km are 305/sup 0/ +- 5 /sup 0/C at 1890 m and 355/sup 0/ +- 10 /sup 0/C at 3170 m. For the upper 1.8 km the latest temperature log (October 24, 1986), using a digital ''slickline'' (heat-shielded downhole recording) device, was within a few degrees Celsius of equilibrium, as confirmed by a more recent log (July 31, 1987) to a depth of approx.1 km.

  1. Laboratory-determined transport properties of core from the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Daily, W.

    1988-11-10

    Two cores from the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project have been studied in the laboratory to determine electrical resistivity, ultrasonic velocity, and brine permeability at pressures and temperatures close to estimated borehole conditions. Both samples were siltstones; the first sample was from 1158-m depth, and the other was from 919-m depth. A synthetic brine with 13.6 weight percent NaCl, 7.5 weight percent CaCl/sub 2/, and 3.2 weight percent KCl was used as a pore fluid. The dry bulk density of the first sample was 2.44 Mg m/sup -3/ with an effective porosity of 8.7%. The second sample had a dry bulk density of 2.06 Mg m/sup -3/ with an effective porosity of 22.2%. At the midplane of the first sample, electrical impedance tomography was used to map the spatial variation of resistivity during the experiment. Also, at the midplane of both samples, ultrasonic tomography was used to map the spatial variation of P wave velocity.

  2. Advances in Mineral Dust Source Composition Measurement with Imaging Spectroscopy at the Salton Sea, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. O.; Realmuto, V. J.; Thompson, D. R.; Mahowald, N. M.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Clark, R. N.; Swayze, G. A.; Okin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust emitted from the Earth's surface is a principal contributor to direct radiative forcing over the arid regions, where shifts in climate have a significant impact on agriculture, precipitation, and desert encroachment around the globe. Dust particles contribute to both positive and negative forcing, depending on the composition of the particles. Particle composition is a function of the surface mineralogy of dust source regions, but poor knowledge of surface mineralogy on regional to global scales limits the skill of Earth System models to predict shifts in regional climate around the globe. Earth System models include the source, emission, transport and deposition phases of the dust cycle. In addition to direct radiative forcing contributions, mineral dust impacts include indirect radiative forcing, modification of the albedo and melting rates of snow and ice, kinetics of tropospheric photochemistry, formation and deposition of acidic aerosols, supply of nutrients to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and impact on human health and safety. We demonstrate the ability to map mineral dust source composition in the Salton Sea dust source region with imaging spectroscopy measurements acquired as part of the NASA HyspIRI preparatory airborne campaign. These new spectroscopically derived compositional measurements provide a six orders of magnitude improvement over current atlases for this dust source region and provide a pathfinder example for a remote measurement approach to address this critical dust composition gap for global Earth System models.

  3. Processes controlling water and hydrocarbon composition in seeps from the Salton Sea geothermal system, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Henrik; Karlsen, Dag A.; Sturz, Anne; Backer-Owe, Kristian; Banks, David A.; Planke, Sverre

    2007-01-01

    Water-, mud-, gas-, and petroleum-bearing seeps are part of the Salton Sea geothermal system (SSGS) in Southern California. Seeps in the Davis-Schrimpf seep field (˜14,000 m2) show considerable variations in water temperature, pH, density, and solute content. Water-rich springs have low densities (<1.4 g/cm3), Cl contents as high as 45,000 ppm, and temperatures between 15 and 34 °C. Gryphons expel denser water-mud mixtures (to 1.7 g/cm3), have low salinities (3600 5200 ppm Cl), and have temperatures between 23 and 63 °C. The main driver for the seep system is CO2 (>98 vol%). Halogen geochemistry of the waters indicates that mixing of deep and shallow waters occurs and that near-surface dissolution of halite may overprint the original fluid compositions. Carbon isotopic analyses suggest that hydrocarbon seep gases have a thermogenic origin. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of petroleum in a water-dominated spring, composed of 53% saturated compounds, 35% aromatics, and 12% polar compounds. The abundance of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and immature biomarkers suggests a hydrothermal formation of the petroleum, making the SSGS a relevant analogue to less accessible hydrothermal seep systems, e.g., the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California.

  4. Particle measurement and brine chemistry at the Salton Sea Deep Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertus, R. J.; Kindle, C. H.; Sullivan, R. G.; Shannon, D. W.

    1991-09-01

    The Advanced Brine Chemistry Project, a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Energy Program, is addressing operating problems associated with scaling and corrosion at geothermal power plants. Under this project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of tests at the Salton Sea Deep Well, which has one of the highest solids contents in the world. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate monitoring instrumentation under field conditions and relate particulate formation to the brine chemistry. The instrumentation, was evaluated under scaling geothermal conditions using two different principles: ultrasonic reflection and laser light scattering. The following conclusions were drawn from the instrumentation testing and brine chemistry and particulate analyses. (1) Using reflected ultrasonic impulses to detect suspended particles has been demonstrated for on-line application in a geothermal brine with strong scaling tendencies. Advantages over laser light scattering include improved high-temperature durability for the transducer and longer operation with less maintenance. (2) Counting and sizing particles using laser light scattering requires constant maintenance in geothermal applications. (3) Silica is the dominant scale species and appears in amounts orders of magnitude greater than other minor species such as barium sulfate. (4) The silica that formed at high temperatures and short residence times is very gelatinous and difficult to filter out of the brine. (5) Correlation of instrument readings with particle collection data was difficult because conditions on the filter (i.e., temperature, flowrate, and pressure) could not be maintained constant for long enough intervals to obtain comparable information.

  5. Geological, Geophysical, And Thermal Characteristics Of The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, L.W.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Tewhey, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is the largest water-dominated geothermal field in the Salton Trough in Southern California. Within the trough, local zones of extension among active right-stepping right-lateral strike-slip faults allow mantle-derived magmas to intrude the sedimentary sequence. The intrusions serves as heat sources to drive hydrothermal systems. We can characterize the field in detail because we have an extensive geological and geophysical data base. The sediments are relatively undeformed and can be divided into three categories as a function of depth: (1) low-permeability cap rock, (2) upper reservoir rocks consisting of sandstones, siltstones, and shales that were subject to minor alterations, and (3) lower reservoir rocks that were extensively altered. Because of the alteration, intergranular porosity and permeability are reduced with depth. permeability is enhanced by renewable fractures, i.e., fractures that can be reactivated by faulting or natural hydraulic fracturing subsequent to being sealed by mineral deposition. In the central portion of the field, temperature gradients are high near the surface and lower below 700 m. Surface gradients in this elliptically shaped region are fairly constant and define a thermal cap, which does not necessarily correspond to the lithologic cap. At the margin of the field, a narrow transition region, with a low near-surface gradient and an increasing gradient at greater depths, separates the high temperature resource from areas of normal regional gradient. Geophysical and geochemical evidence suggest that vertical convective motion in the reservoir beneath the thermal cap is confined to small units, and small-scale convection is superimposed on large-scale lateral flow of pore fluid. Interpretation of magnetic, resistivity, and gravity anomalies help to establish the relationship between the inferred heat source, the hydrothermal system, and the observed alteration patterns. A simple hydrothermal model is

  6. Cores from the Salton Sea scientific drilling program: Metamorphic reaction progress as a function of chemical and thermal environment: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Papike, J.J.; Shearer, C.K.

    1987-05-13

    The study investigated the downhole progressive metamorphism at the Salton Sea site by monitoring and evaluating discontinuous and continuous metamorphic reactions. The main emphasis was placed on: (1) the addition of petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical data to the Salton Sea data base; (2) determination of downhole reactions; (3) evaluation of the progress of individual continuous reaction (epsilon) and the overall reaction progress (epsilon/sub T/) during the transition from one metamorphic zone to the next; and (4) evaluation and correlation of mineral reactions and reaction progress with mineral phase and organic material geothermometry. To these ends, thirty-three samples from the Salton Sea core were analyzed for: (1) quantitative modal mineralogy using the x-ray diffraction reference intensity method (RIM), (2) 30 major and trace elements in the whole rock and (3) mineral chemistry and structural state. In addition, a subset of these samples were used for temperature determinations using vitrinite reflectivity.

  7. Organochlorine pesticide, polychlorinated biphenyl, trace element and metal residues in bird eggs from Salton Sea, California, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, Charles J.; Anderson, T.W.; Crayon, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Salton Sea is a highly eutrophic, hypersaline terminal lake that receives inflows primarily from agricultural drainages in the Imperial and Coachella valleys. Impending reductions in water inflow at Salton Sea may concentrate existing contaminants which have been a concern for many years, and result in higher exposure to birds. Thus, waterbird eggs were collected and analyzed in 2004 and compared with residue concentrations from earlier years; these data provide a base for future comparisons. Eggs from four waterbird species (black-crowned night-heron [Nycticorax nycticorax], great egret [Ardea alba], black-necked stilt [Himantopus mexicanus], and American avocet [Recurvirostra Americana]) were collected. Eggs were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), metals, and trace elements, with current results compared to those reported for eggs collected from the same species and others during 1985a??1993. The two contaminants of primary concern were p,pa??-DDE (DDE) and selenium. DDE concentrations in night-heron and great egret eggs collected from the northwest corner of Salton Sea (Whitewater River delta) decreased 91 and 95%, respectively, by 2004, with a concomitant increase in eggshell thickness for both species. Decreases in bird egg DDE levels paralleled those in tissues of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus ?? O. urolepis), an important prey species for herons and egrets. Despite most nests of night-herons and great egrets failing in 2004 due to predation, predicted reproductive effects based on DDE concentrations in eggs were low or negligible for these species. The 2004 DDE findings were in dramatic contrast to those in the past decade, and included an 81% decrease in black-necked stilt eggs, although concentrations were lower historically than those reported in night-herons and egrets. Selenium concentrations in black-necked stilt eggs from the southeast corner of Salton Sea (Davis Road) were similar in 1993 and 2004, with 4

  8. Investigations of a large scale eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) die-off at the Salton Sea, California in 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Audet, D.J.; Rocke, T.E.; Radke, W.; Creekmore, L.H.; Duncan, R.

    2004-01-01

    An estimated 150,000 Eared Grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) died at the Salton Sea between 16 December 1991 and 21 April 1992. This represented the largest documented mortality event of Eared Grebes at the time and approximately 6% of the North American population. During the die-off, grebes exhibited several uncharacteristic behaviors, such as congregating at freshwater tributaries, repeatedly gulping freshwater, preening excessively, moving onto land, and allowing close approach and/or capture. Avian cholera was diagnosed in Eared Grebes collected along the north and west shoreline of the Sea late in the die-off but not from the majority of the Eared Grebes dying along the south shore. Gross and histological examinations and diagnostic testing for viruses, bacteria, and parasites did not identify the cause of mortality in the majority of Eared Grebes examined from the south shore of the Sea. Liver concentrations of arsenic, chromium, DDE, mercury, selenium, and zinc were elevated in some Eared Grebes, but none of those contaminants exceeded known thresholds for independent lethality. Poisoning by heavy metals, organochlorine, organophosphorus, or carbamate pesticides, avian botulism, and salt were ruled out as the cause of mortality. Hypotheses for the die-off are interactive effects of contaminants, immunosuppression, a yet unidentified biotoxin or pathogen present in the Salton Sea, impairment of feather waterproofing leading to hypothermia, or a unique manifestation of avian cholera that evades laboratory detection.

  9. Double-diffusive convection as a mechanism for transferring heat and mass within the Salton Sea geothermal brine

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Robert O.

    1988-01-01

    H. C. Helgeson noted in 1968 that the salinity of the brine in the geothermal reservoir within the Salton Sea geothermal system generally increases from the top to the bottom and from the center to the sides. He also noted that pressure measurements at perforations in cased wells seemed to indicate that the formation fluids at the depths of production have a specific density about equal to 1, and that hot concentrated brines apparently exist in pressure equilibrium with comparatively cold dilute pore waters in the surrounding rocks. Since 1968 there have been no published reports that dispute these observations. However, a very high heat flux through the top of the system seems to require a substantial component of convective transfer of heat beneath an impermeable cap, whereas the apparent salinity gradient with depth seems to require little or no free convection of brine. This paradox may be resolved if double-diffusive convection is the main process that controls the depth-temperature-salinity relations. Such convection provides a mechanism for transferring heat from the bottom to the top of the hydrothermal system while maintaining vertical and horizontal salinity gradients—densities remaining close to unity. In 1981, Griffiths showed experimentally that layered double-diffusive convection cells may develop in porous media when hot saline waters underlie more dilute cooler waters. However, nagging questions remain about whether fluid densities within the Salton Sea geothermal system really adjust to unity in response to changing temperature and salinity at depths greater than about 1 km. The State 2-14 well, the Salton Sea Scientific Drill Hole, has provided one high-quality data point for a depth interval of 1,865-1,877 m, where the temperature is about 305º C. The calculated density of the pre-flashed reservoir fluid sampled from that depth is 1.0008 ± 0.0023.

  10. Host selection patterns of Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) at wetlands near the Salton Sea, Coachella Valley, California, 1998-2002.

    PubMed

    Reisen, William K; Lothrop, Hugh D; Thiemann, Tara

    2013-09-01

    The bloodmeal hosts used by Culex tarsalis Coquillett collected along the Salton Sea in Coachella Valley, CA, during 1998-2002 were identified using sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase I gene identified from Barcode of Life database. Overall, 265 (83.3%) of 318 bloodmeals were identified, of which 76.6% fed on birds, 18.1% on mammals, and 5.3% on reptiles. Forty-seven different hosts were identified, none of which comprised > 12.5% of the total. Although Cx. tarsalis exhibits specific host-seeking flight patterns, bloodmeals seemed to be acquired opportunistically, thereby limiting potential arbovirus transmission efficiency in species-rich environments. PMID:24180112

  11. Host Selection Patterns of Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) at Wetlands Near the Salton Sea, Coachella Valley, California, 1998–2002

    PubMed Central

    REISEN, WILLIAM K.; LOTHROP, HUGH D.; THIEMANN, TARA

    2014-01-01

    The bloodmeal hosts used by Culex tarsalis Coquillett collected along the Salton Sea in Coachella Valley, CA, during 1998–2002 were identified using sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase I gene identified from Barcode of Life database. Overall, 265 (83.3%) of 318 bloodmeals were identified, of which 76.6% fed on birds, 18.1% on mammals, and 5.3% on reptiles. Forty-seven different hosts were identified, none of which comprised >12.5% of the total. Although Cx. tarsalis exhibits specific host-seeking flight patterns, bloodmeals seemed to be acquired opportunistically, thereby limiting potential arbovirus transmission efficiency in species-rich environments. PMID:24180112

  12. Theoretical prediction of phase relations among aqueous solutions and minerals: Salton Sea geothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Dennis K.; Norton, Denis L.

    1981-09-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of compositional relations among aqueous solutions and minerals in the system Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-Fe2O3 Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-CO2 HCl at pressures and temperatures corresponding to liquid-vapor equilibrium of H2O permit quantitative description and interpretation of phase relations among rock forming minerals and aqueous solutions in magma-hydrothermal systems. The extensive data base on the Salton Sea geothermal system provides an exemplary case for predicting the chemical characteristics of geothermal fluids associated with metasomatic mineral zones observed in deep drillhole samples. Near the Elmore No. 1 well aqueous species activity ratios of {aNa+}/{aH+} and {aK+}/{aH+} vary several tenths of a log unit with increasing depth and temperature from ∼ 0.6 km and ∼250°C to ∼ 2.2 km and ∼350°C, whereas {aCa2+}/{a2H+} decreases ∼ 2 orders of magnitude for a comparable range in depth and temperature. The fugacity of CO2 gas is ∼1.5-6 bars at ≲ 310°C. Calculated values of aSio2(aq), {aNa+}/{aK+}, {aCa2+}/{aMg2+} and fCO2(g), in the fluid phase coexisting with observed mineralogic phase relations are in remarkably close agreement with measured solute concentrations in geothermal fluids produced from deep drillholes near the Salton Sea. Hydrolysis reactions representing observed phase relations and written with alkali and alkaline earth cations as products have negative standard molal enthalpies (ΔH0P,T,r) and volumes (ΔV0P,T,r) of reactions; consequently, {aNa+}/{aH+}, {aK+}/{aH+}, {aCa2+}/{a2H+}, and {aMg2+}/{a2H+} decrease with increasing temperature at constant pressure, but increase with increasing pressure at constant temperature. An approximate linear relationship exists among these activity ratios and the reciprocal of absolute temperatures because ΔH0P,T,r varies only slightly with increasing temperature at ≲ 250 to 300°C. However, at ≳300°C, ΔH0P,T,r and ΔV0P,T,R decrease dramatically as a consequence of extrema in

  13. Water quality in the New River from Calexico to the Salton Sea, Imperial County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Setmire, James G.

    1984-01-01

    The New River enters the United States at Calexico, Calif., after it crosses the international boundary. Water-quality data from routine collection indicated that the New River was degraded by high organic and bacterial content. Intensive sampling for chemical and physical constituents and properties of the river was done May 9-13, 1977, to quantify the chemical composition of the water and to identify water-quality problems. Concentrations of total organic carbon in the New River at Calexico ranged from 80 to 161 milligrams per liter and dissolved organic carbon ranged from 34 to 42 milligrams per liter; the maximum chemical oxygen demand was 510 milligrams per liter. Intensive sampling for chemical and biological characteristics was done in the New River from May 1977 to June 1978 to determine the occurrence of the organic material and its effects on downstream water quality. Dissolved-oxygen concentration was measured along longitudinal profiles of the river from Calexico to the Salton Sea. A dissolved-oxygen sag downstream from the Calexico gage varied seasonally. The sag extended farther downstream and had lower concentrations of dissolved oxygen during the summer months than during the winter months. The sag of zero dissolved-oxygen concentration extended 26 miles in July 1977. In December 1976, the sag extended 20 miles but the minimum dissolved-oxygen concentration was 2.5 milligrams per liter. The greatest diel (24-hour) variation in dissolved-oxygen concentration occurred in the reach from the Calexico gage to Lyons Crossing, 8.8 miles downstream. High concentrations of organic material were detected as far as Highway 80, 19.5 miles downstream from the international boundary. Biological samples analyzed for benthic invertebrates showed that water at the Calexico and Lyons Crossing sites, nearest the international boundary, was of such poor quality that very few bottom-dwelling organisms could survive. Although the water was of poor quality at Keystone

  14. Atmospheric dry deposition in the vicinity of the Salton Sea, California - I: Air pollution and deposition in a desert environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alonso, R.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Boarman, W.I.

    2005-01-01

    Air pollutant concentrations and atmospheric dry deposition were monitored seasonally at the Salton Sea, southern California. Measurements of ozone (O 3), nitric acid vapor (HNO3), ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) were performed using passive samplers. Deposition rates of NO 3-, NH4+, Cl-, SO 42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ to creosote bush branches and nylon filters as surrogate surfaces were determined for one-week long exposure periods. Maximum O3 values were recorded in spring with 24-h average values of 108.8 ??g m-3. Concentrations of NO and NO2 were low and within ranges of the non-urban areas in California (0.4-5.6 and 3.3-16.2 ??g m-3 ranges, respectively). Concentrations of HNO3 (2.0-6.7 ??g m-3) and NH 3 (6.4-15.7 ??g m-3) were elevated and above the levels typical for remote locations in California. Deposition rates of Cl-, SO42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ were related to the influence of sea spray or to suspended soil particles, and no strong enrichments caused by ions originated by human activities were detected. Dry deposition rates of NO3- and NH4+ were similar to values registered in areas where symptoms of nitrogen saturation and changes in species composition have been described. Deposition of nitrogenous compounds might be contributing to eutrophication processes at the Salton Sea. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared Analysis of the Salton Sea, CA Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is an active 20 km2 region in southern California, which lies along the Calipatria Fault; an offshoot of the San Andreas Fault. Several geothermal fields (including the Davis-Schrimpf and Sandbar fields) and ten power plants generating 340 MW lie within this region. In order to better understand the mineral and thermal distribution of the surface, hyperspectral thermal infrared (TIR) data were acquired by Aerospace Corporation using the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEABSS) airborne sensor on March 26, 2009 and April 6, 2010. SEBASS collects 128 wavelength channels at 1 meter spatial resolution, from which a new and more accurate interpretation was produced of the surface mineralogy of the geothermal fields and surrounding areas. Such data are rarely available for this type of scientific analysis and enabled the identification of mineral assemblages associated with geothermally-active areas. These minerals include anhydrite, gypsum, as well as an unknown mineral with a unique TIR wavelength feature at 8.2 μm. Comparing the 2009 and 2010 data, this unknown mineral varies in abundance and spatial distribution likely due to changes in rainfall. Samples rich in this mineral were collected from an area identified in the SEBASS data and analyzed in the laboratory using high resolution TIR emission spectroscopy. The same spectral absorption feature was found confirming the mineral's presence. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed on one of the samples in order to positively identify this mineral and further constrain the TIR analysis. By using the combination of airborne and laboratory spectroscopy, detailed and temporally-variable patterns of the surface mineralogy were ultimately produced. This work has the potential to be used at other geothermal sites to better characterize transient mineralogy, understand the influence of surface and ground water in these systems, and

  16. Research drilling in an active geothermal system: Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP)

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1986 a research borehole, designed to study the processes occurring in an active, high-temperature, magmatically driven hydrothermal system, reached a depth of 3.22 km in the Salton Sea geothermal field at the northern end of the Gulf of California. Only 10% of the borehole was cored; however, an integrated set of drill cuttings, wireline logs, and downhole measurements were obtained using high-temperature tools and cables. Similarly, downhole VSP, gravity, and fluid sampling tools were successfully deployed. The borehole penetrates Pleistocene and upper Pliocene lake and delta sediments with minor extrusive and intrusive igneous rocks, all of which are being progressively altered to greenschist facies hornfelses. A flow test of a zone at 1865 m with a temperature of 305/sup 0/C, produced Na, Ca, and K chloride brines containing 24% of dissolved salts. Flows of up to 200 tons/hr of steam and brine were obtained. An even more productive zone, the deepest tested at 3215 m where the temperature was 355/sup 0/C, briefly attained a peak flow of 400 tons/hr during a 48-hour test. However, this test was marred by interference from other flow zones. Although the borehole was shut in after the 7-in. (17.78-cm) diameter liner parted, a comprehensive program of laboratory studies is underway in about 40 different institutions. Results to date have more than met their original goals. In the summer of 1987, field operations will resume and will include extensive reservoir engineering. However, drilling deeper to penetrate the magmatic rocks that underlie the explored hydrothermal system must await future funding.

  17. A brine interface in the Salton Sea Geothermal System, California: Fluid geochemical and isotopic characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.E.; McKibben, M.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Data from 71 geothermal production intervals in 48 wells from the Salton Sea Geothermal System (SSGS) indicate that fluids in that system cluster into two distinct populations in terms of their salinity and their stable isotopic compositions. The distinctive, hot, hypersaline brine (typically >20 wt% total dissolved solids) for which the SSGS is known is overlain by a cooler (<260{degree}C) fluid with distinctly lower salinity (typically <10 wt% total dissolved solids). Hypersaline brines have high and rather consistent {sup 18}O shifts produced by water-rock interaction and have a very narrow range in {delta}D values. Low TDS fluids, on the other hand, show a wide range in both {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O. production of both types of fluid from closely spaced geothermal wells in many regions of the SSGS indicates that a relatively sharp salinity interface exists over much of the field. The fluid interface typically cross-cuts sedimentary bedding but is consistently found where reservoir temperatures are approximately 260{degree}C. At these temperatures, hypersaline brines have densities of approximately 1.0 gm/cm{sup 3}, while the low TDS fluids have densities as low as 0.85 gm/cm{sup 3}. This stable, density-stratified interface acts as a barrier to convective heat and mass transfer in the SSGS, isolating the hypersaline reservoir from overlying dilute fluids. A lithologic cap implied by previous SSGS models is unnecessary in such a stratified system since heat and mass transfer across the interface must occur by slow conductive, diffusional and interface mixing processes regardless of local permeability.

  18. Temporal Variability in Seismic Velocity at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, T.; Nayak, A.; Brenguier, F.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the temporal variability of ambient noise wavefield and search for velocity changes associated with activities of the geothermal energy development at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. The noise cross-correlations (NCFs) are computed for ~6 years of continuous three-component seismic data (December 2007 through January 2014) collected at 8 sites from the CalEnergy Subnetwork (EN network) with MSNoise software (Lecocq et al., 2014, SRL). All seismic data are downloaded from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center. Velocity changes (dv/v) are obtained by measuring time delay between 5-day stacks of NCFs and the reference NCF (average over the entire 6 year period). The time history of dv/v is determined by averaging dv/v measurements over all station/channel pairs (252 combinations). Our preliminary dv/v measurement suggests a gradual increase in dv/v over the 6-year period in a frequency range of 0.5-8.0 Hz. The resultant increase rate of velocity is about 0.01%/year. We also explore the frequency-dependent velocity change at the 5 different frequency bands (0.5-2.0 Hz, 0.75-3.0 Hz, 1.0-4.0 Hz, 1.5-6.0 Hz, and 2.0-8.0 Hz) and find that the level of this long-term dv/v variability is increased with increase of frequency (i.e., the highest increase rate of ~0.15%/year at the 0.5-2.0 Hz band). This result suggests that the velocity changes were mostly occurred in a depth of ~500 m assuming that the coda parts of NCFs (~10-40 s depending on station distances) are predominantly composed of scattered surface waves, with the SoCal velocity model (Dreger and Helmberger, 1993, JGR). No clear seasonal variation of dv/v is observed in the frequency band of 0.5-8.0 Hz.

  19. Particle measurement and brine chemistry at the Salton Sea Deep Well

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, R.J.; Kindle, C.H.; Sullivan, R.G.; Shannon, D.W.

    1991-09-01

    The Advanced Brine Chemistry Project, a part of the US Department of Energy's Geothermal Energy Program, is addressing operating problems associated with scaling and corrosion at geothermal power plants. Under this project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of tests at the Salton Sea Deep Well, which has one of the highest solids contents in the world. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate monitoring instrumentation under field conditions and relate particulate formation to the brine chemistry. The instrumentation, was evaluated under scaling geothermal conditions using two different principles: ultrasonic reflection and laser light scattering. The following conclusions were drawn from the instrumentation testing and brine chemistry and particulate analyses. (1) Using reflected ultrasonic impulses to detect suspended particles has been demonstrate for on-line application in a geothermal brine with strong scaling tendencies. Advantages over laser light scattering include improved high-temperature durability for the transducer and longer operation with less maintenance. (2) Counting and sizing particles using laser light scattering requires constant maintenance in geothermal applications. (3) Silica is the dominant scale species and appears in amounts orders of magnitude greater than other minor species such as barium sulfate. (4) The silica that formed at high temperatures and short residence times is very gelatinous and difficult to filter out of the brine. (5) Correlation of instrument readings with particle collection data was difficult because conditions on the filter (i.e., temperature, flowrate, and pressure) could not be maintained constant for long enough intervals to obtain comparable information. 5 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Modeling of Potential-Field Data Along Profiles of the Salton Sea Seismic Imaging Project Transects, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Scheirer, D. S.; Athens, N. D.; Fuis, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity and magnetic data provide information on the crustal structure of the Salton Trough that complements seismic velocity data recently obtained as part of the Salton Sea Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP). The potential-field analysis benefits from nearly uniform coverage of the Salton Trough. Density and velocity are related properties and thus forward gravity models using the velocity structure from SSIP provide a means to refine the crustal structure. An earlier comparison of gravity with crustal tomography (Langenheim and Hauksson, 2001) indicated that 10-km spacing of the tomographic model was too coarse to image the basin beneath Coachella Valley. A 2-D forward gravity model using the new SSIP velocity structure of Line 4, located just north of the Salton Sea, produces calculated gravity variations that compare well with observed gravity. The southwest margin of the Coachella Valley basin dips shallowly to the northeast and is interrupted by a 2-km step in the top of basement about 7 km northeast of the basement outcrop. The northeast margin of the basin is marked by the San Andreas fault, which gravity and velocity data suggest dips to the northeast. The western edge of a 100-nT aeromagnetic anomaly coincides with the San Andreas fault from Indio south for a distance of about 50 km. Modeling of the magnetic anomaly along Line 4 indicates a northeast dip of about 70-75 degrees of the fault to a depth of 10 km. A 200-nT magnetic anomaly at the southwest end of Line 4 lies within the upper plate of the Eastern Peninsular Ranges mylonite zone. The modeled base of an interpreted magnetic body indicates a maximum dip of 45 degrees that may extend all the way across the Coachella Valley to the San Andreas fault. Two-dimensional forward modeling of ground- and marine-magnetic data along Line 7 (crossing the Salton Sea and sedimentary basin to the northeast near Salt Creek) indicates two magnetic sources. (1) A broader anomaly is sourced by magnetic rocks with

  1. Nature and Significance of Igneous Rocks Cored in the State 2-14 Research Borehole: Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzig, Charles T.; Elders, Wilfred A.

    1988-11-01

    The State 2-14 research borehole of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project penetrated 3.22 km of Pleistocene to Recent sedimentary rocks in the Salton Sea geothermal system, located in the Salton Trough of southern California and northern Baja California, Mexico. In addition, three intervals of igneous rocks were recovered; a silicic tuff and two sills of altered diabase. The chemical composition of the silicic tuff at 1704 m depth suggests that it is correlative with the Durmid Hill tuff, cropping out 25 km NW of the geothermal system. In turn, both of these tuffs may be deposits of the Bishop Tuff, erupted from the Long Valley caldera of central California at 0.7 Ma. The diabases are similar to basaltic xenoliths found in the nearby Salton Buttes rhyolite domes. These diabase are interpreted as hypabyssal intrusions resulting from magmatism due to rifting of the Salton Trough as part of the East Pacific Rise/Gulf of California transtensional system. The sills apparently intruded an already developed geo-thermal system and were in turn altered by it.

  2. Deviations from self-similarity in barchan form and flux: The case of the Salton Sea dunes, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    2013-12-01

    are the type of aeolian dune associated with a relatively uniform wind direction, incomplete sand coverage of the substrate, and low vegetation cover. Here I present an analysis of the morphology and migration rates of 40 dunes in the Salton Sea dune field using historical aerial orthophotographs, airborne laser swath mapping, terrestrial laser scanning, and measurements of the aerodynamic roughness length derived from wind velocity profiles. The data demonstrate that the Salton Sea dunes deviate from self-similarity such that smaller dunes have a lower ratio of slip face height to crest height and a lower slope, on average, compared with larger dunes and that smaller dunes migrate more slowly than would be predicted based on an inverse relationship between migration rate and dune height. The lack of self-similarity in barchans has been attributed to the dependence of speed-up ratios on dune size and the presence of a finite saturation length in the physics of aeolian transport. Here I argue that deviations from self-similarity at this study site are more likely due to the systematic decrease in aerodynamic roughness length with increasing elevation on stoss slopes. The data set I developed should prove useful to the aeolian geomorphic community for the further testing of models for barchan evolution.

  3. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K.

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California`s Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  4. Response in the water quality of the Salton Sea, California, to changes in phosphorus loading: An empirical modeling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.M.; Schladow, S.G.

    2008-01-01

    Salton Sea, California, like many other lakes, has become eutrophic because of excessive nutrient loading, primarily phosphorus (P). A Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) is being prepared for P to reduce the input of P to the Sea. In order to better understand how P-load reductions should affect the average annual water quality of this terminal saline lake, three different eutrophication programs (BATHTUB, WiLMS, and the Seepage Lake Model) were applied. After verifying that specific empirical models within these programs were applicable to this saline lake, each model was calibrated using water-quality and nutrient-loading data for 1999 and then used to simulate the effects of specific P-load reductions. Model simulations indicate that a 50% decrease in external P loading would decrease near-surface total phosphorus concentrations (TP) by 25-50%. Application of other empirical models demonstrated that this decrease in loading should decrease near-surface chlorophyll a concentrations (Chl a) by 17-63% and increase Secchi depths (SD) by 38-97%. The wide range in estimated responses in Chl a and SD were primarily caused by uncertainty in how non-algal turbidity would respond to P-load reductions. If only the models most applicable to the Salton Sea are considered, a 70-90% P-load reduction is required for the Sea to be classified as moderately eutrophic (trophic state index of 55). These models simulate steady-state conditions in the Sea; therefore, it is difficult to ascertain how long it would take for the simulated changes to occur after load reductions. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  5. Holocene Cyclical Switching of Colorado River Water Alternatively to the Sea of Cortez or to the Salton Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, K. A.; Stock, G. M.; Rockwell, T. K.; Schafer, J.; Webb, R. H.

    2007-05-01

    The former giant lake (ancient Lake Cahuilla) that intermittently filled the Salton Sink with a volume half that of Lake Erie has profound implications for the hydrologic and ecologic history of the Colorado River delta. Because the delta dams and isolates the sink from the Sea of Cortez (Gulf of California), the delta cone has a rare geometry that drains distributaries toward two unconnected termini: sea level on the south side and a fluctuating level in the Salton Sink on the north side. This level fluctuated in the Holocene between 85 m below modern sea level when the Salton Sink was dry and 12 m above sea level when occupied by successive incarnations of full Lake Cahuilla. Geologic and archaeologic records indicate that over the last 1300 years the Salton Sink cycled several times between dry and recurrently holding this 97 m-deep lake. At about 12 m above sea level the lake spilled southward across the delta to the Sea of Cortez most recently in the late 1600s or early 1700s. A simple model based on delta gradient can explain cyclical switching of the river from one side of the delta to the other. When Lake Cahuilla was dry or low, any northward flows off the delta would encounter greater gravitational potential and a steeper gradient compared to the south side. The floods of 1905-1906 dramatically demonstrated that flows down the steep north flank of the delta could cause channel entrenchment, in this case headward retreat of a waterfall 9 m high as fast as 30 cm/min. Except for human intervention, this rapid downcutting would have led to complete capture of Colorado River water until Lake Cahuilla filled. Similar entrenchment and capture events must have recurred many times during the Holocene and also earlier times. We infer that when Lake Cahuilla rose to its spillover level, the feeding distributaries silted in and lowered their grade enough to provide an impetus for the river to switch back to paths down the south side of the delta to the Sea of Cortez

  6. Prevalence of neurotoxic Clostridium botulinum type C in the gastrointestinal tracts of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) in the Salton Sea.

    PubMed

    Nol, P; Rocke, T E; Gross, K; Yuill, T M

    2004-07-01

    Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) have been implicated as the source of type C toxin in avian botulism outbreaks in pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus) at the Salton Sea in southern California (USA). We collected sick, dead, and healthy fish from various sites throughout the Sea during the summers of 1999 through 2001 and tested them for the presence of Clostridium botulinum type C cells by polymerase chain reaction targeting the C(1) neurotoxin gene. Four of 96 (4%), 57 of 664 (9%), and five of 355 (1%) tilapia tested were positive for C. botulinum type C toxin gene in 1999, 2000, and 2001, respectively. The total number of positive fish was significantly greater in 2000 than in 2001 (P<0.0001). No difference in numbers of positives was detected between sick and dead fish compared with live fish. In 2000, no significant relationships were revealed among the variables studied, such as location and date of collection. PMID:15465707

  7. Prevalence of neurotoxic Clostridium botulinum type C in the gastrointestinal tracts of tilapis (Oreochromis mossambicus) in the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nol, P.J.; Rocke, T.E.; Gross, K.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) have been implicated as the source of type C toxin in avian botulism outbreaks in pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus) at the Salton Sea in southern California (USA). We collected sick, dead, and healthy fish from various sites throughout the Sea during the summers of 1999 through 2001 and tested them for the presence of Clostridium botulinum type C cells by polymerase chain reaction targeting the C1 neurotoxin gene. Four of 96 (4%), 57 of 664 (9%), and five of 355 (1%) tilapia tested were positive for C. botulinum type C toxin gene in 1999, 2000, and 2001, respectively. The total number of positive fish was significantly greater in 2000 than in 2001 (P<0.0001). No difference in numbers of positives was detected between sick and dead fish compared with live fish. In 2000, no significant relationships were revealed among the variables studied, such as location and date of collection.

  8. Analysis of earthquake clustering and source spectra in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal field is located within the tectonic step-over between San Andreas Fault and Imperial Fault. Since the 1980s, geothermal energy exploration has resulted with step-like increase of microearthquake activities, which mirror the expansion of geothermal field. Distinguishing naturally occurred and induced seismicity, and their corresponding characteristics (e.g., energy release) is important for hazard assessment. Between 2008 and 2014, seismic data recorded by a local borehole array were provided public access from CalEnergy through SCEC data center; and the high quality local recording of over 7000 microearthquakes provides unique opportunity to sort out characteristics of induced versus natural activities. We obtain high-resolution earthquake location using improved S-wave picks, waveform cross-correlation and a new 3D velocity model. We then develop method to identify spatial-temporally isolated earthquake clusters. These clusters are classified into aftershock-type, swarm-type, and mixed-type (aftershock-like, with low skew, low magnitude and shorter duration), based on the relative timing of largest earthquakes and moment-release. The mixed-type clusters are mostly located at 3 - 4 km depth near injection well; while aftershock-type clusters and swarm-type clusters also occur further from injection well. By counting number of aftershocks within 1day following mainshock in each cluster, we find that the mixed-type clusters have much higher aftershock productivity compared with other types and historic M4 earthquakes. We analyze detailed spatial variation of 'b-value'. We find that the mixed-type clusters are mostly located within high b-value patches, while large (M>3) earthquakes and other types of clusters are located within low b-value patches. We are currently processing P and S-wave spectra to analyze the spatial-temporal correlation of earthquake stress parameter and seismicity characteristics. Preliminary results suggest that the

  9. Molecular characterization and morphology of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Bysmatrum caponii from two solar saltons in western Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Jang, Se Hyeon; Kang, Nam Seon; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Kyung Ha; Yoon, Eun Young; Potvin, Éric; Hwang, Yeong Jong; Kim, Jong Im; Seong, Kyeong Ah

    2012-03-01

    Species belonging to the genus Bysmatrum are peridinoid, thecate, photosynthetic dinoflagellates. The plate formula of Bysmatrum spp., arranged in a Kofoidian series, is almost identical to that of Scrippsiella spp. Bysmatrum spp., which were originally classified as Scrippsiella spp., but were transferred to the genus Bysmatrum spp. because of separation of the intercalary plates 2a and 3a by plate 3'. Whether this transfer from Scrippsiella spp. to Bysmatrum spp. is reasonable should be genetically confirmed. Dinoflagellates were isolated from 2 solar saltons located in western Korea in 2009-2010 and 3 clonal cultures from Sooseong solar saltons and 2 clonal cultures from Garolim solar saltons were successfully established. All of these dinoflagellates were identified as Bysmatrum caponii based on morphology analysis by light and electron microscopy. The plates of all Korean strains of B. caponii were arranged in a Kofoidian series of Po, X, 4', 3a, 7″, 6c, 4s, 5‴, 0 (p), and 24'. When properly aligned, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of the 3 Sooseong strains of B. caponii were identical, as were those of the 2 Garolim strains. Furthermore, the sequences of the 3 Sooseong strains were 0.01% different from those of the Garolim strains. However, the sequences of SSU rDNA of these Korean B. caponii strains were 9% different from that of Bysmatrum subsalsum and > 10% from that of any other dinoflagellate thus far reported. In the phylogenetic trees generated using SSU and LSU rDNA sequences, these Korean B. caponii strains formed a clade with B. subsalsum which was clearly divergent from the Scrippsiella clade. However, this Bysmatrum clade was phylogenetically close to the Protoperidinium and/or Peridinium clades. The results of the present study suggest that Bysmatrum spp. are markedly different genetically from Scrippsiella spp..

  10. Analysis of P- and S-wave VSP (vertical seismic profile) data from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.

    1987-09-01

    To understand any geophysical data, geologic information is necessary. This thesis will begin with a summary of the geology of the Salton Trough region and the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). The information available from the SSSDP will also be summarized. After the geologic summary, the design of the VSP will be discussed, including acquisition equipment and procedures. The data processing procedures and software used will be discussed as a separate section. Processing procedures will also be described at various times in the thesis where more specialized procedures are used. Data analysis makes up the bulk of the thesis and it is divided into a number of sections detailing the basic VSP interpretation, the anisotropy analysis and the fracture detection and orientation analysis. A combined interpretation of the results, with probable geologic causes for observed events, is presented as a separate section from the data analysis. Finally, a summary of results for each of the goals stated above will be given. The reader should note that a large volume of data were collected and various display methods were used (from the standard wiggle-trace to three-component hodographs). Much of these data are left in the appendices with important or representative figures given in the body of the thesis. Also given in the appendices are listings of FORTRAN programs developed in conjunction with the thesis work. 46 refs., 63 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Salton Sea area, California, 1986-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Setmire, J.G.; Wolfe, J.C.; Stroud, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Water, bottom sediment, and biota were sampled during 1986 and 1987 in the Salton Sea area to determine concentrations of trace elements and pesticides as part of the Department of Interior Irrigation Drainage Program. The sampling sites (12 water, 15 bottom sediment, and 5 biota) were located in the Coachella and Imperial Valleys. The focus of sampling was to determine the current or potential threat to the wildlife of the Salton National Wildlife Refuge from irrigation projects sponsored or operated by the Department of the Interior. Results of the investigation indicate that selenium is the major element of concern. Elevated concentrations of selenium in water were restricted to tile-drain effluent. The maximum selenium concentration of 300 microg/L was detected in a tile-drain sample, and the minimum concentration of 1 microg/L was detected in a composite sample of Salton Sea water. The median selenium concentration was 19 microg/L. In contrast to the water, the highest bottom-sediment selenium concentration of 3.3 mg/kg was in a composite sample from the Salton Sea. The selenium detected in samples of waterfowl and fish also are of concern, but, to date, no studies have been done in the Salton Sea area to determine if selenium has caused adverse biological effects. Concentrations of boron and manganese were elevated in tile-drain samples throughout the Imperial Valley. Boron concentrations in migratory waterfowl were at levels that could cause reproduction impairment. Elevated concentrations of chromium, nickel, and zinc were detected in the Whitewater River , but they were not associated with irrigation drainage. Organochlorine pesticide residues were detected in bottom sediment throughout the study area at levels approaching those measured more than 10 years ago. More detailed studies would be needed to determine if these residues are affecting the waterfowl. (USGS)

  12. Rare-earth elements in hot brines (165 to 190 degree C) from the Salton Sea geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.; Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Rare-earth element (REE) concentrations are important indicators for revealing various chemical fractionation processes (water/rock interactions) and source region geochemistry. Since the REE patterns are characteristic of geologic materials (basalt, granite, shale, sediments, etc.) and minerals (K-feldspar, calcite, illite, epidote, etc.), their study in geothermal fluids may serve as a geothermometer. The REE study may also enable us to address the issue of groundwater mixing. In addition, the behavior of the REE can serve as analogs of the actinides in radioactive waste (e.g., neodymium is an analog of americium and curium). In this paper, the authors port the REE data for a Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) brine (two aliquots: port 4 at 165{degree}C and port 5 at 190{degree}C) and six associated core samples.

  13. Operation of a mineral recovery unit on brine from the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource Area. Report of investigations/1982

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

    1982-07-01

    The Bureau of Mines operated a mineral recovery unit to recover metal values from post-flash geothermal brines from the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area as part of its research into the use of plentiful resources. The brine was available for metals recovery after its heat content had been used to generate electricity. The brine source was treated with lime to precipitate the contained iron, manganese, lead, and zinc before injection of the heat-depleted brine into the underground reservoir. Data are presented on the effects of process variables, such as rate and method of lime addition and air oxidation versus air exclusion. Variations in precipitation of metal values, composition of precipitates, effectiveness of slurry thickeners, and methods of treating the precipitates to recover metal values are discussed.

  14. Operation of a mineral-recovery unit on brine from the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines operated a mineral recovery unit to recover metal values from post-flash geothermal brines from the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area as part of its research into the use of plentiful resources. The brine was available for metals recovery after its heat content had been used to generate electricity. The brine source was treated with lime to precipitate the contained iron, manganese, lead, and zinc before injection of the heat-depleted brine into the underground reservoir. Data are presented on the effects of process variables, such as rate and method of lime addition and air oxidation versus air exclusion. Variations in precipitation of metal values, composition of precipitates, effectiveness of slurry thickeners, and methods of treating the precipitates to recover metal values are discussed.

  15. Analysis of P and S wave vertical seismic profile data from the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.

    1988-11-10

    As part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project at California State well 2--14, vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were collected from P and S wave sources at two distances from the well. Use of a three-component geophone, along with rotation of the recorded data traces into a wave front-based coordinate system, allows analysis of many aspects of seismic wave propagation properties around the well. Standard VSP analysis techniques were used to measure interval P and S wave velocities and to identify reflecting horizons both within and below the survey interval (from 455 to 1735 m). A reflection from below the survey interval, seen with both P and S sources, seems to be associated with a fractured reservoir near 2100 m. Indications of fracturing were observed, including vertical scattering of P waves from a zone near 915 m. Orthogonally polarized shear waves were generated at each offset to study anisotropy by travel time measurement and particle motion analysis of the shear wave arrivals. Three component particle motion analysis of shear wave arrivals was found to be effective for characterizing the subtleties in the S wave splitting throughout the various zones in the well. The SH/sub t/ source (horizontal and transverse to the well) produced complicated, elliptical particle motion while the SV source (in-line with the well) produced linear particle motion. The difference in linearity of particle motion from orthogonally polarized shear wave sources was unexpected and may be related to regional tectonics. Anomalous zones may be related to transition depths in the Salton Sea geothermal field. Travel time difference between SV and SH waves, while clearly observable, indicates only about 1% average anisotropy.

