Sample records for sample exam questions

  1. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two exam questions are presented. One suitable for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate courses in organic chemistry, is on equivalent expressions for the description of several pericyclic reactions. The second, for general chemistry students, asks for an estimation of the rate of decay of a million-year-old Uranium-238 sample. (BB)

  2. Validity, Reliability and Difficulty Indices for Instructor-Built Exam Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jandaghi, Gholamreza; Shaterian, Fatemeh

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to determine college Instructor's skill rate in designing exam questions in chemistry subject. The statistical population was all of chemistry exam sheets for two semesters in one academic year from which a sample of 364 exam sheets was drawn using multistage cluster sampling. Two experts assessed the sheets and by…

  3. My Favorite Exam Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styer, Dan

    2015-01-01

    My favorite exam question comes from the final exam in an introductory mechanics course: "A rolling 31 ton railroad boxcar collides with a stationary flatcar. The coupling mechanism activates so the cars latch together and roll down the track attached. Of the initial kinetic energy, 38% dissipates as heat, sound, vibrations, mechanical…

  4. Does Question Structure Affect Exam Performance in the Geosciences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. A.; D'Arcy, M. K.; Craig, L.; Streule, M. J.; Passmore, E.; Irving, J. C. E.

    2015-12-01

    The jump to university level exams can be challenging for some students, often resulting in poor marks, which may be detrimental to their confidence and ultimately affect their overall degree class. Previous studies have found that question structure can have a strong impact on the performance of students in college level exams (see Gibson et al., 2015, for a discussion of its impact on physics undergraduates). Here, we investigate the effect of question structure on the exam results of geology and geophysics undergraduate students. Specifically, we analyse the performance of students in questions that have a 'scaffolded' framework and compare them to their performance in open-ended questions and coursework. We also investigate if observed differences in exam performance are correlated with the educational background and gender of students, amongst other factors. It is important for all students to be able to access their degree courses, no matter what their backgrounds may be. Broadening participation in the geosciences relies on removing systematic barriers to achievement. Therefore we recommend that exams are either structured with scaffolding in questions at lower levels, or students are explicitly prepared for this transition. We also recommend that longitudinal studies of exam performance are conducted within individual departments, and this work outlines one approach to analysing performance data.

  5. Effect of Paper Color and Question Order on Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tal, Ilanit R.; Akers, Katherine G.; Hodge, Gordon K.

    2008-01-01

    To deter cheating, teachers commonly use exams printed on differently colored paper or with varied question orders. Previous studies, however, reported that paper color and question order affect exam performance and suggested that teachers should adjust students' scores accordingly and discontinue the use of alternate exam forms. We conducted 2…

  6. Exam Question Sequencing Effects and Context Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Doris Bitler

    2017-01-01

    Providing two or more versions of multiple-choice exams has long been a popular strategy for reducing the opportunity for students to engage in academic dishonesty. While the results of studies comparing exam scores under different question-order conditions have been inconclusive, the potential importance of contextual cues to aid student recall…

  7. Assessment of Validity, Reliability and Difficulty Indices for Teacher-Built Physics Exam Questions in First Year High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jandaghi, Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to determine high school teachers' skill rate in designing exam questions in physics subject. The statistical population was all of physics exam shits for two semesters in one school year from which a sample of 364 exam shits was drawn using multistage cluster sampling. Two experts assessed the shits and by using…

  8. [Docimologic analysis of 4th-year preclinical exam questions].

    PubMed

    Gnagne-Agnero, Koffi N; Zinsou, E M; Assoumou, N M; Adiko, E F

    2003-12-01

    Operative Dentistry and Endodontics' Department of the School of Dentistry of Abidjan experienced pre-clinical exam in fourth year of dentistry with MCQ following guided courses which aim was to lead student to be correctly in charge of the patients when they start their first clinical performance. The objective off his this work is to show how one's can analyse exams questions efficiently. In this work the authors present et discuss the results of the evaluation of this preclinical exam performed through calculation of index of success (Ir) which gives us information on the difficulty of a question for all the students who answered, the discriminative index (Id) which allow to determine when a question is selective enough to distinguish weak to strong students in a group. The mean to evaluate is well chosen because the questions asked has a Ir between 46% et 80% (satisfying Ir) and the average Id is between 0.30 and 0.53 (Id discriminates well among 0.30 et 1). This methodology allows an evaluation of a high number of students by stocked questions.

  9. Pattern recognition as a concept for multiple-choice questions in a national licensing exam.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, Tilo; Salimi, Madjid; Khaljani, Ehsan; Harendza, Sigrid

    2014-11-14

    Multiple-choice questions (MCQ) are still widely used in high stakes medical exams. We wanted to examine whether and to what extent a national licensing exam uses the concept of pattern recognition to test applied clinical knowledge. We categorized all 4,134 German National medical licensing exam questions between October 2006 and October 2012 by discipline, year, and type. We analyzed questions from the four largest disciplines: internal medicine (n = 931), neurology (n = 305), pediatrics (n = 281), and surgery (n = 233), with respect to the following question types: knowledge questions (KQ), pattern recognition questions (PRQ), inverse PRQ (IPRQ), and pseudo PRQ (PPRQ). A total 51.1% of all questions were of a higher taxonomical order (PRQ and IPRQ) with a significant decrease in the percentage of these questions (p <0.001) from 2006 (61.5%) to 2012 (41.6%). The proportion of PRQs and IPRQs was significantly lower (p <0.001) in internal medicine and surgery, compared to neurology and pediatrics. PRQs were mostly used in questions about diagnoses (71.7%). A significantly higher (p <0.05) percentage of PR/therapy questions was found for internal medicine compared with neurology and pediatrics. The concept of pattern recognition is used with different priorities and to various extents by the different disciplines in a high stakes exam to test applied clinical knowledge. Being aware of this concept may aid in the design and balance of MCQs in an exam with respect to testing clinical reasoning as a desired skill at the threshold of postgraduate medical education.

  10. Two layers LSTM with attention for multi-choice question answering in exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongbin

    2018-03-01

    Question Answering in Exams is typical question answering task that aims to test how accurately the model could answer the questions in exams. In this paper, we use general deep learning model to solve the multi-choice question answering task. Our approach is to build distributed word embedding of question and answers instead of manually extracting features or linguistic tools, meanwhile, for improving the accuracy, the external corpus is introduced. The framework uses a two layers LSTM with attention which get a significant result. By contrast, we introduce the simple long short-term memory (QA-LSTM) model and QA-LSTM-CNN model and QA-LSTM with attention model as the reference. Experiment demonstrate superior performance of two layers LSTM with attention compared to other models in question answering task.

  11. Nursing students collaborating to develop multiple-choice exam revision questions: A student engagement study.

    PubMed

    Craft, Judy A; Christensen, Martin; Shaw, Natasha; Bakon, Shannon

    2017-12-01

    Nursing students find bioscience subjects challenging. Bioscience exams pose particular concerns for these students, which may lead to students adopting a surface-approach to learning. To promote student collective understanding of bioscience, improve their confidence for the final exam, and improve deeper understanding of bioscience. In order to address exam anxiety, and improve student understanding of content, this student engagement project involved nursing students collaborating in small groups to develop multiple-choice questions and answers, which became available to the entire student cohort. This study was conducted at two campuses of an Australian university, within a first year bioscience subject as part of the undergraduate nursing programme. All students enrolled in the subject were encouraged to attend face-to-face workshops, and collaborate in revision question writing. Online anonymous questionnaires were used to invite student feedback on this initiative; 79 respondents completed this feedback. Students collaborated in groups to write revision questions as part of in-class activities. These questions were made available on the student online learning site for revision. An online feedback survey was deployed at the conclusion of all workshops for this subject, with questions rated using a Likert scale. Participants indicated that they enjoyed the opportunity to collaborate in this activity, and almost all of these respondents used these questions in their exam preparation. There was strong agreement that this activity improved their confidence for the final exam. Importantly, almost two-thirds of respondents agreed that writing questions improved their understanding of content, and assisted in their active reflection of content. Overall, this initiative revealed various potential benefits for the students, including promoting bioscience understanding and confidence. This may improve their long-term understanding of bioscience for nursing practice

  12. Association Between Dental Student-Developed Exam Questions and Learning at Higher Cognitive Levels.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cabezas, Carlos; Anderson, Olivia S; Wright, Mary C; Fontana, Margherita

    2015-11-01

    New dental accreditation standards emphasize that graduates must be competent in the use of critical thinking (a high cognitive-level skill). Despite this new standard, most written assessments in dental school courses are still based on low cognitive-level questions. The aim of this study was to determine if an exercise that allows students to collaboratively write exam questions would help cultivate higher cognitive levels of learning. To evaluate this exercise at one U.S. dental school, the cognitive level (according to Bloom's taxonomy) of multiple-choice exam questions and students' scores across two cohorts in a cariology course were compared. This evaluation took place using a control group in which questions were instructor-generated and an intervention group in which students worked in groups to develop questions. All students in one first-year class participated in the intervention group (n=104); all students in the first-year class two years earlier served as the control group (n=106). Among students in the intervention group, the response rate to a post-intervention survey measuring students' attitudes about the experience was 70% (N=73). The results showed that the students generating their own assessments developed higher cognitive-level exam questions than the instructor-generated assessments. The intervention group (with student-generated assessments) also performed as well or better on tests compared to the control group (with instructor-generated assessments). In the intervention group survey, the vast majority of students agreed that the exercise was helpful for their overall learning experience, but working in teams was said to be the least valuable component of the activity for their learning. This study suggests that student-driven, collaborative assessments can be an important tool for building critical thinking skills in dental classrooms and that it may be worthwhile to expand this type of exercise into other courses.

  13. Research and Teaching: Correcting Missed Exam Questions as a Learning Tool in a Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozell, Timothy G.; Johnson, Jessica; Sexten, Andrea; Rhodes, Ashley E.

    2017-01-01

    Students in a junior- and senior-level Anatomy and Physiology course have the opportunity to correct missed exam questions ("regrade") and earn up to half of the original points missed. The three objectives of this study were to determine if: (a) performance on the regrade assignment was correlated with scores on subsequent exams, (b)…

  14. Do Collaborative Exams Really Promote Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Scott; James, C. Renee

    2018-01-01

    Collaborative, two-stage exams are becoming more popular in physics and astronomy courses, and their supposed benefits in terms of collaborative learning have been reported in the field of physics. In a collaborative, two-stage exam, students first complete an exam individually. Once that portion of the exam is over, students then retake all or part of the exam within a group, where they are able to discuss the questions with their peers and arrive at a common answer. While there are a number of papers that discuss the purported benefits of this method from a collaborative point of view, few, if any discuss the actual benefits in terms of student learning. One paper found that when students were presented with previous exam questions a few weeks later, they performed better on questions covered previously in the group portion of the exam compared to similar questions which were tested but not part of the group portion. But, when students were retested on exam questions which were administered earlier, roughly six to seven weeks beforehand, no difference was found in their performance on the two sets of questions.We present preliminary findings comparing student performance levels on multiple sets of exam questions administered to students in an introductory astronomy course where two-stage exams are administered. Questions were administered first in an exam during the course of the semester, then again during a final exam. During the semester exams, one set of questions was also contained within the group portion of the exam, while questions similar in concept and difficulty were not. A comparison of student performance on these two sets of questions are compared to evaluate the usefulness of collaborative exams to promote learning.

  15. Algorithmic, LOCS and HOCS (chemistry) exam questions: performance and attitudes of college students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoller, Uri

    2002-02-01

    The performance of freshmen biology and physics-mathematics majors and chemistry majors as well as pre- and in-service chemistry teachers in two Israeli universities on algorithmic (ALG), lower-order cognitive skills (LOCS), and higher-order cognitive skills (HOCS) chemistry exam questions were studied. The driving force for the study was an interest in moving science and chemistry instruction from an algorithmic and factual recall orientation dominated by LOCS, to a decision-making, problem-solving and critical system thinking approach, dominated by HOCS. College students' responses to the specially designed ALG, LOCS and HOCS chemistry exam questions were scored and analysed for differences and correlation between the performance means within and across universities by the questions' category. This was followed by a combined student interview - 'speaking aloud' problem solving session for assessing the thinking processes involved in solving these types of questions and the students' attitudes towards them. The main findings were: (1) students in both universities performed consistently in each of the three categories in the order of ALG > LOCS > HOCS; their 'ideological' preference, was HOCS > algorithmic/LOCS, - referred to as 'computational questions', but their pragmatic preference was the reverse; (2) success on algorithmic/LOCS does not imply success on HOCS questions; algorithmic questions constitute a category on its own as far as students success in solving them is concerned. Our study and its results support the effort being made, worldwide, to integrate HOCS-fostering teaching and assessment strategies and, to develop HOCS-oriented science-technology-environment-society (STES)-type curricula within science and chemistry education.

  16. A Qualitative Evaluation of Instructors' Exam Questions at a Primary Education Department in Terms of Certain Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Mehmet Kaan; Eryaman, Mustafa Yunus

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study is to analyze instructors' exam questions at a Primary Education Department in terms of the exam's period, the comprehensibility of the instructions, cognitive level, and the appropriateness to the critical thinking. This qualitative study is based on document analysis method. 100 randomly selected…

  17. Technical flaws in multiple-choice questions in the access exam to medical specialties ("examen MIR") in Spain (2009-2013).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díez, María Cristina; Alegre, Manuel; Díez, Nieves; Arbea, Leire; Ferrer, Marta

    2016-02-03

    The main factor that determines the selection of a medical specialty in Spain after obtaining a medical degree is the MIR ("médico interno residente", internal medical resident) exam. This exam consists of 235 multiple-choice questions with five options, some of which include images provided in a separate booklet. The aim of this study was to analyze the technical quality of the multiple-choice questions included in the MIR exam over the last five years. All the questions included in the exams from 2009 to 2013 were analyzed. We studied the proportion of questions including clinical vignettes, the number of items related to an image and the presence of technical flaws in the questions. For the analysis of technical flaws, we adapted the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) guidelines. We looked for 18 different issues included in the manual, grouped into two categories: issues related to testwiseness and issues related to irrelevant difficulties. The final number of questions analyzed was 1,143. The percentage of items based on clinical vignettes increased from 50% in 2009 to 56-58% in the following years (2010-2013). The percentage of items based on an image increased progressively from 10% in 2009 to 15% in 2012 and 2013. The percentage of items with at least one technical flaw varied between 68 and 72%. We observed a decrease in the percentage of items with flaws related to testwiseness, from 30% in 2009 to 20% in 2012 and 2013. While most of these issues decreased dramatically or even disappeared (such as the imbalance in the correct option numbers), the presence of non-plausible options remained frequent. With regard to technical flaws related to irrelevant difficulties, no improvement was observed; this is especially true with respect to negative stem questions and "hinged" questions. The formal quality of the MIR exam items has improved over the last five years with regard to testwiseness. A more detailed revision of the items submitted, checking

  18. Promoting an active form of learning out-of-class via answering online "study questions" leads to higher than expected exam scores in General Biology.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Susan I

    2015-01-01

    A rising need for workers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields has fueled interest in improving teaching within STEM disciplines. Numerous studies have demonstrated the benefits of active learning approaches on student learning outcomes. However, many of these studies have been conducted in experimental, rather than real-life class, settings. In addition, most of these studies have focused on in-class active learning exercises. This study tested the effects of answering questions outside of class on exam performance for General Biology students at the University of Minnesota. An online database of 1,020 multiple-choice questions covering material from the first half of the course was generated. Students in seven course sections (with an average of ∼265 students per section) were given unlimited access to the online study questions. These students made extensive use of the online questions, with students answering an average of 1,323 questions covering material from the half of the semester for which the questions were available. After students answered a set of questions, they were shown the correct answers for those questions. More specific feedback describing how to arrive at the correct answer was provided for the 73% of the questions for which the correct answers were not deemed to be self-explanatory. The extent to which access to the online study questions improved student learning outcomes was assessed by comparing the performance on exam questions of students in the seven course sections with access to the online study questions with the performance of students in course sections without access to the online study questions. Student performance was analyzed for a total of 89 different exams questions that were not included in the study questions, but that covered the same material covered by the study questions. Each of these 89 questions was used on one to five exams given to students in course sections that had access to the

  19. The Value of Analysis of Standardized Placement Exams: A Case Study of Cell Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blystone, Robert V.

    This study focused on potential pedagological uses of standardized placement exams. A sample of 250 exams of the May 1984 Biology Advanced Placement (AP) exam was obtained and student responses to the question on cell structure were analyzed. The frequency of particular responses to the question is listed and trends and patterns in the responses…

  20. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Acceptable answers are provided for two chemistry questions. The first question is related to the prediction of the appearance of non-first-order proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The second question is related to extraterrestrial kinetic theory of gases. (JN)

  1. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Contains two articles relating to chemistry examination questions. One provides examples of how to sequence multiple choice questions so that partial credit may be given for some responses. The second includes a question and solution dealing with stereoisomerism as a result of free radical chlorination of a nonstereoisometic substance. (TW)

  2. Assessing Conceptual and Algorithmic Knowledge in General Chemistry with ACS Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Thomas; Murphy, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the ACS Examinations Institute released an exam for first-term general chemistry in which items are intentionally paired with one conceptual and one traditional item. A second-term, paired-questions exam was released in 2007. This paper presents an empirical study of student performances on these two exams based on national samples of…

  3. Exit Exam as Academic Performance Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud; Al Marzouqi, Ali H.; Hussien, Mousa

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of exit exams on different elements of the educational process, namely: curriculum development, students and instructors. A 50-question multiple-choice Exit Exam was prepared by Electrical Engineering (EE) faculty members covering a poll of questions from EE core courses. A copy of the Exit Exam applied during each…

  4. Can a Picture Ruin a Thousand Words? The Effects of Visual Resources in Exam Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Victoria; Sweiry, Ezekiel

    2006-01-01

    Background: When an exam question is read, a mental representation of the task is formed in each student's mind. This processing can be affected by features such as visual resources (e.g. pictures, diagrams, photographs, tables), which can come to dominate the mental representation due to their salience. Purpose: The aim of this research was to…

  5. Medical Student Dissection of Cadavers Improves Performance on Practical Exams but not on the NBME Anatomy Subject Exam.

    PubMed

    Sargent Jones, Leslie; Paulman, Lance E; Thadani, Raj; Terracio, Louis

    2001-12-01

    We have examined whether cadaver dissection by first year medical students (MIs) affected their performance in two test measures: the NBME Gross Anatomy and Embryology Subject Exam (dissection-relevant questions only), and practical exams given at the end of each major section within the course. The dissections for the entire course were divided into 18 regional dissection units and each student was assigned to dissect one third of the regional units; the other two-thirds of the material was learned from the partner-prosected cadavers. Performance for each student on the exams was then assessed as a function of the regions those students actually dissected. While the results indicated a small performance advantage for MIs answering questions on material they had dissected on the NBME Subject Exam questions relevant to dissection (78-88% of total exam), the results were not statistically significant. However, a similar, small performance advantage on the course practical exams was highly significant.

  6. Optimal Weighting for Exam Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganzfried, Sam; Yusuf, Farzana

    2018-01-01

    A problem faced by many instructors is that of designing exams that accurately assess the abilities of the students. Typically, these exams are prepared several days in advance, and generic question scores are used based on rough approximation of the question difficulty and length. For example, for a recent class taught by the author, there were…

  7. Evaluation of the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam: Lower Extremity Questions.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Basta, Marten N; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate the training of plastic surgery residents, we analyzed a knowledge-based curriculum for plastic and reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity. The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam (PSITE) is a commonly used tool to assess medical knowledge in plastic surgery. We reviewed the lower extremity content on 6 consecutive score keys (2008-2013). Questions were classified by taxonomy, anatomy, and subject. Answer references were quantified by source and relative year of publication. Totally, 107 questions related to the lower extremity (9.1% of all questions) and 14 questions had an associated image (13.1%). Questions required decision making (49%) over interpretation (36%) and direct recall (15%) skills (p < 0.001). Conditions of the leg (42.1%) and thigh (24.3%) constituted most of the questions. Subject matter focused on flap reconstruction (38.3%), nerve injury (8.4%), and congenital deformity (6.5%). Analysis of 263 citations to 66 unique journals showed that Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (54.9%) was the highest yield primary source. The median year of publication relative to PSITE administration was 6 (range: 1-58) with a mode of 2 years. Plastic Surgery by Mathes et al. was the most referenced textbook (21.9%). These data establish a benchmark for lower extremity training during plastic surgery residency. Study efforts focused on the most common topics and references will enhance trainee preparation for lower extremity PSITE questions. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. FLEX: A Modular Software Architecture for Flight License Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsan, Taner; Saka, Hamit Emre; Sahin, Ceyhun

    This paper is about the design and implementation of an examination system based on World Wide Web. It is called FLEX-Flight License Exam Software. We designed and implemented flexible and modular software architecture. The implemented system has basic specifications such as appending questions in system, building exams with these appended questions and making students to take these exams. There are three different types of users with different authorizations. These are system administrator, operators and students. System administrator operates and maintains the system, and also audits the system integrity. The system administrator can not be able to change the result of exams and can not take an exam. Operator module includes instructors. Operators have some privileges such as preparing exams, entering questions, changing the existing questions and etc. Students can log on the system and can be accessed to exams by a certain URL. The other characteristic of our system is that operators and system administrator are not able to delete questions due to the security problems. Exam questions can be inserted on their topics and lectures in the database. Thus; operators and system administrator can easily choose questions. When all these are taken into consideration, FLEX software provides opportunities to many students to take exams at the same time in safe, reliable and user friendly conditions. It is also reliable examination system for the authorized aviation administration companies. Web development platform - LAMP; Linux, Apache web server, MySQL, Object-oriented scripting Language - PHP are used for developing the system and page structures are developed by Content Management System - CMS.

  9. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Hip What's in this article? What ... Have Questions Print What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Forearm What's in this article? What ... Have Questions Print What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What ... Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Foot What's in this article? What ... Have Questions Print What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Wrist What's in this article? What ... Have Questions Print What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Finger What's in this article? What ... Have Questions Print What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Pelvis What's in this article? What ... Have Questions Print What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  16. Cognitive Difficulty and Format of Exams Predicts Gender and Socioeconomic Gaps in Exam Performance of Students in Introductory Biology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Christian D.; Eddy, Sarah L.; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Abshire, Elizabeth; Blankenbiller, Margaret; Brownell, Sara E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reform efforts in undergraduate biology have recommended transforming course exams to test at more cognitively challenging levels, which may mean including more cognitively challenging and more constructed-response questions on assessments. However, changing the characteristics of exams could result in bias against historically underserved groups. In this study, we examined whether and to what extent the characteristics of instructor-generated tests impact the exam performance of male and female and middle/high- and low-socioeconomic status (SES) students enrolled in introductory biology courses. We collected exam scores for 4810 students from 87 unique exams taken across 3 yr of the introductory biology series at a large research university. We determined the median Bloom’s level and the percentage of constructed-response questions for each exam. Despite controlling for prior academic ability in our models, we found that males and middle/high-SES students were disproportionately favored as the Bloom’s level of exams increased. Additionally, middle/high-SES students were favored as the proportion of constructed-response questions on exams increased. Given that we controlled for prior academic ability, our findings do not likely reflect differences in academic ability level. We discuss possible explanations for our findings and how they might impact how we assess our students. PMID:27252299

  17. Providing Opportunities for Argumentation in Science Exam Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Lauren; Solorza, Ruben; Fissore, Cinzia

    2018-01-01

    This article explores undergraduates' efforts to engage in scientific argumentation during exam settings. Thirteen undergraduate students enrolled in an environmental science course completed exams with questions linked around a central theme. Three types of questions were used, including those that prompted students to construct scientific…

  18. Examining ethics - developing a comprehensive exam for a bioethics master's program.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, Toby; Stoddard, Hugh; Labrecque, Cory Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Assessing mastery of bioethics in a graduate program requires careful attention not simply to the content knowledge and skill development of students but also to the principles of sound assessment processes. In this article, we describe the rationale, development process, and features of the comprehensive exam we created as a culminating experience of a master's program in bioethics. The exam became the students' opportunity to demonstrate the way they were able to integrate course, textual, and practical knowledge gained throughout the experience of the program. Additionally, the exam assessed students' proficiency in the field of bioethics and their ability to critically and constructively analyze bioethical issues. In this article, we offer tips to other exam creators regarding our experiences with question and answer development, scoring of the exam, and relationships between coursework and exam preparation and completion. We also include a sample rubric for others to see how we determined which student answers were satisfactory.

  19. Low Levels of Evidence on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Bilici, Nadir; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam is written by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Examinees reasonably infer that tested material reflects the Society's vision for the core curriculum in plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of evidence on which credited answers to the examination questions are based. Two recent Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exams (2014 and 2015) were analyzed. Questions were categorized using a taxonomy model. Recommended journal article references for Level III (decision-making) questions were assigned a level of evidence. Exam sections were analyzed for differences in question taxonomy distribution and level of evidence. To look for studies with higher levels of evidence, a PubMed search was conducted for a random sample of 10 questions from each section. One hundred three Level I (25.8 percent), 138 Level II (34.5 percent), and 159 Level III (39.8 percent) questions were analyzed (p < 0.001). The hand and lower extremity section had the highest percentage of Level III questions (50.0 percent; p = 0.005). Journal articles had a mean level of evidence of 3.9 ± 0.7. The number of articles with a low level of evidence (IV and V) (p = 0.624) and the percentage of questions supported by articles with a high level of evidence (I and II) (p = 0.406) did not vary by section. The PubMed search revealed no instances of a higher level of evidence than the recommended reading list. A significant percentage of Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam questions test clinical management, but most are supported with a low level of evidence. Although that is consistent with low level of evidence of plastic surgery literature, educators should recognize the potential for biases of question writers.

  20. Combined Online and In-Class Pretesting Improves Exam Performance in General Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Arnold Lewis; Brill, Gary; Ingate, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effect of distributed questioning on learning and retention in a college lecture course. A total of 48 question pairs were presented over four exams. The 16 question pairs associated with each of the three blocks of the course appeared on the block exams, and all 48 appeared on the final exam. The two questions in each pair…

  1. Improving Students' Capacity to Show Their Knowledge, Understanding and Skills in Exams by Using Combined Question and Answer Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    This research set out to compare the quality, length and nature of (1) exam responses in combined question and answer booklets, with (2) responses in separate answer booklets in order to inform choices about response format. Combined booklets are thought to support candidates by giving more information on what is expected of them. Anecdotal…

  2. Cognitive Difficulty and Format of Exams Predicts Gender and Socioeconomic Gaps in Exam Performance of Students in Introductory Biology Courses.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christian D; Eddy, Sarah L; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Abshire, Elizabeth; Blankenbiller, Margaret; Brownell, Sara E

    2016-01-01

    Recent reform efforts in undergraduate biology have recommended transforming course exams to test at more cognitively challenging levels, which may mean including more cognitively challenging and more constructed-response questions on assessments. However, changing the characteristics of exams could result in bias against historically underserved groups. In this study, we examined whether and to what extent the characteristics of instructor-generated tests impact the exam performance of male and female and middle/high- and low-socioeconomic status (SES) students enrolled in introductory biology courses. We collected exam scores for 4810 students from 87 unique exams taken across 3 yr of the introductory biology series at a large research university. We determined the median Bloom's level and the percentage of constructed-response questions for each exam. Despite controlling for prior academic ability in our models, we found that males and middle/high-SES students were disproportionately favored as the Bloom's level of exams increased. Additionally, middle/high-SES students were favored as the proportion of constructed-response questions on exams increased. Given that we controlled for prior academic ability, our findings do not likely reflect differences in academic ability level. We discuss possible explanations for our findings and how they might impact how we assess our students. © 2016 C. D. Wright, S. L. Eddy, et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Introducing Standardized EFL/ESL Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laborda, Jesus Garcia

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the features, and a brief comparison, of some of the most well-known high-stakes exams. They are classified in the following fashion: tests that only include multiple-choice questions, tests that include writing and multiple-choice questions, and tests that include speaking questions. The tests reviewed are: BULATS, IELTS,…

  4. Giving bonus points based on oral exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Robert

    2007-04-01

    A pedagogical experiment of giving bonus points based on oral exams in an introductory physics course is described. The orals covered the questions on a written exam that had just been graded and returned to the class. Although the performance of most students on the oral exams was fair at best, the value of bonus point orals would appear to be considerable, even though it may not be applicable to large classes and have other important disadvantages.

  5. Cognitive Difficulty and Format of Exams Predicts Gender and Socioeconomic Gaps in Exam Performance of Students in Introductory Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Christian D.; Eddy, Sarah L.; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Abshire, Elizabeth; Blankenbiller, Margaret; Brownell, Sara E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reform efforts in undergraduate biology have recommended transforming course exams to test at more cognitively challenging levels, which may mean including more cognitively challenging and more constructed-response questions on assessments. However, changing the characteristics of exams could result in bias against historically underserved…

  6. Assessment of Learning Gains Associated with Independent Exam Analysis in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    William, Adrienne E.; Aguilar-Roca, Nancy M.; Tsai, Michelle; Wong, Matthew; Beaupré, Marin Moravec; O’Dowd, Diane K.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of an independent postmidterm question analysis exercise on the ability of students to answer subsequent exam questions on the same topics. It was conducted in three sections (∼400 students/section) of introductory biology. Graded midterms were returned electronically, and each student was assigned a subset of questions answered incorrectly by more than 40% of the class to analyze as homework. The majority of questions were at Bloom's application/analysis level; this exercise therefore emphasized learning at these higher levels of cognition. Students in each section answered final exam questions matched by topic to all homework questions, providing a within-class control group for each question. The percentage of students who correctly answered the matched final exam question was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the Topic Analysis versus Control Analysis group for seven of 19 questions. We identified two factors that influenced activity effectiveness: 1) similarity in topic emphasis of the midterm–final exam question pair and 2) quality of the completed analysis homework. Our data suggest that this easy-to-implement exercise will be useful in large-enrollment classes to help students develop self-regulated learning skills. Additional strategies to help introductory students gain a broader understanding of topic areas are discussed. PMID:22135369

  7. Assessment of learning gains associated with independent exam analysis in introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adrienne E; William, Adrienne E; Aguilar-Roca, Nancy M; Tsai, Michelle; Wong, Matthew; Beaupré, Marin Moravec; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of an independent postmidterm question analysis exercise on the ability of students to answer subsequent exam questions on the same topics. It was conducted in three sections (∼400 students/section) of introductory biology. Graded midterms were returned electronically, and each student was assigned a subset of questions answered incorrectly by more than 40% of the class to analyze as homework. The majority of questions were at Bloom's application/analysis level; this exercise therefore emphasized learning at these higher levels of cognition. Students in each section answered final exam questions matched by topic to all homework questions, providing a within-class control group for each question. The percentage of students who correctly answered the matched final exam question was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the Topic Analysis versus Control Analysis group for seven of 19 questions. We identified two factors that influenced activity effectiveness: 1) similarity in topic emphasis of the midterm-final exam question pair and 2) quality of the completed analysis homework. Our data suggest that this easy-to-implement exercise will be useful in large-enrollment classes to help students develop self-regulated learning skills. Additional strategies to help introductory students gain a broader understanding of topic areas are discussed.

  8. Experience with Online and Open-Web Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehringer, Edward F.; Peddycord, Barry W., III

    2013-01-01

    As homework and other aspects of education migrate to a computer-based format, on-paper exams are beginning to seem like an anachronism. Online delivery is attractive, but comes with a myriad of implications not apparent at first glance. It affects the kinds of questions that can be asked and complicates administration of the exam, but it may make…

  9. Impact of HESI Specialty Exams: the ninth HESI Exit Exam validity study.

    PubMed

    Zweighaft, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Using an ex post facto, nonexperimental design, this, the ninth validity study of Elsevier's HESI Exit Exam (E(2)), reexamined the predictive accuracy of the E(2). The value of administering HESI Specialty Exams within the nursing curriculum in terms of E(2) scores was also investigated. The sample was composed of nursing students (N = 3,790) from 63 randomly selected schools-26 baccalaureate, 31 associate degree, and 6 diploma programs-throughout the United States who took the E(2) between September 2008 and August 2009. As in the previous 8 studies, the E(2) was found to be highly accurate (96.61%) in predicting success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Findings also indicated that students who took one or more HESI Specialty Exams during their nursing curriculum had a significantly higher mean E(2) score (P ≤ .0001) than students who did not take HESI Specialty Exams during their nursing curriculum. Of the 8 HESI Specialty Exams investigated, scores on the Critical Care, Pediatrics, and Medical-Surgical specialty exams were most predictive of NCLEX-RN success. Schools of nursing that used HESI Specialty Exams as course final exams had a significantly higher mean E(2) score (P < .01) than schools that used the exams for remediation and practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. MO-F-204-00: Preparing for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics Exams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    NONE

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance of allmore » aspects of clinical medical physics. All parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those unique aspects of the nuclear exam, and how preparing for a second specialty differs from the first. Medical physicists who recently completed each ABR exam portion will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and

  11. MO-F-204-02: Preparing for Part 2 of the ABR Diagnostic Physics Exam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Szczykutowicz, T.

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance of allmore » aspects of clinical medical physics. All parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those unique aspects of the nuclear exam, and how preparing for a second specialty differs from the first. Medical physicists who recently completed each ABR exam portion will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and

  12. MO-F-204-03: Preparing for Part 3 of the ABR Diagnostic Physics Exam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zambelli, J.

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance of allmore » aspects of clinical medical physics. All parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those unique aspects of the nuclear exam, and how preparing for a second specialty differs from the first. Medical physicists who recently completed each ABR exam portion will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and

  13. MO-F-204-01: Preparing for Part 1 of the ABR Diagnostic Physics Exam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    McKenney, S.

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance of allmore » aspects of clinical medical physics. All parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those unique aspects of the nuclear exam, and how preparing for a second specialty differs from the first. Medical physicists who recently completed each ABR exam portion will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and

  14. WE-D-213-00: Preparing for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medicine Physics Exams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    NONE

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR professional certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance ofmore » all aspects of clinical medical physics. All three parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation and skill sets necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those aspects that are unique to the nuclear exam. Medical physicists who have recently completed each of part of the ABR exam will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to Prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and/or nuclear imaging

  15. WE-D-213-01: Preparing for Part 1 of the ABR Diagnostic Physics Exam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Simiele, S.

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR professional certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance ofmore » all aspects of clinical medical physics. All three parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation and skill sets necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those aspects that are unique to the nuclear exam. Medical physicists who have recently completed each of part of the ABR exam will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to Prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and/or nuclear imaging

  16. WE-D-213-03: Preparing for Part 3 of the ABR Diagnostic Physics Exam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bevins, N.

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR professional certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance ofmore » all aspects of clinical medical physics. All three parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation and skill sets necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those aspects that are unique to the nuclear exam. Medical physicists who have recently completed each of part of the ABR exam will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to Prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and/or nuclear imaging

  17. WE-D-213-02: Preparing for Part 2 of the ABR Diagnostic Physics Exam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zambelli, J.

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR professional certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance ofmore » all aspects of clinical medical physics. All three parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation and skill sets necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those aspects that are unique to the nuclear exam. Medical physicists who have recently completed each of part of the ABR exam will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to Prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and/or nuclear imaging

  18. Database trial impact on graduate nursing comprehensive exams

    PubMed Central

    Pionke, Katharine; Huckstadt, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    While the authors were doing a test period of databases, the question of whether or not databases affect outcomes of graduate nursing comprehensive examinations came up. This study explored that question through using citation analysis of exams that were taken during a database trial and exams that were not. The findings showed no difference in examination pass/fail rates. While the pass/fail rates did not change, a great deal was learned in terms of citation accuracy and types of materials that students used, leading to discussions about changing how citation and plagiarism awareness were taught. PMID:26512218

  19. Investigating the Variables in a Mock Exam Study Session Designed to Improve Student Exam Performance in an Undergraduate Behavior Modification and Therapy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotson, Wesley H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify components of an optional mock exam review session (e.g. requiring students to write answers, providing students grading keys for questions) responsible for improvements in student performance on application-based short-essay exams in an undergraduate behavior modification course. Both…

  20. Multiple-Choice Exams: An Obstacle for Higher-Level Thinking in Introductory Science Classes

    PubMed Central

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F.

    2012-01-01

    Learning science requires higher-level (critical) thinking skills that need to be practiced in science classes. This study tested the effect of exam format on critical-thinking skills. Multiple-choice (MC) testing is common in introductory science courses, and students in these classes tend to associate memorization with MC questions and may not see the need to modify their study strategies for critical thinking, because the MC exam format has not changed. To test the effect of exam format, I used two sections of an introductory biology class. One section was assessed with exams in the traditional MC format, the other section was assessed with both MC and constructed-response (CR) questions. The mixed exam format was correlated with significantly more cognitively active study behaviors and a significantly better performance on the cumulative final exam (after accounting for grade point average and gender). There was also less gender-bias in the CR answers. This suggests that the MC-only exam format indeed hinders critical thinking in introductory science classes. Introducing CR questions encouraged students to learn more and to be better critical thinkers and reduced gender bias. However, student resistance increased as students adjusted their perceptions of their own critical-thinking abilities. PMID:22949426

  1. Can we share questions? Performance of questions from different question banks in a single medical school.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Adrian; Nicholls, Anthony; Ricketts, Chris; Coombes, Lee

    2010-01-01

    To use progress testing, a large bank of questions is required, particularly when planning to deliver tests over a long period of time. The questions need not only to be of good quality but also balanced in subject coverage across the curriculum to allow appropriate sampling. Hence as well as creating its own questions, an institution could share questions. Both methods allow ownership and structuring of the test appropriate to the educational requirements of the institution. Peninsula Medical School (PMS) has developed a mechanism to validate questions written in house. That mechanism can be adapted to utilise questions from an International question bank International Digital Electronic Access Library (IDEAL) and another UK-based question bank Universities Medical Assessment Partnership (UMAP). These questions have been used in our progress tests and analysed for relative performance. Data are presented to show that questions from differing sources can have comparable performance in a progress testing format. There are difficulties in transferring questions from one institution to another. These include problems of curricula and cultural differences. Whilst many of these difficulties exist, our experience suggests that it only requires a relatively small amount of work to adapt questions from external question banks for effective use. The longitudinal aspect of progress testing (albeit summatively) may allow more flexibility in question usage than single high stakes exams.

  2. Comparison of Integrated Testlet and Constructed-Response Question Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Shiell, Ralph C.

    2014-01-01

    Constructed-response (CR) questions are a mainstay of introductory physics textbooks and exams. However, because of the time, cost, and scoring reliability constraints associated with this format, CR questions are being increasingly replaced by multiple-choice (MC) questions in formal exams. The integrated testlet (IT) is a recently developed…

  3. MO-F-204-04: Preparing for Parts 2 & 3 of the ABR Nuclear Medicine Physics Exam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    MacDougall, R.

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance of allmore » aspects of clinical medical physics. All parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those unique aspects of the nuclear exam, and how preparing for a second specialty differs from the first. Medical physicists who recently completed each ABR exam portion will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and

  4. WE-D-213-04: Preparing for Parts 2 & 3 of the ABR Nuclear Medicine Physics Exam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    MacDougall, R.

    Adequate, efficient preparation for the ABR Diagnostic and Nuclear Medical Physics exams is key to successfully obtain ABR professional certification. Each part of the ABR exam presents its own challenges: Part I: Determine the scope of basic medical physics study material, efficiently review this material, and solve related written questions/problems. Part II: Understand imaging principles, modalities, and systems, including image acquisition, processing, and display. Understand the relationship between imaging techniques, image quality, patient dose and safety, and solve related written questions/problems. Part III: Gain crucial, practical, clinical medical physics experience. Effectively communicate and explain the practice, performance, and significance ofmore » all aspects of clinical medical physics. All three parts of the ABR exam require specific skill sets and preparation: mastery of basic physics and imaging principles; written problem solving often involving rapid calculation; responding clearly and succinctly to oral questions about the practice, methods, and significance of clinical medical physics. This symposium focuses on the preparation and skill sets necessary for each part of the ABR exam. Although there is some overlap, the nuclear exam covers a different body of knowledge than the diagnostic exam. A separate speaker will address those aspects that are unique to the nuclear exam. Medical physicists who have recently completed each of part of the ABR exam will share their experiences, insights, and preparation methods to help attendees best prepare for the challenges of each part of the ABR exam. In accordance with ABR exam security policy, no recalls or exam questions will be discussed. Learning Objectives: How to prepare for Part 1 of the ABR exam by determining the scope of basic medical physics study material and related problem solving/calculations How to Prepare for Part 2 of the ABR exam by understanding diagnostic and/or nuclear imaging

  5. An innovative addition to team-based-learning pedagogy to enhance teaching and learning: Students' perceptions of team exams.

    PubMed

    Khansari, Parto S; Coyne, Leanne

    The study investigates students' perceptions of the value of implementing a team exam to enhance learning prior to a summative assessment. Team exams are similar to midterm exams, except that answering questions is a team effort. Data was collected from second year pharmacy students at California Northstate University College of Pharmacy (CNUCOP) through a self-administered online survey. The survey questions included closed-ended questions to evaluate students' perception on preparedness for a summative assessment and to rank advantages and disadvantages of the team exams. Of the 40 students who completed the survey (38% response rate), 100% of participants agreed that having a team exam prior to a major exam made them feel more prepared for a major summative exam. Ninety-seven percent of students believed that the team exam helped them to identify gaps in their knowledge and 85% agreed that taking a team exam reinforced their knowledge by teaching other students. The survey results did not identify any major disadvantages to holding a team exam. Students perceived that taking a team exam prior to a midterm exam is an effective approach to review the course contents and identify areas of improvement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Improving consistency in large laboratory courses: a design for a standardized practical exam.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinnian; Graesser, Donnasue; Sah, Megha

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory courses serve as important gateways to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. One of the challenges in assessing laboratory learning is to conduct meaningful and standardized practical exams, especially for large multisection laboratory courses. Laboratory practical exams in life sciences courses are frequently administered by asking students to move from station to station to answer questions, apply knowledge gained during laboratory experiments, interpret data, and identify various tissues and organs using various microscopic and gross specimens. This approach puts a stringent time limit on all questions regardless of the level of difficulty and also invariably increases the potential risk of cheating. To avoid potential cheating in laboratory courses with multiple sections, the setup for practical exams is often changed in some way between sections. In laboratory courses with multiple instructors or teaching assistants, practical exams may be handled inconsistently among different laboratory sections, due to differences in background knowledge, perceptions of the laboratory goals, or prior teaching experience. In this article, we describe a design for a laboratory practical exam that aims to align the assessment questions with well-defined laboratory learning objectives and improve the consistency among all laboratory sections. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  7. Assessment of the Assessment Tool: Analysis of Items in a Non-MCQ Mathematics Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoshaim, Heba Bakr; Rashid, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Assessment is one of the vital steps in the teaching and learning process. The reported action research examines the effectiveness of an assessment process and inspects the validity of exam questions used for the assessment purpose. The instructors of a college-level mathematics course studied questions used in the final exams during the academic…

  8. Can formative quizzes predict or improve summative exam performance?*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Niu; Henderson, Charles N.R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite wide use, the value of formative exams remains unclear. We evaluated the possible benefits of formative assessments in a physical examination course at our chiropractic college. Methods Three hypotheses were examined: (1) Receiving formative quizzes (FQs) will increase summative exam (SX) scores, (2) writing FQ questions will further increase SE scores, and (3) FQs can predict SX scores. Hypotheses were tested across three separate iterations of the class. Results The SX scores for the control group (Class 3) were significantly less than those of Classes 1 and 2, but writing quiz questions and taking FQs (Class 1) did not produce significantly higher SX scores than only taking FQs (Class 2). The FQ scores were significant predictors of SX scores, accounting for 52% of the SX score. Sex, age, academic degrees, and ethnicity were not significant copredictors. Conclusion Our results support the assertion that FQs can improve written SX performance, but students producing quiz questions didn't further increase SX scores. We concluded that nonthreatening FQs may be used to enhance student learning and suggest that they also may serve to identify students who, without additional remediation, will perform poorly on subsequent summative written exams. PMID:25517737

  9. Crib Sheets and Exam Performance in a Data Structures Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamouda, Sally; Shaffer, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relationship between the use of "crib sheets" or "cheat sheets" and performance on in-class exams. Our extensive survey of the existing literature shows that it is not decisive on the questions of when or whether crib sheets actually help students to either perform better on an exam or better learn…

  10. Reading Quizzes Improve Exam Scores for Community College Students.

    PubMed

    Pape-Lindstrom, Pamela; Eddy, Sarah; Freeman, Scott

    2018-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that adding course structure may encourage self-regulated learning skills resulting in an increase in student exam performance in the community college setting, we added daily preclass online, open-book reading quizzes to an introductory biology course. We compared three control terms without reading quizzes and three experimental terms with online, open-book reading quizzes; the instructor of record, class size, and instructional time did not vary. Analyzing the Bloom's taxonomy level of a random sample of exam questions indicated a similar cognitive level of high-stakes assessments across all six terms in the study. To control for possible changes in student preparation or ability over time, we calculated each student's grade point average in courses other than biology during the term under study and included it as a predictor variable in our regression models. Our final model showed that students in the experimental terms had significantly higher exam scores than students in the control terms. This result shows that online reading quizzes can boost achievement in community college students. We also comment on the importance of discipline-based education research in community college settings and the structure of our community college/4-year institution collaboration.

