Sample records for sample sync adapter

  1. User's manual for SYNC: A FORTRAN program for merging and time-synchronizing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The FORTRAN 77 computer program SYNC for merging and time synchronizing data is described. The program SYNC reads one or more input files which contain either synchronous data frames or time-tagged data points, which can be compressed. The program decompresses and time synchronizes the data, correcting for any channel time skews. Interpolation and hold last value synchronization algorithms are available. The output from SYNC is a file of time synchronized data frames at any requested sample rate.

  2. Long frame sync words for binary PSK telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, B. K.

    1975-01-01

    Correlation criteria have previously been established for identifying whether a given binary sequence would be a good frame sync word for phase-shift keyed telemetry. In the past, the search for a good K-bit sync word has involved the application of these criteria to the entire set of 2 exponent K binary K-tuples. It is shown that restricting this search to a much smaller subset consisting of K-bit prefixes of pseudonoise sequences results in sync words of comparable quality, with greatly reduced computer search times for larger values of K. As an example, this procedure is used to find good sync words of length 16-63; from a storage viewpoint, each of these sequences can be generated by a 5- or 6-bit linear feedback shift register.

  3. Assessing the mental frame syncing in the elderly: a virtual reality protocol.

    PubMed

    Serino, Silvia; Cipresso, Pietro; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Decline in spatial memory in the elderly is often underestimated, and it is crucial to fully investigate the cognitive underpinnings of early spatial impairment. A virtual reality-based procedure was developed to assess deficit in the "mental frame syncing", namely the cognitive ability that allows an effective orientation by synchronizing the allocentric view-point independent representation with the allocentric view-point dependent representation. A pilot study was carried out to evaluate abilities in the mental frame syncing in a sample of 16 elderly participants. Preliminary results indicated that the general cognitive functioning was associated with the ability in the synchronization between these two allocentric references frames.

  4. ShareSync: A Solution for Deterministic Data Sharing over Ethernet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Daniel J., II; Koons, William A.; Kennedy, Richard D.; Davis, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    As part of upgrading the Contact Dynamics Simulation Laboratory (CDSL) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), a simple, cost effective method was needed to communicate data among the networked simulation machines and I/O controllers used to run the facility. To fill this need and similar applicable situations, a generic protocol was developed, called ShareSync. ShareSync is a lightweight, real-time, publish-subscribe Ethernet protocol for simple and deterministic data sharing across diverse machines and operating systems. ShareSync provides a simple Application Programming Interface (API) for simulation programmers to incorporate into their code. The protocol is compatible with virtually all Ethernet-capable machines, is flexible enough to support a variety of applications, is fast enough to provide soft real-time determinism, and is a low-cost resource for distributed simulation development, deployment, and maintenance. The first design cycle iteration of ShareSync has been completed, and the protocol has undergone several testing procedures including endurance and benchmarking tests and approaches the 2001ts data synchronization design goal for the CDSL.

  5. IN-SYNC. VII. Evidence for a Decreasing Spectroscopic Binary Fraction (from 1 to 100 Myr) within the IN-SYNC Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehnig, Karl; Bird, Jonathan C.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Cotaar, Michiel; Somers, Garrett

    2017-12-01

    We study the occurrence of spectroscopic binaries in young star-forming regions using the INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC) survey, carried out in SDSS-III with the APOGEE spectrograph. Multi-epoch observations of thousands of low-mass stars in Orion A, NGC 2264, NGC 1333, IC 348, and the Pleiades have been carried out, yielding H-band spectra with a nominal resolution of R = 22,500 for sources with H < 12 mag. Radial velocity precisions of ˜0.3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 were achieved, which we use to identify radial velocity variations indicative of undetected companions. We use Monte Carlo simulations to assess the types of spectroscopic binaries to which we are sensitive, finding sensitivity to binaries with orbital periods ≲ {10}3.5 days, for stars with 2500 {{K}}≤slant {T}{eff}≤slant 6000 {{K}} and v \\sin i < 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1. Using Bayesian inference, we find evidence for a decline in the spectroscopic binary fraction, by a factor of 3-4, from the age of our pre-main-sequence (PMS) sample to the Pleiades age . The significance of this decline is weakened if spot-induced radial-velocity jitter is strong in the sample, and is only marginally significant when comparing any one of the PMS clusters against the Pleiades. However, the same decline in both sense and magnitude is found for each of the five PMS clusters, and the decline reaches a statistical significance of greater than 95% confidence when considering the PMS clusters jointly. Our results suggest that dynamical processes disrupt the widest spectroscopic binaries ({P}{orb}≈ {10}3{--}{10}4 days) as clusters age, indicating that this occurs early in the stars’ evolution, while they still reside within their nascent clusters.

  6. Q-Sync Motors in Commercial Refrigeration. Preliminary Test Results and Projected Benefits

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Fricke, Brian A.; Becker, Bryan R.

    This report provides background information on various fractional-horsepower electric motor technologies, summarizes initial data from a DOE-sponsored Q-Sync motor demonstration project, and extrapolates that data to project the potential economic and environmental benefits resulting from upgrading the current installed base of 9–12 W evaporator fan motors to Q-Sync motors.

  7. dCache, Sync-and-Share for Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, AP; Fuhrmann, P.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Behrmann, G.; Bernardt, C.; Buchholz, Q.; Guelzow, V.; Litvintsev, D.; Schwank, K.; Rossi, A.; van der Reest, P.

    2015-12-01

    The availability of cheap, easy-to-use sync-and-share cloud services has split the scientific storage world into the traditional big data management systems and the very attractive sync-and-share services. With the former, the location of data is well understood while the latter is mostly operated in the Cloud, resulting in a rather complex legal situation. Beside legal issues, those two worlds have little overlap in user authentication and access protocols. While traditional storage technologies, popular in HEP, are based on X.509, cloud services and sync-and-share software technologies are generally based on username/password authentication or mechanisms like SAML or Open ID Connect. Similarly, data access models offered by both are somewhat different, with sync-and-share services often using proprietary protocols. As both approaches are very attractive, dCache.org developed a hybrid system, providing the best of both worlds. To avoid reinventing the wheel, dCache.org decided to embed another Open Source project: OwnCloud. This offers the required modern access capabilities but does not support the managed data functionality needed for large capacity data storage. With this hybrid system, scientists can share files and synchronize their data with laptops or mobile devices as easy as with any other cloud storage service. On top of this, the same data can be accessed via established mechanisms, like GridFTP to serve the Globus Transfer Service or the WLCG FTS3 tool, or the data can be made available to worker nodes or HPC applications via a mounted filesystem. As dCache provides a flexible authentication module, the same user can access its storage via different authentication mechanisms; e.g., X.509 and SAML. Additionally, users can specify the desired quality of service or trigger media transitions as necessary, thus tuning data access latency to the planned access profile. Such features are a natural consequence of using dCache. We will describe the design of

  8. The size of the sync basin.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Daniel A; Strogatz, Steven H; Girvan, Michelle

    2006-03-01

    We suggest a new line of research that we hope will appeal to the nonlinear dynamics community, especially the readers of this Focus Issue. Consider a network of identical oscillators. Suppose the synchronous state is locally stable but not globally stable; it competes with other attractors for the available phase space. How likely is the system to synchronize, starting from a random initial condition? And how does the probability of synchronization depend on the way the network is connected? On the one hand, such questions are inherently difficult because they require calculation of a global geometric quantity, the size of the "sync basin" (or, more formally, the measure of the basin of attraction for the synchronous state). On the other hand, these questions are wide open, important in many real-world settings, and approachable by numerical experiments on various combinations of dynamical systems and network topologies. To give a case study in this direction, we report results on the sync basin for a ring of n > 1 identical phase oscillators with sinusoidal coupling. Each oscillator interacts equally with its k nearest neighbors on either side. For k/n greater than a critical value (approximately 0.34, obtained analytically), we show that the sync basin is the whole phase space, except for a set of measure zero. As k/n passes below this critical value, coexisting attractors are born in a well-defined sequence. These take the form of uniformly twisted waves, each characterized by an integer winding number q, the number of complete phase twists in one circuit around the ring. The maximum stable twist is proportional to n/k; the constant of proportionality is also obtained analytically. For large values of n/k, corresponding to large rings or short-range coupling, many different twisted states compete for their share of phase space. Our simulations reveal that their basin sizes obey a tantalizingly simple statistical law: the probability that the final state has q

  9. Adaptive web sampling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Steven K

    2006-12-01

    A flexible class of adaptive sampling designs is introduced for sampling in network and spatial settings. In the designs, selections are made sequentially with a mixture distribution based on an active set that changes as the sampling progresses, using network or spatial relationships as well as sample values. The new designs have certain advantages compared with previously existing adaptive and link-tracing designs, including control over sample sizes and of the proportion of effort allocated to adaptive selections. Efficient inference involves averaging over sample paths consistent with the minimal sufficient statistic. A Markov chain resampling method makes the inference computationally feasible. The designs are evaluated in network and spatial settings using two empirical populations: a hidden human population at high risk for HIV/AIDS and an unevenly distributed bird population.

  10. Fabrication of DIRC radiator bars and plates at InSync, Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnessen, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    Fabrication of quality radiator bars and plates is paramount to a successful DIRC project. This write up discusses the trials and tribulations of the manufacture of ~600 bars for the BaBar DIRC project and discusses the history and current capabilities of InSync, Inc.

  11. Adaptive sampling in behavioral surveys.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S K

    1997-01-01

    Studies of populations such as drug users encounter difficulties because the members of the populations are rare, hidden, or hard to reach. Conventionally designed large-scale surveys detect relatively few members of the populations so that estimates of population characteristics have high uncertainty. Ethnographic studies, on the other hand, reach suitable numbers of individuals only through the use of link-tracing, chain referral, or snowball sampling procedures that often leave the investigators unable to make inferences from their sample to the hidden population as a whole. In adaptive sampling, the procedure for selecting people or other units to be in the sample depends on variables of interest observed during the survey, so the design adapts to the population as encountered. For example, when self-reported drug use is found among members of the sample, sampling effort may be increased in nearby areas. Types of adaptive sampling designs include ordinary sequential sampling, adaptive allocation in stratified sampling, adaptive cluster sampling, and optimal model-based designs. Graph sampling refers to situations with nodes (for example, people) connected by edges (such as social links or geographic proximity). An initial sample of nodes or edges is selected and edges are subsequently followed to bring other nodes into the sample. Graph sampling designs include network sampling, snowball sampling, link-tracing, chain referral, and adaptive cluster sampling. A graph sampling design is adaptive if the decision to include linked nodes depends on variables of interest observed on nodes already in the sample. Adjustment methods for nonsampling errors such as imperfect detection of drug users in the sample apply to adaptive as well as conventional designs.