  16. Archaeal and bacterial communities respond differently to environmental gradients in anoxic sediments of a California hypersaline lake, the Salton Sea.

    PubMed

    Swan, Brandon K; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Reifel, Kristen M; Moreno, Lilliana I; Valentine, David L

    2010-02-01

    Sulfidic, anoxic sediments of the moderately hypersaline Salton Sea contain gradients in salinity and carbon that potentially structure the sedimentary microbial community. We investigated the abundance, community structure, and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea along these gradients to further distinguish the ecologies of these domains outside their established physiological range. Quantitative PCR was used to enumerate 16S rRNA gene abundances of Bacteria, Archaea, and Crenarchaeota. Community structure and diversity were evaluated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), quantitative analysis of gene (16S rRNA) frequencies of dominant microorganisms, and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA. Archaea were numerically dominant at all depths and exhibited a lesser response to environmental gradients than that of Bacteria. The relative abundance of Crenarchaeota was low (0.4 to 22%) at all depths but increased with decreased carbon content and increased salinity. Salinity structured the bacterial community but exerted no significant control on archaeal community structure, which was weakly correlated with total carbon. Partial sequencing of archaeal 16S rRNA genes retrieved from three sediment depths revealed diverse communities of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, many of which were affiliated with groups previously described from marine sediments. The abundance of these groups across all depths suggests that many putative marine archaeal groups can tolerate elevated salinity (5.0 to 11.8% [wt/vol]) and persist under the anaerobic conditions present in Salton Sea sediments. The differential response of archaeal and bacterial communities to salinity and carbon patterns is consistent with the hypothesis that adaptations to energy stress and availability distinguish the ecologies of these domains. PMID:19948847

  17. Relationships among seismic velocity, metamorphism, and seismic and aseismic fault slip in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Lohman, Rowena B.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Goldman, Mark R.

    2015-04-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is one of the most geothermally and seismically active areas in California and presents an opportunity to study the effect of high-temperature metamorphism on the properties of seismogenic faults. The area includes numerous active tectonic faults that have recently been imaged with active source seismic reflection and refraction. We utilize the active source surveys, along with the abundant microseismicity data from a dense borehole seismic network, to image the 3-D variations in seismic velocity in the upper 5 km of the crust. There are strong velocity variations, up to ~30%, that correlate spatially with the distribution of shallow heat flow patterns. The combination of hydrothermal circulation and high-temperature contact metamorphism has significantly altered the shallow sandstone sedimentary layers within the geothermal field to denser, more feldspathic, rock with higher P wave velocity, as is seen in the numerous exploration wells within the field. This alteration appears to have a first-order effect on the frictional stability of shallow faults. In 2005, a large earthquake swarm and deformation event occurred. Analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar data and earthquake relocations indicates that the shallow aseismic fault creep that occurred in 2005 was localized on the Kalin fault system that lies just outside the region of high-temperature metamorphism. In contrast, the earthquake swarm, which includes all of the M > 4 earthquakes to have occurred within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in the last 15 years, ruptured the Main Central Fault (MCF) system that is localized in the heart of the geothermal anomaly. The background microseismicity induced by the geothermal operations is also concentrated in the high-temperature regions in the vicinity of operational wells. However, while this microseismicity occurs over a few kilometer scale region, much of it is clustered in earthquake swarms that last from hours to a

  18. Preliminary report on geophysical well-logging activity on the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Morin, R.H.; Hodges, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project has culminated in a 10,564-ft deep test well, State 2-14 well, in the Imperial Valley of southern California. A comprehensive scientific program of drilling, coring, and downhole measurements, which was conducted for about 5 months, has obtained much scientific information concerning the physical and chemical processes associated with an active hydrothermal system. This report primarily focuses on the geophysical logging activities at the State 2-14 well and provides early dissemination of geophysical data to other investigators working on complementary studies. Geophysical-log data were obtained by a commercial logging company and by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Most of the commercial logs were obtained during three visits to the site; only one commercial log was obtained below a depth of 6,000 ft. The commercial logs obtained were dual induction, natural gamma, compensated neutron formation density, caliper and sonic. The USGS logging effort consisted of four primary periods, with many logs extending below a depth of 6,000 ft. The USGS logs obtained were temperature, caliper, natural gamma, gamma spectral, epithermal neutron, acoustic velocity, full-waveform, and acoustic televiewer. Various problems occurred throughout the drilling phase of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project that made successful logging difficult: (1) borehole constrictions, possibly resulting from mud coagulation, (2) maximum temperatures of about 300 C, and (3) borehole conditions unfavorable for logging because of numerous zones of fluid loss, cement plugs, and damage caused by repeated trips in and out of the hole. These factors hampered and compromised logging quality at several open-hole intervals. The quality of the logs was dependent on the degree of probe sophistication and sensitivity to borehole-wall conditions. Digitized logs presented were processed on site and are presented in increments of 1,000 ft. A summary of the numerous

  19. A comparison of long-term changes in seismicity at The Geysers, Salton Sea, and Coso geothermal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trugman, Daniel T.; Shearer, Peter M.; Borsa, Adrian A.; Fialko, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Geothermal energy is an important source of renewable energy, yet its production is known to induce seismicity. Here we analyze seismicity at the three largest geothermal fields in California: The Geysers, Salton Sea, and Coso. We focus on resolving the temporal evolution of seismicity rates, which provides important observational constraints on how geothermal fields respond to natural and anthropogenic loading. We develop an iterative, regularized inversion procedure to partition the observed seismicity rate into two components: (1) the interaction rate due to earthquake-earthquake triggering and (2) the smoothly varying background rate controlled by other time-dependent stresses, including anthropogenic forcing. We apply our methodology to compare long-term changes in seismicity to monthly records of fluid injection and withdrawal. At The Geysers, we find that the background seismicity rate is highly correlated with fluid injection, with the mean rate increasing by approximately 50% and exhibiting strong seasonal fluctuations following construction of the Santa Rosa pipeline in 2003. In contrast, at both Salton Sea and Coso, the background seismicity rate has remained relatively stable since 1990, though both experience short-term rate fluctuations that are not obviously modulated by geothermal plant operation. We also observe significant temporal variations in Gutenberg-Richter b value, earthquake magnitude distribution, and earthquake depth distribution, providing further evidence for the dynamic evolution of stresses within these fields. The differing field-wide responses to fluid injection and withdrawal may reflect differences in in situ reservoir conditions and local tectonics, suggesting that a complex interplay of natural and anthropogenic stressing controls seismicity within California's geothermal fields.

  20. Solar Sea Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zener, Clarence

    1976-01-01

    In their preoccupation with highly complex new energy systems, scientists and statesmen may be overlooking the possibilities of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). That is the view of a Carnegie-Mellon University physicist who is in the forefront of solar sea power investigation. (Author/BT)

  1. Spatial and temporal assessment of environmental contaminants in water, sediments and fish of the Salton Sea and its two primary tributaries, California, USA, from 2002 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Xu, Elvis Genbo; Bui, Cindy; Lamerdin, Cassandra; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-07-15

    The Salton Sea, the largest inland surface water body in California, has been designated as a sensitive ecological area by federal and state governments. Its two main tributaries, the New River and Alamo River are impacted by urban and agriculture land use wastes. The purpose of this study was to temporally and spatially evaluate the ecological risks of contaminants of concern in water, sediments and fish tissues. A total of 229 semivolatile organic compounds and 12 trace metals were examined. Among them Selenium, DDTs, PAHs, PCBs, chlorpyrifos and some current-use pesticides such as pyrethroids exceeded risk thresholds. From 2002 to 2012, measurements of chlorpyrifos in sediments generally declined and were not observed after 2009 at the river outlets. In contrast, pyrethroid concentrations in sediments rose consistently after 2009. In water samples, the outlets of the two rivers showed relatively higher levels of contamination than the main water body of the Salton Sea. However, sediments of the main water body of the Salton Sea showed relatively higher sediment concentrations of contaminants than the two rivers. This was particularly true for selenium which showed reductions in concentrations from 2002 to 2007, but then gradual increases to 2012. Consistent with water evaluations, contaminant concentrations in fish tissues tended to be higher at the New River boundary and at the drainage sites for the Alamo River compared to sites along each river. The persistent contaminants DDTs, PAHs, chlorpyrifos and several pyrethroid insecticides were associated with the toxicity of sediments and water collected from the rivers. Overall, assessment results suggested potential ecological risk in sediments of the Salton Sea as well as in water and fish from the two rivers. PMID:27058132

  2. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Salton Sea Area, California, 1986-87. Water-Resources investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Setmire, J.G.; Wolfe, J.C.; Stroud, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Water, bottom sediment, and biota were sampled during 1986-87 in the Salton Sea area to determine concentrations of trace elements and pesticides as part of the Department of Interior Irrigation Drainage Program. The sampling sites (12 water, 15 bottom sediment, and 5 biota) were located in the Coachella and Imperial Valleys. The focus of sampling was to determine if contaminants in irrigation drainage from Department of the Interior-sponsored irrigation projects have caused or have the potential to cause substantial harmful effects to humans, fish, or wildlife, or to reduce the suitability of water for beneficial uses. Results indicate that selenium is the major element of concern. Elevated concentrations of selenium in water were restricted to tile-drain effluent. The maximum selenium concentration of 300 micrograms per liter was detected in tile drain 6, and the minimum concentration of 1 microgram per liter was detected in a composite sample of Salton Sea water. The median selenium concentration was 19 micrograms per liter. In contrast to the water, the highest bottom-sediment selenium concentration of 3.3 milligrams per kilogram was in a composite sample from the Salton Sea. Concentrations of boron, chromium, nickel, zinc, and organochlorine pesticide residues were detected.

  3. Platyamoeba pseudovannellida n. sp., a naked amoeba with wide salt tolerance isolated from the Salton Sea, California.

    PubMed

    Hauer, G; Rogerson, A; Anderson, O R

    2001-01-01

    A new species of naked amoeba, Platyamoeba pseudovannellida n.sp., is described on the basis of light microscopic and fine structural features. The amoeba was isolated from the Salton Sea, California, from water at a salinity of ca. 44%. Locomotive amoebae occasionally had a spatulate outline and floating cells had radiating pseudopodia, sometimes with pointed tips. Both these features are reminiscent of the genus Vannella. However, the surface coat (glycocalyx) as revealed by TEM indicates that this is a species of Platyamoeba. Although salinity was not used as a diagnostic feature, this species was found to have remarkable tolerance to fluctuating salinity levels, even when changes were rapid. Amoebae survived over the range 0 per thousand to 150 per thousand salt and grew within the range 0 per thousand to 138 per thousand salt. The generation time of cells averaged 29 h and was not markedly affected by salt concentration. This is longer than expected for an amoeba of this size and suggests a high energetic cost of coping with salinity changes. The morphology of cells changed with increasing salinity: at 0 per thousand cells were flattened and active and at the other extreme (138 per thousand) amoebae were wrinkled and domed and cell movement was very slow. At the ultrastructural level, the cytoplasm of cells grown at high salinity (98 per thousand was considerably denser than that of cells reared at 0 per thousand. PMID:11831775

  4. A numerical study of strike-slip bend formation with application to the Salton Sea pull-apart basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jiyang; Liu, Mian; Wang, Hui

    2015-03-01

    How stepovers of strike-slip faults connect to form bends is a question important for understanding the formation of push-up ranges (restraining bends) and pull-apart basins (releasing bends). We investigated the basic mechanics of this process in a simple three-dimensional viscoelastoplastic finite element model. Our model predicts localized plastic strain within stepovers that may eventually lead to the formation of strike-slip bends. Major parameters controlling strain localization include the relative fault strength, geometry of the fault system, and the plasticity model assumed. Using the Drucker-Prager plasticity model, in which the plastic yield strength of the crust depends on both shear and normal stresses, our results show that a releasing bend is easier to develop than a restraining bend under similar conditions. These results may help explain the formation of the Salton Sea pull-apart basin in Southern California 0.5-0.1 Ma ago, when the stepover between the Imperial Fault and the San Andreas Fault was connected by the Brawley seismic zone.

  5. Testing methodology and chemical composition of hypersaline geothermal fluid at the Salton Sea known geothermal resource area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rabizadeh, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and chemical characterization of geothermal fluids from a hypersaline geothermal reservoir in the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Area. The collection and analysis schemes were designed to allow complete analysis of liquid and gaseous constituents of high pressure hypersaline geothermal fluids. The analytical procedures are described in a fairly standard but detailed format showing normal steps, precision, and sensitivity. The sampling techniques and equipment are elaborated specifically for this work, and are evaluated and modified in the field if necessary, so a sample is extracted with simplicity, accuracy, and reliability. Analytical methods are drawn from consultation with practitioners, literature results, and first-hand experience. The primary objectives are sensitivity, interference, availability, and ease of operation. A basic and quantitative description of geological, physical, and chemical character of geothermal resources is presented, and the climatology and air and water quality of Imperial County, California are described. The pre-flash composition of fluids and the composition of noncondensable gases are discussed. Test results are compared, whenever available, with the results from tests from other production wells in the same area.

  6. Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, as a near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1983-11-01

    Since high concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not normally encountered in salt domes or beds, finding an exact geologic analog of expected near-field conditions in a mined nuclear waste repository in salt will be difficult. The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, however, provides an opportunity to investigate the migration and retardation of naturally occurring U, Th, Ra, Cs, Sr and other elements in hot brines which have been moving through clay-rich sedimentary rocks for up to 100,000 years. The more than thirty deep wells drilled in this field to produce steam for electrical generation penetrate sedimentary rocks containing concentrated brines where temperatures reach 365/sup 0/C at only 2 km depth. The brines are primarily Na, K, Ca chlorides with up to 25% of total dissolved solids; they also contain high concentrations of metals such as Fe, Mn, Li, Zn, and Pb. This report describes the geology, geophysics and geochemistry of this system as a prelude to a study of the mobility of naturally occurring radionuclides and radionuclide analogs within it. The aim of this study is to provide data to assist in validating quantitative models of repository behavior and to use in designing and evaluating waste packages and engineered barriers. 128 references, 33 figures, 13 tables.

  7. Double-diffusive convection in geothermal systems: the salton sea, California, geothermal system as a likely candidate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    Much has been published about double-diffusive convection as a mechanism for explaining variations in composition and temperature within all-liquid natural systems. However, relatively little is known about the applicability of this phenomenon within the heterogeneous rocks of currently active geothermal systems where primary porosity may control fluid flow in some places and fractures may control it in others. The main appeal of double-diffusive convection within hydrothermal systems is-that it is a mechanism that may allow efficient transfer of heat mainly by convection, while at the same time maintaining vertical and lateral salinity gradients. The Salton Sea geothermal system exhibits the following reservoir characteristics: (1) decreasing salinity and temperature from bottom to top and center toward the sides, (2) a very high heat flow from the top of the system that seems to require a major component of convective transfer of heat within the chemically stratified main reservoir, and (3) a relatively uniform density of the reservoir fluid throughout the system at all combinations of subsurface temperature, pressure, and salinity. Double-diffusive convection can account for these characteristics very nicely whereas other previously suggested models appear to account either for the thermal structure or for the salinity variations, but not both. Hydrologists, reservoir engineers, and particularly geochemists should consider the possibility and consequences of double-diffusive convection when formulating models of hydrothermal processes, and of the response of reservoirs to testing and production. ?? 1990.

  8. Total Selenium and Selenium Species in Irrigation Drain Inflows to the Salton Sea, California, April and July 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Saiki, Michael K.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results for two sampling periods (April 2008 and July 2008) during a 4-year monitoring program to characterize selenium concentrations in selected irrigation drains flowing into the Salton Sea, California. Total selenium, selenium species (dissolved selenite, selenate, organoselenium), and total suspended solids were determined in water samples and total selenium was determined in water column particulates and in sediment, detritus, and biota that included algae, plankton, midge larvae (family, Chironomidae), and two fish species - western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna). In addition, sediments were analyzed for percent total organic carbon and particle size. Mean total selenium concentrations in water for both sampling periods ranged from 1.93 to 44.2 micrograms per liter, predominately as selenate, which is typical of waters where selenium is leached out of selenium-containing marine shales and associated soils under alkaline and oxidizing conditions. Total selenium concentrations (micrograms per gram dry weight) ranged as follows: algae, 0.75 to 3.39; plankton, 0.88 to 4.03; midges, 2.52 to 44.3; fish, 3.37 to 18.9; detritus, 1.11 to 13.6; sediment, 0.11 to 8.93.

  9. Total Selenium and Selenium Species in Irrigation Drain Inflows to the Salton Sea, California, April and July 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Saiki, Michael K.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results for two sampling periods during a 4-year monitoring survey to provide a characterization of selenium concentrations in selected irrigation drains flowing into the Salton Sea, California. Total selenium, selenium species, and total suspended solids were determined in water samples, and total selenium was determined in sediment, detritus, and biota that included algae, plankton, midge larvae (family, Chironomidae), and two fish species-western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna). In addition, sediments were analyzed for percent total organic carbon and particle size. Total selenium concentrations in water for both sampling periods ranged from 1.43 to 47.1 micrograms per liter, predominately as selenate, which is typical of waters leached out of selenium-contaminated marine shales under alkaline and oxidizing conditions. Total selenium concentrations ranged from 0.88 to 20.2 micrograms per gram in biota, and from 0.15 to 28.9 micrograms per gram in detritus and sediment.

  10. Total Selenium and Selenium Species in Irrigation Drain Inflows to the Salton Sea, California, October 2007 and January 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Saiki, Michael K.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results for two sampling periods (October 2007 and January 2008) during a 4-year monitoring program to characterize selenium concentrations in selected irrigation drains flowing into the Salton Sea, California. Total selenium, selenium species (selenite, selenate, organoselenium), and total suspended solids were determined in water samples, and total selenium was determined in sediment, detritus, and biota that included algae, plankton, midge larvae (family, Chironomidae), and two fish species?western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna). In addition, sediments were analyzed for percent total organic carbon and particle size. Mean total selenium concentrations in water for both sampling periods ranged from 0.97 to 64.5 micrograms per liter, predominately as selenate, which is typical of waters where selenium is leached out of selenium-containing marine shales and associated soils under alkaline and oxidizing conditions. Total selenium concentrations (micrograms per gram dry weight) ranged as follows: algae, 0.95 to 5.99; plankton, 0.15 to 19.3; midges, 1.39 to 15.4; fish, 3.71 to 25.1; detritus, 0.85 to 21.7; sediment, 0.32 to 7.28.

  11. Total Selenium and Selenium Species in Irrigation Drain Inflows to the Salton Sea, California, October 2008 and January 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Saiki, Michael K.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results for two sampling periods (October 2008 and January 2009) during a 4-year monitoring program to characterize selenium concentrations in selected irrigation drains flowing into the Salton Sea, California. Total selenium, selenium species (dissolved selenite, selenate, organoselenium), and total suspended solids were determined in water samples. Total selenium also was determined in water column particulates and in sediment, detritus, and biota that included algae, plankton, midge larvae (family, Chironomidae), and two fish species (western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, and sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna). In addition, sediments were analyzed for percent total organic carbon and particle size. Mean total selenium concentrations in water for both sampling periods ranged from 1.00 to 33.6 micrograms per liter, predominately as selenate, which is typical of waters where selenium is leached out of selenium-containing marine shales and associated soils under alkaline and oxidizing conditions. Total selenium concentrations (micrograms per gram dry weight) ranged as follows: algae, 1.52 to 8.26; plankton, 0.79 to 3.66; midges, 2.68 to 50.6; fish, 3.09 to 30.4; detritus, 1.78 to 58.0; and sediment, 0.42 to 10.0.

  12. Relation of desert pupfish abundance to selected environmental variables in natural and manmade habitats in the Salton Sea basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, B.A.; Saiki, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the relation between abundance of desert pupfish, Cyprinodon macularius, and selected biological and physicochemical variables in natural and manmade habitats within the Salton Sea Basin. Field sampling in a natural tributary, Salt Creek, and three agricultural drains captured eight species including pupfish (1.1% of the total catch), the only native species encountered. According to Bray-Curtis resemblance functions, fish species assemblages differed mostly between Salt Creek and the drains (i.e., the three drains had relatively similar species assemblages). Pupfish numbers and environmental variables varied among sites and sample periods. Canonical correlation showed that pupfish abundance was positively correlated with abundance of western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, and negatively correlated with abundance of porthole livebearers, Poeciliopsis gracilis, tilapias (Sarotherodon mossambica and Tilapia zillii), longjaw mudsuckers, Gillichthys mirabilis, and mollies (Poecilia latipinnaandPoecilia mexicana). In addition, pupfish abundance was positively correlated with cover, pH, and salinity, and negatively correlated with sediment factor (a measure of sediment grain size) and dissolved oxygen. Pupfish abundance was generally highest in habitats where water quality extremes (especially high pH and salinity, and low dissolved oxygen) seemingly limited the occurrence of nonnative fishes. This study also documented evidence of predation by mudsuckers on pupfish. These findings support the contention of many resource managers that pupfish populations are adversely influenced by ecological interactions with nonnative fishes. ?? Springer 2005.

  13. Analysis of geophysical well logs obtained in the State 2-14 borehole, Salton Sea geothermal area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Morin, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    A complete suite of conventional geophysical well logs was obtained in the upper part of a 3220-m-deep borehole drilled into geothermally altered alluvial sediments on the southeastern edge of the Salton Sea. Geophysical logs obtained in the State 2-14 borehole indicate that neutron porosity, gamma-gamma, and deep-induction logs provide useful information on lithologic trends with depth. The natural gamma log contains almost continuous, high-frequency fluctuations that obscure lithologic trends and that may be related to recent radioisotope redistribution and departure from radiometric equilibrium. Acoustic transit time logs give unrealistically low in situ compressional velocities ranging from 1.8 to 3.0 km/s, whereas acoustic waveform logs indicate that sediment compressional velocities range from less than 3.0 km/s shallower than 1000 m in depth to almost 5.0 km/s at depths greater than 2000 m. Analyses indicate that most log values lie between two lithologic end points: an electrically conductive claystone with moderate neutron porosity, but no effective porosity, and an electrically nonconductive, fully cemented siltstone that has small but finite porosity. -from Authors

  14. Atmospheric dry deposition in the vicinity of the Salton Sea, California - II: Measurement and effects of an enhanced evaporation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alonso, R.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Yee, J.L.; Boarman, W.I.

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of salt spray drift from pilot technologies employed by the US Bureau of Reclamation on deposition rates of various air-born ions. An enhanced evaporation system (EES) was tested in the field at the Salton Sea, California. Dry deposition of NO3-, NH4+, SO42-, Cl-, Ca2+, Na+, K+ and Se was assessed by using nylon filters and branches of natural vegetation exposed for one-week long periods. The simultaneous exposure of both lyophilized branches and branches of live plants offered important information highlighting the dynamics of deposited ions on vegetation. The EES significantly increased the deposition rates of Cl-, SO42- and Na+ in an area of about 639-1062 m surrounding the sprayers. Similarly, higher deposition of Ca 2+ and K+ caused by the EES was detected only when deposition was assessed using nylon filters or lyophilized branches. Deposition fluxes of NO3-, NH4+ and Se were not affected by the spraying system. Techniques for measuring dry deposition and calculating landscape-level depositional loads in non-forested systems need further development. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Local and regional seismic response to injection and production at the Salton Sea geothermal field, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, L. J.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    California hosts both the largest geothermal resource capacity and highest seismicity rate in the nation. With plans to increase geothermal output, and proven earthquake triggering in the vicinity of geothermal power plants worldwide, it is important to determine the local and regional effects of geothermal power production. This study focuses on relating the volume of fluid extracted from and re-injected into wells at the Salton Sea geothermal field (SSGF) in Southern California to local seismicity rate and increased probability of larger events on nearby faults such as the San Andreas and Imperial faults. Seismic data is obtained from the publicly available Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) catalog and SSGF injection and production data from the State of California Department of Conservation. We identify triggered earthquakes in the catalog by modeling seismicity in a 15km radius around the SSGF according to an Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) method. The model seeks to fit the cumulative seismicity curve from our dataset by optimizing five seismic parameters in accordance with Gutenberg-Richter and Omori's law. The modeled curve is then removed from the dataset to isolate the non-ETAS, or production-triggered, signal. We then formulate a constitutive law to relate the seismicity rate to the driving stress (i.e. volumetric strain in the reservoir). Defining the local stressing rate provides a tool for predicting the effects that production has on regional seismicity rates. The largest spike in SSGF net production volume over the past 30 years is accompanied by the one of the largest increases in both seismicity rate and moment release within the geothermal field. This indicates a direct coupling between net fluid production volume (volume extracted minus volume re-injected) and seismicity rate and cumulative seismic moment in the field. Three dimensional plots of hypocentral earthquake locations show that seismicity is concentrated on an

  16. Character and Implications of a Newly Identified Creeping Strand of the San Andreas fault NE of Salton Sea, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.; Markowski, D.

    2015-12-01

    The overdue earthquake on the Coachella section, San Andreas fault (SAF), the model ShakeOut earthquake, and the conflict between cross-fault models involving the Extra fault array and mapped shortening in the Durmid Hill area motivate new analyses at the southern SAF tip. Geologic mapping, LiDAR, seismic reflection, magnetic and gravity datasets, and aerial photography confirm the existence of the East Shoreline strand (ESS) of the SAF southwest of the main trace of the SAF. We mapped the 15 km long ESS, in a band northeast side of the Salton Sea. Other data suggest that the ESS continues N to the latitude of the Mecca Hills, and is >35 km long. The ESS cuts and folds upper Holocene beds and appears to creep, based on discovery of large NW-striking cracks in modern beach deposits. The two traces of the SAF are parallel and ~0.5 to ~2.5 km apart. Groups of east, SE, and ENE-striking strike-slip cross-faults connect the master dextral faults of the SAF. There are few sinistral-normal faults that could be part of the Extra fault array. The 1-km wide ESS contains short, discontinuous traces of NW-striking dextral-oblique faults. These en-echelon faults bound steeply dipping Pleistocene beds, cut out section, parallel tight NW-trending folds, and produced growth folds. Beds commonly dip toward the ESS on both sides, in accord with persistent NE-SW shortening across the ESS. The dispersed fault-fold structural style of the ESS is due to decollements in faulted mud-rich Pliocene to Holocene sediment and ramps and flats along the strike-slip faults. A sheared ladder-like geometric model of the two master dextral strands of the SAF and their intervening cross-faults, best explains the field relationships and geophysical datasets. Contraction across >40 km2 of the southernmost SAF zone in the Durmid Hills suggest that interaction of active structures in the SAF zone may inhibit the nucleation of large earthquakes in this region. The ESS may cross the northern Coachella

  17. Drilling investigations of crustal rifting processes in the Salton Trough, California. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.; Newmark, R.L.; Duba, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The results of CSDP activities in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) are briefly described, concentrating on a shallow heat flow survey, but also discussing preliminary results from the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP). The hypothesis that localized thermal zones are the source of all the heat in the Salton Trough is examined. (ACR)

  18. Drilling investigations of crustal rifting processes in the Salton Trough, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.; Newmark, R.L.; Duba, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes the results of CSDP activities in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), concentrating on a shallow heat-flow survey, but also considering preliminary results from the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP). Whether the heat input rate to localized systems is high enough to account for the overall thermal budget of the Salton Trough is examined. (ACR)

  19. Thermal Infrared Airborne Hyperspectral Detection of Fumarolic Ammonia Venting on the Calipatria Fault in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, D. K.; Tratt, D. M.; Buckland, K. N.; Hall, J. L.; Kasper, B. P.; Martino, M. G.; Ortega, L. J.; Westberg, K. R.; Young, S. J.; Johnson, P. D.

    2009-12-01

    An airborne hyperspectral imaging survey was conducted along the Calipatria Fault in the vicinity of the Salton Sea in Southern California. In addition to strong thermal hotspots associated with active fumaroles along the fault, a number of discrete and distributed sources of ammonia were detected. Mullet Island, some recently exposed areas of sea floor, and a shallow-water fumarolic geothermal vent all indicated ammonia emissions, presumed to originate from the eutrophic reduction of nitrate fertilizer in agricultural runoff and the decay (oxidation) of organic matter, probably algae. All emission sources detected lay along the putative Calipatria Fault, one of a number of en echelon faults in the Brawley Seismic Zone that is part of the northern-most spreading center of the East Pacific Rise. The techniques developed during this field experiment suggest a potential methodology for monitoring certain of the toxic episodes that are a known source of mass aquatic fauna kills within the Salton Sea ecosystem. The imagery was acquired at ~0.05 micron spectral resolution across the 7.6-13.5 micron thermal-infrared spectral region with a ground sample distance of approximately 1 m using the SEBASS (Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System) sensor.

  20. Discovering new events beyond the catalogue—application of empirical matched field processing to Salton Sea geothermal field seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Templeton, Dennise C.; Harris, David B.

    2015-10-01

    Using empirical matched field processing (MFP), we compare 4 yr of continuous seismic data to a set of 195 master templates from within an active geothermal field and identify over 140 per cent more events than were identified using traditional detection and location techniques alone. In managed underground reservoirs, a substantial fraction of seismic events can be excluded from the official catalogue due to an inability to clearly identify seismic-phase onsets. Empirical MFP can improve the effectiveness of current seismic detection and location methodologies by using conventionally located events with higher signal-to-noise ratios as master events to define wavefield templates that could then be used to map normally discarded indistinct seismicity. Since MFP does not require picking, it can be carried out automatically and rapidly once suitable templates are defined. In this application, we extend MFP by constructing local-distance empirical master templates using Southern California Earthquake Data Center archived waveform data of events originating within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. We compare the empirical templates to continuous seismic data collected between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2011. The empirical MFP method successfully identifies 6249 additional events, while the original catalogue reported 4352 events. The majority of these new events are lower-magnitude events with magnitudes between M0.2-M0.8. The increased spatial-temporal resolution of the microseismicity map within the geothermal field illustrates how empirical MFP, when combined with conventional methods, can significantly improve seismic network detection capabilities, which can aid in long-term sustainability and monitoring of managed underground reservoirs.

  1. Dynamics of hydrothermal seeps from the Salton Sea geothermal system (California, USA) constrained by temperature monitoring and time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Henrik; Hammer, Ã.˜Yvind; Mazzini, Adriano; Onderdonk, Nathan; Polteau, Stephane; Planke, Sverre; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2009-09-01

    Water-, mud-, gas-, and petroleum-bearing seeps are part of the Salton Sea geothermal system (SSGS) in southern California. Carbon dioxide is the main component behind the seeps in the Davis-Schrimpf seep field (˜20,000 m2). In order to understand the mechanisms driving the system, we have investigated the seep dynamics of the field by monitoring the temperature of two pools and two gryphons for 2180 h (90.8 days) in the period from December 2006 to March 2007, with a total of 32,700 measurements per station. The time series have been analyzed by statistical methods using cross correlation, autocorrelation and spectral analysis, and autoregressive modeling. The water-rich pools never exceed 34.0°C and are characterized by low-amplitude temperature variations controlled by the diurnal cycles in air temperature. The long-term validity of these results is evident from a second period of temperature monitoring of one of the pools from December 2007 to April 2008 (120 days). In contrast to the pools, the mud-rich gryphons have a strikingly different behavior. The gryphons are hotter (maximum 69.7°C) and have large amplitude variations (standard deviation of 6.4) that overprint any signal from external diurnal forcing. Autoregressive modeling shows the presence of distinct hot and cold pulses in the gryphon temperature time series, with amplitudes up to 3°C. These pulses likely reflect a combination of hydrothermal flux variations from the SSGS and the local temporal changes in bubbling activity within the gryphons.

  2. Fault History and Architecture of the Southernmost San Andreas Fault and Brawley Seismic Zone: New Constraints from CHIRP Data Acquired in the Salton Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, D.; Seitz, G.; Williams, P.; Driscoll, N.; Kent, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Salton Trough is the boundary between spreading-center dominated extension in the Gulf of California and dextral strike-slip deformation along the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system. The Salton Trough provides an ideal opportunity to image this transition in modes of deformation. The critical portion of this system, namely the intersection of the SAF and the Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ) in the southern Salton Sea has not been imaged by geophysical methods. To address this problem, we conducted a pilot, high-resolution seismic CHIRP survey in the Salton Sea offshore Bombay Beach. CHIRP imaging, together with onshore field mapping and paleoseismic investigations, has the potential to define the interaction between the SAF and the BSZ, as well as delineate fault architecture and strain partitioning in the central Salton Trough. Preliminary onshore examination of Lake Cahuilla sediments reveal lake-level changes and earthquake event chronology for the last ~1,000 years, and suggest a relatively long period of seismic quiescence for the southern SAF preceded by several events with shorter recurrence intervals. Fault excavations have revealed several lake episodes separated by terrestrial horizons that include distinct features such as mud-cracks. New CHIRP data show potential correlation of faulted offshore stratigraphy with paleoseismic deformation documented at an excavation site 15 km to the north adjacent to Salt Creek. Profiles image a well-defined fault trending obliquely to the strike of the onshore SAF, and the observed trend is sub-parallel to the BSZ. Offset stratigraphy across the fault imaged in CHIRP profiles increases with depth, with a maximum vertical offset of ~6-8 m. Relief of ~.5 m exists across the post-1905 surface and most likely represents deposition mantling an older scarp. Assuming high amplitude reflectors observed in CHIRP data correlate with lowered lake levels associated with weathering and/or desiccation horizons, then we can correlate the

  3. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project: Investigating Earthquake Hazards in the Salton Trough, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, G. S.; Goldman, M.; Sickler, R. R.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Rose, E. J.; Murphy, J. M.; Butcher, L. A.; Cotton, J. A.; Criley, C. J.; Croker, D. S.; Emmons, I.; Ferguson, A. J.; Gardner, M. A.; Jensen, E. G.; McClearn, R.; Loughran, C. L.; Slayday-Criley, C. J.; Svitek, J. F.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Skinner, S. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Kent, G.; Kell, A. M.; Harder, S. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) is a collaborative effort between academia and the U.S. Geological Survey to provide detailed, subsurface 3-D images of the Salton Trough of southern California and northern Mexico. From both active- and passive-source seismic data that were acquired both onshore and offshore (Salton Sea), the resulting images will provide insights into earthquake hazards, rift processes, and rift-transform interaction at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. The southernmost San Andreas Fault (SAF) is considered to be at high-risk of producing a large damaging earthquake, yet the structure of this and other regional faults and that of adjacent sedimentary basins is not currently well understood. Seismic data were acquired from 2 to 18 March 2011. One hundred and twenty-six borehole explosions (10-1400 kg yield) were detonated along seven profiles in the Salton Trough region, extending from area of Palm Springs, California, to the southwestern tip of Arizona. Airguns (1500 and 3500 cc) were fired along two profiles in the Salton Sea and at points in a 2-D array in the southern Salton Sea. Approximately 2800 seismometers were deployed at over 4200 locations throughout the Salton Trough region, and 48 ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed at 78 locations beneath the Salton Sea. Many of the onshore explosions were energetic enough to be recorded and located by the Southern California Seismograph Network. The geometry of the SAF has important implications for energy radiation in the next major rupture. Prior potential field, seismicity, and InSAR data indicate that the SAF may dip moderately to the northeast from the Salton Sea to Cajon Pass in the Transverse Ranges. Much of SSIP was designed to test models of this geometry.

  4. In-Flight Validation of Mid and Thermal Infrared Remotely Sensed Data Using the Lake Tahoe and Salton Sea Automated Validation Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Simon J.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation includes an introduction, Lake Tahoe site layout and measurements, Salton Sea site layout and measurements, field instrument calibration and cross-calculations, data reduction methodology and error budgets, and example results for MODIS. Summary and conclusions are: 1) Lake Tahoe CA/NV automated validation site was established in 1999 to assess radiometric accuracy of satellite and airborne mid and thermal infrared data and products. Water surface temperatures range from 4-25C.2) Salton Sea CA automated validation site was established in 2008 to broaden range of available water surface temperatures and atmospheric water vapor test cases. Water surface temperatures range from 15-35C. 3) Sites provide all information necessary for validation every 2 mins (bulk temperature, skin temperature, air temperature, wind speed, wind direction, net radiation, relative humidity). 4) Sites have been used to validate mid and thermal infrared data and products from: ASTER, AATSR, ATSR2, MODIS-Terra, MODIS-Aqua, Landsat 5, Landsat 7, MTI, TES, MASTER, MAS. 5) Approximately 10 years of data available to help validate AVHRR.

  5. Detailed study of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Salton Sea area, California, 1988-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Setmire, J.G.; Schroeder, R.A.; Densmore, J.N.; Goodbred, S.O.; Audet, D.J.; Radke, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a detailed study by the National Irrigation Water-Quality Program (NIWQP), U.S. Department of the Interior, indicate that factors controlling contaminant concentrations in subsurface irrigation drainwater in the Imperial Valley are soil characteristics, hydrology, and agricultural practices. Higher contaminant concentrations commonly were associated with clayey soils, which retard the movement of irrigation water and thus increase the degree of evaporative concentration. Regression of hydrogen- and oxygen-isotope ratios in samples collected from sumps yields a linear drainwater evaporation line that extrapolates through the isotopic composition of Colorado River water, thus demonstrating that Colorado River water is the sole source of subsurface drainwater in the Imperial Valley. Ratios of selenium to chloride indicate that selenium present in subsurface drainwater throughout the Imperial Valley originates from the Colorado River. The selenium load discharged to the Salton Sea from the Alamo River, the largest contributor, is about 6.5 tons/yr. Biological sampling and analysis showed that drainwater contaminants, including selenium, boron, and DDE, are accumulating in tissues of migratory and resident birds that use food sources in the Imperial Valley and the Salton Sea. Selenium concentration in fish-eating birds, shorebirds, and the endangered Yuma clapper rail were at levels that could affect reproduction. Boron concentrations in migratory waterfowl and resident shorebirds were at levels that potentially could cause reduced growth in young. As a result of DDE contamination of food sources, waterfowl and fish-eating birds in the Imperial Valley may be experiencing reproductive impairment.

  6. Correlation of wireline log characteristics with hydrothermal alteration and other reservoir properties of the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal fields, Imperial Valley, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Muramoto, F.S.; Elders, W.A.

    1984-05-01

    A detailed study of wireline logs from 11 wells in the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal systems was undertaken in order to determine the effects of hydrothermal alteration on the response of electrical and gamma-gamma density well logs. For the Salton Sea geothermal field, definite correspondence between log responses and hydrothermal mineralogy is evident, which in turn is related to the physical properties of the rocks. Three hydrothermal and one unaltered zone can be identified from log data on shales. These are: (1) the unaltered montmorillonite zone (<100/sup 0/ to 190/sup 0/C); (2) the illite zone (100/sup 0/ to 190/sup 0/C to 230/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C); (3) the chlorite zone (230/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C to 290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C); and (4) the feldspar zone (>290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C). The characteristic responses on well logs by which these zones are identified result primarily from changes in clay mineralogy of the shales and increases in density with progressive hydrothermal metamorphism. In the Westmorland geothermal field, differentiating mineral zones from log responses was only partially successful. However, analyses of both well log and petrologic data for wells Landers 1 and Kalin Farms 1 suggest that the former is heating up and the latter is cooling.

  7. CO2 and CH4 degassing from vents and soil in the Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, A.; Etiope, G.; Svensen, H.; Polteau, S.; Planke, S.

    2009-12-01

    Surface expulsion of mud, water, oil and gas from vents is abundant in the Davis-Schrimpf hydrothermal field (Salton Sea, California). These vents consist of gryphons and pools that commonly cluster in 10-20 m diameter calderas. Additionally, soil degassing occurs all over the field through microfractures or mm-sized conduits. Large temperature variations measured in pools and gryphons are ascribed to different mud/water content and to the influence from hot and cold fluid pulses. We have carried out extensive studies of the Davis-Schrimpf field to determine the flux and the origin of the expelled gases. Gas composition has been analysed over several years (2003, 2006, 2007, 2008), whereas gas flux were measured in December 2008. Compositionally, CO2 is the dominant gas (~98%), with an average CH4 concentration around 1.5%. The CO2 carbon isotopes suggest a mixed mantle-metasediment source, whereas the CH4 is derived from thermal maturation of organic matter. Helium isotope analyses suggest a strong input from the mantle, consistent with CO2 stable carbon isotopic ratio. Gas flux was measured both from vents (i.e., pools and gryphons) by volumetric flux-meter techniques and from diffuse soil degassing by a closed-chamber system equipped with portable CO2 and CH4 sensors, over an area of 20 000 m2, following a 20x20m grid. A conservative estimate from 86 measured focussed vents shows that at least 2 046 kg of CO2 and 11 kg of CH4 vented daily to the atmosphere. Our results also show that at least 15 535 kg/day of CO2 and 61.84 kg/day of CH4 were pervasively released due to soil degassing. These data emphasise that soil degassing can be the dominant component of gas released from hydrothermal fields, even in systems with large and vigorous focussed vents. These results are thus important when calculating global budgets of CO2 emissions of hydrothermal fields.

  8. Metamorphosed Plio-Pleistocene evaporites and the origins of hypersaline brines in the Salton Sea geothermal system, California: Fluid inclusion evidence

    SciTech Connect

    McKibben, M.A.; Williams, A.E.; Okubo, Susumu )

    1988-05-01

    The Salton Sea geothermal system (SSGS) occurs in Plio-Pleistocene deltaic-lacustrine-evaporite sediments deposited in the Salton Trough, an active continental rift zone. Temperatures up to 365{degree}C and hypersaline brines with up to 26 wt.% TDS are encountered at 1-3 km depth in the sediments, which are undergoing active greenschist facies hydrothermal metamorphism. Previous models for the origins of the Na-Ca-K-Cl brines have assumed that the high salinities were derived mainly from the downward percolation of cold, dense brines formed by low-temperature dissolution of shallow non-marine evaporites. New drillcores from the central part of the geothermal field contain metamorphosed, bedded evaporites at 1 km depth consisting largely of hornfelsic anhydrite interbedded with anhydrite-cemented solution-collapse shale breccias. Fluid inclusions trapped within the bedded and breccia-cementing anhydrite homogenize at 300{degree}C and contain saline Na-Ca-K-Cl brines. Some of the inclusions contain up to 50 vol.% halite, sylvite and carbonate crystals at room temperature, and some halite crystals persist to above 300{degree}C upon laboratory heating. The data are consistent with the trapping of halite-saturated Na-Ca-K-Cl fluids during hydrothermal metamorphism of the evaporites and accompanying solution collapse of interbedded shales. The authors conclude that many of the slat crystals in inclusions are the residuum of bedded evaporitic salt that was dissolved during metamorphism by heated connate fluids.

  9. Occurrence, distribution, and transport of pesticides, trace elements, and selected inorganic constituents into the Salton Sea Basin, California, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, Lawrence A.; Schroeder, Roy A.; Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathyrn M.

    2004-01-01

    A study of pesticide distribution and transport within the Salton Sea Basin, California, was conducted from September 2001 to October 2002. Sampling for the study was done along transects for the three major rivers that flow into the Salton Sea Basin: the New and Alamo Rivers at the southern end of the basin and the Whitewater River at the northern end. Three stations were established on each river: an outlet station approximately 1 mile upstream of the river discharge, a near-shore station in the river delta, and off-shore station in the Salton Sea. Water and suspended and bed sediments were collected at each station in October 2001, March-April 2002, and September 2002, coinciding with peak pesticide applications in the fall and spring. Fourteen current-use pesticides were detected in the water column. Concentrations of dissolved pesticides typically decreased from the outlets to the sea in all three rivers, consistent with the off-shore transport of pesticides from the rivers to the sea. Dissolved concentrations ranged from the limits of detection to 151 nanograms per liter (ng/L); however, diazinon, eptam (EPTC), and malathion were detected at much higher concentrations (940?3,830 ng/L) at the New and Alamo River outlet and near-shore stations. Concentrations of carbaryl, dacthal, diazinon, and eptam were higher during the two fall sampling periods, whereas concentrations of atrazine, carbofuran, and trifluralin were higher during the spring. Current-use pesticides also were detected on suspended and bed sediments in concentrations ranging from method detection limits to 106 ng/g (nanograms per gram). Chlorpyrifos, dacthal, eptam, trifluralin, and DDE were the most frequently detected pesticides on sediments from all three rivers. The number and concentrations of pesticides associated with suspended sediments frequently were similar for the river outlet and near-shore sites, consistent with the downstream transport of sediment-associated pesticides out of the

  10. Use of stable isotopes, tritium, soluble salts, and redox-sensitive elements to distinguish ground water from irrigation water in the Salton Sea basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Roy A.; Setmire, James G.; Densmore, Jill N.