  11. Saliva pH as a biomarker of exam stress and a predictor of exam performance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Miri; Khalaila, Rabia

    2014-11-01

    Salivary pH is regulated by the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system; therefore, it may serve as a biomarker of stress. To assess the associations between the cognitive and emotional dimensions of exam stress and pH levels, and the predictability of salivary pH in relation to test performance. A prospective study. Eighty-three nursing students answered a questionnaire on stress appraisals, experienced stress, test anxiety (including worry and emotionality subscales) and health behaviors, and gave a saliva sample for measuring pH on the morning of their first term exam and three months later. Their performance on the test (grades) was also recorded. Levels of pH in saliva were higher (levels of acidity were lower) in the post exam compared to the exam period, in parallel to lower threat appraisal, experienced stress, and test anxiety levels post exam. Controlling for smoking, physical activity and working hours per week, pH levels at both time points were predicted by appraised threat regarding the exam situation, experienced stress, and the emotionality dimension of test anxiety. pH at Time 1 predicted performance on the exams and mediated the associations of experienced stress and emotionality subscale with test performance. the present study indicates that pH levels may serve as a reliable, accessible and inexpensive means by which to assess the degree of physiological reactions to exams and other naturalistic stressors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [The touched masculinity: a discussion about the digital rectal exam for prostate cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Romeu; do Nascimento, Elaine Ferreira; Rebello, Lúcia Emília Figueiredo de Sousa; de Araújo, Fábio Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    The present study aims at analyzing the meanings attributed to the digital rectal exam, seeking to problematize questions underlying the masculine discourse on the basis of aspects of the hegemonic masculinity model. Semi-structured interviews were held with 28 men in the city of Rio de Janeiro, in 2004. Among the main results is the idea that the digital rectal exam is something that violates an interdicted space, something that compromises the current understanding of masculinity, shall say, the digital rectal exam does not only affect the prostate, it also affects the masculinity, puts it to shame. We conclude that for understanding and problematizing the questions related to the prostate cancer prevention in special, and to the question of taking care of oneself from the masculine perspective in general, we need to consider the structural and symbolic aspects that underlie these questions.

  13. Examining Exam Reviews: A Comparison of Exam Scores and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackathorn, Jana; Cornell, Kathryn; Garczynski, Amy M.; Solomon, Erin D.; Blankmeyer, Katheryn E.; Tennial, Rachel E.

    2012-01-01

    Instructors commonly use exam reviews to help students prepare for exams and to increase student success. The current study compared the effects of traditional, trivia, and practice test-based exam reviews on actual exam scores, as well as students' attitudes toward each review. Findings suggested that students' exam scores were significantly…

  14. Research participation improves student's exam performance.

    PubMed

    Gil-Gómez de Liaño, Beatriz; León, Orfelio G; Pascual-Ezama, David

    2012-07-01

    Although there have been several attempts to explore for beneficial effects of research participation in social sciences, most of them have mainly explored satisfaction and students learning perceptions (e.g., Bowman & Waite, 2003). Very few works have studied learning by measuring exam performance. Moreover, participation has been usually conceptualized as a mixture of active and passive participation, including in the same measure different practices such as filling up questionnaires, running experiments or reading and answering questions about a journal article or a scientific conference. The present work tries to determine if there is an advantage due to research participation comparing exam performance, satisfaction and perceived learning of the matter Research Methods in Psychology, in three different groups (non-participating, passive and active participating). As we can see in the results, the mere participation benefits exam performance. Results are discussed in terms of the use of research participation as a new powerful active method in education.

  15. Effects of Online Testing on Student Exam Performance and Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stowell, Jeffrey R.; Bennett, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Increased use of course management software to administer course exams online for face-to-face classes raises the question of how well test anxiety and other emotions generalize from the classroom to an online setting. We hypothesized that administering regular course exams in an online format would reduce test anxiety experienced at the time of…

  16. Diabetes eye exams

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... Ophthalmology Retina/Vitreous Panel. Preferred Practice Pattern ... www.aao.org/preferred-practice-pattern/diabetic-retinopathy- ...

  17. Association between EMS Question Bank Completion and Passing Rates on the EMS Certification Examination.

    PubMed

    Clemency, Brian; Martin-Gill, Christian; Rall, Nicole; May, Paul; Lubin, Jeffrey; Cooley, Craig; Van Dillen, Christine; Silvestri, Salvatore; Portela, Roberto; Cooney, Derek; Knutsen, Christian; March, Juan

    2017-01-01

    A board review question bank was created to assist candidates in their preparation for the 2015 EMS certification examination. We aimed to describe the development of this question bank and evaluate its successes in preparing candidates to obtain EMS subspecialty board certification. An online question bank was developed by 13 subject matter experts who participated as item writers, representing eight different EMS fellowship programs. The online question bank consisted of four practice tests, with each of the tests comprised of 100 questions. The number of candidates who participated in and completed the question bank was calculated. The passing rate among candidates who completed the question bank was calculated and compared to the publicly reported statistics for all candidates. The relationship between candidates' performance on the question bank and subspecialty exam pass rates was determined. A total of 252 candidates took at least one practice test and, of those, 225 candidates completed all four 100-question practice tests. The pass rate on the 2015 EMS certification exam was 79% (95%CI 74-85%) among candidates who completed the question bank, which is 12% higher than the overall pass rate (p = 0.003). Candidates' performance on the question bank was positively associated with overall success on the exam (X 2 = 75.8, p < 0.0001). Achieving a score of ≥ 70% on the question bank was associated with a higher likelihood of passing the exam (OR = 17.8; 95% CI: 8.0-39.6). Completing the question bank program was associated with improved pass rates on the EMS certification exam. Strong performance on the question bank correlated with success on the exam.

  18. Should the MCAT exam be used for medical school admissions in Canada?

    PubMed

    Eskander, Antoine; Shandling, Maureen; Hanson, Mark D

    2013-05-01

    In light of the structural and content changes to the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) to be implemented in 2015 and the recent diversity- and social-accountability-based recommendations of the Future of Medical Education in Canada (FMEC) project, the authors review and reexamine the use of the MCAT exam in Canadian medical school admissions decisions.This Perspective article uses a point-counterpoint format to discuss three main advantages and disadvantages of using the MCAT exam in the medical school admissions process, from a Canadian perspective. The authors examine three questions regarding the FMEC recommendations and the revised MCAT exam: (1) Is the MCAT exam equal and useful in Canadian admissions? (2) Does the MCAT exam affect matriculant diversity? and (3) Is the MCAT exam a strong predictor of future performance? They present the most recent arguments and evidence for and against use of the MCAT exam, with the purpose of summarizing these different perspectives for readers.

  19. An investigation into the optimal number of distractors in single-best answer exams.

    PubMed

    Kilgour, James M; Tayyaba, Saadia

    2016-08-01

    In UK medical schools, five-option single-best answer (SBA) questions are the most widely accepted format of summative knowledge assessment. However, writing SBA questions with four effective incorrect options is difficult and time consuming, and consequently, many SBAs contain a high frequency of implausible distractors. Previous research has suggested that fewer than five-options could hence be used for assessment, without deterioration in quality. Despite an existing body of empirical research in this area however, evidence from undergraduate medical education is sparse. The study investigated the frequency of non-functioning distractors in a sample of 480 summative SBA questions at Cardiff University. Distractor functionality was analysed, and then various question models were tested to investigate the impact of reducing the number of distractors per question on examination difficulty, reliability, discrimination and pass rates. A survey questionnaire was additionally administered to 108 students (33 % response rate) to gain insight into their perceptions of these models. The simulation of various exam models revealed that, for four and three-option SBA models, pass rates, reliability, and mean item discrimination remained relatively constant. The average percentage mark however consistently increased by 1-3 % with the four and three-option models, respectively. The questionnaire survey revealed that the student body had mixed views towards the proposed format change. This study is one of the first to comprehensively investigate distractor performance in SBA examinations in undergraduate medical education. It provides evidence to suggest that using three-option SBA questions would maximise efficiency whilst maintaining, or possibly improving, psychometric quality, through allowing a greater number of questions per exam paper.

  20. Comparison of integrated testlet and constructed-response question formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Shiell, Ralph C.

    2014-12-01

    Constructed-response (CR) questions are a mainstay of introductory physics textbooks and exams. However, because of the time, cost, and scoring reliability constraints associated with this format, CR questions are being increasingly replaced by multiple-choice (MC) questions in formal exams. The integrated testlet (IT) is a recently developed question structure designed to provide a proxy of the pedagogical advantages of CR questions while procedurally functioning as set of MC questions. ITs utilize an answer-until-correct response format that provides immediate confirmatory or corrective feedback, and they thus allow not only for the granting of partial credit in cases of initially incorrect reasoning, but, furthermore, the ability to build cumulative question structures. Here, we report on a study that directly compares the functionality of ITs and CR questions in introductory physics exams. To do this, CR questions were converted to concept-equivalent ITs, and both sets of questions were deployed in midterm and final exams. We find that both question types provide adequate discrimination between stronger and weaker students, with CR questions discriminating slightly better than the ITs. There is some indication that any difference in discriminatory power may result from the baseline score for guessing that is inherent in MC testing. Meanwhile, an analysis of interrater scoring of the CR questions raises serious concerns about the reliability of the granting of partial credit when this traditional assessment technique is used in a realistic (but nonoptimized) setting. Furthermore, we show evidence that partial credit is granted in a valid manner in the ITs. Thus, together with consideration of the vastly reduced costs of administering IT-based examinations compared to CR-based examinations, our findings indicate that ITs are viable replacements for CR questions in formal examinations where it is desirable both to assess concept integration and to reward partial

  1. Providing the Answers Does Not Improve Performance on a College Final Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Arnold Lewis; Sinha, Neha

    2013-01-01

    In the context of an upper-level psychology course, even when students were given an opportunity to refer to text containing the answers and change their exam responses in order to improve their exam scores, their performance on these questions improved slightly or not at all. Four experiments evaluated competing explanations for the students'…

  2. Sample Focus Group Questions for Girls in STEM

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Coronado, Elizabeth Phillips

    These are sample questions for focus groups to be conducted as part of qualitative data collection for Year 2- Year 6 of Girls in STEM. You may use any of the questions from the list during the two sessions during the school year, as long as those questions are not repeated in both Baseline and follow-up sessions.

  3. [Docimological analysis of the anatomy test for the PCEMII final exam in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, T; Dia, A; Lo, E A; Cisse, A M; Ndiaye, A; Mauppin, J M; Sow, M L; Mudry, J N; Benkhelil, J

    1991-01-01

    This docimological analysis is based on computer treatment of the results of the anatomy exam for the two sessions of July (159 candidates) and October (56 candidates) of the identification questions, discrimination questions, coupling (paining), grouping, association and diagram labelling. The results were appraised following certain parameters: the gross score revealed a rather low average score for the whole class (14.57 and 9.57 over 30): the low success rate in July and the average figure of October indicate, in general, either the difficulty of the questions for the students or a bad reception of the message; the bad discrimination index, since only 21% of the questions are of the discriminatory type. This finding pointed to a revision of 50 of the 68 questions of July and 53 of the 68 questions of October. On the whole, only 15 questions, over the two sessions, could have been kept unchanged for an eventual bank (stock of data): The correlation coefficient has showed a significant relation between success in the anatomy subject and success in the PCEM2 exam. This work has showed the possibilities that computers may offer in the teaching of anatomy and the evaluation of students. Besides, it emphasizes the importance of the anatomy grade in the PCEM2 exam. Finally, the mode evaluation used help exploring the various levels of the cognitive areas (memorization, interpretation of data, problem-solving) and to build up a bank of anatomy questions.

  4. Promoting an active form of learning out-of-class via answering online “study questions” leads to higher than expected exam scores in General Biology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A rising need for workers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields has fueled interest in improving teaching within STEM disciplines. Numerous studies have demonstrated the benefits of active learning approaches on student learning outcomes. However, many of these studies have been conducted in experimental, rather than real-life class, settings. In addition, most of these studies have focused on in-class active learning exercises. This study tested the effects of answering questions outside of class on exam performance for General Biology students at the University of Minnesota. An online database of 1,020 multiple-choice questions covering material from the first half of the course was generated. Students in seven course sections (with an average of ∼265 students per section) were given unlimited access to the online study questions. These students made extensive use of the online questions, with students answering an average of 1,323 questions covering material from the half of the semester for which the questions were available. After students answered a set of questions, they were shown the correct answers for those questions. More specific feedback describing how to arrive at the correct answer was provided for the 73% of the questions for which the correct answers were not deemed to be self-explanatory. The extent to which access to the online study questions improved student learning outcomes was assessed by comparing the performance on exam questions of students in the seven course sections with access to the online study questions with the performance of students in course sections without access to the online study questions. Student performance was analyzed for a total of 89 different exams questions that were not included in the study questions, but that covered the same material covered by the study questions. Each of these 89 questions was used on one to five exams given to students in course sections that had access to the

  5. The Elite Illusion: Achievement Effects at Boston and New York Exam Schools. NBER Working Paper No. 17264

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulkadiroglu, Atila; Angrist, Joshua D.; Pathak, Parag A.

    2011-01-01

    Talented students compete fiercely for seats at Boston and New York exam schools. These schools are characterized by high levels of peer achievement and a demanding curriculum tailored to each district's highest achievers. While exam school students clearly do very well in school, the question of whether an exam school education adds value…

  6. Standard eye exam

    MedlinePlus

    Standard ophthalmic exam; Routine eye examination; Eye exam - standard; Annual eye exam ... Comprehensive adult medical eye evaluation preferred practice pattern guidelines. Ophthalmology . 2016;123(1):209-236. PMID: 26581558 ...

  7. Teaching to the Test…or Testing to Teach: Exams Requiring Higher Order Thinking Skills Encourage Greater Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jamie L.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Woodard, Steven M.; Kummer, Tyler A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to test the effect of exam-question level on fostering student conceptual understanding, low-level and high-level quizzes and exams were administered in two sections of an introductory biology course. Each section was taught in a high-level inquiry based style but was assigned either low-level questions (memory oriented) on the quizzes…

  8. SU-E-E-02: An Excel-Based Study Tool for ABR-Style Exams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cline, K; Stanley, D; Defoor, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As the landscape of learning and testing shifts toward a computer-based environment, a replacement for paper-based methods of studying is desirable. Using Microsoft Excel, a study tool was developed that allows the user to populate multiple-choice questions and then generate an interactive quiz session to answer them. Methods: The code for the tool was written using Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications with the intent that this tool could be implemented by any institution with Excel. The base tool is a template with a setup macro, which builds out the structure based on user’s input. Once the framework ismore » built, the user can input sets of multiple-choice questions, answer choices, and even add figures. The tool can be run in random-question or sequential-question mode for single or multiple courses of study. The interactive session allows the user to select answer choices and immediate feedback is provided. Once the user is finished studying, the tool records the day’s progress by reporting progress statistics useful for trending. Results: Six doctoral students at UTHSCSA have used this tool for the past two months to study for their qualifying exam, which is similar in format and content to the American Board of Radiology (ABR) Therapeutic Part II exam. The students collaborated to create a repository of questions, met weekly to go over these questions, and then used the tool to prepare for their exam. Conclusion: The study tool has provided an effective and efficient way for students to collaborate and be held accountable for exam preparation. The ease of use and familiarity of Excel are important factors for the tool’s use. There are software packages to create similar question banks, but this study tool has no additional cost for those that already have Excel. The study tool will be made openly available.« less

  9. A Study of the Relationship between Student Final Exam Performance and Simulation Game Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, T. R.; Faria, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes study that investigated the relationship between participation in a business simulation game and performance on a final exam in a principles of marketing course. Past research on business games is reviewed; the use of midterm exam performance level as a pretest variable is explained; and question classification is described. (44…

  10. Perceptions and practices of U.S. dental schools regarding curriculum integrated format and traditional format licensure exams.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shamik; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Donoff, R Bruce; Howell, T Howard; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2013-08-01

    The dental licensure exam in the United States has evolved over the past ten years, and two formats-the traditional format and curriculum integrated format-are now available for students to satisfy licensure requirements. The objective of this study was to examine the differences and relative merits of the two formats. A twenty-five-question survey was distributed to the fifty-seven U.S. dental schools at the time. The survey included both quantitative and discrete variables and followed a strategic sequential order. The first set of questions sought to determine what type of board preparatory/mock exam each dental school offered, and the next set of questions asked which licensure exam each school formally offered. The final questions were qualitative in nature and aimed to determine the school representatives' opinions about the curriculum integrated format versus traditional format. Of the fifty-seven schools contacted, thirty-seven agreed to participate (response rate=64.9 percent). Fourteen schools reported that they administer the traditional format only and twelve administer the curriculum integrated format only, while eleven offer both. Thirty-two schools offered mock board exams to their graduating students, and twenty-four of those said their mock exams were identical in format to the actual qualifying clinical exams offered at their institution. The respondents reported no significant advantage to preparing for the curriculum integrated format examination as compared to the traditional format examination with regards to number of clock hours taken from regular curriculum time. In reporting on this study, this article provides an overview of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two examination formats used for the dental licensure process in the United States.

  11. [International family medicine certification exam in Venezuela: the physician's experience].

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Solaeche, Flor Maria; Romero, Nerio Enrique; Atencio, Carlos Miguel; Pineda, Francisco; Fernández, Miguel Angel

    2006-01-01

    To present opinions of physicians participating in a pilot certification exam in the specialty of Family Medicine implemented in Venezuela, in December 2004, by the Mexican Board of Certification of Family Medicine A.C. Descriptive, transversal. Participant physicians (n:37) completed semi-structured questionnaries: one or two weeks before the exam, and immediately after it. 60% of participants were 41-50 years old and 80% women. All of them were practicing physicians; 49% had 5-10 year experience in family medicine. Main motivation to participate in the exam: the need for continuing learning (83%). Results showed their participation motivated continuing education (46%). Books were the most frequently utilized resource when preparing for the exam (54%). 94% were willing to take the exam again in the future, and all would recommend it to their colleagues. 49% said that examination should be taken every 3-4 years and should be voluntary (54%). 86% considered the content of the exam pertinent to their practice while 54% mentioned it was well adapted to their country's reality. Time for the exam was enough according to 71%, and number of questions was considered excessive by 89%. After the exam, 43% estimated to have personal prognosis for excellent or good outcomes. CONCLUSIONS. The international examination was satisfactory, stimulated desires of update, and the participants would repeat and recommend it in the future. The Mexican experience offers an example to put into practice, and the international collaboration would be a valid option to extend the certification processes in Latin America.

  12. The evaluation of a peer-led question-writing task.

    PubMed

    Nwosu, Amara; Mason, Stephen; Roberts, Anita; Hugel, Heino

    2013-06-01

      Novel studies have previously highlighted the educational benefits of peer-led learning and peer marking of examinations. Limited data exist about the educational value of students writing their own exam questions and sharing these with other students.   To evaluate the potential for medical students to learn about palliative care through the process of writing examination questions. methods:  Fourth-year medical students on a palliative medicine rotation were invited to write a short-answer exam question in a similar format to the official examination run by the medical school. The questions were checked for accuracy and applicability by the coordinator, and were then distributed to students. The answers to the student-generated questions were discussed in a feedback forum at the end of the rotation.   Twenty students took part in the exercise. All agreed the exercise was beneficial to their learning. Eighteen (90%) students did not feel the task was too much additional work. Eight (40%) students felt more confident in passing the official medical school exams. Students enjoyed the exercise, with 19 (95%) indicating that they were keen to repeat this in the future.   Peer-led examination question writing could complement the delivery of palliative care teaching for medical students. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Patient preferences for physician gender in the male genital/rectal exam.

    PubMed

    Heaton, C J; Marquez, J T

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a descriptive survey assessing male patients' past experience, current preferences, and concerns regarding the gender of the physician performing the male genital/rectal exam. The sample consists of 72 male patients seen at a university-based family practice clinic located in a small rural community in Michigan. Patient age and physician gender preference were the main independent variables of interest. This study found that 51.5% of all male patients in the sample indicated a preference for a male physician to perform the genital exam while 48.5% indicated no preference for physician gender. In contrast, for the rectal exam, 61.5% of all male patients indicated no preference for physician gender while 38.5% did express a preference for a male physician. No one expressed a preference for a female physician for either the genital or rectal exams. Further analysis revealed that male patients over the age of 40 who prefer a male physician do so, at least in part, because it would be embarrassing to have a female physician perform the exam. Few, however, would refuse to allow a female physician to perform the exam. Respondents preferred certain positions for the exam and these are a means of minimizing potential embarrassment in the older patient.

  14. Pelvic Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a routine physical exam to find possible signs of ovarian cysts, sexually transmitted infections, uterine fibroids or early-stage cancer. Pelvic exams are also commonly performed during pregnancy. There is a lot of debate among experts ...

  15. Influence of a revision course and the gender of examiners on the grades of the final ENT exam – a retrospective review of 3961 exams

    PubMed Central

    Grasl, Matthäus C.; Seemann, Rudolf; Hanisch, Michael; Heiduschka, Gregor; Kremser, Karl; Thurnher, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Revision courses should repeat already acquired knowledge and skills and mostly provide a basis for passing the following exam. Aim: The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of a previously attended revision course on the grades achieved in a final exam (Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases). Additionally we ask the question whether the gender of the examiners plays a role concerning the marks or not. Methods: 3961 exams at the Department of Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) Diseases in Vienna were investigated, 725 with revision course (experimental group) and 3236 without previous revision course (comparison group). The revision courses were performed in a standardized way concerning form and content, interactive and case based. Both groups were examined uniform in regard to topics and time duration. 16 male and 6 female examiners were involved. The grading followed a five–level scale. The examination marks were calculated in the arithmetic mean and median value for the entire sample, gender dependence was calculated according to the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney-Test. The inferential statistics included single- and multiple factorial analyses of variance as well as uni- and multivariate regression models. Results: The experimental group achieved a grade average of 2.54 compared with 2.46 for the comparison group. Splitting up into male and female examiners, an average of 2.54 and 2.58 resp. for the experimental group and 2.44 and 2.61 resp. for the comparison group resulted. Female examiner marked significantly lower grades in comparison to their male colleagues (P= 0.001926). Conclusions: The ENT revision course did not improve the grade averages of the final ENT exam. Female examiners grade stricter than male examiners. There was no difference concerning grades 4 (pass) and 5 (fail) but female examiners grade less with mark 1. PMID:26483851

  16. Challenges When Introducing Electronic Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuikka, Matti; Kitola, Markus; Laakso, Mikko-Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Time pressures often necessitate the use of more efficient exam tools, such as electronic exams (e-exams), instead of traditional paper exams. However, teachers may face challenges when introducing e-exams in a higher education context. This paper describes what kinds of challenges teachers may face when introducing e-exams, based on experiences…

  17. Development of a testlet generator in re-engineering the Indonesian physics national-exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindyarto, Budi Naini; Mardapi, Djemari; Bastari

    2017-08-01

    The Indonesian Physics national-exams are end-of-course summative assessments that could be utilized to support the assessment for learning in physics educations. This paper discusses the development and evaluation of a testlet generator based on a re-engineering of Indonesian physics national exams. The exam problems were dissected and decomposed into testlets revealing the deeper understanding of the underlying physical concepts by inserting a qualitative question and its scientific reasoning question. A template-based generator was built to facilitate teachers in generating testlet variants that would be more conform to students' scientific attitude development than their original simple multiple-choice formats. The testlet generator was built using open source software technologies and was evaluated focusing on the black-box testing by exploring the generator's execution, inputs and outputs. The results showed the correctly-performed functionalities of the developed testlet generator in validating inputs, generating testlet variants, and accommodating polytomous item characteristics.

  18. Evaluation of virtual environment as a form of interactive resuscitation exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczyński, Piotr; Charuta, Anna; Kołodziejczak, Barbara; Roszak, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    There is scientific evidence confirming the effectiveness of e-learning within resuscitation, however, there is not enough research on modern examination techniques within the scope. The aim of the pilot research is to compare the exam results in the field of Advanced Life Support in a traditional (paper) and interactive (computer) form as well as to evaluate satisfaction of the participants. A survey was conducted which meant to evaluate satisfaction of exam participants. Statistical analysis of the collected data was conducted at a significance level of α = 0.05 using STATISTICS v. 12. Final results of the traditional exam (67.5% ± 15.8%) differed significantly (p < 0.001) from the results of the interactive exam (53.3% ± 13.7%). However, comparing the number of students who did not pass the exam (passing point at 51%), no significant differences (p = 0.13) were observed between the two types exams. The feedback accuracy as well as the presence of well-prepared interactive questions could influence the evaluation of satisfaction of taking part in the electronic test. Significant differences between the results of a traditional test and the one supported by Computer Based Learning system showed the possibility of achieving a more detailed competence verification in the field of resuscitation thanks to interactive solutions.

  19. The Use of a Comprehensive Multiple Choice Final Exam in the Macroeconomics Principles Course: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrowsky, Michael C.

    This paper analyzes the results of a pilot study at Glendale Community College (Arizona) to assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive multiple choice final exam in the macroeconomic principles course. The "pilot project" involved the administration of a 50-question multiple choice exam to 71 students in three macroeconomics sections.…

  20. A Maximum Likelihood Based Offline Estimation of Student Capabilities and Question Difficulties with Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moothedath, Shana; Chaporkar, Prasanna; Belur, Madhu N.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the computerised adaptive test (CAT) has gained popularity over conventional exams in evaluating student capabilities with desired accuracy. However, the key limitation of CAT is that it requires a large pool of pre-calibrated questions. In the absence of such a pre-calibrated question bank, offline exams with uncalibrated…

  1. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    Skip navigation U.S. National Library of Medicine The navigation menu has been collapsed. Menu ... exam URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features ...

  2. Exams: The Secret Ingredients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2012-01-01

    This year, many high-school teachers in the district where the author teaches experienced exam anxiety because midterms--as they had come to know and love them--were no more. For a variety of reasons, the semester exam schedule looked very different. More to the point is the new philosophy about exam content and format that underpinned the…

  3. Fostering Effective Studying and Study Planning with Study Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Pascal; Pieters, Jules M.

    2007-01-01

    In a course on biological psychology and neuropsychology, study questions were provided that also appeared as test questions in the course exam. This method was introduced to support students in active processing and reproduction of the study texts, and study planning. Data were gathered to test the hypothesis that study question use would be…

  4. Verbal Final Exam in Introductory Biology Yields Gains in Student Content Knowledge and Longitudinal Performance

    PubMed Central

    Luckie, Douglas B.; Rivkin, Aaron M.; Aubry, Jacob R.; Marengo, Benjamin J.; Creech, Leah R.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    We studied gains in student learning over eight semesters in which an introductory biology course curriculum was changed to include optional verbal final exams (VFs). Students could opt to demonstrate their mastery of course material via structured oral exams with the professor. In a quantitative assessment of cell biology content knowledge, students who passed the VF outscored their peers on the medical assessment test (MAT), an exam built with 40 Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) questions (66.4% [n = 160] and 62% [n = 285], respectively; p < 0.001);. The higher-achieving students performed better on MCAT questions in all topic categories tested; the greatest gain occurred on the topic of cellular respiration. Because the VF focused on a conceptually parallel topic, photosynthesis, there may have been authentic knowledge transfer. In longitudinal tracking studies, passing the VF also correlated with higher performance in a range of upper-level science courses, with greatest significance in physiology, biochemistry, and organic chemistry. Participation had a wide range but not equal representation in academic standing, gender, and ethnicity. Yet students nearly unanimously (92%) valued the option. Our findings suggest oral exams at the introductory level may allow instructors to assess and aid students striving to achieve higher-level learning. PMID:24006399

  5. Verbal final exam in introductory biology yields gains in student content knowledge and longitudinal performance.

    PubMed

    Luckie, Douglas B; Rivkin, Aaron M; Aubry, Jacob R; Marengo, Benjamin J; Creech, Leah R; Sweeder, Ryan D

    2013-01-01

    We studied gains in student learning over eight semesters in which an introductory biology course curriculum was changed to include optional verbal final exams (VFs). Students could opt to demonstrate their mastery of course material via structured oral exams with the professor. In a quantitative assessment of cell biology content knowledge, students who passed the VF outscored their peers on the medical assessment test (MAT), an exam built with 40 Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) questions (66.4% [n = 160] and 62% [n = 285], respectively; p < 0.001);. The higher-achieving students performed better on MCAT questions in all topic categories tested; the greatest gain occurred on the topic of cellular respiration. Because the VF focused on a conceptually parallel topic, photosynthesis, there may have been authentic knowledge transfer. In longitudinal tracking studies, passing the VF also correlated with higher performance in a range of upper-level science courses, with greatest significance in physiology, biochemistry, and organic chemistry. Participation had a wide range but not equal representation in academic standing, gender, and ethnicity. Yet students nearly unanimously (92%) valued the option. Our findings suggest oral exams at the introductory level may allow instructors to assess and aid students striving to achieve higher-level learning.

  6. [Why are some high achievers on the course final exam unsuccessful on the proficiency exam in English?].

    PubMed

    Matsunuma, Mitsuyasu

    2009-04-01

    This study examined why some high achievers on the course final exam were unsuccessful on the proficiency exam in English. We hypothesized that the learning motives and learning behaviors (learning strategy, learning time) had different effects on the outcomes of the exams. First, the relation between the variables was investigated using structural equation modeling. Second, the learning behaviors of students who got good marks on both exams were compared with students who did well only on the course final exam. The results were as follows. (a) Learning motives influenced test performance via learning behaviors. (b) Content-attached motives influenced all variables concerning learning behaviors. (c) Content-detached motives influenced all variables concerning learning behaviors that were related only to the course final exam. (d) The students who got good marks on both exams performed the learning behaviors that were useful on the proficiency exam more frequently than the students who did well only on the course final exam.

  7. A Very Different Non-Stressful Comprehensive Final Exam that Achieve Our Goals for Student Evaluation and Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavsar, Suketu

    2015-08-01

    I will introduce the radical concept of a final exam where the questions are given beforehand, a method I first encountered as a graduate student at Princeton University from an outstanding and well known astrophysicist and exceptional teacher, Lyman Spitzer.Every Instructor aspires for students to master all the material covered. A comprehensive final can assess the breadth and depth of their learning. Students are required to review early material in light of later topics, create connections and integrate understanding, thus retaining knowledge for the long term. Comprehensive finals can therefore be a significant basis for student learning and evaluation, but are especially daunting for non-STEM majors in required GE synthesis STEM classes. The exam format proposed here calmed student fears and encouraged thorough review.Ten days before the exam students received 20-30 challenging, well-crafted, numbered questions that interconnected and spanned the entire range of topics. The key is crafting questions that lead to deeply understanding the subject matter and mastering skills to solve problems. At the final, each student was required to pick a number out of a hat and answer that numbered question in a 5-minute presentation. They also had to critically comment on 10 other presentations of their peers. They are graded equally on both.The exam sets up definite goals for a student. Equally important, it enhances collaborative learning and peer mentoring. The conceptual questions and problems that students are required to answer can be studied together in study groups. The final presentation is theirs and they are not only encouraged but required to be constructively critical of their peer presentations.I will provide examples of some of the conceptual and problem solving questions I used. These were crafted to interconnect and span the entire range of topics. This method requires students to be prepared for all of the multitude of crafted question encouraging

  8. Asking a Great Question: A Librarian Teaches Questioning Skills to First-Year Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    In a single one-hour session, first-year medical students were taught a framework for differentiating between lower-order questions that lead to knowledge of facts and higher-order questions that lead to integration of concepts and deeper learning, thereby preparing them for problem-based learning (PBL). Students generated lists of questions in response to an assertion prompt and categorized them according to Bloom's Taxonomy. These data were analyzed in addition to data from the course exam, which asked them to formulate a higher-level question in response to a prompt. Categorizing questions according to Bloom's Taxonomy was a more difficult task for students than was formulating higher-order questions. Students reported that the skills that they learned were used in subsequent PBL sessions to formulate higher-order learning objectives that integrated new and previously-learned concepts.

  9. Evaluation of a novel scoring and grading model for VP-based exams in postgraduate nurse education.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Elenita; Ziegert, Kristina; Hult, Håkan; Fors, Uno

    2015-12-01

    For Virtual Patient-based exams, several scoring and grading methods have been proposed, but none have yet been validated. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new scoring and grading model for VP-based exams in postgraduate paediatric nurse education. The same student group of 19 students performed a VP-based exam in three consecutive courses. When using the scoring and grading assessment model, which contains a deduction system for unnecessary or unwanted actions, a progression was found in the three courses: 53% of the students passed the first exam, 63% the second and 84% passed the final exam. The most common reason for deduction of points was due to students asking too many interview questions or ordering too many laboratory tests. The results showed that the new scoring model made it possible to judge the students' clinical reasoning process as well as their progress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Using Pre-Assessment and In-Class Questions to Change Student Understanding of Molecular Movements †

    PubMed Central

    Shi, J.; Knight, Jennifer K.; Chun, Hyonho; Guild, Nancy A.; Martin, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how different types of molecules move through cell membranes is a fundamental part of cell biology. To identify and address student misconceptions surrounding molecular movement through cell membranes, we surveyed student understanding on this topic using pre-class questions, in-class clicker questions, and subsequent exam questions in a large introductory biology course. Common misconceptions identified in student responses to the pre-class assessment questions were used to generate distractors for clicker questions. Two-tier diagnostic clicker questions were used to probe incoming common student misconceptions (first tier) and their reasoning (second tier). Two subsequent lectures with assessment clicker questions were used to help students construct a new framework to understand molecular movement through cell membranes. Comparison of pre-assessment and post-assessment (exam) performance showed dramatic improvement in students’ understanding of molecular movement: student answers to exam questions were 74.6% correct with correct reasoning while only 1.3% of the student answers were correct with correct reasoning on the pre-class assessment. Our results show that students’ conceptual understanding of molecular movement through cell membranes progressively increases through discussions of a series of clicker questions and suggest that this clicker-based teaching strategy was highly effective in correcting common student misconceptions on this topic. PMID:28512521

  11. Variation of semen parameters in healthy medical students due to exam stress.

    PubMed

    Lampiao, Fanuel

    2009-12-01

    This study was aimed at investigating semen parameters that vary most in samples of healthy donors undergoing stressful examination period. Samples were left to liquefy in an incubator at 37 degrees C, 5% CO2 for 30 minutes before volume was measured. Concentration and motility parameters were measured by means of computer assisted semen analysis (CASA) using Sperm Class Analyzer (Microptic S.L, Madrid, Spain). Sperm concentration was significantly decreased in samples donated close to the exam period as well as samples donated during the exam period when compared to samples donated at the beginning of the semester. Stress levels of donors might prove to be clinically relevant and important when designing experiment protocols.

  12. Preparing Students for the AP Psychology Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Placement Psychology exam is one of the fastest growing exams offered by the College Board. The average percent of change in the number of students taking this exam over the past five years is 12.4%. With 238,962 students taking the exam in 2013, the AP Psychology exam is the sixth largest exam, surpassing AP Biology and AP World…

  13. A stimulus control intervention in the gynecological exam with sexual abuse survivors.

    PubMed

    Smith, M S; Smith, M T

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of a new examination gown, as a stimulus control intervention designed to reduce distress during the pelvic exam, was investigated in a sample of sexual abuse survivors and women without abuse histories. Sixty-nine participants from a women's health ambulatory center and a private practice in gynecology were randomly assigned to the experimental gown condition or the paper drape control group. One-third of the sample reported a history of childhood sexual abuse. Survivors reported higher anxiety during exams than did women without abuse histories. Women who wore the experimental gown reported more positive emotional and physical experiences of the exam. Further research is required to examine the trend showing that survivors who wore the experimental gown reported less anxiety during the examination than survivors who wore the control drape.

  14. Improving large class performance and engagement through student-generated question banks.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Dale; Hare, Nicole; Denny, Paul; Denyer, Gareth

    2018-03-12

    Disciplines such as Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which involve concepts not included in the high-school curriculum, are very challenging for many first year university students. These subjects are particularly difficult for students accustomed to surface learning strategies involving memorization and recall of facts, as a deeper understanding of the relationship between concepts is needed for successful transfer to related areas and subsequent study. In this article, we explore an activity in a very large first year Molecular Biology course, in which students create multiple-choice questions related to targeted learning outcomes, and then answer and evaluate one another's questions. This activity encompasses elements of both self- and peer-assessment and the generative tasks of creating questions and producing written feedback may contribute to a deeper understanding of the material. We make use of a free online platform to facilitate all aspects of the process and analyze the effect of student engagement with the task on overall course performance. When compared to previous semester's cohorts, we observe a pronounced improvement in class performance on exam questions targeting similar concepts to the student-generated questions. In addition, those students that engage to a greater extent with the activity perform significantly better on the targeted exam questions than those who are less active, yet all students perform similarly on a set of isolated control questions appearing on the same exam. © 2018 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2018. © 2018 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Physics Exams That Promote Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, Carl E.; Rieger, Georg W.; Heiner, Cynthia E.

    2014-01-01

    The two-stage exam is a relatively simple way to introduce collaborative learning and formative assessment into an exam. Their use is rapidly growing in the physics department at the University of British Columbia, as both students and faculty find them rewarding. In a two-stage exam students first complete and turn in the exam individually, and…

  16. Investigating the Written Exam Scores' Prediction Power of TEOG Exam Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontas, Hakki; Özpolat, Esen Turan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate exam scores' predicting Transition from Primary to Secondary Education (TEOG) exam scores. The research data were obtained from the records of 1035 students studying at the first term of eighth grade in 2015-2016 academic year in e-school system. The research was on relational screening model. Linear…

  17. Realisation of the guidelines for faculty-internal exams at the Department of General Medicine at the University of Munich: Pushing medical exams one step ahead with IMSm.

    PubMed

    Boeder, Niklas; Holzer, Matthias; Schelling, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Graded exams are prerequisites for the admission to the medical state examination. Accordingly the exams must be of good quality in order to allow benchmarking with the faculty and between different universities. Criteria for good quality need to be considered - namely objectivity, validity and reliability. The guidelines for the processing of exams published by the GMA are supposed to help maintaining those criteria. In 2008 the Department of General Medicine at the University of Munich fulfils only 14 of 18 items. A review process, appropriate training of the staff and the introduction of the IMSm software were the main changes that helped to improve the 'GMA-score' to 30 fulfilled items. We see the introduction of the IMSm system as our biggest challenge ahead. IMSm helps to streamline the necessary workflow and improves their quality (e.g. by the detection of cueing, item analysis). Overall, we evaluate the steps to improve the exam process as very positive. We plan to engage co-workers outside the department to assist in the various review processes in the future. Furthermore we think it might be of value to get into contact with other departments and faculties to benefit from each other's question pools.

  18. TH-C-18A-09: Exam and Patient Parameters Affecting the DNA Damage Response Following CT Studies

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Elgart, S; Adibi, A; Bostani, M

    Purpose: To identify exam and patient parameters affecting the biological response to CT studies using in vivo and ex vivo blood samples. Methods: Blood samples were collected under IRB approval from 16 patients undergoing clinically-indicated CT exams. Blood was procured prior to, immediately after and 30minutes following irradiation. A sample of preexam blood was placed on the patient within the exam region for ex vivo analysis. Whole blood samples were fixed immediately following collection and stained for γH2AX to assess DNA damage response (DDR). Median fluorescence of treated samples was compared to non-irradiated control samples for each patient. Patients weremore » characterized by observed biological kinetic response: (a) fast — phosphorylation increased by 2minutes and fell by 30minutes, (b) slow — phosphorylation continued to increase to 30minutes and (c) none — little change was observed or irradiated samples fell below controls. Total dose values were normalized to exam time for an averaged dose-rate in dose/sec for each exam. Relationships between patient biological responses and patient and exam parameters were investigated. Results: A clearer dose response at 30minutes is observed for young patients (<61yoa; R2>0.5) compared to old patients (>61yoa; R{sup 2}<0.11). Fast responding patients were significantly younger than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Unlike in vivo samples, age did not significantly affect the patient response ex vivo. Additionally, fast responding patients received exams with significantly smaller dose-rate than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Conclusion: Age is a significant factor in the biological response suggesting that DDR may be more rapid in a younger population and slower as the population ages. Lack of an agerelated response ex vivo suggests a systemic response to radiation not present when irradiated outside the body. Dose-rate affects the biological response suggesting that patient response may be

  19. Developing an Array Binary Code Assessment Rubric for Multiple- Choice Questions Using Item Arrays and Binary-Coded Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haro, Elizabeth K.; Haro, Luis S.

    2014-01-01

    The multiple-choice question (MCQ) is the foundation of knowledge assessment in K-12, higher education, and standardized entrance exams (including the GRE, MCAT, and DAT). However, standard MCQ exams are limited with respect to the types of questions that can be asked when there are only five choices. MCQs offering additional choices more…

  20. Introducing Computer-Based Testing in High-Stakes Exams in Higher Education: Results of a Field Experiment.

    PubMed

    Boevé, Anja J; Meijer, Rob R; Albers, Casper J; Beetsma, Yta; Bosker, Roel J

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of computer-based testing in high-stakes examining in higher education is developing rather slowly due to institutional barriers (the need of extra facilities, ensuring test security) and teacher and student acceptance. From the existing literature it is unclear whether computer-based exams will result in similar results as paper-based exams and whether student acceptance can change as a result of administering computer-based exams. In this study, we compared results from a computer-based and paper-based exam in a sample of psychology students and found no differences in total scores across the two modes. Furthermore, we investigated student acceptance and change in acceptance of computer-based examining. After taking the computer-based exam, fifty percent of the students preferred paper-and-pencil exams over computer-based exams and about a quarter preferred a computer-based exam. We conclude that computer-based exam total scores are similar as paper-based exam scores, but that for the acceptance of high-stakes computer-based exams it is important that students practice and get familiar with this new mode of test administration.

  1. Analysis of placenta vascularization in patients with uterine altered artery Doppler flow velocity exams.

    PubMed

    Gilio, Daniel Bruno; Miranda Corrêa, Rosana Rosa; Souza de Oliveira Guimarães, Camila; Peres, Luiz Cesar; Marques Salge, Ana Karina; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; de Paula Antunes Teixeira, Vicente; Costa da Cunha Castro, Eumenia

    2009-08-01

    One of the frequent questions in obstetric practice is to determine placental vascular changes that may account for abnormal Doppler flow velocity alterations in maternal uterine vessels from women and fetuses without pregnancy pathology. A retrospective morphometric study was realized using 27 placentas from patients submitted for Doppler flow velocity exam during pregnancy. The placentas were morphologically examined using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Measurements of villi were made with the use of a video camera coupled to a common light microscope and a computer with automatic image analyzing software. Of the 27 placentas, 13 (48%) were of patients showing unaltered Doppler and 14 (52%) showing altered Doppler. The number of stem villi vessels was significantly larger in the placentas of patients with Doppler exam alterations (P = 0.003). This group also presented greater stem villi vessel thickness, although without significant difference. The number of intermediary and terminal villi vessels was greater in the placentas of patients with altered Doppler exams (P < 0.001), and a greater terminal villi area was observed in these cases (P < 0.001). The morphological proof that uterine artery Doppler flow velocity exam alterations are associated with placental vascular alterations demonstrates the importance of this exam during prenatal care, even in the absence of maternal-fetal alterations.

  2. Improving the preparticipation exam process.

    PubMed

    Reed, F E

    2001-08-01

    The Preparticipation Exam for too long has been a mandatory yearly athletic exam and not the base from which a process of continuous athletic care took place. The purpose of this article is not only to introduce improvements in the exam itself but to also describe some extensions of the process that allow us to improve athletic care in South Carolina. It is hoped that a software scanning program will allow compiling of demographic data from individual and group examinations and thus support the method of exam preferred by all physicians in our state. Standard forms will also facilitate communication within the Athletic Care Unit and between physicians involved in athletic care.