  12. Feasibility, safety, and tolerance of subcutaneous synthetic canine B-type natriuretic peptide (syncBNP) in healthy dogs and dogs with stage B1 mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Oyama, M A; Solter, P F; Thorn, C L; Stern, J A

    2017-06-01

    An important aspect of heart failure is the progressive ineffectiveness of the salutary natriuretic peptide system and its secondary messenger, 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In humans with acute heart failure, administration of exogenous natriuretic peptide is associated with improvement in clinical signs and reduction of cardiac filling pressures. This study aimed to determine the feasibility, tolerance, and safety of subcutaneous (SC) synthetic canine B-type natriuretic peptide (syncBNP) administration in dogs. Six privately owned dogs. Dogs were enrolled in a modified 3 + 3 phase I trial. Three dogs initially received doses of 2.5 and 5 μg/kg SC syncBNP followed by an additional three dogs dosed at 5 and 10 μg/kg. Hemodynamic monitoring was performed for 120 min after each injection. Blood and urine samples were collected at 45 and 120 min after injection of 5 μg/kg. Major adverse clinical events that would potentially halt testing were pre-defined. Four healthy dogs and two dogs with stage B1 mitral valve disease were recruited. Synthetic canine B-type natriuretic peptide was well tolerated at all doses. Synthetic canine B-type natriuretic peptide at 5 μg/kg significantly increased median plasma cGMP (baseline cGMP, 131.5 pmol/mL [range, 91.9-183.6 pmol/mL]; 45 min, 153.6 pmol/mL [140.3-214.3 pmol/mL]; 120 min, 192.7 pmol/mL [139.1-240.1 pmol/mL]; p=0.041). We report for the first time administration of syncBNP in privately owned dogs. Administration of SC syncBNP was feasible, well tolerated, safe, and increased plasma cGMP concentration. Further studies using exogenous syncBNP for treatment of heart disease are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 75 FR 41559 - In the Matter of E-Sync Networks, Inc. (n/k/a ESNI, Inc.), EchoCath, Inc., Edison Brothers Stores...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] In the Matter of E[dash]Sync Networks, Inc. (n/k/a ESNI, Inc.), EchoCath, Inc., Edison Brothers Stores, Inc., Electronic Technology Group, Inc. (n... information concerning the securities of E-Sync Networks, Inc. (n/k/a ESNI, Inc.) because it has not filed any...

  14. Binaries at Birth: Stellar multiplicity in embedded clusters from radial velocity variations in the IN-SYNC survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskar Jaehnig, Karl; Stassun, Keivan; Tan, Jonathan C.; Covey, Kevin R.; Da Rio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of stellar multiplicity in young stellar systems using the INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC) survey, carried out in SDSS III with the APOGEE spectrograph. Multi-epoch observations of thousands of low-mass stars in Orion A, NGC2264, NGC1333 and IC348 have been carried out, yielding H-band spectra with R=22,500 for sources with H<12 mag. Radial velocity sensitivities ~0.3 km/s can be achieved, depending on the spectral type of the star. We search the IN-SYNC radial velocity catalog to identify sources with radial velocity variations indicative of spectroscopically undetected companions, analyze their spectral properties and discuss the implications for the overall multiplicity of stellar populations in young, embedded star clusters.

  15. Adaptive sampling in research on risk-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Steven K; Collins, Linda M

    2002-11-01

    This article introduces adaptive sampling designs to substance use researchers. Adaptive sampling is particularly useful when the population of interest is rare, unevenly distributed, hidden, or hard to reach. Examples of such populations are injection drug users, individuals at high risk for HIV/AIDS, and young adolescents who are nicotine dependent. In conventional sampling, the sampling design is based entirely on a priori information, and is fixed before the study begins. By contrast, in adaptive sampling, the sampling design adapts based on observations made during the survey; for example, drug users may be asked to refer other drug users to the researcher. In the present article several adaptive sampling designs are discussed. Link-tracing designs such as snowball sampling, random walk methods, and network sampling are described, along with adaptive allocation and adaptive cluster sampling. It is stressed that special estimation procedures taking the sampling design into account are needed when adaptive sampling has been used. These procedures yield estimates that are considerably better than conventional estimates. For rare and clustered populations adaptive designs can give substantial gains in efficiency over conventional designs, and for hidden populations link-tracing and other adaptive procedures may provide the only practical way to obtain a sample large enough for the study objectives.

  16. DE-Sync: A Doppler-Enhanced Time Synchronization for Mobile Underwater Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Wang, Qi; Nie, DongHu; Qiao, Gang

    2018-05-25

    Time synchronization is the foundation of cooperative work among nodes of underwater sensor networks; it takes a critical role in the research and application of underwater sensor networks. Although numerous time synchronization protocols have been proposed for terrestrial wireless sensor networks, they cannot be directly applied to underwater sensor networks. This is because most of them typically assume that the propagation delay among sensor nodes is negligible, which is not the case in underwater sensor networks. Time synchronization is mainly affected by a long propagation delay among sensor nodes due to the low propagation speed of acoustic signals. Furthermore, sensor nodes in underwater tend to experience some degree of mobility due to wind or ocean current, or some other nodes are on self-propelled vehicles, such as autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). In this paper, we propose a Doppler-enhanced time synchronization scheme for mobile underwater sensor networks, called DE-Sync. Our new scheme considers the effect of the clock skew during the process of estimating the Doppler scale factor and directly substitutes the Doppler scale factor into linear regression to achieve the estimation of the clock skew and offset. Simulation results show that DE-Sync outperforms existing time synchronization protocols in both accuracy and energy efficiency.

  17. Two-stage sequential sampling: A neighborhood-free adaptive sampling procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salehi, M.; Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Designing an efficient sampling scheme for a rare and clustered population is a challenging area of research. Adaptive cluster sampling, which has been shown to be viable for such a population, is based on sampling a neighborhood of units around a unit that meets a specified condition. However, the edge units produced by sampling neighborhoods have proven to limit the efficiency and applicability of adaptive cluster sampling. We propose a sampling design that is adaptive in the sense that the final sample depends on observed values, but it avoids the use of neighborhoods and the sampling of edge units. Unbiased estimators of population total and its variance are derived using Murthy's estimator. The modified two-stage sampling design is easy to implement and can be applied to a wider range of populations than adaptive cluster sampling. We evaluate the proposed sampling design by simulating sampling of two real biological populations and an artificial population for which the variable of interest took the value either 0 or 1 (e.g., indicating presence and absence of a rare event). We show that the proposed sampling design is more efficient than conventional sampling in nearly all cases. The approach used to derive estimators (Murthy's estimator) opens the door for unbiased estimators to be found for similar sequential sampling designs. ?? 2005 American Statistical Association and the International Biometric Society.

  18. panMetaDocs and DataSync - providing a convenient way to share and publish research data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, D.; Klump, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years research institutions, geological surveys and funding organizations started to build infrastructures to facilitate the re-use of research data from previous work. At present, several intermeshed activities are coordinated to make data systems of the earth sciences interoperable and recorded data discoverable. Driven by governmental authorities, ISO19115/19139 emerged as metadata standards for discovery of data and services. Established metadata transport protocols like OAI-PMH and OGC-CSW are used to disseminate metadata to data portals. With the persistent identifiers like DOI and IGSN research data and corresponding physical samples can be given unambiguous names and thus become citable. In summary, these activities focus primarily on 'ready to give away'-data, already stored in an institutional repository and described with appropriate metadata. Many datasets are not 'born' in this state but are produced in small and federated research projects. To make access and reuse of these 'small data' easier, these data should be centrally stored and version controlled from the very beginning of activities. We developed DataSync [1] as supplemental application to the panMetaDocs [2] data exchange platform as a data management tool for small science projects. DataSync is a JAVA-application that runs on a local computer and synchronizes directory trees into an eSciDoc-repository [3] by creating eSciDoc-objects via eSciDocs' REST API. DataSync can be installed on multiple computers and is in this way able to synchronize files of a research team over the internet. XML Metadata can be added as separate files that are managed together with data files as versioned eSciDoc-objects. A project-customized instance of panMetaDocs is provided to show a web-based overview of the previously uploaded file collection and to allow further annotation with metadata inside the eSciDoc-repository. PanMetaDocs is a PHP based web application to assist the creation of metadata in

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IN-SYNC. II. Candidate young stars in NGC 1333 (Foster+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. B.; Cottaar, M.; Covey, K. R.; Arce, H. G.; Meyer, M. R.; Nidever, D. L.; Stassun, K. G.; Tan, J. C.; Chojnowski, S. D.; da Rio, N.; Flaherty, K. M.; Rebull, L.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Majewski, S. R.; Skrutskie, M.; Wilson, J. C.; Zasowski, G.

    2015-06-01

    Spectra were obtained using the APOGEE multiobject spectrograph (1.51-1.69um with R~22500). The details of the data reduction and spectral fitting are presented in Paper I (INfrared Spectra of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC); Cottaar et al. (2014, J/ApJ/794/125). (3 data files).

  20. The IATH ELAN Text-Sync Tool: A Simple System for Mobilizing ELAN Transcripts On- or Off-Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrin, Lise M.; Ross, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present the IATH ELAN Text-Sync Tool (ETST; see http://community.village.virginia.edu/etst), a series of scripts and workflow for playing ELAN files and associated audiovisual media in a web browser either on- or off-line. ELAN has become an indispensable part of documentary linguists' toolkit, but it is less than ideal for…

  1. Introducing sampling entropy in repository based adaptive umbrella sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Han; Zhang, Yingkai

    2009-12-01

    Determining free energy surfaces along chosen reaction coordinates is a common and important task in simulating complex systems. Due to the complexity of energy landscapes and the existence of high barriers, one widely pursued objective to develop efficient simulation methods is to achieve uniform sampling among thermodynamic states of interest. In this work, we have demonstrated sampling entropy (SE) as an excellent indicator for uniform sampling as well as for the convergence of free energy simulations. By introducing SE and the concentration theorem into the biasing-potential-updating scheme, we have further improved the adaptivity, robustness, and applicability of our recently developed repository based adaptive umbrella sampling (RBAUS) approach [H. Zheng and Y. Zhang, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 204106 (2008)]. Besides simulations of one dimensional free energy profiles for various systems, the generality and efficiency of this new RBAUS-SE approach have been further demonstrated by determining two dimensional free energy surfaces for the alanine dipeptide in gas phase as well as in water.