    1991-01-01

    Evaporative concentration of irrigation water diverted from the Colorado River to the Salton Sea basin for several decades has produced an overlying system (that includes drainwater and surface waters) whose composition is highly variable and differs from that of the shallow regional ground water beneath it. The role of hydrologic and geochemical processes in causing these differences (and the variability) is inferred from analyses of selected isotopes (3H, D, 18O, 15N, 34S) and elements (As, B, Br, Cl, Fe, N, Se). Selected element-to-Cl ratios establish the relative importance and location of the various processes. Isotopes of H O are used in estimating the relative contribution of leakage from an unlined canal and regional ground water to a nearby spring.

  11. Transport and distribution of trace elements and other selected inorganic constituents by suspended particulates in the Salton Sea Basin, California, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, L.A.; Schroeder, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    In order to examine the transport of contaminants associated with river-derived suspended particles in the Salton Sea, California, large volume water samples were collected in transects established along the three major rivers emptying into the Salton Sea in fall 2001. Rivers in this area carry significant aqueous and particulate contaminant loads derived from irrigation water associated with the extensive agricultural activity, as well as wastewater from small and large municipalities. A variety of inorganic constituents, including trace metals, nutrients, and organic carbon were analyzed on suspended material isolated from water samples collected at upriver, near-shore, and off-shore sites established on the Alamo, New, and Whitewater rivers. Concentration patterns showed expected trends, with river-borne metals becoming diluted by organic-rich algal particles of lacustrine origin in off-shore stations. More soluble metals, such as cadmium, copper, and zinc showed a more even distribution between sites in the rivers and off-shore in the lake basin. General distributional trends of trace elements between particulate and aqueous forms were discerned by combining metal concentration data for particulates from this study with historical aqueous metals data. Highly insoluble trace metals, such as iron and aluminum, occurred almost entirely in the particulate phase, while major cations and approximately 95% of selenium were transported in the soluble phase. Evidence for greater reducing conditions in the New compared to the Alamo River was provided by the greater proportion of reduced (soluble) manganese in the New River. Evidence of bioconcentration of selenium and arsenic within the lake by algae was provided by calculating "enrichment" concentration ratios from metal concentrations on the algal-derived particulate samples and the off-shore sites. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. Final Report: Baseline Selenium Monitoring of Agricultural Drains Operated by the Imperial Irrigation District in the Salton Sea Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; May, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes comprehensive findings from a 4-year-long field investigation to document baseline environmental conditions in 29 agricultural drains and ponds operated by the Imperial Irrigation District along the southern border of the Salton Sea. Routine water-quality collections and fish community assessments were conducted on as many as 16 sampling dates at roughly quarterly intervals from July 2005 to April 2009. The water-quality measurements included total suspended solids and total (particulate plus dissolved) selenium. With one exception, fish were surveyed with baited minnow traps at quarterly intervals during the same time period. However, in July 2007, fish surveys were not conducted because we lacked permission from the California Department of Fish and Game for incidental take of desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), an endangered species. During April and October 2006-08, water samples also were collected from seven intensively monitored drains (which were selected from the 29 total drains) for measurement of particulate and dissolved selenium, including inorganic and organic fractions. In addition, sediment, aquatic food chain matrices [particulate organic detritus, filamentous algae, net plankton, and midge (chironomid) larvae], and two fish species (western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis; and sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna) were sampled from the seven drains for measurement of total selenium concentrations. The mosquitofish and mollies were intended to serve as surrogates for pupfish, which we were not permitted to sacrifice for selenium determinations. Water quality (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, and turbidity) values were typical of surface waters in a hot, arid climate. A few drains exhibited brackish, near-anoxic conditions, especially during summer and fall when water temperatures occasionally exceeded 30 degrees Celsius. Total selenium concentrations in water were directly correlated with salinity and

  13. The Obsidian Creep Project: Seismic Imaging in the Brawley Seismic Zone and Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired medium- and high-resolution P- and S-wave seismic reflection and refraction data across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) and across part of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), Imperial Valley, California. Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities associated with the BSZ and SSGF. We acquired multiple seismic data sets along a north-south profile and a high-resolution P-wave profile along an east-west profile. The north-south profile included: 1) a 6.4-km-long P-wave (main) profile that was recorded on 320 Texan seismographs spaced at 20-m intervals, 2) a 1.2-km-long cabled, high-resolution profile along the northern end of the main profile, and 3) an approximately 1.2-km-long S-wave profile along the cabled profile. P-wave sources along the main profile were generated by 0.15- to 0.45-kg buried explosions spaced every 40 m, and P-wave sources along the cabled profile were generated by Betsy-Seisgun ‘shots’ spaced every 10 m. S-waves sources were generated by hammer impacts on the ends of an aluminum block. The east-west profile consisted of a 3.4-km-long high-resolution P-wave seismic profile with shots (Betsy-Seisgun) and geophones spaced every 10 m. Preliminary interpretation of shot gathers from blasts in the north-south profile suggests that the BSZ and SSGF are structurally complex, with abundant faults extending to or near the ground surface. Also, we observe relatively high-velocity material, apparent velocities of about 4.0 km/s in one direction and about 2.8 km/s in another relative to about 1.6 km/s for shallower material, that shallows beneath the SSGF. This may be due to high temperatures and resultant metamorphism of buried materials in the SSGF. From preliminary interpretation of shot gathers along the east-west profile we interpret a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on projection of the Kalin fault, from about 40 m to

  14. Sea shell solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for the collection and concentration of solar radiant energy including a longitudinally extending structure having a wall for directing radiant energy. The wall is parabolic with its focus along a line parallel to an extreme ray of the sun at one solstice and with its axis along a line parallel to an extreme ray of the sun at the other solstice. An energy absorber is positioned to receive the solar energy thereby collected.

  15. A Strategy for Interpretation of Microearthquake Tomography Results in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field Based upon Rock Physics Interpretations of State 2-14 Borehole Logs

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B; Hutchings, L; Kasameyer, P

    2006-06-14

    We devise a strategy for analysis of Vp and Vs microearthquake tomography results in the Salton Sea geothermal field to identify important features of the geothermal reservoir. We first interpret rock properties in State 2-14 borehole based upon logged core through the reservoir. Then, we interpret seismic recordings in the well (Daley et al., 1988) to develop the strategy. We hypothesize that mapping Poisson's ratio has two applications for the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir: (1) to map the top of the reservoir, and (2) as a diagnostic for permeable zones. Poisson's ratio can be obtained from Vp and Vs. In the State 2-14 borehole, Poisson's ratio calculated from large scale averages ({approx} 150 m) shows a monotonic decrease with depth to about 1300 m, at which point it increases with depth. Our model is that the monotonic decrease is due to compaction, and the increase below 1300 m is due to the rocks being hydrothermally altered. We hypothesize we can map the depth to alteration by identifying the transition from decreasing to increasing values; and thus, map the top of the reservoir, which is associated with a known increase in sulfite, chlorite, and epidote alteration that may be indicative of hydrothermal activity. We also observe (from Daley et. al. plots) an anomalous drop in Poisson's ratio at a depth of about 900 m, within a sandstone formation. The sandstone has a P-wave velocity significantly higher than the siltstone above it but a lower velocity in the lower half of the formation relative to the upper half. We interpret the relative decrease in velocity to be due to fracturing and chemical alteration caused by permeability. We conclude that using Vp and Vs tomography results to obtain images of Poisson's ratio has the potential to identify significant features in the geothermal reservoir in this geologic setting. Seismic attenuation tomography results (mapped as Qp and Qs) should also be useful for evaluating geothermal reservoirs, but that is not

  16. Compositional, Order/Disorder, and Stable Isotope Characteristics of Al-Fe Epidote, State 2-14 Drill Hole, Salton Sea Geothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, D. K.; Cho, M.; Janik, C. J.; Liou, J. G.; Caruso, L. J.

    1988-11-01

    Epidote (Ca2Fe3Si3O12(OH)-Ca2Al3Si3O12(OH)) is a common hydrothermal mineral in metasediments and veins at depths >900 m in the State 2-14 drill hole of the Salton Sea geothermal system. The mole fraction of Ca2Fe3Si3O12(OH) in epidotes (Xps) from this drill hole ranges from 0.11 to 0.42, and complex compositional zoning of octahedral Fe3+ and Al is typical within single grains. With increasing depth there is an overall, but irregular, decrease in the Fe3+ content of epidotes in metasandstones. In most samples, vein epidotes are more Fe3+ -rich and exhibit a wider compositional range than metasandstone epidotes from the same depth. Octahedral Fe3+ in the M(1) sites in four epidotes, evaluated by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, ranges from 7.5 ± 1.7% to 11.4 ± 1.5% of the total iron. The most ordered epidote formed in veins at 2618 m in the biotite zone. This epidote has an ordering parameter (σ = 1-2XFe3+,M(1)) of 0.85 ± 0.03 which corresponds to a calculated state of equilibrium order/disorder at ˜390° ± 60°C, in close agreement with the probable downhole temperature of ˜340°C, Two epidote samples from the chlorite + calcite zone (1420 m, ˜265°C; 1867 m, ˜300°C) are more disordered, corresponding to calculated states of equilibrium order/disorder of >450°C, These data suggest that the analyzed epidotes from the chlorite + calcite zone are in a metastable state of substitutional order/disorder. The measured value of δDepidote from 1420 m is -96‰, which is 5-6‰ lighter than epidotes from 1867 m (δDepidote = -90‰), 2227 m (δDepidote = -91‰), and 2618 m (δDepidote = -90 ‰). When compared to the reservoir fluid from the December 1985 flow test, the derived fractionation of hydrogen isotopes between epidote and the geothermal brine is -19‰ at 1867 m and ˜340°C. This value is in accord with published experimental hydrogen isotope fractionations between iron-rich epidote and aqueous electrolyte solutions. Therefore, considering the

  17. Field, Laboratory and Imaging spectroscopic Analysis of Landslide, Debris Flow and Flood Hazards in Lacustrine, Aeolian and Alluvial Fan Deposits Surrounding the Salton Sea, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, B. E.; Hooper, D. M.; Mars, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution satellite imagery, field spectral measurements using a portable ASD spectrometer, and 2013 hyperspectral AVIRIS imagery were used to evaluate the age of the Martinez Mountain Landslide (MML) near the Salton Sea, in order to determine the relative ages of adjacent alluvial fan surfaces and the potential for additional landslides, debris flows, and floods. The Salton Sea (SS) occupies a pluvial lake basin, with ancient shorelines ranging from 81 meters to 113 meters above the modern lake level. The highest shoreline overlaps the toe of the 0.24 - 0.38 km3 MML deposit derived from hydrothermally altered granites exposed near the summit of Martinez Mountain. The MML was originally believed to be of early Holocene age. However, AVIRIS mineral maps show abundant desert varnish on the top and toe of the landslide. Desert varnish can provide a means of relative dating of alluvial fan (AF) or landslide surfaces, as it accumulates at determinable rates over time. Based on the 1) highest levels of desert varnish accumulation mapped within the basin, 2) abundant evaporite playa minerals on top of the toe of the landslide, and 3) the highest shoreline of the ancestral lake overtopping the toe of the landslide with gastropod and bivalve shells, we conclude that the MML predates the oldest alluvial fan terraces and lake sediments exposed in the Coachella and Imperial valleys and must be older than early Holocene (i.e. Late Pleistocene?). Thus, the MML landslide has the potential to be used as a spectral endmember for desert varnish thickness and thus proxy for age discrimination of active AF washes versus desert pavements. Given the older age of the MML landslide and low water levels in the modern SS, the risk from future rockslides of this size and related seiches is rather low. However, catastrophic floods and debris flows do occur along the most active AF channels; and the aftermath of such flows can be identified spectrally by montmorillonite crusts forming in

  18. Strong salinity gradients in the northeastern part of the Salton Sea geothermal field, CA: a fluid inclusion and brine chemistry study

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    Geothermal wells in the northeastern Salton Sea geothermal field produce concentrated Na-Ca-K-Cl brines. Maximum dissolved constituents do not exceed 260,000 ppm. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures from cuttings of vein calcite and quartz are in close agreement with temperature logs and indicate maximum reservoir temperatures between 290/sup 0/ and 310/sup 0/C at 3140 to 3565 m. Melting temperatures of inclusion fluids indicate the trapping of both low salinity and high salinity vein-forming solutions. The high salinity inclusion fluids appear similar to the produced reservoir fluids in their total dissolved solids, while both high salinity and low salinity inclusions imply temperatures similar to that of the reservoir. The low salinity inclusions occur over broad intervals above and below the much less vertically extensive high salinity inclusion fluids. Although the presence of interstratified high salinity and low salinity brines should be gravitationally unstable, flow tests of one well, at varying well head pressures, produced two brines of distinctly different compositions. Consequently, the persistence of two different brines requires severe impedance of vertical permeability. Stratification of brines in this geothermal system carries significant implications for the formation models of some epithermal ore deposits by mixing of fluids of different salinity, pH, fO/sub 2/, fS/sub 2/, temperature, etc. Additionally, there are very strong economic advantages to the possible production of hot, dilute brines rather than the currently produced highly saline brines.

  19. Seismicity rate changes in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field and the San Jacinto Fault Zone after the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2014-06-01

    Whether static or dynamic stress changes play the most important role in triggering earthquakes in the near field is still in debate. Here, we examine the seismicity rate changes in southern California following the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. We focus on the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) and the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) because of high-sensitivity continuous borehole recordings and ample background seismicity. A significant increase in seismic activity is found in both study regions immediately following the main shock. However, near the SSGF where the static Coulomb stress decreased, the seismicity rate dropped below the pre-main-shock rate after ˜1 month. In comparison, along the SJFZ with an increase in the static Coulomb stress, the seismicity rate remained higher than the background rate with several moderate-size earthquakes occurring in the subsequent months. While we cannot completely rule out other mechanisms, these observations are best consistent with a widespread increase in seismicity from dynamic stress changes immediately after the main shock, and longer term seismicity rate changes from static stress changes. Our observation, together with other recent studies, suggests that both static and dynamic stress changes are important in triggering near-field earthquakes, but their affected regions and timescales are different.

  20. Source properties of earthquakes near the Salton Sea triggered by the 16 October 1999 M 7.1 Hector Mine, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.; Kanamori, H.

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the source properties of a sequence of triggered earthquakes that occurred near the Salton Sea in southern California in the immediate aftermath of the M 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake of 16 October 1999. The sequence produced a number of early events that were not initially located by the regional network, including two moderate earthquakes: the first within 30 sec of the P-wave arrival and a second approximately 10 minutes after the mainshock. We use available amplitude and waveform data from these events to estimate magnitudes to be approximately 4.7 and 4.4, respectively, and to obtain crude estimates of their locations. The sequence of small events following the initial M 4.7 earthquake is clustered and suggestive of a local aftershock sequence. Using both broadband TriNet data and analog data from the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), we also investigate the spectral characteristics of the M 4.4 event and other triggered earthquakes using empirical Green's function (EGF) analysis. We find that the source spectra of the events are consistent with expectations for tectonic (brittle shear failure) earthquakes, and infer stress drop values of 0.1 to 6 MPa for six M 2.1 to M 4.4 events. The estimated stress drop values are within the range observed for tectonic earthquakes elsewhere. They are relatively low compared to typically observed stress drop values, which is consistent with expectations for faulting in an extensional, high heat flow regime. The results therefore suggest that, at least in this case, triggered earthquakes are associated with a brittle shear failure mechanism. This further suggests that triggered earthquakes may tend to occur in geothermal-volcanic regions because shear failure occurs at, and can be triggered by, relatively low stresses in extensional regimes.

  1. Year 3 Summary Report: Baseline Selenium Monitoring of Agricultural Drains Operated by the Imperial Irrigation District in the Salton Sea Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; May, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from the third year of a 4-year-long field investigation to document selected baseline environmental conditions in 29 agricultural drains and ponds operated by the Imperial Irrigation District along the southern border of the Salton Sea. Routine water quality and fish species were measured at roughly quarterly intervals from April 2007 to January 2008. The water quality measurements included total suspended solids and total (particulate plus dissolved) selenium. In addition, during April and October 2007, water samples were collected from seven intensively monitored drains for measurement of particulate and dissolved selenium, including inorganic and organic fractions. In addition, sediment, aquatic food chain matrices (particulate organic detritus, filamentous algae, net plankton, and midge [chironomid] larvae), and two fish species (western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis; and sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna) were sampled from the seven drains for measurement of total selenium concentrations. The mosquitofish and mollies were intended to serve as surrogates for desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), an endangered species that we were not permitted to take for selenium determinations. Water quality values were typical of surface waters in a hot desert climate. A few drains exhibited brackish, near anoxic conditions especially during the summer and fall when water temperatures occasionally exceeded 30 degrees C. In general, total selenium concentrations in water varied directly with conductivity and inversely with pH. Although desert pupfish were found in several drains, sometimes in relatively high numbers, the fish faunas of most drains and ponds were dominated by nonnative species, especially red shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis), mosquitofish, and mollies. Dissolved selenium in water samples from the seven intensively monitored drains ranged from 0.700 to 24.1 ug/L, with selenate as the major constituent in all samples. Selenium

  2. Pesticide concentrations in water and in suspended and bottom sediments in the New and Alamo rivers, Salton Sea Watershed, California, April 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, Lawrence A.; Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2004-01-01

    This report contains pesticide concentration data for water, and suspended and bed sediment samples collected in April 2003 from twelve sites along the New and Alamo Rivers in the Salton Sea watershed, in southeastern California. The study was done in collaboration with the California State Regional Water Quality Control Board, Colorado River Region, to assess inputs of current-use pesticides associated with water and sediment into the New and Alamo Rivers. Five sites along the New River and seven sites along the Alamo River, downstream of major agricultural drains, were selected and covered the lengths of the rivers from the international boundary to approximately 1.5 km from the river mouths. Sampling from bridges occurred at seven of the twelve sites. At these sites, streamflow measurements were taken. These same sites were also characterized for cross-stream homogeneity by measuring dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, temperature, and suspended solids concentration at several vertical (depths) and horizontal (cross-stream) points across the river. Large volume water samples (200?300 L) were collected for isolation of suspended sediments by flow-through centrifugation. Water from the outflow of the flow-through centrifuge was sampled for the determination of aqueous pesticide concentrations. In addition, bottom sediments were sampled at each site. Current-use pesticides and legacy organochlorine compounds (p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD) were extracted from sediments and measured via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Organic carbon and percentage of fines were also determined for suspended and bottom sediments. Cross-stream transects of dissolved constituents and suspended sediments showed that the rivers were fairly homogeneous at the sites sampled. Streamflow was higher at the outlet sites, with the Alamo River having higher flow (1,240 cfs) than the New River (798 cfs). Twelve current-use pesticides, one legacy organochlorine compound (p

  3. Pesticides in Water and Suspended Sediment of the Alamo and New Rivers, Imperial Valley/Salton Sea Basin, California, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, James L.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    Water and suspended-sediment samples were collected at eight sites on the Alamo and New Rivers in the Imperial Valley/Salton Sea Basin of California and analyzed for both current-use and organochlorine pesticides by the U.S. Geological Survey. Samples were collected in the fall of 2006 and spring of 2007, corresponding to the seasons of greatest pesticide use in the basin. Large-volume water samples (up to 650 liters) were collected at each site and processed using a flow-through centrifuge to isolate suspended sediments. One-liter water samples were collected from the effluent of the centrifuge for the analysis of dissolved pesticides. Additional samples were collected for analysis of dissolved organic carbon and for suspended-sediment concentrations. Water samples were analyzed for a suite of 61 current-use and organochlorine pesticides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A total of 25 pesticides were detected in the water samples, with seven pesticides detected in more than half of the samples. Dissolved concentrations of pesticides observed in this study ranged from below their respective method detection limits to 8,940 nanograms per liter (EPTC). The most frequently detected compounds in the water samples were chlorpyrifos, DCPA, EPTC, and trifluralin, which were observed in more than 75 percent of the samples. The maximum concentrations of most pesticides were detected in samples from the Alamo River. Maximum dissolved concentrations of carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion exceeded aquatic life benchmarks established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for these pesticides. Suspended sediments were analyzed for 87 current-use and organochlorine pesticides using microwave-assisted extraction, gel permeation chromatography for sulfur removal, and either carbon/alumina stacked solid-phase extraction cartridges or deactivated Florisil for removal of matrix interferences. Twenty current-use pesticides were detected in the suspended

  4. Crustal structure during active rifting in the central Salton Trough, California, constrained by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kell, A. M.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lazaro-Mancilla, O.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic refraction and reflection travel times from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) were used to constrain crustal structure during active continental rifting in the central Salton Trough, California. SSIP, funded by NSF and USGS, acquired seismic data in and across the Salton Trough in 2011 to investigate rifting processes at the northern end of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. Seven lines of refraction and low-fold reflection data were acquired onshore, two lines and a grid of airgun and OBS data were acquired in the Salton Sea, and onshore-offshore data were recorded. North American lithosphere in the central Salton Trough appears to have been rifted apart and replaced by new crust added by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. Ongoing active rifting of this new crust is manifested by shallow (<10km depth) seismicity in the oblique Brawley Seismic Zone (connecting the Imperial and San Andreas transform faults), the small Salton Buttes volcanoes, and very high heat flow that enables geothermal energy production. Analyses of the onshore-offshore seismic line that extends along the axis of the Salton Trough, parallel to the direction of plate motion, constrains rifted crustal structure. Crystalline basement (~5 km/s) generally occurs at ~4 km depth, but is at 2-3 km depth in a localized region beneath the Salton Buttes and Salton Sea geothermal field. This crystalline rock is interpreted to be late Pliocene to Quaternary Colorado River sediment that has been metamorphosed by high heat flow to a depth of at least 10km. The shallower basement under the volcanic and geothermal field is due to more intense metamorphism and hydrothermal alteration in this region of extreme heat flow. Faster velocity (6.2-6.4 km/s) observed at 10-13 km depth might be the remains of ruptured pre-existing crust or might be produced by deeper magmatism. Seismic travel times indicate

  5. Active rifting processes in the central Salton Trough, California, constrained by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kell, A. M.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic refraction and reflection travel times from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) are being used to constrain crustal structure during active continental rifting in the central Salton Trough, California. SSIP, funded by NSF and USGS, acquired seismic data in and across the Salton Trough in 2011 to investigate rifting processes at the northern end of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. Seven lines of refraction and low-fold reflection data were acquired onshore, two lines and a grid of airgun and OBS data were acquired in the Salton Sea, and onshore-offshore data were recorded. Based on prior studies of the central Salton Trough, North American lithosphere appears to have been rifted completely apart and replaced by entirely new crust added by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. Ongoing active rifting of this new crust is manifested by shallow (<10km depth) seismicity in the oblique Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ; connecting the Imperial and San Andreas faults), the small Salton Buttes volcanoes (aligned perpendicular to the direction of plate motion), and very high heat flow. Analyses of the onshore-offshore seismic line that extends along the axis of the valley, parallel to the direction of plate motion, constrain crustal structure in the valley. Crystalline basement (~5 km/s) generally occurs at ~4 km depth, but is at 2-3 km depth in a localized region beneath the Salton Buttes and Salton Sea geothermal field. This crystalline rock is interpreted to be late Pliocene to Quaternary sediment metamorphosed by high heat flow. The shallower basement under the volcanic and geothermal field is due to more intense metamorphism and hydrothermal alteration in this region. The seismic velocity of basement is slower in the BSZ than to the south and north, which may be due to seismicity-related fracturing. The basement velocity beneath the Salton Buttes and geothermal

  6. Solar radiation interactions with seasonal sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, Jens Kristian

    Presently, the Arctic Ocean is undergoing an escalating reduction in sea ice and a transition towards a seasonal sea ice environment. This warrants detailed investigations into improving our understanding of the seasonal evolution of sea ice and snow covers, and their representation in climate models. The interaction of solar radiation with sea ice is an important process influencing the energy balance and biological activity in polar seas, and consequently plays a key role in the earth's climate system. This thesis focuses on characterization of the optical properties---and the underlying physical properties that determine them---of seasonal sea ice during the fall freeze-up and the spring melt periods. Both periods display high spatial heterogeneity and rapid temporal changes in sea ice properties, and are therefore poorly understood. Field data were collected in Amundsen Gulf/Franklin Bay (FB), southern-eastern Beaufort Sea, in Oct.-Nov. 2003 and Apr. 2004 and in Button Bay (BB), western Hudson Bay, in Mar.-May 2005 to address (1) the temporal and spatial evolution of surface albedo and transmittance, (2) how radiative transfer in sea ice is controlled by its physical nature, and (3) the characteristics of the bottom ice algae community and its effect on the optical properties. The fall study showed the importance of surface features such as dry or slushy bare ice, frost flowers and snow cover in determining the surface albedo. Ice thickness was also important, however, mostly because surface features were associated with thickness. For example, nilas (<10 cm thick) was typically not covered by a snow layer as snow grains were dissolved or merged with the salty and warm brine skim layer on the surface, while surface conditions on thicker ice types were cold and dry enough to support a snow cover. In general, the surface albedo increased exponentially with an ice thickness increase, however, variability within ice thickness types were very large. It is apparent

  7. Explosive and effusive volcanism in the Salton Trough, Salton Buttes, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, H. M.; Mangan, M.; Champion, D. E.; Bindeman, I. N.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Five mid-late Holocene rhyolitic obsidian domes lie along the southern margin of the Salton Sea, California. The domes are aligned parallel to the axis of spreading along the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates in the Salton Trough pull apart basin in an area of rapid subsidence and high sedimentation (0.2-2.0 cm/year; Schmitt and Hulen 2008; Brothers et al. 2009). These volcanic domes are spatially associated with a broad area of high heat flow (tens of kilometers wide) and active geothermal energy production in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Here, we present new petrologic, paleomagnetic, and isotopic data that yield insight into the origin and eruption styles of the Salton Buttes rhyolites. Magmatic rocks in the Salton Trough are bimodal in composition, including buried rhyolites and subsurface diabase dikes (Schmitt and Hulen 2008). Previous work concluded that rhyolites were generated via partial melting of hydrothermally altered basalt (based on heterogeneous and low δ18O of zircon crystals; Schmitt and Vazquez 2006). Newly determined δ18O compositions for anorthoclase (6.1-6.3 ‰) and rhyolite glass (6.4-6.6 ‰) for all five domes are consistent with rhyolite evolution by fractional crystallization of basalt. The five domes differ slightly in composition, forming compositional trends on Harker-type diagrams, (e.g., FeO [2.7 to 1.9 wt%] or Ba [500 to 350 ppm] vs. SiO2 73.6-76.4 wt%). The most evolved dome, Mullet Island, is aphyric except for accessory zircon and magnetite. Other domes contain 1-2 vol% of phenocrystic anorthoclase, Fe-Ti oxides, and accessory zircon and likely antecrystic corroded pyroxene, fayalite, and amphibole. Our work reveals that temperatures of pre-eruptive rhyolites based on several geothermometers are: 770-790 °C (Zr in melt), 725 - 780 °C (Ti in zircon), and 700-800 °C (Fe-Ti oxides). Volcanism at the Salton Buttes is characterized by explosive and effusive eruptions, where a pyroclastic fall deposit

  8. Preliminary petrological and geochemical results from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California: A near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt: Topical report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.; Williams, A.E.; Neville, S.; Collier, P.; Oakes, C.

    1986-03-01

    High concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not naturally encountered in salt beds. For this reason, the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) may be the best available geologic analog of some of the processes expected to occur in high level nuclear waste repositories in salt. Subsurface temperatures and brine concentrations in the SSGF span most of the temperature range and fluid inclusion brine range expected in a salt repository, and the clay-rich sedimentary rocks are similar to those which host bedded or domal salts. As many of the chemical processes observed in the SSGF are similar to those expected to occur in or near a salt repository, data derived from it can be used in the validation of geochemical models of the near-field of a repository in salt. This report describes preliminary data on petrology and geochemistry, emphasizing the distribution of rare earth elements and U and Th, of cores and cuttings from several deep wells chosen to span a range of temperature gradients and salinities. Subsurface temperature logs have been augmented by fluid inclusion studies, to reveal the effects of brines of varying temperature and salinity. The presence of brines with different oxygen isotopic signatures also indicate lack of mixing. Whole rock major, minor and trace element analyses and data on brine compositions are being used to study chemical migration in these sediments. 65 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Geochemistry and petrology of surface samples, six boreholes and brines from the Salton Sea geothermal field: A natural analog of a nuclear waste repository in salt: Report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    Cuttings from six wells in the Salton Sea geothermal field, and rocks at outcrop that are correlative in age with those encountered at depth in the wells were analyzed in detail. Mineralogy, petrography, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, instrumental neutron activation analysis, fission track radiography, oxygen and stable carbon isotopic, uranium-thorium series disequilibrium, and fluid inclusion analyses are reported. Where fluids were being produced from wells, brine chemistry as well as stable isotope and uranium-thorium series analyses are reported. Particular attention has been paid to defining zones of fluid-rock interaction in which analyses of coexisting geothermal reservoir brine and hydrothermally altered sediments could be acquired. A wide span of temperatures, from surficial to greater than 300/degree/C, and salinities ranging from relatively dilute ground waters up to brines of 25 wt% total dissolved solids, span a range of environments that might be encountered in a waste repository in salt. Progressive hydrothermal alteration, mineral formation and element mobility are documented in the data presented. 52 refs., 25 figs., 49 tabs.

  10. Crustal Structure of Salton Trough using Deformable Layer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.

    2012-12-01

    Salton Trough is an important geologic structure to understand the active rift between Imperial Fault and San Andreas Fault. To determine the underground geometry of Salton Trough and its nearby faults, we analyzed seismic phase data recorded by Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC). Both 2-D and 3-D models have been made to refine the velocity model so as to determine the basin and moho geometry beneath Salton Trough region. Here three inline and five cross-line velocity profiles were built by using 2D Deformable Layer Tomography (DLT) method. From these 2D profiles, we can see that the velocity gradient is very small in the low velocity zone. The low velocity anomaly can be detected beneath the axis of the Salton Trough around the depth of 19-21 km, and the relatively high velocity can be seen beneath the San Andreas faults. Within 100*150*40 km3 model volume, 90,180 P-wave and S-wave first arrival picks from 27,663 local events (from 2001 to 2012), which were obtained from 44 stations, were used to build 3D seismic velocity model of the crust. During the iterations of velocity updating, full 3-D ray tracing is implemented. From these 3-D velocity models with different sizes of grids, low velocity anomalies are present under the southwest of Salton Sea, while high velocity zone is present across Southern San Andreas Fault throughout all the depths. Profiles from 2-D velocity models compared to 3-D velocity models show similar geometry. 3-D crustal structure, which is determined from 3-D DLT, helps to better understand the divergent boundary between the North American and the Pacific tectonic plates

  11. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean. PMID:25309996

  12. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  13. Crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Salton Trough, southeast California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; McCarthy, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents data and modelling results from a crustal and upper mantle wide-angle seismic transect across the Salton Trough region in southeast California. The Salton Trough is a unique part of the Basin and Range province where mid-ocean ridge/transform spreading in the Gulf of California has evolved northward into the continent. In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted the final leg of the Pacific to Arizona Crustal Experiment (PACE). Two perpendicular models of the crust and upper mantle were fit to wide-angle reflection and refraction travel times, seismic amplitudes, and Bouguer gravity anomalies. The first profile crossed the Salton Trough from the southwest to the northeast, and the second was a strike line that paralleled the Salton Sea along its western edge. We found thin crust (???21-22 km thick) beneath the axis of the Salton Trough (Imperial Valley) and locally thicker crust (???27 km) beneath the Chocolate Mountains to the northeast. We modelled a slight thinning of the crust further to the northeast beneath the Colorado River (???24 km) and subsequent thickening beneath the metamorphic core complex belt northeast of the Colorado River. There is a deep, apparently young basin (???5-6 km unmetamorphosed sediments) beneath the Imperial Valley and a shallower (???2-3 km) basin beneath the Colorado River. A regional 6.9-km/s layer (between ???15-km depth and the Moho) underlies the Salton Trough as well as the Chocolate Mountains where it pinches out at the Moho. This lower crustal layer is spatially associated with a low-velocity (7.6-7.7 km/s) upper mantle. We found that our crustal model is locally compatible with the previously suggested notion that the crust of the Salton Trough has formed almost entirely from magmatism in the lower crust and sedimentation in the upper crust. However, we observe an apparently magmatically emplaced lower crust to the northeast, outside of the Salton Trough, and propose that this layer in part

  14. Geodetic investigation into the deformation of the Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Brendan W.; Bock, Yehuda; Sandwell, David T.; Fialko, Yuri

    2013-09-01

    Salton Trough represents a complex transition between the spreading center in Baja California and the strike-slip San Andreas fault system and is one of the most active zones of deformation and seismicity in California. We present a high-resolution interseismic velocity field for the Salton Trough derived from 74 continuous GPS sites and 109 benchmarks surveyed in three GPS campaigns during 2008-2009 and previous surveys between 2000 and 2005. We also investigate small-scale deformation by removing the regional velocity field predicted by an elastic block model for Southern California from the observed velocities. We find a total extension rate of 11 mm/yr from the Mesquite Basin to the southern edge of the San Andreas Fault, coupled with 15 mm/yr of left-lateral shear, the majority of which is concentrated in the southern Salton Sea and Obsidian Buttes and is equivalent to 17 mm/yr oriented in the direction of the San Andreas Fault. Differential shear strain is exclusively localized in the Brawley Seismic Zone, and dilatation rate indicates widespread extension throughout the zone. In addition, we infer clockwise rotation of 10°/Ma, consistent with northwestward propagation of the Brawley Seismic Zone over geologic time.

  15. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP): Active Rift Processes in the Brawley Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lazaro-Mancilla, O.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), funded by NSF and USGS, acquired seismic data in and across the Salton Trough in southern California and northern Mexico in March 2011. The project addresses both rifting processes at the northern end of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. Seven lines of onshore refraction and low-fold reflection data were acquired in the Coachella, Imperial, and Mexicali Valleys, two lines and a grid of airgun and OBS data were acquired in the Salton Sea, and onshore-offshore data were recorded. Almost 2800 land seismometers and 50 OBS's were used in almost 5000 deployments at almost 4300 sites, in spacing as dense as 100 m. These instruments received seismic signals from 126 explosive shots up to 1400 kg and over 2300 airgun shots. In the central Salton Trough, North American lithosphere appears to have been rifted completely apart. Based primarily on a 1979 seismic refraction project, the 20-22 km thick crust is apparently composed entirely of new crust added by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. Active rifting of this new crust is manifested by shallow (<10km depth) seismicity in the oblique Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ), small Salton Buttes volcanoes aligned perpendicular to the transform faults, very high heat flow (~140 mW/m2), and geothermal energy production. This presentation is focused on an onshore-offshore line of densely sampled refraction and low-fold reflection data that crosses the Brawley Seismic Zone and Salton Buttes in the direction of plate motion. At the time of abstract submission, data analysis was very preliminary, consisting of first-arrival tomography of the onshore half of the line for upper crustal seismic velocity. Crystalline basement (>5 km/s), comprised of late-Pliocene to Quaternary sediment metamorphosed by the high heat flow, occurs at ~2 km depth beneath the Salton Buttes and geothermal field and ~4 km

  16. Investigating Earthquake Hazards in the Northern Salton Trough, Southern California, Using Data From the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, G.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Kell, A. M.; Goldman, M.; Rose, E.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Langenheim, V. E.; Scheirer, D. S.; Athens, N. D.; Tarnowski, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The southernmost San Andreas fault (SAF) system, in the northern Salton Trough (Salton Sea and Coachella Valley), is considered likely to produce a large-magnitude, damaging earthquake in the near future. The geometry of the SAF and the velocity and geometry of adjacent sedimentary basins will strongly influence energy radiation and strong ground shaking during a future rupture. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was undertaken, in part, to provide more accurate information on the SAF and basins in this region. We report preliminary results from modeling four seismic profiles (Lines 4-7) that cross the Salton Trough in this region. Our southernmost line, Line 7, crosses the SAF near its southern terminus in the Salton Sea (near Salt Creek). Line 4 crosses the SAF at the northern end of the Salton Sea (at Box Canyon). Line 5 crosses the SAF (2 strands) in the Indio Hills (at Thousand Palms Oasis). Line 6, our northernmost line, crosses the SAF (3 strands) in the northern Coachella Valley (along a line from Palm Springs to Yucca Valley). Lines 4 to 6 terminate on the SW in the Peninsular Ranges, underlain by Mesozoic batholithic rocks, and terminate on the NE in or near the Little San Bernardino or Orocopia Mountains, underlain by Precambrian and Mesozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. These lines cross the Coachella Valley, which is underlain by Miocene to Holocene sedimentary deposits. Line 7 crosses the Salton Sea and sedimentary basin deposits to the northeast similar to those of the Coachella Valley. On three lines (7, 4, 6) there is evidence from our seismic imaging, potential-field studies, and (or) earthquakes that active strands of the SAF dip moderately NE. From south to north, on Lines 7, 4, 5, and 6, maximum sedimentary basin depths are approximately 5.5?, 5.5, 3.5, and 3.5 km, respectively, as measured from the surface to the 5.3 km/s velocity contour. (In prior studies of the Imperial Valley, unmetamorphosed sediment is interpreted to lie above

  17. Understanding strain transfer and basin evolution complexities in the Salton pull-apart basin near the Southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, A. M.; Sahakian, V. J.; Kent, G. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Baskin, R. L.; Barth, M.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Active source seismic data in the Salton Sea provide insight into the complexity of the pull-apart system development. Seismic reflection data combined with tomographic cross sections give constraints on the timing of basin development and strain partitioning between the two dominant dextral faults in the region; the Imperial fault to the southwest and the Southern San Andreas fault (SSAF) to the northeast. Deformation associated with this step-over appears young, having formed in the last 20-40 k.a. The complexity seen in the Salton Sea is similar to that seen in pull-apart basins worldwide. In the southern basin of the Salton Sea, a zone of transpression is noted near the southern termination of the San Andreas fault, though this stress regime quickly transitions to a region of transtension in the northern reaches of the sea. The evolution seen in the basin architecture is likely related to a transition of the SSAF dying to the north, and giving way to youthful segments of the Brawley seismic zone and Imperial fault. Stratigraphic signatures seen in seismic cross-sections also reveal a long-term component of slip to the southwest on a fault 1-2 km west of the northeastern Salton Sea shoreline. Numerous lines of evidence, including seismic reflection data, high-resolution bathymetry within the Salton Sea, and folding patterns in the Borrego Formation to the east of the sea support an assertion of a previously unmapped fault, the Salton Trough fault (STF), parallel to the SAF and just offshore within the Salton Sea. Seismic observations are seen consistently within two datasets of varying vertical resolutions, up to depths of 4-5 km, suggesting that this fault strand is much longer-lived than the evolution seen in the southern sub-basin. The existence of the STF unifies discrepancies between the onshore seismic studies and data collected within the sea. The STF likely serves as the current bounding fault to the active pull-apart system, as it aligns with the "rung

  18. New constraints on the tectonic evolution of the Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, D.; Driscoll, N.; Kent, G.

    2008-12-01

    The Salton Trough is a critical structure where two very different styles of deformation meet; spreading-center dominated deformation to the south in the Gulf of California and dextral strike-slip deformation along the San Andreas fault system(SAF) to the north. Seismic CHIRP data acquired in the Salton Sea provide new constraints on the interaction between the San Andreas, San Jacinto and Imperial fault systems and reveal distinct changes in deformational style from north to south. Based on the stratal geometry observed in CHIRP profiles, we propose three distinct phases of tectonic deformation: (1) Late- Pleistocene transpression north of the Extra Fault Zone (EFZ) replaced by (2) late-Holocene differential subsidence south of the EFZ and (3) recent formation of the Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ), a through-going crustal shear zone. An angular unconformity is observed to separate the folded and faulted (late?) Pleistocene strata of the Brawley Formation from the overlying Holocene Cahuilla Formation (CF). North of the EFZ reflectors in the CF suggest little to no active deformation. Conversely, south of the EFZ reflectors exhibit marked divergence with their dip systematically increasing with depth. Such a pattern of divergence indicates that the rate of sedimentation has kept pace with the rate of tectonically-induced accommodation. As such, it appears that the EFZ is a tectonic hinge zone delineating the northern limit of active subsidence, high heat flow, and volcanism. Furthermore, given the observed subsidence pattern, we predict the existence of a NE trending basin-bounding normal fault, or series of normal faults, near the southern shoreline of the Salton Sea. In our conceptual model, the early distributed faulting and transrotation between the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults accounts for the compressional folding observed in the Brawley Formation, but later gave way to extension-dominated deformation as significant slip became focused along the Imperial

  19. Sea, soil, sky - Testing solar's limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, J.

    1981-12-01

    The potentials and actualities of large scale biomass, ocean thermal, and satellite solar power systems are discussed. Biomass is an energy already on-line in installations ranging from home-sized wood-burning stoves to utility sized generators fueled by sawdust and forest residue. Uses of wheat straw, fast-growing trees such as eucalyptus and alder, and euphorbia as biofuels are examined, noting restrictions imposed by land use limitations and the necessity for genetic engineering for more suitable plants. Pyrolysis and thermochemical gasification of biomass to form gaseous, solid, and liquid fuels are explored, and mention is made of utility refuse and sewage incineration for power generation. OTEC, satellite solar power systems, and tidal generator plants are considered as promising for further investigation and perhaps useful in limited applications, while solar pond power plants require extremely large areas to be effective.

  20. How much do we understand the structure and evolution of the Salton Trough?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.; Dorsey, R. J.; Langenheim, V. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Salton Trough, at the northern end of the Gulf of California, likely formed by different processes than the central and southern Gulf due to the weak rheology of its thick quartz-rich sedimentary fill and its proximity to the transpressional Big Bend and the Eastern California shear zone. Many of its key early structures are buried or poorly exposed, so it is unclear whether deep patches of mafic crust were produced by NE-trending mid-ocean-ridge segments, by E-W extension akin to that seen in the Wagner basin, or by some other process. Three distinct tectonic regimes produced the Salton Trough. (1) Late Miocene extension is poorly understood because much of the record is in the subsurface, and existing evidence from thermochronology in the Sierra el Major and Anza Borrego Park suggests extensional exhumation as old as 10-15 Ma, whereas the oldest stratigraphic evidence for extension is ca. 8-6 Ma. (2) Regional-scale, large-magnitude transtensional deformation began in late Miocene or early Pliocene time (ca. 8-6 Ma). The paleo-San Andreas fault took up most of the strain, with additional dextral shear and extension on detachment faults with breakaways in the W, central? and SE Salton Trough. (3) Pleistocene to modern wrench tectonics followed a massive reorganization at about 1.1-1.3 Ma. Detachment faults were cut, folded and largely abandoned, new dextral faults formed SW of the San Andreas fault, and the SE 2/3 of the paleo-San Andreas fault became inactive. The Imperial, Cerro Prieto, San Jacinto, Elsinore, and San Felipe faults and the Brawley seismic zone all date to this latest period of deformation. The Salton Trough has been interpreted to contain a smothered pair of oceanic spreading centers beneath the Salton Sea and Cerro Prieto geothermal field, two regions of high heat flow and latest Pleistocene volcanism. Patches of dense mafic crust at depth beneath 5-10? km of Pliocene to Holocene sediment and metasedimentary rocks produce two principal

  1. Significances of Radiocarbon Dating on Lake Deposits in Salton Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Xu, X.

    2006-12-01

    During the past four years, we have made 37 AMS C-14 measurements on samples including lake tufa, mollusk shell and charcoal from the ancient Lake Cahuilla, Salton Basin, California. A barnacle shell deposited in 1940 in Salton Sea has radiocarbon age of 160 yr BP, reflecting that the effect of reservoir age on the dating is minor. A bi-valve shell with the calibrated radiocarbon age of 42345 yr BP from the lake's east shore shows that the lake was established at least 40kyr ago. A 64-cm thick tufa slab (LC-1 collected from Travertine Point on the western shoreline has 15 AMS C-14 dates ranging from 1310 to 17840 yr BP with a good age sequence. Three gastropod shells incased in tufas at the 12-m shoreline in the same site have ages of 1390 to 1660 yr BP. These dates indicate that the lake was experienced more alkaline and saline conditions after 18ka and the lake level dropped below the level of LC-1 (-24 m a.s.l.) about 1300 years ago. SST-5, a 38-cm thick tufa slab collected from the 12-m shoreline at Old Pacific Railroad Station, has 9 AMS C-14 dates ranging from 1265 to 7080 yr BP with a good age sequence. An archaeological site, ~40m below SST-5, shows that a charcoal sample has a C-14 date of 575 yr BP and a bivalve shell below the charcoal has a C-14 date of 920 yr BP. Five AMS C-14 dates of SST-1, a 19-cm thick tufa slab collected from the 12-m shoreline in Lake Cahuilla County Park, exhibit the tufa deposited from 4790 to 1365 yr BP. A bivalve shell near SST-1 has a radiocarbon age of 1625 yr BP. At this site, there are tufa traps for fishing made by ancient Indians. The above dates reveal that Lake Cahuilla in the Salton Basin had a continuous history certainly longer than 20 kyrs, probably >40 kyrs. The lake deposits are able to provide information on (1) hydrological change in the Salton Basin; (2) connection between Colorado River and Salton Basin; (3) climate change in the Colorado Drainage basin; (4) westerly jet stream shift and variation of North

  2. Salton Trough regional deformation estimated from combined trilateration and survey-mode GPS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, G.; Agnew, D.C.; Johnson, H.O.