  3. Want to Reduce Guessing and Cheating While Making Students Happier? Give More Exams!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverty, James T.; Bauer, Wolfgang; Kortemeyer, Gerd; Westfall, Gary

    2012-01-01

    It is almost universally agreed that more frequent formative assessment (homework, clicker questions, practice tests, etc.) leads to better student performance and generally better course evaluations. There is, however, only anecdotal evidence that the same would be true for more frequent summative assessment (exams). There maybe many arguments…

  4. The Comparative Difficulty of Professional Certification Questions in an Undergraduate Accounting Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldwater, Paul; Fogarty, Timothy

    1995-01-01

    An expert system administered study questions from the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and Certified Management Accountant (CMA) exams and others designed for textbooks to 113 accounting students. CPA/CMA questions were more difficult (71% correct compared to 74% for others); CMA questions were more challenging than CPA ones (67% to 73%…

  5. Introducing Computer-Based Testing in High-Stakes Exams in Higher Education: Results of a Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Boevé, Anja J.; Meijer, Rob R.; Albers, Casper J.; Beetsma, Yta; Bosker, Roel J.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of computer-based testing in high-stakes examining in higher education is developing rather slowly due to institutional barriers (the need of extra facilities, ensuring test security) and teacher and student acceptance. From the existing literature it is unclear whether computer-based exams will result in similar results as paper-based exams and whether student acceptance can change as a result of administering computer-based exams. In this study, we compared results from a computer-based and paper-based exam in a sample of psychology students and found no differences in total scores across the two modes. Furthermore, we investigated student acceptance and change in acceptance of computer-based examining. After taking the computer-based exam, fifty percent of the students preferred paper-and-pencil exams over computer-based exams and about a quarter preferred a computer-based exam. We conclude that computer-based exam total scores are similar as paper-based exam scores, but that for the acceptance of high-stakes computer-based exams it is important that students practice and get familiar with this new mode of test administration. PMID:26641632

  6. Exam Question Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, John J., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents background information and a problem on "escape velocity," which applies the gas laws to atmospheric and meteorological phenomena. Also, a problem is presented which requires an understanding of the principles of operation of pressure gauges. (CS)

  7. Are Online Exams an Invitation to Cheat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Oskar R.; Lambrinos, James; Kennedy, Peter, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors use data from two online courses in principles of economics to estimate a model that predicts exam scores from independent variables of student characteristics. In one course, the final exam was proctored, and in the other course, the final exam was not proctored. In both courses, the first three exams were unproctored.…

  8. Tales of the Expected: The Influence of Students' Expectations on Question Validity and Implications for Writing Exam Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Victoria; Sweiry, Ezekiel; Ahmed, Ayesha; Pollitt, Alastair

    2008-01-01

    Background: Through classroom preparation and exposure to past papers, textbooks and practice tests students develop expectations about examinations: what will be asked, how it will be asked and how they will be judged. Expectations are also involved in the automatic process of understanding questions. Where a question and a student's expectations…

  9. Assessing a traditional case-based application exercise and a student question creation exercise on student performance and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Tatachar, Amulya; Kominski, Carol

    2017-07-01

    To compare the impact of a traditional case-based application exercise with a student question creation exercise on a) student exam performance, b) student perceptions of enjoyment, competence, understanding, effort, interest in continuing participation, and interest in the subject. Subjects were 84 second-year pharmacy students in a pharmacotherapy course. The research focus was active learning involving the topic of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder. Student teams were randomly assigned to either case-based or student question creation exercises using PeerWise. Student performance was assessed by a pre- and posttest and on block and final exams. After completion, an online survey assessed student perceptions of both exercises. Statistically significant differences were revealed in favor of the student question creation group on enjoyment and interest in the subject matter. No statistically differences were found between the traditional case-based group and the student question creation group on gain score from pre-test to posttest. The student question creation group performed slightly better than the case-based application group on two of the five questions on the block exam but none of these differences reached statistical significance. Students randomly assigned to groups that created and reviewed questions exhibited slightly improved summative exam performance and reported significantly more positive perceptions than students engaging in a more traditional case-based learning activity. Student question creation has demonstrated potential as a useful learning activity. Despite inherent difficulties in designing studies involving educational research in a controlled environment, students who have submitted, created, rated, and answered peers' questions have overall performed well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Retrieving Essential Material at the End of Lectures Improves Performance on Statistics Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyle, Keith B.; Crawford, Nicole A.

    2011-01-01

    At the end of each lecture in a statistics for psychology course, students answered a small set of questions that required them to retrieve information from the same day's lecture. These exercises constituted retrieval practice for lecture material subsequently tested on four exams throughout the course. This technique is called the PUREMEM…

  11. Multiple-Choice Exams: An Obstacle for Higher-Level Thinking in Introductory Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F.

    2012-01-01

    Learning science requires higher-level (critical) thinking skills that need to be practiced in science classes. This study tested the effect of exam format on critical-thinking skills. Multiple-choice (MC) testing is common in introductory science courses, and students in these classes tend to associate memorization with MC questions and may not…

  12. Clinical breast exam screening by trained laywomen in Malawi integrated with other health services

    PubMed Central

    Gutnik, Lily; Lee, Clara; Msosa, Vanessa; Moses, Agnes; Stanley, Christopher; Mzumara, Suzgo; Liomba, N. George; Gopal, Satish

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer awareness and early detection are limited in sub-Saharan Africa. Resource limitations make screening mammography or clinical breast exam (CBE) by physicians or nurses impractical in many settings. We aimed to assess feasibility and performance of CBE by laywomen in urban health clinics in Malawi. Methods Four laywomen were trained to deliver breast cancer educational talksand conduct CBE. After training, screening was implemented in diverse urbanhealth clinics. Eligible women were ≥30 years, with no prior breast cancer or breast surgery, and clinic attendance for reasons other than abreast concern. Wo men with abnormal CBE were referred to a study surgeon. All palpable masses confirmed by surgeon exam were pathologically sampled. Patients with abnormal screening CBE but normal surgeon exam underwentbreast ultrasound con firmation. Additionally, 50 randomly selected women with normal screening CBE underwent breast ultrasound, and 45 different women with normal CBE were randomly assigned to surgeon exam. Results Among 1,220 eligible women, 1,000 (82%) agreed to CBE. Lack of time (69%) was the commonest reason for refusal. Educational talk attendance was associated with higher CBE participation (83% vs 77%, p=0.012). Among 1,000 women screened, 7% had abnormal CBE. Of 45 women with normal CBE randomized to physician exam, 43 had normal exams and two had axillary lymphadenopathy not detected by CBE. Sixty of 67 women (90%) with abnormal CBE attended the referral visit. Of these, 29 (48%) had concordant abnormal physician exam. Thirty-one women (52%) had discordant normal physician exam, all of whom also had normal breast ultrasounds. Compared to physician exam, sensitivity for CBE by laywomen was 94% (CI 79-99%), specificity 58% (CI 46-70%), positive predictive value 48% (CI 35-62%), and negative predictive value 96% (CI 85-100%). Of 13 women who underwent recommended pathologic sampling of a breast lesion, two had cytologic dysplasia and all

  13. Testing Collective Memory: Representing the Soviet Union on Multiple-Choice Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Gabriel A.

    2011-01-01

    This article tests the assumption that state-mandated multiple-choice history exams are a cultural tool for disseminating an "official" collective memory. Findings from a qualitative study of a collection of multiple-choice questions that relate to the history of the Soviet Union are presented. The 263 questions all come from New York…

  14. Texas High School Seniors: The Path of Students Who Fail the First Administration of End of Course Exams and Eventually Meet Standard and Graduate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanez, Lilia G.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study investigated Texas high school seniors who failed the initial administration of the End of Course (EOC) exams required for graduation but succeeded upon subsequent test administration. The four questions that guided the research explored the experienced regarding the EOC exams by identifying which…

  15. Formative student-authored question bank: perceptions, question quality and association with summative performance

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jason L; Harris, Benjamin H L; Denny, Paul; Smith, Phil

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of the study There are few studies on the value of authoring questions as a study method, the quality of the questions produced by students and student perceptions of student-authored question banks. Here we evaluate PeerWise, a widely used and free online resource that allows students to author, answer and discuss multiple-choice questions. Study design We introduced two undergraduate medical student cohorts to PeerWise (n=603). We looked at their patterns of PeerWise usage; identified associations between student engagement and summative exam performance; and used focus groups to assess student perceptions of the value of PeerWise for learning. We undertook item analysis to assess question difficulty and quality. Results Over two academic years, the two cohorts wrote 4671 questions, answered questions 606 658 times and posted 7735 comments. Question writing frequency correlated most strongly with summative performance (Spearman’s rank: 0.24, p=<0.001). Student focus groups found that: (1) students valued curriculum specificity; and (2) students were concerned about student-authored question quality. Only two questions of the 300 ’most-answered' questions analysed had an unacceptable discriminatory value (point-biserial correlation <0.2). Conclusions Item analysis suggested acceptable question quality despite student concerns. Quantitative and qualitative methods indicated that PeerWise is a valuable study tool. PMID:28866607

  16. Driven to Distraction: Does the Infamous Earth Shadow Distractor Divert Student Attention in the Cause of the Phases of the Moon Question?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the cause of the phases of the Moon is one that is well known to be a problem for astronomy students, with a large fraction thinking incorrectly that the phases are caused by the shadow of the Earth. I have typically repeated this question from the first exam in the two-semester Introductory Astronomy course, through the final exam of the second semester, for a total of 8 appearances. It occurred to me that the inclusion of the shadow distractor in these multiple choice questions may actually reinforce the misconception by repeatedly distracting the student to the familiar but wrong answer. I am running an experiment to see if this is happening. I am giving different forms of the question to half the class for exams 2 and 3 of the first semester, exams 1-3 of the second, with half the class not getting the shadow distractor. I then am offering the shadow distractor to the whole class for the two semesters’ final exams. The early results of this experiment will be discussed.

  17. Delayed, but not immediate, feedback after multiple-choice questions increases performance on a subsequent short-answer, but not multiple-choice, exam: evidence for the dual-process theory of memory.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Neha; Glass, Arnold Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments, two performed in the laboratory and one embedded in a college psychology lecture course, investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed feedback following a multiple-choice exam on subsequent short answer and multiple-choice exams. Performance on the subsequent multiple-choice exam was not affected by the timing of the feedback on the prior exam; however, performance on the subsequent short answer exam was better following delayed than following immediate feedback. This was true regardless of the order in which immediate versus delayed feedback was given. Furthermore, delayed feedback only had a greater effect than immediate feedback on subsequent short answer performance following correct, confident responses on the prior exam. These results indicate that delayed feedback cues a student's prior response and increases subsequent recollection of that response. The practical implication is that delayed feedback is better than immediate feedback during academic testing.

  18. Breast-feeding, self-exam, and exercise practices before and after reduction mammoplasty.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Holton, Luther H; Chung, Thomas L; Slezak, Sheri

    2008-10-01

    The current indications for reduction mammoplasty include the relief of painful physical symptoms of macromastia. Numerous studies have demonstrated not only improvement in physical symptoms following reduction mammoplasty, but postoperative psychological benefits as well, including increased ability to participate in physical activity as a result of pain relief and decreased breast mass. Reduction mammoplasty may have additional effects on the patient's ability to breast-feed and perform breast self-exam. The present study is a retrospective study of the effects of reduction mammoplasty on breast-feeding, breast self-exam, physical symptoms, and physical activity. One-hundred and forty-one patients who underwent reduction mammoplasty at our institution between the years 1996-2005 agreed to participate in the study. Each was asked a series of questions in order to assess changes in symptoms and behaviors including breast-feeding and breast self-exam practices before and after the surgery. Patients were also asked questions regarding their pain symptoms and physical activity profiles. Ninety-seven percent of the participants claimed to have back, neck, and/or shoulder pain that was either significantly improved or completely resolved. Moreover, 100% of patients report that physical activity such as exercise was easier following reduction mammoplasty. Ninety-three percent of participants reported that performing breast self-exam following surgery was either the same (68%) or easier (25%) as a result of having less breast tissue. Eighty-nine percent of participants had no children following surgery, therefore effects on breast-feeding practices following reduction mammoplasty were not statistically significant. However, we suggest that when patients are seen in consultation or in the perioperative period, there is an opportunity to teach patients about the benefits of breast-feeding, and to assure patients that a pedicle flap reduction will likely allow breastfeeding

  19. An investigation into the impact of question structure on the performance of first year physics undergraduate students at the University of Cambridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Valerie; Jardine-Wright, Lisa; Bateman, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    We describe a study of the impact of exam question structure on the performance of first year Natural Sciences physics undergraduates from the University of Cambridge. The results show conclusively that a student’s performance improves when questions are scaffolded compared with university style questions. In a group of 77 female students we observe that the average exam mark increases by 13.4% for scaffolded questions, which corresponds to a 4.9 standard deviation effect. The equivalent observation for 236 male students is 9% (5.5 standard deviations). We also observe a correlation between exam performance and A2-level marks for UK students, and that students who receive their school education overseas, in a mixed gender environment, or at an independent school are more likely to receive a first class mark in the exam. These results suggest a mis-match between the problem-solving skills and assessment procedures between school and first year university and will provide key input into the future teaching and assessment of first year undergraduate physics students.

  20. Eye Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... may use a variety of instruments, shine bright lights directly at your eyes and request that you ... exam is complete, as daylight or other bright lights may be uncomfortable or cause blurred vision. Also, ...

  1. Clinic exam room design: present and future.

    PubMed

    Freihoefer, Kara; Nyberg, Gary; Vickery, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to deconstruct various design qualities and strategies of clinic exam rooms, and discuss how they influence users' interaction and behavior in the space. Relevant literature supports the advantages and disadvantages of different design strategies. Annotated exam room prototypes illustrate the design qualities and strategies discussed. Advancements in technology and medicine, along with new legislative policies, are influencing the way care providers deliver care and ultimately clinic exam room designs. The patient-centered medical home model has encouraged primary care providers to make patients more active leaders of their health plan which will influence the overall functionality and configuration of clinic exam rooms. Specific design qualities discussed include overall size, location of doors and privacy curtains, positioning of exam tables, influence of technology in the consultation area, types of seating, and placement of sink and hand sanitizing dispensers. In addition, future trends of exam room prototypes are presented. There is a general lack of published evidence to support design professionals' design solutions for outpatient exam rooms. Future research should investigate such topics as the location of exam tables and privacy curtains as they relate to patient privacy; typical size and location of consultation table as it relates to patient connection and communication; and placement of sinks and sanitization dispensers as they relate to frequency and patterns of usage. Literature review, outpatient, technology, visual privacy.

  2. Are Prior Experience and Subspecialty Training Time Predictive of Pediatric Anesthesia Exit Exam Scores for Rotating CA-2 Residents?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonathon H; Deutsch, Nina; Cohen, Ira T; Reddy, Srijaya K

    2017-01-01

    Anesthesiology residency programs commonly have rotations at free-standing children's hospitals to provide and/or supplement their residents' training in pediatric anesthesia. Length and timing of these rotations differ from program to program as can their residents' existing medical knowledge and clinical skills. We predicted that residents with prior pediatric anesthesia experience, who rotate at our pediatric institution for two consecutive months, will score higher on an exit exam compared to residents without prior pediatric experience or those that only rotate for one month. A 50-question multiple choice test was created using pediatric questions released from The American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) written examinations. The test was administered and proctored at the end of each rotation. Study participants came from three different programs: Program A offers prior pediatric anesthesia experience and a one month rotation; Program B - offers prior pediatric anesthesia experience and a two month rotation; and Program C - does not offer prior pediatric anesthesia experience but includes a two month rotation. The 2014-2015 cohort consisted of 26 rotating second-year clinical anesthesia (CA-2) residents. One resident's exam scores were excluded from this study due to protocol violation. Mean exam scores for Program A, B, and C were 70.5% ± 5.7, 64.2% ± 7.0, and 67.3% ± 4.3, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the exit exam scores among the three groups. Prior pediatric anesthesia experience or length of time for subspecialty rotation was not associated with any significant difference in exit exam scores for CA-2 residents.

  3. Helping Struggling Students: The Impact of Three Instructional Interventions on College Students' Exam Scores and Exam-Skipping Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nichole Gibbs; Thomas, Antonio Lamar

    2018-01-01

    Whether instructional-communication feedback sent to struggling students and succeeding students following course exams would significantly increase their exam scores and significantly decrease their exam-skipping behavior relative to students in the control group was investigated. An experimenter-blind study utilizing feedback and the…

  4. Formative student-authored question bank: perceptions, question quality and association with summative performance.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jason L; Harris, Benjamin H L; Denny, Paul; Smith, Phil

    2018-02-01

    There are few studies on the value of authoring questions as a study method, the quality of the questions produced by students and student perceptions of student-authored question banks. Here we evaluate PeerWise, a widely used and free online resource that allows students to author, answer and discuss multiple-choice questions. We introduced two undergraduate medical student cohorts to PeerWise (n=603). We looked at their patterns of PeerWise usage; identified associations between student engagement and summative exam performance; and used focus groups to assess student perceptions of the value of PeerWise for learning. We undertook item analysis to assess question difficulty and quality. Over two academic years, the two cohorts wrote 4671 questions, answered questions 606 658 times and posted 7735 comments. Question writing frequency correlated most strongly with summative performance (Spearman's rank: 0.24, p=<0.001). Student focus groups found that: (1) students valued curriculum specificity; and (2) students were concerned about student-authored question quality. Only two questions of the 300 'most-answered' questions analysed had an unacceptable discriminatory value (point-biserial correlation <0.2). Item analysis suggested acceptable question quality despite student concerns. Quantitative and qualitative methods indicated that PeerWise is a valuable study tool. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. The Grass Isn’t Always Greener: Perceptions of and Performance on Open-Note Exams

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Brian K.; He, Wenliang; Warschauer, Mark; Kadandale, Pavan

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biology education is often viewed as being focused on memorization rather than development of students’ critical-thinking abilities. We speculated that open-note testing would be an easily implemented change that would emphasize higher-order thinking. As open-note testing is not commonly used in the biological sciences and the literature on its effects in biology education is sparse, we performed a comprehensive analysis of this intervention on a primary literature–based exam across three large-enrollment laboratory courses. Although students believed open-note testing would impact exam scores, we found no effect on performance, either overall or on questions of nearly all Bloom’s levels. Open-note testing also produced no advantage when examined under a variety of parameters, including research experience, grade point average, course grade, prior exposure to primary literature–focused laboratory courses, or gender. Interestingly, we did observe small differences in open- and closed-note exam performance and perception for students who experienced open-note exams for an entire quarter. This implies that student preparation or in-test behavior can be altered by exposure to open-note testing conditions in a single course and that ­increased experience may be necessary to truly understand the impact of this intervention. PMID:25828402

  6. An algorithm for calculating exam quality as a basis for performance-based allocation of funds at medical schools.

    PubMed

    Kirschstein, Timo; Wolters, Alexander; Lenz, Jan-Hendrik; Fröhlich, Susanne; Hakenberg, Oliver; Kundt, Günther; Darmüntzel, Martin; Hecker, Michael; Altiner, Attila; Müller-Hilke, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The amendment of the Medical Licensing Act (ÄAppO) in Germany in 2002 led to the introduction of graded assessments in the clinical part of medical studies. This, in turn, lent new weight to the importance of written tests, even though the minimum requirements for exam quality are sometimes difficult to reach. Introducing exam quality as a criterion for the award of performance-based allocation of funds is expected to steer the attention of faculty members towards more quality and perpetuate higher standards. However, at present there is a lack of suitable algorithms for calculating exam quality. In the spring of 2014, the students' dean commissioned the "core group" for curricular improvement at the University Medical Center in Rostock to revise the criteria for the allocation of performance-based funds for teaching. In a first approach, we developed an algorithm that was based on the results of the most common type of exam in medical education, multiple choice tests. It included item difficulty and discrimination, reliability as well as the distribution of grades achieved. This algorithm quantitatively describes exam quality of multiple choice exams. However, it can also be applied to exams involving short assay questions and the OSCE. It thus allows for the quantitation of exam quality in the various subjects and - in analogy to impact factors and third party grants - a ranking among faculty. Our algorithm can be applied to all test formats in which item difficulty, the discriminatory power of the individual items, reliability of the exam and the distribution of grades are measured. Even though the content validity of an exam is not considered here, we believe that our algorithm is suitable as a general basis for performance-based allocation of funds.

  7. Development of a Memory Game to Improve Knowledge Retention in Preparation for Broad Scope Exams in an Introductory Earth Science Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, H. M.; Bilsley, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    As the demand for introductory earth science classes rises at educational institutions, large class sizes place strain on the educator's time and ability to offer extensive project-based assignments. As a result, exams covering a broad spectrum of material are more heavily weighted in students' grades. Students often struggle on the first exam, as they attempt to retain a large amount of information from several different topics, while having no exposure to the type of questions that will be asked. This frequently leads to a large dropout rate early in the academic term, or at least a sense of discouragement and stress among struggling students. To better prepare students for a broad scope exam, a review activity modelled after the traditional Milton Bradley "Memory" game was developed to remind students of what would be covered on the exam, prepare them for the style of questions that may be asked, as well as provide a fun, interactive, and educational activity. The Earth Science Memory Game was developed to have interchangeable sets to cover a broad range of topics and thus also be reusable for the duration of the course. Example games sets presented include, but are not limited to, the scientific method, minerals, rocks, topographic maps, tectonics, geologic structures, volcanoes, and weather. The Earth Science Memory Game not only provides an effective review tool to improve success rates on broad scope exams, but is also customizable by the instructor, reusable, and easily constructed by common office supplies.

  8. Assessment Drives Learning: The Effect of Central Exit Exams on Curricular Knowledge and Mathematical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurges, Hendrik; Schneider, Kerstin; Senkbeil, Martin; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use data from the German PISA 2003 sample to study the effects of central exit examinations on student performance and student attitudes. Unlike earlier studies we use (i) a value-added measure to pin down the effect of central exit exams on learning in the last year before the exam and (ii) separate test scores for mathematical…

  9. Breast Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause changes in your breasts, including breast cancer. A breast self-exam for breast awareness isn't a reliable way to screen for ... instructions and technique with your doctor. The American Cancer Society recommends ... have their techniques periodically evaluated by their doctors. ...

  10. Resources Used to Teach the Physical Exam to Preclerkship Medical Students: Results of a National Survey.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Toshiko; Achike, Francis I; Blood, Angela D; Boyle, Mary; Farnan, Jeanne M; Gowda, Deepthiman; Hojsak, Joanne; Ovitsh, Robin K; Park, Yoon Soo; Silvestri, Ronald

    2018-05-01

    To examine resources used in teaching the physical exam to preclerkship students at U.S. medical schools. The Directors of Clinical Skills Courses developed a 49-question survey addressing resources and pedagogical methods employed in preclerkship physical exam curricula. The survey was sent to all 141 Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited medical schools in October 2015. Results were averaged across schools, and data were weighted by class size. Results from 106 medical schools (75% response rate) identified a median of 59 hours devoted to teaching the physical exam. Thirty-eight percent of time spent teaching the physical exam involved the use of standardized patients, 30% used peer-to-peer practice, and 25% involved examining actual patients. Approximately half of practice time with actual patients was observed by faculty. At 48% of schools (51), less than 15% of practice time was with actual patients, and at 20% of schools (21) faculty never observed students practicing with actual patients. Forty-eight percent of schools (51) did not provide compensation for their outpatient clinical preceptors. There is wide variation in the resources used to teach the physical examination to preclerkship medical students. At some schools, the amount of faculty observation of students examining actual patients may not be enough for students to achieve competency. A significant percentage of faculty teaching the physical exam remain uncompensated for their effort. Improving faculty compensation and increasing use of senior students as teachers might allow for greater observation and feedback and improved physical exam skills among students.

  11. Oral Exams as a Tool for Teaching and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2014-01-01

    Oral exams are a fruitful and practical alternative to written exams in small-enrolment Science classes. In an oral exam, the instructor can assess conceptual understanding, problem-solving, scientific communication skills, and a student's philosophy of science. In contrast, a written exam gives a much poorer picture of how students learn and…

  12. Sleep and Final Exam Performance in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletta, Vincent; Wikholm, Colin; Pascoe, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Most physics instructors believe that adequate sleep is important in order for students to perform well on problem solving, and many instructors advise students to get plenty of sleep the night before an exam. After years of giving such advice to students at Loyola Marymount University (LMU), one of us decided to find out how many hours students actually do sleep the night before an exam, and how that would relate to their performance. The effect of inadequate sleep on exam performance was explored in a second-semester introductory physics course. At the end of the final exam, students reported the number of hours they slept the night before. Sleep deprivation corresponded to lower final exam scores. The main purpose of this study is to provide evidence that instructors can provide to their students to convince them that their time is better spent sleeping rather than studying all night before an exam.

  13. Physical exam frequency

    MedlinePlus

    How often you need a physical exam; Health maintenance visit; Health screening; Checkup ... illness Recommendations are based on sex and age: Health screening -- women -- age 18 to 39 Health screening -- ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Neck What's in this article? What ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  15. Answering Student Questions During Examinations: A Descriptive Study of Faculty Beliefs.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, Susan B; Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2016-01-01

    Examinations are used to evaluate individual student learning. Therefore, fair and consistent administration practices are essential. One issue associated with testing administration practices includes whether or not students should be allowed to ask questions during exams and how faculty should respond. Findings from this descriptive study indicate that faculty believe answering questions disrupts the testing environment, inhibits effective monitoring of the testing environment, and could provide unfair hints to students who ask questions. Yet, faculty permit students to ask questions to clarify unclear wording, to provide definitions, and to appear receptive to student needs. Recommendations for nursing education and research are provided.

  16. Language of Mechanisms: Exam Analysis Reveals Students' Strengths, Strategies, and Errors When Using the Electron-Pushing Formalism (Curved Arrows) in New Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Alison B.; Featherstone, Ryan B.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated students' successes, strategies, and common errors in their answers to questions that involved the electron-pushing (curved arrow) formalism (EPF), part of organic chemistry's language. We analyzed students' answers to two question types on midterms and final exams: (1) draw the electron-pushing arrows of a reaction step,…

  17. The Provision of Diabetes-Monitoring Exams to Older Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Angelica P.; Lee Smith, Matthew; Ory, Marcia G.; Rodriguez, Hector P.; Warre, Ruth; Thompson, Wesley K.; Azcue, Annette; Romero, Jairo A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore factors associated with the provision of diabetes-monitoring practices among older Latinos with type 2 diabetes. Method Data from 547 Latinos (≥55 years) were analyzed from the 2007 California Health Interview Survey. Multivariate logistic regression modeled the relationship between health status and sociodemographic factors and the receipt of semiannual HbA1c tests, annual foot exams, and annual retinal exams. Results The majority of older Latino diabetics received foot exams (87%) and retinal exams (77%), but the provision of semiannual HbA1c tests (30%) was low. Higher English-language proficiency and health insurance coverage were associated with the provision of HbA1c tests and foot exams, but not retinal exams. Insulin therapy was positively associated with semiannual HbA1c testing, but negatively associated with foot exams. Discussion There are considerable missed opportunities in the provision of diabetes monitoring for older Latinos, particularly those with limited English proficiency, less comprehensive insurance, and noninsulin therapy. PMID:21948771

  18. Improving the National Board of Medical Examiners internal Medicine Subject Exam for use in clerkship evaluation.

    PubMed

    Elnicki, D Michael; Lescisin, Dianne A; Case, Susan

    2002-06-01

    To provide a consensus opinion on modifying the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Medicine Subject Exam (Shelf) to: 1) reflect the internal medicine clerkship curriculum, developed by the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) and the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM); 2) emphasize knowledge important for a clerkship student; and 3) obtain feedback about students' performances on the Shelf. Two-round Delphi technique. The CDIM Research and Evaluation Committee and CDIM members on NBME Step 2 Committees. Using 1-5 Likert scales (5 = highest ratings), the group rated test question content for relevance to the SGIM-CDIM Curriculum Guide and importance for clerkship students' knowledge. The Shelf content is organized into 4 physician tasks and into 11 sections that are generally organ system based. Each iteration of the Shelf has 100 questions. Participants indicated a desired distribution of questions by physician task and section, topics critical for inclusion on each exam, and new topics to include. They specified the types of feedback clerkship directors desired on students' performances. Following the first round, participants viewed pooled results prior to submitting their second-round responses. Of 15 individuals contacted, 12 (80%) participated in each round. The desired distribution by physician task was: diagnosis (43), treatment (23), mechanism of disease (20), and health maintenance (15). The sections with the most questions requested were the cardiovascular (17), respiratory (15), and gastroenterology (12) sections. The fewest were requested in aging/ethics (4) and neurology, dermatology, and immunology (5 each). Examples of low-rated content were Wilson's Disease, chancroid and tracheal rupture (all <2.0). Health maintenance in type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease all received 5.0 ratings. Participants desired feedback by: section (4.6) and physician task (3.9), on performances of the entire class (4

  19. Breast self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Self-examination of the breast; BSE; Breast cancer - BSE; Breast cancer screening - self exam ... chap 15. US Preventive Services Task Force website. Breast cancer: screening. www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/breast- ...

  20. Ocular Health (OH) Fundoscope Exam

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-05

    ISS036-E-006520 (5 June 2013) --- NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts an ocular health exam on herself in the Destiny laboratory of the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, flight engineer, nearby but out of frame, assisted in the testing, part of a suite of eye exams carried out over a two-day period on various crew members to gather information on intraocular pressure and eye anatomy.

  1. Enhanced Security for Online Exams Using Group Cryptography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, I. Y.; Yeom, H. Y.

    2009-01-01

    While development of the Internet has contributed to the spread of online education, online exams have not been widely adopted. An online exam is defined here as one that takes place over the insecure Internet, and where no proctor is in the same location as the examinees. This paper proposes an enhanced secure online exam management environment…

  2. Exit Exams: Decreases or Increases the Dropout Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the impact of exit exams on the dropout rate. Data was gathered from several research articles. The most impressionable research revealed exit exams have a negative effect on minorities, especially black males. Results indicate by 2012, that exit exams in 25 states will affect 81 percent of minority high…

  3. Does Pelvic Exam in the Emergency Department Add Useful Information?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jeremy; Fleming, Rita; Aristzabel, Jamie; Gishta, Rocksolana

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Physicians are taught that the pelvic exam is a key part of the evaluation of a woman presenting with abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding. However, the exam is time consuming and invasive, and its use in the emergency department (ED) has not been prospectively evaluated. We evaluated how often the findings of the pelvic exam changed management in a cohort of consecutive female patients presenting with acute abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding. Methods: We enrolled women who required a pelvic exam together with the providers caring for them in an academic ED from September 2004 to August 2005. We collected the results of the general history and physical exam. The provider was asked to predict the findings of the pelvic exam, and these were compared with the actual findings of the exam. Results: One hundred eighty-three patients were prospectively entered into the study. When compared with predicted findings, the pelvic exam was as expected in 131 patients (72%). In a further 40 patients (22%), the findings of the pelvic exam were not as predicted, but resulted in no change in the clinical plan. In 12 cases (6%) the exam revealed a finding that was both unexpected and changed the clinical plan. Only one of these patients was admitted. Of the 24 patients who were admitted, four had a pelvic exam that revealed unexpected results, but only one of these cases caused the physician to change the care planned for the patient. Conclusion: In 94% of women with acute abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding, the results of the pelvic exam were either predictable or had no effect on the clinical plan. This suggests that there may be a subset of women with abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding in whom a pelvic exam may safely be deferred. PMID:21691528

  4. Exam anxiety in the undergraduate medical students of Taibah University.

    PubMed

    Khoshhal, Khalid I; Khairy, Gamal A; Guraya, Salman Y; Guraya, Shaista S

    2017-04-01

    Assessment is perceived to create highly stressful environment among medical students. Several studies have reported exam-related anxiety symptoms but the contributing factors seem to differ across institutions. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of exam anxiety, gender differences and the variables that moderate exam anxiety among students of a Saudi medical school. A cross-section study was done on 5th year medical students by administering a 12-statement self-administered questionnaire. The degree of exam anxiety was gauged by a visual analog scale. Of 125 students, 111 responded (response rate 89%). About 65% students experienced exam anxiety due to various reasons. Studying all night before exam (28 students; 25.2%) and extensive course load (26 students; 23.4%) were the major confounding factors. Female students experienced more stress due to extensive course load as compared with male students (p = .00). The data about the identified risk factors for exam anxiety can help medical educators to deeply understand the reasons for exam anxiety. There is a need to reassess the amount of study material in undergraduate medical curricula and students need to organize their time management skills to cope with exam anxiety.

  5. Length of internship influences performance on medical residency exam.

    PubMed

    Santos, Itamar de Souza; Vieira, Joaquim Edson; Nunes, Maria do Patrocínio Tenório

    2009-01-01

    Medical education encompasses globally diverse context and conditions. The Brazilian scenario seemed a natural environment to study the influence of medical education programs and internship duration on the entrance exam for medical residency. This investigation evaluates some methods used during the entrance exam for medical residency as a means to make a distinction between candidates with longer clerkships. Candidates selected for a residency program performed a multiple-choice (MC), an open question (OQ) and OSCE-like tests, an interview and a curriculum analysis for participation in scientific meetings, papers published and voluntary activities. Groups were compared for gender, year of graduation, tests and OSCE scores. Participants were distributed into two groups based on clerkship duration: 2 years or less than 2 years. There was no difference for the MCT score among groups or any of the activities from interview and curriculum analysis. The 2 years clerkship group showed significantly higher OQ (p=0.009) and OSCE-like affective (p=0.025) and knowledge (p=0.002) scores. The OSCE test identified some aspects related to competence acquisition and assessed basic skills and attitudes essential to the supervised practice of medicine during residency. OSCE discriminated aspects not perceived by the sole use of knowledge tests.

  6. What students learn when studying physics practice exam problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakcharoenphol, Witat; Potter, Eric; Stelzer, Timothy

    2011-06-01

    We developed a web-based tool to provide students with access to old exam problems and solutions. By controlling the order in which students saw the problems, as well as their access to solutions, we obtained data about student learning by studying old exam problems. Our data suggest that in general students learn from doing old exam problems, and that having access to the problem solutions increases their learning. However, the data also suggest the depth of learning may be relatively shallow. In addition, the data show that doing old exam problems provides important formative assessment about the student’s overall preparedness for the exam and their particular areas of strength and weakness.

  7. From Exam to Education: The Math Exam/Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruni, Carmen; Koch, Christina; Konrad, Bernhard; Lindstrom, Michael; Moyles, Iain; Thompson, Will

    2016-01-01

    The Math Exam/Education Resources (MER) is an open online learning resource hosted at The University of British Columbia (UBC), aimed at providing mathematics education resources for students and instructors at UBC. In this paper, there will be a discussion of the motivation for creating this resource on the MediaWiki platform, key features of the…

  8. Tailoring the Preparticipation Exam to Female Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mimi D.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the basics of the preparticipation exam, focusing on aspects specific to females, such as menstrual dysfunction, disordered eating, and orthopedic problems such as scoliosis and patellofemoral pain. Health history questionnaire and other parts of the exam are included in six tables. (SM)

  9. The evaluation of eye pain with a normal ocular exam.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew G; Brazis, Paul W

    2003-12-01

    Eye pain with or without associated head or face pain is a common complaint to the ophthalmologist. The ocular exam may reveal the etiology (e.g., corneal disease, angle closure glaucoma) but typically the exam is normal. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of eye pain with a "normal" ocular exam, including: 1) subtle findings on ocular exam; 2) transient findings on exam, and 3) no abnormal ocular findings. Ophthalmologists should be aware of the various etiologies for eye pain and the specific and distinctive features that make the diagnosis.

  10. The impact of a scheduling change on ninth grade high school performance on biology benchmark exams and the California Standards Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Marcelo

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a scheduling change from a trimester 4x4 block schedule to a modified hybrid schedule on student achievement in ninth grade biology courses. This study examined the impact of the scheduling change on student achievement through teacher created benchmark assessments in Genetics, DNA, and Evolution and on the California Standardized Test in Biology. The secondary purpose of this study examined the ninth grade biology teacher perceptions of ninth grade biology student achievement. Using a mixed methods research approach, data was collected both quantitatively and qualitatively as aligned to research questions. Quantitative methods included gathering data from departmental benchmark exams and California Standardized Test in Biology and conducting multiple analysis of covariance and analysis of covariance to determine significance differences. Qualitative methods include journal entries questions and focus group interviews. The results revealed a statistically significant increase in scores on both the DNA and Evolution benchmark exams. DNA and Evolution benchmark exams showed significant improvements from a change in scheduling format. The scheduling change was responsible for 1.5% of the increase in DNA benchmark scores and 2% of the increase in Evolution benchmark scores. The results revealed a statistically significant decrease in scores on the Genetics Benchmark exam as a result of the scheduling change. The scheduling change was responsible for 1% of the decrease in Genetics benchmark scores. The results also revealed a statistically significant increase in scores on the CST Biology exam. The scheduling change was responsible for .7% of the increase in CST Biology scores. Results of the focus group discussions indicated that all teachers preferred the modified hybrid schedule over the trimester schedule and that it improved student achievement.

  11. Investigating the Effects of Exam Length on Performance and Cognitive Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jamie L.; Berry, Dane A.; Kummer, Tyler A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of exam length on student performance and cognitive fatigue in an undergraduate biology classroom. Exams tested higher order thinking skills. To test our hypothesis, we administered standard- and extended-length high-level exams to two populations of non-majors biology students. We gathered exam performance data between conditions as well as performance on the first and second half of exams within conditions. We showed that lengthier exams led to better performance on assessment items shared between conditions, possibly lending support to the spreading activation theory. It also led to greater performance on the final exam, lending support to the testing effect in creative problem solving. Lengthier exams did not result in lower performance due to fatiguing conditions, although students perceived subjective fatigue. Implications of these findings are discussed with respect to assessment practices. PMID:23950918

  12. Exploring viewing behavior data from whole slide images to predict correctness of students' answers during practical exams in oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Walkowski, Slawomir; Lundin, Mikael; Szymas, Janusz; Lundin, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The way of viewing whole slide images (WSI) can be tracked and analyzed. In particular, it can be useful to learn how medical students view WSIs during exams and how their viewing behavior is correlated with correctness of the answers they give. We used software-based view path tracking method that enabled gathering data about viewing behavior of multiple simultaneous WSI users. This approach was implemented and applied during two practical exams in oral pathology in 2012 (88 students) and 2013 (91 students), which were based on questions with attached WSIs. Gathered data were visualized and analyzed in multiple ways. As a part of extended analysis, we tried to use machine learning approaches to predict correctness of students' answers based on how they viewed WSIs. We compared the results of analyses for years 2012 and 2013 - done for a single question, for student groups, and for a set of questions. The overall patterns were generally consistent across these 3 years. Moreover, viewing behavior data appeared to have certain potential for predicting answers' correctness and some outcomes of machine learning approaches were in the right direction. However, general prediction results were not satisfactory in terms of precision and recall. Our work confirmed that the view path tracking method is useful for discovering viewing behavior of students analyzing WSIs. It provided multiple useful insights in this area, and general results of our analyses were consistent across two exams. On the other hand, predicting answers' correctness appeared to be a difficult task - students' answers seem to be often unpredictable.

  13. Is Student Performance on the Information Systems Analyst Certification Exam Affected by Form of Delivery of Information Systems Coursework?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haga, Wayne; Moreno, Abel; Segall, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we compare the performance of Computer Information Systems (CIS) majors on the Information Systems Analyst (ISA) Certification Exam. The impact that the form of delivery of information systems coursework may have on the exam score is studied. Using a sample that spans three years, we test for significant differences between scores…

  14. Quality Multiple-Choice Test Questions: Item-Writing Guidelines and an Analysis of Auditing Testbanks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James D.; Dexter, Lee

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of test item banks in 10 auditing textbooks found that 75% of questions violated one or more guidelines for multiple-choice items. In comparison, 70% of a certified public accounting exam bank had no violations. (SK)

  15. High Stakes Tests with Self-Selected Essay Questions: Addressing Issues of Fairness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamprianou, Iasonas

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of reporting the unadjusted raw scores in a high-stakes language exam when raters differ significantly in severity and self-selected questions differ significantly in difficulty. More sophisticated models, introducing meaningful facets and parameters, are successively used to investigate the characteristics of…

  16. Developing On-line Exams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartsell, Taralynn S.; Yuen, Steve Chi-Yin

    2003-01-01

    Discusses advantages and limitations of online exams, describes available software tools for creating computer-based tests (CGI, JavaScript, commercial programs, course authoring tools), and offers suggestions for implementation. (JOW)

  17. Will students pass a competitive exam that they failed in their dreams?

    PubMed

    Arnulf, Isabelle; Grosliere, Laure; Le Corvec, Thibault; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Lascols, Olivier; Duguet, Alexandre

    2014-10-01

    We tested whether dreams can anticipate a stressful exam and how failure/success in dreams affect next-day performance. We collected information on students' dreams during the night preceding the medical school entrance exam. Demographic, academic, sleep and dream characteristics were compared to the students' grades on the exam. Of the 719 respondents to the questionnaire (of 2324 total students), 60.4% dreamt of the exam during the night preceding it. Problems with the exam appeared in 78% of dreams and primarily involved being late and forgetting answers. Reporting a dream about the exam on the pre-exam night was associated with better performance on the exam (p=.01). The frequency of dreams concerning the exam during the first term predicted proportionally higher performance on the exam (R=0.1, p=.01). These results suggest that the negative anticipation of a stressful event in dreams is common and that this episodic simulation provides a cognitive gain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Marshburn performs Tonometry Eye Exam on Hadfield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-21

    ISS034-E-035949 (21 Jan. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn (right), Expedition 34 flight engineer, performs a Tonometry eye exam on Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield, flight engineer, in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. The purpose of this exam is to measure intraocular eye pressure.

  19. The licensure exam in nursing degree courses: a survey in the four universities of the Lazio Region.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, A; Virgolesi, M; Pulimeno, A M L; Rocco, G; Stievano, A; Venturini, G; De Marinis, M G

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the nursing licensure exam is at the centre of a national and international wide debate. This debate regards the planning of the nursing licensure exam in many Universities and the competences that this exam must certify to ensure quality, effectiveness, and ethics of nursing care from newly-graduated nurses to general public. The aim of this study was to describe the practical tests used for the licensure exam in the four Universities of the Lazio Region. The researchers analyzed the type of practical tests used and the field of competences assessed according to the degrees of performance defined by the Dublin Descriptors. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews to Presidents, Directors and Lecturers of nursing degree courses and through direct retrieval of the written texts of the licensure exam. Two researchers analyzed the practical tests. A special lecture-grid divided into three different sections to interpret the data was created. Statistical analysis was carried out by means of Epi-info 3.5.1/2008. Analysis of data showed that the most used tests were Discussion of theoretical and practical aspects in context (33.6%), followed by the Test with open and/or closed questions (23,9%). Psychomotor and relational skills tests were little used. The most valued field of competence was the cognitive one (85,5%) that assessed, above all, the storage of the concept. The ability to interpret data and solve problems was less valued. The study showed the high discrepancy in the types of tests used in the four Universities of the Lazio Region. Universities found it difficult to assess psychomotor and relational skills of the students. Most of the cognitive tests utilized omitted the evaluation of mastery of complex competences. Therefore, there is the necessity of a new planning of the nursing licensure exam to overcome these critical issues.

  20. Class A and Class B UST Operator Exams

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about exams developed by EPA to help underground storage tank system owners and operators in Indian country meet the 2015 federal UST regulation requirement that designated operators demonstrate knowledge and pass an exam.

  1. The new AP Physics exams: Integrating qualitative and quantitative reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elby, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    When physics instructors and education researchers emphasize the importance of integrating qualitative and quantitative reasoning in problem solving, they usually mean using those types of reasoning serially and separately: first students should analyze the physical situation qualitatively/conceptually to figure out the relevant equations, then they should process those equations quantitatively to generate a solution, and finally they should use qualitative reasoning to check that answer for plausibility (Heller, Keith, & Anderson, 1992). The new AP Physics 1 and 2 exams will, of course, reward this approach to problem solving. But one kind of free response question will demand and reward a further integration of qualitative and quantitative reasoning, namely mathematical modeling and sense-making--inventing new equations to capture a physical situation and focusing on proportionalities, inverse proportionalities, and other functional relations to infer what the equation ``says'' about the physical world. In this talk, I discuss examples of these qualitative-quantitative translation questions, highlighting how they differ from both standard quantitative and standard qualitative questions. I then discuss the kinds of modeling activities that can help AP and college students develop these skills and habits of mind.

  2. Performing pediatric eye exams in primary care.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elaine F

    2017-08-17

    Early vision care is critical for all children. If undetected, eye disorders such as amblyopia and strabismus may result in permanent vision loss. Vision exams should include a careful history and physical including fix and follow, red reflex, and cover/uncover testing. Photo screening and visual acuity exams should be administered whenever possible.