  2. Spatial adaptive sampling in multiscale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouet-Leduc, Bertrand; Barros, Kipton; Cieren, Emmanuel; Elango, Venmugil; Junghans, Christoph; Lookman, Turab; Mohd-Yusof, Jamaludin; Pavel, Robert S.; Rivera, Axel Y.; Roehm, Dominic; McPherson, Allen L.; Germann, Timothy C.

    2014-07-01

    In a common approach to multiscale simulation, an incomplete set of macroscale equations must be supplemented with constitutive data provided by fine-scale simulation. Collecting statistics from these fine-scale simulations is typically the overwhelming computational cost. We reduce this cost by interpolating the results of fine-scale simulation over the spatial domain of the macro-solver. Unlike previous adaptive sampling strategies, we do not interpolate on the potentially very high dimensional space of inputs to the fine-scale simulation. Our approach is local in space and time, avoids the need for a central database, and is designed to parallelize well on large computer clusters. To demonstrate our method, we simulate one-dimensional elastodynamic shock propagation using the Heterogeneous Multiscale Method (HMM); we find that spatial adaptive sampling requires only ≈ 50 ×N0.14 fine-scale simulations to reconstruct the stress field at all N grid points. Related multiscale approaches, such as Equation Free methods, may also benefit from spatial adaptive sampling.

  3. Assessing instrument handling and operative consequences simultaneously: a simple method for creating synced multicamera videos for endosurgical or microsurgical skills assessments.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Noel; Sidman, James

    2011-10-01

    There has been an increasing interest in assessment of technical skills in most medical and surgical disciplines. Many of these assessments involve microscopy or endoscopy and are thus amenable to video recording for post hoc review. An ideal skills assessment video would provide the reviewer with a simultaneous view of the examinee's instrument handling and the operative field. Ideally, a reviewer should be blinded to the identity of the examinee and whether the assessment was performed as a pretest or posttest examination, when given in conjunction with an educational intervention. We describe a simple method for reliably creating deidentified, multicamera, time-synced videos, which may be used in technical skills assessments. We pilot tested this method in a pediatric airway endoscopy Objective Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). Total video length was compared with the OSATS administration time. Thirty-nine OSATS were administered. There were no errors encountered in time-syncing the videos using this method. Mean duration of OSATS videos was 11 minutes and 20 seconds, which was significantly less than the time needed for an expert to be present at the administration of each 30-minute OSATS (P < 0.001). The described method for creating time-synced, multicamera skills assessment videos is reliable and may be used in endosurgical or microsurgical skills assessments. Compared with live review, post hoc video review using this method can save valuable expert reviewer time. Most importantly, this method allows a reviewer to simultaneously evaluate an examinee's instrument handling and the operative field while being blinded to the examinee's identity and timing of examination administration.

  4. IN-SYNC. V. Stellar Kinematics and Dynamics in the Orion A Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Covey, Kevin R.; Cottaar, Michiel; Foster, Jonathan B.; Cullen, Nicholas C.; Tobin, John; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Meyer, Michael R.; Nidever, David L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Zasowski, Gail; Pan, Kaike

    2017-08-01

    The kinematics and dynamics of young stellar populations enable us to test theories of star formation. With this aim, we continue our analysis of the SDSS-III/APOGEE IN-SYNC survey, a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey of young clusters. We focus on the Orion A star-forming region, for which IN-SYNC obtained spectra of ˜2700 stars. In Paper IV we used these data to study the young stellar population. Here we study the kinematic properties through radial velocities (v r ). The young stellar population remains kinematically associated with the molecular gas, following a ˜ 10 {km} {{{s}}}-1 gradient along the filament. However, near the center of the region, the v r distribution is slightly blueshifted and asymmetric; we suggest that this population, which is older, is slightly in the foreground. We find evidence for kinematic subclustering, detecting statistically significant groupings of colocated stars with coherent motions. These are mostly in the lower-density regions of the cloud, while the ONC radial velocities are smoothly distributed, consistent with it being an older, more dynamically evolved cluster. The velocity dispersion {σ }v varies along the filament. The ONC appears virialized, or just slightly supervirial, consistent with an old dynamical age. Here there is also some evidence for ongoing expansion, from a v r -extinction correlation. In the southern filament, {σ }v is ˜2-3 times larger than virial in the L1641N region, where we infer a superposition along the line of sight of stellar subpopulations, detached from the gas. In contrast, {σ }v decreases toward L1641S, where the population is again in agreement with a virial state.

  5. Adaptive Cluster Sampling for Forest Inventories

    Treesearch

    Francis A. Roesch

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive cluster sampling is shown to be a viable alternative for sampling forests when there are rare characteristics of the forest trees which are of interest and occur on clustered trees. The ideas of recent work in Thompson (1990) have been extended to the case in which the initial sample is selected with unequal probabilities. An example is given in which the...

  6. Application of adaptive cluster sampling to low-density populations of freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.; Villella, R.F.; Lemarie, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Freshwater mussels appear to be promising candidates for adaptive cluster sampling because they are benthic macroinvertebrates that cluster spatially and are frequently found at low densities. We applied adaptive cluster sampling to estimate density of freshwater mussels at 24 sites along the Cacapon River, WV, where a preliminary timed search indicated that mussels were present at low density. Adaptive cluster sampling increased yield of individual mussels and detection of uncommon species; however, it did not improve precision of density estimates. Because finding uncommon species, collecting individuals of those species, and estimating their densities are important conservation activities, additional research is warranted on application of adaptive cluster sampling to freshwater mussels. However, at this time we do not recommend routine application of adaptive cluster sampling to freshwater mussel populations. The ultimate, and currently unanswered, question is how to tell when adaptive cluster sampling should be used, i.e., when is a population sufficiently rare and clustered for adaptive cluster sampling to be efficient and practical? A cost-effective procedure needs to be developed to identify biological populations for which adaptive cluster sampling is appropriate.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IN-SYNC. III. Radial velocities of IC348 stars (Cottaar+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaar, M.; Covey, K. R.; Foster, J. B.; Meyer, M. R.; Tan, J. C.; Nidever, D. L.; Drew Chojnowski, S.; da Rio, N.; Flaherty, K. M.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Majewski, S.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Wilson, J. C.; Zasowski, G.

    2015-11-01

    Cottaar et al. (Paper I, 2014, J/ApJ/794/125) describes the analysis of the high-resolution near-infrared spectra obtained by the APOGEE multi-object spectrograph from stars in IC 348, NGC 1333, NGC 2264, and Orion A as part of the INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC) ancillary program. Using radial velocities determined from APOGEE spectra of 380 likely cluster members, we have measured the radial velocity distribution of the young (2-6Myr) cluster IC 348. (2 data files).

  8. Adaptive Sampling for Urban Air Quality through Participatory Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution is one of the major problems of the modern world. The popularization and powerful functions of smartphone applications enable people to participate in urban sensing to better know about the air problems surrounding them. Data sampling is one of the most important problems that affect the sensing performance. In this paper, we propose an Adaptive Sampling Scheme for Urban Air Quality (AS-air) through participatory sensing. Firstly, we propose to find the pattern rules of air quality according to the historical data contributed by participants based on Apriori algorithm. Based on it, we predict the on-line air quality and use it to accelerate the learning process to choose and adapt the sampling parameter based on Q-learning. The evaluation results show that AS-air provides an energy-efficient sampling strategy, which is adaptive toward the varied outside air environment with good sampling efficiency. PMID:29099766

  9. Adaptive Signal Timing Comparison Between the InSync and QuicTrac Adaptive Signal Systems Installed in Colorado

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-07-01

    The FHWAs Every Day Counts (EDC) initiative identifies adaptive signal control as a tool for local agencies to deploy : innovation. In an effort to achieve the goals of the EDC initiative, the traffic sections of the Colorado Department of : Trans...

  10. Adaptive sampling of AEM transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Massa, Domenico; Florio, Giovanni; Viezzoli, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on the sampling of the electromagnetic transient as acquired by airborne time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems. Typically, the sampling of the electromagnetic transient is done using a fixed number of gates whose width grows logarithmically (log-gating). The log-gating has two main benefits: improving the signal to noise (S/N) ratio at late times, when the electromagnetic signal has amplitudes equal or lower than the natural background noise, and ensuring a good resolution at the early times. However, as a result of fixed time gates, the conventional log-gating does not consider any geological variations in the surveyed area, nor the possibly varying characteristics of the measured signal. We show, using synthetic models, how a different, flexible sampling scheme can increase the resolution of resistivity models. We propose a new sampling method, which adapts the gating on the base of the slope variations in the electromagnetic (EM) transient. The use of such an alternative sampling scheme aims to get more accurate inverse models by extracting the geoelectrical information from the measured data in an optimal way.

  11. Adaptive Peer Sampling with Newscast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölgyesi, Norbert; Jelasity, Márk

    The peer sampling service is a middleware service that provides random samples from a large decentralized network to support gossip-based applications such as multicast, data aggregation and overlay topology management. Lightweight gossip-based implementations of the peer sampling service have been shown to provide good quality random sampling while also being extremely robust to many failure scenarios, including node churn and catastrophic failure. We identify two problems with these approaches. The first problem is related to message drop failures: if a node experiences a higher-than-average message drop rate then the probability of sampling this node in the network will decrease. The second problem is that the application layer at different nodes might request random samples at very different rates which can result in very poor random sampling especially at nodes with high request rates. We propose solutions for both problems. We focus on Newscast, a robust implementation of the peer sampling service. Our solution is based on simple extensions of the protocol and an adaptive self-control mechanism for its parameters, namely—without involving failure detectors—nodes passively monitor local protocol events using them as feedback for a local control loop for self-tuning the protocol parameters. The proposed solution is evaluated by simulation experiments.

  12. An adaptive two-stage sequential design for sampling rare and clustered populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.A.; Salehi, M.M.; Moradi, M.; Bell, G.; Smith, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    How to design an efficient large-area survey continues to be an interesting question for ecologists. In sampling large areas, as is common in environmental studies, adaptive sampling can be efficient because it ensures survey effort is targeted to subareas of high interest. In two-stage sampling, higher density primary sample units are usually of more interest than lower density primary units when populations are rare and clustered. Two-stage sequential sampling has been suggested as a method for allocating second stage sample effort among primary units. Here, we suggest a modification: adaptive two-stage sequential sampling. In this method, the adaptive part of the allocation process means the design is more flexible in how much extra effort can be directed to higher-abundance primary units. We discuss how best to design an adaptive two-stage sequential sample. ?? 2008 The Society of Population Ecology and Springer.