    2003-01-01

    The Salton Trough in southeastern California, United States, has one of the highest seismicity and deformation rates in southern California, including 20 earthquakes M 6 or larger since 1892. From 1972 through 1987, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measured a 41-station trilateration network in this region. We remeasured 37 of the USGS baselines using survey-mode Global Positioning System methods from 1995 through 1999. We estimate the Salton Trough deformation field over a nearly 30-year period through combined analysis of baseline length time series from these two datasets. Our primary result is that strain accumulation has been steady over our observation span, at a resolution of about 0.05 ??strain/yr at 95% confidence, with no evidence for significant long-term strain transients despite the occurrence of seven large regional earthquakes during our observation period. Similar to earlier studies, we find that the regional strain field is consistent with 0.5 ?? 0.03 ??strain/yr total engineering shear strain along an axis oriented 311.6?? ?? 23?? east of north, approximately parallel to the strike of the major regional faults, the San Andreas and San Jacinto (all uncertainties in the text and tables are standard deviations unless otherwise noted). We also find that (1) the shear strain rate near the San Jacinto fault is at least as high as it is near the San Andreas fault, (2) the areal dilatation near the southeastern Salton Sea is significant, and (3) one station near the southeastern Salton Sea moved anomalously during the period 1987.95-1995.11.

  3. Tidal Currents between Titan's Seas Detected by Solar Glints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Lawrence, K. J.; Soderblom, J. M.; Audi, E.; Brown, R. H.; Le Mouelic, S.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Titan is the only place in the solar system, besides Earth, to have stable bodies of liquids on its surface. The three large seas and most of the lakes are located in the northern pole area [1]. They are major reservoirs of organic material [2]. Questions related to the variability in composition of the seas [2] and their interaction [3] can be addressed by dedicated observations. For this purpose, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed the area between Ligeia Mare and Kraken Mare, Titan's two largest seas on February 12, 2015. The location of the specular point was close to the strait that has been suggested to link Ligeia and Kraken [4]. As demonstrated by previous observations of specular reflections on the lakes and seas [5, 6], such observations provide a means to assess the presence of liquids and the dynamics of the liquid surface. The VIMS observation provides images of the strait, named Trevize fretum, with a footprint of about 3 km. It shows a remarkable correlation with the radar images, suggesting that no major changes in the level of the seas have occurred in the last 10 years, a third of a Titan year. Very strong values of I/F at 5-μm suggest specular reflection away from the specular point on the Ligiea outlet. This is consistent with the presence of waves which can be generated by either winds or strong currents between Kraken Mare and Ligeia mare. Such currents can be generated during Titan's orbital motion around Saturn. We have investigated the volume of liquids that would transit through Trevize fretum during a Titan day and have found that the flow would be in a turbulent regime for the value of the mean anomaly at the time of the VIMS observation. Although subsurface communication between the two seas cannot be ruled out, the present observation underlines the role of the strait in providing exchange of fluids between the two large seas. This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute

  4. Structure and mineralization in the Salton Trough, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ririe, G.T. . Science and Technology Div.)

    1992-01-01

    The Salton Trough (ST) is located in southeastern California and extends into northern Baja, Mexico. Structurally the ST consists of predominantly northwest-trending, right-lateral, strike-slip faults separated by a series of down-dropped basinal areas. A variety of processing techniques were used to enhance gravity and magnetic data which were used to help define the structural styles present in the sediment-filled ST, and to define the boundaries of the basinal areas. The system of strike-slip faults and related basinal areas in interpreted to be a late Neogene style of deformation that overprints an earlier-formed extensional basin. The intrusion of Neogene intrusive rocks into the sediment-filled ST has resulted in the development of a number of geothermal systems including the Salton Sea (SS) system. A characteristic feature of the commercially productive geothermal systems in the ST is the presence of high-temperature (> 250 C) saline brines. The chemistry of these brines varies widely within the ST. Data from a large number of analyses of the SS geothermal system brines and scales document the presence of a variety of metallic elements including: Pb, ZN, Cu, Mn, Ag, and Au. A variety of mineral deposits occur within and adjacent to the ST including the large open pit Mesquite gold mine. However, none of the gold deposits along the margin of the ST formed from a fossil geothermal system analogous to the SS system. Fossil analogs to SS type systems are suggested to be present in the Proterozoic Mt. Isa block in northern Australia. Deposits in this part of Australia consist of several world-class base metal deposits including the Mt. Isa mine. Structural controls on the localization of geothermal systems in the ST may be similar to those controlling the distribution of mineralization in ancient continental rift systems such as those in northern Australia.

  5. Modern and ancient mineralization in the Salton Trough Rift

    SciTech Connect

    McKibben, M.A. . Dept. Earth Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Salton Trough of SW North America is an active continental rift, the landward extension of the divergent tectonics of the Gulf of California. Shallow magmatic heat sources, thick porous sediments, tectonic activity and saline lakes interact to yield a variety of Pleistocene to modern hydrothermal systems. The oldest mineralization, the fish Creek evaporite, is a CASO[sub 4] deposit formed by a pre-rift Tertiary marine incursion. 4--5 million years ago the prograding Colorado River delta bisected the Trough, influencing the character of Pliocene and younger hydrothermal activity. The northern part of the Trough became a closed basin filled intermittently by large freshwater lakes. Along the W margin of the rift lies the Modoc hot spring gold deposit. This deposit occurs at the intersection of a range-front growth fault with fossil lake levels, suggesting paleohydrologic control by ancient lakes. Active geothermal systems within the Trough include low-T systems such as Heber and East Mesa, localized along high-angle faults where shallow groundwaters are conductively heated above basement highs. These blind systems have no surface expression and only moderate geophysical anomalies. High-T (> 250 C) active systems occur in sediment filled pull-apart basins developed over spreading center fragments (e.g., Salton Sea, Brawley, Cerro Prieto). These systems exhibit high heat flow, strong gravity and magnetic anomalies, and often have surface manifestations such as Quaternary volcanoes and thermal features. Many contain hot metalliferous brines that have evolved in the saline lake environment of the northern Trough.

  6. Salton Seismic Imaging Project Line 7: Data and Analysis to Date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M.; Fuis, G.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Bauer, K.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Kell, A. M.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) is a large-scale, active- and passive-source seismic-imaging project designed to image the San Andreas Fault (SAF) and adjacent basins (Imperial and Coachella Valleys) in southernmost California. Data and preliminary results from many of the seismic profiles are reported elsewhere (Fuis et al., Catchings et al., Rymer et al., this meeting). Here, we focus on SSIP Line 7, one of four 2-D NE-SW-oriented seismic profiles that were acquired across the SAF, parts of the Coachella Valley, and/or the Salton Sea. Seismic sources for Line 7 include both land-based downhole explosive sources and airgun sources within the Salton Sea. Data were recorded by 189 Texan seismographs on land (50 m spacing), 102 channels of a multi-channel cabled recording system near the San Andreas fault on land (10 m spacing), and nine ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) within the Salton Sea (1.3 km spacing). The Texans and OBS's recorded both airgun and explosive sources, and the cable array recorded explosions only. Data from the Texan and the multi-channel seismographs were organized as shotgathers, and the OBS data were arranged as receiver gathers. All data were merged into a single profile for analysis. The seismic profile is approximately 23 km long and crosses approximately normal to the SAF, but an approximately 2-km-long segment of the profile at the northeastern edge of the Salton Sea, does not have either seismograph or seismic source coverage due to limited OBS data. Because the gap in the seismic profile was within about 500 m of the surface trace of the SAF, imaging of the shallow part of the SAF was limited. First arrivals from all data sets were combined to develop a refraction tomography velocity image of the upper crust. From the surface to about 6 km depth, P-wave velocities range from about 2 km/s to about 6 km/s, with basement (~6 km/s) shallower northeast of the SAF. The SAF also marks the southwestern boundary of a relatively high

  7. Sun-stirred Kraken Mare: Circulation in Titan's seas induced by solar heating and methane precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, Tetsuya; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2016-05-01

    Density-driven circulation in Titan's seas forced by solar heating and methane evaporation/precipitation is simulated by an ocean circulation model. If the sea is transparent to sunlight, solar heating can induce anti-clockwise gyres near the sea surface and clockwise gyres near the sea bottom. The gyres are in geostrophic balance between the radially symmetric pressure gradient force and Coriolis force. If instead the sea is turbid and most sunlight is absorbed near the sea surface, the sea gets stratified in warm seasons and the circulation remains weak. Precipitation causes compositional stratification of the sea to an extent that the sea surface temperature can be lower than the sea interior temperature without causing a convective overturning. Non-uniform precipitation can also generate a latitudinal gradient in the methane mole fraction and density, which drives a meridional overturning with equatorward currents near the sea surface and poleward currents near the sea bottom. However, gyres are more ubiquitous than meridional overturning.

  8. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 10: Modeling of the SeaWiFS solar and lunar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Robert H.; Barnes, Robert A.; Mcclain, Charles R.; Esaias, Wayne E.; Barnes, William L.; Mecherikunnel, Ann T.; Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Post-launch stability monitoring of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWifs) will include periodic sweeps of both an onboard solar diffuser plate and the moon. The diffuser views will provide short-term checks and the lunar views will monitor long-term trends in the instrument's radiometric stability. Models of the expected sensor response to these observations were created on the SeaWiFS computer at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) using the Interactive Data Language (IDL) utility with a graphical user interface (GUI). The solar model uses the area of intersecting circles to simulate the ramping of sensor response while viewing the diffuser. This model is compared with preflight laboratory scans of the solar diffuser. The lunar model reads a high-resolution lunar image as input. The observations of the moon are simulated with a bright target recovery algorithm that includes ramping and ringing functions. Tests using the lunar model indicate that the integrated radiance of the entire lunar surface provides a more stable quantity than the mean of radiances from centralized pixels. The lunar model is compared to ground-based scans by the SeaWiFS instrument of a full moon in December 1992. Quality assurance and trend analyses routines for calibration and for telemetry data are also discussed.

  9. Investigation of indigenous water, salt and soil for solar ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The existence of salt-gradient solar ponds in nature is a strong indication that the successful exploitation of this phenomenon must account adequately for the influences of the local setting. Sun, weather and other general factors are treated elsewhere. This paper deals with water, salt, and soil. A general methodology for evaluating and, where feasible, adjusting the effects of these elements is under development. Eight essential solar pond characteristics have been identified, along with a variety of their dependencies upon properties of water, salt and soil. The comprehensive methodology, when fully developed, will include laboratory investigation in such diverse areas as brine physical chemistry, light transmission, water treatment, brine-soil interactions, sealants, and others. With the Salton Sea solar pond investigation as an example, some methods under development will be described.

  10. New constraints on the geometry and evolution of the Southern San Andreas Fault and Salton Pull-apart basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakian, V. J.; Holmes, J. J.; Kell, A. M.; Harding, A. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.

    2013-12-01

    In the recent geologic past, the Salton pull-apart basin, northern Imperial Fault (IF) and Southern San Andreas Fault (SSAF) have been part of an evolving tectonic regime, subject to strain partitioning. This part of the North American/Pacific plate boundary has the potential for generating a large earthquake. Several lines of active-source seismic reflection and refraction data in the Salton Sea were analyzed to better understand the fault interactions and evolution in this region by investigating the SSAF geometry, stratigraphy, and velocity structure. These data, collected in conjunction with the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) include two fault-perpendicular lines: one adjacent to the southern terminus of the SSAF (Line 7), and one just south of the terminus (Line 8). We present results from Multi Channel Seismic (MCS) data along Line 7, and refraction data along Lines 7 and 8. Velocity models along these lines were constructed from the refraction data. Included in the Line 7 model is an interface representing a strong reflector observed in the MCS data, which helps to constrain the raypaths and velocities in the model. Line 7 MCS data image stratigraphic layers thickening to and dipping down to the east towards the SSAF, indicative of a westward-dipping, oblique strike-slip fault. The refraction data along this line are consistent with a westward dipping SSAF and a down the west normal component. We present velocity models for Line 7 and 8, as well as resolution tests supporting the fault's geometry. The results from these two lines and a fault parallel line suggest that the SSAF is dipping to the west and is in transtension. We propose that the SSAF has migrated northward through time, partitioning its strain onto the IF. As the IF migrates northwards it forms the Salton pull-apart basin.

  11. Device for desalting sea or brackish water by using solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Clavier, P.

    1981-09-29

    A device is described for desalting sea or brackish water using solar energy. It includes two adjacent canals or equivalent structures fed with the sea or brackish water, a green house type structure over one of the canals to vaporize water from it and a structure for condensation of water and for collecting softwater, the structure being in communication with the greenhouse structure and largely immersed in the other canal, which acts as the cold source for the condensating unit.

  12. Tree rings, solar radiation and ice cover of the Barents sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkina, Elena; Shumilov, Oleg; Timonen, Mauri; Kanatjev, Alexandr

    2015-04-01

    Intercomparisons of the Kola Peninsula tree-ring records, ice cover of the Barents sea and sea and surface temperatures have been made. Tree-ring series over the last 100 years showed a highly significant correlation with the sea surface temperatures and ice cover (r=-0.57, p<0.05). It should be noted that the correlation between the tree-ring widths and local temperatures was not so high. We suppose that a possible reason seems to be the prevailing influence of solar irradiance and their UV components on tree growth in the Kola North. It is known that solar variability and fluctuations of solar irradiance in the UV band of the spectrum has increased over the last decades. In addition, there are frequent cases of total ozone content depletions (or so-called ozone mini-holes) resulting in increased UV-B. The recent studies demonstrate that many boreal and subarctic plants have increased susceptibility to UV-B radiation. An indirect confirmation of the hypothesis proposed is a close relationship between solar total irradiance and global sea surface temperature (Reid, 2000). The results of spectral MTM-analysis also revealed periodicities close to the solar cycles in the ice cover and tree-ring records. These results confirm the above-mentioned interpretation.

  13. Upper-Mantle Anisotropy from SKS Splitting on a Dense Broadband Profile Across the Salton Trough, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, A. B.; Barak, S.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    plate motion, basin-parallel fluid-filled cracks, or shearing associated with the San Andreas and related strike-slip faults. Some stations across our array have anomalous fast-axes, which could be caused by local heterogeneities, such as magma-filled cracks beneath the localized magmatic zones south of the Salton Sea. Additionally, there is some evidence for a much more complex model of anisotropy beneath the Salton Trough than we can model with our best-fit, single-horizontal-layer of mantle anisotropy. However, the seismically noisy environment of the trough makes it unlikely that we will have enough good events from sufficient back-azimuths, even by the end of our two-year deployment, to rigorously constrain multi-layer splitting models.

  14. The impact of stored solar heat on Arctic sea ice growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, M.-L.

    2015-08-01

    High-resolution measurements of ocean temperature and salinity in the Arctic Ocean's Canada Basin reveal the importance of the release of solar-derived stored ocean heat on sea ice growth. Locally absorbed summer solar heat is stored in a near-surface temperature maximum (NSTM) layer underlying the mixed layer. The heat content of the NSTM layer was anomalously large following summer 2007, which saw considerable sea ice losses and intense solar absorption into the exposed surface ocean. Measurements provide evidence for the entrainment of NSTM layer heat in fall/winter 2007-2008 by shear-driven mixing, and convective mixing by the release of dense, salty plumes during sea ice growth. While at least a portion of the NSTM layer was eroded, deeper warm ocean layers remained unaffected. It is shown that the release of solar heat stored following summer 2007 was sufficient to have reduced sea ice thickness at the end of the 2008 growth season by about 25%.

  15. Solar-Terrestrial interaction: case study of Caspian Sea level changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaftan, V.; Komitov, B.; Lebedev, S.

    2016-07-01

    The results of the analysis of the average annual values concerning the Caspian Sea level, obtained according to the ground and satellite observations, and also the corresponding characteristics of solar activity, earth's magnetic field and a length of day are presented. Spectra of the indicated processes are investigated and their approximation models are also built. Previously assumed statistical dependence between space-geophysical processes and Caspian Sea level (CSL) changes is confirmed. Close connection is revealed in the low-frequency models of the solar and geomagnetic activity change with the sea level. Prediction to the next decades shows the high probability of an increase in CSL and decrease of the compared space-geophysical parameters.

  16. Sea of Bubbles at Edge of Solar System

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation summarizes the new heliospheric scenario and the formation of the “sea” of bubbles in the heliosheath. The Sun’s magnetic field points toward the Sun in the Northern hemisphere...

  17. Glacial Influences on Solar Radiation in a Subarctic Sea.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding macroscale processes controlling solar radia­tion in marine systems will be important in interpreting the potential effects of global change from increasing ultraviolet radiation (UV) and glacial retreat. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of UV i...

  18. SeaWiFS long-term solar diffuser reflectance and sensor noise analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Eplee, Robert E. Jr.; Patt, Frederick S.; Barnes, Robert A.; McClain, Charles R

    2007-02-10

    The NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group's Calibration and Validation(Cal/Val) team has undertaken an analysis of the mission-long Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS)solar calibration time series to assess the long-term degradation of the solar diffuser reflectance over 9 years on orbit. The SeaWiFS diffuser is an aluminum plate coated with YB71 paint. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the diffuser was not fully characterized before launch,so the Cal/Val team has implemented a regression of the solar incidence angles and the drift in the node of the satellite's orbit against the diffuser time series to correct for solar incidence angle effects. An exponential function with a time constant of 200 days yields the best fit to the diffuser time series.The decrease in diffuser reflectance over the mission is wavelength dependent,ranging from 9% in the blue(412 nm) to 5% in the red and near infrared(670-865 nm). The Cal/Val team has developed a methodology for computing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for SeaWiFS on orbit from the diffuser time series corrected for both the varying solar incidence angles and the diffuser reflectance degradation. A sensor noise model is used to compare on-orbit SNRs computed for radiances reflected from the diffuser with prelaunch SNRs measured at typical radiances specified for the instrument. To within the uncertainties in the measurements, the SNRs for SeaWiFS have not changed over the mission. The on-orbit performance of the SeaWiFS solar diffuser should offer insight into the long-term on-orbit performance of solar diffusers on other instruments, such as the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer [currently flying on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites], the Visible and Infrared Radiometer Suite [scheduled to fly on the NASA National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) and NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellites] and the Advanced Baseline

  19. Influence of the Solar Luminosity on the Glaciations, sea Level Changes and Resulting Earthquakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shopov, Y. Y.; Stoykova, D. A.; Tsankov, L. T.; Sanabria, M. E.; Georgieva, D. I.; Ford, D. C.; Georgiev, L. N.

    2002-12-01

    Glaciations were attributed to variations of the Earth's orbit (Milankovitch cycles). But the best ever dated paleoclimatic record (from Devils Hole, Nevada) demonstrated that the end of the last glacial period (termination II) happened 10 000 years before the one suggested by the orbital variations, i.e. the result appeared before the reason. This fact suggests that there is something wrong in the theory. Calcite speleothems luminescence of organics depends exponentially upon soil temperatures that are determined primarily by the solar radiation. So the microzonality of luminescence of speleothems may be used as an indirect Solar Insolation (radiation) proxy index. We obtained luminescence solar insolation proxy records in speleothems (from Jewel Cave, South Dakota, US and Duhlata cave, Bulgaria). These records exhibit very rapid increasing of the solar insolation at 139 kyrs BP responsible for the termination II (the end of the last glaciation) and demonstrate that solar luminosity variations contribute to Earth's heating almost as much as the orbital variations of the Earth's orbit (Milankovitch cycles). The most powerful cycle of the solar luminosity (11500 yrs) is responsible for almost 1/2 of the variations in solar insolation experimental records. Changes in the speed of Earth's rotation during glacial- interglacial transitions produce fracturing of the Earth's crust and major earthquakes along the fractures. The intensity of this process is as higher as faster is the change of the sea level and as higher is its amplitude. Glaciations and deglaciations drive changes of the sea level. Much higher dimensions of this process should be caused by eruptive increasing of solar luminosity, which may be caused only by collision of large asteroids with the Sun. We demonstrate that such collision may cause "Bible Deluge" type of event.

  20. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Plan and Well Designs

    SciTech Connect

    1985-02-01

    The purpose and goals of the Scientific Deep Drilling Program have been outlined in previous documents. The purpose of this report is to provide supporting documentation for the engineering recommendations and detailed specifications associated with the drilling program. The drilling plan developed for Bechtel and described in the report has been revised several times due to changes in the project scope and project guidelines. Some of these changes were made due to the unforeseen cost implications associated with certain drilling operations and specifications. Some of the revisions were in response to DOE requests to Bechtel. The revisions have required the rewriting of some of the draft input for resubmission to Bechtel. [DJE-2005

  1. FREELIVING NEMATODES FROM THE SALTON SEA. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. NAKED AMOEBAE (PROTOZOA) OF THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Microearthquake Studies at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    DOE Data Explorer

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this project is to detect and locate microearthquakes to aid in the characterization of reservoir fracture networks. Accurate identification and mapping of the large numbers of microearthquakes induced in EGS is one technique that provides diagnostic information when determining the location, orientation and length of underground crack systems for use in reservoir development and management applications. Conventional earthquake location techniques often are employed to locate microearthquakes. However, these techniques require labor-intensive picking of individual seismic phase onsets across a network of sensors. For this project we adapt the Matched Field Processing (MFP) technique to the elastic propagation problem in geothermal reservoirs to identify more and smaller events than traditional methods alone.

  4. Solar forcing as an important trigger for West Greenland sea-ice variability over the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Longbin; Jiang, Hui; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Muscheler, Raimund; Zhang, Xu; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Olsen, Jesper; Knudsen, Karen Luise; Zhang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Arctic sea ice represents an important component of the climate system, and the present reduction of sea ice in the Arctic is of major concern. Despite its importance, little is known about past changes in sea-ice cover and the underlying forcing mechanisms. Here, we use diatom assemblages from a marine sediment core collected from the West Greenland shelf to reconstruct changes in sea-ice cover over the last millennium. The proxy-based reconstruction demonstrates a generally strong link between changes in sea-ice cover and solar variability during the last millennium. Weaker (or stronger) solar forcing may result in the increase (or decrease) in sea-ice cover west of Greenland. In addition, model simulations show that variations in solar activity not only affect local sea-ice formation, but also control the sea-ice transport from the Arctic Ocean through a sea-ice-ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism. The role of solar forcing, however, appears to have been more ambiguous during an interval around AD 1500, after the transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the Little Ice Age, likely to be driven by a range of factors.

  5. Tension between reducing sea-level rise and global warming through solar-radiation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, P. J.; Sriver, R. L.; Keller, K.

    2012-02-01

    Geoengineering using solar-radiation management (SRM) is gaining interest as a potential strategy to reduce future climate change impacts. Basic physics and past observations suggest that reducing insolation will, on average, cool the Earth. It is uncertain, however, whether SRM can reduce climate change stressors such as sea-level rise or rates of surface air temperature change. Here we use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to quantify the possible response of sea levels and surface air temperatures to projected climate forcings and SRM strategies. We find that SRM strategies introduce a potentially strong tension between the objectives to reduce (1) the rate of temperature change and (2) sea-level rise. This tension arises primarily because surface air temperatures respond faster to radiative forcings than sea levels. Our results show that the forcing required to stop sea-level rise could cause a rapid cooling with a rate similar to the peak business-as-usual warming rate. Furthermore, termination of SRM was found to produce warming rates up to five times greater than the maximum rates under the business-as-usual CO2 scenario, whereas sea-level rise rates were only 30% higher. Reducing these risks requires a slow phase-out of many decades and thus commits future generations.

  6. Crustal structure of the Salton Trough and southern San Andreas Fault based on gravity and magnetic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athens, N. D.; Scheirer, D. S.; Langenheim, V. E.

    2011-12-01

    Gravity and magnetic investigations reveal regional and local features of the subsurface structure of the Salton Trough and southern San Andreas Fault. Regional gravity features include a prominent, narrow gravity low in Coachella Valley that decreases in amplitude to the southeast near the north shore of the Salton Sea. At the south end of the Salton Sea, the gravity low has become a large gravity high that has been attributed to crustal thinning and mafic lower crust. The northeast margin of the gravity low is linear and coincides with both the San Andreas Fault and a distinctive magnetic high that is probably related to crystalline basement rocks of the Little San Bernardino Mountains. The southwest margin of the gravity low is also marked by a gravity gradient, but is not linear in map-view and is generally less steep. The gradient mimics the irregular contact between pre-Cenozoic basement rocks and Cenozoic basin fill. Gravity data were collected to augment existing data along transects of the Salton Seismic Imaging Project. Measurement spacing averaged about 800-m, except along the high-resolution seismic line near Salt Creek, where a detailed grid of gravity measurements spaced about 400-m is supplemented by ground magnetic transects. The detailed data reveal a bench in the gravity gradient that is coincident with a narrow (500-m) 100-nT magnetic high that may reflect multiple strands of the San Andreas Fault or interactions with the Hidden Springs fault. These anomalies, however, only extend along strike for about 2-km before diminishing. Along the stretch of the San Andreas Fault between Indio and Salt Creek, the San Andreas Fault is located near the base of the southwest-facing steep gravity gradient, indicating a steep northeast dip of the basement contact, with higher-density rocks northeast of the fault. North of Indio, the gradient becomes more diffuse, suggestive of a gentler northeast dip. About 5-km south of Salt Creek, the fault changes its

  7. 75 FR 63502 - Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography... include wildlife observation, photography, interpretation, environmental education, waterfowl hunting,...

  8. Simulation Study of Effects of Solar Irradiance and Sea Surface Temperature on Monsoons and Global Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Mehta, V.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A recent version of the GEOS 2 GCM was used to isolate the roles of the annual cycles of solar irradiation and/or sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on the simulated circulation and rainfall. Four 4-year long integrations were generated with the GCM. The first integration, called Control Case, used daily-interpolated SSTs from a 30 year monthly SST climatology that was obtained from the analyzed SST-data, while the solar irradiation at the top of the atmosphere was calculated normally at hourly intervals. The next two cases prescribed the SSTs or the incoming solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere at their annual mean values, respectively while everything else was kept the same as in the Control Case. In this way the influence of the annual cycles of both external forcings was isolated.

  9. Plate boundary deformation at the latitude of the Salton Trough - northern Gulf of California (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Along the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone, the segment including the southern San Andreas fault to Salton Trough and northern Gulf of California basins has been transtensional throughout its evolution, based on Pacific-North America displacement vectors calculated from the global plate circuit (900 × 20 km at N54°W since 20 Ma; 460 × 20 km at N48°W since 11 Ma). Nevertheless, active seismicity and focal mechanisms show a broad zone of plate boundary deformation within which the inferred stress regime varies locally (Yang & Hauksson 2013 GJI), and fault patterns in some regions suggest ongoing tectonic rotation. Similar behavior is inferred to have occurred in this zone over most of its history. Crustal structure in this region is constrained by surface geology, geophysical experiments (e.g., the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), USGS Imperial Valley 1979, PACE), and interdisciplinary marine and onland studies in Mexico (e.g., NARS-Baja, Cortes, and surveys by PEMEX). Magnetic data (e.g., EMAG-2) aids in the recognition of large-scale crustal provinces and fault boundaries in regions lacking detailed geophysical surveys. Consideration of existing constraints on crustal thickness and architecture, and fault and basin evolution suggests that to reconcile geological deformation with plate motion history, the following additional factors need to be taken into account. 1) Plate boundary displacement via interacting systems of rotating blocks, coeval with slip on steep strike slip faults, and possibly related to slip on low angle extensional faults (e.g, Axen & Fletcher 1998 IGR) may be typical prior to the onset of seafloor spreading. This fault style may have accommodated up to 150 km of plate motion in the Mexican Continental Borderland and north of the Vizcaino Peninsula, likely between 12 and 15 Ma, as well as explaining younger rotations adjacent to the Gulf of California and current deformation southwest of the Salton Sea. 2) Geophysical

  10. The effects of thick sediment upon continental breakup: seismic imaging and thermal modeling of the Salton Trough, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Lowell, R. P.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kell, A. M.; Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lázaro-Mancilla, O.

    2015-12-01

    Continental rifting ultimately creates a deep accommodation space for sediment. When a major river flows into a late-stage rift, thick deltaic sediment can change the thermal regime and alter the mechanisms of extension and continental breakup. The Salton Trough, the northernmost rift segment of the Gulf of California plate boundary, has experienced the same extension as the rest of the Gulf, but is filled to sea level by sediment from the Colorado River. Unlike the southern Gulf, seafloor spreading has not initiated. Instead, seismicity, high heat flow, and minor volcanoes attest to ongoing rifting of thin, transitional crust. Recently acquired controlled-source seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection data in the Salton Trough provide constraints upon crustal architecture and active rift processes. The crust in the central Salton Trough is only 17-18 km thick, with a strongly layered but relatively one-dimensional structure for ~100 km in the direction of plate motion. The upper crust includes 2-4 km of Colorado River sediment. Crystalline rock below the sediment is interpreted to be similar sediment metamorphosed by the high heat flow and geothermal activity. Meta-sediment extends to at least 9 km depth. A 4-5 km thick layer in the middle crust is either additional meta-sediment or stretched pre-existing continental crust. The lowermost 4-5 km of the crust is rift-related mafic magmatic intrusion or underplating from partial melting in the hot upper mantle. North American lithosphere in the Salton Trough has been almost or completely rifted apart. The gap has been filled by ~100 km of new transitional crust created by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. These processes create strong lithologic, thermal, and rheologic layering. While heat flow in the rift is very high, rapid sedimentation cools the upper crust as compared to a linear geotherm. Brittle extension occurs within new meta-sedimentary rock. The lower crust, in comparison, is

  11. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project: Tomographic characterization of a sediment-filled rift valley and adjacent ranges, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, K.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Carrick, E.; Tikoff, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Trough in Southern California represents the northernmost rift of the Gulf of California extensional system. Relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates is accommodated by continental rifting in step-over zones between the San Andreas, Imperial, and Cerro Prieto transform faults. Rapid sedimentation from the Colorado River has isolated the trough from the southern portion of the Gulf of California, progressively filling the subsiding rift basin. Based on data from previous seismic surveys, the pre-existing continent has ruptured completely, and a new ~22 km thick crust has been created entirely by sedimentation overlying rift-related magmatism. The MARGINS, EarthScope, and USGS-funded Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was designed to investigate the nature of this new crust, the ongoing process of continental rifting, and associated earthquake hazards. SSIP, acquired in March 2011, comprises 7 lines of onshore seismic refraction / wide-angle reflection data, 2 lines of refraction / reflection data in the Salton Sea, and a line of broadband stations. This presentation focuses on the refraction / wide-angle reflection line across the Imperial Valley, extending ~220 km across California from Otay Mesa, near Tijuana, to the Colorado River. The data from this line includes seventeen 100-160 kg explosive shots and receivers at 100 m spacing across the Imperial Valley to constrain the structure of the Salton Trough rift basin, including the Imperial Fault. Eight larger shots (600-920 kg) at 20-35 km spacing and receivers at 200-500 m spacing extend the line across the Peninsular Ranges and the Chocolate Mountains. These data will contrast the structure of the rift to that of the surrounding crust and provide constraints on whole-crust and uppermost mantle structure. Preliminary work has included tomographic inversion of first-arrival travel times across the Valley, emphasizing a minimum-structure approach to create a velocity model of the

  12. Structure of the active rift zone and margins of the northern Imperial Valley from Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livers, A.; Han, L.; Delph, J. R.; White-Gaynor, A. L.; Petit, R.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    First-arrival refraction data were used to create a seismic velocity model of the upper crust across the actively rifting northern Imperial Valley and its margins. The densely sampled seismic refraction data were acquired by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) , which is investigating rift processes in the northern-most rift segment of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. A 95-km long seismic line was acquired across the northern Imperial Valley, through the Salton Sea geothermal field, parallel to the five Salton Butte volcanoes and perpendicular to the Brawley Seismic Zone and major strike-slip faults. Nineteen explosive shots were recorded with 100 m seismometer spacing across the valley and with 300-500 m spacing into the adjacent ranges. First-arrival travel times were picked from shot gathers along this line and a seismic velocity model was produced using tomographic inversion. Sedimentary basement and seismic basement in the valley are interpreted to be sediment metamorphosed by the very high heat flow. The velocity model shows that this basement to the west of the Brawley Seismic Zone is at ~4-km depth. The basement shallows to ~2-km depth in the active geothermal field and Salton Buttes volcanic field which locally coincide with the Brawley Seismic Zone. At the eastern edge of the geothermal field, the basement drops off again to ~3.5-km depth. The eastern edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the along-strike extension of the Sand Hills Fault, an inactive strike-slip fault. The seismic velocities to the east of the fault correspond to metamorphic rock of the Chocolate Mountains, different from the metamorphosed basement in the valley. The western edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the active Superstition Hills Fault. To the west of the valley, >4-km deep valley basement extends to the active Superstition Hills Fault. Basement then shallows

  13. Unexpected pronounced heating in the uppermost layer of the Dead Sea after a sharp drop in noon surface solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Starobinets, Boris; Gertman, Isaac; Ozer, Tal; Alpert, Pinhas

    2016-04-01

    A passage of frontal cloudiness accompanied by dust pollution over the Judean Mountains and the Dead Sea valley, which occurred on March 22, 2013, led to a sharp drop in noon solar radiation under weak winds (from 860 W m-2 to 50 W m-2). Solar radiation measurements showed that the transition from clear-sky to overcast conditions was sharper over the Dead Sea than over the Israel Mediterranean coast. The maximal rate of decrease in noon solar radiation at the Dead Sea almost doubled that near the Mediterranean coast (17 W m-2 min-1 vs. 10 W m-2 min-1). The temperature stratification was observed in the uppermost layer of the Dead Sea before the aforementioned drop in noon solar radiation. This temperature stratification was evidence that the weak winds were incapable of producing significant mixing in the Dead Sea. Buoy measurements showed that, unexpectedly, a sharp decrease in noon solar radiation caused pronounced heating in the uppermost layer of the Dead Sea. Evaporation from the Dead Sea surface leads to an increase in salinity in the surface layer. In the presence of significant solar radiation, this increased salinity in the surface layer did not lead to an increase in water density. The gravitational stability and temperature stratification in the uppermost layer were observed. By contrast, after the drop in solar radiation, the increased salinity in the surface layer led to an increase in water density and, consequently, to gravitational instability, because of higher density of surface seawater compared to the density in the layers below. The gravitational instability switched on a pronounced heating process in the 2-m uppermost layer of the Dead Sea. This temperature increase took place under weak winds, which were incapable of creating significant mechanical mixing in the Dead Sea. The heating of seawater in the 2-m uppermost layer was switched off later by the sharp influx of hot foehn winds up to 20 m/s from the lee side of the Judean Mts. into the

  14. Are solar activity and sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus strandings around the North Sea related?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanselow, Klaus Heinrich; Ricklefs, Klaus

    2005-04-01

    In the final decades of the last century, an increasing number of strandings of male sperm whales ( Physeter macrocephalus) around the North Sea led to an increase in public interest. Anthropogenic influences (such as contaminants or intensive sound disturbances) are supposed to be the main causes, but natural environmental effects may also explain the disorientation of the animals. We compared the documented sperm whale strandings in the period from 1712 to 2003 with solar activity, especially with sun spot number periodicity and found that 90% of 97 sperm whale stranding events around the North Sea took place when the smoothed sun spot period length was below the mean value of 11 years, while only 10% happened during periods of longer sun spot cycles. The relation becomes even more pronounced (94% to 6%, n = 70) if a smaller time window from November to March is used (which seems to be the main southward migration period of male sperm whales). Adequate chi-square tests of the data give a significance of 1% error probability that sperm whale strandings can depend on solar activity. As an alternative explanation, we suggest that variations of the earth's magnetic field, due to variable energy fluxes from the sun to the earth, may cause a temporary disorientation of migrating animals.

  15. Solar total irradiance variations and the global sea surface temperature record

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, G.C. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder )

    1991-02-20

    The record of globally averaged sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 130 years shows a highly significant correlation with the envelope of the 11-year cycle of solar activity over the same period. This correlation could be explained by a variation in the sun's total irradiance (the solar constant) that is in phase with the solar-cycle envelope, supporting and updating an earlier conclusion by Eddy (1976) that such variations could have played a major role in climate change over the past millennium. Measurements of the total irradiance from spacecraft, rockets, and balloons over the past 25 years have provided evidence of long-term variations and have been used to develop a simple linear relationship between irradiance and the envelope of the sunspot cycle. This relationship has been used to force a one-dimensional model of the thermal structure of the ocean, consisting of a 100-m mixed layer coupled to a deep ocean and including a thermohaline circulation. The model was started in the mid-seventeenth century, at the time of the Maunder Minimum of solar activity, and mixed-layer temperatures were calculated at 6-month intervals up to the present. The total range of irradiance values during the period was about 1%, and the total range of SST was about 1C. Cool periods, when temperatures were about 0.5C below present-day values, were found in the early decades of both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The results can be taken as indicating that solar variability has been an important contributor to global climate variations in recent decades. The growing atmospheric burden of greenhouse gases may well have played an important role in the immediate past.

  16. Investigating the San Andreas Fault System in the Northern Salton Trough by a Combination of Seismic Tomography and Pre-stack Depth Migration: Results from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Ryberg, T.; Fuis, G. S.; Goldman, M.; Catchings, R.; Rymer, M. J.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Salton Trough in southern California is a tectonically active pull-apart basin which was formed in migrating step-overs between strike-slip faults, of which the San Andreas fault (SAF) and the Imperial fault are current examples. It is located within the large-scale transition between the onshore SAF strike-slip system to the north and the marine rift system of the Gulf of California to the south. Crustal stretching and sinking formed the distinct topographic features and sedimentary successions of the Salton Trough. The active SAF and related fault systems can produce potentially large damaging earthquakes. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), funded by NSF and USGS, was undertaken to generate seismic data and images to improve the knowledge of fault geometry and seismic velocities within the sedimentary basins and underlying crystalline crust around the SAF in this key region. The results from these studies are required as input for modeling of earthquake scenarios and prediction of strong ground motion in the surrounding populated areas and cities. We present seismic data analysis and results from tomography and pre-stack depth migration for a number of seismic profiles (Lines 1, 4-7) covering mainly the northern Salton Trough. The controlled-source seismic data were acquired in 2011. The seismic lines have lengths ranging from 37 to 72 km. On each profile, 9-17 explosion sources with charges of 110-460 kg were recorded by 100-m spaced vertical component receivers. On Line 7, additional OBS data were acquired within the Salton Sea. Travel times of first arrivals were picked and inverted for initial 1D velocity models. Alternatively, the starting models were derived from the crustal-scale velocity models developed by the Southern California Earthquake Center. The final 2D velocity models were obtained using the algorithm of Hole (1992; JGR). We have also tested the tomography packages FAST and SIMUL2000, resulting in similar velocity structures. An

  17. Discussion on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2013-05-01

    Herein I discuss common errors in applying regression models and wavelet filters used to analyze geophysical signals. I demonstrate that: (1) multidecadal natural oscillations (e.g. the quasi 60 yr Multidecadal Atlantic Oscillation (AMO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)) need to be taken into account for properly quantifying anomalous background accelerations in tide gauge records such as in New York City; (2) uncertainties and multicollinearity among climate forcing functions also prevent a proper evaluation of the solar contribution to the 20th century global surface temperature warming using overloaded linear regression models during the 1900-2000 period alone; (3) when periodic wavelet filters, which require that a record is pre-processed with a reflection methodology, are improperly applied to decompose non-stationary solar and climatic time series, Gibbs boundary artifacts emerge yielding misleading physical interpretations. By correcting these errors and using optimized regression models that reduce multicollinearity artifacts, I found the following results: (1) the relative sea level in New York City is not accelerating in an alarming way, and may increase by about 350 ± 30 mm from 2000 to 2100 instead of the previously projected values varying from 1130 ± 480 mm to 1550 ± 400 mm estimated using the methods proposed, e.g., by Sallenger Jr. et al. (2012) and Boon (2012), respectively; (2) the solar activity increase during the 20th century contributed at least about 50% of the 0.8 °C global warming observed during the 20th century instead of only 7-10% (e.g.: IPCC, 2007; Benestad and Schmidt, 2009; Lean and Rind, 2009; Rohde et al., 2013). The first result was obtained by using a quadratic polynomial function plus a 60 yr harmonic to fit a required 110 yr-long sea level record. The second result was obtained by using solar, volcano, greenhouse gases and aerosol constructors to fit modern paleoclimatic temperature

  18. Clear-Sky Surface Solar Radiation During South China Sea Monsoon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Po-Hsiung; Chou, Ming-Dah; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Downward solar fluxes measured at Dungsha coral island (20 deg. 42 min. N, 116 deg. 43 min. E) during the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (May-June 1998) have been calibrated and compared with radiative transfer calculations for three clear-sky days. Model calculations use water vapor and temperature profiles from radiosound measurements and the aerosol optical thickness derived from sunphotometric radiance measurements at the surface. Results show that the difference between observed and model-calculated downward fluxes is less than 3% of the daily mean. Averaged over the three clear days, the difference reduces to 1%. The downward surface solar flux averaged over the three days is 314 W per square meters from observations and 317 W per square meters from model calculations, This result is consistent with a previous study using TOGA CAORE measurements, which found good agreements between observations and model calculations. This study provides an extra piece of useful information on the modeling of radiative transfer, which fills in the puzzle of the absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere.

  19. Evaporation and solar irradiance as regulators of sea surface temperature in annual and interannual changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Zhang, Anzhen; Bishop, James K. B.

    1994-01-01

    Seven years of net surface solar irradiance (S) derived from cloud information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and 4 years of surface latent heat flux (E) derived from the observations of the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) were used to examine the relation between surface heat fluxes and sea surface temperature (T(sub s)) in their global geographical distribution, seasonal cycle, and interannual variation. The relations of seasonal changes imply that evaporation cooling is significant over most of the ocean and that solar heating is the main drive for the change of T(sub s) away from the equatorial wave guide where ocean dynamics may be more important. However, T(sub s) is not the most direct and significant factor in the seasonal changes of S and E over most of the ocean; the solar incident angle may be more important to S, and wind speed and air humidity are found to correlate better with E. Significant local correlations between anomalies of T(sub s) and S and between anomalies of T(sub s) and E are found in the central equatorial Pacific; both types of correlation are negative. The influence of ocean dynamics in changing T(sub s) in the tropical ocean cannot be ignored.

  20. SeaWiFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 5; The SeaWiFS Solar Radiation-Based Calibration and the Transfer-to-Orbit Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Zalewski, Edward F.; Slater, Philip N.; Holmes, Alan W.

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation-based calibration (SRBC) of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) was performed on 1 November 1993. Measurements were made outdoors in the courtyard of the instrument manufacturer. SeaWiFS viewed the solar irradiance reflected from the sensor's diffuser in the same manner as viewed on orbit. The calibration included measurements using a solar radiometer designed to determine the transmittances of principal atmospheric constituents. The primary uncertainties in the outdoor measurements are the transmission of the atmosphere and the reflectance of the diffuser. Their combined uncertainty is about 5 or 6%. The SRBC also requires knowledge of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum. Four solar models are used. When averaged over the responses of the SeaWiFS bands, the irradiance models agree at the 3.6% level, with the greatest difference for SeaWiFS band 8. The calibration coefficients from the SRBC are lower than those from the laboratory calibration of the instrument in 1997. For a representative solar model, the ratios of the SRBC coefficients to laboratory values average 0.962 with a standard deviation of 0.012. The greatest relative difference is 0.946 for band 8. These values are within the estimated uncertainties of the calibration measurements. For the transfer-to-orbit experiment, the measurements in the manufacturer's courtyard are used to predict the digital counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit (August 1, 1997). This experiment requires an estimate of the relative change in the diffuser response for the period between the launch of the instrument and its first solar measurements on orbit (September 9, 1997). In relative terms, the counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit averaged 1.3% higher than predicted, with a standard deviation of 1.2% and a greatest difference of 2.4% or band 7. The estimated uncertainty for the transfer-to-orbit experiment is about 3 or 4%.