  3. Investigation into the need for ingesting foreign imaging exams into local systems and evaluation of the design challenges of Foreign Exam Management (FEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Lazar; Agrawal, Arun; Bak, Peter; Bender, Duane; Koff, David

    2015-03-01

    The deployment of regional and national Electronic Health Record solutions has been a focus of many countries throughout the past decade. Most of these deployments have taken the approach of "sharing" imaging exams via portals and web-based viewers. The motivation of portal/web-based access is driven by a) the perception that review of imaging exams via portal methods is satisfactory to all users and b) the perceived complexity of ingesting foreign exams into local systems. This research project set out to objectively evaluate who really needs foreign exams within their local systems, what those systems might be and how often this is required. Working on the belief that Foreign Exam Management (FEM) is required to support clinical workflow, the project implemented a FEM capability within an XDSI. b domain to identify the design challenges and nuances associated with FEM.

  4. Prior-to-Exam: What Activities Enhance Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, C. J.; Healy, Therese

    2013-01-01

    Can instructors impact their student performance by recommending an activity just prior to taking an exam? In this study, college students were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups (study, exercise, or meditation) or a control group. Each group was given two different types of tests; a traditional concept exam, and a non-traditional…

  5. COAMFTE accreditation and California MFT licensing exam success.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Benjamin E; Kunker, Shelly A; Brown, Stephen W; Saiki, Dustin Y

    2011-10-01

    Professional accreditation of graduate programs in marital and family therapy (MFT) is intended to ensure the strength of the education students receive. However, there is great difficulty in assessing the real-world impact of accreditation on students. Only one measure is applied consistently to graduates of all MFT programs, regardless of accreditation status: licensure examinations. Within California, COAMFTE-accredited, regionally (WASC) accredited, and state-approved programs all may offer degrees qualifying for licensure. Exam data from 2004, 2005, and 2006 (n = 5,646 examinees on the Written Clinical Vignette exam and n = 3,408 first-time examinees on the Standard Written Exam) were reviewed to determine the differences in exam success among graduates of programs at varying levels of accreditation. Students from COAMFTE-accredited programs were more successful on both California exams than were students from other WASC-accredited or state-approved universities. There were no significant differences between (non-COAMFTE) WASC-accredited universities and state-approved programs. Differences could be related to selection effects, if COAMFTE programs initially accept students of higher quality. Implications for therapist education and training are discussed. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  6. The Relationship of Deep and Surface Study Approaches on Factual and Applied Test-Bank Multiple-Choice Question Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonker, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of online test banks and large introductory classes, instructors have often turned to textbook publisher-generated multiple-choice question (MCQ) exams in their courses. Multiple-choice questions are often divided into categories of factual or applied, thereby implicating levels of cognitive processing. This investigation examined…

  7. Exams disadvantage women in introductory biology

    PubMed Central

    Cotner, Sehoya

    2017-01-01

    The gender gap in STEM fields has prompted a great deal of discussion, but what factors underlie performance deficits remain poorly understood. We show that female students underperformed on exams compared to their male counterparts across ten large introductory biology course sections in fall 2016 (N > 1500 students). Females also reported higher levels of test anxiety and course-relevant science interest. Results from mediation analyses revealed an intriguing pattern: for female students only, and regardless of their academic standing, test anxiety negatively impacted exam performance, while interest in the course-specific science topics increased exam performance. Thus, instructors seeking equitable classrooms can aim to decrease test anxiety and increase student interest in science course content. We provide strategies for mitigating test anxiety and suggestions for alignment of course content with student interest, with the hope of successfully reimagining the STEM pathway as one that is equally accessible to all. PMID:29049334

  8. Use of Galvanic Skin Responses, Salivary Biomarkers, and Self-reports to Assess Undergraduate Student Performance During a Laboratory Exam Activity

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Idalis; Valladares, Maria; Goodridge, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Typically, self-reports are used in educational research to assess student response and performance to a classroom activity. Yet, addition of biological and physiological measures such as salivary biomarkers and galvanic skin responses are rarely included, limiting the wealth of information that can be obtained to better understand student performance. A laboratory protocol to study undergraduate students' responses to classroom events (e.g., exams) is presented. Participants were asked to complete a representative exam for their degree. Before and after the laboratory exam session, students completed an academic achievement emotions self-report and an interview that paralleled these questions when participants wore a galvanic skin sensor and salivary biomarkers were collected. Data collected from the three methods resulted in greater depth of information about students' performance when compared to the self-report. The work can expand educational research capabilities through more comprehensive methods for obtaining nearer to real-time student responses to an examination activity. PMID:26891278

  9. The Devil's in the Details: Evidence from the GED on Large Effects of Small Differences in High Stakes Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, John H.; Murnane, Richard J.; Willett, John B.

    2004-01-01

    As part of standards-based educational reform efforts, more than 40 states will soon require students to achieve passing scores on standardized exams in order to obtain a high school diploma. Currently, many states are struggling with the design of their examination systems, debating such questions as which subjects should be tested, what should…

  10. Trainee Teachers' Conceptions of Teaching and Learning, Classroom Layout and Exam Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betoret, Fernando Domenech; Artiga, Amparo Gomez

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study centres on identifying and classifying the conceptions of teaching and learning held by future secondary school teachers, and on analysing the relationship between these conceptions and the way classroom space is organized and exams are designed. The test instruments used were applied to a sample of 138 graduates, who…

  11. [Centrally and non-centrally designed exams in nursing: Comparisons of the final exams in 2008 to 2013 in Berlin focusing on different concepts of professional nursing education].

    PubMed

    Strube-Lahmann, Sandra; Vogler, Christine; Friedrich, Kai; Dassen, Theo; Kottner, Jan

    2016-12-01

    In Germany, nursing education ends with a final written, oral and practical exam. In the federal state of Berlin, Germany, all nursing students take centrally standardized written exams, while the practical and oral exams are developed by each individual nursing school or university and conducted without standardized protocols (non-central). Comparability might be seriously limited by this procedure. Since there is no official statistics available, the objective of this study is to compare the results of the final written, oral and practical exams of different nursing education institutions with an additional focus on different educational concepts. In a secondary data analysis, the final grades (written, oral, practical) of 4,342 nursing students in all 16 educational institutions in Berlin from 2008 to 2013 were analyzed. The mean (SD) of all written, oral and practical exams taken was 2.9 (0.7), 2.6 (1.1) and 2.2 (1.0), respectively. In each type of exam, the trend in grades was stable over the observation period. There was a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of initially failed exams from 2008 (7.9 %) to 2013 (12.0 %). In institutions following a traditional concept of education, the difference in grades between oral/practical exams on the one hand and written exams on the other ranged from 0.1 to 0.9, while in generalist (academic) institutions it ranged between -0.1 and 0.3 (-0.1 to 0). In nursing schools with a traditional approach to education, there was a big difference in grades between written and oral/practical exams. Standardization of oral and practical exams should be initiated to ensure greater comparability between different educational institutions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Even after Thirteen Class Exams, Students Are Still Overconfident: The Role of Memory for Past Exam Performance in Student Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Nathaniel L.; Was, Christopher A.; Dunlosky, John; Isaacson, Randall M.

    2017-01-01

    Students often are overconfident when they predict their performance on classroom examinations, and their accuracy often does not improve across exams. One contributor to overconfidence may be that students did not have enough experience, and another is that students may under-use their knowledge of prior exam performance to predict performance on…

  13. X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study What's in this article? What It ... de la edad ósea What It Is A bone age study helps doctors estimate the maturity of ...

  14. The Cognitive Abilities of Children: Reflections from an Entrance Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cil, Emine; Cepni, Salih

    2012-01-01

    The basic determiner for the school in which the children who completed their primary education will in at an upper education level in Turkey is the entrance exam carried out nationwide. The items of national exam, called as LDE (Level Determination Exam) which the primary education pupils (aged between 12 and 15) will participate in Turkey were…

  15. Biology Question Generation from a Semantic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lishan

    Science instructors need questions for use in exams, homework assignments, class discussions, reviews, and other instructional activities. Textbooks never have enough questions, so instructors must find them from other sources or generate their own questions. In order to supply instructors with biology questions, a semantic network approach was developed for generating open response biology questions. The generated questions were compared to professional authorized questions. To boost students' learning experience, adaptive selection was built on the generated questions. Bayesian Knowledge Tracing was used as embedded assessment of the student's current competence so that a suitable question could be selected based on the student's previous performance. A between-subjects experiment with 42 participants was performed, where half of the participants studied with adaptive selected questions and the rest studied with mal-adaptive order of questions. Both groups significantly improved their test scores, and the participants in adaptive group registered larger learning gains than participants in the control group. To explore the possibility of generating rich instructional feedback for machine-generated questions, a question-paragraph mapping task was identified. Given a set of questions and a list of paragraphs for a textbook, the goal of the task was to map the related paragraphs to each question. An algorithm was developed whose performance was comparable to human annotators. A multiple-choice question with high quality distractors (incorrect answers) can be pedagogically valuable as well as being much easier to grade than open-response questions. Thus, an algorithm was developed to generate good distractors for multiple-choice questions. The machine-generated multiple-choice questions were compared to human-generated questions in terms of three measures: question difficulty, question discrimination and distractor usefulness. By recruiting 200 participants from

  16. Exam 2 Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Richard G.; Gruber, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    After students take their first exam in an accounting course, tax accounting and intermediate accounting in this case, their reactions to their test scores may be varied. This is their first major assessment of how they have performed in the class. The students in the class near the high end of the grading scale are going to be satisfied with…

  17. [Laboratory exams necessity for patients admitted to an university hospital intensive care unity].

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernando Osni; Silva, Flávia Solano Patrício da; Argente, Juliana Sonego; Moritz, Rachel Duarte

    2006-12-01

    The progressive increasing diagnostic resources had influenced the quality and quantity of laboratory exams. It is not clear if the amount of exams performed influence the morbidity and mortality in the ICU patients. The purpose of this study was to appraise the frequency of the most ordering tests in the ICU of HU-UFSC and to check if there was connection between them and the age, the destiny until the ICU discharge and the estimate severity of their diseases. Prospective cohort study with qualitative approach. The blood samples of admitted patients were analyzed, from July to December 2005. Clinical and demographic features were collected and the most frequently blood-samples were quantified per day. In the sequence the daily rate of exams were calculated during all the admission period. The patients were analyzed according to three criterions: age, destiny until the ICU discharge and estimate severity according to APACHE II index. Data were analyzed using Fisher Exact, Chi-square and ANOVA tests. One hundred and thirteen patients were enrolled to this study. The average test-ordering was 11.50 per day. These numbers didn't have statistical difference when they were compared between survivor and non-survivor patients, and between those whose the death estimated tax was bigger or smaller than 50 per cent. The test-ordering didn't show clinical and prognostic relation to its request. There were no statistic relation between the patient's age, ICU discharge and the estimate severity.

  18. A Pilot Study of an Electronic Exam System at an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wibowo, Santoso; Grandhi, Srimannarayana; Chugh, Ritesh; Sawir, Erlenawati

    2016-01-01

    This study sought academic staff and students' views of electronic exams (e-exams) system and the benefits and challenges of e-exams in general. The respondents provided useful feedback for future adoption of e-exams at an Australian university and elsewhere too. The key findings show that students and academic staff are optimistic about the…

  19. Final Exam Weighting as Part of Course Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franke, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    The weighting of a final exam or a final assignment is an essential part of course design that is rarely discussed in pedagogical literature. Depending on the weighting, a final exam or assignment may provide unequal benefits to students depending on their prior performance in the class. Consequently, uncritical grade weighting can discount…

  20. Gender Differences in STEM Related Advanced Placement Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jill B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine differences between boys and girls in their performance on STEM related AP exams. Specifically, gender differences were examined for the following STEM related AP exams: Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Physics B, Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism, Physics C: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Computer Science…

  1. Effect of Using Assist Devices on Exam Completion Questions among Thai College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Arthur E.

    2017-01-01

    Action research was undertaken to begin to explore the possibility of improving second-language Thai college student performance on completion questions by using bolded and underscored words in test item stems, called "assist devices." This intervention was designed to focus student attention on key terms. Twenty-one students, in an…

  2. Ocular Health (OH) Fundoscope Exam

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-05

    Astronaut Karen Nyberg and Astronaut Chris Cassidy (partially visible), both Expedition 37 flight engineers, perform an Ocular Health (OH) Fundoscope Exam in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station

  3. Observing and Deterring Social Cheating on College Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Richard J.; Yates, Michael C.; Godbey, Johnathan M.

    2018-01-01

    This research introduces a unique multiple choice exam design to observe and measure the degree to which students copy answers from their peers. Using data collected from the exam, an empirical experiment is conducted to determine whether random seat assignment deters cheating relative to a control group of students allowed to choose their seats.…

  4. Behavioral economics and diabetic eye exams.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew M; Liu, Peggy J; Muir, Kelly W; Waxman, Evan L

    2018-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and is the leading cause of new blindness among working-age adults in the United States. Timely intervention to prevent vision loss is possible with early detection by regular eye examinations. Unfortunately, adherence to recommended annual diabetic eye exams is poor. Public health interventions have targeted traditional barriers to care, such as cost and transportation, with limited success. Behavioral economics provides an additional framework of concepts and tools to understand low screening rates and to promote regular diabetic eye exams for populations at risk. In particular, behavioral economics outlines biases and heuristics that affect decision-making and underlie pervasive barriers to care, such as not viewing diabetic eye exams as a priority or perceiving oneself as too healthy to need an examination. In this review, we examine the literature on the use of behavioral economics interventions to promote regular diabetic eye exams. From the results of the included studies, we outline how concepts from behavioral economics can improve eye examination rates. In particular, the default bias, present bias, and self-serving bias play a significant role in precluding regular diabetic eye examinations. Potential tools to mitigate these biases include leveraging default options, using reminder messages, providing behavioral coaching, applying commitment contracts, offering financial incentives, and personalizing health messages. When combined with traditional public health campaigns, insights from behavioral economics can improve understanding of pervasive barriers to care and offer additional strategies to promote regular preventive eye care for patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance Analysis of Exam Gloves Used for Aseptic Rodent Surgery

    PubMed Central

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP–PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham ‘exertion’ activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP–PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP–PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries. PMID:26045458

  6. Performance analysis of exam gloves used for aseptic rodent surgery.

    PubMed

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-05-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP-PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham 'exertion' activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP-PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP-PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries.

  7. Exit Exams Face Pinch in Common-Core Push

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ujifusa, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    With many states crafting assessments based on the common-core standards--and an increasing emphasis on college and career readiness--some are rethinking the kind of tests high school students must pass to graduate, or whether to use such exit exams at all. Twenty-five states, enrolling a total of 34.1 million students, make exit exams a…

  8. Multiple-Choice and Short-Answer Exam Performance in a College Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Steven C.; Dickson, K. Laurie

    2011-01-01

    The authors experimentally investigated the effects of multiple-choice and short-answer format exam items on exam performance in a college classroom. They randomly assigned 50 students to take a 10-item short-answer pretest or posttest on two 50-item multiple-choice exams in an introduction to personality course. Students performed significantly…

  9. Sleep Patterns and Academic Performance during Preparation for College Entrance Exam in Chinese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanghai; Ren, Fen; Liu, Zhijun; Xu, Guangxing; Jiang, Fan; Skora, Elizabeth; Lewin, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deficient sleep is linked to detrimental outcomes in health and school performance for adolescents. This study characterized sleep patterns in Chinese adolescents preparing for the College Entrance Exam (CEE) and evaluated the association between sleep patterns, self-rated academic performance, and the CEE scores. Methods: A sample of…

  10. Multiple Choice Questions Can Be Designed or Revised to Challenge Learners' Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Gushta, Matthew M.; Mulroney, Susan E.; Weissinger, Peggy A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple choice (MC) questions from a graduate physiology course were evaluated by cognitive-psychology (but not physiology) experts, and analyzed statistically, in order to test the independence of content expertise and cognitive complexity ratings of MC items. Integration of higher order thinking into MC exams is important, but widely known to…

  11. Validity and Reliability of Scores Obtained on Multiple-Choice Questions: Why Functioning Distractors Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Syed Haris; Carr, Patrick A.; Ruit, Kenneth G.

    2016-01-01

    Plausible distractors are important for accurate measurement of knowledge via multiple-choice questions (MCQs). This study demonstrates the impact of higher distractor functioning on validity and reliability of scores obtained on MCQs. Freeresponse (FR) and MCQ versions of a neurohistology practice exam were given to four cohorts of Year 1 medical…

  12. Hispanic Student Performance on Advanced Placement Exams: A Multiyear, National Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Teresa Dianne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the Advanced Placement exams that Hispanic students complete and to compare their overall performance with the performance of White students from 2000 to 2012. A second purpose was to determine which Advanced Placement exams were the most difficult exams for Hispanic students and which Advanced…

  13. Relationships between Preclinical Course Grades and Standardized Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Yinin; Martindale, James R.; LeGallo, Robin D.; White, Casey B.; McGahren, Eugene D.; Schroen, Anneke T.

    2016-01-01

    Success in residency matching is largely contingent upon standardized exam scores. Identifying predictors of standardized exam performance could promote primary intervention and lead to design insights for preclinical courses. We hypothesized that clinically relevant courses with an emphasis on higher-order cognitive understanding are most…

  14. Expedition 50 Qualification Exams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-25

    Expedition 50 crew members NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, left, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos, center, and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet laugh together as they prepare for their final qualification exams, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Developing a prelicensure exam for Canada: an international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Hobbins, Bonnie; Bradley, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Nine previously conducted studies indicate that Elsevier's HESI Exit Exam (E(2)) is 96.36%-99.16% accurate in predicting success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. No similar standardized exam is available in Canada to predict Canadian Registered Nurse Examination (CRNE) success. Like the E(2), such an exam could be used to evaluate Canadian nursing students' preparedness for the CRNE, and scores on the numerous subject matter categories could be used to guide students' remediation efforts so that, ultimately, they are successful on their first attempt at taking the CRNE. The international collaboration between a HESI test construction expert and a nursing faculty member from Canada, who served as the content expert, resulted in the development of a 180-item, multiple-choice/single-answer prelicensure exam (PLE) that was pilot tested with Canadian nursing students (N = 175). Item analysis data obtained from this pilot testing were used to develop a 160-item PLE, which includes an additional 20 pilot test items. The estimated reliability of this exam is 0.91, and it exhibits congruent validity with the CRNE because the PLE test blueprint mimics the CRNE test blueprint. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Blooms' separation of the final exam of Engineering Mathematics II: Item reliability using Rasch measurement model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuaad, Norain Farhana Ahmad; Nopiah, Zulkifli Mohd; Tawil, Norgainy Mohd; Othman, Haliza; Asshaari, Izamarlina; Osman, Mohd Hanif; Ismail, Nur Arzilah

    2014-06-01

    In engineering studies and researches, Mathematics is one of the main elements which express physical, chemical and engineering laws. Therefore, it is essential for engineering students to have a strong knowledge in the fundamental of mathematics in order to apply the knowledge to real life issues. However, based on the previous results of Mathematics Pre-Test, it shows that the engineering students lack the fundamental knowledge in certain topics in mathematics. Due to this, apart from making improvements in the methods of teaching and learning, studies on the construction of questions (items) should also be emphasized. The purpose of this study is to assist lecturers in the process of item development and to monitor the separation of items based on Blooms' Taxonomy and to measure the reliability of the items itself usingRasch Measurement Model as a tool. By using Rasch Measurement Model, the final exam questions of Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) for semester 2 sessions 2012/2013 were analysed and the results will provide the details onthe extent to which the content of the item providesuseful information about students' ability. This study reveals that the items used in Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) final exam are well constructed but the separation of the items raises concern as it is argued that it needs further attention, as there is abig gap between items at several levels of Blooms' cognitive skill.

  17. The Preparatory Workshop: A Partial Solution to an English Compulsory Exam Failure Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naugle, Helen; McGuire, Peter

    Georgia Institute of Technology has created a preparatory workshop that avoids focusing composition courses on the state competency exam while helping its students pass the exam. In checking the exams of students who had failed, three problems appeared: lack of motivation, lack of awareness of the standards for grading the exam, and an inability…

  18. Washback Effect of University Entrance exams in Applied Mathematics to Social Sciences.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Muñiz, Luis J; Díaz, Patricia; Mier, Verónica; Alonso, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Curricular issues of subject Applied Mathematics to Social Sciences are studied in relation to university entrance exams performed in several Spanish regions between 2009-2014. By using quantitative and qualitative analyses, it has been studied how these exams align with curriculum and how they produce a washback on curriculum and teachers' work. Additionally, one questionnaire about teachers' practices has been performed, in order to find out how the exams are influencing teaching methodology development. Main results obtained show that evaluation is producing a bias on the official curriculum, substantially simplifying the specific orientation that should guide applied mathematics. Furthermore, teachers' practices are influenced by the exams, and they usually approach their teaching methodology to the frequent types of exams. Also, slight differences among the teachers lead to distinguish two behavioral subgroups. Results can also be useful in an international context, because of the importance of standardized exit exams in OECD countries.

  19. Peer-led instruction for a qualifying exam preparatory course or: How I learned to stop worrying and love the PhD Qualifying Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Warren; Engelhardt, Larry

    2006-04-01

    In the spring of 2004, the authors were charged with the task of creating and administering a qualifying exam preparation curriculum that would strive to assist graduate students studying for their comprehensive physics exam. We incorporated many pedagogical techniques that have been proven effective at nearly all levels of instruction by leading researchers in the field of physics education. Our primary focus was on peer-led instruction and time-on-task doing actual problems from previous qualifying exams. After a brief but precise lecture covering essential ideas over a particular subject matter, students spend most of class time working in small groups and presenting worked problems at the board. At all times, the focus was on student explanations concerning the fundamental concepts behind a specific problem, as well as contemplating variations to broaden understanding and challenge students to think on their feet. We found that students who attended and participated regularly in class could be correlated with those students who achieved high marks on the exam.

  20. Use of the National Board of Medical Examiners® Comprehensive Basic Science Exam: survey results of US medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Wright, William S; Baston, Kirk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The National Board of Medical Examiners® (NBME) Comprehensive Basic Science Exam (CBSE) is a subject exam offered to US medical schools, where it has been used for external validation of student preparedness for the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE) Step 1 in new schools and schools undergoing curricular reform. Information regarding the actual use of the NBME CBSE is limited. Therefore, the aim of the survey was to determine the scope and utilization of the NBME CBSE by US medical schools. Methods A survey was sent in May 2016 to curriculum leadership of the 139 US medical schools listed on the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME®) website with provisional or full accreditation as of February 29, 2016. Responses were received from 53 schools (38% response rate). A series of different follow-up questions were asked if respondents stated “yes” or “no” to the initial question “Does your institution administer the NBME CBSE prior to the USMLE Step 1?”. Results A total of 37 schools (70%) administered the NBME CBSE. In all, 36 of the 37 schools responded to follow-up questions. Of 36 schools, 13 schools (36%) used the NBME CBSE for curriculum modification. Six schools (17%) used the NBME CBSE for formative assessment for a course, and five schools (14%) used the NBME CBSE for summative assessment for a course. A total of 28 schools (78%) used the NBME CBSE for identifying students performing below expectations and providing targeted intervention strategies. In all, 24 schools (67%) of the 36 responding schools administering the NBME CBSE administered the test once prior to the administration of the USMLE Step 1, whereas 10 (28%) schools administered the NBME CBSE two or more times prior to the administration of the USMLE Step 1. Conclusion Our data suggest that the NBME CBSE is administered by many US medical schools. However, the objective, timing, and number of exams administered vary greatly among schools. PMID

  1. Use of the National Board of Medical Examiners® Comprehensive Basic Science Exam: survey results of US medical schools.

    PubMed

    Wright, William S; Baston, Kirk

    2017-01-01

    The National Board of Medical Examiners ® (NBME) Comprehensive Basic Science Exam (CBSE) is a subject exam offered to US medical schools, where it has been used for external validation of student preparedness for the United States Medical Licensing Examination ® (USMLE) Step 1 in new schools and schools undergoing curricular reform. Information regarding the actual use of the NBME CBSE is limited. Therefore, the aim of the survey was to determine the scope and utilization of the NBME CBSE by US medical schools. A survey was sent in May 2016 to curriculum leadership of the 139 US medical schools listed on the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME ® ) website with provisional or full accreditation as of February 29, 2016. Responses were received from 53 schools (38% response rate). A series of different follow-up questions were asked if respondents stated "yes" or "no" to the initial question "Does your institution administer the NBME CBSE prior to the USMLE Step 1?". A total of 37 schools (70%) administered the NBME CBSE. In all, 36 of the 37 schools responded to follow-up questions. Of 36 schools, 13 schools (36%) used the NBME CBSE for curriculum modification. Six schools (17%) used the NBME CBSE for formative assessment for a course, and five schools (14%) used the NBME CBSE for summative assessment for a course. A total of 28 schools (78%) used the NBME CBSE for identifying students performing below expectations and providing targeted intervention strategies. In all, 24 schools (67%) of the 36 responding schools administering the NBME CBSE administered the test once prior to the administration of the USMLE Step 1, whereas 10 (28%) schools administered the NBME CBSE two or more times prior to the administration of the USMLE Step 1. Our data suggest that the NBME CBSE is administered by many US medical schools. However, the objective, timing, and number of exams administered vary greatly among schools.

  2. Comparison in the quality of distractors in three and four options type of multiple choice questions.

    PubMed

    Rahma, Nourelhouda A A; Shamad, Mahdi M A; Idris, Muawia E A; Elfaki, Omer Abdelgadir; Elfakey, Walyedldin E M; Salih, Karimeldin M A

    2017-01-01

    The number of distractors needed for high quality multiple choice questions (MCQs) will be determined by many factors. These include firstly whether English language is their mother tongue or a foreign language; secondly whether the instructors who construct the questions are experts or not; thirdly the time spent on constructing the options is also an important factor. It has been observed by Tarrant et al that more time is often spent on constructing questions than on tailoring sound, reliable, and valid distractors. Firstly, to investigate the effects of reducing the number of options on psychometric properties of the item. Secondly, to determine the frequency of functioning distractors among three or four options in the MCQs examination of the dermatology course in University of Bahri, College of Medicine. This is an experimental study which was performed by means of a dermatology exam, MCQs type. Forty MCQs, with one correct answer for each question were constructed. Two sets of this exam paper were prepared: in the first one, four options were given, including one key answer and three distractors. In the second set, one of the three distractors was deleted randomly, and the sequence of the questions was kept in the same order. Any distracter chosen by less than 5% of the students was regarded as non-functioning. Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 (Kr-20) measures the internal consistency and reliability of an examination with an acceptable range 0.8-1.0. Chi square test was used to compare the distractors in the two exams. A significant difference was observed in discrimination and difficulty indexes for both sets of MCQs. More distractors were non-functional for set one (of four options), but slightly more reliable. The reliability (Kr-20) was slightly higher for set one (of four options). The average marks in option three and four were 34.163 and 33.140, respectively. Compared to set 1 (four options), set 2 (of three options) was more discriminating and associated

  3. Analysis of References on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Zhang, Alicia; Lin, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam is a knowledge assessment tool widely used during plastic surgery training in the United States. This study analyzed literature supporting correct answer choices to determine highest yield sources, journal publication lag, and journal impact factors. Digital syllabi of 10 consecutive Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam administrations (2006 to 2015) were reviewed. The most-referenced articles, journals, and textbooks were determined. Mean journal impact factor and publication lag were calculated and differences were elucidated by section. Two thousand questions and 5386 references were analyzed. From 2006 to 2015, the percentage of journal citations increased, whereas textbook references decreased (p < 0.001). Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was cited with greatest frequency (38.5 percent), followed by Clinics in Plastic Surgery (5.6 percent), Journal of Hand Surgery (American volume) (5.1 percent), and Annals of Plastic Surgery (3.8 percent). There was a trend toward less publication lag over the study period (p = 0.05), with a mean publication lag of 9.1 ± 9.0 years for all journal articles. Mean journal impact factor was 2.3 ± 4.3 and lowest for the hand and lower extremity section (1.7 ± 2.8; p < 0.001). The highest yield textbooks were elucidated by section. Plastic surgery faculty and residents may use these data to facilitate knowledge acquisition during residency.

  4. Redesigning the MCAT exam: balancing multiple perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schwartzstein, Richard M; Rosenfeld, Gary C; Hilborn, Robert; Oyewole, Saundra Herndon; Mitchell, Karen

    2013-05-01

    The authors of this commentary discuss the recently completed review of the current Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), which has been used since 1991, and describe the blueprint for the new test that will be introduced in 2015. The design of the MCAT exam reflects changes in medical education, medical science, health care delivery, and the needs of the populations served by graduates of U.S. and Canadian medical schools. The authors describe how balancing the ambitious goals for the new exam and the varying priorities of the testing program's many stakeholders made blueprint design complex. They discuss the tensions and trade-offs that characterized the design process as well as the deliberations and data that shaped the blueprint.The blueprint for the MCAT exam balances the assessment of a broad range of competencies in the natural, social, and behavioral sciences and critical analysis and reasoning skills that are essential to entering students' success in medical school. The exam will include four sections: Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems; Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems; Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior; and Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills.The authors also offer recommendations for admission committees, advising them to review applicants' test scores, course work, and other academic, personal, and experiential credentials as part of a holistic admission process and in relation to their institutions' educational, scientific, clinical, and service-oriented goals.

  5. Impact of the clinical ultrasound elective course on retention of anatomical knowledge by second-year medical students in preparation for board exams.

    PubMed

    Kondrashov, Peter; Johnson, Jane C; Boehm, Karl; Rice, Daris; Kondrashova, Tatyana

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound has been integrated into a gross anatomy course taught during the first year at an osteopathic medical school. A clinical ultrasound elective course was developed to continue ultrasound training during the second year of medical school. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of this elective course on the understanding of normal anatomy by second-year students. An anatomy exam was administered to students enrolled in the clinical ultrasound elective course before the start of the course and after its conclusion. Wilcoxon signed ranks tests were used to determine whether exam scores changed from the pre-test to the post-test. Scores from two classes of second-year students were analyzed. Students who took the elective course showed significant improvement in the overall anatomy exam score between the pre-test and post-test (P < 0.001). Scores for exam questions pertaining to the heart, abdomen, upper extremity, and lower extremity also significantly improved from the pretest to post-test (P < 0.001), but scores for the neck and eye showed no significant improvement. The clinical ultrasound elective course offered during the second year of medical school provided students with an important review of key anatomical concepts while preparing them for board exams. Our results suggested that more emphasis should be placed on head and neck ultrasound to improve student performance in those areas. Musculoskeletal, abdominal, and heart ultrasound labs were more successful for retaining relevant anatomical information. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Washback Effect of University Entrance exams in Applied Mathematics to Social Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Patricia; Mier, Verónica; Alonso, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Curricular issues of subject Applied Mathematics to Social Sciences are studied in relation to university entrance exams performed in several Spanish regions between 2009–2014. By using quantitative and qualitative analyses, it has been studied how these exams align with curriculum and how they produce a washback on curriculum and teachers’ work. Additionally, one questionnaire about teachers’ practices has been performed, in order to find out how the exams are influencing teaching methodology development. Main results obtained show that evaluation is producing a bias on the official curriculum, substantially simplifying the specific orientation that should guide applied mathematics. Furthermore, teachers’ practices are influenced by the exams, and they usually approach their teaching methodology to the frequent types of exams. Also, slight differences among the teachers lead to distinguish two behavioral subgroups. Results can also be useful in an international context, because of the importance of standardized exit exams in OECD countries. PMID:27936103

  7. EFL Teachers' Formal Assessment Practices Based on Exam Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiliçkaya, Ferit

    2016-01-01

    This study reports initial findings from a small-scale qualitative study aimed at gaining insights into English language teachers' assessment practices in Turkey by examining the formal exam papers. Based on the technique of content analysis, formal exam papers were analyzed in terms of assessment items, language skills tested as well as the…

  8. Class-Wide Access to a Commercial Step 1 Question Bank During Preclinical Organ-Based Modules: A Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Baños, James H; Pepin, Mark E; Van Wagoner, Nicholas

    2018-03-01

    The authors examined the usefulness of a commercially available Step 1 question bank as a formative academic support tool throughout organ-based modules in an integrated preclinical medical curriculum. The authors also determined the extent to which correlation between question bank utilization and academic metrics varied with Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores. In 2015, a cohort of 185 first-year medical students at University of Alabama School of Medicine were provided with 18-month full access to a commercially available Step 1 question bank of over 2,100 items throughout organ-based modules, although there were no requirements for use. Data on student use of the question bank were collected via an online administrative portal. Relationships between question bank utilization and academic outcomes including exams, module grades, and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 were determined using multiple linear regression. MCAT scores and number of items attempted in the question bank significantly predicted all academic measures, with question bank utilization as the stronger predictor. The association between question bank utilization and academic outcome was stronger for individuals with lower MCAT scores. The findings elucidate a novel academic support mechanism that, for some programs, may help bridge the gap between holistic and mission-based admissions practices and a residency match process that places a premium on USMLE exam scores. Distributed formative use of USMLE Step 1 practice questions may be of value as an academic support tool that benefits all students, but particularly those entering with lower MCAT scores.

  9. [What happens when medical students set their own exam papers?].

    PubMed

    Baerheim, A; Meland, E

    2001-10-20

    In the section for general practice at the University of Bergen, Norway, we want to emphasise learning more than control in our work with students. As a step in this direction we invited students to come up with proposals for exam papers, papers that usually include six to nine multiple steps for clinical reasoning. We guaranteed that one out of three proposals would be included as a paper in the written examination, possibly slightly modified. This article is an evaluation of the consequences of letting medical students set some of their own exam papers. The process was evaluated using 1) grades given, 2) students' assessment of whether this mode of setting papers influenced their exam preparations, and 3) students' free-text comments on the process. 57 out of 64 students (89%) took part in the evaluation. All knew that their fellow students had set one of the exam papers, but only 34 (60%) reported that this knowledge had changed the way they prepared for the exam. The mean grade was 9.9 (range 5-12, on a scale from 1 to 12, 6 being the lowest pass grade) for the paper set by students, and 9.5 (range 5-11) for all papers combined. Mean difference in score was 0.32 (95% confidence interval 0.08-0.64). Students' free-text comments showed that they specifically prepared for the three known paper topics. They drew comfort from knowing at least one of the papers set, and the student-set papers were found relevant for general practice. Letting medical students set one of the exam papers makes them feel more confident. Student-set papers were seen as relevant for clinical practice. The control function of the exam seemed to have been preserved.

  10. Improving Patient Safety: Avoiding Unread Imaging Exams in the National VA Enterprise Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Bastawrous, Sarah; Carney, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    In the current digital and filmless age of radiology, rates of unread radiology exams remain low, however, may still exist in unique environments. Veterans Affairs (VA) health care systems may experience higher rates of unread exams due to coexistence of Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture (VistA) imaging and commercial picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). The purpose of this patient safety initiative was to identify any unread exams and causes leading to unread exams. Following approval by departmental quality assurance committee, a comprehensive review was performed of all radiology exams within VistA imaging from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2014 to identify unread radiology exams. Over the 5-year period, the total unread exam rate was calculated to be 0.17%, with the highest yearly unread exam rate of 0.25%. The leading majority of unread exam type was plain radiographs. Analysis revealed unfinished dictations, unassociated accession numbers, technologist errors, and inefficient radiologist work lists as top contributors to unread exams. Once unread radiology exams were discovered and the causes identified, valuable process changes were implemented within our department to ensure simultaneous tracking of all unread exams in VistA imaging as well as the commercial PACS.

  11. Preparing Students to Take SOA/CAS Exam FM/2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides suggestions for preparing students to take the actuarial examination on financial mathematics, SOA/CAS Exam FM/2. It is based on current practices employed at Slippery Rock University, a small public liberal arts university. Detailed descriptions of our Theory of Interest course and subsequent Exam FM/2 prep course are provided…

  12. An Exploration into Improving Examinees' Acceptance of Participation in an Online Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, I-Fan; Chen, Ruey-Shin; Lu, Hao-Chun

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet and information technology, the issues related to online exams have become the concern of an increasing number of researchers. At present, the biggest challenges for the integration of web communication technology into online exams are the ability to detect cheating behaviors during the exam, and the…

  13. Anxiety and Piano Exams: Turkish Prospective Music Teachers' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güven, Elif

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the test anxiety levels of prospective music teachers and their opinions regarding anxiety in piano exams. Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI) and semi-structured interviews were used to meet the purpose. Interviews were conducted with students prior to and after the piano exam. As a result of the study it was…

  14. The Management Skills of Exam Process for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Filiz; Cetin, Saban

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify to what degree undergraduate students are able to manage the exam process to be successful in exams. The study group of the research, which utilizes the survey model, consists of 350 students in total, 185 female and 165 male, attending 4 different teaching programs in Faculty of Education, Gazi University. "The…

  15. The Impact of Teacher Efficacy and Student Engagement on Eleventh-Grade South Carolina U.S History and Constitution End-of-Course State Exam Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinski, Jacqueline L.

    2015-01-01

    This research study analyzed the impact of teacher self-efficacy and student engagement on eleventh-grade South Carolina U.S. History and Constitution end-of-course state exam scores. Research questions centered on analyzing the relationships between the variables of teacher efficacy, student engagement, and student achievement as measured by the…

  16. Analysis of Low Appropriateness Score Exam Trends in Decision Support-based Radiology Order Entry System.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Supriya; Klein, Kandace; Singh, Anand H; Thrall, James H

    2017-05-01

    Awareness of imaging utilization increased after implementation of Radiology Order Entry with decision support systems (ROE-DS). Our hypothesis is few exams with low Clinical Appropriateness Score (CAS) on ROE-DS are performed. Clinical indications of exams with CAS less than 3 (9-point scale) were re-reviewed and reports analyzed. Structured Query Language-based query retrieved exams with CAS less than 3 in ROE-DS from January 2007 to December 2011. Reasons provided by physicians for ordering these exams and reports of exams performed were analyzed. For each indication, number of exams ordered and performed was calculated. Statistical significance was assessed using Student's t test and χ 2 analysis (P < .05). From 445,984 exams, 12,615 exams (2.8%) had CAS less than 3, and 7,956 exams (63%) were performed. Reasons for ordering of 12,615 low CAS exams were as follows: Requests by physician specialists without further explanation (4,516 = 35.8%), notation of special clinical circumstances (2,877 = 22.8%), requests by nonphysician staff without further explanation (1,383 = 10.9%), absence of suspected finding on previous modality (1,099 = 8.7%), patient preference (737 = 5.8%), and requests based on radiologists' recommendations (706 = 5.6%). Difference between male and female (male < female) preferences for low CAS exams was statistically significant (P < .01). Imaging outcome was highest for extremity MRI cases (66.7%; P < .01). Less than 3% of exams ordered had low CAS and about two-thirds of these were performed. Most common indication for ordering these exams was physician specialist request based on opinion of medical necessity without specification. Extremity MRI constituted the highest positive findings for low CAS exams performed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Auricular Acupuncture for Exam Anxiety in Medical Students—A Randomized Crossover Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Klausenitz, Catharina; Hacker, Henriette; Hesse, Thomas; Kohlmann, Thomas; Endlich, Karlhans; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Usichenko, Taras

    2016-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture (AA) is effective in the treatment of preoperative anxiety. The aim was to investigate whether AA can reduce exam anxiety as compared to placebo and no intervention. Forty-four medical students were randomized to receive AA, placebo, or no intervention in a crossover manner and subsequently completed three comparable oral anatomy exams with an interval of 1 month between the exams/interventions. AA was applied using indwelling fixed needles bilaterally at points MA-IC1, MA-TF1, MA-SC, MA-AT1 and MA-TG one day prior to each exam. Placebo needles were used as control. Levels of anxiety were measured using a visual analogue scale before and after each intervention as well as before each exam. Additional measures included the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory, duration of sleep at night, blood pressure, heart rate and the extent of participant blinding. All included participants finished the study. Anxiety levels were reduced after AA and placebo intervention compared to baseline and the no intervention condition (p < 0.003). AA was better at reducing anxiety than placebo in the evening before the exam (p = 0.018). Participants were able to distinguish between AA and placebo intervention. Both AA and placebo interventions reduced exam anxiety in medical students. The superiority of AA over placebo may be due to insufficient blinding of participants. PMID:28033320

  18. How Does Student Performance on Formative Assessments Relate to Learning Assessed by Exams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gary

    2007-01-01

    A retrospective analysis examines the relationships between formative assessments and exam grades in two undergraduate geoscience courses. Pair and group-work grades correlate weakly with individual exam grades. Exam performance correlates to individual, weekly online assessments. Student attendance and use of assessment feedback are also…

  19. Analysis of Cosmetic Topics on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Taglienti, Anthony J; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam (PSITE) is a multiple-choice examination taken by plastic surgery trainees to provide an assessment of plastic surgery knowledge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate cosmetic questions and determine overlap with national procedural data. Digital syllabi of six consecutive PSITE administrations (2008-2013) were analyzed for cosmetic surgery topics. Questions were classified by taxonomy, focus, anatomy, and procedure. Answer references were tabulated by source. Relationships between tested material and national procedural volume were assessed via Pearson correlation. 301 questions addressed cosmetic topics (26% of all questions) and 20 required image interpretations (7%). Question-stem taxonomy favored decision-making (40%) and recall (37%) skills over interpretation (23%, P < .001). Answers focused on treatments/outcomes (67%) over pathology/anatomy (20%) and diagnoses (13%, P < .001). Tested procedures were largely surgical (85%) and focused on the breast (25%), body (18%), nose (13%), and eye (10%). The most common surgeries were breast augmentation (12%), rhinoplasty (11%), blepharoplasty (10%), and body contouring (6%). Minimally invasive procedures were lasers (5%), neuromodulators (4%), and fillers (3%). Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (58%), Clinics in Plastic Surgery (7%), and Aesthetic Surgery Journal (6%) were the most cited journals, with a median 5-year publication lag. There was poor correlation between PSITE content and procedural volume data (r(2) = 0.138, P = .539). Plastic surgeons receive routine evaluation of cosmetic surgery knowledge. These data may help optimize clinical and didactic experiences for training in cosmetic surgery. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Expedition 50 Qualification Exams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-25

    ESA Flight Surgeon Dr. Brigitte Godard, seated left, NASA Flight ‎Surgeon Jennifer Law, center, talk with Expedition 50 NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson ahead of the final qualification exams with Whitson and her fellow crew mates Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. The Red Effect, Anxiety, and Exam Performance: A Multistudy Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smajic, Adnan; Merritt, Stephanie; Banister, Christina; Blinebry, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies have established a negative relationship between the color red and academic performance. This research examined whether this effect would generalize to classroom performance and whether anxiety and negative affect might mediate the effect. In two studies, students taking classroom exams were randomly assigned an exam color. We…

  2. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease in Brazil: Supplementary exams

    PubMed Central

    Caramelli, Paulo; Teixeira, Antonio Lúcio; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; Lee, Hae Won; Livramento, José Antônio; Fernandez, Liana Lisboa; Anghinah, Renato

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a review of the recommendations on supplementary exams employed for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in Brazil published in 2005. A systematic assessment of the consensus reached in other countries, and of articles on AD diagnosis in Brazil available on the PUBMED and LILACS medical databases, was carried out. Recommended laboratory exams included complete blood count, serum creatinine, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), albumin, hepatic enzymes, Vitamin B12, folic acid, calcium, serological reactions for syphilis and serology for HIV in patients aged younger than 60 years with atypical clinical signs or suggestive symptoms. Structural neuroimaging, computed tomography or – preferably – magnetic resonance exams, are indicated for diagnostic investigation of dementia syndrome to rule out secondary etiologies. Functional neuroimaging exams (SPECT and PET), when available, increase diagnostic reliability and assist in the differential diagnosis of other types of dementia. The cerebrospinal fluid exam is indicated in cases of pre-senile onset dementia with atypical clinical presentation or course, for communicant hydrocephaly, and suspected inflammatory, infectious or prion disease of the central nervous system. Routine electroencephalograms aid the differential diagnosis of dementia syndrome with other conditions which impair cognitive functioning. Genotyping of apolipoprotein E or other susceptibility polymorphisms is not recommended for diagnostic purposes or for assessing the risk of developing the disease. Biomarkers related to the molecular alterations in AD are largely limited to use exclusively in research protocols, but when available can contribute to improving the accuracy of diagnosis of the disease. PMID:29213741

  3. The Extend of Adaptation Bloom's Taxonomy of Cognitive Domain in English Questions Included in General Secondary Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alzu'bi, Mohammad Akram

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at analyzing English questions of the Jordanian Secondary Certificate Examinations via Blooms' cognitive levels. An analysis sheet was prepared by the researcher for the purpose of the study, which was ensured to be valid and reliable. The whole questions of the general secondary examinations for English course in both levels…

  4. The Inclusion of Science Process Skills in Multiple Choice Questions: Are We Getting Any Better?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmas, Ridvan; Bodner, George M.; Aydogdu, Bulent; Saban, Yakup

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to analyze the science and technology questions with respect to science process skills (SPS) included in the "Transition from Primary to Secondary Education" (TEOG) examination developed for use with 8th-grade students in Turkey. The 12 TEOG exams administered in the course of three academic years from 2014…

  5. Industry Supplied CAD Curriculum: Case Study on Passing Certification Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Rustin; Dues, Joseph; Ottway, Rudy

    2017-01-01

    Students who successfully pass professional certification exams while in school are often targeted first by industry for internships and entry level positions. Over the last decade, leading industry suppliers of computer-aided design (CAD) software have developed and launched certification exams for many of their product offerings. Some have also…

  6. [Difference analysis among majors in medical parasitology exam papers by test item bank proposition].