  13. Irregular and adaptive sampling for automatic geophysic measure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagnina, Davide; Lo Presti, Letizia; Mulassano, Paolo

    2000-07-01

    In this paper a sampling method, based on an irregular and adaptive strategy, is described. It can be used as automatic guide for rovers designed to explore terrestrial and planetary environments. Starting from the hypothesis that a explorative vehicle is equipped with a payload able to acquire measurements of interesting quantities, the method is able to detect objects of interest from measured points and to realize an adaptive sampling, while badly describing the not interesting background.

  14. SAChES: Scalable Adaptive Chain-Ensemble Sampling.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Ray, Jaideep; Ebeida, Mohamed Salah

    We present the development of a parallel Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method called SAChES, Scalable Adaptive Chain-Ensemble Sampling. This capability is targed to Bayesian calibration of com- putationally expensive simulation models. SAChES involves a hybrid of two methods: Differential Evo- lution Monte Carlo followed by Adaptive Metropolis. Both methods involve parallel chains. Differential evolution allows one to explore high-dimensional parameter spaces using loosely coupled (i.e., largely asynchronous) chains. Loose coupling allows the use of large chain ensembles, with far more chains than the number of parameters to explore. This reduces per-chain sampling burden, enables high-dimensional inversions and the usemore » of computationally expensive forward models. The large number of chains can also ameliorate the impact of silent-errors, which may affect only a few chains. The chain ensemble can also be sampled to provide an initial condition when an aberrant chain is re-spawned. Adaptive Metropolis takes the best points from the differential evolution and efficiently hones in on the poste- rior density. The multitude of chains in SAChES is leveraged to (1) enable efficient exploration of the parameter space; and (2) ensure robustness to silent errors which may be unavoidable in extreme-scale computational platforms of the future. This report outlines SAChES, describes four papers that are the result of the project, and discusses some additional results.« less

  15. Adaptive Oceanographic Sampling in a Coastal Environment Using Autonomous Gliding Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    cost autonomous vehicles with near-global range and modular sensor payload. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of adaptive sampling...environment. Secondary objectives include continued development of adaptive sampling strategies suitable for large fleets of slow-moving autonomous ... vehicles , and development and implementation of new oceanographic sensors and sampling methodologies. The main task completed was a complete redesign of

  16. Adaptive Sampling of Time Series During Remote Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the challenge of online adaptive data collection in a time series. A remote sensor or explorer agent adapts its rate of data collection in order to track anomalous events while obeying constraints on time and power. This problem is challenging because the agent has limited visibility (all its datapoints lie in the past) and limited control (it can only decide when to collect its next datapoint). This problem is treated from an information-theoretic perspective, fitting a probabilistic model to collected data and optimizing the future sampling strategy to maximize information gain. The performance characteristics of stationary and nonstationary Gaussian process models are compared. Self-throttling sensors could benefit environmental sensor networks and monitoring as well as robotic exploration. Explorer agents can improve performance by adjusting their data collection rate, preserving scarce power or bandwidth resources during uninteresting times while fully covering anomalous events of interest. For example, a remote earthquake sensor could conserve power by limiting its measurements during normal conditions and increasing its cadence during rare earthquake events. A similar capability could improve sensor platforms traversing a fixed trajectory, such as an exploration rover transect or a deep space flyby. These agents can adapt observation times to improve sample coverage during moments of rapid change. An adaptive sampling approach couples sensor autonomy, instrument interpretation, and sampling. The challenge is addressed as an active learning problem, which already has extensive theoretical treatment in the statistics and machine learning literature. A statistical Gaussian process (GP) model is employed to guide sample decisions that maximize information gain. Nonsta tion - ary (e.g., time-varying) covariance relationships permit the system to represent and track local anomalies, in contrast with current GP approaches. Most common GP models

  17. DataSync - sharing data via filesystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, Damian; Klump, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Usually research work is a cycle of to hypothesize, to collect data, to corroborate the hypothesis, and finally to publish the results. In this sequence there are possibilities to base the own work on the work of others. Maybe there are candidates of physical samples listed in the IGSN-Registry and there is no need to go on excursion to acquire physical samples. Hopefully the DataCite catalogue lists already metadata of datasets that meet the constraints of the hypothesis and that are now open for reappraisal. After all, working with the measured data to corroborate the hypothesis involves new methods, and proven methods as well as different software tools. A cohort of intermediate data is created that can be shared with colleagues to discuss the research progress and receive a first evaluation. In consequence, the intermediate data should be versioned to easily get back to valid intermediate data, when you notice you get on the wrong track. Things are different for project managers. They want to know what is currently done, what has been done, and what is the last valid data, if somebody has to continue the work. To make life of members of small science projects easier we developed Datasync [1] as a software for sharing and versioning data. Datasync is designed to synchronize directory trees between different computers of a research team over the internet. The software is developed as JAVA application and watches a local directory tree for changes that are replicated as eSciDoc-objects into an eSciDoc-infrastructure [2] using the eSciDoc REST API. Modifications to the local filesystem automatically create a new version of an eSciDoc-object inside the eSciDoc-infrastructure. This way individual folders can be shared between team members while project managers can get a general idea of current status by synchronizing whole project inventories. Additionally XML metadata from separate files can be managed together with data files inside the eSciDoc-objects. While

  18. Efficiently sampling conformations and pathways using the concurrent adaptive sampling (CAS) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Surl-Hee; Grate, Jay W.; Darve, Eric F.

    2017-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are useful in obtaining thermodynamic and kinetic properties of bio-molecules, but they are limited by the time scale barrier. That is, we may not obtain properties' efficiently because we need to run microseconds or longer simulations using femtosecond time steps. To overcome this time scale barrier, we can use the weighted ensemble (WE) method, a powerful enhanced sampling method that efficiently samples thermodynamic and kinetic properties. However, the WE method requires an appropriate partitioning of phase space into discrete macrostates, which can be problematic when we have a high-dimensional collective space or when little is known a priori about the molecular system. Hence, we developed a new WE-based method, called the "Concurrent Adaptive Sampling (CAS) algorithm," to tackle these issues. The CAS algorithm is not constrained to use only one or two collective variables, unlike most reaction coordinate-dependent methods. Instead, it can use a large number of collective variables and adaptive macrostates to enhance the sampling in the high-dimensional space. This is especially useful for systems in which we do not know what the right reaction coordinates are, in which case we can use many collective variables to sample conformations and pathways. In addition, a clustering technique based on the committor function is used to accelerate sampling the slowest process in the molecular system. In this paper, we introduce the new method and show results from two-dimensional models and bio-molecules, specifically penta-alanine and a triazine trimer.

  19. Distributed database kriging for adaptive sampling (D²KAS)

    DOE PAGES

    Roehm, Dominic; Pavel, Robert S.; Barros, Kipton; ...

    2015-03-18

    We present an adaptive sampling method supplemented by a distributed database and a prediction method for multiscale simulations using the Heterogeneous Multiscale Method. A finite-volume scheme integrates the macro-scale conservation laws for elastodynamics, which are closed by momentum and energy fluxes evaluated at the micro-scale. In the original approach, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are launched for every macro-scale volume element. Our adaptive sampling scheme replaces a large fraction of costly micro-scale MD simulations with fast table lookup and prediction. The cloud database Redis provides the plain table lookup, and with locality aware hashing we gather input data for our predictionmore » scheme. For the latter we use kriging, which estimates an unknown value and its uncertainty (error) at a specific location in parameter space by using weighted averages of the neighboring points. We find that our adaptive scheme significantly improves simulation performance by a factor of 2.5 to 25, while retaining high accuracy for various choices of the algorithm parameters.« less

  20. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Castle, Joseph P.; Lvov, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    The following concepts were introduced: a) Bayesian adaptive sampling for solving biomass estimation; b) Characterization of MISR Rahman model parameters conditioned upon MODIS landcover. c) Rigorous non-parametric Bayesian approach to analytic mixture model determination. d) Unique U.S. asset for science product validation and verification.

  1. Adaptive Sampling-Based Information Collection for Wireless Body Area Networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Wendong; Tian, Hui

    2016-08-31

    To collect important health information, WBAN applications typically sense data at a high frequency. However, limited by the quality of wireless link, the uploading of sensed data has an upper frequency. To reduce upload frequency, most of the existing WBAN data collection approaches collect data with a tolerable error. These approaches can guarantee precision of the collected data, but they are not able to ensure that the upload frequency is within the upper frequency. Some traditional sampling based approaches can control upload frequency directly, however, they usually have a high loss of information. Since the core task of WBAN applications is to collect health information, this paper aims to collect optimized information under the limitation of upload frequency. The importance of sensed data is defined according to information theory for the first time. Information-aware adaptive sampling is proposed to collect uniformly distributed data. Then we propose Adaptive Sampling-based Information Collection (ASIC) which consists of two algorithms. An adaptive sampling probability algorithm is proposed to compute sampling probabilities of different sensed values. A multiple uniform sampling algorithm provides uniform samplings for values in different intervals. Experiments based on a real dataset show that the proposed approach has higher performance in terms of data coverage and information quantity. The parameter analysis shows the optimized parameter settings and the discussion shows the underlying reason of high performance in the proposed approach.