  1. Chronostratigraphy of the Fish Creek-Vallecito Basin, SW Salton Trough: A High-Fidelity Record of Slip on the West Salton Detachment Fault and Subsidence in its Upper Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, R. J.; Housen, B. A.; Janecke, S. U.; McDougall, K.; Fanning, M.; Fluette, A.; Axen, G. J.; Shirvell, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    The Fish Creek-Vallecito basin contains a 5.1-km thick section of sedimentary rocks in the SW Salton Trough that range in age from 8.1 to 0.9 Ma. The section preserves a record of basin subsidence related to slip on the West Salton detachment fault (WSDF), which formed the main western rift-flank structure of the Salton Trough. We obtained a well-constrained chronology from compilation of existing (Johnson et al., 1983) and new paleomagnetic data, ages of two tuffs high in the section, and thicknesses calculated from the geologic map of Winker (1987) and our work in the lower 1.3 km. The tuffs yielded SHRIMP U-Pb ages of 2.56 ± 0.09 and 2.54 ± 0.09 Ma from single zircons. Geohistory analysis, corrected for paleobathymetry and global sea- level change, yields a decompacted subsidence curve with 5 segments bounded by abrupt changes in subsidence rate: (1) 0.46 mm/yr from 8.1 to 5.5 Ma; (2) 1.8 mm/yr from 5.5 to 5.2 Ma; (3) zero subsidence or slight uplift from 5.2 to 4.6 Ma; (4) 1.9 mm/yr from 4.6 to 3.2 Ma; and (5) 0.4 mm/yr from 3.2 to 0.9 Ma. The base of the Elephant Trees Fm, dated here at 8.1 Ma, provides the earliest well dated record of extension in the SW Salton Trough. Earliest marine incursion is dated at 6.3 Ma, and the first appearance of Colorado River sand coincides closely with the Miocene-Pliocene boundary (5.33 Ma). Because the base of the marine Imperial Group does not coincide with a change in subsidence rate, we suggest that initial marine incursion resulted from a latest Miocene global sea-level highstand superposed on steady subsidence. Thus, the inflections at 8.1 and 5.5 Ma are the two most likely ages for onset of slip on the WSDF, but 4.6 Ma is also possible. Variations in subsidence rate are not predicted by models for extensional detachment faults, and may reflect episodic pulsed fault slip and/or long-wavelength folding related to dextral-wrench tectonics. Rapid subsidence in segment 4 began during progradation of the Colorado River

  2. Photocatalytic activity of sea water using TiO₂ catalyst under solar light.

    PubMed

    Shinde, S S; Bhosale, C H; Rajpure, K Y

    2011-05-01

    Wastewater is generally released into the rivers and streams in developing countries. Industrial wastewater usually contains highly toxic pollutants, cyanides, chlorinated compounds. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight also decomposes organic compounds by oxidation process. However, the process is less effective due to large amount of toxic effluent entering in the main stream of water. The solar radiation can effectively be applied to accelerate the process by using suitable catalyst for economically cleaning the water sources. This paper describes the photocatalytic degradation of the sea water using novel approach of photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactor module consisting of nine photoelectrochemical cells equipped with spray deposited TiO₂ catalysts under solar light. The resulted water samples were studied for physicochemical and bacteriological analysis. The complete mineralization of degraded sample was confirmed by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis, COD measurement and estimation of the formation of inorganic ions such as NH₄(+), NO₃⁻, Cl⁻ and SO²⁻₄. Microbiological examinations are performed to determine the bacterial analysis. This implies that photoelectrocatalysis could be a promising way for improving water quality in developing countries with low cost and clean energy reliable resource. PMID:21377373

  3. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project: Seismic velocity structure of the Brawley Seismic Zone, Salton Buttes and Geothermal Field, Salton Trough, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, J.; Hole, J. A.; Fuis, G. S.; Stock, J. M.; Rymer, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Trough is an active rift in southern California in a step-over between the plate-bounding Imperial and San Andreas Faults. In March 2011, the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) investigated the rift's crustal structure by acquiring several seismic refraction and reflection lines. One of the densely sampled refraction lines crosses the northern-most Imperial Valley, perpendicular to the strike-slip faults and parallel to a line of small Quaternary rhyolitic volcanoes. The line crosses the obliquely extensional Brawley Seismic Zone and goes through one of the most geothermally productive areas in the United States. Well logs indicate the valley is filled by several kilometers of late Pliocene-recent lacustrine, fluvial, and shallow marine sediment. The 42-km long seismic line was comprised of eleven 110-460 kg explosive shots and receivers at a 100 m spacing. First arrival travel times were used to build a tomographic seismic velocity image of the upper crust. Velocity in the valley increases smoothly from <2 km/s to >5 km/s, indicating diagenesis and gradational metamorphism of rift sediments at very shallow depth due to an elevated geotherm. The velocity gradient is much smaller in the relatively low velocity (<6 km/s) crystalline basement comprised of recently metamorphosed sediment reaching greenschist to lower amphibolite facies. The depth of this basement is about 4-km below the aseismic region of the valley west of the Brawley Seismic Zone, but rises sharply to ~2 km depth beneath the seismically, geothermally, and volcanically active area of the Brawley Seismic Zone. The basement deepens to the northeast of the active tectonic zone and then is abruptly offset to shallower depth on the northeast side of the valley. This offset may be the subsurficial expression of a paleofault, most likely an extension of the Sand Hills Fault, which bounds the basin to the east. Basement velocity east of the fault is ~5.7 km/s, consistent with the granitic rocks

  4. The application of active-source seismic imaging techniques to transtensional problems the Walker Lane and Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, Anna Marie

    The plate margin in the western United States is an active tectonic region that contains the integrated deformation between the North American and Pacific plates. Nearly focused plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates within the northern Gulf of California gives way north of the Salton Trough to more diffuse deformation. In particular a large fraction of the slip along the southernmost San Andreas fault ultimately bleeds eastward, including about 20% of the total plate motion budget that finds its way through the transtensional Walker Lane Deformation Belt just east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Fault-bounded ranges combined with intervening low-lying basins characterize this region; the down-dropped features are often filled with water, which present opportunities for seismic imaging at unprecedented scales. Here I present active-source seismic imaging from the Salton Sea and Walker Lane Deformation Belt, including both marine applications in lakes and shallow seas, and more conventional land-based techniques along the Carson range front. The complex fault network beneath the Salton Trough in eastern California is the on-land continuation of the Gulf of California rift system, where North American-Pacific plate motion is accommodated by a series of long transform faults, separated by small pull-apart, transtensional basins; the right-lateral San Andreas fault bounds this system to the north where it carries, on average, about 50% of total plate motion. The Salton Sea resides within the most youthful and northerly "spreading center" in this several thousand-kilometer-long rift system. The Sea provides an ideal environment for the use of high-data-density marine seismic techniques. Two active-source seismic campaigns in 2010 and 2011 show progression of the development of the Salton pull-apart sub-basin and the northerly propagation of the Imperial-San Andreas system through time at varying resolutions. High fidelity seismic imagery

  5. Seismic Reflectivity of the Crust in the Northern Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Fuis, G. S.; Goldman, M.; Persaud, P.; Ryberg, T.; Langenheim, V. E.; Scheirer, D. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Catchings, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Salton Trough in southern California is a tectonically active pull-apart basin that was formed by migrating step-overs between strike-slip faults, of which the San Andreas Fault (SAF) and the Imperial Fault are the current, northernmost examples. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was undertaken to improve our knowledge of fault geometry and seismic velocities within the sedimentary basins and underlying crystalline crust around the SAF. Such data are useful as input for modeling scenarios of strong ground shaking in the surrounding high-population areas. We used pre-stack depth migration of line segments from shot gathers in several seismic profiles that were acquired in the northern part of the SSIP study area (Lines 4 - 7). Our migration approach can be considered as an infinite-frequency approximation of the Fresnel volume pre-stack depth migration method. We use line segments instead of the original waveform data. We demonstrate the method using synthetic data and analyze real data from Lines 4 - 7 to illustrate the relationship between distinct phases in the time domain and their resulting image at depth. We show both normal-moveout reflections from sub-horizontal interfaces and reverse-moveout reflections from steep interfaces, such as faults. Migrated images of dipping faults, such as the SAF and the Pinto Mountain Fault, are presented in this way. The SAF is imaged along Line 4, through the Mecca Hills, as a number of steeply dipping fault segments that collectively form a flower structure, above 5 km depth, that sole into a moderately NE-dipping fault below that depth. The individual migrated reflection packages correlate with mapped surface fault traces in the Mecca Hills. A similar geometry is seen on Line 6, from Palm Springs through Yucca Valley, where fault splays sole or project into a moderately dipping SAF below 10-km depth. We also show and discuss the reflectivity pattern of the middle and lower crust for Lines 4 - 7.

  6. The West Salton Detachment Fault, Salton Trough, California: a Primary Low-Angle Normal Fault in an Evolving Dextral Wrench Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axen, G. J.; Janecke, S.; Steely, A.; Shirvell, C.; Fluette, A.; Kairouz, M.; Housen, B.; Stockli, D.; Dorsey, R.; Grove, M.

    2006-12-01

    The west Salton detachment fault (WSDF), bounded the W rift flank, and was largely coeval with the southern San Andreas fault (SSAF). The WSDF is exposed in ~E-trending folds: broad, apparently primary corrugations S. Santa Rosa Mts., Borrego Valley-Pinyon Mts., Whale Peak, Vallecito Valley, and Tiera Blanca Mts) and narrow, post-WSDF folds (e.g., adjacent to San Felipe and Earthquake Valley faults). WSDF slip may have begun at ~12+, ~8.1, 5.5 or 4.6 Ma and was probably rapid from ~5 to 2 Ma. Two (U-Th)/He vertical transects from the WSDF footwall show rapid cooling since 12 Ma, and very rapid cooling between ~5.5-4.5 and ~2 Ma. Subsidence curves from the Fish Creek Vallecito basin (FCVB; Dorsey et al., this session) show increased rates at ~8.1 Ma, 5.5, and 4.6 Ma. Syntectonic conglomerate (base ~8.1 Ma) there records earliest extension, but may have been only local. Widespread marine deposits (~6.3 to 4.25 Ma) locally contain syndetachment fault-scarp facies; eustatic sea level rise may have controlled initial marine flooding. Subsidence was most rapid from ~4.6 to 3 Ma. Upper-plate normal faults are rare but folds formed locally. At Borrego Mtn. a WNW-trending anticline formed by ~6 Ma and persisted until after 4 Ma, coeval with WSDF slip. Folding at Split Mtn may have begun earlier. The WSDF has at least 5 km of E or NE slip, from offset basement but higher WSDF strands carry syntectonic conglomerates some additional distance. (U-Th)/He apatite ages from the upper and lower plates suggest ~2.4 km of footwall exhumation, yielding 5-15 km of slip, depending upon dip assumed. WSDF striae scatter widely, but concentrate at 090-110, probably the main or most recent slip direction. CW vertical- axis rotations have occurred (Housen et al., this session): ~3-4 m.y. old FCVB strata are rotated 19° ± 12°, and footwall La Posta pluton at Whale Peak rotated perhaps 36° (relative to the Peninsular Range La Posta). Similar rotations were common in N Baja CA in latest

  7. Midwestern streamflow, precipitation, and atmospheric vorticity influenced by Pacific sea-surface temperatures and total solar-irradiance variations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    A solar effect on streamflow in the Midwestern United States is described and supported in a six-step physical connection between total solar irradiance (TSI), tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), extratropical SSTs, jet-stream vorticity, surface-layer vorticity, precipitation, and streamflow. Variations in the correlations among the individual steps indicate that the solar/hydroclimatic mechanism is complex and has a time element (lag) that may not be constant. Correct phasing, supported by consistent spectral peaks between 0.092 and 0.096 cycles per year in all data sets within the mechanism is strong evidence for its existence. A significant correlation exists between total solar irradiance and the 3-year moving average of annual streamflow for Iowa (R = 0.67) and for the Mississippi River at St Louis, Missouri (R = 0.60), during the period 1950-2000. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Changes in the Radiometric sensitivity of SeaWiFS determined from lunar and solar-based measurements.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R A; Eplee, R E; Patt, F S; McClain, C R

    1999-07-20

    We report on the lunar and solar measurements used to determine the changes in the radiometric sensitivity of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Radiometric sensitivity is defined as the output from the instrument (or from one of the instrument bands) per unit spectral radiance at the instrument's input aperture. Knowledge of the long-term repeatability of the SeaWiFS measurements is crucial to maintaining the quality of the ocean scenes derived from measurements by the instrument. For SeaWiFS bands 1-6 (412-670 nm), the change in radiometric sensitivity is less than 0.2% for the period from November 1997 through November 1998. For band 7 (765 nm), the change is approximately 1.5% and for band 8 (865 nm) approximately 5%. The rates of change of bands 7 and 8, which were linear with time for the first eight months of lunar measurements, are now slowing. The scatter in the data points about the trend lines in this analysis is less than 0.3% for all eight SeaWiFS bands. These results are based on monthly measurements of the moon. Daily solar measurements using an onboard diffuser show that the radiometric sensitivities of the SeaWiFS bands have changed smoothly during the time intervals between lunar measurements. Because SeaWiFS measurements have continued past November 1998, the results presented here are considered as a snapshot of the instrument performance as of that date.

  9. Exposure of eggs to solar UV-B leads to reduced hatching rates in two sparid fishes, red sea bream Pagrus major and black sea bream Acanthopagrus schlegeli.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Y; Masuda, R; Yamashita, Y

    2010-02-01

    Hatching success was examined under exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) using filters to give three different light conditions [C1: UV-B, UV-A and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), C2: UV-A and PAR, C3: PAR] in red Pagrus major and black Acanthopagrus schlegeli sea bream. Hatching rate of both species was reduced by an exposure over a 2 day period to UVR and was not significantly different between two species under the three light conditions. PMID:20666911

  10. Borehole-explosion and air-gun data acquired in the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), southern California: description of the survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Elizabeth J.; Fuis, Gary S.; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Kell, Annie M.; Kent, Graham; Driscoll, Neal W.; Goldman, Mark; Reusch, Angela M.; Han, Liang; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Criley, Coyn J.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Skinner, Steven M.; Slayday-Criley, Coye J.; Murphy, Janice M.; Jensen, Edward G.; McClearn, Robert; Ferguson, Alex J.; Butcher, Lesley A.; Gardner, Max A.; Emmons, Iain; Loughran, Caleb L.; Svitek, Joseph R.; Bastien, Patrick C.; Cotton, Joseph A.; Croker, David S.; Harding, Alistair J.; Babcock, Jeffrey M.; Harder, Steven H.; Rosa, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    detailed images we need for earthquake hazard assessment. Air gun bursts, generated in the Salton Sea

  11. The effect of sea ice on the solar energy budget in the astmosphere-sea ice-ocean system: A model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, Knut; Weeks, W. F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    1994-01-01

    A coupled one-dimensional multilayer and multistream radiative transfer model has been developed and applied to the study of radiative interactions in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system. The consistent solution of the radiative transfer equation in this coupled system automatically takes into account the refraction and reflection at the air-ice interface and allows flexibility in choice of stream numbers. The solar radiation spectrum (0.25 micron-4.0 micron) is divided into 24 spectral bands to account adequately for gaseous absorption in the atmosphere. The effects of ice property changes, including salinity and density variations, as well as of melt ponds and snow cover variations over the ice on the solar energy distribution in the entire system have been studied quantitatively. The results show that for bare ice it is the scattering, determined by air bubbles and brine pockets, in just a few centimeters of the top layer of ice that plays the most important role in the solar energy absorption and partitioning in the entire system. Ice thickness is important to the energy distribution only when the ice is thin, while the absorption in the atmosphere is not sensitive to ice thickness exceeds about 70 cm. The presence of clouds moderates all the sensitivities of the absorptive amounts in each layer to the variations in the ice properties and ice thickness. Comparisons with observational spectral albedo values for two simple ice types are also presented.

  12. Seasonal Evolution and Interannual Variability of the Local Solar Energy Absorbed by the Arctic Sea Ice-Ocean System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Markus, Thorsten; Schwieger, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The melt season of the Arctic sea ice cover is greatly affected by the partitioning of the incident solar radiation between reflection to the atmosphere and absorption in the ice and ocean. This partitioning exhibits a strong seasonal cycle and significant interannual variability. Data in the period 1998, 2000-2004 were analyzed in this study. Observations made during the 1997-1998 SHEBA (Surface HEat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) field experiment showed a strong seasonal dependence of the partitioning, dominated by a five-phase albedo evolution. QuikSCAT scatterometer data from the SHEBA region in 1999-2004 were used to further investigate solar partitioning in summer. The time series of scatterometer data were used to determine the onset of melt and the beginning of freezeup. This information was combined with SSM/I-derived ice concentration, TOVS-based estimates of incident solar irradiance, and SHEBA results to estimate the amount of solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system for these years. The average total solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system from April through September was 900 MJ m(sup -2). There was considerable interannual variability, with a range of 826 to 1044 MJ m(sup -2). The total amount of solar energy absorbed by the ice and ocean was strongly related to the date of melt onset, but only weakly related to the total duration of the melt season or the onset of freezeup. The timing of melt onset is significant because the incident solar energy is large and a change at this time propagates through the entire melt season, affecting the albedo every day throughout melt and freezeup.

  13. Changes in sea-level pressure over South Korea associated with high-speed solar wind events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Il-Hyun; Kwak, Young-Sil; Marubashi, Katsuhide; Kim, Yeon-Han; Park, Young-Deuk; Chang, Heon-Young

    2012-09-01

    We explore a possibility that the daily sea-level pressure (SLP) over South Korea responds to the high-speed solar wind event. This is of interest in two aspects: first, if there is a statistical association this can be another piece of evidence showing that various meteorological observables indeed respond to variations in the interplanetary environment. Second, this can be a very crucial observational constraint since most models proposed so far are expected to preferentially work in higher latitude regions than the low latitude region studied here. We have examined daily solar wind speed V, daily SLP difference ΔSLP, and daily log(BV2) using the superposed epoch analysis in which the key date is set such that the daily solar wind speed exceeds 800 km s-1. We find that the daily ΔSLP averaged out of 12 events reaches its peak at day +1 and gradually decreases back to its normal level. The amount of positive deviation of ΔSLP is +2.5 hPa. The duration of deviation is a few days. We also find that ΔSLP is well correlated with both the speed of solar wind and log(BV2). The obtained linear correlation coefficients and chance probabilities with one-day lag for two cases are r ≃ 0.81 with P > 99.9%, and r ≃ 0.84 with P > 99.9%, respectively. We conclude by briefly discussing future direction to pursue.

  14. Solar preheating of both domestic hot water and space. Final technical report for the Sea Loft restaurant in Long Branch, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-28

    Stephen Giddio's Sea Loft Restaurant in Long Branch, NJ is equipped with an active solar system for preheating water for both space heating and domestic hot water. Three pumped water loops, each a closed circuit, transfer heat from one major component to another. Solar heat is collected by an array of 83 evacuated tube collectors. The acceptance test results are appended, as well as the operational and maintenance manual. Reference CAPE-2805. (LEW)

  15. Borehole-explosion and air-gun data acquired in the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), southern California: description of the survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Elizabeth J.; Fuis, Gary S.; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Kell, Annie M.; Kent, Graham; Driscoll, Neal W.; Goldman, Mark; Reusch, Angela M.; Han, Liang; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Criley, Coyn J.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Skinner, Steven M.; Slayday-Criley, Coye J.; Murphy, Janice M.; Jensen, Edward G.; McClearn, Robert; Ferguson, Alex J.; Butcher, Lesley A.; Gardner, Max A.; Emmons, Iain; Loughran, Caleb L.; Svitek, Joseph R.; Bastien, Patrick C.; Cotton, Joseph A.; Croker, David S.; Harding, Alistair J.; Babcock, Jeffrey M.; Harder, Steven H.; Rosa, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    detailed images we need for earthquake hazard assessment. Air gun bursts, generated in the Salton Sea along extensions of our onshore seismic lines, also were utilized as sound-wave sources. Temporary deployments of portable land seismometers, as well as ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) on the floor of the Salton Sea, recorded the energy from the land shots and air gun bursts. SSIP is similar to the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiments of 1994 and 1999 (LARSE I and II, respectively; Murphy and others, 1996; Fuis and others, 2001). The LARSE surveys demonstrated that the USGS and collaborators can safely and effectively conduct seismic imaging surveys in urban and nonurban areas, on lands owned and/or managed by many different types of agencies and entities. Information was produced that could not have been obtained any other way, and this information was key to changing the leading ideas about earthquake hazards at that time in the Los Angeles region. These surveys produced no significant environmental impact or damage to structures, and they did not trigger earthquakes.

  16. A Study of Tropical Cyclones over India (Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea) and Solar Influence on It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Dhruba

    2016-07-01

    A prominent example of extreme weather event in India is Cyclonic Storm. In this paper annual variation of tropical Cyclonic Storm (CS), Severe Cyclonic Storm (SCS), Very Severe Cyclonic Storm (VSCS) and Super Cyclonic Storm (SuCS) over Bay Of Bengal (BOB) and Arabian Sea (ARS) during last 20 years (1990-2009) have been analyzed .The analysis revels that the total number of cyclone (TNC) has increased with high rate(gradient being +1.67 per year) and although C.S. is more over BOB than that over ARS.The rate of increase of C.S. over Arabian Sea is more than that over Bay of Bengal. Furthermore, two interesting features have been noted: (i) Monsoon tends to prohibit the formation of C.S (ii) Cyclonic Storm(C.S.) increases with the increase of Global Sea Surface Temperature (GSST) during said period.. Attempt has also been made to find out the influence of solar activity on these extreme weather events. Keeping in mind that the Sun Spot Number (SSN) is an indicator of the strength of solar effects, it has been found that in most of the times the high value of SSN is associated with small number of total cyclone (C.S.). Specifically, when only the years of high Sun's Spot Number (approximately greater than 90) are taken into consideration then Correlation Coefficient (C.C.) between SSN and number of cyclones comes out to be quite high (-0.78) significance at 99.99% level while Correlation Coefficient (C.C.) of cyclones with time is 0.53 and with SSN < 60 it is..095 . Thus it appears that although C.S. frequency is increasing with time, Sun's Spot's influence is such that it basically opposes the formation of cyclone provided SSN exceeds certain critical value (roughly 90). In principle, this is very important for any such event, and it is consistent with the trend of different phenomena occurring in nature. Key words: India, cyclone, solar influence, Critical Sun's Spot Number

  17. Fault tectonics and earthquake hazards in parts of southern California. [penninsular ranges, Garlock fault, Salton Trough area, and western Mojave Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M. (Principal Investigator); Lamar, D. L.; Gazley, C., Jr.; Lamar, J. V.; Stratton, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Four previously unknown faults were discovered in basement terrane of the Peninsular Ranges. These have been named the San Ysidro Creek fault, Thing Valley fault, Canyon City fault, and Warren Canyon fault. In addition fault gouge and breccia were recognized along the San Diego River fault. Study of features on Skylab imagery and review of geologic and seismic data suggest that the risk of a damaging earthquake is greater along the northwestern portion of the Elsinore fault than along the southeastern portion. Physiographic indicators of active faulting along the Garlock fault identifiable in Skylab imagery include scarps, linear ridges, shutter ridges, faceted ridges, linear valleys, undrained depressions and offset drainage. The following previously unrecognized fault segments are postulated for the Salton Trough Area: (1) An extension of a previously known fault in the San Andreas fault set located southeast of the Salton Sea; (2) An extension of the active San Jacinto fault zone along a tonal change in cultivated fields across Mexicali Valley ( the tonal change may represent different soil conditions along opposite sides of a fault). For the Skylab and LANDSAT images studied, pseudocolor transformations offer no advantages over the original images in the recognition of faults in Skylab and LANDSAT images. Alluvial deposits of different ages, a marble unit and iron oxide gossans of the Mojave Mining District are more readily differentiated on images prepared from ratios of individual bands of the S-192 multispectral scanner data. The San Andreas fault was also made more distinct in the 8/2 and 9/2 band ratios by enhancement of vegetation differences on opposite sides of the fault. Preliminary analysis indicates a significant earth resources potential for the discrimination of soil and rock types, including mineral alteration zones. This application should be actively pursued.

  18. Muon excess at sea level from solar flares in association with the Fermi GBM spacecraft detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, C. R. A.; Navia, C. E.; Shigueoka, H.; Tsui, K. H.; Fauth, A. C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents results of an ongoing survey on the association between muon excesses at ground level, registered by the Tupi telescopes, and transient solar events, whose gamma-ray and x-ray emissions were reported by the Fermi Gamma Burst Monitor and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 14, respectively. We show that solar flares of small scale, those with prompt x-ray emission classified by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite as C-Class with power 10-6 to 10-5Wattsm-2 at 1 AU, may give rise to muon excess probably associated with solar protons and ions emitted by the flare and arriving at the Earth as a coherent particle pulse. The Tupi telescopes are within the central region of the South Atlantic Anomaly, where the geomagnetic field intensity is the lowest on the Earth. Here we argue for the possibility of a “scale-free” power-law energy spectrum of particles accelerated by solar flares. For energies around and exceeding the pion production, large and small scale flares have the same power-law energy spectrum. The difference is only in the intensity. The Tupi events give support to this conjecture.

  19. Solar preheating of both domestic hot water and space. Final technical report for the Sea Loft restaurant in Long Branch, New Jersey (Engineering Materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-28

    Stephen Giddio's Sea Loft Restaurant in Long Branch, NJ is equipped with an active solar system for preheating of both Space and Domestic Hot Water (DHW). Three pumped water loops, each closed circuit, transfer heat from one major equipment component to another. The closed loop drain back solar energy collection circuit uses a 3/4 horsepower pump to circulate seventeen gallons per minute of deionized water from the Solar Storage Tank to the Solar Collector Array, and return. This tank has a capacity of 600 gallons. The solar array consist of eighty-three evacuated tube type concentrating collectors. The heat gathered in this circuit is stored in the tank for either simultaneous or future use in either or both of the Space and DHW preheating loops. The preheating of city water prior to its entrance into the gas fired 86 gallon DHW heater is accomplished in a separate 600 gallon capacity tank. Two thirty-five square foot tubed heat exchanger bundles inserted into this tank accept solar heated hot water from the Solar Storage Tank. This solar heated water is pumped at sixteen GPM in a closed loop circuit using a 1/4 HP pump. The preheating of restaurant space is accomplished in a closed loop circuit between the Solar Storage Tank and an eight SF hot water coil inserted into the return air from the Main Dining Room of the restaurant. A 1/4 HP pump circulates fifteen gallons of solar heated hot water per minute. This system incorporates a differential temperature controller that utilizes a multitude of pressure sensors and temperature thermistors located throughout the various portions of the system components and piping. The Display Board mounted on the wall of the Bar-Lounge Area serves to integrate the entire solar system. It not only displays the flow but houses the Btu flowmeters, Digital temperature readouts, and HVAC EMS Programmer. Reference DOE/CS/30007-T1.

  20. UV solar-blind FSO sub-sea video communications: link budget study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shlomi; Kedar, Debbie

    2008-10-01

    Sub-sea monitoring of floating oil production platforms is a crucial issue in the interests of security, efficient functioning and pollution prevention. Sensors and sensor networks are essential tools for implementing the monitoring operations and low-error data communication from the sensors and within the network is a critical element in these systems. Free space optics (FSO) has gained recognition in numerous applications as a high bandwidth, energy efficient communication medium and has recently been considered as a viable alternative to acoustic communications for underwater applications when high data rates are required over short transmission ranges. Video recording is a powerful method for gathering extensive data in time and space that requires broadband communication facilities, such as could be provided by FSO. However, the immense variability of background illumination in shallow waters, inducing shot noise at the receiver, presents a challenge for sub-sea FSO. This has stimulated us to investigate the potential of underwater FSO in the UV solarblind spectral range. The potential of UV solarblind optical wireless links for sub-sea FSO is investigated in this paper and compared with performance at 520nm. In clear ocean data rates of 100bps can be transmitted over distances of above 120m using 520nm radiation, but this range is reduced to around 10m in harbour waters for these data rates and to 50m in clear ocean when the data rate is increased to 100Mbps. It is anticipated that ranges of 10m can also be obtained with UV solarblind wavelengths, although experimental corroboration is not yet available.

  1. Estimation of sea surface solar radiation at 400-700 nm using satellite ocean color data, and its validation by ship data.

    PubMed

    Vazyulya, S V; Kopelevich, O V; Sheberstov, S V; Artemiev, V A

    2016-03-21

    We present results of validating the algorithms used to estimate sea surface solar radiation at 400-700 nm, photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), from satellite ocean color data and an appropriate validation procedure when data are collected using a moving ship. The validation was performed using field measurements of PAR during a transit cruise from the Baltic to the White Sea during the summer of 2014. The PAR was measured at 10-minute intervals using a deck radiometer throughout the daylight hours. The satellite estimate of daily surface PAR with an acceptable error, on the scale of 1 day-102 km, is shown. PMID:27136880

  2. Effect of sea-ice melt on inherent optical properties and vertical distribution of solar radiant heating in Arctic surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granskog, Mats A.; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Sagan, Sławomir; Kowalczuk, Piotr; Raczkowska, Anna; Stedmon, Colin A.

    2015-10-01

    The inherent optical properties (IOPs) of Polar Waters (PW) exiting the Arctic Ocean in the East Greenland Current (EGC) and of the inflowing Atlantic waters (AW) in the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) were studied in late summer when surface freshening due to sea-ice melt was widespread. The absorption and attenuation coefficients in PW were significantly higher than previous observations from the western Arctic. High concentrations of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) resulted in 50-60% more heat deposition in the upper meters relative to clearest natural waters. This demonstrates the influence of terrigenous organic material inputs on the optical properties of waters in the Eurasian basin. Sea-ice melt in CDOM-rich PW decreased CDOM absorption, but an increase in scattering nearly compensated for lower absorption, and total attenuation was nearly identical in the sea-ice meltwater layer. This suggests a source of scattering material associated with sea-ice melt, relative to the PW. In the AW, melting sea-ice forms a stratified surface layer with lower absorption and attenuation, than well-mixed AW waters in late summer. It is likely that phytoplankton in the surface layer influenced by sea-ice melt are nutrient limited. The presence of a more transparent surface layer changes the vertical radiant heat absorption profile to greater depths in late summer both in EGC and WSC waters, shifting accumulation of solar heat to greater depths and thus this heat is not directly available for ice melt during periods of stratification.

  3. SKELETAL DEVELOPMENT IN HERMESINUM ADRIATICUM ZACHARIAS, A FLAGELLATE FROM THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. FLAGELLATE CRYPTOBIA BRANCHIALIS (BODONIDA: KINETOPLASTIDA), ECTOPARASITE OF TILAPIA FROM THE SALTON SEA. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. PLEUROCHRYSIS PSEUDOROSCOFFENSIS (PRYMNESIOPHYCEAE) BLOOMS ON THE SURFACE OF THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. METAZOOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA, 1997-1999. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. THERMAL, MIXING, AND OXYGEN REGIMES OF THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA, 1997-1999. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Studies of brine chemistry and scaling at the Salton Sea Geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrar, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Features of studies related to brine chemistry and scaling are reported. The results of investigations of brine chemistry, the effects of brine acidification and organic additives on the rate of scale formation and scale composition, and the use of other additives for scale control are summarized. High salinity, high silica geothermal brines were studied and it was shown that the silica and sulfide scales formed from these brines could be eliminated by lowering the pH of brine. The following steps were completed: testing of technical chemical solutions to the scaling problem; finding low cost metallic materials that will resist the brine; proving a method for the treatment of spend brine for injection; perfection of chemical measurement techniques. Most environmental issues are addressed and first increments of electrical power are generated.

  9. Discussion on sea level fluctuations along the Adriatic coasts coupling to climate indices forced by solar activity: Insights into the future of Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchettin, Davide; Traverso, Pietro; Tomasino, Mario

    2006-04-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), which is a dominant circulation pattern in Northern Hemisphere winter, is known to affect sea-level variability in the Mediterranean Sea mainly through the hydrostatic response of water masses to pressure anomalies and changes in evaporation/precipitation budgets. In this study the influence of the NAO on sea levels along the Adriatic coasts is re-assessed in the attempt to uncover the potential causes of the observed high sensitivity of the northern basin to NAO fluctuations. The investigation is focused on the role of the NAO as forcing factor of the winds blowing in the area and of the freshwaters input from the Po River, both of which influence the hydrodynamics of the Northern Adriatic. In addition, some insights into the future of Venice are discussed on the basis of the hypothesis that NAO phases are modulated by the varying solar activity through the intensity of the Earth's geomagnetic activity.

  10. Single and Double ITCZ in Aqua-Planet Models with Globally Uniform Sea Surface Temperature and Solar Insolation: An Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chen, Baode; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    It has been known for more than a decade that an aqua-planet model with globally uniform sea surface temperature and solar insolation angle can generate ITCZ (intertropical convergence zone). Previous studies have shown that the ITCZ under such model settings can be changed between a single ITCZ over the equator and a double ITCZ straddling the equator through one of several measures. These measures include switching to a different cumulus parameterization scheme, changes within the cumulus parameterization scheme, and changes in other aspects of the model design such as horizontal resolution. In this paper an interpretation for these findings is offered. The latitudinal location of the ITCZ is the latitude where the balance of two types of attraction on the ITCZ, both due to earth's rotation, exists. The first type is equator-ward and is directly related to the earth's rotation and thus not sensitive to model design changes. The second type is poleward and is related to the convective circulation and thus is sensitive to model design changes. Due to the shape of the attractors, the balance of the two types of attractions is reached either at the equator or more than 10 degrees away from the equator. The former case results in a single ITCZ over the equator and the latter case a double ITCZ straddling the equator.

  11. The solar hydrogen from sea water using Cu/TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Baraniruben A./l.; Kait, Chong Fai; Bustam, M. Azmi; Nurlaela, Ela

    2012-09-01

    H2 production from water under visible light radiation has great potential for sustainable energy supply. The incorporation of 10 wt% Cu onto TiO2 via precipitation method in the presence of glycerol, followed by activation at 180°C and 200°C, was investigated for H2 production from sea water under visible light radiation. The photocatalysts were also characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), powder X-Ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectrophotometry (DR-UV-Vis). Results indicated that photocatalyst calcined at 180°C for 30 min displayed the best performance for H2 production (9.1 mL) compared to TiO2 which produced merely 4.4 mL H2. The bandgap energy of this photocatalyst was lower (3.10 eV) compare to that for TiO2 (3.16 eV). Details of the synthesis procedure, photocatalysts characterization, and photoreaction are presented in this paper.

  12. Solar PAR and UVR modify the community composition and photosynthetic activity of sea ice algae.

    PubMed

    Enberg, Sara; Piiparinen, Jonna; Majaneva, Markus; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Autio, Riitta; Rintala, Janne-Markus

    2015-10-01

    The effects of increased photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on species diversity, biomass and photosynthetic activity were studied in fast ice algal communities. The experimental set-up consisted of nine 1.44 m(2) squares with three treatments: untreated with natural snow cover (UNT), snow-free (PAR + UVR) and snow-free ice covered with a UV screen (PAR). The total algal biomass, dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates, increased in all treatments during the experiment. However, the smaller biomass growth in the top 10-cm layer of the PAR + UVR treatment compared with the PAR treatment indicated the negative effect of UVR. Scrippsiella complex (mainly Scrippsiella hangoei, Biecheleria baltica and Gymnodinium corollarium) showed UV sensitivity in the top 5-cm layer, whereas Heterocapsa arctica ssp. frigida and green algae showed sensitivity to both PAR and UVR. The photosynthetic activity was highest in the top 5-cm layer of the PAR treatment, where the biomass of the pennate diatom Nitzschia frigida increased, indicating the UV sensitivity of this species. This study shows that UVR is one of the controlling factors of algal communities in Baltic Sea ice, and that increased availability of PAR together with UVR exclusion can cause changes in algal biomass, photosynthetic activity and community composition.

  13. Solar PAR and UVR modify the community composition and photosynthetic activity of sea ice algae.

    PubMed

    Enberg, Sara; Piiparinen, Jonna; Majaneva, Markus; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Autio, Riitta; Rintala, Janne-Markus

    2015-10-01

    The effects of increased photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on species diversity, biomass and photosynthetic activity were studied in fast ice algal communities. The experimental set-up consisted of nine 1.44 m(2) squares with three treatments: untreated with natural snow cover (UNT), snow-free (PAR + UVR) and snow-free ice covered with a UV screen (PAR). The total algal biomass, dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates, increased in all treatments during the experiment. However, the smaller biomass growth in the top 10-cm layer of the PAR + UVR treatment compared with the PAR treatment indicated the negative effect of UVR. Scrippsiella complex (mainly Scrippsiella hangoei, Biecheleria baltica and Gymnodinium corollarium) showed UV sensitivity in the top 5-cm layer, whereas Heterocapsa arctica ssp. frigida and green algae showed sensitivity to both PAR and UVR. The photosynthetic activity was highest in the top 5-cm layer of the PAR treatment, where the biomass of the pennate diatom Nitzschia frigida increased, indicating the UV sensitivity of this species. This study shows that UVR is one of the controlling factors of algal communities in Baltic Sea ice, and that increased availability of PAR together with UVR exclusion can cause changes in algal biomass, photosynthetic activity and community composition. PMID:26310455

  14. Fault zone characteristics and basin complexity in the southern Salton Trough, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persaud, Patricia; Ma, Yiran; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Fuis, Gary S.; Han, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing oblique slip at the Pacific–North America plate boundary in the Salton Trough produced the Imperial Valley (California, USA), a seismically active area with deformation distributed across a complex network of exposed and buried faults. To better understand the shallow crustal structure in this region and the connectivity of faults and seismicity lineaments, we used data primarily from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project to construct a three-dimensional P-wave velocity model down to 8 km depth and a velocity profile to 15 km depth, both at 1 km grid spacing. A VP = 5.65–5.85 km/s layer of possibly metamorphosed sediments within, and crystalline basement outside, the valley is locally as thick as 5 km, but is thickest and deepest in fault zones and near seismicity lineaments, suggesting a causative relationship between the low velocities and faulting. Both seismicity lineaments and surface faults control the structural architecture of the western part of the larger wedge-shaped basin, where two deep subbasins are located. We estimate basement depths, and show that high velocities at shallow depths and possible basement highs characterize the geothermal areas.

  15. The measurement and analysis of normal incidence solar UVB radiation and its application to the photoclimatherapy protocol for psoriasis at the Dead Sea, Israel.

    PubMed

    Kudish, Avraham I; Harari, Marco; Evseev, Efim G

    2011-01-01

    The broad-band normal incidence UVB beam radiation has been measured at Neve Zohar, Dead Sea basin, using a prototype tracking instrument composed of a Model 501A UV-Biometer mounted on an Eppley Solar Tracker Model St-1. The diffuse and beam fraction of the solar global UVB radiation have been determined using the concurrently measured solar global UVB radiation. The diffuse fraction was observed to exceed 80% throughout the year. The application of the results of these measurements to the possible revision of the photoclimatherapy protocol for psoriasis patients at the Dead Sea medical spas is now under investigation. The suggested revision would enable the sun-exposure treatment protocol to take advantage of the very high diffuse fraction by allowing the patient to receive the daily dose of UVB radiation without direct exposure to the sun, viz. receive the diffuse UVB radiation under a sunshade. This would require an increase in sun-exposure time intervals, as the UVB radiation intensity beneath a sunshade is less than that on an exposed surface. PMID:21091490

  16. Early Pliocene Hiatus in Sand Output by the Colorado River: Evidence From Marine Deposits in the Salton Trough, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, R. J.; Bykerk-Kauffman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Early Pliocene deposits in the western Salton Trough preserve a high-fidelity record of sediment dispersal into the marine realm during initiation and early evolution of the Colorado River (CR). Grain-size fractionation, sediment routing, and transport dynamics of the early CR delta are recorded in sediments of the Fish Creek - Vallecito basin, which was located ~100 km south of Yuma along the transform plate boundary at 5 Ma. Early Pliocene delivery of CR sand to the basin took place in two distinct pulses: (1) deposition of sandy turbidites (Wind Caves Mbr of the Latrania Fm) in a restricted submarine canyon at Split Mt Gorge between ~5.3 and 5.1 Ma; and (2) progradation of a thick, widespread, coarsening-up deltaic sequence of marine mudstone, sandstone, and coquinas (Deguynos Fm) between ~4.8 and 4.2 Ma. Estimated flux of CR sediment during Wind Caves deposition was weak (~3-5 Mt/yr) compared to the long-term average (172±64 Mt/yr). The two pulses of CR sand input are separated by the Coyote Clay (CC, ~5.1-4.8 Ma), a regionally correlable, greenish-yellow-weathering marine claystone unit at the base of the Deguynos Fm. CC gradationally overlies Wind Caves turbidites in the area of the paleocanyon. In contrast, in the Coyote Mts 15-23 km to the south and SE, CC rests on coarse-grained locally-derived late Miocene sedimentary rocks, Alverson volcanics, and metamorphic basement rock along a regional unconformity. Identical claystone facies occur in the NW Indio Hills (restores to Yuma at the mouth of the CR at 5 Ma), and Sierra Cucapa in Mexico (~200 km south of Yuma at 5 Ma). Marine localities outside of the Wind Caves paleocanyon experienced slow to negligible sedimentation along a rugged rocky shoreline until abrupt arrival of CR-derived clay. CC accumulated in a sand-starved, pro-delta marine setting (Winker, 1987) over an inferred N-S distance of ~200 km. We therefore reject an alternate hypothesis that CC accumulated on the muddy slope of the prograding CR

  17. MATISSE-v2.0 infrared sea images: sensitivity analysis and experimental validation using MIRAMER campaign measurements in solar glint configurations.

    PubMed

    Fauqueux, Sandrine

    2013-08-20

    The validation of the multiresolution model of sea radiance in the infrared, developed at Onera, is investigated by comparison with measurements obtained during the MIRAMER campaign that took place in May 2008 in the Mediterranean Sea. The sea radiance model and optical properties are expressed and the experimental setup of the campaign is briefly presented. We focus on solar glint measurements collected on the 22nd of May at 5 h 59 m 50 s in the mid-wave IR (3.93-4.14 μm) band and the long-wave IR (8.19-8.96 μm) band onboard the research vessel (R/V) Atalante at a grazing observational angle. A sensitivity analysis of glitter radiance on atmospheric and aerosol profiles, as well as sea temperature and wind speed in the vicinity of the measured contextual parameters, is presented. Modeled and measured images are compared and results are delved into further by comparisons of histograms, averaged vertical and horizontal profiles. Errors in the 3.93-4.14 μm band are under those potentially due to calibration, whereas discrepancies are noticed in the 8.19-8.96 μm band, where the deepest analysis has to be performed.

  18. The effect of spatially variable surfaces on PAR transmission, solar heating and primary production under first-year sea ice during advanced stages of melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossnagel, A.; Barber, D. G.; Mundy, C. J.; Ehn, J.; Gosselin, M.

    2009-12-01

    Melt ponds greatly increase the transmission of solar radiation through sea ice relative to snow covered or bare ice. This rise in transmitted irradiance has the potential to enhance solar heating of the underlying ocean and to increase water column primary production. In this paper we examine how a spatially variable melt pond-covered sea ice surface controls the under-ice light field of transmitted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and provide estimates of solar heating and primary production during this period. Data for this study were collected as part of the International Polar Year-Circumpolar Flaw Lead system study between 2 to 27 June 2008 in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. Conductivity, temperature, depth and PAR profiles were collected under a variety of drained white ice through to deep melt pond surfaces to a depth of 60 m. Melt pond depths and ice thickness ranged from 4 to 30 cm and 90 to 160 cm, respectively. The under-ice light field up to a depth of 12 m was highly variable, controlled by both increased transmission under melt ponds and shading by drained white ice patches between the ponds. Below 12 m, the light field became relatively homogeneous showing the depth to which the spatial heterogeneity of the surface had an effect on the transmitted PAR irradiance. This variable light field influenced the calculation of the attenuation coefficient (Kd) rendering it impossible to accurately estimate this apparent optical property from a single PAR profile. Therefore spatial variations in the ice properties and transmission have little effect on the light field below about 10-15m.

  19. Changes in summer sea ice, albedo, and portioning of surface solar radiation in the Pacific sector of Arctic Ocean during 1982-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ruibo; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Leppäranta, Matti; Wang, Jia; Kaleschke, Lars; Zhang, Zhanhai

    2016-08-01

    SSM/I sea ice concentration and CLARA black-sky composite albedo were used to estimate sea ice albedo in the region 70°N-82°N, 130°W-180°W. The long-term trends and seasonal evolutions of ice concentration, composite albedo, and ice albedo were then obtained. In July-August 1982-2009, the linear trend of the composite albedo and the ice albedo was -0.069 and -0.046 units per decade, respectively. During 1 June to 19 August, melting of sea ice resulted in an increase of solar heat input to the ice-ocean system by 282 MJ·m-2 from 1982 to 2009. However, because of the counter-balancing effects of the loss of sea ice area and the enhanced ice surface melting, the trend of solar heat input to the ice was insignificant. The summer evolution of ice albedo matched the ice surface melting and ponding well at basin scale. The ice albedo showed a large difference between the multiyear and first-year ice because the latter melted completely by the end of a melt season. At the SHEBA geolocations, a distinct change in the ice albedo has occurred since 2007, because most of the multiyear ice has been replaced by first-year ice. A positive polarity in the Arctic Dipole Anomaly could be partly responsible for the rapid loss of summer ice within the study region in the recent years by bringing warmer air masses from the south and advecting more ice toward the north. Both these effects would enhance ice-albedo feedback.

  20. Geothermal resources of rifts: A comparison of the rio grande rift and the salton trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanberg, Chandler A.