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin-Zhi; Ya-Jun, Ma; Cao, Yi; Qian, Fen; Li, Xiang-Yu

    2012-04-30

    The quality index among "Medical Parasitology" exam papers and measured data for students in three majors from the university in 2010 were compared and analyzed. The exam papers were formed from the test item bank. The alpha reliability coefficients of the three exam papers were above 0.70. The knowledge structure and capacity structure of the exam papers were basically balanced. But the alpha reliability coefficients of the second major was the lowest, mainly due to quality of test items in the exam paper and the failure of revising the index of test item bank in time. This observation demonstrated that revising the test items and their index in the item bank according to the measured data can improve the quality of test item bank proposition and reduce the difference among exam papers.

  7. Sure, or unsure? Measuring students' confidence and the potential impact on patient safety in multiple-choice questions.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Rafael Henrique; Möller, Leona; Sitter, Helmut; Stibane, Tina; Strzelczyk, Adam

    2017-11-01

    Multiple-choice questions (MCQs) provide useful information about correct and incorrect answers, but they do not offer information about students' confidence. Ninety and another 81 medical students participated each in a curricular neurology multiple-choice exam and indicated their confidence for every single MCQ. Each MCQ had a defined level of potential clinical impact on patient safety (uncritical, risky, harmful). Our first objective was to detect informed (IF), guessed (GU), misinformed (MI), and uninformed (UI) answers. Further, we evaluated whether there were significant differences for confidence at correct and incorrect answers. Then, we explored if clinical impact had a significant influence on students' confidence. There were 1818 IF, 635 GU, 71 MI, and 176 UI answers in exam I and 1453 IF, 613 GU, 92 MI, and 191 UI answers in exam II. Students' confidence was significantly higher for correct than for incorrect answers at both exams (p < 0.001). For exam I, students' confidence was significantly higher for incorrect harmful than for incorrect risky classified MCQs (p = 0.01). At exam II, students' confidence was significantly higher for incorrect harmful than for incorrect benign (p < 0.01) and significantly higher for correct benign than for correct harmful categorized MCQs (p = 0.01). We were pleased to see that there were more informed than guessed, more uninformed than misinformed answers and higher students' confidence for correct than for incorrect answers. Our expectation that students state higher confidence in correct and harmful and lower confidence in incorrect and harmful MCQs could not be confirmed.

  8. FormScanner: Open-Source Solution for Grading Multiple-Choice Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chadwick; Lo, Glenn; Young, Kaisa; Borsetta, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The multiple-choice exam remains a staple for many introductory physics courses. In the past, people have graded these by hand or even flaming needles. Today, one usually grades the exams with a form scanner that utilizes optical mark recognition (OMR). Several companies provide these scanners and particular forms, such as the eponymous…

  9. Impact of implementing an EMR on physical exam documentation by ambulance personnel.

    PubMed

    Katzer, R; Barton, D J; Adelman, S; Clark, S; Seaman, E L; Hudson, K B

    2012-01-01

    Georgetown University has a student run Emergency Medical Services (EMS) organization with over 100 emergency medical technicians (EMTs). We set out to determine whether implementing an electronic patient care report (ePCR) system was associated with improved physical exam documentation. This study evaluated documentation of the physical exam on prehospital patient care reports (PCRs). An ePCR system was implemented. ePCR documentation was compared to that of the previously used paper PCRs. This study looked retrospectively at 154 PCRs. 77 were hand written PCRs from before the electronic system. The PCRs involved chief complaints that were primarily respiratory, neurologic, or both. 77 ePCRs of matching chief complaint categories were used for comparison. Each chart was reviewed for completion of certain physical exam findings. The mean percentage of documented components from the ePCRs was compared to that of the hand written PCRs. The null hypothesis was that the absolute increase in the mean was not more than 20 percent. The two exclusion criteria were PCRs completed by study investigators after the design of the project and partially or completely missing PCRs. The absolute increase in mean physical exam component documentation was 36% (95% CI = 29-43%). A weighted kappa of 0.894 showed very good agreement between chart reviewers. This study rejected the null hypothesis that the ePCR system was associated with a mean increase of no more than 20%. It observed increase in physical exam documentation. Limitations of this study included the inability to determine whether documentation of physical exam findings reflected performance of the physical exam, and what components of the ePCR system bundle were responsible for the increase in physical exam component documentation.

  10. Impact of implementing an EMR on physical exam documentation by ambulance personnel

    PubMed Central

    Katzer, R.; Barton, D.J.; Adelman, S.; Clark, S.; Seaman, E.L.; Hudson, K.B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Georgetown University has a student run Emergency Medical Services (EMS) organization with over 100 emergency medical technicians (EMTs). We set out to determine whether implementing an electronic patient care report (ePCR) system was associated with improved physical exam documentation. Methods This study evaluated documentation of the physical exam on prehospital patient care reports (PCRs). An ePCR system was implemented. ePCR documentation was compared to that of the previously used paper PCRs. This study looked retrospectively at 154 PCRs. 77 were hand written PCRs from before the electronic system. The PCRs involved chief complaints that were primarily respiratory, neurologic, or both. 77 ePCRs of matching chief complaint categories were used for comparison. Each chart was reviewed for completion of certain physical exam findings. The mean percentage of documented components from the ePCRs was compared to that of the hand written PCRs. The null hypothesis was that the absolute increase in the mean was not more than 20 percent. The two exclusion criteria were PCRs completed by study investigators after the design of the project and partially or completely missing PCRs. Results The absolute increase in mean physical exam component documentation was 36% (95% CI = 29–43%). A weighted kappa of 0.894 showed very good agreement between chart reviewers. Conclusions This study rejected the null hypothesis that the ePCR system was associated with a mean increase of no more than 20%. It observed increase in physical exam documentation. Limitations of this study included the inability to determine whether documentation of physical exam findings reflected performance of the physical exam, and what components of the ePCR system bundle were responsible for the increase in physical exam component documentation. PMID:23646077

  11. Comparison in the quality of distractors in three and four options type of multiple choice questions

    PubMed Central

    Rahma, Nourelhouda A A; Shamad, Mahdi M A; Idris, Muawia E A; Elfaki, Omer Abdelgadir; Elfakey, Walyedldin E M; Salih, Karimeldin M A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The number of distractors needed for high quality multiple choice questions (MCQs) will be determined by many factors. These include firstly whether English language is their mother tongue or a foreign language; secondly whether the instructors who construct the questions are experts or not; thirdly the time spent on constructing the options is also an important factor. It has been observed by Tarrant et al that more time is often spent on constructing questions than on tailoring sound, reliable, and valid distractors. Objectives Firstly, to investigate the effects of reducing the number of options on psychometric properties of the item. Secondly, to determine the frequency of functioning distractors among three or four options in the MCQs examination of the dermatology course in University of Bahri, College of Medicine. Materials and methods This is an experimental study which was performed by means of a dermatology exam, MCQs type. Forty MCQs, with one correct answer for each question were constructed. Two sets of this exam paper were prepared: in the first one, four options were given, including one key answer and three distractors. In the second set, one of the three distractors was deleted randomly, and the sequence of the questions was kept in the same order. Any distracter chosen by less than 5% of the students was regarded as non-functioning. Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 (Kr-20) measures the internal consistency and reliability of an examination with an acceptable range 0.8–1.0. Chi square test was used to compare the distractors in the two exams. Results A significant difference was observed in discrimination and difficulty indexes for both sets of MCQs. More distractors were non-functional for set one (of four options), but slightly more reliable. The reliability (Kr-20) was slightly higher for set one (of four options). The average marks in option three and four were 34.163 and 33.140, respectively. Conclusion Compared to set 1 (four

  12. Air Force Health Care Providers Incidence of Performing Testicular Exams and Instruction of Testicular Self-Exam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    Misener & Fuller,1995; Singer, Tichler , Orvieto, Finestone, & Moskowitz,1993; Sladden & Dickinson, 1995). This continues despite the American Cancer...175. Shaffner, R.J. (1995). Knowledge of testicular self exam. Nurse Practitioner, 20, (8), 10-11. Singer, A.J., Tichler , T., Orvieto, R., Finestone

  13. Air Force Health Care Providers Incidence of Performing Testicular Exams and Instruction of Testicular Self-Exam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    or discussing TSE with patients (Misener & Fuller, 1995; Singer, Tichler , Orvieto, Finestone, & Moskowitz, 1993; Sladden & Dickinson, 1995). This...Clinicians, 43, 3, 151-175. Shaffner, R.J. (1995). Knowledge of testicular self exam. Nurse Practitioner, 20, (8), 10-11. Singer, A.J., Tichler , T

  14. Test anxiety levels of board exam going students in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Mary, Revina Ann; Marslin, Gregory; Franklin, Gregory; Sheeba, Caroline J

    2014-01-01

    The latest report by the National Crime Records Bureau has positioned Tamil Nadu as the Indian state with highest suicide rate. At least in part, this is happening due to exam pressure among adolescents, emphasizing the imperative need to understand the pattern of anxiety and various factors contributing to it among students. The present study was conducted to analyze the level of state anxiety among board exam attending school students in Tamil Nadu, India. A group of 100 students containing 50 boys and 50 girls from 10th and 12th grades participated in the study and their state anxiety before board exams was measured by Westside Test Anxiety Scale. We found that all board exam going students had increased level of anxiety, which was particularly higher among boys and 12th standard board exam going students. Analysis of various demographic variables showed that students from nuclear families presented higher anxiety levels compared to their desired competitive group. Overall, our results showing the prevalence of state anxiety among board exam going students in Tamil Nadu, India, support the recent attempt taken by Tamil Nadu government to improve student's academic performance in a healthier manner by appointing psychologists in all government schools.

  15. Test Anxiety Levels of Board Exam Going Students in Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Ann Mary, Revina; Marslin, Gregory; Franklin, Gregory; Sheeba, Caroline J.

    2014-01-01

    The latest report by the National Crime Records Bureau has positioned Tamil Nadu as the Indian state with highest suicide rate. At least in part, this is happening due to exam pressure among adolescents, emphasizing the imperative need to understand the pattern of anxiety and various factors contributing to it among students. The present study was conducted to analyze the level of state anxiety among board exam attending school students in Tamil Nadu, India. A group of 100 students containing 50 boys and 50 girls from 10th and 12th grades participated in the study and their state anxiety before board exams was measured by Westside Test Anxiety Scale. We found that all board exam going students had increased level of anxiety, which was particularly higher among boys and 12th standard board exam going students. Analysis of various demographic variables showed that students from nuclear families presented higher anxiety levels compared to their desired competitive group. Overall, our results showing the prevalence of state anxiety among board exam going students in Tamil Nadu, India, support the recent attempt taken by Tamil Nadu government to improve student's academic performance in a healthier manner by appointing psychologists in all government schools. PMID:25143938

  16. Pick-N Multiple Choice-Exams: A Comparison of Scoring Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Daniel; Holzer, Matthias; Kopp, Veronika; Fischer, Martin R.

    2011-01-01

    To compare different scoring algorithms for Pick-N multiple correct answer multiple-choice (MC) exams regarding test reliability, student performance, total item discrimination and item difficulty. Data from six 3rd year medical students' end of term exams in internal medicine from 2005 to 2008 at Munich University were analysed (1,255 students,…

  17. Challenges in Creating Online Exercises and Exams in Organic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jaun, Bernhard; Thilgen, Carlo

    2018-02-01

    e-Learning has become increasingly important in chemical education and online exams can be an attractive alternative to traditional exams written on paper, particularly in classes with a large number of students. Ten years ago, we began to set up an e-course complementing our lecture courses Organic Chemistry I and II within the open-source e-learning environment Moodle. In this article, we retrace a number of decisions we took over time, thereby illustrating the challenges one faces when creating online exercises and exams in (organic) chemistry. Special emphasis is put on the development of MOSFECCS (MOlecular Structural Formula Editor and Calculator of Canonical SMILES), our new editor for drawing structural formulae and converting them to alphanumeric SMILES codes that can be submitted as answers to e-problems. Convinced that the possibility for structure input is essential to set up sensible chemistry quizzes and exams, and realising that existing tools present major flaws in an educational context, we decided to embark on the implementation of MOSFECCS which takes into account a number of didactic aspects.

  18. Psychological and physiological responses during an exam and their relation to personality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Spangler, G

    1997-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare emotional and physiological responses to real and control examinations and to assess their relation to personality characteristics. Emotional responses were assessed by state anxiety and perceived stress. The assessment of physiological responses included the activity of the cardiac system (heart periods, vagal tone), the adrenocortical system (cortisol) and the immune system (immune globulin A, sIgA). Emotional and physiological responses of 23 students (12 males, 11 females) were assessed during an oral exam at the end of a basic course in psychology which was a prerequisite for the students' final exams. For the control condition physiological responses were assessed one week before the examination during a memory test. The findings of the study demonstrate different emotional and physiological response patterns to examinations as compared to the control condition. Heightened anxiety was observed only before the exam. Whereas within-situation physiological responses (higher heart periods, cortisol, and sIgA; lower vagal tone) were observed both under the exam and control condition, responses to exam condition indicated pre-exam anticipatory activation and post-exam restricted recovery responses. With regard to personality characteristics subjects with high ego-resiliency showed more flexible adaptation than subjects with low ego-resiliency both on the emotional level (anxiety down-regulation after exam) and on the physiological level (situation-specific responses, quick recovery). Subjects with high ego-control exhibited a lower physiological reactivity under both conditions, i.e. they seemed to maintain longer their control also on a physiological level independent of the type of situation.

  19. Teaching Materials and Strategies for the AP Music Theory Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lively, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Each year, many students take the Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory Exam, and the majority of these students enroll in specialized AP music theory classes as part of the preparation process. For the teachers of these AP music theory classes, a number of challenges are presented by the difficulty and complexity of the exam subject material as…

  20. Reworking Exams to Teach Chemistry Content and Reinforce Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risley, John M.

    2007-01-01

    One meaningful approach to demonstrate to students the value of reworking exams is to offer an incentive to do so. This paper describes the strategy and effects of offering partial credit to students who rework answers originally answered incorrectly on an exam. This has proved largely successful for the last 10 years in several classes at the…

  1. Approaches to Studying and Academic Performance in Short Essay Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minbashian, Amirali; Huon, Gail F.; Bird, Kevin D.

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has generally failed to find a relation between the way students approach the task of studying and their exam grades. The present study investigated why it is that a deep approach to studying, which has been shown to result in a higher quality of learning, does not consistently result in higher exam grades. The participants in…

  2. Going Green and Using Less Paper to Print Exams: Student Performance, Completion Time, and Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Two studies measured the impact on student exam performance and exam completion time of strategies aimed to reduce the amount of paper used for printing multiple-choice course exams. Study 1 compared single-sided to double-sided printed exams. Study 2 compared a single-column arrangement of multiple-choice answer options to a space (and paper)…

  3. The Odds of Success: Predicting Registered Health Information Administrator Exam Success

    PubMed Central

    Dolezel, Diane; McLeod, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to craft a predictive model to examine the relationship between grades in specific academic courses, overall grade point average (GPA), on-campus versus online course delivery, and success in passing the Registered Health Information Administrator (RHIA) exam on the first attempt. Because student success in passing the exam on the first attempt is assessed as part of the accreditation process, this study is important to health information management (HIM) programs. Furthermore, passing the exam greatly expands the graduate's job possibilities because the demand for credentialed graduates far exceeds the supply of credentialed graduates. Binary logistic regression was utilized to explore the relationships between the predictor variables and success in passing the RHIA exam on the first attempt. Results indicate that the student's cumulative GPA, specific HIM course grades, and course delivery method were predictive of success. PMID:28566994

  4. Radiation Exposure from Medical Exams and Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Adopted: January 2010 Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Radiation Exposure from Medical Exams and Procedures Ionizing radiation is used daily in hospitals and clinics ...

  5. English-Spanish Verbatim Translation Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    The development and validation of the English-Spanish Verbatim Translation Exam (ESVTE) is described. The test is for use by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the selection of applicants for the positions of Language Specialist or Contract Linguist. The report is divided into eight sections. Section 1 describes the need for the test,…

  6. Sleep quality during exam stress: the role of alcohol, caffeine and nicotine.

    PubMed

    Zunhammer, Matthias; Eichhammer, Peter; Busch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Academic exam stress is known to compromise sleep quality and alter drug consumption in university students. Here we evaluated if sleeping problems and changes in legal drug consumption during exam stress are interrelated. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to survey sleep quality before, during, and after an academic exam period in 150 university students in a longitudinal questionnaire study. Self-reports of alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine consumption were obtained. The Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ-20) was used as a measure of stress. Sleep quality and alcohol consumption significantly decreased, while perceived stress and caffeine consumption significantly increased during the exam period. No significant change in nicotine consumption was observed. In particular, students shortened their time in bed and showed symptoms of insomnia. Mixed model analysis indicated that sex, age, health status, as well as the amounts of alcohol and caffeine consumed had no significant influence on global sleep quality. The amount of nicotine consumed and perceived stress were identified as significant predictors of diminished sleep quality. Nicotine consumption had a small-to-very-small effect on sleep quality; perceived stress had a small-to-moderate effect. In conclusion, diminished sleep quality during exam periods was mainly predicted by perceived stress, while legal drug consumption played a minor role. Exam periods may pose an interesting model for the study of stress-induced sleeping problems and their mechanisms.

  7. Sleep Quality during Exam Stress: The Role of Alcohol, Caffeine and Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Zunhammer, Matthias; Eichhammer, Peter; Busch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Academic exam stress is known to compromise sleep quality and alter drug consumption in university students. Here we evaluated if sleeping problems and changes in legal drug consumption during exam stress are interrelated. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to survey sleep quality before, during, and after an academic exam period in 150 university students in a longitudinal questionnaire study. Self-reports of alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine consumption were obtained. The Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ-20) was used as a measure of stress. Sleep quality and alcohol consumption significantly decreased, while perceived stress and caffeine consumption significantly increased during the exam period. No significant change in nicotine consumption was observed. In particular, students shortened their time in bed and showed symptoms of insomnia. Mixed model analysis indicated that sex, age, health status, as well as the amounts of alcohol and caffeine consumed had no significant influence on global sleep quality. The amount of nicotine consumed and perceived stress were identified as significant predictors of diminished sleep quality. Nicotine consumption had a small-to-very-small effect on sleep quality; perceived stress had a small-to-moderate effect. In conclusion, diminished sleep quality during exam periods was mainly predicted by perceived stress, while legal drug consumption played a minor role. Exam periods may pose an interesting model for the study of stress-induced sleeping problems and their mechanisms. PMID:25279939

  8. The Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) Residency In-Training Exam: A Preliminary Psychometric Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Gregory P. J.; Crockford, David N.; Hecker, Kent

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) Residency In-Training Exam is a formative exam for Canadian psychiatric residents that was reconstructed using assessment best practices. An assessment of psychometric properties was subsequently performed on the exam to ensure preliminary validity and reliability. Methods: An exam…

  9. Undergraduate range management exam: 1999-2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Undergraduate Range Management Exam (URME) has been administered to undergraduate students at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management since 1983, with students demonstrating their higher order learning skills and synthesis knowledge of the art and science of rangeland management. ...

  10. 46 CFR 10.304 - General medical exam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... impairs cognitive ability, judgment, or reaction time. The Coast Guard will provide guidance on the... medical exam, but must obtain a statement from a licensed physician, physician assistant, or nurse...

  11. The AP Calculus Exam Reading Experience: Implications for Teacher Classroom Practice and Student Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Mimi

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation explores the views and experiences of high school calculus teachers and college mathematics professors on the professional development which occurs at the annual national AP Calculus exam grading. This professional development experience comes in several forms: the exam briefing sessions, the actual reading of the exams, the…

  12. Accuracy of a technology-assisted eye exam in evaluation of referable diabetic retinopathy and concomitant ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Conlin, Paul R; Asefzadeh, Baharak; Pasquale, Louis R; Selvin, Gerald; Lamkin, Rebecca; Cavallerano, Anthony A

    2015-12-01

    Digital retinal imaging using store-and-forward technology is used to screen for diabetic retinopathy (DR). Its usefulness in detecting non-diabetic eye diseases is uncertain. We determined the level of agreement between teleretinal imaging supplemented with visual acuity and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements (ie, technology-assisted eye (TAE) exam) and a comprehensive eye exam in evaluation for DR and non-diabetic ocular conditions. We conducted a prospective, observational study with two parallel evaluations. Patients with diabetes (n=317) had a TAE exam and a comprehensive eye exam on the same day. A subset of participants with normal baseline exams (n=72) had follow-up exams 1 year later. We measured the level of agreement for referable ocular findings. Agreement for referable ocular findings was moderate (n=389, agreement: 77%; κ: 0.55), due in part to ungradable exams (22%). However, about half of the ungradable exams had findings that warranted referral. There was substantial agreement for follow-up exams (n=72, agreement: 93%; κ: 0.63). Among all gradable exams (n=303), the TAE exam had 86% sensitivity and 84% specificity for referable ocular findings, with high agreement (≥94%) for DR and other major ocular diagnoses. There was moderate-to-substantial agreement between a TAE exam and a comprehensive eye exam for referable ocular findings in patients with diabetes. Ungradable exams were a frequent marker of ocular pathology. Teleretinal imaging may be a useful evaluation for both diabetic and non-diabetic ocular conditions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. The Road to Redemption: Reclaiming the Value in Assessment Retention Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohlman, Trey

    2015-01-01

    A good assessment plan combines many direct and indirect measures to validate the collected data. One often controversial assessment measure comes in the form of retention exams. Although assessment retention exams may come with faults, others advocate for their inclusion in program assessment. Objective-based tests may offer insight to…

  14. Cheating on Multiple-Choice Exams: Monitoring, Assessment, and an Optional Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Leda; Lovaglia, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is unethical. Exam cheating is viewed as more serious than most other forms (Pincus and Schmelkin 2003). The authors review the general cheating problem, introduce a program to conservatively identify likely cheaters on multiple-choice exams, and offer a procedure for handling likely cheaters. Feedback from students who confess…

  15. Principal Licensure Exams and Future Job Performance: Evidence from the School Leaders Licensure Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissom, Jason A.; Mitani, Hajime; Blissett, Richard S. L.

    2017-01-01

    Many states require prospective principals to pass a licensure exam to obtain an administrative license, but we know little about the potential effects of principal licensure exams on the pool of available principals or whether scores predict later job performance. We investigate the most commonly used exam, the School Leaders Licensure Assessment…

  16. Do You Prefer to Have the Text or a Sheet with Your Physics Exams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Kastro M.

    2008-01-01

    Many high school and introductory college physics instructors ponder the choice between "open text" exams versus "facts and formulae sheet" exams. Other alternatives are closed book/closed notes exams or an instructor-prepared sheet of facts and relevant formulas. There is no agreement on merit. Rehfuss strongly opposes allowing students to use…

  17. The Effect of School Size on Exam Performance in Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Steve; Taylor, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Examines the effects of school size on exam performance for pupils in their final year of compulsory education in England. Background information about English secondary schools and the determinants of exam performance are discussed along with a description of the variables used in the econometric analysis and their expected effects on exam…

  18. Do Exam Wrappers Increase Metacognition and Performance? A Single Course Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soicher, Raechel N.; Gurung, Regan A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that an intervention called "exam wrappers" can improve students' metacognition when they are using wrappers in more than one course per academic term. In this study, we tested if exam wrappers would improve students' metacognition and academic performance when used in only one course per academic term. A…

  19. Writing Proficiency Exams and the Internationalization of U.S. Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott-Smith, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    In the U.S., writing proficiency exams (WPEs) often employ a construct of writing proficiency that is based on U.S. English and essay-text literacy. As universities internationalize, they should reconsider whether such exams reflect the literacy requirements of a globalizing world. Since the ways in which universities respond to international…

  20. Differences in exam performance between pupils attending selective and non-selective schools mirror the genetic differences between them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Woolley, Emily; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Selzam, Saskia; Rimfeld, Kaili; Krapohl, Eva; von Stumm, Sophie; Asbury, Kathryn; Dale, Philip S.; Young, Toby; Allen, Rebecca; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2018-03-01

    On average, students attending selective schools outperform their non-selective counterparts in national exams. These differences are often attributed to value added by the school, as well as factors schools use to select pupils, including ability, achievement and, in cases where schools charge tuition fees or are located in affluent areas, socioeconomic status. However, the possible role of DNA differences between students of different schools types has not yet been considered. We used a UK-representative sample of 4814 genotyped students to investigate exam performance at age 16 and genetic differences between students in three school types: state-funded, non-selective schools (`non-selective'), state-funded, selective schools (`grammar') and private schools, which are selective (`private'). We created a genome-wide polygenic score (GPS) derived from a genome-wide association study of years of education (EduYears). We found substantial mean genetic differences between students of different school types: students in non-selective schools had lower EduYears GPS compared to those in grammar (d = 0.41) and private schools (d = 0.37). Three times as many students in the top EduYears GPS decile went to a selective school compared to the bottom decile. These results were mirrored in the exam differences between school types. However, once we controlled for factors involved in pupil selection, there were no significant genetic differences between school types, and the variance in exam scores at age 16 explained by school type dropped from 7% to <1%. These results show that genetic and exam differences between school types are primarily due to the heritable characteristics involved in pupil admission.

  1. Students' Attitudes towards Group-Based Project Exams in Two Engineering Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Bettina; Kolmos, Anette

    2015-01-01

    At Aalborg University, engineering students spend half the time each semester in groups working on projects in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. The projects are assessed through group exams, except for between 2007 and 2013 when the law forbade group-based project exams. Prior to 2007, a survey showed that students preferred the…

  2. Negotiating the Inquiry Question: A Comparison of Whole Class and Small Group Strategies in Grade Five Science Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnetto, Andy R.; Hand, Brian; Norton-Meier, Lori

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of two strategies for negotiating the question for exploration during science inquiry on student achievement and teachers' perceptions. The study is set in the context of the Science Writing Heuristic. The first strategy (small group) consisted of each group of four students negotiating a question for inquiry with the teacher while the second strategy (whole class) consisted of the entire class negotiating a single question for inquiry with the teacher. The study utilized a mixed-method approach. A quasi-experimental repeated measures design was used to determine the effect of strategy on student achievement and semi-structured teacher interviews were used to probe the question of teacher perceptions of the two strategies. Teacher observations were conducted using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) to check for variation in implementation of the two strategies. Iowa Test of Basic Skills Science (ITBSS) (2005 and 2006) and teacher/researcher developed unit exams (pre and post) were used as student achievement measures. No statistically significant differences were found among students in the two treatment groups on the ITBSS or unit exams. RTOP observations suggest that teacher implementation was consistent across the two treatment strategies. Teachers disclosed personal preferences for the two strategies, indicating the whole class treatment was easier to manage (at least at the beginning of the school year) as students gained experience with science inquiry and the associated increased responsibility. Possible mechanisms linking the two strategies, negotiated questions, and student outcomes are discussed.

  3. Examining the Effects of State High School Exit Exam Policies on Selected Outcomes of Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Tracy Gail

    2012-01-01

    This study had several purposes. The first purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between selected student, family and school characteristics, and state exit exam policies and the impact on graduation from high school among a sample of students with disabilities. A second purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between…

  4. Can Higher Household Education Expenditure Improve the National College Entrance Exam Performance? Empirical Evidence from Jinan, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Xuehan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of household education expenditure on National College Entrance Exam (NCEE) performance in China. Using a comprehensive dataset with a sample size of 5840 students collected in Jinan, China, this study found that the average effect of household education expenditure on NCEE performance is not…

  5. AK State Profile. Alaska: Alaska High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGOE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Alaska High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGQE), a comprehensive standards-based exam. Its purpose is to meet a state mandate. A bill to remove the HSGQE as a graduation requirement by July 1, 2011 was presented to the state legislature as SB 109. However, it did not pass both houses of the legislature.…

  6. Using the First Exam for Student Placement in Beginning Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Pamela; Sweeney, William; Bonner, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    The first exam in a typical first-semester general chemistry course is used to identify students at risk of failing the course. The performance at Hunter College of 667 students on the first exam in general chemistry in seven different classes between fall 2000 and fall 2005 was correlated with the students' final score in the course. The…

  7. Double Sampling with Multiple Imputation to Answer Large Sample Meta-Research Questions: Introduction and Illustration by Evaluating Adherence to Two Simple CONSORT Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Capers, Patrice L.; Brown, Andrew W.; Dawson, John A.; Allison, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meta-research can involve manual retrieval and evaluation of research, which is resource intensive. Creation of high throughput methods (e.g., search heuristics, crowdsourcing) has improved feasibility of large meta-research questions, but possibly at the cost of accuracy. Objective: To evaluate the use of double sampling combined with multiple imputation (DS + MI) to address meta-research questions, using as an example adherence of PubMed entries to two simple consolidated standards of reporting trials guidelines for titles and abstracts. Methods: For the DS large sample, we retrieved all PubMed entries satisfying the filters: RCT, human, abstract available, and English language (n = 322, 107). For the DS subsample, we randomly sampled 500 entries from the large sample. The large sample was evaluated with a lower rigor, higher throughput (RLOTHI) method using search heuristics, while the subsample was evaluated using a higher rigor, lower throughput (RHITLO) human rating method. Multiple imputation of the missing-completely at-random RHITLO data for the large sample was informed by: RHITLO data from the subsample; RLOTHI data from the large sample; whether a study was an RCT; and country and year of publication. Results: The RHITLO and RLOTHI methods in the subsample largely agreed (phi coefficients: title = 1.00, abstract = 0.92). Compliance with abstract and title criteria has increased over time, with non-US countries improving more rapidly. DS + MI logistic regression estimates were more precise than subsample estimates (e.g., 95% CI for change in title and abstract compliance by year: subsample RHITLO 1.050–1.174 vs. DS + MI 1.082–1.151). As evidence of improved accuracy, DS + MI coefficient estimates were closer to RHITLO than the large sample RLOTHI. Conclusion: Our results support our hypothesis that DS + MI would result in improved precision and accuracy. This method is flexible and may provide a practical

  8. Student perception and post-exam analysis of one best MCQs and one correct MCQs: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Adhi, Mohammad Idrees; Aly, Syed Moyn

    2018-04-01

    To find differences between One-Correct and One-Best multiple-choice questions with relation to student scores, post-exam item analyses results and student perception. This comparative cross-sectional study was conducted at the Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from November 2010 to April 2011, and comprised medical students. Data was analysed using SPSS 18. Of the 207 participants, 16(7.7%) were boys and 191(92.3%) were girls. The mean score in Paper I was 18.62±4.7, while in Paper II it was 19.58±6.1. One-Best multiple-choice questions performed better than One-Correct. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean scores of the two papers or in the difficulty indices. Difficulty and discrimination indices correlated well in both papers. Cronbach's alpha of paper I was 0.584 and that of paper II was 0.696. Point-biserial values were better for paper II than for paper I. Most students expressed dissatisfaction with paper II. One-Best multiple-choice questions showed better scores, higher reliability, better item performance and correlation values.

  9. When is a research question not a research question?

    PubMed

    Mayo, Nancy E; Asano, Miho; Barbic, Skye Pamela

    2013-06-01

    Research is undertaken to answer important questions yet often the question is poorly expressed and lacks information on the population, the exposure or intervention, the comparison, and the outcome. An optimal research question sets out what the investigator wants to know, not what the investigator might do, nor what the results of the study might ultimately contribute. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent to which rehabilitation scientists optimally define their research questions. A cross-sectional survey of the rehabilitation research articles published during 2008. Two raters independently rated each question according to pre-specified criteria; a third rater adjudicated all discrepant ratings. The proportion of the 258 articles with a question formulated as methods or expected contribution and not as what knowledge was being sought was 65%; 30% of questions required reworking. The designs which most often had poorly formulated research questions were randomized trials, cross-sectional and measurement studies. Formulating the research question is not purely a semantic concern. When the question is poorly formulated, the design, analysis, sample size calculations, and presentation of results may not be optimal. The gap between research and clinical practice could be bridged by a clear, complete, and informative research question.

  10. FormScanner: Open-Source Solution for Grading Multiple-Choice Exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Chadwick; Lo, Glenn; Young, Kaisa; Borsetta, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The multiple-choice exam remains a staple for many introductory physics courses. In the past, people have graded these by hand or even flaming needles. Today, one usually grades the exams with a form scanner that utilizes optical mark recognition (OMR). Several companies provide these scanners and particular forms, such as the eponymous "Scantron." OMR scanners combine hardware and software—a scanner and OMR program—to read and grade student-filled forms.

  11. Hair and stress: A pilot study of hair and cytokine balance alteration in healthy young women under major exam stress.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eva M J; Müller, Yvonne; Snaga, Wenke; Fliege, Herbert; Reißhauer, Anett; Schmidt-Rose, Thomas; Max, Heiner; Schweiger, Dorothea; Rose, Matthias; Kruse, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Mouse models show that experimental stress mimicking prolonged life-stress exposure enhances neurogenic inflammation, induces adaptive immunity cytokine-imbalance characterized by a shift to Type 1 T-helper cell cytokines and increases apoptosis of epithelial cells. This affects hair growth in otherwise healthy animals. In this study, we investigate whether a prolonged naturalistic life-stress exposure affects cytokine balance and hair parameters in healthy humans. 33 (18 exam, 15 comparison) female medical students with comparable sociobiological status were analyzed during a stressful final examination period, at three points in time (T) 12 weeks apart. T1 was before start of the learning period, T2 between the three-day written exam and an oral examination, and T3 after a 12 week rest and recovery from the stress of the examination period. Assessments included: self-reported distress and coping strategies (Perceived Stress Questionnaire [PSQ], Trier Inventory for the Assessment of Chronic Stress [TICS]), COPE), cytokines in supernatants of stimulated peripheral blood mononucleocytes (PBMCs), and trichogram (hair cycle and pigmentation analysis). Comparison between students participating in the final medical exam at T2 and non-exam students, revealed significantly higher stress perception in exam students. Time-wise comparison revealed that stress level, TH1/TH2 cytokine balance and hair parameters changed significantly from T1 to T2 in the exam group, but not the control. However, no group differences were found for cytokine balance or hair parameters at T2. The study concludes that in humans, naturalistic stress, as perceived during participation in a major medical exam, has the potential to shift the immune response to TH1 and transiently hamper hair growth, but these changes stay within a physiological range. Findings are instructive for patients suffering from hair loss in times of high stress. Replication in larger and more diverse sample populations is

  12. Hair and stress: A pilot study of hair and cytokine balance alteration in healthy young women under major exam stress

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Eva M. J.; Müller, Yvonne; Snaga, Wenke; Fliege, Herbert; Reißhauer, Anett; Schmidt-Rose, Thomas; Max, Heiner; Schweiger, Dorothea; Rose, Matthias; Kruse, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Mouse models show that experimental stress mimicking prolonged life-stress exposure enhances neurogenic inflammation, induces adaptive immunity cytokine-imbalance characterized by a shift to Type 1 T-helper cell cytokines and increases apoptosis of epithelial cells. This affects hair growth in otherwise healthy animals. In this study, we investigate whether a prolonged naturalistic life-stress exposure affects cytokine balance and hair parameters in healthy humans. 33 (18 exam, 15 comparison) female medical students with comparable sociobiological status were analyzed during a stressful final examination period, at three points in time (T) 12 weeks apart. T1 was before start of the learning period, T2 between the three-day written exam and an oral examination, and T3 after a 12 week rest and recovery from the stress of the examination period. Assessments included: self-reported distress and coping strategies (Perceived Stress Questionnaire [PSQ], Trier Inventory for the Assessment of Chronic Stress [TICS]), COPE), cytokines in supernatants of stimulated peripheral blood mononucleocytes (PBMCs), and trichogram (hair cycle and pigmentation analysis). Comparison between students participating in the final medical exam at T2 and non-exam students, revealed significantly higher stress perception in exam students. Time-wise comparison revealed that stress level, TH1/TH2 cytokine balance and hair parameters changed significantly from T1 to T2 in the exam group, but not the control. However, no group differences were found for cytokine balance or hair parameters at T2. The study concludes that in humans, naturalistic stress, as perceived during participation in a major medical exam, has the potential to shift the immune response to TH1 and transiently hamper hair growth, but these changes stay within a physiological range. Findings are instructive for patients suffering from hair loss in times of high stress. Replication in larger and more diverse sample populations is

  13. Correlation of the NBME advanced clinical examination in EM and the national EM M4 exams.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Katherine; Miller, Emily S; Lawson, Luan; Wald, David; Beeson, Michael; Heitz, Corey; Morrissey, Thomas; House, Joseph; Poznanski, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Since 2011 two online, validated exams for fourth-year emergency medicine (EM) students have been available (National EM M4 Exams). In 2013 the National Board of Medical Examiners offered the Advanced Clinical Examination in Emergency Medicine (EM-ACE). All of these exams are now in widespread use; however, there are no data on how they correlate. This study evaluated the correlation between the EM-ACE exam and the National EM M4 Exams. From May 2013 to April 2014 the EM-ACE and one version of the EM M4 exam were administered sequentially to fourth-year EM students at five U.S. medical schools. Data collected included institution, gross and scaled scores and version of the EM M4 exam. We performed Pearson's correlation and random effects linear regression. 305 students took the EM-ACE and versions 1 (V1) or 2 (V2) of the EM M4 exams (281 and 24, respectively) [corrected].The mean percent correct for the exams were as follows: EM-ACE 74.9 (SD-9.82), V1 83.0 (SD-6.39), V2 78.5 (SD-7.70) [corrected]. Pearson's correlation coefficient for the V1/EM-ACE was 0.53 (0.43 scaled) and for the V2/EM-ACE was 0.58 (0.41 scaled) [corrected]. The coefficient of determination for V1/ EM-ACE was 0.73 and for V2/EM-ACE 0.71 (0.65 and .49 for scaled scores) [ERRATUM]. The R-squared values were 0.28 and 0.30 (0.18 and 0.13 scaled), respectively [corrected]. There was significant cluster effect by institution. There was moderate positive correlation of student scores on the EM-ACE exam and the National EM M4 Exams.

  14. Academic Achievement by Graduates from For-Profit and Nonprofit Institutions: Evidence from CPA Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittelstaedt, H. Fred; Morris, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    This study shows that graduates from nonprofit educational institutions outperform graduates from for-profit institutions on the four sections of the certified public accountant (CPA) exam. Specifically, it (1) documents univariate differences in CPA exam scores, score distributions, pass rates, and time to complete the CPA exam; (2) investigates…

  15. Evaluation of Performance and Perceptions of Electronic vs. Paper Multiple-Choice Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Shannon; Herman, James; Stewart, Randolph

    2017-01-01

    In the veterinary professional curriculum, methods of examination in many courses are transitioning from the traditional paper-based exams to electronic-based exams. Therefore, a controlled trial to evaluate the impact of testing methodology on examination performance in a veterinary physiology course was designed and implemented. Formalized…

  16. Evaluating outcomes of computer-based classroom testing: Student acceptance and impact on learning and exam performance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meixun; Bender, Daniel

    2018-03-13

    Computer-based testing (CBT) has made progress in health sciences education. In 2015, the authors led implementation of a CBT system (ExamSoft) at a dental school in the U.S. Guided by the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), the purposes of this study were to (a) examine dental students' acceptance of ExamSoft; (b) understand factors impacting acceptance; and (c) evaluate the impact of ExamSoft on students' learning and exam performance. Survey and focus group data revealed that ExamSoft was well accepted by students as a testing tool and acknowledged by most for its potential to support learning. Regression analyses showed that perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of ExamSoft significantly predicted student acceptance. Prior CBT experience and computer skills did not significantly predict acceptance of ExamSoft. Students reported that ExamSoft promoted learning in the first program year, primarily through timely and rich feedback on examination performance. t-Tests yielded mixed results on whether students performed better on computerized or paper examinations. The study contributes to the literature on CBT and the application of the TAM model in health sciences education. Findings also suggest ways in which health sciences institutions can implement CBT to maximize its potential as an assessment and learning tool.

  17. Language Placement and Beyond: Guidelines for the Design and Implementation of a Computerized Spanish Heritage Language Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudrie, Sara M.; Ducar, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the design, implementation, and analysis of a computerized Spanish heritage language (SHL) placement exam. The exam created by the authors exemplifies how to design a simple yet effective placement exam with limited resources. It is suggested that an SHL placement exam should be developed in-house due not only to the diversity…

  18. Experience using radio frequency laptops to access the electronic medical record in exam rooms.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, L. A.; Krall, M.; Chin, H.; Robertson, N.; Harris, J.; Hughes, J.

    1999-01-01

    Kaiser Permanente, Northwest, evaluated the use of laptop computers to access our existing comprehensive Electronic Medical Record in exam rooms via a wireless radiofrequency (RF) network. Eleven of 22 clinicians who were offered the laptops successfully adopted their use in the exam room. These clinicians were able to increase their exam room time with the patient by almost 4 minutes (25%), apparently without lengthening their overall work day. Patient response to exam room computing was overwhelmingly positive. The RF network response time was similar to the hardwired network. Problems cited by some laptop users and many of the eleven non-adopters included battery issues, different equipment layout and function, and inadequate training. IT support needs for the RF laptops were two to four times greater than for hardwired desktops. Addressing the reliability and training issues should increase clinician acceptance, making a successful general roll-out for exam room computing more likely. PMID:10566458

  19. Learning during a Collaborative Final Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstrom, Orjan

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative testing has been suggested to serve as a good learning activity, for example, compared to individual testing. The aim of the present study was to measure learning at different levels of knowledge during a collaborative final exam in a course in basic methods and statistical procedures. Results on pre- and post-tests taken…

  20. Beta-Blockers for Exams Identify Students at High Risk of Psychiatric Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Butt, Jawad H; Dalsgaard, Søren; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Kruuse, Christina; Fosbøl, Emil L

    2017-04-01

    Beta-blockers relieve the autonomic symptoms of exam-related anxiety and may be beneficial in exam-related and performance anxiety, but knowledge on related psychiatric outcomes is unknown. We hypothesized that beta-blocker therapy for exam-related anxiety identifies young students at risk of later psychiatric events. Using Danish nationwide administrative registries, we studied healthy students aged 14-30 years (1996-2012) with a first-time claimed prescription for a beta-blocker during the exam period (May-June); students who were prescribed a beta-blocker for medical reasons were excluded. We matched these students on age, sex, and time of year to healthy and study active controls with no use of beta-blockers. Risk of incident use of antidepressants, incident use of other psychotropic medications, and suicide attempts was examined by cumulative incidence curves for unadjusted associations and multivariable cause-specific Cox proportional hazard analyses for adjusted hazard ratios (HRs). We identified 12,147 healthy students with exam-related beta-blocker use and 12,147 matched healthy students with no current or prior use of beta-blockers (median age, 19 years; 80.3% women). Among all healthy students, 0.14% had a first-time prescription for a beta-blocker during the exam period with the highest proportion among students aged 19 years (0.39%). Eighty-one percent of the students filled only that single prescription for a beta-blocker during follow-up. During follow-up, 2225 (18.3%) beta-blocker users and 1400 (11.5%) nonbeta-blocker users were prescribed an antidepressant (p < 0.0001); 1225 (10.1%) beta-blocker users and 658 (5.4%) nonbeta-blocker users were prescribed a psychotropic drug (p < 0.0001); and 16 (0.13%) beta-blocker users and 6 (0.05%) nonbeta-blocker users attempted suicide (p = 0.03). Exam-related beta-blocker use was associated with an increased risk of antidepressant use (adjusted HRs, 1.68 [95% confidence intervals (CIs), 1

  1. The Role of Frequent Short Exams in Improving Student Performance in Hybrid Global Business Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakos, George; Whiting, Anita

    2018-01-01

    The authors investigate whether frequent in class exams can improve the performance of students in hybrid global business courses. An experiment was conducted in three hybrid sections of a global business course exposing students to short in class exams. The expectation of a short exam forces students to watch the online lectures and study the…

  2. Incorporating Multiple-Choice Questions into an AACSB Assurance of Learning Process: A Course-Embedded Assessment Application to an Introductory Finance Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Michael R.; Hu, Aidong; Jordan, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The authors offer a classification technique to make a quantitative skills rubric more operational, with the groupings of multiple-choice questions to match the student learning levels in knowledge, calculation, quantitative reasoning, and analysis. The authors applied this classification technique to the mid-term exams of an introductory finance…

  3. Students' Attitudes and Perceptions about the Use of Cooperative Exams in an Introductory Leadership Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lori L.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to examine student perceptions related to the use of cooperative exams in an introductory leadership class. In this study, cooperative exams were used as a collaborative learning activity in which students took class exams individually first and then as a peer group. The majority of students (n = 41, 61.4%) had not previously…

  4. Red vs. green: Does the exam booklet color matter in higher education summative evaluations? Not likely.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Winfred; Cho, Inchul; Muñoz, Gonzalo J

    2016-10-01

    We examined the so-called "red effect" in the context of higher education summative exams under the premise that unlike the conditions or situations where this effect typically has been obtained, the totality of factors, such as higher motivation, familiarity with exam material, and more reliance on domain knowledge that characterize high-stakes testing such as those in operational educational settings, are likely to mitigate any color effects. Using three naturally occurring archival data sets in which students took exams on either red or green exam booklets, the results indicated that booklet color (red vs. green) did not affect exam performance. From a scientific perspective, the results suggest that color effects may be attenuated by factors that characterize high-stakes assessments, and from an applied perspective, they suggest that the choice of red vs. green exam booklets in higher education summative evaluations is likely not a concern.