  2. Lateral Coherence and Mixing in the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling using Gliders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Adaptive Sampling using Gliders R. Kipp Shearman Jonathan D. Nash James N. Moum John A. Barth College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State...persistent on O (3 day) timescales, so are ideally suited to be adaptively sampled by autonomous gliders that actively report both turbulent and...plan to deploy 4 AUV gliders to perform intensive, adaptive surveys. Newly-enhanced to measure turbulent mixing, water-column currents and dye

  3. Lateral Coherence and Mixing in the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling using Gliders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Coherence and Mixing in the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling using Gliders R. Kipp Shearman Jonathan D. Nash James N. Moum John A. Barth College of...These structures evolve yet are often persistent on O (3 day) timescales, so are ideally suited to be adaptively sampled by autonomous gliders that...processes driving lateral dispersion, we plan to deploy 4 AUV gliders to perform intensive, adaptive surveys. Newly-enhanced to measure turbulent mixing

  4. Using Integer Clocks to Verify the Timing-Sync Sensor Network Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xiaowan; Singh, Anu; Smolka, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    We use the UPPAAL model checker for Timed Automata to verify the Timing-Sync time-synchronization protocol for sensor networks (TPSN). The TPSN protocol seeks to provide network-wide synchronization of the distributed clocks in a sensor network. Clock-synchronization algorithms for sensor networks such as TPSN must be able to perform arithmetic on clock values to calculate clock drift and network propagation delays. They must be able to read the value of a local clock and assign it to another local clock. Such operations are not directly supported by the theory of Timed Automata. To overcome this formal-modeling obstacle, we augment the UPPAAL specification language with the integer clock derived type. Integer clocks, which are essentially integer variables that are periodically incremented by a global pulse generator, greatly facilitate the encoding of the operations required to synchronize clocks as in the TPSN protocol. With this integer-clock-based model of TPSN in hand, we use UPPAAL to verify that the protocol achieves network-wide time synchronization and is devoid of deadlock. We also use the UPPAAL Tracer tool to illustrate how integer clocks can be used to capture clock drift and resynchronization during protocol execution

  5. Adaptive Sampling-Based Information Collection for Wireless Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Wendong; Tian, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To collect important health information, WBAN applications typically sense data at a high frequency. However, limited by the quality of wireless link, the uploading of sensed data has an upper frequency. To reduce upload frequency, most of the existing WBAN data collection approaches collect data with a tolerable error. These approaches can guarantee precision of the collected data, but they are not able to ensure that the upload frequency is within the upper frequency. Some traditional sampling based approaches can control upload frequency directly, however, they usually have a high loss of information. Since the core task of WBAN applications is to collect health information, this paper aims to collect optimized information under the limitation of upload frequency. The importance of sensed data is defined according to information theory for the first time. Information-aware adaptive sampling is proposed to collect uniformly distributed data. Then we propose Adaptive Sampling-based Information Collection (ASIC) which consists of two algorithms. An adaptive sampling probability algorithm is proposed to compute sampling probabilities of different sensed values. A multiple uniform sampling algorithm provides uniform samplings for values in different intervals. Experiments based on a real dataset show that the proposed approach has higher performance in terms of data coverage and information quantity. The parameter analysis shows the optimized parameter settings and the discussion shows the underlying reason of high performance in the proposed approach. PMID:27589758

  6. Adaptive control system for line-commutated inverters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolland, C. R.; Bailey, D. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A control system for a permanent magnet motor driven by a multiphase line commutated inverter is provided with integration for integrating the back EMF of each phase of the motor. This is used in generating system control signals for an inverter gate logic using a sync and firing angle (alpha) control generator connected to the outputs of the integrators. A precision full wave rectifier provides a speed control feedback signal to a phase delay rectifier via a gain and loop compensation circuit and to the integrators for adaptive control of the attenuation of low frequencies by the integrators as a function of motor speed. As the motor speed increases, the attenuation of low frequency components by the integrators is increased to offset the gain of the integrators to spurious low frequencies.

  7. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale in a French-Speaking Swiss Sample: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Personality and Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossier, Jerome; Zecca, Gregory; Stauffer, Sarah D.; Maggiori, Christian; Dauwalder, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) in a French-speaking Swiss sample and its relationship with personality dimensions and work engagement. The heterogeneous sample of 391 participants (M[subscript age] = 39.59, SD = 12.30) completed the CAAS-International and a short version…

  8. Multi-species attributes as the condition for adaptive sampling of rare species using two-stage sequential sampling with an auxiliary variable

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panahbehagh, B.; Smith, D.R.; Salehi, M.M.; Hornbach, D.J.; Brown, D.J.; Chan, F.; Marinova, D.; Anderssen, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing populations of rare species is challenging because of the large effort required to locate patches of occupied habitat and achieve precise estimates of density and abundance. The presence of a rare species has been shown to be correlated with presence or abundance of more common species. Thus, ecological community richness or abundance can be used to inform sampling of rare species. Adaptive sampling designs have been developed specifically for rare and clustered populations and have been applied to a wide range of rare species. However, adaptive sampling can be logistically challenging, in part, because variation in final sample size introduces uncertainty in survey planning. Two-stage sequential sampling (TSS), a recently developed design, allows for adaptive sampling, but avoids edge units and has an upper bound on final sample size. In this paper we present an extension of two-stage sequential sampling that incorporates an auxiliary variable (TSSAV), such as community attributes, as the condition for adaptive sampling. We develop a set of simulations to approximate sampling of endangered freshwater mussels to evaluate the performance of the TSSAV design. The performance measures that we are interested in are efficiency and probability of sampling a unit occupied by the rare species. Efficiency measures the precision of population estimate from the TSSAV design relative to a standard design, such as simple random sampling (SRS). The simulations indicate that the density and distribution of the auxiliary population is the most important determinant of the performance of the TSSAV design. Of the design factors, such as sample size, the fraction of the primary units sampled was most important. For the best scenarios, the odds of sampling the rare species was approximately 1.5 times higher for TSSAV compared to SRS and efficiency was as high as 2 (i.e., variance from TSSAV was half that of SRS). We have found that design performance, especially for adaptive

  9. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-03-21

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes’ rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle thesemore » challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.« less

  10. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang, E-mail: guanglin@purdue.edu

    2015-08-01

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes' rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle thesemore » challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.« less

  11. Adaptive enhanced sampling by force-biasing using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ashley Z.; Sevgen, Emre; Sidky, Hythem; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2018-04-01

    A machine learning assisted method is presented for molecular simulation of systems with rugged free energy landscapes. The method is general and can be combined with other advanced sampling techniques. In the particular implementation proposed here, it is illustrated in the context of an adaptive biasing force approach where, rather than relying on discrete force estimates, one can resort to a self-regularizing artificial neural network to generate continuous, estimated generalized forces. By doing so, the proposed approach addresses several shortcomings common to adaptive biasing force and other algorithms. Specifically, the neural network enables (1) smooth estimates of generalized forces in sparsely sampled regions, (2) force estimates in previously unexplored regions, and (3) continuous force estimates with which to bias the simulation, as opposed to biases generated at specific points of a discrete grid. The usefulness of the method is illustrated with three different examples, chosen to highlight the wide range of applicability of the underlying concepts. In all three cases, the new method is found to enhance considerably the underlying traditional adaptive biasing force approach. The method is also found to provide improvements over previous implementations of neural network assisted algorithms.

  12. Strategies for informed sample size reduction in adaptive controlled clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arandjelović, Ognjen

    2017-12-01

    Clinical trial adaptation refers to any adjustment of the trial protocol after the onset of the trial. The main goal is to make the process of introducing new medical interventions to patients more efficient. The principal challenge, which is an outstanding research problem, is to be found in the question of how adaptation should be performed so as to minimize the chance of distorting the outcome of the trial. In this paper, we propose a novel method for achieving this. Unlike most of the previously published work, our approach focuses on trial adaptation by sample size adjustment, i.e. by reducing the number of trial participants in a statistically informed manner. Our key idea is to select the sample subset for removal in a manner which minimizes the associated loss of information. We formalize this notion and describe three algorithms which approach the problem in different ways, respectively, using (i) repeated random draws, (ii) a genetic algorithm, and (iii) what we term pair-wise sample compatibilities. Experiments on simulated data demonstrate the effectiveness of all three approaches, with a consistently superior performance exhibited by the pair-wise sample compatibilities-based method.

  13. Stochastic, adaptive sampling of information by microvilli in fly photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuoyi; Postma, Marten; Billings, Stephen A; Coca, Daniel; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko

    2012-08-07

    In fly photoreceptors, light is focused onto a photosensitive waveguide, the rhabdomere, consisting of tens of thousands of microvilli. Each microvillus is capable of generating elementary responses, quantum bumps, in response to single photons using a stochastically operating phototransduction cascade. Whereas much is known about the cascade reactions, less is known about how the concerted action of the microvilli population encodes light changes into neural information and how the ultrastructure and biochemical machinery of photoreceptors of flies and other insects evolved in relation to the information sampling and processing they perform. We generated biophysically realistic fly photoreceptor models, which accurately simulate the encoding of visual information. By comparing stochastic simulations with single cell recordings from Drosophila photoreceptors, we show how adaptive sampling by 30,000 microvilli captures the temporal structure of natural contrast changes. Following each bump, individual microvilli are rendered briefly (~100-200 ms) refractory, thereby reducing quantum efficiency with increasing intensity. The refractory period opposes saturation, dynamically and stochastically adjusting availability of microvilli (bump production rate: sample rate), whereas intracellular calcium and voltage adapt bump amplitude and waveform (sample size). These adapting sampling principles result in robust encoding of natural light changes, which both approximates perceptual contrast constancy and enhances novel events under different light conditions, and predict information processing across a range of species with different visual ecologies. These results clarify why fly photoreceptors are structured the way they are and function as they do, linking sensory information to sensory evolution and revealing benefits of stochasticity for neural information processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stochastic, Adaptive Sampling of Information by Microvilli in Fly Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuoyi; Postma, Marten; Billings, Stephen A.; Coca, Daniel; Hardie, Roger C.; Juusola, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background In fly photoreceptors, light is focused onto a photosensitive waveguide, the rhabdomere, consisting of tens of thousands of microvilli. Each microvillus is capable of generating elementary responses, quantum bumps, in response to single photons using a stochastically operating phototransduction cascade. Whereas much is known about the cascade reactions, less is known about how the concerted action of the microvilli population encodes light changes into neural information and how the ultrastructure and biochemical machinery of photoreceptors of flies and other insects evolved in relation to the information sampling and processing they perform. Results We generated biophysically realistic fly photoreceptor models, which accurately simulate the encoding of visual information. By comparing stochastic simulations with single cell recordings from Drosophila photoreceptors, we show how adaptive sampling by 30,000 microvilli captures the temporal structure of natural contrast changes. Following each bump, individual microvilli are rendered briefly (∼100–200 ms) refractory, thereby reducing quantum efficiency with increasing intensity. The refractory period opposes saturation, dynamically and stochastically adjusting availability of microvilli (bump production rate: sample rate), whereas intracellular calcium and voltage adapt bump amplitude and waveform (sample size). These adapting sampling principles result in robust encoding of natural light changes, which both approximates perceptual contrast constancy and enhances novel events under different light conditions, and predict information processing across a range of species with different visual ecologies. Conclusions These results clarify why fly photoreceptors are structured the way they are and function as they do, linking sensory information to sensory evolution and revealing benefits of stochasticity for neural information processing. PMID:22704990

  15. Adaptive sampling strategies with high-throughput molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, Cecilia

    Despite recent significant hardware and software developments, the complete thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of large macromolecular complexes by molecular simulations still presents significant challenges. The high dimensionality of these systems and the complexity of the associated potential energy surfaces (creating multiple metastable regions connected by high free energy barriers) does not usually allow to adequately sample the relevant regions of their configurational space by means of a single, long Molecular Dynamics (MD) trajectory. Several different approaches have been proposed to tackle this sampling problem. We focus on the development of ensemble simulation strategies, where data from a large number of weakly coupled simulations are integrated to explore the configurational landscape of a complex system more efficiently. Ensemble methods are of increasing interest as the hardware roadmap is now mostly based on increasing core counts, rather than clock speeds. The main challenge in the development of an ensemble approach for efficient sampling is in the design of strategies to adaptively distribute the trajectories over the relevant regions of the systems' configurational space, without using any a priori information on the system global properties. We will discuss the definition of smart adaptive sampling approaches that can redirect computational resources towards unexplored yet relevant regions. Our approaches are based on new developments in dimensionality reduction for high dimensional dynamical systems, and optimal redistribution of resources. NSF CHE-1152344, NSF CHE-1265929, Welch Foundation C-1570.