    1983-05-01

    The Rio Grande Rift and the Salton Trough are the best developed rift systems in the United States and both share many features common to rifts in general, including geothermal resources. These two rifts have different tectonic and magmatic histories, however, and these differences are reflected in the nature of their geothermal resources. The Salton Trough is a well developed and successful rift. It is the landward extension of the Gulf of California spreading center, which has separated Baja, California, from the remainder of Mexico. Quaternary silicic magmatization has occurred and several of the geothermal resources are associated with recent rhyolitic intrusions. Such resources tend to be high temperature (> 200°C). Greenschist facies metamorphism has been observed in several of the geothermal wells. Localized upper crustal melting is a distinct possibility and there is increasing speculation that very high temperature (> 300°C) geothermal fluids may underlie a large portion of the central trough at depths in excess of 4 km. Low temperature geothermal resources associated with shallow hydrothermal convection are less common and tend to be located on the flanks of the trough or in the Coachella Valley to the north of the zone of active rifting. In contrast, the Rio Grande Rift is less well developed. Recent volcanism consists primarily of mantle-derived basalts, which have not had sufficient residence time within the crust to generate significant crustal melting. The geothermal resources within the Rio Grande Rift do not correlate well with these young basalts. Rather, the quantity of geothermal resources are low temperature (< 100°C) and result from forced hydrothermal convection which discharges at constrictions within or at the end of the major sedimentary basins. High temperature resources are less common and the only discovered example is the Valles Caldera of northern New Mexico ( T = 250-300°C). The deep interiors of the sedimentary basins of the Rio

  1. Limited effectiveness of solar radiation management geoengineering in preventing sea-level rise from the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Patrick; Keller, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) is an important contributor to present-day sea level rise, and the ice sheet's importance for sea level rise will likely increase with Arctic temperatures. Some scientists have recently suggested that geoengineering, the deliberate management of Earth's climate, could prevent sea level rise from the ice sheets. Previous efforts to assess geoengineering's effects on the GIS and sea level rise have broken important new ground, but neglect key feedbacks and/or are silent on the short-term effects of geoengineering that are perhaps most important for decision-making. Here, we use a simplified, three-dimensional model of the GIS (SICOPOLIS by Ralf Greve) to examine the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet under plausible geoengineering scenarios. We find that i) the GIS generally continues to melt over the first 100 yr after geoengineering initiation; ii) reductions in GIS sea level contributions over these first 100 yr are small; and iii) there is a delay of decades to centuries between the initiation of aggressive geoengineering and any regrowth of the ice sheet, and the rate of this regrowth is slow. However, geoengineering produces appreciable reductions in the rate of sea level rise contributions from the GIS within the first few decades. Our results suggest that past studies have overestimated the effectiveness of geoengineering in preventing mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet and in reversing sea level rise once it has occurred. We comment on the importance of feedbacks in the ice sheet system in assessing geoengineering's effectiveness in reducing sea level rise from the GIS.

  2. Ambient Noise Tomography of Southern California Images Dipping San Andreas-Parallel Structure and Low-Velocity Salton Trough Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, S.; Klemperer, S. L.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography (ANT) images the entire crust but does not depend on the spatial and temporal distribution of events. Our ANT high-resolution 3D velocity model of southern California uses 849 broadband stations, vastly more than previous studies, and four years of data, 1997-1998, 2007, and 2011, chosen to include our own broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project, a 40-station transect across the Salton Trough, as well as other campaign stations in both Mexico and the U.S.A., and permanent stations. Our shear-wave model has 0.05° x 0.05° lateral and 1 km vertical blocks. We used the Harvard Community Velocity Model (CVM-H) as the initial model for the inversion. We show significant differences relative to the CVM-H model, especially in the lower crust and upper mantle. We observe prominent low-velocity anomalies in the upper mantle under the Salton Buttes and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields, indicating high-temperatures and possibly partial-melt. Similar low-velocity zones have been previously observed along the Gulf of California. We also observe vertical to gradually dipping lateral velocity contrasts in the lower crust under the southern part of the San Andreas Fault. The east to northeast dip may represent crustal fabric sheared by movement of the Pacific plate under the North American plate prior to the initiation of transform motion.

  3. Geometry Of The San Andreas Fault In The Salton Trough And Its Effect On Simulated Shaking For A Rupture Similar To That Of The Great California Shakeout Of 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, G. S.; Bauer, K.; Graves, R. W.; Aagaard, B.; Catchings, R.; Goldman, M.; Hole, J. A.; Langenheim, V. E.; Ryberg, T.; Rymer, M. J.; Scheirer, D. S.; Stock, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The southernmost San Andreas fault (SAF) zone, in the northern Salton Trough, is considered likely to produce a large-magnitude, damaging earthquake in the near future (Jones et al., 2008, USGS OFR). The geometry of the SAF and adjacent sedimentary basins will strongly influence energy radiation and strong ground motion during a future rupture. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was undertaken, in part, to provide more accurate information on SAF and basin geometry in this region. We report interpretations of seismic profiles in the Salton Trough (Lines 4-7). Lines 4 through 6 are SW-NE fault-perpendicular profiles that cross the Coachella Valley and extend into the mountain ranges on either side. Line 7 crosses the Salton Sea and sedimentary basin deposits similar to those of the Coachella Valley to the north. On three lines (4, 6, 7), seismic imaging, potential-field studies, and (or) earthquake hypocentral relocations provide evidence that active strands of the SAF dip moderately NE. Importantly, on Line 4, we have obtained a reflection image of the SAF zone, in the depth range of 5-10 km, that coincides with the microearthquake pattern here (Hauksson et al., 2012, BSSA). We interpret a moderate northeast dip (~60 deg.) for the SAF, as previously reported by Fuis et al. (2012, BSSA). We used a 3D finite-difference wave propagation method to model shaking in southern California expected from rupture on the SAF with the propeller-shaped geometry reported by Fuis et al. (2012), and we have compared this shaking to that modeled from the generally vertical geometry used in the Great California ShakeOut (Jones et al., 2008). Our results were obtained by projecting the kinematic 2008 ShakeOut rupture onto the newly characterized, dipping SAF geometry. We estimate higher levels of shaking on the hanging wall of the SAF (to the NE) and lower levels on the footwall (to the SW), as compared to the 2008 estimates. The change in ground motion level for most shaking

  4. How effective is albedo modification (solar radiation management geoengineering) in preventing sea-level rise from the Greenland Ice Sheet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Patrick J.; Keller, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Albedo modification (AM) is sometimes characterized as a potential means of avoiding climate threshold responses, including large-scale ice sheet mass loss. Previous work has investigated the effects of AM on total sea-level rise over the present century, as well as AM’s ability to reduce long-term (≫103 yr) contributions to sea-level rise from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS). These studies have broken new ground, but neglect important feedbacks in the GIS system, or are silent on AM’s effectiveness over the short time scales that may be most relevant for decision-making (<103 yr). Here, we assess AM’s ability to reduce GIS sea-level contributions over decades to centuries, using a simplified ice sheet model. We drive this model using a business-as-usual base temperature forcing scenario, as well as scenarios that reflect AM-induced temperature stabilization or temperature drawdown. Our model results suggest that (i) AM produces substantial near-term reductions in the rate of GIS-driven sea-level rise. However, (ii) sea-level rise contributions from the GIS continue after AM begins. These continued sea level rise contributions persist for decades to centuries after temperature stabilization and temperature drawdown begin, unless AM begins in the next few decades. Moreover, (iii) any regrowth of the GIS is delayed by decades or centuries after temperature drawdown begins, and is slow compared to pre-AM rates of mass loss. Combined with recent work that suggests AM would not prevent mass loss from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, our results provide a nuanced picture of AM’s possible effects on future sea-level rise.

  5. The roles of vertical mixing, solar radiation, and wind stress in a model simulation of the sea surface temperature seasonal cycle in the tropical Pacfic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dake; Busalacchi, Antonio J.; Rothstein, Lewis M.

    1994-01-01

    The climatological seasonal cycle of sea surface temperature (SST) in the tropical Pacific is simulated using a newly developed upper ocean model. The roles of vertical mixing, solar radiation, and wind stress are investigated in a hierarchy of numerical experiments with various combinations of vertical mixing algorithms and surface-forcing products. It is found that the large SST annual cycle in the eastern equatorial Pacific is, to a large extent, controlled by the annually varying mixed layer depth which, in turn, is mainly determined by the competing effects of solar radiation and wind forcing. With the application of our hybrid vertical mixing scheme the model-simulated SST annual cycle is much improved in both amplitude and phase as compared to the case of a constant mixed layer depth. Beside the strong effects on vertical mixing, solar radiation is the primary heating term in the surface layer heat budget, and wind forcing influences SST by driving oceanic advective processes that redistribute heat in the upper ocean. For example, the SST seasonal cycle in the western Pacific basically follows the semiannual variation of solar heating, and the cycle in the central equatorial region is significantly affected by the zonal advective heat flux associated with the seasonally reversing South Equatorial Current. It has been shown in our experiments that the amount of heat flux modification needed to eliminate the annual mean SST errors in the model is, on average, no larger than the annual mean uncertainties among the various surface flux products used in this study. Whereas a bias correction is needed to account for remaining uncertainties in the annual mean heat flux, this study demonstrates that with proper treatment of mixed layer physics and realistic forcing functions the seasonal variability of SST is capable of being simulated successfully in response to external forcing without relying on a relaxation or damping formulation for the dominant surface heat

  6. Evolution of Rotations in the Fish Creek Vallecito Basin, Western Salton Trough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housen, B. A.; Dorsey, R. J.; Janecke, S. U.; Axen, G. J.

    2006-12-01

    Rocks in the Western Salton Trough region record the history of slip on the transtensional West Salton detachment fault and initiation of younger strike-slip faults in this plate boundary zone. Spatial and temporal patterns of vertical axis rotations as determined by paleomagnetism can be used to provide valuable constraints on the structural-tectonic evolution of this area. Prior work includes the magnetostratigraphy of Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary rocks in the Fish Creek-Vallecito Basin (FCVB) (Opdyke et al., 1977; Johnson et al., 1983), who found that these rocks contain a complete record of geomagnetic field reversals spanning Pliocene-Pleistocene time. Johnson et al. (1983) also concluded that the FCVB had undergone 35° of CW rotation during the past 0.9 Ma. We resampled and reanalyzed their section, and sampled additional sedimentary and plutonic rocks in the Western Salton Trough in order to better document the history of vertical axis rotation recorded by these rocks. Results from 29 sites in the FCVB have well-defined magnetizations with two components. The first removed component in all samples is unblocked between 90 and 220 °C, and the second-removed components are unblocked between 300 and 590 °C. The second-removed components have either normal or reversed polarity. Sites from the Diablo Fm are predominantly reversed and have a mean of D = 204, I = -48.3, k = 37, α95 = 12.7°, N = 5. Sites from the middle of the section (Olla and Tapiado Fms) are predominantly normal and have a mean of D = 8.1, I = 48, k = 32, α95= 8.7°, N = 10. Sites from the upper portion of the section (Hueso Fm) have predominantly reversed polarity with means of D = 179.6, I = -43.4, k = 82, α95 = 10.2°, N = 4. Results from weakly-magnetized and deformed rocks of the La Posta pluton, on the south side of Whale Peak, have well-defined magnetizations with a group mean direction of D = 16.3, I = 37.3, k = 44, α95 = 7.4°, N = 10. The stratigraphic distribution of declination

  7. Sea grass like arranged TiO2 nanorods sensitized by natural dyes for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akila, Y.; Muthukumarasamy, N.; Agilan, S.; Senthilarasu, S.; Velauthapillai, Dhayalan

    2016-08-01

    Rutile-phase seagrass-like-arranged TiO2 nanorods have been synthesized by low-temperature template-free hydrothermal method. These TiO2 nanorods have been sensitized by flowers of Sesbania grandiflora, leaves of Camellia sinensis and roots of Rubia tinctorum. The sensitized TiO2 nanorods-based films have been used as photoanode in natural dye-sensitized solar cells. The films were photoelectrochemically active, and the fabricated solar cells had short-circuit photocurrent density (JSC) lying in the range of 3.7-4.7mAcm-2. The efficiency of the fabricated natural dye-sensitized solar cells was found to lie in the range of 0.6-1.036 %, respectively

  8. Shallow hydrothermal regime of the East Brawley and Glamis known geothermal resource areas, Salton Trough, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mase, C.W.; Sass, J.H.; Brook, C.A.; Munroe, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradients and thermal conductivities were obtained in real time using an in situ heat-flow technique in 15 shallow (90 to 150 m) wells drilled between Brawley and Glamis in the Imperial Valley, Southern California. The in situ measurements were supplemented by follow-up conventional temperature logs in seven of the wells and by laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity on drill cuttings. The deltaic sedimentary material comprising the upper approx. 100 m of the Salton Trough generally is poorly sorted and high in quartz resulting in quite high thermal conductivities (averaging 2.0 Wm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ as opposed to 1.2 to 1.7 for typical alluvium). A broad heat-flow anomaly with maximum of about 200 mWm/sup -2/ (approx. 5 HFU) is centered between Glamis and East Brawley and is superimposed on a regional heat-flow high in excess of 100 mWm/sup -2/ (> 2.5 HFU). The heat-flow high corresponds with a gravity maximum and partially with a minimum in electrical resistivity, suggesting the presence of a hydrothermal system at depth in this area.

  9. Faults on Skylab imagery of the Salton Trough area, Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M.; Lamar, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Large segments of the major high angle faults in the Salton Trough area are readily identifiable in Skylab images. Along active faults, distinctive topographic features such as scarps and offset drainage, and vegetation differences due to ground water blockage in alluvium are visible. Other fault-controlled features along inactive as well as active faults visible in Skylab photography include straight mountain fronts, linear valleys, and lithologic differences producing contrasting tone, color or texture. A northwestern extension of a fault in the San Andreas set, is postulated by the regional alignment of possible fault-controlled features. The suspected fault is covered by Holocene deposits, principally windblown sand. A northwest trending tonal change in cultivated fields across Mexicali Valley is visible on Skylab photos. Surface evidence for faulting was not observed; however, the linear may be caused by differences in soil conditions along an extension of a segment of the San Jacinto fault zone. No evidence of faulting could be found along linears which appear as possible extensions of the Substation and Victory Pass faults, demonstrating that the interpretation of linears as faults in small scale photography must be corroborated by field investigations.

  10. Differential impacts of solar UV radiation on photosynthetic carbon fixation from the coastal to offshore surface waters in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Kunshan; Gao, Guang

    2011-01-01

    We carried out experiments during an expedition (14 August to 14 September, 2007) that covered up to 250,000 km(2) to investigate the effects of solar UV radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm) on the photosynthetic carbon fixation of tropical phytoplankton assemblages in surface seawater of the South China Sea. From coastal to pelagic surface seawaters, UV-B (280-315 nm) caused similar inhibition, while UV-A (315-400 nm) induced photosynthetic inhibition increased from coastal to offshore waters. UV-B resulted in an inhibition by up to 27% and UV-A by up to 29%. Under reduced levels of solar radiation with heavy overcast, UV-A resulted in enhanced photosynthetic carbon fixation by up to 25% in coastal waters where microplankton was abundant. However, such a positive impact was not observed in the offshore waters where piconanoplankton was more abundant. The daily integrated inhibition of UV-A reached 4.3% and 13.2%, and that of UV-B reached 16.5% and 13.5%, in the coastal and offshore waters, respectively.

  11. Episodic Holocene eruption of the Salton Buttes rhyolites, California, from paleomagnetic, U-Th, and Ar/Ar dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Champion, Duane E.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Stelten, Mark E.; Cooper, Kari M.; Herzig, Charles; Schriener Jr., Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In the Salton Trough, CA, five rhyolite domes form the Salton Buttes: Mullet Island, Obsidian Butte, Rock Hill, North and South Red Hill, from oldest to youngest. Results presented here include 40Ar/39Ar anorthoclase ages, 238U-230Th zircon crystallization ages, and comparison of remanent paleomagnetic directions with the secular variation curve, which indicate that all domes are Holocene. 238U-230Th zircon crystallization ages are more precise than but within uncertainty of 40Ar/39Ar anorthoclase ages, suggesting that zircon crystallization proceeded until shortly before eruption in all cases except one. Remanent paleomagnetic directions require three eruption periods: (1) Mullet Island, (2) Obsidian Butte, and (3) Rock Hill, North Red Hill, and South Red Hill. Borehole cuttings logs document up to two shallow tephra layers. North and South Red Hills likely erupted within 100 years of each other, with a combined 238U-230Th zircon isochron age of: 2.83 ± 0.60 ka (2 sigma); paleomagnetic evidence suggests this age predates eruption by hundreds of years (1800 cal BP). Rock Hill erupted closely in time to these eruptions. The Obsidian Butte 238U-230Th isochron age (2.86 ± 0.96 ka) is nearly identical to the combined Red Hill age, but its Virtual Geomagnetic Pole position suggests a slightly older age. The age of aphyric Mullet Island dome is the least well constrained: zircon crystals are resorbed and the paleomagnetic direction is most distinct; possible Mullet Island ages include ca. 2300, 5900, 6900, and 7700 cal BP. Our results constrain the duration of Salton Buttes volcanism to between ca. 5900 and 500 years.

  12. Episodic Holocene eruption of the Salton Buttes rhyolites, California, from paleomagnetic, U-Th, and Ar/Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Heather M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Champion, Duane E.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Stelten, Mark; Cooper, Kari M.; Herzig, Charles; Schriener, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    In the Salton Trough, CA, five rhyolite domes form the Salton Buttes: Mullet Island, Obsidian Butte, Rock Hill, North and South Red Hill, from oldest to youngest. Results presented here include 40Ar/39Ar anorthoclase ages, 238U-230Th zircon crystallization ages, and comparison of remanent paleomagnetic directions with the secular variation curve, which indicate that all domes are Holocene. 238U-230Th zircon crystallization ages are more precise than but within uncertainty of 40Ar/39Ar anorthoclase ages, suggesting that zircon crystallization proceeded until shortly before eruption in all cases except one. Remanent paleomagnetic directions require three eruption periods: (1) Mullet Island, (2) Obsidian Butte, and (3) Rock Hill, North Red Hill, and South Red Hill. Borehole cuttings logs document up to two shallow tephra layers. North and South Red Hills likely erupted within 100 years of each other, with a combined 238U-230Th zircon isochron age of: 2.83 ± 0.60 ka (2 sigma); paleomagnetic evidence suggests this age predates eruption by hundreds of years (1800 cal BP). Rock Hill erupted closely in time to these eruptions. The Obsidian Butte 238U-230Th isochron age (2.86 ± 0.96 ka) is nearly identical to the combined Red Hill age, but its Virtual Geomagnetic Pole position suggests a slightly older age. The age of aphyric Mullet Island dome is the least well constrained: zircon crystals are resorbed and the paleomagnetic direction is most distinct; possible Mullet Island ages include ca. 2300, 5900, 6900, and 7700 cal BP. Our results constrain the duration of Salton Buttes volcanism to between ca. 5900 and 500 years.

  13. Development of the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS Low Latency Salton Trough Radio Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, C.; Miller, S.; Wilson, B.; Lawrence, S.; Arnitz, E.

    2008-05-01

    UNAVCO is developing a 20 GPS station low latency radio network that spans the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults in the region of highest strain in southern California and the narrowest part of the North America-Pacific plate boundary. The Salton Trough Radio Network (STRN) is instrumented with Ethernet bridge Intuicom EB6+ (900 MHz) radios to transmit a high rate low latency data stream from each permanent GPS site for the purpose of the following: 1) telemeter 15 second data (1 MB/day/station) to the Plate Boundary Observatory archive, 2) accommodate the timely download of 1 and 5 sample per second data following large earthquakes (4 MB/hour/station), and 3) test the UStream of 1Hz BINEX and RTCM data. Three of four phases have been completed. Office radio testing yielded transfer rates of 30-50 KB/s with subsecond latency while streaming 1 Hz data. Latency climbed to ~1.8 seconds while simultaneously streaming 1 Hz and downloading hourly 1 and 5 sample per second data files. Field testing demonstrated rates on the order of 30 KB/s. At present the radios are installed and have transfer rates of 10-40 KB/s between sites that span 10-32 km. The final phase will be the installation of the main telemetry relay where master radios will be connected to a high speed ISP near the town of Brawley. The high-rate low latency UStream data will be available to researchers who are developing prototype earthquake early warning systems in Southern California. A goal of the STRN is to make the data available rapidly enough for GPS-derived coseismic and dynamic displacements to be integrated into early warning system earthquake models. The improved earthquake models will better assist emergency response. UStream data will also aid surveyors who wish to use PBO GPS stations as permanent, high-quality base stations in real-time kinematic surveys.

  14. Solar-, monsoon- and Kuroshio-influenced thermocline depth and sea surface salinity in the southern Okinawa Trough during the past 17,300 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Li, Jun; Zhao, Jingtao; Wei, Helong; Hu, Bangqi; Dou, Yanguang; Sun, Zhilei; Zou, Liang; Bai, Fenglong

    2016-08-01

    Factors influencing millennial-scale variability in the thermocline depth (vertical mixing) and sea surface salinity (SSS) of the southern Okinawa Trough (OT) during the past 17,300 years were investigated based on foraminifer oxygen isotope records of the surface dweller Globigerinoides ruber sensu stricto and the thermocline dweller Pulleniatina obliquiloculata in the AMS 14C dated OKT-3 core. The thermocline depth is influenced by surface thermal buoyancy (heat) flux, in turn controlled by the annual mean insolation at 30°N and the strength of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM). Strong insolation and weak EAWM tend to increase buoyancy gain (decrease buoyancy loss), corresponding to shallow thermocline depths, and vice versa. Regional SSS is influenced by the global ice volume, the Kuroshio Current (KC), and vertical mixing. A deep thermocline coincides with a high SSS because strong vertical mixing brings more, saltier subsurface KC water to the surface, and vice versa. Local SSS (excluding the global ice volume effect) became lower in the northern OT than in the southern OT after ~9.2 ka, implying that Changjiang diluted water had stronger influence in the northern sector. SSS show no major changes during the Bølling/Allerød and Younger Dryas events, probably because the KC disturbed the North Atlantic signals. This argues against earlier interpretations of sea surface temperature records of this core. Wavelet and spectral analyses of the Δδ18OP-G (δ18O of P. obliquiloculata minus G. ruber s.s.) and δ18Olocal records display 1,540-, 1,480-, 1,050-, 860-, 640-, and 630-year periods. These are consistent with published evidence of a pervasive periodicity of 1,500 years in global climate as well as EAWM and KC signatures, and a fundamental solar periodicity of 1,000 years and intermediary derived periodicity of 700 years.

  15. Relationship of photosynthetic carbon fixation with environmental changes in the Jiulong River estuary of the South China Sea, with special reference to the effects of solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Kunshan; Yuan, Dongxing; Zheng, Ying; Yang, Guiyuan

    2011-08-01

    Phytoplankton cells in estuary waters usually experience drastic changes in chemical and physical environments due to mixing of fresh and seawaters. In order to see their photosynthetic performance in such dynamic waters, we measured the photosynthetic carbon fixation by natural phytoplankton assemblages in the Jiulong River estuary of the South China Sea during April 24-26 and July 24-26 of 2008, and investigated its relationship with environmental changes in the presence or the absence of UV radiation. Phytoplankton biomass (Chl a) decreased sharply from the river-mouth to seawards (17.3-2.1 μg L(-1)), with the dominant species changed from chlorophytes to diatoms. The photosynthetic rate based on Chl a at noon time under PAR-alone increased from 1.9 μg C (μg Chl a)(-1) L(-1) in low salinity zone (SSS<10) to 12.4 μg C (μg Chl a)(-1) L(-1) in turbidity front (SSS within 10-20), and then decreased to 2.1 μg C (μg Chl a)(-1) L(-1) in mixohaline zone (SSS>20); accordingly, the carbon fixation per volume of seawater increased from 12.8 to 149 μg C L(-1) h(-1), and decreased to 14.3 μg C L(-1) h(-1). Solar UVR caused the inhibition of carbon fixation in surface water of all the investigated zones, by 39% in turbidity area and 7-10% in freshwater or mixohaline zones. In the turbidity zone, higher availability of CO2 could have enhanced the photosynthetic performance; while osmotic stress might be responsible for the higher sensitivity of phytoplankton assemblages to solar UV radiation.

  16. Imaging the San Andreas Fault between Parkfield and the Salton Sea Using Wavelet Analysis of Airborne Laser Swath Mapping Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, K.; Hilley, G. E.; Moon, S.; Saltzman, J.; Sanquini, A.

    2011-12-01

    The distribution of fault related landforms may be used to divulge the spatial and temporal evolution of fault ruptures within a fault zone. In this study, wavelet analysis was performed on high-resolution Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) topographic data to image the morphologic structure of the San Andreas Fault Zone (SAFZ) between Parkfield, CA and the US-Mexico border. ASLM data were collected by the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping as part of the B4 project and were processed these data to produce a 2-m-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The DEM tiles were imported to ArcMap, which was used to mosaic, rotate, and crop them. Matlab was used to perform a progressive filling of NODATA values within each of the tiles using an iterative nearest-neighbor averaging scheme on these data. Next, scarp-like features roughly paralleling the average trend of the SAFZ were identified using a previously developed wavelet analysis method. This method convolves the second derivative of an elongated template of a scarp-like topography with the directional curvature of the ALSM DEM that is represented by each of the tiles. In this way, the analysis recovers, in a least-squares best-fitting sense, the amplitude of a particular scarp geometry and orientation. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is then computed at each point in the ALSM DEM for a given template scarp geometry and orientation-- this process is repeated for all scarp geometries and orientations to determine those that have the highest SNR. Such scarp forms are automatically identified as the best-fitting scarp geometry, amplitude, and orientation at each point in the DEM. The geometry gives a quantitative measure of the "roundness" of the profile of the scarp form, and supposing that sharper scarps have been created more recently than those whose forms have been rounded by prolonged erosion, a relative chronology of activity of various fault strands within the fault zone can be reconstructed. With the data from Matlab, the tiles are then imported back to ArcMap for further processing. In ArcMap, the individual tiles from Matlab were mosaicked together to create a model of the swath. To complete this process, the mosaicked dataset was then rotated to mimic the orientation of the fault in the real world. The comparison of the location of the identified scarps to those that have been mapped in the field is currently being made to determine the fidelity of this method. Preliminary results indicate that this analysis reveals the locations of recently active fault ruptures, and as such, these computer-generated maps may provide valuable information about the history of rupture within the fault zone and evaluation of its seismic hazard potential.

  17. Studies of brine chemistry and scaling at the Salton Sea geothermal field, 1977-1979. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrar, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Summarized are the results of investigations of brine chemistry, the effects of brine acidification and organic additives on the rate of scale formation and scale composition, and the use of other additives for scale control. A bibliography of reports describing these studies is included. Recommendations are given for techniques and approaches for further testing of additives for silica scale control.

  18. PLATYAMOEBA PSEUDOVANNELLIDA N. SP., A NAKED AMOEBA WITH WIDE SALT TOLERANCE ISOLATED FROM THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. Geothermal alteration of sediments in the Salton Sea scientific drill hole: Petrophysical properties and mass changes during alteration: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, S.D.

    1987-12-11

    This report has been divided into two sections. The first deals with the results of the petrophysical measurements, and the second concentrates on the distribution of alteration minerals and textures, and on a series of calculations of geochemical changes that occurred during alteration. 32 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Salton Sea 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area California and Arizona: data report (abbreviated)

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, J.D.

    1980-09-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 997 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 76 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) (2) physical measurements (water temperature, well description where applicable, and scintillometer reading) and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available and (2) elemental analyses (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors are given. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for the elements listed above; U/Th and U/Hf ratios; and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included. Analyses of the sediment fraction finer than 149..mu..m show high uranium values clustered in the Eagle and Chuckwalla Mountains. High uranium values in the 420 ..mu..m to 1000 ..mu..m fraction are clustered in the McCoy Mountains. Both fractions show groups of high values in the Chocolate Mountains at the Southeastern edge of the Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range. Aerial distribution of analytical values shows that high values of many elements in both size fractions are grouped around the Eagle Mountains and the Chuckwalla Mountains. Fe, Mn, Ti, V, Sc, Hf, and the rare earth elements, all of which typically occur in high-density minerals, have higher average (log mean) concentrations in the finer fraction than in the coarser fraction.

  1. Seasonal impacts of solar UV radiation on photosynthesis of phytoplankton assemblages in the coastal waters of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaping; Gao, Kunshan; Li, Gang; Helbling, Eduardo Walter

    2010-01-01

    We carried out experiments to evaluate seasonal changes in the impacts of UV radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm) on photosynthetic carbon fixation of phytoplankton assemblages. Surface water samples were obtained in the coastal area of the South China Sea, where chlorophyll a ranged 0.72-3.82 microg L(-1). Assimilation numbers (photosynthetic carbon fixation rate per chl a) were significantly higher during summer 2005 than those in spring and winter 2004. The mean values obtained under photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were 2.83 (spring 2004), 4.35 (winter 2004) and 7.29 microg C (microg chl a)(-1) h(-1) (summer 2005), respectively. The assimilation numbers under PAR + UVR were 1.58, 2.71 and 5.28 microg C (microg chl a)(-1) h(-1), for spring, winter and summer, respectively. UVR induced less inhibition of photosynthesis during summer 2005 than during the other seasons, in spite of the higher UVR during summer. The seasonal differences in the productivity and photosynthetic response to UV were mainly due to changes in water temperature, while irradiance and vertical mixing explained >80% of the observed variability. Our data suggest that previous studies in the SCS using UV-opaque vessels might have overestimated the phytoplankton production by about 80% in spring, 61% in winter and 38% in summer.

  2. Constraints on Shallow Crustal Structure across the San Andreas Fault Zone, Coachella Valley, Southern California: Results from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, A.; Persaud, P.; Bauer, K.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Hole, J. A.; Goldman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The strong influence of basin structure and crustal heterogeneities on seismic wave propagation suggests that these factors should be included in calculations of strong ground shaking. Knowledge of the shallow subsurface is thus essential for an accurate seismic hazard estimate for the densely populated Coachella Valley, the region north of the potential M7.8 rupture near the Salton Sea. Using SSIP data, we analyzed first arrivals from nine 65-911 kg explosive shots recorded along a profile in the Coachella Valley in order to evaluate the interpretation of our 2D tomographic results and give added details on the structural complexity of the shallow crust. The line extends 37 km from the Peninsular Ranges to the Little San Bernardino Mountains crossing the major strands of the San Andreas Fault Zone. We fit traveltime curves to our picks with forward modeling ray tracing, and determined 1D P-wave velocity models for traveltime arrivals east and west of each shot, and a 2D model for the line. We also inferred the geometry of near-vertical faults from the pre-stack line migration method of Bauer et al. (2013). In general, the 1D models east of individual shots have deeper basement contacts and lower apparent velocities, ~5 km/s at 4 km depth, whereas the models west of individual shots have shallower basement and velocities up to 6 km/s at 2 km depth. Mismatches in basement depths (assuming 5-6 km/s) between individual 1D models indicate a shallowly dipping basement, deepening eastward towards the Banning Fault and shoaling abruptly farther east. An east-dipping structure in the 2D model also gives a better fit than horizontal layers. Based on high velocity zones derived from traveltimes at 9-20 km from the western end of the line, we included an offset from ~2 km to 4 km depth near the middle of the line, which significantly improved the 2D model fit. If fault-related, this offset could represent the Garnet Hill Fault if it continues southward in the subsurface.

  3. Triggered surface slips in the Salton Trough associated with the 1999 Hector Mine, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rymer, M.J.; Boatwright, J.; Seekins, L.C.; Yule, J.D.; Liu, J.

    2002-01-01

    Surface fracturing occurred along the southern San Andreas, Superstition Hills, and Imperial faults in association with the 16 October 1999 (Mw 7.1) Hector Mine earthquake, making this at least the eighth time in the past 31 years that a regional earthquake has triggered slip along faults in the Salton Trough. Fractures associated with the event formed discontinuous breaks over a 39-km-long stretch of the San Andreas fault, from the Mecca Hills southeastward to Salt Creek and Durmid Hill, a distance from the epicenter of 107 to 139 km. Sense of slip was right lateral; only locally was there a minor (~1 mm) vertical component of slip. Dextral slip ranged from 1 to 13 mm. Maximum slip values in 1999 and earlier triggered slips are most common in the central Mecca Hills. Field evidence indicates a transient opening as the Hector Mine seismic waves passed the southern San Andreas fault. Comparison of nearby strong-motion records indicates several periods of relative opening with passage of the Hector Mine seismic wave-a similar process may have contributed to the field evidence of a transient opening. Slip on the Superstition Hills fault extended at least 9 km, at a distance from the Hector Mine epicenter of about 188 to 196 km. This length of slip is a minimum value, because we saw fresh surface breakage extending farther northwest than our measurement sites. Sense of slip was right lateral; locally there was a minor (~1 mm) vertical component of slip. Dextral slip ranged from 1 to 18 mm, with the largest amounts found distributed (or skewed) away from the Hector Mine earthquake source. Slip triggered on the Superstition Hills fault commonly is skewed away from the earthquake source, most notably in 1968, 1979, and 1999. Surface slip on the Imperial fault and within the Imperial Valley extended about 22 km, representing a distance from the Hector Mine epicenter of about 204 to 226 km. Sense of slip dominantly was right lateral; the right-lateral component of slip

  4. Maribius salinus gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from a solar saltern and Maribius pelagius sp. nov., cultured from the Sargasso Sea, belonging to the Roseobacter clade.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong H; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Lanoil, Brian D; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Cho, Byung C

    2007-02-01

    Two strictly aerobic, Gram-negative bacteria, designated strains CL-SP27T and B5-6T, were isolated from the hypersaline water of a solar saltern in Korea and from the surface water of the Sargasso Sea, respectively. The two strains were rod-shaped, non-motile and grew on marine agar 2216 as beige colonies. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a clear affiliation of the novel strains to the family Rhodobacteraceae. However, the novel strains were only distantly related to members of the Roseobacter clade, forming a distinct lineage. Although the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strains CL-SP27T and B5-6T was very high (99.6 %), DNA-DNA relatedness between the strains was 48.4 %, suggesting that the strains be categorized as two genospecies. Additionally, the two novel strains could be differentiated by DNA G+C contents, fatty acid profiles, carbon source utilization patterns, antibiotic susceptibilities and biochemical characteristics. Based on taxonomic data obtained in this study, strains CL-SP27T and B5-6T represent separate species within a novel genus of the family Rhodobacteraceae, for which the names Maribius salinus gen. nov., sp. nov. (type species) and Maribius pelagius sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains of Maribius salinus and Maribius pelagius are CL-SP27T (=KCCM 42113T=JCM 13037T) and B5-6T (=KCCM 42336T=JCM 14009T), respectively.

  5. Solar energy from the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Tabata, R.S.

    1981-10-01

    Questions addressed include: what is OTEC, what could OTEC mean for the future, what are some advantages and disadvantages of OTEC, who's working on OTEC, what's happening with OTEC in Hawaii, and what are some possible environmental concerns now being studied. A list of publications, films, and information sources is included. The OTEC resource of the Pacific Ocean is mapped and the closed-cycle OTEC process is explained in elementary terms. (LEW)

  6. Heat balance in the Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, N.; Ueno, H.; Itoh, M.; Kikuchi, T.; Mizobata, K.; Watanabe, E.; Nishino, S.

    2014-12-01

    Interannual variation of heat balance in the Chukchi Sea in summer was investigated through analysis of satellite-derived sea-ice concentrations and reanalysis products during 1999-2010. The solar heat input varied from 4.3 to 8.0 × 1020 J over the Chukchi Sea defined in this study (5.9 × 105 km2). These values were larger than the heat transport from the Bering Strait ranging from 2.9 to 5.1 × 1020 J, suggesting that the Chukchi Sea was the area where the Pacific Water from the Bering Sea was strongly modified, affecting the interannual variation of the heat transport to the interior Arctic basin. Interannual variation in the latent, sensible, longwave radiation fluxes and the heat of fusion of sea ice in the Chukchi Sea are small compared with the heat transport from the Bering Strait as well as the solar heat input in the Chukchi Sea.

  7. Solar Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    ARCO Solar manufactures PV Systems tailored to a broad variety of applications. PV arrays are routinely used at remote communications installations to operate large microwave repeaters, TV and radio repeaters rural telephone, and small telemetry systems that monitor environmental conditions. Also used to power agricultural water pumping systems, to provide electricity for isolated villages and medical clinics, for corrosion protection for pipelines and bridges, to power railroad signals, air/sea navigational aids, and for many types of military systems. ARCO is now moving into large scale generation for utilities.

  8. Beaufort Sea Mesoscale Meteorology Modeling Study: Sea Breeze Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Zhang, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Beaufort Sea and its adjacent continental areas are prominent geographical features which are largely covered by sea ice on a seasonal basis over the ocean and bounded by the Brooks Range in the south on land. This complex geographical environment offers unique challenges for mesoscale meteorology modeling. Further oil development in this area requires improved understanding of the surface wind field, a crucial parameter for assessing and predicting dispersal and movement of oil spills. As thus a study has been established to investigate the mesoscale features of the surface wind field throughout this region, specifically in relation to the sea breeze and topographic effects. In this study, we focus on the sea breeze effect. Based on the analysis of observed surface winds at the weather stations along the Beaufort coast, as well as model simulations with the weather research and forecast model (WRF), we found that the sea breeze along the Beaufort Sea coast is of different from the temperate latitude. Due to the stable Arctic boundary layer (inversion), which is unfavorable for the vertical convection, the offshore flow aloft occurs at relatively low level. In addition, due to continuous solar radiation, the sea breeze along the Beaufort coast is not followed by the land breeze. However the sea breeze’s strength and horizontal extent demonstrate a diurnal variation. The wind direction shows clockwise turning from 12:00 AKST to 00:00 AKST. Sea breeze could be a dominant factor causing the wind variation along the Beaufort Sea coast.

  9. Seismic calibration shots conducted in 2009 in the Imperial Valley, southern California, for the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Janice; Goldman, Mark; Fuis, Gary; Rymer, Michael; Sickler, Robert; Miller, Summer; Butcher, Lesley; Ricketts, Jason; Criley, Coyn; Stock, Joann; Hole, John; Chavez, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of the southern section of the San Andreas Fault, from the Coachella Valley to the Mojave Desert, is believed to be the greatest natural hazard facing California in the near future. With an estimated magnitude between 7.2 and 8.1, such an event would result in violent shaking, loss of life, and disruption of lifelines (freeways, aqueducts, power, petroleum, and communication lines) that would bring much of southern California to a standstill. As part of the Nation's efforts to prevent a catastrophe of this magnitude, a number of projects are underway to increase our knowledge of Earth processes in the area and to mitigate the effects of such an event. One such project is the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), which is a collaborative venture between the United States Geological Survey (USGS), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech). This project will generate and record seismic waves that travel through the crust and upper mantle of the Salton Trough. With these data, we will construct seismic images of the subsurface, both reflection and tomographic images. These images will contribute to the earthquake-hazard assessment in southern California by helping to constrain fault locations, sedimentary basin thickness and geometry, and sedimentary seismic velocity distributions. Data acquisition is currently scheduled for winter and spring of 2011. The design and goals of SSIP resemble those of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE) of the 1990's. LARSE focused on examining the San Andreas Fault system and associated thrust-fault systems of the Transverse Ranges. LARSE was successful in constraining the geometry of the San Andreas Fault at depth and in relating this geometry to mid-crustal, flower-structure-like decollements in the Transverse Ranges that splay upward into the network of hazardous thrust faults that caused the 1971 M 6.7 San Fernando and 1987 M 5

  10. Solar neutrinos, solar flares, solar activity cycle and the proton decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raychaudhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there may be a correlation between the galactic cosmic rays and the solar neutrino data, but it appears that the neutrino flux which may be generated during the large solar cosmic ray events cannot in any way effect the solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. Only initial stage of mixing between the solar core and solar outer layers after the sunspot maximum in the solar activity cycle can explain the higher (run number 27 and 71) of solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. But solar flare induced atmospheric neutrino flux may have effect in the nucleon decay detector on the underground. The neutrino flux from solar cosmic rays may be a useful guide to understand the background of nucleon decay, magnetic monopole search, and the detection of neutrino flux in sea water experiment.

  11. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of the Red Sea was acquired on August 13, 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of algae,  Trichodesmium ...

  12. Salton Seismic Imaging Project Line 5—the San Andreas Fault and Northern Coachella Valley Structure, Riverside County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, M. J.; Fuis, G.; Catchings, R. D.; Goldman, M.; Tarnowski, J. M.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Matti, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) is a large-scale, active- and passive-source seismic project designed to image the San Andreas Fault (SAF) and the adjacent basins (Imperial and Coachella Valleys) in southern California. Here, we focus on SSIP Line 5, one of four 2-D NE-SW-oriented seismic profiles that were acquired across the Coachella Valley. The 38-km-long SSIP-Line-5 seismic profile extends from the Santa Rosa Ranges to the Little San Bernardino Mountains and crosses both strands of the SAF, the Mission Creek (MCF) and Banning (BF) strands, near Palm Desert. Data for Line 5 were generated from nine buried explosive sources (most spaced about 2 to 8 km apart) and were recorded on approximately 281 Texan seismographs (average spacing 138 m). First-arrival refractions were used to develop a refraction tomographic velocity image of the upper crust along the seismic profile. The seismic data were also stacked and migrated to develop low-fold reflection images of the crust. From the surface to about 8 km depth, P-wave velocities range from about 2 km/s to more than 7.5 km/s, with the lowest velocities within a well-defined (~2-km-deep, 15-km-wide) basin (< 4 km/s), and the highest velocities below the transition from the Coachella Valley to the Santa Rosa Ranges on the southwest and within the Little San Bernardino Mountains on the northeast. The MCF and BF strands of the SAF bound an approximately 2.5-km-wide horst-type structure on the northeastern side of the Coachella Valley, beneath which the upper crust is characterized by a pronounced low-velocity zone that extends to the bottom of the velocity image. Rocks within the low-velocity zone have significantly lower velocities than those to the northeast and the southwest at the same depths. Conversely, the velocities of rocks on both sides of the Coachella Valley are greater than 7 km/s at depths exceeding about 4 km. The relatively narrow zone of shallow high-velocity rocks between the surface traces of

  13. Paleostress analyses in the uppermost footwalls of the Whipple detachment and the West Salton detachment faults, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, A. L.; Axen, G. J.; Selverstone, J.; Michelsen, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    Low-angle normal faults (LANFs) slip while nearly perpendicular to the regional S1, presenting a mechanical paradox that may be explained by rotation of S1 toward the fault as it is approached, weak materials reducing friction and/or high pore-fluid pressure. Well-exposed LANF footwalls provide opportunities for detailed studies of weak faults. Paleostress inversions of fault-slip data coupled with structural and chemical analyses of footwall rocks are in progress on the Whipple detachment fault (WDF; >40 km Miocene slip; evolved from ductile shear zone to brittle fault) and the West Salton detachment fault (WSDF; ~10 km slip during dextral-wrench tectonism coeval with San Andreas Fault slip). Both were folding during detachment slip. Paleostress analyses indicate that both faults slipped mainly in extensional stress fields (sub-vertical S1) and in axial compression (S2 ≈ S3). Over 40% of extensional stress fields yield S1 plunging >70° relative to the detachment, but ~30% yield plunges of 40° to 60° relative to the detachment. Thus, the stress field may have been locally and/or temporarily rotated away from sub-vertical during detachment slip. About 15% of the inversions yield shortening stress fields (S1 ~horizontal) consistent with folding and/or dextral-wrench deformation. Mutually cross-cutting relationships between fracture sets suggest that the stress fields may have alternated through time. “Mini-detachments” (MDs) are small, detachment-parallel faults that are structurally analogous to the main faults. Inversions yield S1 ~45° from the MDs and a larger magnitude of S2 relative to S3. Damage zones subjacent to MD fault cores commonly yield more moderately plunging S1 than do MD fault cores or deeper rocks. Petrological evidence suggests that the MDs formed early in the detachment history (Selverstone et al., GSA Abstract, 2009). If their damage zones also formed early, then S1 may have been shallower early in detachment history and(or) at greater

  14. Completion of the Southern California Plate Boundary Observatory GPS Network and Implementation of the Low Latency Salton Trough Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, C.; Miller, S.; Lawrence, S.; Wilson, B.; Jackson, M.; Feaux, K.