  5. The flipped exam: creating an environment in which students discover for themselves the concepts and principles we want them to learn.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2014-12-01

    Students are naturally curious and inquisitive with powerful intrinsic motives to probe, learn, and understand their world. Accordingly, class activities must capitalize on this inherently energetic and curious nature so that learning becomes a lifelong activity where students take initiative for learning, are skilled in learning, and want to learn new things. This report describes a student-centered class activity, the "flipped exam," designed to achieve this goal. The flipped exam was a collaborative, group effort, and learning was interactive. It included a significant proportion (∼30-35%) of material not covered in class. This required students to actively search for content and context, dynamically making connections between what they knew and what they learned, grappling with complexity, uncertainty, and ambiguity, and finally discovering answers to important questions. Accordingly, the need or desire to know was the catalyst for meaningful learning. Student assessment was determined by behavioral noncognitive parameters that were based on the observation of the student and the student's work as well as cognitive parameters (i.e., the student's score on the examination). It is our view that the flipped exam provided a student-centered activity in which students discovered, because of the need to know and opportunities for discussion, the important concepts and principles we wanted them to learn. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  6. Cheating in a Dental Practical Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Wendy; Dracopoulos, Susie; Hendry, Graham

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing attention given to academic integrity across university education and dental schools are not immune to this problem (Andrews et al. J Dent Educ 71; 1027-1039, 2007; Ford & Hughes Eur J Dent Educ 16(1):e180-e186, 2012). While there has been an increasing concern about academic dishonesty in written exams and assignments,…

  7. Inference on cancer screening exam accuracy using population-level administrative data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Brown, P E; Walter, S D

    2016-01-15

    This paper develops a model for cancer screening and cancer incidence data, accommodating the partially unobserved disease status, clustered data structures, general covariate effects, and dependence between exams. The true unobserved cancer and detection status of screening participants are treated as latent variables, and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used to estimate the Bayesian posterior distributions of the diagnostic error rates and disease prevalence. We show how the Bayesian approach can be used to draw inferences about screening exam properties and disease prevalence while allowing for the possibility of conditional dependence between two exams. The techniques are applied to the estimation of the diagnostic accuracy of mammography and clinical breast examination using data from the Ontario Breast Screening Program in Canada. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Alone in the Crowd: I Failed the ABGC Certification Exam.

    PubMed

    Colón, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The American Board of Genetic Counseling (ABGC) certification examination (often referred to as "the board exam") has become a milestone within the field of genetic counseling. For many, it is the final standardized test taken and indicates the examinee has met "the standards of minimal competence to practice as a genetic counselor" (Bulletin 2015). Although voluntary, certification is strongly encouraged, and in some employment situations, required. Although recent statistics indicate the majority of those who take the test pass, each year there are those who sit for the test unsuccessfully. Despite this fact, exam failure and tools for dealing with this experience are not often broached in the literature. This essay recalls my experiences with a failed exam attempt and the subsequent emotional turmoil. It also aims to start the conversation regarding the difficulty of coping with the "secret" shame of public, professional failure, and suggests there is room for further discussion and resource development in this area.

  9. Helping Students Prepare for Qualifying Exams; A Summary of WCRA Institute III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmer, Lorraine

    This paper describes several learning laboratory program approaches to teaching students how to prepare for professional school admission exams. That these exams are true aptitude tests is a myth repeatedly deflated when students study for the tests and manage to score significantly higher on a second testing. Factors in addition to intelligence…

  10. Does Failing a Placement Exam Discourage Underprepared Students from Going to College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martorell, Paco; McFarlin, Isaac, Jr.; Xue, Yu

    2015-01-01

    About one third of college students are required to take remedial courses. Assignment to remediation is generally made on the basis of performance on a placement exam. When students are required to take a placement exam "prior" to enrolling in college-level courses, assignment to remediation may dissuade students from actually going to…

  11. The Impact of Assessment Policy on Learning: Replacement Exams or Grade Dropping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDermott, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Instructors often debate the merits of alternate grading policies such as dropping the lowest exam or offering an additional exam to replace the lowest score. To date, there has been little research conducted on the impact of these policies on performance. In this study, the author investigates student performance in intermediate macroeconomics…

  12. Changes in Student Attributions Due to the Implementation of Central Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oerke, Britta; Maag Merki, Katharina; Holmeier, Monika; Jager, Daniela J.

    2011-01-01

    The central aim of standardized exit exams is to motivate students and teachers to work harder on critical subject matters and thus increase student achievement. However, the effects of the implementation of central exams on student motivation have not been analyzed in a longitudinal section until now. In the present study, the consequences of…

  13. Factors Affecting Success in the Professional Entry Exam for Accountants in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima Rodrigues, Lúcia; Pinho, Carlos; Bugarim, Maria Clara; Craig, Russell; Machado, Diego

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores factors that have affected the success of candidates in the professional entry exam conducted by Brazil's Federal Council of Accounting. We analyse results of 18,948 candidates who sat for the exam in 2012, using a logistic regression model and the key indicators used by government to monitor the performance of higher education…

  14. Does Eating Breakfast Affect the Performance of College Students on Biology Exams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gregory W.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the breakfast eating habits of 1,259 college students over an eleven year period to determine if eating breakfast had an impact upon their grade on a General Biology exam. The study determined that there was a significant difference in the performance on the exam with a higher percent of the participants, who had eaten…

  15. High School Exit Exams and Dropout in an Era of Increased Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelt, Steven W.; Marcotte, Dave E.

    2013-01-01

    A key form of student-level accountability is the requirement for students to pass high school exit exams (HSEEs) in order to receive a diploma. In this paper, we examine the impact of HSEEs on dropout during a period when these exams became more common and rigorous. Further, we study whether offering alternate pathways to graduation for students…

  16. The Effect of Tutoring on Math Scores for the Praxis I Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longwell-Grice, Robert; McIlheran, Janine; Schroeder, Mark; Scheele, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The Praxis test is one of a series of national teacher certification exams written and administered by the Education Testing Service (ETS) since 1947. Currently, forty states now require some form of the Praxis Series (Educational Testing Service, 2011). Using pre- and post-tests similar to the Praxis I math exam, this study examined the affect…

  17. Improving Consistency in Large Laboratory Courses: A Design for a Standardized Practical Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xinnian; Graesser, Donnasue; Sah, Megha

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory courses serve as important gateways to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. One of the challenges in assessing laboratory learning is to conduct meaningful and standardized practical exams, especially for large multisection laboratory courses. Laboratory practical exams in life sciences courses are frequently…

  18. High-Stakes, Minimum-Competency Exams: How Competent Are They for Evaluating Teacher Competence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Gay; Arbona, Consuelo; Dominguez de Rameriz, Romilia

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, teacher educators recommend authentic, performance-related measures for evaluating teacher candidates. Nevertheless, more states are requiring teachers to pass high-stakes, minimum-competency exams. This study examined the relation between teacher candidate scores on authentic measures and their scores on certification exams required…

  19. A sampling strategy for promoting and assessing medical student retention of physical examination skills.

    PubMed

    Williams, Reed G; Klamen, Debra L; Mayer, David; Valaski, Maureen; Roberts, Nicole K

    2007-10-01

    Skill acquisition and maintenance requires spaced deliberate practice. Assessing medical students' physical examination performance ability is resource intensive. The authors assessed the nature and size of physical examination performance samples necessary to accurately estimate total physical examination skill. Physical examination assessment data were analyzed from second year students at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago in 2002, 2003, and 2004 (N = 548). Scores on subgroups of physical exam maneuvers were compared with scores on the total physical exam, to identify sound predictors of total test performance. Five exam subcomponents were sufficiently correlated to overall test performance and provided adequate sensitivity and specificity to serve as a means to prompt continued student review and rehearsal of physical examination technical skills. Selection and administration of samples of the total physical exam provide a resource-saving approach for promoting and estimating overall physical examination skills retention.

  20. Incorporation of core competency questions into an annual national self-assessment examination for residents in physical medicine and rehabilitation: results and implications.

    PubMed

    Webster, Joseph B

    2009-03-01

    To determine the performance and change over time when incorporating questions in the core competency domains of practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI), systems-based practice (SBP), and professionalism (PROF) into the national PM&R Self-Assessment Examination for Residents (SAER). Prospective, longitudinal analysis. The national Self-Assessment Examination for Residents (SAER) in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, which is administered annually. Approximately 1100 PM&R residents who take the examination annually. Inclusion of progressively more challenging questions in the core competency domains of PBLI, SBP, and PROF. Individual test item level of difficulty (P value) and discrimination (point biserial index). Compared with the overall test, questions in the subtopic areas of PBLI, SBP, and PROF were relatively easier and less discriminating (correlation of resident performance on these domains compared with that on the total test). These differences became smaller during the 3-year time period. The difficulty level of the questions in each of the subtopic domains was raised during the 3 year period to a level close to the overall exam. Discrimination of the test items improved or remained stable. This study demonstrates that, with careful item writing and review, multiple-choice items in the PBLI, SBP, and PROF domains can be successfully incorporated into an annual, national self-assessment examination for residents. The addition of these questions had value in assessing competency while not compromising the overall validity and reliability of the exam. It is yet to be determined if resident performance on these questions corresponds to performance on other measures of competency in the areas of PBLI, SBP, and PROF.

  1. TH-AB-207A-03: Skin Dose to Patients Receiving Multiple CTA and CT Exams of the Head

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Nawfel, RD; Young, G

    Purpose: To measure patient skin dose from CT angiography (CTA) and CT exams of the head, and determine if patients having multiple exams could receive cumulative doses that approach or exceed deterministic thresholds. Methods: This study was HIPAA compliant and conducted with IRB approval. Patient skin doses were measured over a 4 month period using nanoDot OSL dosimeters placed on the head of 52 patients for two CT scanners. On each scanner, 26 patients received CT exams (scanner 1: 10 females, 16 males, mean age 64.2 years; scanner 2: 18 females, 8 males, mean age 61.2 years). CT exam dosemore » metrics, CTDIvol and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded for each exam. Additionally, skin dose was measured on an acrylic skull phantom in each scanner and on a neuro-interventional imaging system using clinical protocols. Measured dose data was used to estimate peak skin dose (PSD) for 4 patients receiving multiple exams including CTA, head CT, and cerebral angiography. Results: For scanner 1, the mean PSD for CTA exams (98.9 ± 5.3 mGy) and for routine head CT exams (39.2 ± 3.7 mGy) agreed reasonably well with the PSD measured on the phantom, 105.4 mGy and 40.0 mGy, respectively. Similarly for scanner 2, the mean PSD for CTA exams (98.8 ± 7.4 mGy) and for routine head CT exams (42.9 ± 9.4 mGy) compared well with phantom measurements, 95.2 mGy and 37.6 mGy, respectively. In addition, the mean PSD was comparable between scanners for corresponding patient exams, CTA and routine head CT respectively. PSD estimates ranged from 1.9 – 4.5 Gy among 4 patients receiving multiple exams. Conclusion: Patients having several exams including both CTA and routine head CT may receive cumulative doses approaching or exceeding the threshold for single dose deterministic effects.« less

  2. Does Missing Classes Decelerate Student Exam Performance Progress? Empirical Evidence and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tin-Chun

    2014-01-01

    A total of 389 business students in undergraduate introductory microeconomics classes in spring 2007, 2009, and 2011, and fall 2012 participated in an exam performance progress study. Empirical evidence suggested that missing classes decelerates and hampers high-performing students' exam performance progress. Nevertheless, the evidence does…

  3. Doppler ultrasound exam of an arm or leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003775.htm Doppler ultrasound exam of an arm or leg To use ... this page, please enable JavaScript. This test uses ultrasound to look at the blood flow in the ...

  4. Global benchmarking of medical student learning outcomes? Implementation and pilot results of the International Foundations of Medicine Clinical Sciences Exam at The University of Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Schafer, Jennifer; Hewett, David; Eley, Diann; Swanson, Dave

    2014-01-01

    To report pilot results for international benchmarking of learning outcomes among 426 final year medical students at the University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. Students took the International Foundations of Medicine (IFOM) Clinical Sciences Exam (CSE) developed by the National Board of Medical Examiners, USA, as a required formative assessment. IFOM CSE comprises 160 multiple-choice questions in medicine, surgery, obstetrics, paediatrics and mental health, taken over 4.5 hours. Significant implementation issues; IFOM scores and benchmarking with International Comparison Group (ICG) scores and United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) scores; and correlation with UQ medical degree cumulative grade point average (GPA). Implementation as an online exam, under university-mandated conditions was successful. Mean IFOM score was 531.3 (maximum 779-minimum 200). The UQ cohort performed better (31% scored below 500) than the ICG (55% below 500). However 49% of the UQ cohort did not meet the USMLE Step 2 CK minimum score. Correlation between IFOM scores and UQ cumulative GPA was reasonable at 0.552 (p < 0.001). International benchmarking is feasible and provides a variety of useful benchmarking opportunities.

  5. [Relieving pre-exam anxiety syndrome with wrist-ankle acupuncture: a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Shu, Shi; Li, Tong-ming; Fang, Fan-fu; He, Hou-luo; Zhou, Qing-hui; Gu, Wei; Zhou, Shuang

    2011-06-01

    Pre-exam anxiety syndrome is a common condition occurring in pre-exam students and directly affects their examination performance and physical state. Wrist-ankle acupuncture has significant therapeutic effects in treating mental disorders and may also relieve the symptoms of pre-exam anxiety syndrome. To assess the therapeutic effect of wrist-ankle acupuncture on pre-exam anxiety syndrome. A total of 60 students who met the inclusion criteria of pre-exam anxiety syndrome were enrolled from a university in Shanghai and they were randomly divided into treatment group and control group. There were 30 cases in each group, and no case failed to follow-up. In the treatment group, wrist-ankle acupuncture was adopted to point upper 1 bilaterally (impression between flexor carpi ulnaris tendon and ulnar margin), and there was no requirement for Deqi (arrival of qi). In the control group, sham acupuncture was adopted. The treatment was applied 3 times totally in both groups one week before the exam, once every other day, each time with the needles retained for 30 min. The therapeutic effects were compared between two groups. Before and after 3 treatments, Sarason Test Anxiety Scale (TAS) and Expectation and Treatment Credibility Scale (ETCS) were measured and evaluated. The therapeutic effect experienced by the treatment group was better than that of the control group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in TAS and ETCS before treatment between the two groups. The scores of TAS after treatment in two groups were higher than those before treatment (P<0.05, P<0.01). There were statistical differences in TAS absolute difference and TAS relative difference between the two groups and the treatment group had better results (P<0.05, P<0.01). After treatment, patients in the treatment group had higher scores in ETCS than those in the control group (P<0.05, P<0.01). No adverse reaction was reported. Wrist-ankle acupuncture can relieve the symptoms of pre-exam

  6. Student-generated questions during chemistry lectures: Patterns, self-appraisals, and relations with motivational beliefs and achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergey, Bradley W.

    Self-generated questions are a central mechanism for learning, yet students' questions are often infrequent during classroom instruction. As a result, little is known about the nature of student questioning during typical instructional contexts such as listening to a lecture, including the extent and nature of student-generated questions, how students evaluate their questions, and the relations among questions, motivations, and achievement. This study examined the questions undergraduate students (N = 103) generated during 8 lectures in an introductory chemistry course. Students recorded and appraised their question in daily question logs and reported lecture-specific self-efficacy beliefs. Self-efficacy, personal interest, goal orientations, and other motivational self-beliefs were measured before and after the unit. Primary analyses included testing path models, multiple regressions, and latent class analyses. Overall, results indicated that several characteristics of student questioning during lectures were significantly related to various motivations and achievement. Higher end-of-class self-efficacy was associated with fewer procedural questions and more questions that reflected smaller knowledge deficits. Lower exam scores were associated with questions reflecting broader knowledge deficits and students' appraisals that their questions had less value for others than for themselves. Individual goal orientations collectively and positively predicted question appraisals. The questions students generated and their relations with motivational variables and achievement are discussed in light of the learning task and academic context.

  7. Analysis of the Difficulty and Discrimination Indices of Multiple-Choice Questions According to Cognitive Levels in an Open and Distance Learning Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koçdar, Serpil; Karadag, Nejdet; Sahin, Murat Dogan

    2016-01-01

    This is a descriptive study which intends to determine whether the difficulty and discrimination indices of the multiple-choice questions show differences according to cognitive levels of the Bloom's Taxonomy, which are used in the exams of the courses in a business administration bachelor's degree program offered through open and distance…

  8. Learning Gains from a Recurring "Teach and Question" Homework Assignment in a General Biology Course: Using Reciprocal Peer Tutoring Outside Class.

    PubMed

    Bailey, E G; Baek, D; Meiling, J; Morris, C; Nelson, N; Rice, N S; Rose, S; Stockdale, P

    2018-06-01

    Providing students with one-on-one interaction with instructors is a big challenge in large courses. One solution is to have students interact with their peers during class. Reciprocal peer tutoring (RPT) is a more involved interaction that requires peers to alternate the roles of "teacher" and "student." Theoretically, advantages for peer tutoring include the verbalization and questioning of information and the scaffolded exploration of material through social and cognitive interaction. Studies on RPT vary in their execution, but most require elaborate planning and take up valuable class time. We tested the effectiveness of a "teach and question" (TQ) assignment that required student pairs to engage in RPT regularly outside class. A quasi-experimental design was implemented: one section of a general biology course completed TQ assignments, while another section completed a substitute assignment requiring individuals to review course material. The TQ section outperformed the other section by ∼6% on exams. Session recordings were coded to investigate correlation between TQ quality and student performance. Asking more questions was the characteristic that best predicted exam performance, and this was more predictive than most aspects of the course. We propose the TQ as an easy assignment to implement with large performance gains.

  9. Do You Prefer to Have the Text or a Sheet with Your Physics Exams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Kastro M.

    2008-05-01

    Many high school and introductory college physics instructors ponder the choice between "open text" exams versus "facts and formulae sheet" exams. Other alternatives are closed book/closed notes exams or an instructor-prepared sheet of facts and relevant formulas. There is no agreement on merit. Rehfuss strongly opposes allowing students to use formula sheets while taking physics exams despite acknowledging that such use is common practice. Cone2 responded to Rehfuss by defending the use of such sheets and outlining the benefits of a "cheat sheet." Debate over the use of a "cheat sheet" or other resources during exams is not limited to the physics community. Skidmore and Aagaard3 studied the relationship between testing conditions and student test scores for students in teacher education. Two decades earlier Boniface,4 Dorsal and Cundiff,5 and Hindman6 published papers on the use of texts and/or sheets during examinations in psychology and education. Others, such as Pullen et al.7 focused on studying the discarded cheat sheets themselves. Humorously, in October 2005 The New York Times8 reported an unusual museum exhibit of "cheat sheets" and the different ways students had cheated at a particular university.

  10. Democracy in the Israeli Education System: The Case of the English Matriculation Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaher, Rana

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates the extent to which indices of social justice and democratic rights are expressed in Israel in the crucial national English matriculation exam, as perceived by Palestinian Arab high school pupils studying for these exams and their English teachers. The research employed Critical Theory as a paradigm, case study as a…

  11. Automatic Assessment of 3D Modeling Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanna, A.; Lamberti, F.; Paravati, G.; Demartini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based assessment of exams provides teachers and students with two main benefits: fairness and effectiveness in the evaluation process. This paper proposes a fully automatic evaluation tool for the Graphic and Virtual Design (GVD) curriculum at the First School of Architecture of the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. In particular, the tool is…

  12. Ethnic and Gender Differences in Advanced Placement Exam Performance: A Multiyear National Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Maria Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze ethnic and gender differences in Advanced Placement (AP) exam performance of U.S. high school students. Specifically, the extent to which differences exist in overall AP exam performance scores within and between four ethnic groups (i.e., Asian, Black, Hispanic, and White) was investigated. Within…

  13. Training Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders to Be Compliant with a Physical Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuvo, Anthony J.; Reagan, Amanda Law; Ackerlund, Julie; Huckfeldt, Rachel; Kelly, Cheri

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to train children with autism spectrum disorders to be compliant with a 10-component physical examination. After a physician assistant administered an exam pretest, noncompliance on steps of the exam were considered with respect to a skill deficit and escape from aversive stimuli. A package of training procedures was…

  14. The ACS Exams Institute Undergraduate Chemistry Anchoring Concepts Content Map I: General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Thomas; Murphy, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    To provide tools for programmatic assessment related to the use of ACS Exams in undergraduate chemistry courses, the ACS Exams Institute has built a content map that applies to the entire undergraduate curriculum. At the top two levels, the grain size of the content classification is large and spans the entire undergraduate curriculum. At the…

  15. Do Resit Exams Promote Lower Investments of Study Time? Theory and Data from a Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenstein, Mark R.; de Jong, Ritske; Lorist, Monicque M.

    2016-01-01

    Although many educational institutions allow students to resit exams, a recently proposed mathematical model suggests that this could lead to a dramatic reduction in study-time investment, especially in rational students. In the current study, we present a modification of this model in which we included some well-justified assumptions about learning and performance on multiple-choice tests, and we tested its predictions in two experiments in which participants were asked to invest fictional study time for a fictional exam. Consistent with our model, the prospect of a resit exam was found to promote lower investments of study time for a first exam and this effect was stronger for participants scoring higher on the cognitive reflection test. We also found that the negative effect of resit exams on study-time investment was attenuated when access to the resit was made uncertain by making it probabilistic or dependent on obtaining a minimal, non-passing grade for the first attempt. Taken together, these results suggest that offering students resit exams may compromise the achievement of learning goals, and they raise the more general implication that second chances promote risky behavior. PMID:27711140

  16. Do Resit Exams Promote Lower Investments of Study Time? Theory and Data from a Laboratory Study.

    PubMed

    Nijenkamp, Rob; Nieuwenstein, Mark R; de Jong, Ritske; Lorist, Monicque M

    2016-01-01

    Although many educational institutions allow students to resit exams, a recently proposed mathematical model suggests that this could lead to a dramatic reduction in study-time investment, especially in rational students. In the current study, we present a modification of this model in which we included some well-justified assumptions about learning and performance on multiple-choice tests, and we tested its predictions in two experiments in which participants were asked to invest fictional study time for a fictional exam. Consistent with our model, the prospect of a resit exam was found to promote lower investments of study time for a first exam and this effect was stronger for participants scoring higher on the cognitive reflection test. We also found that the negative effect of resit exams on study-time investment was attenuated when access to the resit was made uncertain by making it probabilistic or dependent on obtaining a minimal, non-passing grade for the first attempt. Taken together, these results suggest that offering students resit exams may compromise the achievement of learning goals, and they raise the more general implication that second chances promote risky behavior.

  17. The importance of the anal exam in neurologic classification of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Donovan, William H

    2018-01-01

    The examination of the sensation of the anal orifice and the contraction of the external anal sphincter, either voluntarily or reflexly, has always been an integral part of the International Standards for Neurologic Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI). Yet the importance of this component has been defended and challenged. This paper compares these two points of view as expressed by Previnaire and Marino, respectively. Both authors make important points but as the papers do not address the same aspect of the anal exam, room for further refinement of ISNCSCI both regarding the details of the exam and the use of components of the exam for prognostication of neurologic recovery is apparent.

  18. Determinants of Student Attitudes toward Team Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinig, Bruce A.; Horowitz, Ira; Whittenburg, Gene

    2014-01-01

    We examine how student attitudes toward their group, learning method, and perceived development of professional skills are initially shaped and subsequently evolve through multiple uses of team exams. Using a Tobit regression model to analyse a sequence of 10 team quizzes given in a graduate-level tax accounting course, we show that there is an…

  19. The UCSF screening exam effectively screens cognitive and behavioral impairment in patients with ALS.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jennifer; Ahmed, Fizaa; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    The University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Screening Battery provides clinicians with a uniquely tailored tool to measure ALS patients' cognitive and behavioral changes, adjusting for dysarthria and hand weakness. The battery consists of the ALS-CBS ( 1 ), Written Fluency Test ( 2 ), and a new revision of the Frontal Behavior Inventory (FBI-ALS) ( 3 ). The validity of each component was tested by comparing results with a gold standard neuropsychological exam (GNE). Consensus criteria-based GNE diagnoses ( 4 ) were assigned (n = 24) and concurrent validity was tested for each screening exam component. Results showed that each of the four cognitive and behavioral screening test components were significantly associated with diagnoses confirmed by GNE. GNE diagnoses were significantly associated with FBI-ALS negative score, written S-words score, and ALS-CBS cognitive score. The total FBI-ALS score and C-words tests were less predictive of GNE-diagnosed impairment. In conclusion, the UCSF Cognitive Screening Battery demonstrates good external validity compared with GNE in this modest sample, encouraging its use in larger investigations. These data suggest that this battery may provide an effective screen to identify ALS patients who will then benefit from a full examination to confirm their diagnosis.

  20. Relationships between Self-Regulating Behaviors and Predictor Exam Scores for Senior Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Low pass rates on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses have directed nursing faculty to examine how to predict the readiness of the nursing student. Exit exam testing that predicts readiness has become one way to assess the nursing student's readiness. Nursing students at the research site's school of nursing are…

  1. Including an Exam P/1 Prep Course in a Growing Actuarial Science Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the actuarial science program at our university and the development of a course to enhance students' problem solving skills while preparing them for Exam P/1 of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and the Casualty Actuary Society (CAS). The Exam P/1 prep course, formally titled Mathematical Foundations of…

  2. Developing an evidence base of best practices for integrating computerized systems into the exam room: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minal R; Vichich, Jennifer; Lang, Ian; Lin, Jessica; Zheng, Kai

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of health information technology systems, electronic health records in particular, is changing the nature of how clinicians interact with patients. Lack of knowledge remains on how best to integrate such systems in the exam room. The purpose of this systematic review was to (1) distill "best" behavioral and communication practices recommended in the literature for clinicians when interacting with patients in the presence of computerized systems during a clinical encounter, (2) weigh the evidence of each recommendation, and (3) rank evidence-based recommendations for electronic health record communication training initiatives for clinicians. We conducted a literature search of 6 databases, resulting in 52 articles included in the analysis. We extracted information such as study setting, research design, sample, findings, and implications. Recommendations were distilled based on consistent support for behavioral and communication practices across studies. Eight behavioral and communication practices received strong support of evidence in the literature and included specific aspects of using computerized systems to facilitate conversation and transparency in the exam room, such as spatial (re)organization of the exam room, maintaining nonverbal communication, and specific techniques that integrate the computerized system into the visit and engage the patient. Four practices, although patient-centered, have received insufficient evidence to date. We developed an evidence base of best practices for clinicians to maintain patient-centered communications in the presence of computerized systems in the exam room. Further work includes development and empirical evaluation of evidence-based guidelines to better integrate computerized systems into clinical care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Does exam-targeted training help village doctors pass the certified (assistant) physician exam and improve their practical skills? A cross-sectional analysis of village doctors' perspectives in Changzhou in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohong; Shen, Jay J; Yao, Fang; Jiang, Chunxin; Chang, Fengshui; Hao, Fengfeng; Lu, Jun

    2018-05-11

    Quality of health care needs to be improved in rural China. The Chinese government, based on the 1999 Law on Physicians, started implementing the Rural Doctor Practice Regulation in 2004 to increase the percentage of certified physicians among village doctors. Special exam-targeted training for rural doctors therefore was launched as a national initiative. This study examined these rural doctors' perceptions of whether that training helps them pass the exam and whether it improves their skills. Three counties were selected from the 4 counties in Changzhou City in eastern China, and 844 village doctors were surveyed by a questionnaire in July 2012. Chi-square test and Fisher exact test were used to identify differences of attitudes about the exam and training between the rural doctors and certified (assistant) doctors. Longitudinal annual statistics (1980-2014) of village doctors were further analyzed. Eight hundred and forty-four village doctors were asked to participate, and 837 (99.17%) responded. Only 14.93% of the respondents had received physician (assistant) certification. Only 49.45% of the village doctors thought that the areas tested by the certification exam were closely related to the healthcare needs of rural populations. The majority (86.19%) felt that the training program was "very helpful" or "helpful" for preparing for the exam. More than half the village doctors (61.46%) attended the "weekly school". The village doctors considered the most effective method of learning was "continuous training (40.36%)" . The majority of the rural doctors (89.91%) said they would be willing to participate in the training and 96.87% stated that they could afford to pay up to 2000 yuan for it. The majority of village doctors in Changzhou City perceived that neither the certification exam nor the training for it are closely related to the actual healthcare needs of rural residents. Policies and programs should focus on providing exam-preparation training for selected

  4. Somatic symptoms evoked by exam stress in university students: the role of alexithymia, neuroticism, anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Zunhammer, Matthias; Eberle, Hanna; Eichhammer, Peter; Busch, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of somatization is incompletely understood, but could be elucidated by models of psychosocial stress. Academic exam stress has effectively been applied as a naturalistic stress model, however its effect on somatization symptoms according to ICD-10 and DSM-IV criteria has not been reported so far. Baseline associations between somatization and personality traits, such as alexithymia, have been studied exhaustively. Nevertheless, it is largely unknown if personality traits have an explanatory value for stress induced somatization. This longitudinal, quasi-experimental study assessed the effects of university exams on somatization - and the reversal of effects after an exam-free period. Repeated-observations were obtained within 150 students, measuring symptom intensity before, during and after an exam period, according to the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms 7-day (SOMS-7d). Additionally, self-reports on health status were used to differentiate between medically explained and medically unexplained symptoms. Alexithymia, neuroticism, trait-anxiety and baseline depression were surveyed using the Toronto-Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Big-Five Personality Interview (NEO-FFI), the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II). These traits were competitively tested for their ability to explain somatization increases under exam stress. Somatization significantly increased across a wide range of symptoms under exam stress, while health reports pointed towards a reduction in acute infections and injuries. Neuroticism, alexithymia, trait anxiety and depression explained variance in somatization at baseline, but only neuroticism was associated with symptom increases under exam stress. Exam stress is an effective psychosocial stress model inducing somatization. A comprehensive quantitative description of bodily symptoms under exam stress is supplied. The results do not support the stress-alexithymia hypothesis, but favor

  5. Somatic Symptoms Evoked by Exam Stress in University Students: The Role of Alexithymia, Neuroticism, Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Zunhammer, Matthias; Eberle, Hanna; Eichhammer, Peter; Busch, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Objective The etiology of somatization is incompletely understood, but could be elucidated by models of psychosocial stress. Academic exam stress has effectively been applied as a naturalistic stress model, however its effect on somatization symptoms according to ICD-10 and DSM-IV criteria has not been reported so far. Baseline associations between somatization and personality traits, such as alexithymia, have been studied exhaustively. Nevertheless, it is largely unknown if personality traits have an explanatory value for stress induced somatization. Methods This longitudinal, quasi-experimental study assessed the effects of university exams on somatization — and the reversal of effects after an exam-free period. Repeated-observations were obtained within 150 students, measuring symptom intensity before, during and after an exam period, according to the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms 7-day (SOMS-7d). Additionally, self-reports on health status were used to differentiate between medically explained and medically unexplained symptoms. Alexithymia, neuroticism, trait-anxiety and baseline depression were surveyed using the Toronto-Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Big-Five Personality Interview (NEO-FFI), the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI-II). These traits were competitively tested for their ability to explain somatization increases under exam stress. Results Somatization significantly increased across a wide range of symptoms under exam stress, while health reports pointed towards a reduction in acute infections and injuries. Neuroticism, alexithymia, trait anxiety and depression explained variance in somatization at baseline, but only neuroticism was associated with symptom increases under exam stress. Conclusion Exam stress is an effective psychosocial stress model inducing somatization. A comprehensive quantitative description of bodily symptoms under exam stress is supplied. The results do not support the stress

  6. A history and overview of the certification exam for medical dosimetrists

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Pusey, Damien; Smith, Lisette; Zeman, Elaine M.

    2005-06-30

    During the last century, the creation and implementation of board certification has had a powerful impact on the medical community. Board certification has helped to shape the scope and practice of medical professionals and the care they provide, as well as to influence the way the health insurance industry sets standards for reimbursement. One profession that offers board certification to its members is medical dosimetry. The Medical Dosimetrist Certification Board exam has been administered since 1988 and its content covers a broad spectrum of information from the radiation therapy sciences. The exam has strict application requirements and is rather difficultmore » to pass. Those who pass the exam can then call themselves Certified Medical Dosimetrists. For data purposes of this study, several members of the dosimetry community were solicited to participate in a survey regarding the exam's content and history, and to provide relevant statistical data. Currently 2,177 medical dosimetrists are board certified, with an additional 1,500 estimated to be working without certification. Although board certification is not currently required to practice medical dosimetry, new legislation known as the CARE Bill could change this. The CARE Bill, if passed, would mandate nationwide compulsory licensure and/or certification for medical dosimetrists and other medical professionals who want to work in radiation-related health care. Health maintenance organizations and other insurance carriers may likewise require certification for reimbursement purposes.« less

  7. Spanish-English Verbatim Translation Exam. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    The development and validation of the Spanish-English Verbatim Translation Exam (SEVTE) is described. The test is for use by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the selection of applicants for the positions of Language Specialist or Contract Linguist. The report is divided into eight sections. Section 1 describes the need for the test,…

  8. Will I Do as Well on the Final Exam as I Expect? An Examination of Students' Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Immediately prior to an exam, it is common to hear students commenting on whether they anticipate doing as well on the exam as they expect (or, in other words, whether they anticipate performing as well on the exam as the standard at which they believe they should be performing). These anticipations have received little past research attention. In…

  9. Like Climbing Jacob's Ladder: An Art-Based Exploration of the Comprehensive Exam Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Sara Scott

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive exam process is a rite of passage in the scholarly world, and as such the movements of this process often feel like a guarded secret to graduate students. As a PhD candidate, I left the comprehensive exam process feeling both initiated and inundated. This article is an attempt to uncover the secret that is the comprehensive exam…

  10. The educational and financial impact of using patient educators to teach introductory physical exam skills.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sharon S; Miller, Jane; Ratner, Edward; Santilli, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Physical exam skills are essential to core competencies for physicians in training. It is increasingly difficult to secure time and funding for physician faculty to teach these critical skills. This study was designed to determine whether Patient Educators (PE) (non-physician instructors) in an introductory clinical medicine (ICM) course (1) were as effective as physician faculty in teaching the physical exam, (2) impacted consistency of student performance on a final practical exam, and (3) whether this model was cost effective. PE were introduced into an ICM course at the University of Minnesota from 2006 to 2008. Each year, students' physical exam competencies were evaluated by a performance-based head-to-toe examination and 6 months later by an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Differences in test scores between years and variability (i.e., consistency) among yearly scores were assessed. The cost per student was calculated by considering a stable compensation cost per hour for the required number of physician faculty, standardized patients, and PE in each year. Mean student performance was statistically lower with PE, but only by two percentage points. The amount of variation within the medical student classes' physical exam skills remained stable as the use of PE expanded. Total educator salary costs per student declined from $449 in 2006 to $196 in 2008. In terms of sustainability and student performance, the use of trained lay educators has equivalent outcomes and is less costly for physical exam instruction in the pre-clinical years.

  11. A Study of the Technological, Instructional, and Motivational Factors Affecting PHR Certification Exam Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Although previous studies have considered the factors affecting other certification exam outcomes, they have not examined those that are related to performance on the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) exam. In response to that need, this study specifically investigates technology and training factors that affect self-efficacy and self-set…

  12. OHS Redecorates Exam Rooms to Educate Patients | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Occupational Health Services interns are educating patients during their visits via updated exam rooms that now display health-related “themes” like cancer, general health, mental health, and travel safety. They hope the vibrant designs and intriguing facts they’ve displayed will attract attention and benefit patients.

  13. Teacher-Generated Final Exams in High School Science: Content, Rigor, and Assessment Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Michael

    This study investigates a large collection of teacher-generated end-of-semester final exams from Chicago Public School high school science classrooms in order to explore the depth and breadth of content that students learn in science classrooms. Teachers focus on a specific set of scientific content that is driven by district guidelines and popular textbooks but not particularly aligned to standards. To most teachers, rigor means coverage instead of intellectual press. The assessments, while unsophisticated, seem to be delivering what is expected of them---a way to mimic the most basic format of the ACT exam quickly. There was little variation among high poverty and low poverty schools, matching national data and indicating issues that are more due to a particular culture of science teaching and learning than driven by particular contexts. The study identifies implications for the observed homogeneity of final exam rigor and content, identifies gaps between how the routine of final exams are design and implemented in schools, and discusses similar methodological efforts that could enhance the ability of schools and districts to access useful information about the technical core of instruction.

  14. The association between school exam grades and subsequent development of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Steffie Damgaard; Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Petersen, Liselotte

    2018-03-13

    Prior studies have indicated that both high and low school grades are associated with development of bipolar disorder (BD), but these studies have not adjusted for parental history of mental disorder, which is a likely confounder. Furthermore, the association between school grades and bipolar I disorder (BD-I) has not been studied. Therefore, we aimed to study the association between school exam grades and subsequent development of BD and BD-I while adjusting for parental history of mental disorder. We conducted a register-based nationwide cohort study following 505 688 individuals born in Denmark between 1987 and 1995. We investigated the association between school exam grades and development of BD or BD-I with a Cox model adjusting for family history of mental disorder and other potential confounders. During follow-up, 900 individuals were diagnosed with BD and 277 of these with BD-I. The risk for BD and BD-I was significantly increased for individuals not having completed the exams at term [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for BD (aHR=1.71, 95% CI: 1.43-2.04) and for BD-I (aHR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.13-2.19)]. Also, having low exam grades in mathematics was associated with increased risk of both BD (aHR=2.41, 95% CI: 1.27-4.59) and BD-I (aHR=2.71, 95% CI: 1.41-5.21). Females with very high exam grades in Danish (percentile group>97.7) had a significantly increased risk of BD-I (aHR=2.49, 95% CI: 1.19-5.23). The potential to develop BD seems to affect the school results of individuals negatively even before BD is diagnosed - with females having the potential to develop BD-I as a possible exception.

  15. Expedition 43 Crew Final Exams in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-13

    NASA Video File of ISS Expedition 43 final exams in Russia on March 5, 2015 with crewmembers Scott Kelly, Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Kornienko; and backup crew Jeff Williams, Sergei Volkov and Alexei Ovchinin. Includes footage of final qualification training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC); interview with Emily Nelson, ISS Expedition 46 Lead Flight Director; and scenes from the qualification training.

  16. Influence of Preparatory Workshops on Dental Students' Academic Performance and Stress on Their First Operative Dentistry Psychomotor Exam.

    PubMed

    Dilbone, Deborah A; Feng, Xiaoying; Su, Yu; Xirau-Probert, Patricia; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Nascimento, Marcelle M

    2018-06-01

    Predoctoral dental psychomotor examinations are known to generate high levels of stress among dental students, which may compromise their academic performance. At one U.S. dental school, all 93 first-year dental students were invited to attend a series of three workshop sessions prior to enrollment in their initial operative dentistry course. The workshops were developed to facilitate academic transition from the dental anatomy course to the operative dentistry course; provide early exposure to materials, instruments, and laboratory techniques; support the early development of psychomotor and self-assessment skills; and lessen students' stress and anxiety levels regarding psychomotor examinations. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the workshops on the students' academic performance and self-reported stress and preparedness. All students who attended the workshop sessions and all who did not were asked to complete a pre-exam survey (immediately preceding the exam) and a post-exam survey (immediately after the exam) on the day of their first operative dentistry psychomotor exam. Of the 93 students, 21 attended one, 34 attended two, and 25 attended three workshop sessions, while 13 students did not attend any. Response rates for the pre- and post-exam surveys were 100% and 98.9%, respectively. Students who attended all three workshop sessions reported being significantly less stressed about taking the exam than the other groups. The mean exam grade of students who attended the workshop sessions was significantly higher than that of students who did not attend the sessions. These findings support the development and implementation of preparatory workshops to improve academic performance and decrease the stress levels of dental students prior to the first operative dentistry psychomotor exam.

  17. A Valid and Reliable Instrument for Cognitive Complexity Rating Assignment of Chemistry Exam Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaus, Karen; Murphy, Kristen; Blecking, Anja; Holme, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The design and use of a valid and reliable instrument for the assignment of cognitive complexity ratings to chemistry exam items is described in this paper. Use of such an instrument provides a simple method to quantify the cognitive demands of chemistry exam items. Instrument validity was established in two different ways: statistically…

  18. Classification tree analysis to enhance targeting for follow-up exam of colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Follow-up rate after a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is low worldwide. In order to increase the follow-up rate, segmentation of the target population has been proposed as a promising strategy, because an intervention can then be tailored toward specific subgroups of the population rather than using one type of intervention for all groups. The aim of this study is to identify subgroups that share the same patterns of characteristics related to follow-up exams after FOBT. Methods The study sample consisted of 143 patients aged 50–69 years who were requested to undergo follow-up exams after FOBT. A classification tree analysis was performed, using the follow-up rate as a dependent variable and sociodemographic variables, psychological variables, past FOBT and follow-up exam, family history of colorectal cancer (CRC), and history of bowel disease as predictive variables. Results The follow-up rate in 143 participants was 74.1% (n = 106). A classification tree analysis identified four subgroups as follows; (1) subgroup with a high degree of fear of CRC, unemployed and with a history of bowel disease (n = 24, 100.0% follow-up rate), (2) subgroup with a high degree of fear of CRC, unemployed and with no history of bowel disease (n = 17, 82.4% follow-up rate), (3) subgroup with a high degree of fear of CRC and employed (n = 24, 66.7% follow-up rate), and (4) subgroup with a low degree of fear of CRC (n = 78, 66.7% follow-up rate). Conclusion The identification of four subgroups with a diverse range of follow-up rates for CRC screening indicates the direction to take in future development of an effective tailored intervention strategy. PMID:24112563

  19. The CPA Exam as a Postcurriculum Accreditation Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barilla, Anthony G.; Jackson, Robert E.; Mooney, J. Lowell

    2008-01-01

    Business schools often attain accreditation to demonstrate program efficacy. J. A. Marts, J. D. Baker, and J. M. Garris (1988) hypothesized that candidates from Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB)-accredited accounting programs perform better on the CPA exam than do candidates from non-AACSB-accredited…

  20. Preparticipation Exams: How to Detect a Teenage Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Parnell

    1990-01-01

    Sport-specific preparticipation examinations do not address social problems (drug abuse, suicide, murder, accidents, and sex) epidemic among teenagers, but they are often the only contact these youth have with a physician. This article discusses these risk factors and presents methods for assessing them during preparticipation exams. (SM)

  1. Psychosocial Factors Associated with Skin Self-Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Moriarty, Cortney M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined psychosocial factors associated with skin self-exam (SSE) performance by young adults. Participants and Methods: The authors administered surveys to 218 US college students (aged 18-26 years) attending a large midwestern university. Results: Contrary to prior research, men (44%) and women (49%) were relatively…

  2. Brief questions highlight the need for melanoma information campaigns.

    PubMed

    Foote, Janet A; Poole, Catherine M

    2013-12-01

    Melanoma awareness was briefly assessed at walk/runs held simultaneously in Philadelphia PA, Phoenix AZ, and Seattle WA. Of the participants, 75 % (1521) answered short questions during event registration. Among 1,036 respondents aged 14 years and older, 66 % reported knowing melanoma warning signs. Significantly more respondents with melanoma family history reported having a physician-administered skin exam and knowing warning signs. More than one third of walk/run participants reported no definitive melanoma warning sign knowledge. Self-reported melanoma awareness and detection indices were lowest among Phoenix participants; the event city with the greatest annual sun exposure. Educational efforts for melanoma awareness are critically needed. Selected results of this project were presented in a poster forum at the 2006 Congress for Epidemiology meeting held in Seattle, WA (June 2006).