  16. Autonomous spatially adaptive sampling in experiments based on curvature, statistical error and sample spacing with applications in LDA measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theunissen, Raf; Kadosh, Jesse S.; Allen, Christian B.

    2015-06-01

    Spatially varying signals are typically sampled by collecting uniformly spaced samples irrespective of the signal content. For signals with inhomogeneous information content, this leads to unnecessarily dense sampling in regions of low interest or insufficient sample density at important features, or both. A new adaptive sampling technique is presented directing sample collection in proportion to local information content, capturing adequately the short-period features while sparsely sampling less dynamic regions. The proposed method incorporates a data-adapted sampling strategy on the basis of signal curvature, sample space-filling, variable experimental uncertainty and iterative improvement. Numerical assessment has indicated a reduction in the number of samples required to achieve a predefined uncertainty level overall while improving local accuracy for important features. The potential of the proposed method has been further demonstrated on the basis of Laser Doppler Anemometry experiments examining the wake behind a NACA0012 airfoil and the boundary layer characterisation of a flat plate.

  17. InSync Adaptive Traffic Control System for the Veterans Memorial Hwy Corridor on Long Island, NY

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-01

    This report documents Rhythm Engineerings adaptive traffic control system field installation performed : by New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) along Veterans Memorial Hwy in Long : Island, NY. This report reviews the reason for t...

  18. Preliminary Observations from the 2014 Sand Dunes Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    sync (start) 06/01/2014 09:00 0.00 ms ( latched ) Clock sync (end) 06/18/2014 11:55:00 10.846 ms slow Drift rate 633.471 μs/day (slowing) 22...10m (faired Kevlar) 210.0 m Sample rate 9765.625 Hz Clock sync (start) 06/01/2014 (YD 152) 01:33 0.00s ( latched ) Clock sync (end) 06/19/2014 (YD...02/2014 07:43 0.00s ( latched ) Clock sync (end) 06/16/2014 01:10 38.527 ms fast Drift rate 2.8066 ms/day (fast) 32 Figure 30. SBE39

  19. Implementation of time-efficient adaptive sampling function design for improved undersampled MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinhyeok; Kim, Hyeonjin

    2016-12-01

    To improve the efficacy of undersampled MRI, a method of designing adaptive sampling functions is proposed that is simple to implement on an MR scanner and yet effectively improves the performance of the sampling functions. An approximation of the energy distribution of an image (E-map) is estimated from highly undersampled k-space data acquired in a prescan and efficiently recycled in the main scan. An adaptive probability density function (PDF) is generated by combining the E-map with a modeled PDF. A set of candidate sampling functions are then prepared from the adaptive PDF, among which the one with maximum energy is selected as the final sampling function. To validate its computational efficiency, the proposed method was implemented on an MR scanner, and its robust performance in Fourier-transform (FT) MRI and compressed sensing (CS) MRI was tested by simulations and in a cherry tomato. The proposed method consistently outperforms the conventional modeled PDF approach for undersampling ratios of 0.2 or higher in both FT-MRI and CS-MRI. To fully benefit from undersampled MRI, it is preferable that the design of adaptive sampling functions be performed online immediately before the main scan. In this way, the proposed method may further improve the efficacy of the undersampled MRI.

  20. SMI adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals. [Sample Matrix Inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of adaptive antenna arrays in the presence of weak interfering signals (below thermal noise) is studied. It is shown that a conventional adaptive antenna array sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm is unable to suppress such interfering signals. To overcome this problem, the SMI algorithm is modified. In the modified algorithm, the covariance matrix is redefined such that the effect of thermal noise on the weights of adaptive arrays is reduced. Thus, the weights are dictated by relatively weak signals. It is shown that the modified algorithm provides the desired interference protection.

  1. Temporal sampling, resetting, and adaptation orchestrate gradient sensing in sperm

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Luis; Seifert, Reinhard; Gregor, Ingo; Jäckle, Oliver; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    Sperm, navigating in a chemical gradient, are exposed to a periodic stream of chemoattractant molecules. The periodic stimulation entrains Ca2+ oscillations that control looping steering responses. It is not known how sperm sample chemoattractant molecules during periodic stimulation and adjust their sensitivity. We report that sea urchin sperm sampled molecules for 0.2–0.6 s before a Ca2+ response was produced. Additional molecules delivered during a Ca2+ response reset the cell by causing a pronounced Ca2+ drop that terminated the response; this reset was followed by a new Ca2+ rise. After stimulation, sperm adapted their sensitivity following the Weber–Fechner law. Taking into account the single-molecule sensitivity, we estimate that sperm can register a minimal gradient of 0.8 fM/µm and be attracted from as far away as 4.7 mm. Many microorganisms sense stimulus gradients along periodic paths to translate a spatial distribution of the stimulus into a temporal pattern of the cell response. Orchestration of temporal sampling, resetting, and adaptation might control gradient sensing in such organisms as well. PMID:22986497

  2. Temporal sampling, resetting, and adaptation orchestrate gradient sensing in sperm.

    PubMed

    Kashikar, Nachiket D; Alvarez, Luis; Seifert, Reinhard; Gregor, Ingo; Jäckle, Oliver; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Kaupp, U Benjamin

    2012-09-17

    Sperm, navigating in a chemical gradient, are exposed to a periodic stream of chemoattractant molecules. The periodic stimulation entrains Ca(2+) oscillations that control looping steering responses. It is not known how sperm sample chemoattractant molecules during periodic stimulation and adjust their sensitivity. We report that sea urchin sperm sampled molecules for 0.2-0.6 s before a Ca(2+) response was produced. Additional molecules delivered during a Ca(2+) response reset the cell by causing a pronounced Ca(2+) drop that terminated the response; this reset was followed by a new Ca(2+) rise. After stimulation, sperm adapted their sensitivity following the Weber-Fechner law. Taking into account the single-molecule sensitivity, we estimate that sperm can register a minimal gradient of 0.8 fM/µm and be attracted from as far away as 4.7 mm. Many microorganisms sense stimulus gradients along periodic paths to translate a spatial distribution of the stimulus into a temporal pattern of the cell response. Orchestration of temporal sampling, resetting, and adaptation might control gradient sensing in such organisms as well.

  3. A mixed signal ECG processing platform with an adaptive sampling ADC for portable monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Van Hoof, Chris; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a mixed-signal ECG processing platform with an 12-bit ADC architecture that can adapt its sampling rate according to the input signals rate of change. This enables the sampling of ECG signals with significantly reduced data rate without loss of information. The presented adaptive sampling scheme reduces the ADC power consumption, enables the processing of ECG signals with lower power consumption, and reduces the power consumption of the radio while streaming the ECG signals. The test results show that running a CWT-based R peak detection algorithm using the adaptively sampled ECG signals consumes only 45.6 μW and it leads to 36% less overall system power consumption.

  4. Recruitment of hard-to-reach population subgroups via adaptations of the snowball sampling strategy.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; Lee, Hau-Chen; Lim, Rod Seung-Hwan; Fullerton, Judith

    2010-09-01

    Nurse researchers and educators often engage in outreach to narrowly defined populations. This article offers examples of how variations on the snowball sampling recruitment strategy can be applied in the creation of culturally appropriate, community-based information dissemination efforts related to recruitment to health education programs and research studies. Examples from the primary author's program of research are provided to demonstrate how adaptations of snowball sampling can be used effectively in the recruitment of members of traditionally underserved or vulnerable populations. The adaptation of snowball sampling techniques, as described in this article, helped the authors to gain access to each of the more-vulnerable population groups of interest. The use of culturally sensitive recruitment strategies is both appropriate and effective in enlisting the involvement of members of vulnerable populations. Adaptations of snowball sampling strategies should be considered when recruiting participants for education programs or for research studies when the recruitment of a population-based sample is not essential.

  5. Efficiently sampling conformations and pathways using the concurrent adaptive sampling (CAS) algorithm

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ahn, Surl-Hee; Grate, Jay W.; Darve, Eric F.