    2008-12-01

    Between 2003-2008 875 permanent PBO GPS stations have been built throughout the United States. Concomitant with construction of the PBO the majority of pre-existing GPS stations that meet stability specifications have been upgraded with Trimble NetRS and IP based communications to PBO standards under the EarthScope PBO Nucleus project. In October 2008, with completed construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory, more than 1100 GPS stations now share common design specifications and have identical receivers with common communications making it the most homogeneous geodetic network in the World. Of the 875 total Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations, 216 sites are distributed throughout the Southern California region. 102 of the sites are built as SDBM, 111 DDBM, and 3 as strainmeter GPS hybrids. Fifteen second data is archived for each station and 1 Hz and 5 Hz data is buffered to be triggered for download in the event of an earthquake. Additionally, 125 of the existing former-SCIGN GPS stations have been integrated into the SoCal region of PBO, of which 25 have real-time data streams. The Salton Trough Radio Network (STRN) comprises of 20 stations equipped with Ethernet bridge Intuicom EB6+ (900 MHz) radios to transmit a high rate low latency data stream from each permanent GPS site. The high-rate low latency UStream data will be available to researchers who are developing prototype earthquake early warning systems in Southern California. A goal of the STRN is to make the data available rapidly enough for GPS-derived coseismic and dynamic displacements to be integrated into early warning system earthquake models. The improved earthquake models will better assist emergency response. UStream data will also aid surveyors who wish to use PBO GPS stations as permanent, high-quality base stations in real- time kinematic surveys. Requests for streaming data access at available GPS sites and latency statistics are located at http://pboweb.unavco.org/?pageid=107

  15. Solar desalination system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, C.L.

    1985-03-12

    A solar desalination system in which fresh water is derived from sea water by focussing solar ray energy from a collecting reflector onto an evaporator tube located at substantially the focal apex of the reflector. The reflector/evaporator tube assembly is mounted on a horizontal open grid platform which may support a plurality of parallel reflector/evaporator tube assemblies. The reflectors may serve as pontoons to support the desalination system unit on a body of sea water. The solar heat generated vapor is condensed in condenser tubes immersed in the sea water. Intermittently sea water concentrate is withdrawn from the evaporator tubes. Velocity of the vapor passing from the evaporator tubes to the condensers may be utilized for generating power.

  16. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  17. Solar desalting process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.J.

    1983-03-15

    A solar desalting method and apparatus includes a storage tank for receiving heated sea water at a first rate from a solar collector during daylight hours and for delivering the same to a flash evaporator a second rate. The flash evaporator is connected for delivery of the evaporated and unevaporated portions of the feed water as the heating vapor and feed liquid, respectively, to a serially connected multi-effect film evaporator. Sea water is used to condense the vapor from the last evaporator effect as the distillate product of the system. The storage tank permits nighttime operation with the brine from the last effect and a portion of the cooling water being fed to the solar collector during the daytime and discharged at night.

  18. Solar desalting plant

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.J.

    1982-05-18

    A solar desalting method and apparatus includes a storage tank for receiving heated sea water at a first rate from a solar collector during daylight hours and for delivering the same to a flash evaporator a second rate. The flash evaporator is connected for delivery of the evaporated and unevaporated portions of the feed water as the heating vapor and feed liquid, respectively, to a serially connected multi-effect film evaporator. Sea water is used to condense the vapor from the last evaporator effect as the distillate product of the system. The storage tank permits nighttime operation with the brine from the last effect and a portion of the cooling water being fed to the solar collector during the daytime and discharged at night.

  19. San Andreas Fault dip, Peninsular Ranges mafic lower crust and partial melt in the Salton Trough, Southern California, from ambient-noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, Shahar; Klemperer, Simon L.; Lawrence, Jesse F.

    2015-11-01

    We use ambient-noise tomography to improve CVM-H11.9, a community velocity model of southern California. Our new 3-D shear-velocity model with 0.05° x 0.05° lateral and 1 km vertical blocks reveals new structure beneath the San Andreas Fault (SAF), Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB), southern Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB), and the Salton Trough (ST). We use 4 years of data recorded on 849 broadband stations, vastly more than previous studies and including our own broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project, a 40 station transect across the ST, as well as other campaign stations in both Mexico and the United States. Mean lower crust and upper mantle wave speeds (3.6 km/s at 20 km, 4.2 km/s at 40 km) are low by global standards. Across the SAF, southeast of San Gorgonio Pass, we observe vertical to steeply dipping lateral velocity contrasts that extend beneath the Moho. Beneath the western PRB and westernmost southern SNB, we observe relatively high shear velocities (≥3.8 km/s) in the lower crust that we interpret as the mafic roots of the overlying arc. Relatively high-velocity upper mantle (up to ˜4.5 km/s) may be part of the intact arc, or possibly a remnant of the Farallon plate. Beneath the ST, we observe zones of low shear-velocity in the lower crust and upper mantle which permit up to ˜4.5% melt in the lower crust and up to ˜6% melt in the upper mantle, depending on the assumed composition and pore geometry. Our results preclude the existence of older continental crust beneath the ST and support the creation of new crust beneath the ST.

  20. Dynamic triggering of creep events in the Salton Trough, Southern California by regional M ≥ 5.4 earthquakes constrained by geodetic observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Meng; Liu, Yajing; Kaneko, Yoshihiro; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Bilham, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Since a regional earthquake in 1951, shallow creep events on strike-slip faults within the Salton Trough, Southern California have been triggered at least 10 times by M ≥ 5.4 earthquakes within 200 km. The high earthquake and creep activity and the long history of digital recording within the Salton Trough region provide a unique opportunity to study the mechanism of creep event triggering by nearby earthquakes. Here, we document the history of fault creep events on the Superstition Hills Fault based on data from creepmeters, InSAR, and field surveys since 1988. We focus on a subset of these creep events that were triggered by significant nearby earthquakes. We model these events by adding realistic static and dynamic perturbations to a theoretical fault model based on rate- and state-dependent friction. We find that the static stress changes from the causal earthquakes are less than 0.1 MPa and too small to instantaneously trigger creep events. In contrast, we can reproduce the characteristics of triggered slip with dynamic perturbations alone. The instantaneous triggering of creep events depends on the peak and the time-integrated amplitudes of the dynamic Coulomb stress change. Based on observations and simulations, the stress change amplitude required to trigger a creep event of a 0.01-mm surface slip is about 0.6 MPa. This threshold is at least an order of magnitude larger than the reported triggering threshold of non-volcanic tremors (2-60 kPa) and earthquakes in geothermal fields (5 kPa) and near shale gas production sites (0.2-0.4 kPa), which may result from differences in effective normal stress, fault friction, the density of nucleation sites in these systems, or triggering mechanisms. We conclude that shallow frictional heterogeneity can explain both the spontaneous and dynamically triggered creep events on the Superstition Hills Fault.

  1. Implication of the visual system in the regulation of activity cycles in the absence of solar light: 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites and melatonin receptor gene expression in the brains of demersal deep-sea gadiform fish

    PubMed Central

    Priede, I. G.; Williams, L. M.; Wagner, H.-J.; Thom, A.; Brierley, I.; Collins, M. A.; Collin, S. P.; Merrett, N. R.; Yau, C.

    1999-01-01

    Relative eye size, gross brain morphology and central localization of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites and melatonin receptor gene expression were compared in six gadiform fish living at different depths in the north-east Atlantic Ocean: Phycis blennoides (capture depth range 265 to 1260 m), Nezumia aequalis (445 to 1512 m), Coryphaenoides rupestris (706 to 1932 m), Trachyrincus murrayi (1010 to 1884 m), Coryphaenoides guentheri (1030 m) and Coryphaenoides (Nematonurus) armatus (2172 to 4787 m). Amongst these, the eye size range was 0.15 to 0.35 of head length with a value of 0.19 for C. (N.) armatus, the deepest species. Brain morphology reflected behavioural differences with well-developed olfactory regions in P. blennoides, T. murrayi and C. (N.) armatus and evidence of olfactory deficit in N. aequalis, C. rupestris and C. guentheri. All species had a clearly defined optic tectum with 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding and melatonin receptor gene expression localized to specific brain regions in a similar pattern to that found in shallow-water fish. Melatonin receptors were found throughout the visual structures of the brains of all species. Despite living beyond the depth of penetration of solar light these fish have retained central features associated with the coupling of cycles of growth, behaviour and reproduction to the diel light–dark cycle. How this functions in the deep sea remains enigmatic.

  2. Salton Seismic Imaging Project Line 6: San Andreas Fault and Northern Coachella Valley Structure, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Fuis, G.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Tarnowski, J. M.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Matti, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) is a large-scale, active- and passive-source seismic project designed to image the San Andreas fault (SAF) and adjacent basins (Imperial and Coachella Valleys) in southernmost California. Data and preliminary results from many of the seismic profiles are reported elsewhere (including Fuis et al., Rymer et al., Goldman et al., Langenheim et al., this meeting). Here, we focus on SSIP Line 6, one of four 2-D seismic profiles that were acquired across the Coachella Valley. The 44-km-long, SSIP-Line-6 seismic profile extended from the east flank of Mt. San Jacinto northwest of Palm Springs to the Little San Bernardino Mountains and crossed the SAF (Mission Creek (MCF), Banning (BF), and Garnet Hill (GHF) strands) roughly normal to strike. Data were generated by 10 downhole explosive sources (most spaced about 3 to 5 km apart) and were recorded by approximately 347 Texan seismographs (average spacing 126 m). We used first-arrival refractions to develop a P-wave refraction tomography velocity image of the upper crust along the seismic profile. The seismic data were also stacked and migrated to develop low-fold reflection images of the crust. From the surface to about 7 km depth, P-wave velocities range from about 2.5 km/s to about 7.2 km/s, with the lowest velocities within an ~2-km-deep, ~20-km-wide basin, and the highest velocities below the transition zone from the Coachella Valley to Mt. San Jacinto and within the Little San Bernardino Mountains. The BF and GHF strands bound a shallow sub-basin on the southwestern side of the Coachella Valley, but the underlying shallow-depth (~4 km) basement rocks are P-wave high in velocity (~7.2 km/s). The lack of a low-velocity zone beneath BF and GHF suggests that both faults dip northeastward. In a similar manner, high-velocity basement rocks beneath the Little San Bernardino Mountains suggest that the MCF dips vertically or southwestward. However, there is a pronounced low-velocity zone

  3. Rotation of Plio-Pleistocene Sedimentary Rocks in the Fish Creek Vallecito Basin, Western Salton Trough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housen, B. A.; Dorsey, R. J.; Janecke, S. U.; Axen, G. J.

    2005-12-01

    directions that are best clustered at 0-40% untilting, and sites from the base of the section have directions that are best-clustered at 80-100% untilting. For this initial interpretation, results are tilt-corrected for maximum degree of clustering. Sites from near the base of the section (Diablo Fm) are predominately reverse and have a mean of D = 204, I = -48.3, k = 37, α95 = 12.7°, N = 5. Sites from the middle of the section (Olla and Tapiado Fms) are predominantly normal and have a mean of D = 8.1, I = 48, k = 32, α95 = 8.7°, N = 10. Sites from the upper portion of the section (Hueso Fm) have predominately reverse polarity with means of D = 179.6, I = -43.4, k = 82, α95 = 10.2°, N = 4. Based on these results and correlations between the magnetostratigraphy of this section with the polarity timescale we tentatively conclude that little or no CW rotation has occurred in the FCVB during the past 2 Ma. Larger (24° CW) rotations are recorded by the 3-4 Ma rocks of the Diablo Fm, indicating that significant rotation occurred between 2 and 3 Ma. We tentatively ascribe slowing of the rotation rate in the FCVB to still poorly understood evolution of the west Salton detachment fault system. The relative lack of rotation since 2 Ma suggests that younger, post-detachment strike-slip faulting has not produced significant CW rotation between the San Jacinto and Elsinore faults.

  4. Field-test results for a two-phase nozzle operating on a Salton Sea geothermal resource, November 20-December 19, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The following are described: the test system, the data acquisition system, operating procedure and data acquisition, procedure for taking data, shutdown procedure, discussion of nozzle frequency, the effect of non-condensables, the results of non-condensable evaluation, the thermodynamic effect of dissolved solids, and a brief summary of scale tests.

  5. Determination of aerosol content in the atmosphere from LANDSAT data. [San Diego, Salton Sea, Miami, Adrigole, Atlantic City, Barrow, and Burke, Divide, Hill, and Toole Counties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A large set of LANDSAT 2 data, obtained at San Diego, showed excellent linear relationships, particularly for MSS 5 and MSS 6, between the radiance over the ocean and the atmospheric aerosol content. Two other data points obtained at Adrigole, Ireland, representing a different ocean and a different ground truth instrument, showed very good agreement with the San Diego data. It appeared that the technique could be used for global monitoring of the atmospheric aerosol content over the oceans. Results obtained at several inland bodies of water showed that MSS 4, MSS 5, and MSS 6 cannot be used due to the effect of water pollution generally present. However, the LANDSAT 1 results suggested that MSS 7, which operates at longer wavelengths, was not very sensitive to water pollution, and might be useful for inland measurements of aerosol content. Use of the longer wavelength would also minimize the effects of adjacent high albedo land, since atmospheric scattering was reduced at longer wavelengths.

  6. Trophic relationships of small nonnative fishes in a natural creek and several agricultural drains flowing into the Salton Sea, and their potential, effects on the endangered desert pupfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Barbara A.; Saiki, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to characterize trophic relationships of small nonnative fishes and to determine if predation by these fishes contributes to the decline of desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), an endangered cyprinodont on the verge of extinction. We sampled 403 hybrid Mozambique tilapias (Oreochromis mossambica by O. urolepis), 107 redbelly tilapias (Tilapia zillii), 32 longjaw mudsuckers (Gillkhthys mirabilis), 182 western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), 222 sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna), 63 shortfin mollies (Poecilia mexicana), and 235 porthole livebearers (Poecilurpsis gracilis) from a natural creek and four agricultural drains during September 1999- December 2001. Evidence of piscivory was in gastrointestinal contents of 14 hybrid Mozambique tilapias, 3 redbelly tilapias, 10 longjaw mudsuckers, 8 western mosquitofish, 2 sailfin mollies, and 8 porthole livebearers. Although digestion often was too advanced for identification of fishes consumed by nonnative fishes, remains of desert pupfish were in gastrointestinal contents of a longjaw mudsucker. Our findings, along with Field evidence from other studies that inverse relationships exist between abundances of desert pupfish and nonnative species, are consistent with the hypothesis that predation by nonnative species is contributing to decline of desert pupfish. We suspect that competitive interactions with nonnative fishes might also adversely affect abundance of desert pupfish.

  7. Aeromagnetic maps of the Colorado River region including the Kingman, Needles, Salton Sea, and El Centro 1 degree by 2 degrees quadrangles, California, Arizona, and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariano, John; Grauch, V.J.

    1988-01-01

    Aeromagnetic anomalies are produced by variations in the strength and direction of the magnetic field of rocks that include magnetic minerals, commonly magnetite. Patterns of anomalies on aeromagnetic maps can reveal structures - for example, faults which have juxtaposed magnetic rocks against non-magnetic rocks, or areas of alteration where magnetic minerals have been destroyed by hydrothermal activity. Tectonic features of regional extent may not become apparent until a number of aeromagnetic surveys have been compiled and plotted at the same scale. Commonly the compilation involves piecing together data from surveys that were flown at different times with widely disparate flight specifications and data reduction procedures. The data may be compiled into a composite map, where all the pieces are plotted onto one map without regard to the difference in flight elevation and datum, or they may be compiled into a merged map, where all survey data are analytically reduced to a common flight elevation and datum, and then digitally merged at the survey boundaries. The composite map retains the original resolution of all the survey data, but computer methods to enhance regional features crossing the survey boundaries may not be applied. On the other hand, computer methods can be applied to the merged data, but the accuracy of the data may be slightly diminished.

  8. Arabian Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... sometimes results in copious phytoplankton production and oxygen depletion of the subsurface waters. Although red phytoplankton fluorescences have been associated with the low oxygen concentrations in the intermediate and deep waters of the Arabian Sea, ...

  9. Sea Legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Kenneth C.

    Forty-foot, storm-swept seas, Spitzbergen polar bears roaming vast expanses of Arctic ice, furtive exchanges of forbidden manuscripts in Cold War Moscow, the New York city fashion scene, diving in mini-subs to the sea floor hot srings, life with the astronauts, romance and heartbreak, and invading the last bastions of male exclusivity: all are present in this fast-moving, non-fiction account of one woman' fascinating adventures in the world of marine geology and oceanography.

  10. Internet Relaying of Total Solar Eclipse on 11 August,1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, T.; Takahashi, N.; Okyudo, M.; Suginaka, M.; Matsumoto, N.; Team Of Live! Eclipse

    The total solar eclipse was relayed live through the Internet from Siberia, Russia, on 9 March 1997. Subsequently, the total solar eclipse was relayed from Venezuela and Guadeloupe in the Caribbean Sea in 26 February 1998, the annular solar eclipse from Malaysia on 21 August 1998, and the annular solar eclipse from Australia on 16 February 1999. The Internet was used to relay the total solar eclipse to be seen in Europe, Rumania, Turkey, and Iran. We succeeded in transmitting images from Turkey.

  11. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  12. Aral Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This series of MODIS images shows the dwindling Aral Sea. Once one of the world's largest freshwater lakes, the Aral Sea has decreased by as much as 60% over the past few decades due to diversion of the water to grow cotton and rice. These diversion have dropped the lake levels, increased salinity, and nearly decimated the fishing industry. The previous extent of the lake is clearly visible as a whitish perimeter in these image from April 16, May 18, and June 3, 2002. s. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  13. Loss of sea ice in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Perovich, Donald K; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline A

    2009-01-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover is in decline. The areal extent of the ice cover has been decreasing for the past few decades at an accelerating rate. Evidence also points to a decrease in sea ice thickness and a reduction in the amount of thicker perennial sea ice. A general global warming trend has made the ice cover more vulnerable to natural fluctuations in atmospheric and oceanic forcing. The observed reduction in Arctic sea ice is a consequence of both thermodynamic and dynamic processes, including such factors as preconditioning of the ice cover, overall warming trends, changes in cloud coverage, shifts in atmospheric circulation patterns, increased export of older ice out of the Arctic, advection of ocean heat from the Pacific and North Atlantic, enhanced solar heating of the ocean, and the ice-albedo feedback. The diminishing Arctic sea ice is creating social, political, economic, and ecological challenges.

  14. Ross Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Icebergs in the Ross Sea     View Larger Image Two large icebergs, designated B-15A and C-16, are captured in this Multi-angle Imaging ... the longitudinal quadrant in which it is first seen, and new icebergs sighted in that quadrant are sequentially numbered. B-15 divided from ...

  15. Aral Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... The retreating shoreline leaves the surface encrusted with salt and with agrochemicals brought in by the rivers. As the Sea's moderating ... Large Aral, and may be associated with windblown snow and/or salt particles carried aloft. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer ...

  16. [Reflectance of sea ice in Liaodong Bay].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhan-tang; Yang, Yue-zhong; Wang, Gui-fen; Cao, Wen-xi; Kong, Xiang-peng

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the relationships between sea ice albedo and the bidirectional reflectance distribution in Liaodong Bay were investigated. The results indicate that: (1) sea ice albedo alpha(lambda) is closely related to the components of sea ice, the higher the particulate concentration in sea ice surface is, the lower the sea ice albedo alpha(lambda) is. On the contrary, the higher the bubble concentration in sea ice is, the higher sea ice albedo alpha(lambda) is. (2) Sea ice albedo alpha(lambda) is similar to the bidirectional reflectance factor R(f) when the probe locates at nadir. The R(f) would increase with the increase in detector zenith theta, and the correlation between R(f) and the detector azimuth would gradually increase. When the theta is located at solar zenith 63 degrees, the R(f) would reach the maximum, and the strongest correlation is also shown between the R(f) and the detector azimuth. (3) Different types of sea ice would have the different anisotropic reflectance factors.

  17. Photovoltaics: solar electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    1980-02-01

    The operation and uses of solar cells and the National Photovoltaic Program are briefly described. Eleven DOE photovoltaic application projects are described including forest lookout towers; Wilcox Memorial Hospital in Hawaii; WBNO daytime AM radio station; Schuchuli Indian Village; Meade, Nebraska, agricultural experiment; Mt. Laguna Air Force Station; public schools and colleges; residential applications; and Sea World of Florida. (WHK)

  18. From Sea to Shining Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Beverly

    2005-01-01

    Deep down in the depths of the sea, beautiful fish, mysterious ocean life, and unusual plants glimmer and glow in the eerie atmosphere of an ever-changing ocean. This article describes how, with this vision and a purpose in mind, three teachers pulled open classroom walls and joined forces so their second graders could create a mammoth 30 x 75"…

  19. Sea, soil, sky: testing solar's limits

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkinson, J.; DeMeo, E.

    1981-12-01

    Gigantic heat exchangers for ocean-thermal energy conversion, vast plantations harvested for fuel, and massive arrays of photovoltaic cells in geocentric orbit have captured conceptual fancy in recent years. But the facts emerging from engineering assessments and the limitation of federal support point to lower priority among the research and development options. For the foreseeable future, greater emphasis will be placed on less grandiose schemes, such as forest and agricultural waste combustion and municipal refuse, which may have significant local impacts. 6 references, 1 figure.

  20. Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  1. Solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  2. Solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, D.

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  3. Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  4. Solar Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Solar Energy's solar panels are collectors for a solar energy system which provides heating for a drive-in bank in Akron, OH. Collectors were designed and manufactured by Solar Energy Products, a firm established by three former NASA employees. Company President, Frank Rom, an example of a personnel-type technology transfer, was a Research Director at Lewis Research Center, which conducts extensive solar heating and cooling research, including development and testing of high-efficiency flat-plate collectors. Rom acquired solar energy expertise which helped the company develop two types of collectors, one for use in domestic/commercial heating systems and the other for drying grain.

  5. Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2005-01-01

    Sea ice covers vast areas of the polar oceans, with ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 7 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September to approximately 15 x 10(exp 6) sq km in March and ice extent in the Southern Hemisphere ranging from approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) sq km in February to approximately 18 x 10(exp 6) sq km in September. These ice covers have major impacts on the atmosphere, oceans, and ecosystems of the polar regions, and so as changes occur in them there are potential widespread consequences. Satellite data reveal considerable interannual variability in both polar sea ice covers, and many studies suggest possible connections between the ice and various oscillations within the climate system, such as the Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, and Antarctic Oscillation, or Southern Annular Mode. Nonetheless, statistically significant long-term trends are also apparent, including overall trends of decreased ice coverage in the Arctic and increased ice coverage in the Antarctic from late 1978 through the end of 2003, with the Antarctic ice increases following marked decreases in the Antarctic ice during the 1970s. For a detailed picture of the seasonally varying ice cover at the start of the 21st century, this chapter includes ice concentration maps for each month of 2001 for both the Arctic and the Antarctic, as well as an overview of what the satellite record has revealed about the two polar ice covers from the 1970s through 2003.

  6. Mammals of the Sea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information on sea mammals, including definitions and characteristics of cetaceans, pinnipeds, and sirenians. Contains descriptions of the teaching activities "Whale Music,""Draw A Whale to Scale,""Adopt a Sea Mammal," and "Sea Mammal Sleuths." (TW)

  7. Melting Ice, Rising Seas

    NASA Video Gallery

    Sea level rise is an indicator that our planet is warming. Much of the world's population lives on or near the coast, and rising seas are something worth watching. Sea level can rise for two reason...

  8. Solar Cooking

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    ... (kWh/m2/day) Amount of electromagnetic energy (solar radiation) incident on the surface of the earth. Also referred to as total or global solar radiation.   Midday insolation (kWh/m2/day) Average ...

  9. Solar Lentigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyperpigmented) lesion caused by natural or artificial ultraviolet (UV) light. Solar lentigines may be single or multiple. This ... simplex) because it is caused by exposure to UV light. Solar lentigines are benign, but they do indicate ...

  10. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  11. Buying Solar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joe

    Presented are guidelines for buying solar systems for the individual consumer. This is intended to help the consumer reduce many of the risks associated with the purchase of solar systems, particularly the risks of fraud and deception. Engineering terms associated with solar technology are presented and described to enable the consumer to discuss…

  12. Sentinel-3 Solar Array Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combet, Y.; Reutenauer, X.; Mouret, G.; Guerrere, S.; Ergan, A.; Ferrando, E.; Riva, S.; Hodgetts, P.; Levesque, D.; D'Accolti, G.

    2011-10-01

    Sentinel-3 is primarily a mission to support services relating to the marine environment, with capability to serve numerous land-, atmospheric- and cryospheric- based application areas. The mission's main objective is to determine parameters, such as sea-surface topography, sea- and land-surface temperatures, as well as ocean- and land-surface colours with high-end accuracy and reliability. For this mission, Thales Alenia Space has been selected as the spacecraft prime contractor and is also responsible for the solar array. In this frame, TAS leads a European industrial team, comprising Selex Galileo for the photovoltaic assembly and Patria for the panel substrate.

  13. Hybrid solar powered desalination plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hamester, H.L.; Husseiny, A.; Lumdstrom, J.; La Porta, C.; McLagan, G.

    1981-01-01

    A solar powered sea water desalination system design is described. The commercial size plant is specified to provide at least 1.8*10/sup 6/m/sup 3//year of product water (<500 kg/m/sup 3/ total dissolved solids) from sea water containing 44,000 kg/m/sup 3/ total dissolved solids. The basis of the design is a two-stage desalination system employing membrane technologies. Membrane technologies were selected since they require about a factor of five less energy than desalination technologies which use distillation.

  14. Solar nutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    The topics covered include: an overview of the subject of solar neutrinos, a brief summary of the theory of stellar evolution, a description of the main sources of solar neutrinos, a brief summary of the results of the Brookhaven C1-37 experiment, an anaysis of the principal solar neutrino experiments, and a discussion of how solar neutrino experiments can be used to detect the collapse of stars in the Galaxy. A description of how the Ga-71 experiment can be used to decide whether the origin of the present discrepancy between theory and observation lies in conventional solar models or conventional physics is presented.

  15. Solar flair.

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, John S

    2003-01-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  16. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams.

  17. Solar Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B.F.

    2000-10-04

    Solar opacities are presented from the center of the Sun to the photosphere. The temperatures, densities and hydrogen mass fractions are taken from the standard solar model. For the heavy element abundances the Grevesse mixture is used. In the solar interior photoabsorption is dominated by free-free absorption and they compare two sets of opacities based on two different models for the inverse bremsstrahlung. The radiative luminosities calculated from the two sets of opacities are compared with those predicted by previous models of the standard solar model and also with the known luminosity of the Sun. pressures, specific heats and the speed of sound in the solar plasma are also presented.

  18. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  19. Solar Energy: Solar System Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system economics is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies.…

  20. Solar Sailing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Solar sailing is a topic of growing technical and popular interest. Solar sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to destinations within (and beyond) the solar system that are currently beyond our technical reach. The lecture will describe solar sails, how they work, and what they will be used for in the exploration of space. It will include a discussion of current plans for solar sails and how advanced technology, such as nanotechnology, might enhance their performance. Much has been accomplished recently to make solar sail technology very close to becoming an engineering reality and it will soon be used by the world s space agencies in the exploration of the solar system and beyond. The first part of the lecture will summarize state-of-the-art space propulsion systems and technologies. Though these other technologies are the key to any deep space exploration by humans, robots, or both, solar-sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to distant and difficult destinations. The second part of the lecture will describe the fundamentals of space solar sail propulsion and will describe the near-, mid- and far-term missions that might use solar sails as a propulsion system. The third part of the lecture will describe solar sail technology and the construction of current and future sailcraft, including the work of both government and private space organizations.

  1. A solar array module fabrication process for HALE solar electric UAVs

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, P.G.; Aceves, R.C.; Colella, N.J.; Thompson, J.B.; Williams, K.A.

    1993-12-01

    We describe a fabrication process to manufacture high power to weight ratio flexible solar array modules for use on high altitude long endurance (HALE) solar electric unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). A span-loaded flying wing vehicle, known as the RAPTOR Pathfinder, is being employed as a flying test bed to expand the envelope of solar powered flight to high altitudes. It requires multiple light weight flexible solar array modules able to endure adverse environmental conditions. At high altitudes the solar UV flux is significantly enhanced relative to sea level, and extreme thermal variations occur. Our process involves first electrically interconnecting solar cells into an array followed by laminating them between top and bottom laminated layers into a solar array module. After careful evaluation of candidate polymers, fluoropolymer materials have been selected as the array laminate layers because of their inherent abilities to withstand the hostile conditions imposed by the environment.

  2. Colorful Underwater Sea Creatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project wherein students created colorful underwater sea creatures. This project began with a discussion about underwater sea creatures and how they live. The first step was making the multi-colored tissue paper that would become sea creatures and seaweed. Once students had the shapes of their sea creatures…

  3. Beaufort Sea: information update

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, P.R.

    1988-04-01

    The report is based on a multi-disciplinary meeting held March 6-7, 1985, as part of preparations for the Beaufort Sea Sale 97. The chapters are based on presentations given: The causeway effect: Modification of nearshore thermal regime resulting from causeways; Summertime sea ice intrusions in the Chukchi Sea; The deepwater limit of ice gouging on the Beaufort Sea shelf; Distribution, abundance, migration, harvest, and stock identity of Belukha Whales in the Beaufort Sea; Ringed seals in the Beaufort Sea; Beaufort Sea socioeconomics; The Baffin Island Oil Spill, (BIOS) Project.

  4. Solar breeze power package and saucer ship

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, S. E.

    1985-11-12

    A solar breeze power package having versatile sail and windmast options useful both on land and sea and especially useful in the saucer ship type design. The Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) of the several Darrieus designs in conjunction with roll-up or permanently mounted solar cells combine in a hybrid or are used separately to provide power to a battery bank or other storage device.

  5. Physical processes contributing to an ice free Beaufort Sea during September 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babb, D. G.; Galley, R. J.; Barber, D. G.; Rysgaard, S.

    2016-01-01

    During the record September 2012 sea ice minimum, the Beaufort Sea became ice free for the first time during the observational record. Increased dynamic activity during late winter enabled increased open water and seasonal ice coverage that contributed to negative sea ice anomalies and positive solar absorption anomalies which drove rapid bottom melt and sea ice loss. As had happened in the Beaufort Sea during previous years of exceptionally low September sea ice extent, anomalous solar absorption developed during May, increased during June, peaked during July, and persisted into October. However in situ observations from a single floe reveal less than 78% of the energy required for bottom melt during 2012 was available from solar absorption. We show that the 2012 sea ice minimum in the Beaufort was the result of anomalously large solar absorption that was compounded by an arctic cyclone and other sources of heat such as solar transmission, oceanic upwelling, and riverine inputs, but was ultimately made possible through years of preconditioning toward a younger, thinner ice pack. Significant negative trends in sea ice concentration between 1979 and 2012 from June to October, coupled with a tendency toward earlier sea ice reductions have fostered a significant trend of +12.9 MJ m-2 yr-1 in cumulative solar absorption, sufficient to melt an additional 4.3 cm m-2 yr-1. Overall through preconditioning toward a younger, thinner ice pack the Beaufort Sea has become increasingly susceptible to increased sea ice loss that may render it ice free more frequently in coming years.

  6. Simulated sea surface temperature and heat fluxes in different climates of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Döscher, Ralf; Meier, H E Markus

    2004-06-01

    The physical state of the Baltic Sea in possible future climates is approached by numerical model experiments with a regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model driven by different global simulations. Scenarios and recent climate simulations are compared to estimate changes. The sea surface is clearly warmer by 2.9 degrees C in the ensemble mean. The horizontal pattern of average annual mean warming can largely be explained in terms of ice-cover reduction. The transfer of heat from the atmosphere to the Baltic Sea shows a changed seasonal cycle: a reduced heat loss in fall, increased heat uptake in spring, and reduced heat uptake in summer. The interannual variability of surface temperature is generally increased. This is associated with a smoothed frequency distribution in northern basins. The overall heat budget shows increased solar radiation to the sea surface, which is balanced by changes of the other heat flux components.

  7. Simulated sea surface temperature and heat fluxes in different climates of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Döscher, Ralf; Meier, H E Markus

    2004-06-01

    The physical state of the Baltic Sea in possible future climates is approached by numerical model experiments with a regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model driven by different global simulations. Scenarios and recent climate simulations are compared to estimate changes. The sea surface is clearly warmer by 2.9 degrees C in the ensemble mean. The horizontal pattern of average annual mean warming can largely be explained in terms of ice-cover reduction. The transfer of heat from the atmosphere to the Baltic Sea shows a changed seasonal cycle: a reduced heat loss in fall, increased heat uptake in spring, and reduced heat uptake in summer. The interannual variability of surface temperature is generally increased. This is associated with a smoothed frequency distribution in northern basins. The overall heat budget shows increased solar radiation to the sea surface, which is balanced by changes of the other heat flux components. PMID:15264603

  8. Solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    A solar greenhouse is disclosed wherein plants are grown and utilized as collectors to absorb solar radiation and produce heat laden humidified air through the process of evapotranspiration. This humidified air is then further heated by solar energy. Energy is then extracted from the humidified air by cooling the air and condensing the water vapor within the air. The extracted heat can then be stored and utilized as required to heat the greenhouse and plants.

  9. Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The areas of emphasis are: (1) develop theoretical models of the transient release of magnetic energy in the solar atmosphere, e.g., in solar flares, eruptive prominences, coronal mass ejections, etc.; (2) investigate the role of the Sun's magnetic field in the structuring of solar corona by the development of three-dimensional numerical models that describe the field configuration at various heights in the solar atmosphere by extrapolating the field at the photospheric level; (3) develop numerical models to investigate the physical parameters obtained by the ULYSSES mission; (4) develop numerical and theoretical models to investigate solar activity effects on the solar wind characteristics for the establishment of the solar-interplanetary transmission line; and (5) develop new instruments to measure solar magnetic fields and other features in the photosphere, chromosphere transition region and corona. We focused our investigation on the fundamental physical processes in solar atmosphere which directly effect our Planet Earth. The overall goal is to establish the physical process for the Sun-Earth connections.

  10. Solar Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  11. Three modes of interdecadal trends in sea surface temperature and sea surface height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.

    2013-12-01

    It might be thought that sea surface height and sea surface temperature would be tightly related. We show that this is not necessarily the case on a global scale. We analysed this relationship in a suite of coupled climate models run under 1860 forcing conditions. The models are low-resolution variants of the GFDL Earth System Model, reported in Galbraith et al. (J. Clim. 2011). 1. Correlated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperature. This mode corresponds to opening and closing of convective chimneys in the Southern Ocean. As the Southern Ocean destratifies, sea ice formation is suppressed during the winter and more heat is taken up during the summer. This mode of variability is highly correlated with changes in the top of the atmosphere radiative budget and weakly correlated with changes in the deep ocean circulation. 2. Uncorrelated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperature. This mode of variability is associated with interdecadal variabliity in tropical winds. Changes in the advective flux of heat to the surface ocean play a critical role in driving these changes, which also result in significant local changes in sea level. Changes sea ice over the Southern Ocean still result in changes in solar absorption, but these are now largely cancelled by changes in outgoing longwave radiation. 3. Anticorrelated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperatures. By varying the lateral diffusion coefficient in the ocean model, we are able to enhance and suppress convection in the Southern and Northern Pacific Oceans. Increasing the lateral diffusion coefficients shifts the balance sources of deep water away from the warm salty deep water of the North Atlantic and towards cold fresh deep water from the other two regions. As a result, even though the planet as a whole warms, the deep ocean cools and sea level falls, with changes of order 30 cm over 500 years. The increase in solar absorption

  12. Monitoring Arctic Sea ice using ERTS imagery. [Bering Sea, Beaufort Sea, Canadian Archipelago, and Greenland Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C.; Bowley, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    Because of the effect of sea ice on the heat balance of the Arctic and because of the expanding economic interest in arctic oil and other minerals, extensive monitoring and further study of sea ice is required. The application of ERTS data for mapping ice is evaluated for several arctic areas, including the Bering Sea, the eastern Beaufort Sea, parts of the Canadian Archipelago, and the Greenland Sea. Interpretive techniques are discussed, and the scales and types of ice features that can be detected are described. For the Bering Sea, a sample of ERTS imagery is compared with visual ice reports and aerial photography from the NASA CV-990 aircraft.

  13. Solar Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hippel, Frank; Williams, Robert H.

    1975-01-01

    As fossil fuels decrease in availability and environmental concerns increase, soalr energy is becoming a potential major energy source. Already solar energy is used for space heating in homes. Proposals for solar-electric generating systems include land-based or ocean-based collectors and harnessing wind and wave power. Photosynthesis can also…

  14. Solar Sprint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  15. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...   View Larger Image On June 10, 2002 the Moon obscured the central portion of the solar disk in a phenomenon known as an annular solar eclipse. Partial phases of the eclipse were visible throughout much of southeast Asia and North ...

  16. SOLAR UV RADIATION AND AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade significant interest has developed in the influence of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in surface waters of lakes and the sea. A major portion of this research has focused on photoreactions of the colored component of dissolved organic matter, ...

  17. Aral Sea basin: a sea dies, a sea also rises.

    PubMed

    Glantz, Michael H

    2007-06-01

    The thesis of this article is quite different from many other theses of papers, books, and articles on the Aral Sea. It is meant to purposely highlight the reality of the situation in Central Asia: the Aral Sea that was once a thriving body of water is no more. That sea is dead. What does exist in its place are the Aral seas: there are in essence three bodies of water, one of which is being purposefully restored and its level is rising (the Little Aral), and two others which are still marginally connected, although they continue to decline in level (the Big Aral West and the Big Aral East). In 1960 the level of the sea was about 53 m above sea level. By 2006 the level had dropped by 23 m to 30 m above sea level. This was not a scenario generated by a computer model. It was a process of environmental degradation played out in real life in a matter of a few decades, primarily as a result of human activities. Despite wishes and words to the contrary, it will take a heroic global effort to save what remains of the Big Aral. It would also take a significant degree of sacrifice by people and governments in the region to restore the Big Aral to an acceptable level, given that the annual rate of flow reaching the Amudarya River delta is less than a 10th of what it was several decades ago. Conferring World Heritage status to the Aral Sea(s) could spark restoration efforts for the Big Aral.

  18. 7 CFR 1437.310 - Sea grass and sea oats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sea grass and sea oats. 1437.310 Section 1437.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.310 Sea grass and sea oats. (a) Sea grass and sea oats are value...

  19. 7 CFR 1437.310 - Sea grass and sea oats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sea grass and sea oats. 1437.310 Section 1437.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.310 Sea grass and sea oats. (a) Sea grass and sea oats are value...

  20. 7 CFR 1437.310 - Sea grass and sea oats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sea grass and sea oats. 1437.310 Section 1437.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.310 Sea grass and sea oats. (a) Sea grass and sea oats are value...

  1. 7 CFR 1437.310 - Sea grass and sea oats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sea grass and sea oats. 1437.310 Section 1437.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.310 Sea grass and sea oats. (a) Sea grass and sea oats are value...

  2. Spatial and temporal variability of sea-surface temperature fronts in the coastal Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, Sélima Ben; Larouche, Pierre; Dubois, Jean-Marie

    2016-08-01

    An analysis of 11 years of sea surface temperatures images allowed the determination of the frontal occurrence probability in the southeastern Beaufort Sea using the single-image edge detection method. Results showed that, as the season progresses, fronts become more detectable due to solar heating of the surface layer. Some recurrent features can be identified in the summer time frontal climatology such as the Mackenzie River plume front, the Cape Bathurst front, the Mackenzie Trough front and the Amundsen Gulf front. These areas may be playing an important role in the biological processes acting as drivers to local enhanced biological productivity.

  3. Solar electricity and solar fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, David J.

    1989-04-01

    The nature of solar radiation and its variation with location is described. The distribution of energy in the solar spectrum places immediate limits on the theoretical efficiency of conversion processes, since practical absorbers cannot convert all wavelengths received to useful energy. The principles of solar energy conversion methods are described. Absorption of solar energy can give rise to direct electrical generation, heating, or chemical change. Electrical generation from sunlight can be achieved by photovoltaic systems directly or by thermal systems which use solar heat to drive a heat engine and generator. The technology used and under research for promising ways of producing electricity or fuel from solar energy is described. Photovoltaic technology is established today for remote area, small power applications, and photovoltaic module sales alone are over 100 million dollars per year at present. The photovoltaic market has grown steadily since the mid-1970's, as prices have fallen continuously. Future energy options are briefly described. The merits of a sustainable energy economy, based on renewable energy resources, including solar energy, are emphasized, as this seems to provide the only hope of eliminating the problems caused by the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide, acid rain pollution and nuclear waste disposal. There is no doubt that clean fuels which were derived from solar energy and either did not involve carbon dioxide and used atmospheric carbon dioxide as the source dioxide as the source of carbon would be a worthy ideal. Methods described could one day achieve this.

  4. Recent State of Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Rigor, I. G.; Clemente-Colón, P.; Perovich, D. K.; Richter-Menge, J. A.; Chao, Y.; Neumann, G.; Ortmeyer, M.

    2008-12-01

    Route, and most of two routes of the Northwest Passage, north and south of Victoria Island, which facilitated ice retreat and the opening of waterways this summer. Most importantly, the shift from a perennial to a seasonal ice covered Arctic Ocean significantly decreases the overall surface albedo resulting in enhanced solar heat absorption in spring and summer, which further decreases the Arctic ice pack through the ice albedo feedback mechanism. In early September 2008, a major melt event occurred over a large region extending from the Beaufort Sea across the Kara Sea toward the Laptev Sea, with active melt areas encroaching in the NP vicinity. This melt event was caused by an advection of warm air from the south, which melted and pushed sea ice away at the same time. At that time, the total extent of Arctic sea ice was about 0.5 million km2 (size of Spain) larger than that at the same time last year.

  5. Solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    This report first describes the different types of solar ponds including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. It then discusses the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds, and compares the economics of salty and saltless ponds as a function of salt cost. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirements is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

  6. Solar sail

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, K.E.

    1986-09-30

    This patent describes a solar sail propulsion system comprising: solar sail means for intercepting light pressure to produce thrust, the solar sail means being a thin metal film; tension truss means having two ends attached at one end to the solar sail means for transferring the thrust from the solar sail and for preventing gross deformation of the solar sail under light pressure, the solar sail means being a plurality of separate generally two-dimensional pieces joined by springs to the tension truss means; a payload attached to the other end of the tension truss means, the tension truss means comprising a plurality of attachment means for attaching shroud lines to the top of the tension truss means and a plurality of the shroud lines attached to the attachment means at one of their ends and the payload at the other; a plurality of reel means attached to the shroud lines for controllably varying the length of the lines; and a plurality of reflective panel means attached to the sail means for controlling the orientation of the system.

  7. Solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    The different types of solar ponds are described, including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. Then the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds are discussed and costs are compared. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirement is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

  8. Can regional climate engineering save the summer Arctic sea ice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmes, S.; Jahn, Alexandra; Kay, Jennifer E.; Holland, Marika; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2014-02-01

    Rapid declines in summer Arctic sea ice extent are projected under high-forcing future climate scenarios. Regional Arctic climate engineering has been suggested as an emergency strategy to save the sea ice. Model simulations of idealized regional dimming experiments compared to a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emission simulation demonstrate the importance of both local and remote feedback mechanisms to the surface energy budget in high latitudes. With increasing artificial reduction in incoming shortwave radiation, the positive surface albedo feedback from Arctic sea ice loss is reduced. However, changes in Arctic clouds and the strongly increasing northward heat transport both counteract the direct dimming effects. A 4 times stronger local reduction in solar radiation compared to a global experiment is required to preserve summer Arctic sea ice area. Even with regional Arctic dimming, a reduction in the strength of the oceanic meridional overturning circulation and a shut down of Labrador Sea deep convection are possible.

  9. All That Unplowed Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Hunting and gathering at sea may fast be approaching their productive limits. Aquaculture - farming at sea - linked to conservation represents the sea's promise. If the system works, it might prove to be the key to supplying large amounts of food and fresh water at no cost in nonrenewable energy resources. (BT)

  10. Concentrating solar thermal power.

    PubMed

    Müller-Steinhagen, Hans

    2013-08-13

    In addition to wind and photovoltaic power, concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) will make a major contribution to electricity provision from renewable energies. Drawing on almost 30 years of operational experience in the multi-megawatt range, CSP is now a proven technology with a reliable cost and performance record. In conjunction with thermal energy storage, electricity can be provided according to demand. To date, solar thermal power plants with a total capacity of 1.3 GW are in operation worldwide, with an additional 2.3 GW under construction and 31.7 GW in advanced planning stage. Depending on the concentration factors, temperatures up to 1000°C can be reached to produce saturated or superheated steam for steam turbine cycles or compressed hot gas for gas turbine cycles. The heat rejected from these thermodynamic cycles can be used for sea water desalination, process heat and centralized provision of chilled water. While electricity generation from CSP plants is still more expensive than from wind turbines or photovoltaic panels, its independence from fluctuations and daily variation of wind speed and solar radiation provides it with a higher value. To become competitive with mid-load electricity from conventional power plants within the next 10-15 years, mass production of components, increased plant size and planning/operating experience will be accompanied by technological innovations. On 30 October 2009, a number of major industrial companies joined forces to establish the so-called DESERTEC Industry Initiative, which aims at providing by 2050 15 per cent of European electricity from renewable energy sources in North Africa, while at the same time securing energy, water, income and employment for this region. Solar thermal power plants are in the heart of this concept.