  3. Effects of High School Exit Exams on Dropout Rates: Summary of a Panel Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudowsky, Naomi; Gayler, Keith

    This paper summarizes a panel discussion that addressed exit-exam policies and dropout issues. It presents the panel members' conclusions about existing research and their recommendations on what kinds of further work are needed. Research on how exit exams affect dropout rates is limited and inconclusive, so policies continue to be made in the…

  4. Additional Support for the Information Systems Analyst Exam as a Valid Program Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Donald A.; Snyder, Johnny; Slauson, Gayla Jo; Bridge, Morgan K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis to support the notion that the Information Systems Analyst (ISA) exam can be used as a program assessment tool in addition to measuring student performance. It compares ISA exam scores earned by students in one particular Computer Information Systems program with scores earned by the same students on the…

  5. The Effect of Online Chapter Quizzes on Exam Performance in an Undergraduate Social Psychology Course

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bethany C.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2009-01-01

    Assigned textbook readings are a common requirement in undergraduate courses, but students often do not complete reading assignments or do not do so until immediately before an exam. This may have detrimental effects on learning and course performance. Regularly scheduled quizzes on reading material may increase completion of reading assignments and therefore course performance. This study examined the effectiveness of compulsory, mastery-based, weekly reading quizzes as a means of improving exam and course performance. Completion of reading quizzes was related to both better exam and course performance. The discussion includes recommendations for the use of quizzes in undergraduate courses. PMID:20046908

  6. Uncovering an Existential Barrier to Breast Self-exam Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Jamie L.; Arndt, Jamie; Hart, Joshua; Routledge, Clay

    2008-01-01

    The present research applies an analysis derived from terror management theory to the health domain of breast examination, and in doing so uncovers previously unrecognized factors that may contribute to women’s reluctance to perform breast self-examinations (BSEs). In Study 1, when concerns about mortality were primed, reminders of human beings’ physical nature (i.e., creatureliness) reduced intentions to conduct BSEs compared to reminders of humans’ uniqueness. In Study 2, women conducted shorter exams on a breast model (an experience found to increase death-thought accessibility) when creatureliness was primed compared to a uniqueness and no essay condition. In Study 3, after a creatureliness prime, women performed shorter BSEs when a placebo did not provide an alternative explanation for their discomfort compared to when it did. Advances for theory and breast self-exam promotion are discussed. PMID:19255593

  7. Scanner Based Assessment in Exams Organized with Personalized Thesis Randomly Generated via Microsoft Word

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teneqexhi, Romeo; Qirko, Margarita; Sharko, Genci; Vrapi, Fatmir; Kuneshka, Loreta

    2017-01-01

    Exams assessment is one of the most tedious work for university teachers all over the world. Multiple choice theses make exams assessment a little bit easier, but the teacher cannot prepare more than 3-4 variants; in this case, the possibility of students for cheating from one another becomes a risk for "objective assessment outcome." On…

  8. Skipping Class in College and Exam Performance: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobkin, Carlos; Gil, Ricard; Marion, Justin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we estimate the effect of class attendance on exam performance by implementing a policy in three large economics classes that required students scoring below the median on the midterm exam to attend class. This policy generated a large discontinuity in the rate of post-midterm attendance at the median of the midterm score. We…

  9. How Question Types Reveal Student Thinking: An Experimental Comparison of Multiple-True-False and Free-Response Formats

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Joanna K.; Potts, Macy A.; Couch, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    Assessments represent an important component of undergraduate courses because they affect how students interact with course content and gauge student achievement of course objectives. To make decisions on assessment design, instructors must understand the affordances and limitations of available question formats. Here, we use a crossover experimental design to identify differences in how multiple-true-false (MTF) and free-response (FR) exam questions reveal student thinking regarding specific conceptions. We report that correct response rates correlate across the two formats but that a higher percentage of students provide correct responses for MTF questions. We find that MTF questions reveal a high prevalence of students with mixed (correct and incorrect) conceptions, while FR questions reveal a high prevalence of students with partial (correct and unclear) conceptions. These results suggest that MTF question prompts can direct students to address specific conceptions but obscure nuances in student thinking and may overestimate the frequency of particular conceptions. Conversely, FR questions provide a more authentic portrait of student thinking but may face limitations in their ability to diagnose specific, particularly incorrect, conceptions. We further discuss an intrinsic tension between question structure and diagnostic capacity and how instructors might use multiple formats or hybrid formats to overcome these obstacles. PMID:28450446

  10. Oral Exam System at Teacher Appointments in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colak, Ismail; Demir, Selcuk Besir

    2017-01-01

    Many systems have been developed on teacher selection and appointments procedures throughout history in Turkey. Latest teacher appointments and selection systems in Turkey is Oral Exam Evaluation. This new system is discussed in detail in this study. Basically, the study is to analysis what the positive and negative reflections of the system might…

  11. Improving Learning through Interventions of Student-Generated Questions and Concept Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Jack W.; Chew, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    Using the principles of the scholarship of teaching and learning, we evaluated 2 learning strategies to determine if they could improve student exam performance in general psychology. After the second of 3 exams, we gave students the option of participating in a specific learning activity and assessed its impact using the third exam. In Study 1,…

  12. Dual process theory and intermediate effect: are faculty and residents' performance on multiple-choice, licensing exam questions different?

    PubMed

    Dong, Ting; Durning, Steven J; Artino, Anthony R; van der Vleuten, Cees; Holmboe, Eric; Lipner, Rebecca; Schuwirth, Lambert

    2015-04-01

    Clinical reasoning is essential for the practice of medicine. Dual process theory conceptualizes reasoning as falling into two general categories: nonanalytic reasoning (pattern recognition) and analytic reasoning (active comparing and contrasting of alternatives). The debate continues regarding how expert performance develops and how individuals make the best use of analytic and nonanalytic processes. Several investigators have identified the unexpected finding that intermediates tend to perform better on licensing examination items than experts, which has been termed the "intermediate effect." We explored differences between faculty and residents on multiple-choice questions (MCQs) using dual process measures (both reading and answering times) to inform this ongoing debate. Faculty (board-certified internists; experts) and residents (internal medicine interns; intermediates) answered live licensing examination MCQs (U.S. Medical Licensing Examination Step 2 Clinical Knowledge and American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination) while being timed. We conducted repeated analysis of variance to compare the 2 groups on average reading time, answering time, and accuracy on various types of items. Faculty and residents did not differ significantly in reading time [F (1,35) = 0.01, p = 0.93], answering time [F (1,35) = 0.60, p = 0.44], or accuracy [F (1,35) = 0.24, p = 0.63] regardless of easy or hard items. Dual process theory was not evidenced in this study. However, this lack of difference between faculty and residents may have been affected by the small sample size of participants and MCQs may not reflect how physicians made decisions in actual practice setting. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Predictors of Academic Success for the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination and the Southern Regional Testing Agency Clinical Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efurd, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose for conducting this study was to investigate and describe the relationship between applicant criteria for a dental hygiene program and subsequent outcomes on credentialing exams: the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam and the Southern Regional Testing Agency clinical exam. Because admission criteria play a crucial role in applicant…

  14. Importance of questionnaire context for a physical activity question.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, M E; Sørensen, M R; Ekholm, O; Rasmussen, N K

    2013-10-01

    Adequate information about physical activity habits is essential for surveillance, implementing, and evaluating public health initiatives in this area. Previous studies have shown that question order and differences in wording result in systematic differences in people's responses to questionnaires; however, this has never been shown for physical activity questions. The aim was to study the influence of different formulations and question order on self-report physical activity in a population-based health interview survey. Four samples of each 1000 adults were drawn at random from the National Person Register. A new question about physical activity was included with minor differences in formulations in samples 1-3. Furthermore, the question in sample 2 was included in sample 4 but was placed in the end of the questionnaire. The mean time spent on moderate physical activity varied between the four samples from 57 to 100 min/day. Question order was associated with the reported number of minutes spent on moderate-intensity physical activity and with prevalence of meeting the recommendation, whereas physical inactivity was associated with the differences in formulation of the question. Questionnaire context influences the way people respond to questions about physical activity significantly and should be tested systematically in validation studies of physical activity questionnaires. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. External Quality Monitoring of the Cervical Cytopathological Exams in the Rio de Janeiro City.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Vânia Stiepanowez de Oliveira; Malfacini, Solange da Silva; Gomes, Alex Moreira; Rocha, Cláudia Ramos Marques da

    2018-06-20

     To discuss the implementation and contributions of the External Quality Monitoring in the city of Rio de Janeiro and to analyze the performance of the main providers of cervical cytopathology in this city from September 2013 to March 2017, here referred to as "Alpha laboratory" and "Beta laboratory."  Observational, cross-sectional, retrospective study using information from the Cervical Cancer Control Information System (SISCOLO, in the Portuguese acronym), municipal coordination module, External Quality Monitoring report. The proportions of false positives, false negatives, unsatisfactory samples and rejected samples were estimated. The agreement among the observers was analyzed through the Kappa index and the reduction of disagreements in the period for each laboratory studied, comparing the results of each cycle.  A total of 19,158 examinations were selected, of which 19,130 (99.85%) were monitored, 16.649 (87, 03%) were reviewed by the External Quality Monitoring Unit, 2,481 (12,97%) were rejected and 441 (2,65%) were considered unsatisfactory. The "Beta laboratory" presented excellent concordance in all cycles; the "Alpha laboratory" had good concordance in the first two cycles (K = 0.76 and 0.79), becoming excellent in the following four cycles. The average Kappa index was 0.85, with median of 0.86. The percentage of diagnostic disagreement was 6.63% of the reviewed exams, of which 5.38% required a change of conduct CONCLUSION:  External Quality Monitoring is an exercise in diagnostic improvement, and its implementation was fundamental to ensure the reliability of the cytopathological exams in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  16. Why do some women refuse to allow male residents to perform pelvic exams?

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Julie I; Shapiro, Howard; Regensteiner, Judith G; Stotler, Jeanne K; Schmidt, Betty

    2002-10-01

    Many women who receive medical care in residency training clinics refuse to allow male residents to perform their pelvic exams. This study was conducted to identify which women were most likely to refuse and to learn their reasons for refusing. From January to March 1997, a questionnaire was given to all women entering a Tri-County Health office and a Planned Parenthood clinic, both in the Denver, Colorado, metropolitan area, who consented to participate in the study. Data from the questionnaire were analyzed using a statistical software package. A total of 1,437 women entered the clinics during the study period. Of these patients, 1,078 consented to complete the questionnaire. Seven of these 1,078 women did not complete the questionnaire. Women who did not know the training level of the resident performing the pelvic exam were more likely to refuse than were women who knew the training level of the resident (p =.001), but many women preferred a female physician regardless of the physician's training level. Fifty-eight percent said they would allow a male resident to observe a female attending physician perform the exam, compared with 36% who said they would allow a male resident to observe if the attending physician was a man. Common statements from those who would refuse were: "I am just more comfortable with a female," "Women do not want men to examine their private body parts," and "Women explain things better." A woman's knowledge of the resident's training level correlates with her willingness to have a pelvic exam performed by a male resident. Women who said they would refuse a pelvic exam performed by a male resident gave specific reasons for their decision.

  17. Verbal Final Exam in Introductory Biology Yields Gains in Student Content Knowledge and Longitudinal Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckie, Douglas B.; Rivkin, Aaron M.; Aubry, Jacob R.; Marengo, Benjamin J.; Creech, Leah R.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    We studied gains in student learning over eight semesters in which an introductory biology course curriculum was changed to include optional verbal final exams (VFs). Students could opt to demonstrate their mastery of course material via structured oral exams with the professor. In a quantitative assessment of cell biology content knowledge,…

  18. Sleep and Final Exam Performance in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coletta, Vincent; Wikholm, Colin; Pascoe, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Most physics instructors believe that adequate sleep is important in order for students to perform well on problem solving, and many instructors advise students to get plenty of sleep the night before an exam. After years of giving such advice to students at Loyola Marymount University (LMU), one of us decided to find out how many hours students…

  19. Should I Do a Breast Self-Exam? (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... growing and changing. The reason women do breast self-exams is to learn what's normal for their breasts. But during the teen years, what's "normal" can change based on where a girl is in her development. To make things more confusing, your breasts can ...

  20. 76 FR 37200 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self...

  1. 76 FR 10942 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self...

  2. 76 FR 46897 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small...

  3. 76 FR 6189 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self...

  4. 76 FR 22170 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self...

  5. 76 FR 56879 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small...

  6. 76 FR 63715 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small...

  7. The importance of the first ultrasonic exam of newborn hips.

    PubMed

    Grubor, Predrag; Asotic, Mithat; Biscevic, Mirza; Grubor, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Developmental hip disorder (DHD) is a disorder in development of the acetabulum which remains abrupt (dysplasia) and probably consequential cranialisation of the femur head (luxation). The aim of this paper is to establish the total number of DHD and its subtypes at the first clinical and ultrasound exam of newborns in a retrospective-prospective study made in the period from 1st Jan 2006 through to 31 Dec 2010 at the Clinic for orthopaedics and traumatology in Banja Luka. In total 6132 patients were examined and 99 cases diagnosed with DHD (dysplasia and luxation). Ultrasonic exam was done by means of electronic probe of 5-12 MHz according to standard method after Graph. Girls were significantly more present (96%). Positive family anamnesis on DHD was present with 7.8% examinee, mainly with primiparas, and/ or with 77.8% children with DHD. Dominant intrauterine risk factors for DHD were: mal position of foetus in uterus (78.6%), oligoamnion (17.9%), malformation of the spinal column of the pregnant woman (3.6%), whereas with 38.4% of children with a certain form of DHD the following were found: breech presentation, caesarean section or twin pregnancy. The clinical exam indicated DHD with 8.87% examinee, out of which hip looseness was found with 5% examinees. Ultrasonic finding was positive with 99 examinee, that is with 1.61% of them (deficient and badly formed acetabulum, sleeked protrusion; 8 luxations and 91 dysplasia). Prophylactic measures were requested by 58.6% children (abductive bending and exercises), whereas 41.4 % needed non-intervention therapeutic measures (traction, Pavlik's straps, Graph's knickers, plastering), after which there were no children needing surgical correction of DHD. These data indicate that clinical exam is unreliable for DHD diagnostics, and that Ultrasonic diagnostics and treatment of DHD should start as early as possible applying atraumatic helping devices and procedures in the period when all structures are elastic, flexible and

  8. Analysis of the Relation between Academic Procrastination, Academic Rational/Irrational Beliefs, Time Preferences to Study for Exams, and Academic Achievement: A Structural Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkis, Murat; Duru, Erdinc; Bulus, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relations between academic rational/irrational beliefs, academic procrastination, and time preferences to study for exams and academic achievement by using the structural equation model. The sample consisted of 281 undergraduate students who filled in questionnaires at the 7-week-long summer course.…

  9. Two-Stage Exams Improve Student Learning in an Introductory Geology Course: Logistics, Attendance, and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knierim, Katherine; Turner, Henry; Davis, Ralph K.

    2015-01-01

    Two-stage exams--where students complete part one of an exam closed book and independently and part two is completed open book and independently (two-stage independent, or TS-I) or collaboratively (two-stage collaborative, or TS-C)--provide a means to include collaborative learning in summative assessments. Collaborative learning has been shown to…

  10. Lack of Follow-Up Exams after Failed School Vision Screenings: An Investigation of Contributing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimel, Linda S.

    2006-01-01

    Programs to facilitate professional eye exams after failed school vision screenings often are based on the assumption that funding and access to services are major obstacles to care. Despite such programs, many children do not receive professional exams. The purpose of this study was to identify additional barriers to follow-up eye care. School…

  11. Validating the Use of AP® Exam Scores for College Course Placement. Research Report 2013-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Brian F.; Ewing, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) was created to provide access to rigorous, college-level curricula to motivated and prepared high school students. This study evaluated whether the AP Exam scores from the summative exams associated with 10 courses were valid for the placement of students into higher-level college courses in the subject area…

  12. 76 FR 2193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement will be conducted. The...: Notice is hereby given pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App...

  13. 76 FR 17995 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Practitioner Engagement Project... Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the...

  14. 46 CFR 71.50-3 - Drydock examination, internal structural examination, underwater survey, and alternate hull exam...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., underwater survey, and alternate hull exam intervals. 71.50-3 Section 71.50-3 Shipping COAST GUARD...-3 Drydock examination, internal structural examination, underwater survey, and alternate hull exam... wooden hulls must undergo two drydock and two internal structural examinations within any five year...

  15. Advanced Placement[R] Exam-Taking and Performance: Relationships with First-Year Subject Area College Grades. Research Report 2011-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Brian F.; Packman, Sheryl; Kobrin, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Advanced Placement[R] (AP[R]) exam participation and performance on college grades for courses taken in the same subject area as students' AP Exam(s). Students' first-year college subject area grade point averages (SGPAs) were examined in nine subject areas: mathematics, computer science,…

  16. PCR-Based Method for Detecting Viral Penetration of Medical Exam Gloves

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, John M.; O'Connell, Kevin P.; Korniewicz, Denise M.

    2002-01-01

    The test approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for assessment of the barrier quality of medical exam gloves includes visual inspection and a water leak test. Neither method tests directly the ability of gloves to prevent penetration by microorganisms. Methods that use microorganisms (viruses and bacteria) to test gloves have been developed but require classical culturing of the organism to detect it. We have developed a PCR assay for bacteriophage φX174 that allows the rapid detection of penetration of gloves by this virus. The method is suitable for use with both latex and synthetic gloves. The presence of glove powder on either latex or synthetic gloves had no effect on the ability of the PCR assay to detect bacteriophage DNA. The assay is rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive; requires only small sample volumes; and can be automated. PMID:12149320

  17. The Challenges of Using the WebCAPE Placement Exam in an Advanced Spanish Grammar Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Robert L., III

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to ascertain if the WebCAPE placement exam can be used to measure improvement in an upper division grammar course. The WebCAPE online placement exam is a widely used instrument designed to help university language programs place students into the basic language course best corresponding to their proficiency level. This is done…

  18. An electronic safety screening process during inpatient computerized physician order entry improves the efficiency of magnetic resonance imaging exams.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Erika; Ruggieri, Paul; Fromwiller, Lauren; Underwood, Reginald; Gurland, Brooke; Yurkschatt, Cynthia; Kubiak, Kevin; Obuchowski, Nancy A

    2013-12-01

    Delays between order and magnetic resonance (MR) exam often result when using the conventional paper-based MR safety screening process. The impact of an electronic MR safety screening process imbedded in a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system was evaluated. Retrospective chart review of 4 months of inpatient MR exam orders and reports was performed before and after implementation of electronic MR safety documentation. Time from order to MR exam completion, time from MR exam completion to final radiology report, and time from first order to final report were analyzed by exam anatomy. Length of stay (LOS) and date of service within the admission were also analyzed. We evaluated 1947 individual MR orders in 1549 patients under an institutional review board exemption and a waiver of informed consent. Implementation of the electronic safety screening process resulted in a significant decrease of 1.1 hours (95% confidence interval 1.0-1.3 hours) in the mean time between first order to final report and a nonsignificant decrease of 0.8 hour in the median time from first order to exam end. There was a 1-day reduction (P = .697) in the time from admission to the MR exam compared to the paper process. No significant change in LOS was found except in neurological intensive care patients imaged within the first 24 hours of their admission, where a mean 0.9-day decrease was found. Benefits of an electronic process for MR safety screening include enabling inpatients to have decreased time to MR exams, thus enabling earlier diagnosis and treatment and reduced LOS. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Implementation of the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam in a High-Risk Infant Follow-Up Program

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, Nathalie L; Chorna, Olena; Romeo, Domenico M; Guzzetta, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Background High-Risk Infant Follow-Up (HRIF) programs provide early identification and referral for treatment of neurodevelopmental delays and impairments. In these programs, a standardized neurological exam is a critical component of evaluation for clinical and research purposes. Implementation To address primary challenges of provider educational diversity and standardized documentation, we designed an approach to training and implementation of the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam (HINE) with pre-course materials, a workshop model and adaptation of the electronic medical record. Conclusions Provider completion and documentation of a neurologic exam were evaluated before and after HINE training. Standardized training and implementation of the HINE in a large HRIF is feasible and effective and allows for quantitative evaluation of neurological findings and developmental trajectories. PMID:27765470

  20. Questioning the Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Goldberg, Stephanie; DiRocco, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Historical accounts of questioning used in the education process trace back to Socrates. One of the best examples of his use of questioning is found in Plato's "The Republic." Socrates used a series of strategic questions to help his student Glaucon come to understand the concept of justice. Socrates purposefully posed a series of…

  1. Knowledge Assessment of Food Safety Managers in Utah and Its Implications on the Exam and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nummer, Brian A.; Guy, Stanley M.; Bentley, Joanne P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Food Safety Manager's Certification is offered through a state-local Extension partnership in Utah using an online course management system. Exams and course materials were created by an Extension Specialist at Utah State Univ. Extension Agents provide exam and curriculum facilitation in each county. This form of distance education enables access…

  2. Exam High Schools and Academic Achievement: Evidence from New York City. NBER Working Paper No. 17286

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbie, Will; Fryer, Roland G., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Publicly funded exam schools educate many of the world's most talented students. These schools typically contain higher achieving peers, more rigorous instruction, and additional resources compared to regular public schools. This paper uses a sharp discontinuity in the admissions process at three prominent exam schools in New York City to provide…

  3. Reading Quizzes Improve Exam Scores for Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape-Lindstrom, Pamela; Eddy, Sarah; Freeman, Scott

    2018-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that adding course structure may encourage self-regulated learning skills resulting in an increase in student exam performance in the community college setting, we added daily preclass online, open-book reading quizzes to an introductory biology course. We compared three control terms without reading quizzes and three…

  4. Student-Produced Videos for Exam Review in Mathematics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulsizer, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Videos have been used in classrooms for decades, but student-produced video has recently become a viable, economical option to enhance learning. Students were asked to create videos to be used for their exam review in two different undergraduate mathematics courses: Differential Equation and Complex Analysis. Students were then surveyed about…

  5. Interteaching: The Effects of Quality Points on Exam Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Bryan K.; Zinn, Tracy E.

    2009-01-01

    Although previous studies have found interteaching to be an effective alternative to traditional methods of instruction, few studies have examined which of its components contribute to its effectiveness. In the current study, we examined whether manipulating quality points had an effect on our students' exam scores. In two sections of an…

  6. Evaluation of Simulated Clinical Breast Exam Motion Patterns Using Marker-Less Video Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Azari, David P.; Pugh, Carla M.; Laufer, Shlomi; Kwan, Calvin; Chen, Chia-Hsiung; Yen, Thomas Y.; Hu, Yu Hen; Radwin, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigates using marker-less video tracking to evaluate hands-on clinical skills during simulated clinical breast examinations (CBEs). Background There are currently no standardized and widely accepted CBE screening techniques. Methods Experienced physicians attending a national conference conducted simulated CBEs presenting different pathologies with distinct tumorous lesions. Single hand exam motion was recorded and analyzed using marker-less video tracking. Four kinematic measures were developed to describe temporal (time pressing and time searching) and spatial (area covered and distance explored) patterns. Results Mean differences between time pressing, area covered, and distance explored varied across the simulated lesions. Exams were objectively categorized as either sporadic, localized, thorough, or efficient for both temporal and spatial categories based on spatiotemporal characteristics. The majority of trials were temporally or spatially thorough (78% and 91%), exhibiting proportionally greater time pressing and time searching (temporally thorough) and greater area probed with greater distance explored (spatially thorough). More efficient exams exhibited proportionally more time pressing with less time searching (temporally efficient) and greater area probed with less distance explored (spatially efficient). Just two (5.9 %) of the trials exhibited both high temporal and spatial efficiency. Conclusions Marker-less video tracking was used to discriminate different examination techniques and measure when an exam changes from general searching to specific probing. The majority of participants exhibited more thorough than efficient patterns. Application Marker-less video kinematic tracking may be useful for quantifying clinical skills for training and assessment. PMID:26546381

  7. Should a Physician Comply with a Parent's Demands for a Forensic Exam on a 16-Year-Old Trauma Patient?

    PubMed

    Bowdler, Michelle; Kent, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    Physicians must remain vigilant about their ethical duties to patients, especially in high-stakes situations. The question raised by this case-whether a physician should comply with a parent's demand for treatment against her underage child's wishes-is not one of life or death in which a guardian might more credibly argue her judgment should stand. Given that forcing a rape kit exam on a patient who refuses to give assent could be further traumatizing, we argue that the physician should not comply. Deciding upon a course of action in this situation will involve considering what is in the patient's best interest and what constitutes a physician's appropriate role in gathering evidence for criminal investigations. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Advanced Placement® Exam-Taking and Performance: Relationships with First-Year Subject Area College Grades. Research Report No. 2011-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Brian F.; Packman, Sheryl; Kobrin, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Advanced Placement (AP) exam participation and performance on college grades for courses taken in the same subject area as students' AP Exam(s). Students' first-year college subject area grade point averages (SGPAs) were examined in nine subject areas: mathematics, computer science,…

  9. Review of multiple-choice-questions and group performance - A comparison of face-to-face and virtual groups with and without facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kazubke, Edda; Schüttpelz-Brauns, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Multiple choice questions (MCQs) are often used in exams of medical education and need careful quality management for example by the application of review committees. This study investigates whether groups communicating virtually by email are similar to face-to-face groups concerning their review process performance and whether a facilitator has positive effects. Methods: 16 small groups of students were examined, which had to evaluate and correct MCQs under four different conditions. In the second part of the investigation the changed questions were given to a new random sample for the judgement of the item quality. Results: There was no significant influence of the variables “form of review committee” and “facilitation”. However, face-to-face and virtual groups clearly differed in the required treatment times. The test condition “face to face without facilitation” was generally valued most positively concerning taking over responsibility, approach to work, sense of well-being, motivation and concentration on the task. Discussion: Face-to-face and virtual groups are equally effective in the review of MCQs but differ concerning their efficiency. The application of electronic review seems to be possible but is hardly recommendable because of the long process time and technical problems. PMID:21818213

  10. Developing a Geoscience Literacy Exam: Pushing Geoscience Literacy Assessment to New Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, E. A.; Steer, D. N.; Manduca, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    InTeGrate is a community effort aimed at improving geoscience literacy and building a workforce that can use geoscience to solve societal issues. As part of this work we have developed a geoscience literacy assessment instrument to measure students' higher order thinking. This assessment is an important part of the development of curricula designed to increase geoscience literacy for all undergraduate students. To this end, we developed the Geoscience Literacy Exam (GLE) as one of the tools to quantify the effectiveness of these materials on students' understandings of geoscience literacy. The InTeGrate project is a 5-year, NSF-funded STEP Center grant in its first year of funding. Details concerning the project are found at http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/index.html. The GLE instrument addresses content and concepts in the Earth, Climate, and Ocean Science literacy documents. The testing schema is organized into three levels of increasing complexity. Level 1 questions are single answer, understanding- or application-level multiple choice questions. For example, selecting which type of energy transfer is most responsible for the movement of tectonic plates. They are designed such that most introductory level students should be able to correctly answer after taking an introductory geoscience course. Level 2 questions are more advanced multiple answer/matching questions, at the understanding- through analysis-level. Students might be asked to determine the types of earth-atmosphere interactions that could result in changes to global temperatures in the event of a major volcanic eruption. Because the answers are more complicated, some introductory students and most advanced students should be able to respond correctly. Level 3 questions are analyzing- to evaluating-level short essays, such as describe the ways in which the atmosphere sustains life on Earth. These questions are designed such that introductory students could probably formulate a rudimentary response

  11. 76 FR 46897 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee will be conducted....C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed...

  12. 76 FR 37893 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee will be conducted....C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed...

  13. 76 FR 6190 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee will be conducted....C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed...

  14. 76 FR 10942 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Panel Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee will be conducted....C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed...

  15. Identification of technical item flaws leads to improvement of the quality of single best Multiple Choice Questions.

    PubMed

    Fayyaz Khan, Humaira; Farooq Danish, Khalid; Saeed Awan, Azra; Anwar, Masood

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify technical item flaws in the multiple choice questions submitted for the final exams for the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. This descriptive analytical study was carried out in Islamic International Medical College (IIMC). The Data was collected from the MCQ's submitted by the faculty for the final exams for the year 2009, 2010 and 2011. The data was compiled and evaluated by a three member assessment committee. The data was analyzed for frequency and percentages the categorical data was analyzed by chi-square test. Overall percentage of flawed item was 67% for the year 2009 of which 21% were for testwiseness and 40% were for irrelevant difficulty. In year 2010 the total item flaws were 36% and 11% testwiseness and 22% were for irrelevant difficulty. The year 2011 data showed decreased overall flaws of 21%. The flaws of testwisness were 7%, irrelevant difficulty were 11%. Technical item flaws are frequently encountered during MCQ construction, and the identification of flaws leads to improved quality of the single best MCQ's.

  16. Rumor Has It: Investigating Teacher Licensure Exam Advice Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Doyle, Kira; Petchauer, Emery

    2015-01-01

    In many countries, including the United States, England, Korea, Hong Kong, and Japan, individuals must pass some form of examination for entry into or completion of a teacher education program (Wang, Coleman, Coley, & Phelps, 2003). These exams are meant to act as gatekeeping mechanisms for teacher quality. In the majority of the countries…

  17. Factors Distinguishing Exceptional Performance on the Uniform CPA Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbaugh, Donald L.; Thompson, A. Frank

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of data from 234 Certified Public Accountant (CPA) candidates (98 of whom failed at least 1 part of the exam) showed that higher grades in the CPA review course correlated with passing the first time. Higher high school class rank and larger high school class size influenced exceptional test performance. (SK)

  18. Regression Effects in Angoff Ratings: Examples from Credentialing Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses regression effects that are commonly observed in Angoff ratings where panelists tend to think that hard items are easier than they are and easy items are more difficult than they are in comparison to estimated item difficulties. Analyses of data from two credentialing exams illustrate these regression effects and the…

  19. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam).

    PubMed

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Razavi, S Mohammad; Pozveh, Elham Zamani; Jahangirmoghaddam, Milad

    2011-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint is one of the most complicated joints of the body and plays an important role in the head and neck system. One of the factors affecting the temporomandibular joint and lead to temporomandibular disorder is anxiety with all the events causing it. The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. In this prospective study, subjects were randomly selected. One hundred and thirty pre-university students in Isfahan were evaluated with Ketel's test of anxiety, exam stress test and temporomandibular disorder questionnaires. The evaluation was done in two stages 10 months and 1 month prior to the university entrance exam (Konkour), clinical assessments consisted of masticatory muscles and sternocleidomastoid muscle palpation, temporomandibular joint palpation for pain and noise and its movement, and mouth opening limitations. The Wilcoxon rank test and paired t-test were used to analyze the data and the P value under 0.05 was considered significant. The level of anxiety and occurrence of temporomandibular disorders were increased between two stages and had the highest level in the second stage. There was a significant increase between two stages (P<0.001). The parallel increase of temporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable.

  20. Medication competency of nurses according to theoretical and drug calculation online exams: A descriptive correlational study.

    PubMed

    Sneck, Sami; Saarnio, Reetta; Isola, Arja; Boigu, Risto

    2016-01-01

    Medication administration is an important task of registered nurses. According to previous studies, nurses lack theoretical knowledge and drug calculation skills and knowledge-based mistakes do occur in clinical practice. Finnish health care organizations started to develop a systematic verification processes for medication competence at the end of the last decade. No studies have yet been made of nurses' theoretical knowledge and drug calculation skills according to these online exams. The aim of this study was to describe the medication competence of Finnish nurses according to theoretical and drug calculation exams. A descriptive correlation design was adopted. Participants and settings All nurses who participated in the online exam in three Finnish hospitals between 1.1.2009 and 31.05.2014 were selected to the study (n=2479). Quantitative methods like Pearson's chi-squared tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc Tukey tests and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to test the existence of relationships between dependent and independent variables. The majority of nurses mastered the theoretical knowledge needed in medication administration, but 5% of the nurses struggled with passing the drug calculation exam. Theoretical knowledge and drug calculation skills were better in acute care units than in the other units and younger nurses achieved better results in both exams than their older colleagues. The differences found in this study were statistically significant, but not high. Nevertheless, even the tiniest deficiency in theoretical knowledge and drug calculation skills should be focused on. It is important to identify the nurses who struggle in the exams and to plan targeted educational interventions for supporting them. The next step is to study if verification of medication competence has an effect on patient safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. What Does a Student Know Who Earns a Top Score on the Advanced Placement Chemistry Exam?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claesgens, Jennifer; Daubenmire, Paul L.; Scalise, Kathleen M.; Balicki, Scott; Gochyyev, Perman; Stacy, Angelica M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the performance of students at a high-performing U.S. public school (n = 64) on the advanced placement (AP) chemistry exam to their performance on the ChemQuery assessment system. The AP chemistry exam was chosen because, as the National Research Council acknowledges, it is the "perceived standard of excellence and school…

  2. USER MANUAL FOR EXPRESS, THE EXAMS-PRZM EXPOSURE SIMULATION SHELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Fate and Effects Division (EFED) of EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs(OPP) uses a suite of ORD simulation models for the exposure analysis portion of regulatory risk assessments. These models (PRZM, EXAMS, AgDisp) are complex, process-based simulation codes tha...

  3. Acute vocal fold hemorrhage caught on video during office exam.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Thomas L; Smith, Libby J

    2009-03-01

    This article presents a unique video of a laryngeal exam during which a vocal fold hemorrhage occurs. This patient had likely been suffering from intermittent vocal fold hemorrhages for the last decade due to a persistent vascular lesion and an underlying chronic cough.

  4. Lack of follow-up exams after failed school vision screenings: an investigation of contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Kimel, Linda S

    2006-06-01

    Programs to facilitate professional eye exams after failed school vision screenings often are based on the assumption that funding and access to services are major obstacles to care. Despite such programs, many children do not receive professional exams. The purpose of this study was to identify additional barriers to follow-up eye care. School nurses in an urban, midwestern public school district identified elementary school students who had not received follow-up eye exams after failed school vision screenings. Parents of these students were interviewed during the summer to determine financial, logistical, social/family, and perceptual barriers to care. Family issues, parental perceptions of vision problems, and difficulty planning ahead were found to be significant factors. Strategies to increase follow-up compliance and recommendations for overcoming barriers to care were also identified.

  5. How Much Is that Exam Grade Really Worth? An Estimation of Student Risk Aversion to Their Unknown Final College Course Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalley, Lanier; McKenzie, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This study created an experimental design with which students can empirically assess their risk behavior with respect to exam grades within an expected utility framework. Specifically, the authors analyzed students' risk preferences associated with taking exams and earning a "risky" unknown grade versus not taking exams and instead…

  6. Tablet computer enhanced training improves internal medicine exam performance.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Daniel C; Wende, Ilja; Grittner, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Traditional teaching concepts in medical education do not take full advantage of current information technology. We aimed to objectively determine the impact of Tablet PC enhanced training on learning experience and MKSAP® (medical knowledge self-assessment program) exam performance. In this single center, prospective, controlled study final year medical students and medical residents doing an inpatient service rotation were alternatingly assigned to either the active test (Tablet PC with custom multimedia education software package) or traditional education (control) group, respectively. All completed an extensive questionnaire to collect their socio-demographic data, evaluate educational status, computer affinity and skills, problem solving, eLearning knowledge and self-rated medical knowledge. Both groups were MKSAP® tested at the beginning and the end of their rotation. The MKSAP® score at the final exam was the primary endpoint. Data of 55 (tablet n = 24, controls n = 31) male 36.4%, median age 28 years, 65.5% students, were evaluable. The mean MKSAP® score improved in the tablet PC (score Δ + 8 SD: 11), but not the control group (score Δ- 7, SD: 11), respectively. After adjustment for baseline score and confounders the Tablet PC group showed on average 11% better MKSAP® test results compared to the control group (p<0.001). The most commonly used resources for medical problem solving were journal articles looked up on PubMed or Google®, and books. Our study provides evidence, that tablet computer based integrated training and clinical practice enhances medical education and exam performance. Larger, multicenter trials are required to independently validate our data. Residency and fellowship directors are encouraged to consider adding portable computer devices, multimedia content and introduce blended learning to their respective training programs.

  7. Tablet computer enhanced training improves internal medicine exam performance

    PubMed Central

    Wende, Ilja; Grittner, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional teaching concepts in medical education do not take full advantage of current information technology. We aimed to objectively determine the impact of Tablet PC enhanced training on learning experience and MKSAP® (medical knowledge self-assessment program) exam performance. Methods In this single center, prospective, controlled study final year medical students and medical residents doing an inpatient service rotation were alternatingly assigned to either the active test (Tablet PC with custom multimedia education software package) or traditional education (control) group, respectively. All completed an extensive questionnaire to collect their socio-demographic data, evaluate educational status, computer affinity and skills, problem solving, eLearning knowledge and self-rated medical knowledge. Both groups were MKSAP® tested at the beginning and the end of their rotation. The MKSAP® score at the final exam was the primary endpoint. Results Data of 55 (tablet n = 24, controls n = 31) male 36.4%, median age 28 years, 65.5% students, were evaluable. The mean MKSAP® score improved in the tablet PC (score Δ + 8 SD: 11), but not the control group (score Δ- 7, SD: 11), respectively. After adjustment for baseline score and confounders the Tablet PC group showed on average 11% better MKSAP® test results compared to the control group (p<0.001). The most commonly used resources for medical problem solving were journal articles looked up on PubMed or Google®, and books. Conclusions Our study provides evidence, that tablet computer based integrated training and clinical practice enhances medical education and exam performance. Larger, multicenter trials are required to independently validate our data. Residency and fellowship directors are encouraged to consider adding portable computer devices, multimedia content and introduce blended learning to their respective training programs. PMID:28369063

  8. Teachers' Interpretations of Exit Exam Scores and College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Shelby

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' interpretations of Virginia's high school exit exam policy through the teachers' responses to a survey. The survey was administered to teachers from one school district in Northern Virginia. The teachers selected for the survey taught a subject in which students must pass a Standards of Learning (SOL) test in order to…

  9. Thinking out of the Exams Box: Assessment through Talk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coultas, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the abandonment of talk-based assessment in favour of written exams, even when writing results in less valid assessment. It points to substantial experience of assessment through talk in English and media studies and points to its potential use in other subjects. It is followed by an example, originally designed by the…

  10. Levels of Music Performance Anxiety and Test Anxiety of Turkish Prospective Music Teachers in Piano Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Elif

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the anxiety of prospective music teachers (N = 129) during piano exams and to examine the effects of peer and self-assessments on anxiety and exam achievement of individuals with high performance and test anxiety (n = 5). Female students were more anxious compared to males, students of the fourth class…

  11. Photographic art in exam rooms may reduce white coat hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harper, Michael B; Kanayama-Trivedi, Stacy; Caldito, Gloria; Montgomery, David; Mayeaux, E J; DelRosso, Lourdes M

    2015-12-01

    Blood pressure (BP) elevation in medical office settings in patients who are normotensive in nonmedical settings is an effect known as 'white coat hypertension'. This phenomenon is thought to be due to situational anxiety caused by the experience of visiting a doctor and the anxiety-inducing nature of the medical office. Our study was designed to determine if carefully selected photographic art could counter the anxiety that causes white coat hypertension and lead to lower BP recordings in some patients. 117 adults, non-pregnant patients from the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Family Medicine Resident Clinic participated in this study. After the triage nurse measured the BP, the patients were randomly placed in either an exam room with standard medical posters (control room) or in an exam room with photographic art (photo room). The BP was measured in the exam room. After the medical visit, the patients switched rooms and the BP was measured a third time. The patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire to identify room preference. On average, the BP obtained in the control rooms was higher than that obtained in the photo rooms. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean arterial pressure, systolic BP and diastolic BP between the control room and the photo room. Landscape photographic art may have the beneficial effect of reducing BP in medical office examination rooms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. 76 FR 17996 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee will be conducted. The... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self...

  13. 76 FR 22170 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee will be conducted. The... hereby given pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988...

  14. Does patient gender impact resident physicians' approach to the cardiac exam?

    PubMed

    Chakkalakal, Rosette J; Higgins, Stacy M; Bernstein, Lisa B; Lundberg, Kristina L; Wu, Victor; Green, Jacqueline; Long, Qi; Doyle, Joyce P

    2013-04-01

    Physical examination remains an important part of the initial evaluation of patients presenting with chest pain but little is known about the effect of patient gender on physician performance of the cardiovascular exam. To determine if resident physicians are less likely to perform five key components of the cardiovascular exam on female versus male standardized patients (SPs) presenting with acute chest pain. Videotape review of SP encounters during Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) administered by the Emory University Internal Medicine Residency Program in 2006 and 2007. Encounters were reviewed to assess residents' performance of five cardiac exam skills: auscultation of the aortic, pulmonic, tricuspid, and mitral valve areas and palpation for the apical impulse. One hundred forty-nine incoming residents. Residents' performance for each skill was classified as correct, incorrect, or unknown. One hundred ten of 149 (74 %) of encounters were available for review. Residents were less likely to correctly perform each of the five skills on female versus male SPs. This difference was statistically significant for auscultation of the tricuspid (p = 0.004, RR = 0.62, 95 % CI 0.46-0.83) and mitral (p = 0.007, RR = 0.58, 95 % CI = 0.41-0.83) valve regions and palpation for the apical impulse (p < 0.001, RR = 0.27, 95 % CI = 0.16-0.47). Male residents were less likely than female residents to correctly perform each maneuver on female versus male SPs. The interaction of SP gender and resident gender was statistically significant for auscultation of the mitral valve region (p = 0.006) and palpation for the apical impulse (p = 0.01). We observed significant differences in the performance of key elements of the cardiac exam for female versus male SPs presenting with chest pain. This observation represents a previously unidentified but potentially important source of gender bias in the evaluation of patients presenting

  15. Internal quality control indicators of cervical cytopathology exams performed in laboratories monitored by the External Quality Control Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ázara, Cinara Zago Silveira; Manrique, Edna Joana Cláudio; Tavares, Suelene Brito do Nascimento; de Souza, Nadja Lindany Alves; Amaral, Rita Goreti

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of continued education provided by an external quality control laboratory on the indicators of internal quality control of cytopathology exams. The internal quality assurance indicators for cytopathology exams from 12 laboratories monitored by the External Quality Control Laboratory were evaluated. Overall, 185,194 exams were included, 98,133 of which referred to the period preceding implementation of a continued education program, while 87,061 referred to the period following this intervention. Data were obtained from the Cervical Cancer Database of the Brazilian National Health Service. Following implementation of the continued education program, the positivity index (PI) remained within recommended limits in four laboratories. In another four laboratories, the PI progressed from below the limits to within the recommended standards. In one laboratory, the PI remained low, in two laboratories, it remained very low, and in one, it increased from very low to low. The percentage of exams compatible with a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) remained within the recommended limits in five laboratories, while in three laboratories it progressed from below the recommended levels to >0.4% of the total number of satisfactory exams, and in four laboratories it remained below the standard limit. Both the percentage of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) in relation to abnormal exams, and the ratio between ASC-US and intraepithelial lesions remained within recommended levels in all the laboratories investigated. An improvement was found in the indicators represented by the positivity index and the percentage of exams compatible with a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, showing that the role played by the external quality control laboratory in providing continued education contributed towards improving laboratory staff skills in detecting cervical cancer precursor lesions.

  16. Time to Say Goodbye to High School Exit Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a concatenation of fears, pressures, and agendas has produced a new round of testing in the form of high school exit examinations. There has not, however, been an accompanying rush to see whether the exams do any good. No state has attempted to validate its test against external criteria: given the hyperbole surrounding the tests…

  17. State High School Exit Exams: A Policy in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Shelby

    2012-01-01

    Since 2002, the Center on Education Policy (CEP) at The George Washington University, a national advocate for public education and improving public schools, has been studying state high school exit examinations--tests students must pass to receive a high school diploma. This year marks the 11th year CEP has reported on exit exams in order to help…

  18. 76 FR 2196 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS.../ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is... pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open...

  19. 76 FR 56880 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee will be conducted. The...: Notice is hereby given pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App...

  20. 76 FR 63716 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Small Business/Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Small Business/ Self Employed Correspondence Exam Toll Free Project Committee will be conducted. The...: Notice is hereby given pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App...