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are useful in obtaining thermodynamic and kinetic properties of bio-molecules but are limited by the timescale barrier, i.e., we may be unable to efficiently obtain properties because we need to run microseconds or longer simulations using femtoseconds time steps. While there are several existing methods to overcome this timescale barrier and efficiently sample thermodynamic and/or kinetic properties, problems remain in regard to being able to sample un- known systems, deal with high-dimensional space of collective variables, and focus the computational effort on slow timescales. Hence, a new sampling method, called the “Concurrent Adaptive Sampling (CAS) algorithm,”more » has been developed to tackle these three issues and efficiently obtain conformations and pathways. The method is not constrained to use only one or two collective variables, unlike most reaction coordinate-dependent methods. Instead, it can use a large number of collective vari- ables and uses macrostates (a partition of the collective variable space) to enhance the sampling. The exploration is done by running a large number of short simula- tions, and a clustering technique is used to accelerate the sampling. In this paper, we introduce the new methodology and show results from two-dimensional models and bio-molecules, such as penta-alanine and triazine polymer« less

  6. Elucidating Microbial Adaptation Dynamics via Autonomous Exposure and Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grace, Joseph M.; Verseux, Cyprien; Gentry, Diana; Moffet, Amy; Thayabaran, Ramanen; Wong, Nathan; Rothschild, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of micro-organisms to their environments is a complex process of interaction between the pressures of the environment and of competition. Reducing this multifactorial process to environmental exposure in the laboratory is a common tool for elucidating individual mechanisms of evolution, such as mutation rates. Although such studies inform fundamental questions about the way adaptation and even speciation occur, they are often limited by labor-intensive manual techniques. Current methods for controlled study of microbial adaptation limit the length of time, the depth of collected data, and the breadth of applied environmental conditions. Small idiosyncrasies in manual techniques can have large effects on outcomes; for example, there are significant variations in induced radiation resistances following similar repeated exposure protocols. We describe here a project under development to allow rapid cycling of multiple types of microbial environmental exposure. The system allows continuous autonomous monitoring and data collection of both single species and sampled communities, independently and concurrently providing multiple types of controlled environmental pressure (temperature, radiation, chemical presence or absence, and so on) to a microbial community in dynamic response to the ecosystem's current status. When combined with DNA sequencing and extraction, such a controlled environment can cast light on microbial functional development, population dynamics, inter- and intra-species competition, and microbe-environment interaction. The project's goal is to allow rapid, repeatable iteration of studies of both natural and artificial microbial adaptation. As an example, the same system can be used both to increase the pH of a wet soil aliquot over time while periodically sampling it for genetic activity analysis, or to repeatedly expose a culture of bacteria to the presence of a toxic metal, automatically adjusting the level of toxicity based on the

  7. A Novel Virtual Reality-Based Training Protocol for the Enhancement of the "Mental Frame Syncing" in Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease: A Development-of-Concept Trial.

    PubMed

    Serino, Silvia; Pedroli, Elisa; Tuena, Cosimo; De Leo, Gianluca; Stramba-Badiale, Marco; Goulene, Karine; Mariotti, Noemi G; Riva, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that people with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) show compromised spatial abilities. In addition, there exists from the earliest stages of AD a specific impairment in "mental frame syncing," which is the ability to synchronize an allocentric viewpoint-independent representation (including object-to-object information) with an egocentric one by computing the bearing of each relevant "object" in the environment in relation to the stored heading in space (i.e., information about our viewpoint contained in the allocentric viewpoint-dependent representation). The main objective of this development-of-concept trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel VR-based training protocol focused on the enhancement of the "mental frame syncing" of the different spatial representations in subjects with AD. We recruited 20 individuals with AD who were randomly assigned to either "VR-based training" or "Control Group." Moreover, eight cognitively healthy elderly individuals were recruited to participate in the VR-based training in order to have a different comparison group. Based on a neuropsychological assessment, our results indicated a significant improvement in long-term spatial memory after the VR-based training for patients with AD; this means that transference of improvements from the VR-based training to more general aspects of spatial cognition was observed. Interestingly, there was also a significant effect of VR-based training on executive functioning for cognitively healthy elderly individuals. In sum, VR could be considered as an advanced embodied tool suitable for treating spatial recall impairments.

  8. Adaptation of the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire in a Spanish sample of athletes.

    PubMed

    Arce, Constantino; De Francisco, Cristina; Andrade, Elena; Seoane, Gloria; Raedeke, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we offer a general version of the Spanish adaptation of Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (ABQ) designed to measure the syndrome of burnout in athletes of different sports. In previous works, the Spanish version of ABQ was administered to different samples of soccer players. Its psychometric properties were appropriate and similar to the findings in original ABQ. The purpose of this study was to examine the generalization to others sports of the Spanish adaptation. We started from this adaptation, but we included three alternative statements (one for each dimension of the questionnaire), and we replaced the word "soccer" with the word "sport". An 18-item version was administered to a sample of 487 athletes aged 13 and 29 years old. Confirmatory factor analyses replicated the factor structure, but two items modification were necessary in order to obtain a good overall fit of the model. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the questionnaire were satisfactory.

  9. Using continuous in-situ measurements to adaptively trigger urban storm water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, B. P.; Kerkez, B.

    2015-12-01

    Until cost-effective in-situ sensors are available for biological parameters, nutrients and metals, automated samplers will continue to be the primary source of reliable water quality measurements. Given limited samples bottles, however, autosamplers often obscure insights on nutrient sources and biogeochemical processes which would otherwise be captured using a continuous sampling approach. To that end, we evaluate the efficacy a novel method to measure first-flush nutrient dynamics in flashy, urban watersheds. Our approach reduces the number of samples required to capture water quality dynamics by leveraging an internet-connected sensor node, which is equipped with a suite of continuous in-situ sensors and an automated sampler. To capture both the initial baseflow as well as storm concentrations, a cloud-hosted adaptive algorithm analyzes the high-resolution sensor data along with local weather forecasts to optimize a sampling schedule. The method was tested in a highly developed urban catchment in Ann Arbor, Michigan and collected samples of nitrate, phosphorus, and suspended solids throughout several storm events. Results indicate that the watershed does not exhibit first flush dynamics, a behavior that would have been obscured when using a non-adaptive sampling approach.

  10. Recruiting hard-to-reach United States population sub-groups via adaptations of snowball sampling strategy

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; Lee, Hau-Chen; Seung-Hwan Lim, Rod; Fullerton, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Nurse researchers and educators often engage in outreach to narrowly defined populations. This article offers examples of how variations on the snowball sampling recruitment strategy can be applied in the creation of culturally appropriate, community-based information dissemination efforts related to recruitment to health education programs and research studies. Examples from the primary author’s program of research are provided to demonstrate how adaptations of snowball sampling can be effectively used in the recruitment of members of traditionally underserved or vulnerable populations. The adaptation of snowball sampling techniques, as described in this article, helped the authors to gain access to each of the more vulnerable population groups of interest. The use of culturally sensitive recruitment strategies is both appropriate and effective in enlisting the involvement of members of vulnerable populations. Adaptations of snowball sampling strategies should be considered when recruiting participants for education programs or subjects for research studies when recruitment of a population based sample is not essential. PMID:20727089

  11. Convergence and Efficiency of Adaptive Importance Sampling Techniques with Partial Biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, G.; Jourdain, B.; Lelièvre, T.; Stoltz, G.

    2018-04-01

    We propose a new Monte Carlo method to efficiently sample a multimodal distribution (known up to a normalization constant). We consider a generalization of the discrete-time Self Healing Umbrella Sampling method, which can also be seen as a generalization of well-tempered metadynamics. The dynamics is based on an adaptive importance technique. The importance function relies on the weights (namely the relative probabilities) of disjoint sets which form a partition of the space. These weights are unknown but are learnt on the fly yielding an adaptive algorithm. In the context of computational statistical physics, the logarithm of these weights is, up to an additive constant, the free-energy, and the discrete valued function defining the partition is called the collective variable. The algorithm falls into the general class of Wang-Landau type methods, and is a generalization of the original Self Healing Umbrella Sampling method in two ways: (i) the updating strategy leads to a larger penalization strength of already visited sets in order to escape more quickly from metastable states, and (ii) the target distribution is biased using only a fraction of the free-energy, in order to increase the effective sample size and reduce the variance of importance sampling estimators. We prove the convergence of the algorithm and analyze numerically its efficiency on a toy example.

  12. Elucidating Microbial Adaptation Dynamics via Autonomous Exposure and Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, J. M.; Verseux, C.; Gentry, D.; Moffet, A.; Thayabaran, R.; Wong, N.; Rothschild, L.

    2013-12-01

    The adaptation of micro-organisms to their environments is a complex process of interaction between the pressures of the environment and of competition. Reducing this multifactorial process to environmental exposure in the laboratory is a common tool for elucidating individual mechanisms of evolution, such as mutation rates[Wielgoss et al., 2013]. Although such studies inform fundamental questions about the way adaptation and even speciation occur, they are often limited by labor-intensive manual techniques[Wassmann et al., 2010]. Current methods for controlled study of microbial adaptation limit the length of time, the depth of collected data, and the breadth of applied environmental conditions. Small idiosyncrasies in manual techniques can have large effects on outcomes; for example, there are significant variations in induced radiation resistances following similar repeated exposure protocols[Alcántara-Díaz et al., 2004; Goldman and Travisano, 2011]. We describe here a project under development to allow rapid cycling of multiple types of microbial environmental exposure. The system allows continuous autonomous monitoring and data collection of both single species and sampled communities, independently and concurrently providing multiple types of controlled environmental pressure (temperature, radiation, chemical presence or absence, and so on) to a microbial community in dynamic response to the ecosystem's current status. When combined with DNA sequencing and extraction, such a controlled environment can cast light on microbial functional development, population dynamics, inter- and intra-species competition, and microbe-environment interaction. The project's goal is to allow rapid, repeatable iteration of studies of both natural and artificial microbial adaptation. As an example, the same system can be used both to increase the pH of a wet soil aliquot over time while periodically sampling it for genetic activity analysis, or to repeatedly expose a culture of

  13. Adaptive control of turbulence intensity is accelerated by frugal flow sampling.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Daniel B; van Halder, Yous; Lentink, David

    2017-11-01

    The aerodynamic performance of vehicles and animals, as well as the productivity of turbines and energy harvesters, depends on the turbulence intensity of the incoming flow. Previous studies have pointed at the potential benefits of active closed-loop turbulence control. However, it is unclear what the minimal sensory and algorithmic requirements are for realizing this control. Here we show that very low-bandwidth anemometers record sufficient information for an adaptive control algorithm to converge quickly. Our online Newton-Raphson algorithm tunes the turbulence in a recirculating wind tunnel by taking readings from an anemometer in the test section. After starting at 9% turbulence intensity, the algorithm converges on values ranging from 10% to 45% in less than 12 iterations within 1% accuracy. By down-sampling our measurements, we show that very-low-bandwidth anemometers record sufficient information for convergence. Furthermore, down-sampling accelerates convergence by smoothing gradients in turbulence intensity. Our results explain why low-bandwidth anemometers in engineering and mechanoreceptors in biology may be sufficient for adaptive control of turbulence intensity. Finally, our analysis suggests that, if certain turbulent eddy sizes are more important to control than others, frugal adaptive control schemes can be particularly computationally effective for improving performance. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Self-adaptive enhanced sampling in the energy and trajectory spaces: accelerated thermodynamics and kinetic calculations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi Qin

    2008-04-07

    Here, we introduce a simple self-adaptive computational method to enhance the sampling in energy, configuration, and trajectory spaces. The method makes use of two strategies. It first uses a non-Boltzmann distribution method to enhance the sampling in the phase space, in particular, in the configuration space. The application of this method leads to a broad energy distribution in a large energy range and a quickly converged sampling of molecular configurations. In the second stage of simulations, the configuration space of the system is divided into a number of small regions according to preselected collective coordinates. An enhanced sampling of reactive transition paths is then performed in a self-adaptive fashion to accelerate kinetics calculations.