  11. Concentrating solar thermal power.

    PubMed

    Müller-Steinhagen, Hans

    2013-08-13

    In addition to wind and photovoltaic power, concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) will make a major contribution to electricity provision from renewable energies. Drawing on almost 30 years of operational experience in the multi-megawatt range, CSP is now a proven technology with a reliable cost and performance record. In conjunction with thermal energy storage, electricity can be provided according to demand. To date, solar thermal power plants with a total capacity of 1.3 GW are in operation worldwide, with an additional 2.3 GW under construction and 31.7 GW in advanced planning stage. Depending on the concentration factors, temperatures up to 1000°C can be reached to produce saturated or superheated steam for steam turbine cycles or compressed hot gas for gas turbine cycles. The heat rejected from these thermodynamic cycles can be used for sea water desalination, process heat and centralized provision of chilled water. While electricity generation from CSP plants is still more expensive than from wind turbines or photovoltaic panels, its independence from fluctuations and daily variation of wind speed and solar radiation provides it with a higher value. To become competitive with mid-load electricity from conventional power plants within the next 10-15 years, mass production of components, increased plant size and planning/operating experience will be accompanied by technological innovations. On 30 October 2009, a number of major industrial companies joined forces to establish the so-called DESERTEC Industry Initiative, which aims at providing by 2050 15 per cent of European electricity from renewable energy sources in North Africa, while at the same time securing energy, water, income and employment for this region. Solar thermal power plants are in the heart of this concept. PMID:23816910

  12. Solar Two

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power on demand to the local utility, Southern California Edison Company. It can do so because it operates not only during sunny parts of the day, but it can store enough thermal energy from the sun to operate during cloudy periods and after dark, for up to three hours, at its rated output of 10 megawatts (MW). For the first time ever, a utility scale solar power plant can supply electricity when the utility needs it most, to satisfy the energy requirements of its customers.

  13. Solar chulha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, P. H.; Patrikar, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    The main goal of the proposed system is to transfer energy from sun to the cooking load that is located in the kitchen. The energy is first collected by the solar collector lens system and two curve bars of same radius of curvature are mounted parallel and adjacent to each other at different height the solar collector is clamed on this two bars such that solar collector is exactly perpendicular to sunlight. The topology includes an additional feature which is window in the wall through which the beam is collimated is directed in the of kitchen. The solar energy that is collected is directed by the mirror system into the kitchen, where it is redirected to cooking platform located in the kitchen. The special feature in this system full Indian meal can be made since cooking platform is indoors.

  14. Solar dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelin, R.W.; Hurst, D.W.; Osos, G.R.

    1984-02-07

    Fabrics are dried by tumbling the fabrics in a drying chamber into which hot air is introduced. The hot air is formed by passing ambient air through a solar heater to heat the air to a first temperature, and then further heating the air with a second heater such as a burner. The burner can be one which burns a fuel in the presence of combustion air. The combustion air can be a portion of the air that is passed through the solar heater. After drying the fabrics by this method, the drying zone can be cooled and the fabrics can be further dried by passing air through the solar heater, and then without further heating the air that has passed through the solar heater, introducing the air to the drying chamber.

  15. Solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.I.; Kaplow, R.

    1980-08-26

    An improved solar cell designed for optimum efficiency is comprised of a plurality of series connected unit solar cells formed from a common substrate of semiconductor material. Each unit solar cell has spaced elongate sidewalls, and a ''dead space'' area between adjoining sidewalls of adjacent units is made substantially smaller than an active, light receiving area, extending between the opposite sidewalls of each individual unit. In addition, the width of the active area is concisely limited to ensure that radiation incident on the active area is incident at a point which is spaced from the p-n junction of each unit by no more than a predetermined optimum distance. Reducing the ''dead space'' area while concisely limiting the width of the active area provides improved solar cell performance without requiring focusing lenses.

  16. Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Design and Construction, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes 21 completed projects now using solar energy for heating, cooling, or electricity. Included are elementary schools in Atlanta and San Diego, a technical school in Detroit, and Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. (MLF)

  17. Solar Nexus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jim

    1980-01-01

    The design team for the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has pushed the state of the energy art to its current limits for the initial phase, with provisions for foreseeable and even speculative future applications. (Author/MLF)

  18. Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) produces high efficiency crystal ingots in an automated well-insulated furnace offering low equipment, labor and energy costs. The "grown" silicon crystals are used to make solar cells, or photovoltaic cells which convert sunlight directly into electricity. The HEM method is used by Crystal Systems, Inc. and was developed under a NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory contract. The square wafers which are the result of the process are sold to companies manufacturing solar panels.

  19. Solar Schematic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The home shown at right is specially designed to accommodate solar heating units; it has roof planes in four directions, allowing placement of solar collectors for best exposure to the sun. Plans (bottom) and complete working blueprints for the solar-heated house are being marketed by Home Building Plan Service, Portland, Oregon. The company also offers an inexpensive schematic (center) showing how a homeowner only moderately skilled in the use of tools can build his own solar energy system, applicable to new or existing structures. The schematic is based upon the design of a low-cost solar home heating system built and tested by NASA's Langley Research Center; used to supplement a warm-air heating system, it can save the homeowner about 40 percent of his annual heating bill for a modest investment in materials and components. Home Building Plan Service saved considerable research time by obtaining a NASA technical report which details the Langley work. The resulting schematic includes construction plans and simplified explanations of solar heat collection, collectors and other components, passive heat factors, domestic hot water supply and how to work with local heating engineers.

  20. Dust Storm, Aral Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Aral Sea has shrunk to less than half its size since 1985. The Aral Sea receives little water (sometimes no water) from the two major rivers that empty into it-the Syr Darya and Amu Darya. Instead, the river water is diverted to support irrigation for the region's extensive cotton fields. Recently, water scarcity has increased due to a prolonged drought in Central Asia. As the Aral Sea recedes, its former sea bed is exposed. The Aral's sea bed is composed of fine sediments-including fertilizers and other agricultural chemicals-that are easily picked up by the region's strong winds, creating thick dust storms. The International Space Station crew observed and recorded a large dust storm blowing eastward from the Aral Sea in late June 2001. This image illustrates the strong coupling between human activities (water diversions and irrigation), and rapidly changing land, sea and atmospheric processes-the winds blow across the

  1. Understanding the Red Sea nutrient cycle - a first look into nitrogen fixation in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Roslinda; Arrieta, Jesus; Alam, Intikhab; Duarte, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The Red Sea is an elongated and semi-enclosed system bordered by Africa and Saudi Arabia. Positioned in an arid, tropical zone, the system receives high solar irradiance and heat flux, extensive evaporation, low rainfall and therefore high salinity. These harsh environmental conditions has set the Red Sea to be one of the fastest warming and saltiest ecosystem in the world. Although nutrients are known to be at very low concentrations, the ultimately limiting nutrient in the system is still undefined. Therefore, like most other oligotrophic systems, we regard the Red Sea as being nitrogen-limited and we foresee nitrogen fixation as the most probable bottleneck in the Red Sea nitrogen budget. On the basis of metagenomes from pelagic microbial communities along the Red Sea, we looked into the distribution of nitrogenase, an enzyme involved in nitrogen fixation, in this system and provide a first insight into the microbial community that is involved in the process. The implications of this study will not only help improve our understanding of the Red Sea nutrient regime, but may also hint on future ocean responses to rising climates.

  2. Solar Activity and Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Our Sun is a dynamic, ever-changing star. In general, its atmosphere displays major variation on an 11-year cycle. Throughout the cycle, the atmosphere occasionally exhibits large, sudden outbursts of energy. These "solar eruptions" manifest themselves in the form of solar flares, filament eruptions, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and energetic particle releases. They are of high interest to scientists both because they represent fundamental processes that occur in various astrophysical context, and because, if directed toward Earth, they can disrupt Earth-based systems and satellites. Research over the last few decades has shown that the source of the eruptions is localized regions of energy-storing magnetic field on the Sun that become destabilized, leading to a release of the stored energy. Solar scientists have (probably) unraveled the basic outline of what happens in these eruptions, but many details are still not understood. In recent years we have been studying what triggers these magnetic eruptions, using ground-based and satellite-based solar observations in combination with predictions from various theoretical models. We will present an overview of solar activity and solar eruptions, give results from some of our own research, and discuss questions that remain to be explored.

  3. Solar power satellite: an opportunity for third world development

    SciTech Connect

    Mayur, R.; Glaser, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief discussion of the effects of energy resource depletion and price escalation on developing countries and of the potential of solar energy in general to meet their energy needs, the possibilities of obtaining energy from a solar power satellite to meet world energy needs are discussed. International implications of the solar power satellite system from the viewpoint of developing countries are presented, including involvement of developing countries in solar power satellite development, use of land under receiving antennas for agriculture and of seas under antennas for mariculture, and the legal basis for the use of geosynchronous orbit. (LEW)

  4. Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2013-07-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

  5. Solar Neutrinos

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Harmer, D. S.

    1964-12-01

    The prospect of studying the solar energy generation process directly by observing the solar neutrino radiation has been discussed for many years. The main difficulty with this approach is that the sun emits predominantly low energy neutrinos, and detectors for observing low fluxes of low energy neutrinos have not been developed. However, experimental techniques have been developed for observing neutrinos, and one can foresee that in the near future these techniques will be improved sufficiently in sensitivity to observe solar neutrinos. At the present several experiments are being designed and hopefully will be operating in the next year or so. We will discuss an experiment based upon a neutrino capture reaction that is the inverse of the electron-capture radioactive decay of argon-37. The method depends upon exposing a large volume of a chlorine compound, removing the radioactive argon-37 and observing the characteristic decay in a small low-level counter.

  6. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  7. First satellite tracks of neonate sea turtles redefine the 'lost years' oceanic niche.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Katherine L; Wyneken, Jeanette; Porter, Warren P; Luo, Jiangang

    2014-04-22

    Few at-sea behavioural data exist for oceanic-stage neonate sea turtles, a life-stage commonly referred to as the sea turtle 'lost years'. Historically, the long-term tracking of small, fast-growing organisms in the open ocean was logistically or technologically impossible. Here, we provide the first long-term satellite tracks of neonate sea turtles. Loggerheads (Caretta caretta) were remotely tracked in the Atlantic Ocean using small solar-powered satellite transmitters. We show that oceanic-stage turtles (i) rarely travel in Continental Shelf waters, (ii) frequently depart the currents associated with the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, (iii) travel quickly when in Gyre currents, and (iv) select sea surface habitats that are likely to provide a thermal benefit or refuge to young sea turtles, supporting growth, foraging and survival. Our satellite tracks help define Atlantic loggerhead nursery grounds and early loggerhead habitat use, allowing us to re-examine sea turtle 'lost years' paradigms.

  8. Solar ADEPT: Efficient Solar Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Solar ADEPT Project: The 7 projects that make up ARPA-E's Solar ADEPT program, short for 'Solar Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,' aim to improve the performance of photovoltaic (PV) solar energy systems, which convert the sun's rays into electricity. Solar ADEPT projects are integrating advanced electrical components into PV systems to make the process of converting solar energy to electricity more efficient.

  9. East Siberian Sea, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The winter sea ice in the east Siberian Sea is looking a bit like a cracked windshield in these true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images from June 16 and 23, 2002. North of the thawing tundra, the sea ice takes on its cracked, bright blue appearance as it thins, which allows the reflection of the water to show through. Numerous still-frozen lakes dot the tundra. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  10. Future Directions in Simulating Solar Geoengineering

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Robock, Alan; Boucher, Olivier

    2014-08-05

    Solar geoengineering is a proposed set of technologies to temporarily alleviate some of the consequences of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) created a framework of geoengineering simulations in climate models that have been performed by modeling centers throughout the world (B. Kravitz et al., The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP), Atmospheric Science Letters, 12(2), 162-167, doi:10.1002/asl.316, 2011). These experiments use state-of-the-art climate models to simulate solar geoengineering via uniform solar reduction, creation of stratospheric sulfate aerosol layers, or injecting sea spray into the marine boundary layer. GeoMIP has been quite successful in its mission of revealing robust features and key uncertainties of the modeled effects of solar geoengineering.

  11. Processes relevant for decadal changes in primary production of the North Sea and Baltic Sea: hindcast and scenario modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daewel, Ute; Schrum, Corinna; Pushpadas, Dhanya

    2016-04-01

    Despite their geographical vicinity, the North Sea and the Baltic Sea ecosystems exhibit very different characteristics in both physical and biological parameters. Nonetheless, since both ecosystems are characterized by the same general functional groups in phytoplankton and zooplankton and, their geographical distribution indicates comparable thermal adaptation of the plankton groups, we propose that the same ecosystem parameterization can be utilized to simulate the dynamics in both ecosystems simultaneously. Here we present results from an updated version of the 3d coupled ecosystem model ECOSMO valid for both areas. The model allows both multi-decadal hind cast simulation of primary production and specific process studies under controlled environmental conditions. Our results from a long-term hind-cast (1948-2008) indicate incoherent "regime shifts" in the primary productivity (PP) between the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Correlation analysis between atmospheric forcing and PP indicates significant correlations for both solar radiation and wind but cannot serve to identify causal relationship. Therefore additional scenario tests with perturbations in individual atmospheric condition where accomplished emphasizing specifically the role of solar radiation, wind and eutrophication. The results revealed that, although all parameters are relevant for the PP in North Sea and Baltic Sea, the dominant impact on long term variability was introduced by modulations of the wind fields.

  12. Solar Energy and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    This booklet provides an introduction to solar energy by discussing: (1) how a home is heated; (2) how solar energy can help in the heating process; (3) the characteristics of passive solar houses; (4) the characteristics of active solar houses; (5) how solar heat is stored; and (6) other uses of solar energy. Also provided are 10 questions to…

  13. The pattern of northern hemisphere surface air temperature during prolonged periods of low solar output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Feyman, J.; Jiang, X.; Noone, D. C.; Waple, A. M.; Yung, Y. L.

    2004-01-01

    We show that the reconstructed sensitivity of the sea level temperature to long term solar forcing in the Northern Hemisphere is in very good agreement with the empirical temperature pattern corresponding to changes of the North Annular Mode (NAM).

  14. Stratospheric Ozone-induced Indirect Radiative Effects on Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Xia, Y.; LIU, J.; Huang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the Antarctic Ozone Hole has important influences on Antarctic sea ice. While all these have focused on stratospheric ozone-induced dynamic effects on sea ice, here we show results that ozone-induced indirect radiative effects have important influences on Antarctic sea ice. Our simulations demonstrate that the recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole causes equatorward shift of clouds over the Southern Ocean. The cloud-band shift leads to reduction of downward infrared radiation, which causes surface cooling. On the other hand, it also causes increasing solar radiation on the surface. However, the increase in solar radiation is offset by surface reflection due to increasing sea ice. As a result solar radiation absorbed by the surface is reduced, which also causes surface cooling. Therefore, the overall ozone-induced cloud radiative effect is to cool the surface and causes expansion of sea ice around the Antarctic. As shown in previous studies, the cloud-band shift is associated with the equatorward shift of the westerly jet stream around the Antarctic. Our simulations also demonstrate increasing snow rate near the sea ice edge, which also contributes to Antarctic sea-ice expansion. The ozone-induced cloud radiative effect would mitigate Antarctic sea-ice melting due to greenhouse warming in the 21st century.

  15. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea

    PubMed Central

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-01-01

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans. PMID:24648228

  16. The Newfoundland ice extent and the solar cycle from 1860 to 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.T.; Jones, S.J. )

    1990-04-15

    Sea ice conditions off the east coast of Newfoundland for the last 130 years are presented, forming what is believed to be the longest ice record for the northwestern Atlantic. Because of differenced in how these data were originally collected, the series is divided into two sets, before and after 1920. Time series for solar activity and air temperature at St. John's have also been compiled and correlation coefficients between the various data sets determined. The relationships between the sea ice extent and solar activity are discussed in the contest of the Iceland ice index and recent findings in the atmosphere-ocean-ice system in the northern hemisphere. The association with the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and the similarity with the fluctuating trends of sea levels, sea surface temperatures, and storms in the North Atlantic are noted. Predictions for the sea ice extent are made for the next few years based on the relationship with solar activity.

  17. A Solar-luminosity Model and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of climatic change are not completely understood, the potential causes include changes in the Sun's luminosity. Solar activity in the form of sunspots, flares, proton events, and radiation fluctuations has displayed periodic tendencies. Two types of proxy climatic data that can be related to periodic solar activity are varved geologic formations and freshwater diatom deposits. A model for solar luminosity was developed by using the geometric progression of harmonic cycles that is evident in solar and geophysical data. The model assumes that variation in global energy input is a result of many periods of individual solar-luminosity variations. The 0.1-percent variation of the solar constant measured during the last sunspot cycle provided the basis for determining the amplitude of each luminosity cycle. Model output is a summation of the amplitudes of each cycle of a geometric progression of harmonic sine waves that are referenced to the 11-year average solar cycle. When the last eight cycles in Emiliani's oxygen-18 variations from deep-sea cores were standardized to the average length of glaciations during the Pleistocene (88,000 years), correlation coefficients with the model output ranged from 0.48 to 0.76. In order to calibrate the model to real time, model output was graphically compared to indirect records of glacial advances and retreats during the last 24,000 years and with sea-level rises during the Holocene. Carbon-14 production during the last millenium and elevations of the Great Salt Lake for the last 140 years demonstrate significant correlations with modeled luminosity. Major solar flares during the last 90 years match well with the time-calibrated model.

  18. Solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.; Startevant, R.C.

    1985-01-22

    A solar heater has an outlet conduit above an inlet conduit intercoupling a solar heating chamber with the inside of a building through a window opening. In one form the solar collecting chamber is outside the building below the window and the outlet conduit and inlet conduit are contiguous and pass through the window opening between the windowsill and the lower sash. In another form of the invention the solar collecting chambers are located beside each side of the window and joined at the top by the outlet conduit that passes through an opening between the upper window sash and the top of the window frame and at the bottom by an inlet conduit that passes through an opening between the lower sash and the windowsill. The outlet conduit carries photoelectric cells that provide electrical energy for driving a squirrel-cage fan in the outlet conduit through a mercury switch seated on a damper actuated by a bimetallic coil that closes the damper when the temperature in the outlet conduit goes below a predetermined temperature.

  19. Solar VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapping, K. F.; Kuijpers, J.

    1986-01-01

    In April, 1981, radio telescopes at Dwingeloo (The Netherlands) and Onsala (Sweden) were used as a long-baseline interferometer at a wavelength of 18 cm. The baseline of 619 km gave a spatial resolution on the Sun of about 45 km. The major problems of Solar Very Long Baseline Interferometry are discussed.

  20. Solar Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesko, Carolyn, Ed.

    This directory is designed to help the researcher and developer, the manufacturer and distributor, and the general public communicate together on a mutually beneficial basis. Its content covers the wide scope of solar energy activity in the United States primarily, but also in other countries, at the academic, governmental, and industrial levels.…

  1. Solar Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Norman C.; Kane, Joseph W.

    1971-01-01

    Proposes a method of collecting solar energy by using available plastics for Fresnel lenses to focus heat onto a converter where thermal dissociation of water would produce hydrogen. The hydrogen would be used as an efficient non-polluting fuel. Cost estimates are included. (AL)

  2. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... View Larger Image Within that narrow window during a solar eclipse where an observer on Earth can watch the Moon's shadow obscure ... of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 20920. The panels cover an area of about 380 kilometers x 2909 kilometers and use data ...

  3. Solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Golder, J.C.

    1981-10-06

    A portable, foldable solar oven is provided wherein the basic construction material is ordinary cardboard, some surfaces of which are coated with a reflective material. The portable oven doubles as an insulated container for keeping refrigerated foodstuffs cold while being transported to a distant site for cooking.

  4. Solar dimming/brightening in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambezidis, Harry; Demetriou, Dora; Kaskaoutis, Dimitris; Nastos, Panagiotis

    2010-05-01

    Early analyses of solar radiation records have pointed to a widespread decline of surface solar radiation from the 1950s up to the 1980s in various parts of the world. This phenomenon was attributed to increasing air pollution and has been named "global dimming". More recent analyses with data records updated to near present suggested that surface solar radiation shows no sign of decrease anymore since the 1980s or even started to recover at many locations. This recovery has been named "solar brightening". Air pollution control and the economic breakdown of the former communist countries are the major influential factors for this transition. Further the influence of the recovery from the dimming caused by Mt. Pinatubo volcanic eruption in 1991 and internal climate variability with associated cloud variations were suggested to contribute to the brightening in the 1990s. Despite the interest in the solar dimming/brightening phenomenon the Mediterranean area has not attracted the attention of the scientists in this respect so far. Therefore, the present work tries to fill this gap by providing spatio-temporal analysis of the incoming short-wave solar radiation in the whole area of the Mediterranean Sea in the period 1979-2004 taken from satellites. To give better spatial information about the phenomenon the Mediterranean region has been divided into three sub-regions: the West Mediterranean, from Gibraltar to Corsica, the Central Mediterranean, from Corsica to the Ionian Sea, and the East Mediterranean, from the Ionian Sea to the shores of Syria. The analysis shows that the three sub-regions have not undergone the same spatio-temporal pattern of the phenomenon probably due to the different distribution of aerosols in the region.

  5. Solar electric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Warfield, G.

    1984-01-01

    Electricity from solar sources is the subject. The state-of-the-art of photovoltaics, wind energy and solar thermal electric systems is presented and also a broad range of solar energy activities throughout the Arab world is covered. Contents, abridged: Solar radiation fundamentals. Basic theory solar cells. Solar thermal power plants. Solar energy activities at the scientific research council in Iraq. Solar energy program at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Prospects of solar energy for Egypt. Non-conventional energy in Syria. Wind and solar energies in Sudan. Index.

  6. White Sea - Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At bottom center of this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from April 13, 2001, the White Sea in western Russia is becoming free of ice in its southern extent. Meanwhile, the blue-green waters along the coast of the peninsula jutting out into the Barents Sea to the northeast could be due to a phytoplankton bloom.

  7. Getting Your Sea Legs

    PubMed Central

    Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Chen, Fu-Chen; Varlet, Manuel; Alcantara, Cristina; Bardy, Benoît G.

    2013-01-01

    Sea travel mandates changes in the control of the body. The process by which we adapt bodily control to life at sea is known as getting one's sea legs. We conducted the first experimental study of bodily control as maritime novices adapted to motion of a ship at sea. We evaluated postural activity (stance width, stance angle, and the kinematics of body sway) before and during a sea voyage. In addition, we evaluated the role of the visible horizon in the control of body sway. Finally, we related data on postural activity to two subjective experiences that are associated with sea travel; seasickness, and mal de debarquement. Our results revealed rapid changes in postural activity among novices at sea. Before the beginning of the voyage, the temporal dynamics of body sway differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) severity of seasickness. Body sway measured at sea differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) experience of mal de debarquement. We discuss implications of these results for general theories of the perception and control of bodily orientation, for the etiology of motion sickness, and for general phenomena of perceptual-motor adaptation and learning. PMID:23840560

  8. Sea Anemone: Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, John D.

    1982-01-01

    Several investigations can be undertaken with live sea anemones. A sea anemone's feeding response, fighting power, color, and symbiotic relationships to other invertebrates (such as a marine hermit crab) can be investigated in the high school classroom. Background information and laboratory procedures are provided. (Author/JN)

  9. Red sea drillings.

    PubMed

    Ross, D A; Whitmarsh, R B; Ali, S A; Boudreaux, J E; Coleman, R; Fleisher, R L; Girdler, R; Manheim, F; Matter, A; Nigrini, C; Stoffers, P; Supko, P R

    1973-01-26

    Recent drilling in the Red Sea has shown that much of the basin is underlain by evaporites of a similar age to that of evaporites found in the Mediterranean Sea. These evaporites and their structural positions indicate that other brine areas are present-and, indeed, several others have been discovered. PMID:17843766

  10. Red sea drillings.

    PubMed

    Ross, D A; Whitmarsh, R B; Ali, S A; Boudreaux, J E; Coleman, R; Fleisher, R L; Girdler, R; Manheim, F; Matter, A; Nigrini, C; Stoffers, P; Supko, P R

    1973-01-26

    Recent drilling in the Red Sea has shown that much of the basin is underlain by evaporites of a similar age to that of evaporites found in the Mediterranean Sea. These evaporites and their structural positions indicate that other brine areas are present-and, indeed, several others have been discovered.

  11. Transmission of solar ultraviolet radiation through invertebrate exteriors

    SciTech Connect

    Karentz, D.; Gast, T. )

    1993-01-01

    The occurrence of springtime ozone depletion over the Antarctic has created concern about the effects of increases ultraviolet-B on marine organisms, particularly in intertidal and subtidal populations. The first line of defense that an animal has to solar radiation exposure is its outer covering. This paper examines four species of antarctic invertebrates to determine the amount of UV protection provided by their external covering (the sea urchin, the sea star; the limpet; and the tunicate). 5 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Experimental study of a solar still

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassoun, Z. Sari; Aliane, K.; Berrezoug, H. I.

    2016-07-01

    This work concerns the study of a solar distiller. Particular attention is paid to the different operating characteristics such as: temperature, global and internal efficiency, performance and the performance factor during the distillation process. We have also established the overall heat balance in transition. A series of tests was carried out during the summer under the sea water to see the evolution of different parameters of the distiller. The daily output of solar still is 1.8litre / day. All the dissolved solids (TDS), conductivity and pH of the water were measured.

  13. Black Sea in Bloom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image shows bright, turquoise-colored swirls across the surface of the Black Sea, signifying the presence of a large phytoplankton bloom. Scientists have observed similar blooms recurring annually, roughly this same time of year. The Sea of Azov, which is the smaller body of water located just north of the Black Sea in this image, also shows a high level of biological activity currently ongoing. The brownish pixels in the Azov are probably sediments carried in from high waters upstream. This scene was acquired by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on May 4, 2002. According to the Black Sea Environment Programme's Marine Hydrophysical Institute, the Black Sea is 'one of the marine areas of the world most damaged by human activities.' The coastal zone around these Eastern European inland water bodies is densely populated-supporting a permanent population of roughly 16 million people and another 4 million tourists each year. Six countries border with the Black Sea, including Ukraine to the north, Russia and Georgia to the east, Turkey to the south, and Bulgaria and Romania to the west. Because it is isolated from the world's oceans, and because there is an extensive drainage network of rivers that empty into it, the Black Sea has a unique and delicate water balance which is very important for supporting its marine ecosystem. Of particular concern to scientists is the salinity, water level, and nutrient levels of the Black Sea's waters, all of which are, unfortunately, being impacted by human activities. Within the last three decades the combination of increased nutrient loads from human sources together with pollution and over-harvesting of fisheries has resulted in a sharp decline in water quality. Scientists from each of the Black Sea's bordering nations are currently working together to study the issues and formulate a joint, international strategy for saving this unique marine ecosystem

  14. Collecting Solar Energy. Solar Energy Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Alexander

    This solar energy learning module for use with junior high school students offers a list of activities, a pre-post test, job titles, basic solar energy vocabulary, and diagrams of solar energy collectors and installations. The purpose is to familiarize students with applications of solar energy and titles of jobs where this knowledge could be…

  15. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2016-07-12

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  16. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  17. Solar cycle modulation of ENSO variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodera, Kunihiko; Thiéblemont, Rémi

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the work of Labitzke and van Loon on solar/QBO modulation in the stratosphere, Barnett (1989) conducted an investigation on the relationship between the the biannual component of the sea surface temperature (SST) in the equatorial eastern Pacific and the solar activity. He found that the amplitude of biannual component of the SST (BO) is modulated by the 11-year solar cycle: the amplitude of the BO is large during a period of low solar activity, but small during high solar activity. More than 25-years or two solar cycle has passed since his finding, but the relationship still holds. In order to get an insight into the mechanism of the solar modulation of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), here we have revisited this problem. Solar cycle modulation of the BO in the tropical SST is discernible since the end of the 19th centuries, but the amplitude modulation is particularly clear after 1960's. The composite analysis of the SST based on the amplitude of the BO during 1958-2012, indicates that the amplitude of BO is larger when the equatorial Pacific temperature anomalies are high in the central Pacific, but low in the eastern Pacific. Central Pacific anomalies extend to the northern hemisphere, while those in the central Pacific spread toward the southern hemisphere. In short, this anomalous SST pattern is similar to the El Niño modoki. In this connection, it should be noted that the solar signal in the tropical SST also exhibits a similar pattern. This suggests that the modulation of the ENSO variability by the solar cycle originates through a modulation of the El Niño Modoki rather than the canonical El Nino.

  18. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 23: SeaWiFS prelaunch radiometric calibration and spectral characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Robert A.; Holmes, Alan W.; Barnes, William L.; Esaias, Wayne E.; Mcclain, Charles R.; Svitek, Tomas; Hooker, Stanford B.; Firestone, Elaine R.; Acker, James G.

    1994-01-01

    Based on the operating characteristics of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), calibration equations have been developed that allow conversion of the counts from the radiometer into Earth-existing radiances. These radiances are the geophysical properties the instrument has been designed to measure. SeaWiFS uses bilinear gains to allow high sensitivity measurements of ocean-leaving radiances and low sensitivity measurements of radiances from clouds, which are much brighter than the ocean. The calculation of these bilinear gains is central to the calibration equations. Several other factors within these equations are also included. Among these are the spectral responses of the eight SeaWiFS bands. A band's spectral response includes the ability of the band to isolate a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and the amount of light that lies outside of that region. The latter is termed out-of-band response. In the calibration procedure, some of the counts from the instrument are produced by radiance in the out-of-band region. The number of those counts for each band is a function of the spectral shape of the source. For the SeaWiFS calibration equations, the out-of-band responses are converted from those for the laboratory source into those for a source with the spectral shape of solar flux. The solar flux, unlike the laboratory calibration, approximates the spectral shape of the Earth-existing radiance from the oceans. This conversion modifies the results from the laboratory radiometric calibration by 1-4 percent, depending on the band. These and other factors in the SeaWiFS calibration equations are presented here, both for users of the SeaWiFS data set and for researchers making ground-based radiance measurements in support of Sea WiFS.

  19. An Evaluation of the Seasonal Arctic Sea Ice Predictions from CFSv2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Wang, M.; Overland, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid reductions in Arctic sea ice have been observed in the past several decades, especially at the end of the summer melt season in September. It is necessary to have a reliable seasonal forecast of Arctic sea ice. In this study, we examined the Arctic sea ice predictions produced by NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) in the real- time operational mode. Forecasts were initialized monthly for two-year period (March 2014 to September 2015). Forecasts of sea ice extent (SIE) and concentration (SIC) were evaluated against the sea ice analysis (HadISST_ice) from the Hadley Center. We found that the Arctic September SIE forecasts from CFS were overestimated with the biases in SIC mainly originated from the Beaufort Sea, Laptev Sea and Fram Strait. For 2014, we found that the forecast initialized from March with the lead-time of 6 months gave the best September SIE forecast while the forecast initialized from July with the lead-time of 2 months had the worst September SIE forecast. In order to understand the forecast biases in September sea ice, the atmospheric forecasted forcings including incoming solar/Infrared radiation, upward solar/infrared radiation from surface, latent and sensible heat flux, 2-meter air temperature, cloud fraction, sea level pressure and 10-meter wind from CFSv2 were evaluated using the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) .

  20. Solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.S.

    1982-06-08

    A solar concentrator having an open framework formed as a geodesic dome. A rotatable support axle extends substantially diametrically across the dome and has the opposite ends thereof supported on the framework. The support axle defines a first rotational axis which is oriented to extend substantially parallel with the earth's north-south axis. A support post is hingedly mounted on the support shaft substantially at the midpoint thereof for permitting angular displacement of the support post relative to the support shaft about a second rotational axis which is perpendicular to the first axis. A dishshaped reflector assembly is positioned within the interior of the framework and fixedly secured to the support post. First and second drives effect angular displacement of the reflector assembly about the first and second axes, respectively, to permit tracking of the solar position.

  1. Solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treble, F. C.

    1980-11-01

    The history, state of the art, and future prospects of solar cells are reviewed. Solar cells are already competitive in a wide range of low-power applications, and during the 1980's they are expected to become cheaper to run than diesel or gasoline generators, the present mainstay of isolated communities. At this stage they will become attractive for water pumping, irrigation, and rural electrification, particularly in developing countries. With further cost reduction, they may be used to augment grid supplies in domestic, commercial, institutional, and industrial premises. Cost reduction to the stage where photovoltaics becomes economic for large-scale power generation in central stations depends on a technological breakthrough in the development of thin-film cells. DOE aims to reach this goal by 1990, so that by the end of the century about 20% of the estimated annual additions to their electrical generating capacity will be photovoltaic.

  2. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  3. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  4. Solar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    High energy processes that take place in the Sun's atmosphere and the relationship of these phenomena to the basic problems of solar activity are discussed. Gamma ray emission exhibits characteristics of the conditions in regions where accelerated high energy particles interact. A number of gamma ray production mechanisms are considered. These include: the Compton effect, magnetobremsstrahlung, pi meson production by proton-proton interaction or by proton-antiproton annihilation, fission and neutral of charged particle radiative capture on inelastic scatter.

  5. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  6. Solar cooker

    SciTech Connect

    Zwach, D.M.

    1987-09-29

    A solar unit is described comprising a solar oven having an open end. A generally concave parabolic main reflector is joined to the oven to move therewith and reflect solar radiation away from the oven. The main reflector has a central opening to the oven open end, a generally parabolic convex secondary reflector for reflecting the radiation from the main reflector through the central opening to the open end of the oven, means for mounting the secondary reflector on the main reflector for movement, a frame, and means for mounting the oven on the frame for adjustable movement relative to the frame. This permits adjusting the angular position relative to the earth. The last mentioned means includes means for supporting the oven including first and second pairs of pivot members that respectively have a fist pivot axis and a second pivot axis that extends perpendicular to the first pivot axis. The oven extends between each of the first pivot members and each of the second pivot members.

  7. Global sea level rise

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, B.C. )

    1991-04-15

    Published values for the long-term, global mean sea level rise determined from tide gauge records exhibit considerable scatter, from about 1 mm to 3 mm/yr. This disparity is not attributable to instrument error; long-term trends computed at adjacent sites often agree to within a few tenths of a millimeter per year. Instead, the differing estimates of global sea level rise appear to be in large part due to authors' using data from gauges located at convergent tectonic plate boundaries, where changes of land elevation give fictitious sea level trends. In addition, virtually all gauges undergo subsidence or uplift due to postglacial rebound (PGR) from the last deglaciation at a rate comparable to or greater than the secular rise of sea level. Modeling PGR by the ICE-3G model of Tushingham and Peltier (1991) and avoiding tide gauge records in areas of converging tectonic plates produces a highly consistent set of long sea level records. The value for mean sea level rise obtained from a global set of 21 such stations in nine oceanic regions with an average record length of 76 years during the period 1880-1980 is 1.8 mm/yr {plus minus} 0.1. This result provides confidence that carefully selected long tide gauge records measure the same underlying trend of sea level and that many old tide gauge records are of very high quality.

  8. Sea surface temperature variability in the Colombian Basin, Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Ochoa, Mauricio; Beier, Emilio; Bernal, Gladys; Barton, Eric Desmond

    2012-06-01

    Daily sea surface temperature (SST) data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) database with ∼4 km of spatial resolution were analyzed for the period 1985-2009 in the Colombian Basin using harmonic and empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. The data were compared with observational records in the Rosario Island National Park at 10 m depth (T10) from March 2003 to August 2005. SST values were higher than T10 from June to October (rainy season), but similar from December to February (dry season); both data sets have similar coefficient of variation. The mean SST distribution varies spatially, with minimum SST values in the coastal zone of La Guajira Peninsula and maximum values in the Darien and Mosquitos Gulfs. The seasonal variability explains up to 75% of the total variability in La Guajira, a high value compared with 40% in the Mosquitos Gulf. The most important feature of the splitting of SST variation into annual and semiannual harmonics in La Guajira is the relationship between their amplitudes. These are of the same order, which is not common in other ocean zones, where the semiannual component is only a small fraction of the annual dominated by the solar warming. The river water discharge, highest from August to November, produces low density surface water, reduces vertical mixing and limits the absorption of solar radiation to a thin surface layer, explaining the discrepancy between SST and T10 in the rainy season. The decomposition of the SST in EOFs indicated that the dominant mode of the basin is a uniform interannual variation in phase with the North Tropical Atlantic Index. The second mode, representing the variability of the Guajira upwelling, covaried strongly with the second mode of wind stress curl. The third mode reflected the role of the vertical atmospheric circulation cell associated with the Caribbean Low Level Jet off Central America.

  9. Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael; Evans, James; Ellis, Jordan; Schimmels, John; Roberts, Timothy; Rios-Reyes, Leonel; Scheeres, Daniel; Bladt, Jeff; Lawrence, Dale; Piggott, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation Software (S5) toolkit provides solar-sail designers with an integrated environment for designing optimal solar-sail trajectories, and then studying the attitude dynamics/control, navigation, and trajectory control/correction of sails during realistic mission simulations. Unique features include a high-fidelity solar radiation pressure model suitable for arbitrarily-shaped solar sails, a solar-sail trajectory optimizer, capability to develop solar-sail navigation filter simulations, solar-sail attitude control models, and solar-sail high-fidelity force models.

  10. Solar-stellar astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    Nonthermal physical processes in the solar atmosphere are discussed. The solar atmospheric regions are defined, and solar convection and its phenomena are explained. The relationship of the solar dynamo, magnetic field, and flares is explored. The solar atmospheric velocity fields are discussed, and the unresolved problem of the nature of atmospheric heating is detailed. The solar wind heating and acceleration are discussed and the need for global solar atmospheric models is emphasized. The application of these solar nonthermal processes to the stars in general is then taken up, employing the same categories as were applied to the solar atmosphere.

  11. Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Roy

    2006-01-01

    The Solar Sail Propulsion investment area has been one of the three highest priorities within the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Project. In the fall of 2003, the NASA Headquarters' Science Mission Directorate provided funding and direction to mature the technology as far as possible through ground research and development from TRL 3 to 6 in three years. A group of experts from government, industry, and academia convened in Huntsville, Alabama to define technology gaps between what was needed for science missions to the inner solar system and the current state of the art in ultra1ightweight materials and gossamer structure design. This activity set the roadmap for development. The centerpiece of the development would be the ground demonstration of scalable solar sail systems including masts, sails, deployment mechanisms, and attitude control hardware and software. In addition, new materials would be subjected to anticipated space environments to quantify effects and assure mission life. Also, because solar sails are huge structures, and it is not feasible to validate the technology by ground test at full scale, a multi-discipline effort was established to develop highly reliable analytical models to serve as mission assurance evidence in future flight program decision-making. Two separate contractor teams were chosen to develop the SSP System Ground Demonstrator (SGD). After a three month conceptual mission/system design phase, the teams developed a ten meter diameter pathfinder set of hardware and subjected it to thermal vacuum tests to compare analytically predicted structural behavior with measured characteristics. This process developed manufacturing and handling techniques and refined the basic design. In 2005, both contractor teams delivered 20 meter, four quadrant sail systems to the largest thermal vacuum chamber in the world in Plum Brook, Ohio, and repeated the tests. Also demonstrated was the deployment and articulation of attitude control

  12. Sea level variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Bruce C.

    1992-01-01

    Published values for the long-term, global mean sea level rise determined from tide gauge records range from about one to three mm per year. The scatter of the estimates appears to arise largely from the use of data from gauges located at convergent tectonic plate boundaries where changes of land elevation give fictitious sea level trends, and the effects of large interdecadal and longer sea level variations on short (less than 50+ years) or sappy records. In addition, virtually all gauges undergo subsidence or uplift due to isostatic rebound from the last deglaciation at a rate comparable to or greater than the secular rise of sea level. Modeling rebound by the ICE-3G model of Tushingham and Peltier (1990) and avoiding tide gauge records in areas of converging tectonic plates produces a highly consistent set of long sea level records. A global set of 21 such stations in nine oceanic regions with an average record length of 76 years during the period 1880-1980 yields the global sea level rise value 1.8 mm/year +/- 0.1. Greenhouse warming scenarios commonly forecast an additional acceleration of global sea level in the next 5 or 6+ decades in the range 0.1-0.2 mm/yr2. Because of the large power at low frequencies in the sea level spectrum, very long tide gauge records (75 years minimum) have been examined for past apparent sea level acceleration. For the 80-year period 1905-1985, 23 essentially complete tide gauge records in 10 geographic groups are available for analysis. These yielded the apparent global acceleration -0.011 (+/- 0.012) mm/yr2. A larger, less uniform set of 37 records in the same 10 groups with 92 years average length covering the 141 years from 1850-1991 gave 0.001 (+/- 0.008) mm/yr2. Thus there is no evidence for an apparent acceleration in the past 100+ years that is significant either statistically, or in comparison to values associated with global warming. Unfortunately, the large interdecadal fluctuations of sea level severely affect

  13. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    ScienceCinema

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2016-07-12

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  14. Solar energy collector

    DOEpatents

    Brin, Raymond L.; Pace, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a solar energy collector comprising solar energy absorbing material within chamber having a transparent wall, solar energy being transmitted through the transparent wall, and efficiently absorbed by the absorbing material, for transfer to a heat transfer fluid. The solar energy absorbing material, of generally foraminous nature, absorbs and transmits the solar energy with improved efficiency.

  15. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2012-01-01

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  16. Solar Cycle Variations in the Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. J.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will review the observational evidence for solar cycle-dependent changes in the structure and dynamical motions of the solar interior. It will include the results of studies that have been carried out using the tools of both global and local heiloseismology during Solar Cycles 22, 23, and 24. The presentation will describe results obtained with both ground- and space-based helioseismic programs, and it will also describe the role that these helioseismic studies have played in providing inputs to theoretical studies of the solar dynamo. Among the topics that will be covered are temporal changes in the solar torsional oscillations, the solar meridional circulation, the solar seismic radius, the subsurface vorticity, and the solar p-mode oscillation frequencies and widths. Also covered will be evidence for temporal changes in the solar interior that are related to the emergence of active regions on both the near and far sides of the Sun.

  17. The north Sulu Sea productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The Sulu Sea is a part of the western North Pacific. It is a closed sea for its deep water and a semi-closed sea for its upper layer. The Sulu Sea exchanges mainly surface waters with the South China Sea and the Celebes Sea. The Sulu Sea is more productive than the adjacent South China Sea (Jones, 2002). On the basis of MERIS satellite observations from 2002 to 2008, we focus on the high-chlorophyll area as an indicator of the abundance of primary productivity in the Sulu Sea. Strong chlorophyll concentration in the north Sulu Sea close to the Mindoro Strait mainly occurs from December to March and low chlorophyll concentration happens in April to November. The adjacent South China Sea on the other side of Mindoro Strait has shown persistent signs of low chlorophyll concentration. Based on 1/8° Global Navy Coastal Ocean Model, the intrusion of the South China Sea waters through the Mindoro Strait to the Sulu Sea from April to November is the main reason for the low chlorophyll concentration observed in the north Sulu Sea. During April to November, the South China Sea waters flow through the Mindoro Strait and stay on the surface of the north Sulu Sea because of their low density. The north Sulu Sea waters mix with fresher waters coming from the South China Sea without new nutrients supply. When the inflow from South China Sea to Sulu Sea ceases in December to March, the upwelling due to the summer monsoon wind becomes an important mechanism supplying deep nutrients to the surface water which lead to high chlorophyll concentration. Jones, I.S.F., 2002. Primary production in the Sulu Sea. Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences-Earth and Planetary Sciences 111, 209-213.

  18. Energy economy of salmon aquaculture in the Baltic sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folke, Carl

    1988-07-01

    Resource utilization in Atlantic salmon aquaculture in the Baltic Sea was investigated by means of an energy analysis. A comparison was made between cage farming and sea ranching enterprises each with yearly yields of 40 t of Atlantic salmon. A variety of sea ranching options were evaluated, including (a) conventional ranching, (b) ranching employing a delayed release to the sea of young smolts, (c) harvesting salmon both by offshore fishing fleets and as they return to coastal areas, and (d) when offshore fishing is banned, harvesting salmon only as they return to coastal areas where released. Inputs both from natural ecosystems (i.e., fish consumed by ranched salmon while in the sea and raw materials used for producing dry food pellets) and from the economy (i.e., fossil fuels and energy embodied in economic goods and services) were quantified in tonnes for food energy and as direct plus indirect energy cost (embodied energy). The fixed solar energy (estimated as primary production) and the direct and indirect auxiliary energy requirements per unit of fish output were expressed in similar units. Similar quantities of living resources in tonnes per unit of salmon biomass output are required whether the salmon are feeding in the sea or are caged farmed. Cage farming is about 10 times more dependent on auxiliary energies than sea ranching. Sea ranching applying delayed release of smolts is 35 45% more efficient in the use of auxiliary energies than conventional sea ranching and cage farming. Restriction of offshore fishing would make sea ranching 3 to 6.5 times more efficient than cage farming. The fixed solar energy input to Atlantic salmon aquaculture is 4 to 63 times larger than the inputs of auxiliary energy. Thus, cage farming and sea ranching are both heavily dependent on the productivity of natural ecosystems. It is concluded that sustainable development of the aquaculture industry must be founded on ecologically integrated technologies which utilize the free

  19. Sensing the sea bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    William Wilcock and a team of scientists and engineers drilled holes in the sea floor, and inadvertently provided a breeding ground for octopuses, in their attempt to understand deep-ocean hydrothermal venting.

  20. Science at Sea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Mary Nied

    2001-01-01

    Describes a three-week inservice teacher education program that involves two sessions of preparatory classes ashore in nautical science and oceanography, and concludes with a nine-day sea voyage. (ASK)