  1. Effects of exam room EHR use on doctor-patient communication: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, Zainab

    2013-01-01

    High levels of funding have been invested in health information technologies, especially electronic health records (EHRs), in an effect to coordinate and organize patient health data. However, the effect of EHRs in the exam room on doctor-patient communication has not been sufficiently explored. Objective The purpose of this systematic review was to determine how physician use of EHRs in medical consultations affects doctor-patient communication, both in terms of patient perceptions and actual physician behaviours. The reviewer conducted a comprehensive online database search in March 2013 of EMBASE, MEDLINE, and SCOPUS, using a combination of synonyms of the terms "patient", "doctor", "communication", and "EHR" or "computing". For inclusion in this review, articles had to be published in English, take place in an outpatient setting and demonstrate an empirical investigation into whether EHR affects doctor-patient communication. The reviewer then analysed 13 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Studies showed EHR use encouraged biomedical questioning of the patient, and encouraged patient-led questioning and doctor-led information provision. EHR-related behaviours such as keyboarding and screen gaze impaired relationships with patients, by reducing eye contact, rapport, and provision of emotional support. EHRs negatively affected physician-led patient-centred communication. Computer use may have amplified existing physician behaviours regarding medical record use. We noted both positive and negative effects of EHR use. This review highlights the need for increased EHR-specific communication training to mitigate adverse effects and for continued acknowledgement of patient perspectives.

  2. Evaluation of Hands-On Clinical Exam Performance Using Marker-less Video Tracking.

    PubMed

    Azari, David; Pugh, Carla; Laufer, Shlomi; Cohen, Elaine; Kwan, Calvin; Chen, Chia-Hsiung Eric; Yen, Thomas Y; Hu, Yu Hen; Radwin, Robert

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the potential of using marker-less video tracking of the hands for evaluating hands-on clinical skills. Experienced family practitioners attending a national conference were recruited and asked to conduct a breast examination on a simulator that simulates different clinical presentations. Videos were made of the clinician's hands during the exam and video processing software for tracking hand motion to quantify hand motion kinematics was used. Practitioner motion patterns indicated consistent behavior of participants across multiple pathologies. Different pathologies exhibited characteristic motion patterns in the aggregate at specific parts of an exam, indicating consistent inter-participant behavior. Marker-less video kinematic tracking therefore shows promise in discriminating between different examination procedures, clinicians, and pathologies.

  3. 76 FR 73021 - Agency Information Collection (Exam for Housebound Status or Permanent Need for Regular Aid and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-0721] Agency Information Collection (Exam for... with the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3521), this notice announces that the... INFORMATION: Title: Exam for Housebound Status or Permanent Need for Regular Aid and Attendance, VA Form 21...

  4. Physical Exam Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Injury in High School Athletes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Onate, James A.; Everhart, Joshua S.; Clifton, Daniel R.; Best, Thomas M.; Borchers, James R.; Chaudhari, Ajit M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A stated goal of the preparticipation physical evaluation (PPE) is to reduce musculoskeletal injury, yet the musculoskeletal portion of the PPE is reportedly of questionable use in assessing lower extremity injury risk in high school-aged athletes. The objectives of this study are: (1) identify clinical assessment tools demonstrated to effectively determine lower extremity injury risk in a prospective setting, and (2) critically assess the methodological quality of prospective lower extremity risk assessment studies that use these tools. Data Sources A systematic search was performed in PubMed, CINAHL, UptoDate, Google Scholar, Cochrane Reviews, and SportDiscus. Inclusion criteria were prospective injury risk assessment studies involving athletes primarily ages 13 to 19 that used screening methods that did not require highly specialized equipment. Methodological quality was evaluated with a modified physiotherapy evidence database (PEDro) scale. Main Results Nine studies were included. The mean modified PEDro score was 6.0/10 (SD, 1.5). Multidirectional balance (odds ratio [OR], 3.0; CI, 1.5–6.1; P < 0.05) and physical maturation status (P < 0.05) were predictive of overall injury risk, knee hyperextension was predictive of anterior cruciate ligament injury (OR, 5.0; CI, 1.2–18.4; P < 0.05), hip external: internal rotator strength ratio of patellofemoral pain syndrome (P = 0.02), and foot posture index of ankle sprain (r = −0.339, P = 0.008). Conclusions Minimal prospective evidence supports or refutes the use of the functional musculoskeletal exam portion of the current PPE to assess lower extremity injury risk in high school athletes. Limited evidence does support inclusion of multidirectional balance assessment and physical maturation status in a musculoskeletal exam as both are generalizable risk factors for lower extremity injury. PMID:26978166

  5. Medical certification questions and concerns.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-03-01

    Most (more than 90%) medical certification applicants pass their physical examinations, and the Aviation Medical Examiner (AME) is able to issue a medical certificate at the time of the exam. Occasionally, however, a condition is found that requires ...

  6. How to pass exams on the run.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J

    1988-09-17

    Yes, dear friends of my youth, it is I - he who left school with two 'O' levels, o music CSE [Illegible Word] a budgerigar; consolidating this by failing his SRN three times, finally getting on the only refresher course in England and passing in October 1979- the very last occasion to take an SRN for the fourth time. Have I got a cheek to write about passing exams? These experiences hove had their effect! I come to academic life late and have developed a hectic domestic, social and professional life meanwhile.

  7. Who Does Not Cut Down? Comparing Characteristics and Drinking Motives of Drinkers and Abstainers during the Exam Periods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Damme, Joris; Hublet, Anne; De Clercq, Bart; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Maes, Lea; Clays, Els

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Drinking alcohol during the exams can affect academic performance and future career options, but is rarely investigated. Drinking motives, sociodemographics and personality characteristics are investigated in nonabstainers and weekly drinkers during the exams. Participants: 7,181 Belgian university students who anonymously responded to…

  8. A One-Day Dental Faculty Workshop in Writing Multiple-Choice Questions: An Impact Evaluation.

    PubMed

    AlFaris, Eiad; Naeem, Naghma; Irfan, Farhana; Qureshi, Riaz; Saad, Hussain; Al Sadhan, Ra'ed; Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2015-11-01

    Long training workshops on the writing of exam questions have been shown to be effective; however, the effectiveness of short workshops needs to be demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a one-day, seven-hour faculty development workshop at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, on the quality of multiple-choice questions (MCQs). Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model was used. Participants' satisfaction (Kirkpatrick's Level 1) was evaluated with a post-workshop questionnaire. A quasi-experimental, randomized separate sample, pretest-posttest design was used to assess the learning effect (Kirkpatrick's Level 2). To evaluate transfer of learning to practice (Kirkpatrick's Level 3), MCQs created by ten faculty members as a result of the training were assessed. To assess Kirkpatrick's Level 4 regarding institutional change, interviews with three key leaders of the school were conducted, coded, and analyzed. A total of 72 course directors were invited to and attended some part of the workshop; all 52 who attended the entire workshop completed the satisfaction form; and 22 of the 36 participants in the experimental group completed the posttest. The results showed that all 52 participants were highly satisfied with the workshop, and significant positive changes were found in the faculty members' knowledge and the quality of their MCQs with effect sizes of 0.7 and 0.28, respectively. At the institutional level, the interviews demonstrated positive structural changes in the school's assessment system. Overall, this one-day item-writing faculty workshop resulted in positive changes at all four of Kirkpatrick's levels; these effects suggest that even a short training session can improve a dental school's assessment of its students.

  9. Using Self-Efficacy Beliefs to Understand How Students in a General Chemistry Course Approach the Exam Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willson-Conrad, Angela; Kowalske, Megan Grunert

    2018-01-01

    Retention of students who major in STEM continues to be a major concern for universities. Many students cite poor teaching and disappointing grades as reasons for dropping out of STEM courses. Current college chemistry courses often assess what a student has learned through summative exams. To understand students' experiences of the exam process,…

  10. Analysis of Factors that Affect the Teacher Certification Exam Results in a University System in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalo, Jorge H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors that affect a teacher preparation exam results within a University System in Puerto Rico. Using Bertalanffy's System Theory as theoretical framework, this mixed methods study examined factors in the university system that could have affected student's preparation for a teacher exam (PCMAS by its…

  11. Disorders of Sex Development: Pediatric Psychology and the Genital Exam.

    PubMed

    Tishelman, Amy C; Shumer, Daniel E; Nahata, Leena

    2017-06-01

    To provide suggestions for clinical care of youth with disorders of sex development (DSD) and their families, by drawing on preexisting pediatric psychology literature with a particular focus on child sexual abuse (CSA) genital exams. Relevant peer-reviewed papers published since 1990 in the CSA literature were systematically reviewed, as well as an illustrative sample of general pediatric psychology papers. Empirical research from the CSA literature provided information on prevalence of distress and the impact of provider behavior, the importance of preparation, and proposed interventions. Expert recommendations from CSA literature and general findings gleaned from pediatric psychology also address these issues. Psychological findings in the CSA pediatric population suggest that fears and anxieties are not universal and can be linked to a number of variables. Based on this review, we make a number of recommendations for potential interventions for youth with DSD and their families, emphasizing the need for further clinical research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Using Oral Exams to Assess Communication Skills in Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke-Smalley, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Business, like many other fields in higher education, continues to rely largely on conventional testing methods for assessing student learning. In the current article, another evaluation approach--the oral exam--is examined as a means for building and evaluating the professional communication and oral dialogue skills needed and utilized by…

  13. From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery: The Democratic Route

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffield, Frank; Williamson, Bill

    2011-01-01

    "From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery" passionately calls for educators to challenge the dominant market-led model of education and instead build a more democratic one, better able to face threats such as environmental damage; intensified global competition; corrosive social inequalities in and between nations in the world;…

  14. Strategies Instruction to Improve the Preparation for English Oral Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abad, José Vicente; Alzate, Paula Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results of an inter-institutional research study that assessed the impact of strategies instruction on students' preparation for and performance in oral exams. Two teacher-researchers at different universities trained 26 students in their respective B1-English-level courses in using language learning strategies. The study…

  15. Residency Applicants Misinterpret Their United States Medical Licensing Exam Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger C.; Desbiens, Norman A.

    2009-01-01

    Proper interpretation of the results of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) is important for program directors, residents, and faculty who advise applicants about applying for residency positions. We suspected that applicants often misinterpreted their performance in relationship to others who took the same examination. In 2005, 54…

  16. The TRIPSE: A Process-Oriented Exam for Large Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nastos, Stash; Rangachari, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    The TRIPSE (tri-partite problem solving exercise), a process-oriented exam that mimics the scientific process, was used previously in small classes (15-25). Provided limited data, students frame explanations and design experimental tests that they later revise with additional information. Our 6-year experience using it with larger numbers…

  17. The Management Challenge: Handling Exams Involving Large Quantities of Students, on and off Campus--A Design Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Ken

    2014-01-01

    This paper looks at the process of managing large numbers of exams efficiently and secure with the use of a dedicated IT support. The system integrates regulations on different levels, from national to local, (even down to departments) and ensures that the rules are employed in all stages of handling the exams. The system has a proven record of…

  18. Decrease in the Number of People Taking the CPA Exam Not Due to the 150-Hour Requirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metinko, Teresa R.; Gray, Dahli

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study that examined the association of the 120/150-hour education requirement with the number of CPA exam candidates during 1998 and 2008. Data gathered from the NASBA Candidate Performance Reports 1999 and 2009 found no relationship between the number of CPA exam candidates and the education requirements in…

  19. Geographic information systems for mapping the National Exam Result of Junior High School in 2014 at West Java Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan Abdullah, Atje; Nurani Ruchjana, Budi; Rejito, Juli; Rosadi, Rudi; Candra Permana, Fahmi

    2017-10-01

    National Exam level of schooling is implemented by the Ministry of Education and Culture for the development of education in Indonesia. The national examinations are centrally evaluated by the National Education Standards Agency, and the expected implementation of the national exams can describe the successful implementation of education at the district, municipal, provincial, or national level. In this study, we evaluate, analyze, and explore the implementation of the national exam database of the results of the Junior High School in 2014, with the Junior High School (SMP/MTs) as the smallest unit of analysis at the district level. The method used in this study is a data mining approach using the methodology of Knowledge Discovery in Databases (KDD) using descriptive analysis and spatial mapping of national examinations. The results of the classification of the data mining process to national exams of Junior High School in 2014 using data 6,878 SMP/MTs in West Java showed that 81.01 % were at moderate levels. While the results of the spatial mapping for SMP/MTs in West Java can be explained 36,99 % at the unfavorable level. The evaluation results visualization in graphic is done using ArcGIS to provide position information quality of education in municipal, provincial or national level. The results of this study can be used by management to make decision to improve educational services based on the national exam database in West Java. Keywords: KDD, spatial mapping, national exam.

  20. Test Group Rethinks Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    A group that is developing tests for half the states in the nation has dramatically reduced the length of its assessment in a bid to balance the desire for a more meaningful and useful exam with concerns about the amount of time spent on testing. The decision by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium reflects months of conversation among its…

  1. How Should I Study for the Exam? Self-Regulated Learning Strategies and Achievement in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Sebesta, Amanda J.; Bray Speth, Elena

    2017-01-01

    In college introductory science courses, students are challenged with mastering large amounts of disciplinary content while developing as autonomous and effective learners. Self-regulated learning (SRL) is the process of setting learning goals, monitoring progress toward them, and applying appropriate study strategies. SRL characterizes successful, “expert” learners, and develops with time and practice. In a large, undergraduate introductory biology course, we investigated: 1) what SRL strategies students reported using the most when studying for exams, 2) which strategies were associated with higher achievement and with grade improvement on exams, and 3) what study approaches students proposed to use for future exams. Higher-achieving students, and students whose exam grades improved in the first half of the semester, reported using specific cognitive and metacognitive strategies significantly more frequently than their lower-achieving peers. Lower-achieving students more frequently reported that they did not implement their planned strategies or, if they did, still did not improve their outcomes. These results suggest that many students entering introductory biology have limited knowledge of SRL strategies and/or limited ability to implement them, which can impact their achievement. Course-specific interventions that promote SRL development should be considered as integral pedagogical tools, aimed at fostering development of students’ lifelong learning skills. PMID:28495934

  2. The effect of ankle position on the exam for first ray mobility.

    PubMed

    Grebing, Brett R; Coughlin, Michael J

    2004-07-01

    The clinical assessment of first ray motion in the sagittal plane, as originally described by Morton, is difficult to quantify. Different reports have shown inconsistent values and variability between the manual exam and examination using an external measuring device. The authors hypothesize that when performing a manual examination for evidence of increased first ray motion, the magnitude of first ray mobility varies as the position of ankle dorsiflexion/plantarflexion varies. Using an external caliper (a modified Klaue device), the authors quantified first ray motion in reference to variable ankle positions in a group of normal patients, a group of patients with untreated moderate and severe hallux valgus, a group who had undergone a successful metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis for hallux valgus, and a small group who had previously undergone a plantar fasciectomy. A total of 119 feet (109 patients) were measured. In addition to first ray motion, radiographic data were compared between groups. With the ankle in the neutral dorsiflexion position, the mean first ray motion was 4.9 mm for the control group, 7.0 mm for the hallux valgus group, 4.4 mm for the metatarsophalangeal fusion group, and 7.7 mm for the plantar fasciectomy group. There was a significant decrease (p < .05) in first ray motion when the ankle was moved to the dorsiflexed position for all four groups. There was a significant increase in first ray motion when the ankle was moved to the plantarflexed position (p < .01) for all groups except the plantar fasciectomy group. No significant difference in first ray motion was observed for the plantar fasciectomy group between the neutral and plantarflexed ankle positions (p < .05). The exam for first ray mobility is influenced by the position of the ankle and may explain the discrepancy between the manual exam and measurement with an external device. Recommendations for the manual exam of first ray mobility are given.

  3. Computer Modeling of the Instructionally Insensitive Nature of the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Vinh Huy

    Stakeholders of the educational system assume that standardized tests are transparently about the subject content being tested and therefore can be used as a metric to measure achievement in outcome-based educational reform. Both analysis of longitudinal data for the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) exam and agent based computer modeling of its underlying theoretical testing framework have yielded results that indicate the exam only rank orders students on a persistent but uncharacterized latent trait across domains tested as well as across years. Such persistent rank ordering of students is indicative of an instructionally insensitive exam. This is problematic in the current atmosphere of high stakes testing which holds teachers, administrators, and school systems accountable for student achievement.

  4. Validating Performance Level Descriptors (PLDs) for the AP® Environmental Science Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reshetar, Rosemary; Kaliski, Pamela; Chajewski, Michael; Lionberger, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This presentation summarizes a pilot study conducted after the May 2011 administration of the AP Environmental Science Exam. The study used analytical methods based on scaled anchoring as input to a Performance Level Descriptor validation process that solicited systematic input from subject matter experts.

  5. Cheat Sheet or Open-Book? A Comparison of the Effects of Exam Types on Performance, Retention, and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharib, Afshin; Phillips, William; Mathew, Noelle

    2012-01-01

    The differences between open-book, cheat sheet, and closed-book exams were examined in two different types of psychology courses. A total of 297 students enrolled in eight sections of Introductory Psychology and 99 students enrolled in four sections of Statistics participated in this study. Exam types were counterbalanced across sections of the…

  6. Transnational English Language Learners Fighting on an Unlevel Playing Field: High School Exit Exams, Accommodations, and ESL Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Mariko Mizuno

    2017-01-01

    Though previous research addresses the negative impact of state-mandated high school exit exams on English language learners' (ELLs) educational experiences, less attention has been given to how college-oriented ELLs, especially those who attended school in their home countries before coming to the US, handle rigorous exams or gain access to…

  7. Voluntary peer-led exam preparation course for international first year students: Tutees' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Huhn, Daniel; Eckart, Wolfgang; Karimian-Jazi, Kianush; Amr, Ali; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2015-06-18

    While the number of international students has increased over the last decade, such students face diverse challenges due to language and cultural barriers. International medical students suffer from personal distress and a lack of support. Their performance is significantly lower than non-international peers in clinical examinations. We investigated whether international students benefit from a peer-led exam preparation course. An exam preparation course was designed, and relevant learning objectives were defined. Two evaluations were undertaken: Using a qualitative approach, tutees (N = 10) were asked for their thoughts and comments in a semi-structured interview at the end of the semester. From a quantitative perspective, all participants (N = 22) were asked to complete questionnaires at the end of each course session. International students reported a range of significant benefits from the course as they prepared for upcoming exams. They benefited from technical and didactic, as well as social learning experiences. They also considered aspects of the tutorial's framework helpful. Social and cognitive congruence seem to be the key factors to success within international medical students' education. If tutors have a migration background, they can operate as authentic role models. Furthermore, because they are still students themselves, they can offer support using relevant and understandable language.

  8. Comparative Racial Analysis of Enlisted Advancement Exams: Item- Difficulty.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    11cm-ana lysis Promotion Racial comparison Equal opportunity 1 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reveree aide 11 neceeemry mnd Identity by block...improving equal oppor- tunity in career growth for minority groups. The study of exam item- difficulty levels is the first of a series of technical reports...under Exploratory Development Task Area PF55.521.032 (Contemporary Social Issues). J. J. CLARKIN Commanding Officer SUMMARY Purpose A number of

  9. MO-F-201-00: PANEL DISCUSSION: Preparing for Parts 2 and 3 of the ABR Therapy Medical Physics Exam

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    NONE

    The goal of this session is to provide guidance to medical physicists undergoing the American Board of Radiology certification process in therapeutic medical physics. This panel discussion will focus on parts 2 (computer-based) and 3 (oral) of the examination. Unlike the latter portions of the exam which are specialty-driven, part 1 is universal for all medical physics fields and will not be addressed. This session is structured into different topics that aim to guide the participants on how to successfully prepare for the board exams. The subjects of discussion will include timing and strategies for exam preparation, crucial differences inmore » preparing for the clinical computer-based exam versus the oral exam, what study tools are currently available for each, etc. The panel discussion format will allow the speakers to collectively present their experience and advice relating to each topic and foment audience participation. Learning Objectives: Know the main differences between what is expected for parts 2 and 3 Know different resources for test preparation Know how to formulate a plan to best study for each part based on the specific skill set the two parts require Know how to best present his/her answers during the oral examination – demeanor, answer structure, etc.« less

  10. Should Live Patient Licensing Examinations in Dentistry Be Discontinued? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Alternative Assessment Models Are Not Yet Viable Replacements for Live Patients in Clinical Licensure Exams and Viewpoint 2: Ethical and Patient Care Concerns About Live Patient Exams Require Full Acceptance of Justifiable Alternatives.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel; Makhoul, Nicholas M; Silva, Daniela Rodrigues; Gonzales, Theresa S; Letra, Ariadne; Mays, Keith A

    2018-03-01

    This Point/Counterpoint article addresses a long-standing but still-unresolved debate on the advantages and disadvantages of using live patients in dental licensure exams. Two contrasting viewpoints are presented. Viewpoint 1 supports the traditional use of live patients, arguing that other assessment models have not yet been demonstrated to be viable alternatives to the actual treatment of patients in the clinical licensure process. This viewpoint also contends that the use of live patients and inherent variances in live patient treatment represent the realities of daily private practice. Viewpoint 2 argues that the use of live patients in licensure exams needs to be discontinued considering those exams' ethical dilemmas of exposing patients to potential harm, as well as their lack of reliability and validity and limited scope. According to this viewpoint, the current presence of viable alternatives means that the risk of harm inherent in live patient exams can finally be eliminated and those exams replaced with other means to confirm that candidates are qualified for licensure to practice.

  11. Awarding Credit Where Credit Is Due: Effective Practices for the Implementation of Credit by Exam. Adopted Spring 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Credit by Exam is a mechanism employed in the California community colleges as a means of granting credit for student learning outside of the traditional classroom. In some instances, credit by exam is the means used to award college credit for structured learning experiences in a secondary educational setting, while in other instances knowledge…

  12. Assessing the Key Attributes of Low Utilization of Mammography Screening and Breast-self Exam among African-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rupak; David, Nganwa; Bogale, Asseged; Nandy, Shami; Habtemariam, T.; Tameru, Berhanu

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: African-American (AA) women living in four Black Belt Counties (BBC) of Alabama; consisting of Barbour, Macon, Green and Wilcox are known to have lower mammogram utilization and breast self-exam rates when compared to their white female counterparts. The influence of socioeconomic and demographic factors on these disparities has not been clearly defined so far. Our study was designed to determine whether these observed disparities can be predicted with the socioeconomic and other demographic attributes. METHODS: Health Disparity Questionnaires data (n = 516) for BBC of Alabama was analyzed using a logistic regression model to examine the association of breast cancer screening rates and breast self-exam with income, the level of education, family doctor, type of health insurance, obesity, and age. RESULTS: Income, education, family doctor, age and health insurance were independent predictors for the low utilization rate of mammography and breast self-exam (BSE). CONCLUSION: Improving socioeconomic conditions such as level of education and availability of health care are essential to increase the rates of breast cancer screening test and breast self-exam in the BBC of Alabama. PMID:26958089

  13. An Innovative Excel Application to Improve Exam Reliability in Marketing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Christopher M.; Kros, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Measures of survey reliability are commonly addressed in marketing courses. One statistic of reliability is "Cronbach's alpha." This paper presents an application of survey reliability as a reflexive application of multiple-choice exam validation. The application provides an interactive decision support system that incorporates survey item…

  14. Advanced Ultrasonic Diagnosis of Extremity Trauma: The Faster Exam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, S. A.; Henry, S. E.; Moed, B. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Marshburn, T.; Hamilton, D. R.; Logan, J.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Williams, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasound is of prO)len accuracy in abdominal and thoracic trauma and may be useful to diagnose extremity injury in situations where radiography is not available such as military and space applications. We prospectively evaluated the utility of extremity , ultrasound performed by trained, non-physician personnel in patients with extremity trauma, to simulate remote aerospace or military applications . Methods: Patients with extremity trauma were identified by history, physical examination, and radiographic studies. Ultrasound examination was performed bilaterally by nonphysician personnel with a portable ultrasound device using a 10-5 MHz linear probe, Images were video-recorded for later analysis against radiography by Fisher's exact test. The average time of examination was 4 minutes. Ultrasound accurately diagnosed extremity, injury in 94% of patients with no false positive exams; accuracy was greater in mid-shaft locations and least in the metacarpa/metatarsals. Soft tissue/tendon injury was readily visualized . Extremity ultrasound can be performed quickly and accurately by nonphysician personnel with excellent accuracy. Blinded verification of the utility of ultrasound in patients with extremity injury should be done to determine if Extremity and Respiratory evaluation should be added to the FAST examination (the FASTER exam) and verify the technique in remote locations such as military and aerospace applications.

  15. Exam preparation course in obstetrics and gynecology for the German Medical State Examination: proof of concept and implications for the recruitment of future residents.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Fabian; Fremd, Carlo; Tabatabai, Patrik; Smetanay, Katharina; Doster, Anne; Heil, Joerg; Schuetz, Florian; Sohn, Christof; Hennigs, André

    2016-11-01

    Today´s written part of the medical state examination requires students to retrieve a comprehensive amount of knowledge in a limited period of time. Therefore, the main study objectives were to implement and to evaluate a two-day exam preparation course for the German Medical State Examination in obstetrics and gynecology. The project evaluation focused on acceptability, satisfaction and the gain of knowledge for the participants of such a face-to-face course. The two-day intensive training for senior medical students offered a review of the entire exam-relevant content in the field of obstetrics and gynecology in combination with interactive discussions along selected exam questions. Skill gains were assessed using pre- and post-course multiple choice tests. In addition, a qualitative questionnaire assessed attitudes and satisfaction of course participants. A total of 101 fifth year senior medical students from Heidelberg University Medical School participated in the two pilot courses (summer 2014 and winter 2015). Pre- and post-course tests showed a significant skill-gain from 14.9 to 18.0 points [of a maximum of 20; pre-post difference 95 % CI (2.21; 3.98), t test: p < 0.001]. Furthermore, the qualitative results showed high satisfaction with the course, with an average Likert scale grading of 5.63 (2014) and 5.44 (2015) on a scale from 1 ("extraordinary bad") to 6 ("extraordinary good"). This study shows that a two-day intensive course in obstetrics and gynecology is feasible, effective and highly appreciated by senior medical students preparing for the Second German Medical State Examination. It further suggests surplus value for academic clinical departments to recruit future residents. Methods and tools presented in this paper are intended to inspire and guide clinical colleagues in implementing the format at their respective universities.

  16. Questioning Questions: Elementary Teachers' Adaptations of Investigation Questions Across the Inquiry Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggers, Mandy

    2018-02-01

    Questioning is a central practice in science classrooms. However, not every question translates into a "good" science investigation. Questions that drive science investigations can be provided by many sources including the teacher, the curriculum, or the student. The variations in the source of investigation questions were explored in this study. A dataset of 120 elementary science classroom videos and associated lesson plans from 40 elementary teachers (K-5) across 21 elementary school campuses were scored on an instrument measuring the amount of teacher-direction or student-direction of the lessons' investigation questions. Results indicated that the investigation questions were overwhelmingly teacher directed in nature, with no opportunities for students to develop their own questions for investigation. This study has implications for researchers and practitioners alike, calling attention to the teacher-directed nature of investigation questions in existing science curriculum materials, and the need for teacher training in instructional strategies to adapt their existing curriculum materials across the continuum of teacher-directed and student-directed investigation questions. Teachers need strategies for adapting the teacher-directed questions provided in their existing curriculum materials in order to allow students the opportunity to engage in this essential scientific practice.

  17. Brief Daily Writing Activities and Performance on Major Multiple-Choice Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Haley C.; Bliss, Stacy L.; Hautau, Briana; Carroll, Erin; Jaspers, Kathryn E.; Williams, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Although past research indicates that giving brief quizzes, administered either regularly or randomly, may lead to improvement in students' performance on major exams, negligible research has targeted daily writing activities that require the processing of course information at a deeper level than might result from simply reading course materials…

  18. Development of a Biological Science Quantitative Reasoning Exam (BioSQuaRE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanhope, Liz; Ziegler, Laura; Haque, Tabassum; Le, Laura; Vinces, Marcelo; Davis, Gregory K.; Zieffler, Andrew; Brodfuehrer, Peter; Preest, Marion; Belitsky, Jason M.; Umbanhowar, Charles, Jr.; Overvoorde, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple reports highlight the increasingly quantitative nature of biological research and the need to innovate means to ensure that students acquire quantitative skills. We present a tool to support such innovation. The Biological Science Quantitative Reasoning Exam (BioSQuaRE) is an assessment instrument designed to measure the quantitative…

  19. Final Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coullahan, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Explains the use of a maintenance-management assessment process that educational facility managers can use to improve facility conditions and to provide evidence for future capital investments in maintenance management. Discusses questions a maintenance-management audit can answer and describes how to analyze the data to gain maximum understanding…

  20. [Evaluation of cytopathologic exam for diagnosis of oral chronic paracoccidioidomycosis].

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Marcelo Sivieri; Sousa, Suzana C O M; Correia, Dalmo

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of evaluating exfoliative cytology for the diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis oral lesions, eight patients that presented the disease were studied. The presence of fungi was demonstrated in all these cases. It was concluded that the oral exfoliative cytology exam can be effectively used in the diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis and contribute to the therapeutic control of oral forms of this mycosis.

  1. Students' Opinions about Ubiquitous Delivery of Standardized English Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litzler Jerman, Mary Frances; Garcia Laborda, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a study conducted with 218 students in the final year of high school to determine their opinions about the feasibility of using a tablet PC for delivery of a standardized English language test. One such test could be the English paper of the exam given to students upon completion of the Baccalaureate program in…

  2. Piloting a Geoscience Literacy Exam for Assessing Students' Understanding of Earth, Climate, Atmospheric and Ocean Science Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, D. N.; Iverson, E. A.; Manduca, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    This research seeks to develop valid and reliable questions that faculty can use to assess geoscience literacy across the curriculum. We are particularly interested on effects of curricula developed to teach Earth, Climate, Atmospheric, and Ocean Science concepts in the context of societal issues across the disciplines. This effort is part of the InTeGrate project designed to create a population of college graduates who are poised to use geoscience knowledge in developing solutions to current and future environmental and resource challenges. Details concerning the project are found at http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/index.html. The Geoscience Literacy Exam (GLE) under development presently includes 90 questions. Each big idea from each literacy document can be probed using one or more of three independent questions: 1) a single answer, multiple choice question aimed at basic understanding or application of key concepts, 2) a multiple correct answer, multiple choice question targeting the analyzing to analysis levels and 3) a short essay question that tests analysis or evaluation cognitive levels. We anticipate multiple-choice scores and the detail and sophistication of essay responses will increase as students engage with the curriculum. As part of the field testing of InTeGrate curricula, faculty collected student responses from classes that involved over 700 students. These responses included eight pre- and post-test multiple-choice questions that covered various concepts across the four literacies. Discrimination indices calculated from the data suggest that the eight tested questions provide a valid measure of literacy within the scope of the concepts covered. Student normalized gains across an academic term with limited InTeGrate exposure (typically two or fewer weeks of InTeGrate curriculum out of 14 weeks) were found to average 16% gain. A small set of control data (250 students in classes from one institution where no InTeGrate curricula were used) was

  3. Cheating or Cheated? Surviving Secondary Exit Exams in a Neoliberal Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Elizabeth; Hodges, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Cheating on exams is a rampant and highly developed practice among youth in the Arab world, often involving elaborate networks, advanced technology and adult authorities. Rather than viewing cheating as mere laziness or immorality, this article interrogates the social meanings of cheating by comparing the practices and discourses of cheating on…

  4. Science and Mathematics Advanced Placement Exams: Growth and Achievement over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judson, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of Advanced Placement (AP) exams in the last 2 decades has been paralleled by national enthusiasm to promote availability and rigor of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Trends were examined in STEM AP to evaluate and compare growth and achievement. Analysis included individual STEM subjects and disaggregation…

  5. From Napoleon to Sarkozy: Two Hundred Years of the "Baccalaureat" Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Atia, Samira

    2008-01-01

    In March 17th, 2008, the Baccalaureat exam in France celebrates 200 years since its establishment. The Baccalaureat is the French national examination to complete secondary education and determine admission to higher education. A byproduct of several factors: the strict educational philosophy of the Jesuits, the radical reforms of the French…

  6. Comparing NET and ERI standardized exam scores between baccalaureate graduates who pass or fail the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Bondmass, Mary D; Moonie, Sheniz; Kowalski, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, nursing programs are commonly evaluated by their graduates success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The purpose of this paper is to describe a change in NCLEX-RN success rates following the addition of standardized exams throughout our program's curriculum, and to compare these exam scores between graduates who pass NCLEX-RN and those who do not. Our results indicate an 8.5% change (p < 0.000) in the NCLEX-RN pass rate from our previous 5-year mean pass rate, and significant differences in standardized test scores for those who pass the NCLEX-RN compared to those who do not (p < 0.03). We conclude that our selected standardized exam scores are able to significantly identify graduates who are more likely to pass NCLEX-RN than not.

  7. How Question Types Reveal Student Thinking: An Experimental Comparison of Multiple-True-False and Free-Response Formats.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joanna K; Potts, Macy A; Couch, Brian A

    2017-01-01

    Assessments represent an important component of undergraduate courses because they affect how students interact with course content and gauge student achievement of course objectives. To make decisions on assessment design, instructors must understand the affordances and limitations of available question formats. Here, we use a crossover experimental design to identify differences in how multiple-true-false (MTF) and free-response (FR) exam questions reveal student thinking regarding specific conceptions. We report that correct response rates correlate across the two formats but that a higher percentage of students provide correct responses for MTF questions. We find that MTF questions reveal a high prevalence of students with mixed (correct and incorrect) conceptions, while FR questions reveal a high prevalence of students with partial (correct and unclear) conceptions. These results suggest that MTF question prompts can direct students to address specific conceptions but obscure nuances in student thinking and may overestimate the frequency of particular conceptions. Conversely, FR questions provide a more authentic portrait of student thinking but may face limitations in their ability to diagnose specific, particularly incorrect, conceptions. We further discuss an intrinsic tension between question structure and diagnostic capacity and how instructors might use multiple formats or hybrid formats to overcome these obstacles. © 2017 J. K. Hubbard et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Exams? Why worry? Interpreting anxiety as facilitative and stress appraisals.

    PubMed

    Strack, Juliane; Esteves, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined why people differ in how they appraise the same stressful situation (an approaching exam). We explored whether interpreting anxiety as a facilitative emotion can affect the type of stress appraisal people make. One hundred and three undergraduate students took part in this study, which lasted for 10 days (leading up to an exam). The students completed a daily self-reported evaluation of anxiety, emotional exhaustion, and stress experienced. The findings suggest a process by which a stressful time can be experienced as motivating rather than threatening or emotionally exhausting. For example, interpreting anxiety as facilitative moderated the relationship between anxiety and stress appraisals. When interpreting their anxiety as facilitative, individuals showed a higher tendency to make challenge stress appraisals and a lower tendency to appraising the stressor as a threat. These differences were especially visible with high levels of anxiety. Furthermore, interpreting anxiety as facilitative was negatively associated with emotional exhaustion, but positively associated with the academic performance. These findings suggest an explanation why people differ in how they appraise the same stressor: how people interpret their anxiety may to a large part affect how they appraise difficult events and situations.

  9. Development of a measure of student self-evaluation of physics exam performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Eric Anthony

    The central purpose of this study was to provide preliminary evidence of the reliability and validity of the SEVSI - P (Self- evaluation scaled instrument - physics). This instrument, designed to measure student self-evaluation of physics exam performance, was developed in congruence with social cognitive theory. Self-evaluation in this study is defined to consist of two of the three subprocesses of self-regulation: self-observation and judgmental process. As such, the SEVSI - P consists of two subscales, one measuring the frequency and types of self-observations made during a physics exam and one measuring the frequency and types of judgmental comparisons made after an exam. Data from 621 completed surveys, voluntarily taken by first semester algebra/trigonometry based physics students at six Midwestern universities and one Southern university, were analyzed for reliability and factorial validity. Cronbach alphas of .71 and .83 for the self-observation and judgment subscales, respectively, indicate acceptable reliability for the instrument. Confirmatory factor analysis indicates the acceptability of the hypothesis that the data analyzed could have indeed been obtained from the proposed two factor model (self-observation and judgment). The results of this confirmatory factor analysis provide preliminary construct validity for this instrument. A number of theoretically related items were included on the SEVSI - P form to elicity information about the use of goals and pre-planned strategies, actions taken in response to previous poor performances, and emotional responses to performance. A correlational analysis of these items along with the self-observation and judgment subscale scores provided a limited degree of convergent validity for the two subscales. Analyses of variance were done to determine the presence of differences in scoring patterns based on gender or reported ethnic origin. These results indicate slightly higher judgment subscale scores for women and

  10. Be a Professional - Be Licensed! - Take the agricultural engineering professional engineering exam

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Between October 2005 and October 2007, only 78 Agricultural Engineers took the professional engineering (PE) exam in the field of Agricultural Engineering, while the other 406 registered Agricultural Engineering Examinees took tests offer by other engineering disciplines. With the decline in partic...

  11. User's guide for Northeast Stand Exam Program (NEST Version 2.1).

    Treesearch

    Thomas M. Schuler; Brian T. Simpson

    1991-01-01

    Explains the Northeast Stand Exam (NEST Version 2.1) program. The NEST program was designed for use on the Polycorder 600 Series electronic portable data recorder to record data collected from the standard permanent plot as described by the Stand Culture and Stand Establishment Working Groups of the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station.

  12. Detection and Evaluation of Cheating on College Exams Using Supervised Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavalcanti, Elmano Ramalho; Pires, Carlos Eduardo; Cavalcanti, Elmano Pontes; Pires, Vládia Freire

    2012-01-01

    Text mining has been used for various purposes, such as document classification and extraction of domain-specific information from text. In this paper we present a study in which text mining methodology and algorithms were properly employed for academic dishonesty (cheating) detection and evaluation on open-ended college exams, based on document…

  13. Examination of the Classification Accuracy of Music Education Special Aptitude Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atar, Hakan Yavuz; Sayin, Ayfer; Atar, Burcu

    2013-01-01

    It is critical both for candidates who apply for programs that require special aptitude and the professors who teach in these programs whether those students' scores on placement exams are correctly calculated. Because student's ability profile and the quality of education in these programs may be directly affected by how candidates placement…

  14. The Scare Tactic: Do Fear Appeals Predict Motivation and Exam Scores?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David; Remedios, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prior to high-stakes exams, teachers use persuasive messages that highlight to students the possible consequences of failure. Such messages are known as fear appeals. This study examined whether fear appeals relate to self- and non-self-determined motivation and academic performance. Data were collected in 3 waves. Self-report data pertaining to…

  15. Multiple-Choice Exams and Guessing: Results from a One-Year Study of General Chemistry Tests Designed to Discourage Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-choice exams, while widely used, are necessarily imprecise due to the contribution of the final student score due to guessing. This past year at the United States Naval Academy the construction and grading scheme for the department-wide general chemistry multiple-choice exams were revised with the goal of decreasing the contribution of…

  16. Estimation of the collective ionizing dose in the Portuguese population for the years 2011 and 2012, due to nuclear medicine exams.

    PubMed

    Costa, F; Teles, P; Nogueira, A; Barreto, A; Santos, A I; Carvalho, A; Martins, B; Oliveira, C; Gaspar, C; Barros, C; Neves, D; Costa, D; Rodrigues, E; Godinho, F; Alves, F; Cardoso, G; Cantinho, G; Conde, I; Vale, J; Santos, J; Isidoro, J; Pereira, J; Salgado, L; Rézio, M; Vieira, M; Simãozinho, P; Almeida, P; Castro, R; Parafita, R; Pintão, S; Lúcio, T; Reis, T; Vaz, P

    2015-01-01

    In 2009-2010 a Portuguese consortium was created to implement the methodologies proposed by the Dose Datamed II (DDM2) project, aiming to collect data from diagnostic X-ray and nuclear medicine (NM) procedures, in order to determine the most frequently prescribed exams and the associated ionizing radiation doses for the Portuguese population. The current study is the continuation of this work, although it focuses only on NM exams for the years 2011 and 2012. The annual frequency of each of the 28 selected NM exams and the average administered activity per procedure was obtained by means of a nationwide survey sent to the 35 NM centres in Portugal. The results show a reduction of the number of cardiac exams performed in the last two years compared with 2010, leading to a reduction of the annual average effective dose of Portuguese population due to NM exams from 0.08 mSv ± 0.017 mSv/caput to 0.059 ± 0.011 mSv/caput in 2011 and 0.054 ± 0.011 mSv/caput in 2012. Portuguese total annual average collective effective dose due to medical procedures was estimated to be 625.6 ± 110.9 manSv in 2011 and 565.1 ± 117.3 manSv in 2012, a reduction in comparison with 2010 (840.3 ± 183.8 manSv). The most frequent exams and the ones that contributed the most for total population dose were the cardiac and bone exams, although a decrease observed in 2011 and in 2012 was verified. The authors intend to perform this study periodically to identify trends in the annual Portuguese average effective dose and to help to raise awareness about the potential dose optimization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  17. Tracking delays in report availability caused by incorrect exam status with Web-based issue tracking: a quality initiative.

    PubMed

    Awan, Omer Abdulrehman; van Wagenberg, Frans; Daly, Mark; Safdar, Nabile; Nagy, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Many radiology information systems (RIS) cannot accept a final report from a dictation reporting system before the exam has been completed in the RIS by a technologist. A radiologist can still render a report in a reporting system once images are available, but the RIS and ancillary systems may not get the results because of the study's uncompleted status. This delay in completing the study caused an alarming number of delayed reports and was undetected by conventional RIS reporting techniques. We developed a Web-based reporting tool to monitor uncompleted exams and automatically page section supervisors when a report was being delayed by its incomplete status in the RIS. Institutional Review Board exemption was obtained. At four imaging centers, a Python script was developed to poll the dictation system every 10 min for exams in five different modalities that were signed by the radiologist but could not be sent to the RIS. This script logged the exams into an existing Web-based tracking tool using PHP and a MySQL database. The script also text-paged the modality supervisor. The script logged the time at which the report was finally sent, and statistics were aggregated onto a separate Web-based reporting tool. Over a 1-year period, the average number of uncompleted exams per month and time to problem resolution decreased at every imaging center and in almost every imaging modality. Automated feedback provides a vital link in improving technologist performance and patient care without assigning a human resource to manage report queues.

  18. Computers in the exam room: differences in physician-patient interaction may be due to physician experience.

    PubMed

    Rouf, Emran; Whittle, Jeff; Lu, Na; Schwartz, Mark D

    2007-01-01

    The use of electronic medical records can improve the technical quality of care, but requires a computer in the exam room. This could adversely affect interpersonal aspects of care, particularly when physicians are inexperienced users of exam room computers. To determine whether physician experience modifies the impact of exam room computers on the physician-patient interaction. Cross-sectional surveys of patients and physicians. One hundred fifty five adults seen for scheduled visits by 11 faculty internists and 12 internal medicine residents in a VA primary care clinic. Physician and patient assessment of the effect of the computer on the clinical encounter. Patients seeing residents, compared to those seeing faculty, were more likely to agree that the computer adversely affected the amount of time the physician spent talking to (34% vs 15%, P = 0.01), looking at (45% vs 24%, P = 0.02), and examining them (32% vs 13%, P = 0.009). Moreover, they were more likely to agree that the computer made the visit feel less personal (20% vs 5%, P = 0.017). Few patients thought the computer interfered with their relationship with their physicians (8% vs 8%). Residents were more likely than faculty to report these same adverse effects, but these differences were smaller and not statistically significant. Patients seen by residents more often agreed that exam room computers decreased the amount of interpersonal contact. More research is needed to elucidate key tasks and behaviors that facilitate doctor-patient communication in such a setting.

  19. Using College Placement Exams as Early Signals of College Readiness: An Examination of California's Early Assessment Program and New York's At Home in College Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venezia, Andrea; Voloch, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A promising strategy for promoting successful college transition and increasing college completion rates is to help students avoid developmental coursework by preparing them for placement exams before they enroll in college. A lack of content alignment between high school exit exams and college entrance exams is one of many troubling disconnects…

  20. Question analysis for Indonesian comparative question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saelan, A.; Purwarianti, A.; Widyantoro, D. H.

    2017-01-01

    Information seeking is one of human needs today. Comparing things using search engine surely take more times than search only one thing. In this paper, we analyzed comparative questions for comparative question answering system. Comparative question is a question that comparing two or more entities. We grouped comparative questions into 5 types: selection between mentioned entities, selection between unmentioned entities, selection between any entity, comparison, and yes or no question. Then we extracted 4 types of information from comparative questions: entity, aspect, comparison, and constraint. We built classifiers for classification task and information extraction task. Features used for classification task are bag of words, whether for information extraction, we used lexical, 2 previous and following words lexical, and previous label as features. We tried 2 scenarios: classification first and extraction first. For classification first, we used classification result as a feature for extraction. Otherwise, for extraction first, we used extraction result as features for classification. We found that the result would be better if we do extraction first before classification. For the extraction task, classification using SMO gave the best result (88.78%), while for classification, it is better to use naïve bayes (82.35%).