  15. An Energy Efficient Adaptive Sampling Algorithm in a Sensor Network for Automated Water Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shu, Tongxin; Xia, Min; Chen, Jiahong; Silva, Clarence de

    2017-11-05

    Power management is crucial in the monitoring of a remote environment, especially when long-term monitoring is needed. Renewable energy sources such as solar and wind may be harvested to sustain a monitoring system. However, without proper power management, equipment within the monitoring system may become nonfunctional and, as a consequence, the data or events captured during the monitoring process will become inaccurate as well. This paper develops and applies a novel adaptive sampling algorithm for power management in the automated monitoring of the quality of water in an extensive and remote aquatic environment. Based on the data collected on line using sensor nodes, a data-driven adaptive sampling algorithm (DDASA) is developed for improving the power efficiency while ensuring the accuracy of sampled data. The developed algorithm is evaluated using two distinct key parameters, which are dissolved oxygen (DO) and turbidity. It is found that by dynamically changing the sampling frequency, the battery lifetime can be effectively prolonged while maintaining a required level of sampling accuracy. According to the simulation results, compared to a fixed sampling rate, approximately 30.66% of the battery energy can be saved for three months of continuous water quality monitoring. Using the same dataset to compare with a traditional adaptive sampling algorithm (ASA), while achieving around the same Normalized Mean Error (NME), DDASA is superior in saving 5.31% more battery energy.

  16. An Energy Efficient Adaptive Sampling Algorithm in a Sensor Network for Automated Water Quality Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Tongxin; Xia, Min; Chen, Jiahong; de Silva, Clarence

    2017-01-01

    Power management is crucial in the monitoring of a remote environment, especially when long-term monitoring is needed. Renewable energy sources such as solar and wind may be harvested to sustain a monitoring system. However, without proper power management, equipment within the monitoring system may become nonfunctional and, as a consequence, the data or events captured during the monitoring process will become inaccurate as well. This paper develops and applies a novel adaptive sampling algorithm for power management in the automated monitoring of the quality of water in an extensive and remote aquatic environment. Based on the data collected on line using sensor nodes, a data-driven adaptive sampling algorithm (DDASA) is developed for improving the power efficiency while ensuring the accuracy of sampled data. The developed algorithm is evaluated using two distinct key parameters, which are dissolved oxygen (DO) and turbidity. It is found that by dynamically changing the sampling frequency, the battery lifetime can be effectively prolonged while maintaining a required level of sampling accuracy. According to the simulation results, compared to a fixed sampling rate, approximately 30.66% of the battery energy can be saved for three months of continuous water quality monitoring. Using the same dataset to compare with a traditional adaptive sampling algorithm (ASA), while achieving around the same Normalized Mean Error (NME), DDASA is superior in saving 5.31% more battery energy. PMID:29113087

  17. Temporally Adaptive Sampling: A Case Study in Rare Species Survey Design with Marbled Salamanders (Ambystoma opacum)

    PubMed Central

    Charney, Noah D.; Kubel, Jacob E.; Eiseman, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds. PMID:25799224

  18. Flexible binding simulation by a novel and improved version of virtual-system coupled adaptive umbrella sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2016-10-01

    Virtual-system coupled adaptive umbrella sampling (VAUS) enhances sampling along a reaction coordinate by using a virtual degree of freedom. However, VAUS and regular adaptive umbrella sampling (AUS) methods are yet computationally expensive. To decrease the computational burden further, improvements of VAUS for all-atom explicit solvent simulation are presented here. The improvements include probability distribution calculation by a Markov approximation; parameterization of biasing forces by iterative polynomial fitting; and force scaling. These when applied to study Ala-pentapeptide dimerization in explicit solvent showed advantage over regular AUS. By using improved VAUS larger biological systems are amenable.

  19. Low bit-rate image compression via adaptive down-sampling and constrained least squares upconversion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Xiangjun; Wang, Xiaohan

    2009-03-01

    Recently, many researchers started to challenge a long-standing practice of digital photography: oversampling followed by compression and pursuing more intelligent sparse sampling techniques. In this paper, we propose a practical approach of uniform down sampling in image space and yet making the sampling adaptive by spatially varying, directional low-pass prefiltering. The resulting down-sampled prefiltered image remains a conventional square sample grid, and, thus, it can be compressed and transmitted without any change to current image coding standards and systems. The decoder first decompresses the low-resolution image and then upconverts it to the original resolution in a constrained least squares restoration process, using a 2-D piecewise autoregressive model and the knowledge of directional low-pass prefiltering. The proposed compression approach of collaborative adaptive down-sampling and upconversion (CADU) outperforms JPEG 2000 in PSNR measure at low to medium bit rates and achieves superior visual quality, as well. The superior low bit-rate performance of the CADU approach seems to suggest that oversampling not only wastes hardware resources and energy, and it could be counterproductive to image quality given a tight bit budget.

  20. Influence of wave-front sampling in adaptive optics retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Laslandes, Marie; Salas, Matthias; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Pircher, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of sampling densities of the wave-front has been used in retinal adaptive optics (AO) instruments, compared to the number of corrector elements. We developed a model in order to characterize the link between number of actuators, number of wave-front sampling points and AO correction performance. Based on available data from aberration measurements in the human eye, 1000 wave-fronts were generated for the simulations. The AO correction performance in the presence of these representative aberrations was simulated for different deformable mirror and Shack Hartmann wave-front sensor combinations. Predictions of the model were experimentally tested through in vivo measurements in 10 eyes including retinal imaging with an AO scanning laser ophthalmoscope. According to our study, a ratio between wavefront sampling points and actuator elements of 2 is sufficient to achieve high resolution in vivo images of photoreceptors. PMID:28271004

  1. Adaptive enhanced sampling with a path-variable for the simulation of protein folding and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Emanuel K.

    2017-12-01

    In this article, we present a novel adaptive enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD) method for the accelerated simulation of protein folding and aggregation. We introduce a path-variable L based on the un-biased momenta p and displacements dq for the definition of the bias s applied to the system and derive 3 algorithms: general adaptive bias MD, adaptive path-sampling, and a hybrid method which combines the first 2 methodologies. Through the analysis of the correlations between the bias and the un-biased gradient in the system, we find that the hybrid methodology leads to an improved force correlation and acceleration in the sampling of the phase space. We apply our method on SPC/E water, where we find a conservation of the average water structure. We then use our method to sample dialanine and the folding of TrpCage, where we find a good agreement with simulation data reported in the literature. Finally, we apply our methodologies on the initial stages of aggregation of a hexamer of Alzheimer's amyloid β fragment 25-35 (Aβ 25-35) and find that transitions within the hexameric aggregate are dominated by entropic barriers, while we speculate that especially the conformation entropy plays a major role in the formation of the fibril as a rate limiting factor.

  2. Adaptive enhanced sampling with a path-variable for the simulation of protein folding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel K

    2017-12-07

    In this article, we present a novel adaptive enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD) method for the accelerated simulation of protein folding and aggregation. We introduce a path-variable L based on the un-biased momenta p and displacements dq for the definition of the bias s applied to the system and derive 3 algorithms: general adaptive bias MD, adaptive path-sampling, and a hybrid method which combines the first 2 methodologies. Through the analysis of the correlations between the bias and the un-biased gradient in the system, we find that the hybrid methodology leads to an improved force correlation and acceleration in the sampling of the phase space. We apply our method on SPC/E water, where we find a conservation of the average water structure. We then use our method to sample dialanine and the folding of TrpCage, where we find a good agreement with simulation data reported in the literature. Finally, we apply our methodologies on the initial stages of aggregation of a hexamer of Alzheimer's amyloid β fragment 25-35 (Aβ 25-35) and find that transitions within the hexameric aggregate are dominated by entropic barriers, while we speculate that especially the conformation entropy plays a major role in the formation of the fibril as a rate limiting factor.

  3. Self-organizing adaptive map: autonomous learning of curves and surfaces from point samples.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Competitive Hebbian Learning (CHL) (Martinetz, 1993) is a simple and elegant method for estimating the topology of a manifold from point samples. The method has been adopted in a number of self-organizing networks described in the literature and has given rise to related studies in the fields of geometry and computational topology. Recent results from these fields have shown that a faithful reconstruction can be obtained using the CHL method only for curves and surfaces. Within these limitations, these findings constitute a basis for defining a CHL-based, growing self-organizing network that produces a faithful reconstruction of an input manifold. The SOAM (Self-Organizing Adaptive Map) algorithm adapts its local structure autonomously in such a way that it can match the features of the manifold being learned. The adaptation process is driven by the defects arising when the network structure is inadequate, which cause a growth in the density of units. Regions of the network undergo a phase transition and change their behavior whenever a simple, local condition of topological regularity is met. The phase transition is eventually completed across the entire structure and the adaptation process terminates. In specific conditions, the structure thus obtained is homeomorphic to the input manifold. During the adaptation process, the network also has the capability to focus on the acquisition of input point samples in critical regions, with a substantial increase in efficiency. The behavior of the network has been assessed experimentally with typical data sets for surface reconstruction, including suboptimal conditions, e.g. with undersampling and noise. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. ADAPTIVE METHODS FOR STOCHASTIC DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS VIA NATURAL EMBEDDINGS AND REJECTION SAMPLING WITH MEMORY.

    PubMed

    Rackauckas, Christopher; Nie, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive time-stepping with high-order embedded Runge-Kutta pairs and rejection sampling provides efficient approaches for solving differential equations. While many such methods exist for solving deterministic systems, little progress has been made for stochastic variants. One challenge in developing adaptive methods for stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is the construction of embedded schemes with direct error estimates. We present a new class of embedded stochastic Runge-Kutta (SRK) methods with strong order 1.5 which have a natural embedding of strong order 1.0 methods. This allows for the derivation of an error estimate which requires no additional function evaluations. Next we derive a general method to reject the time steps without losing information about the future Brownian path termed Rejection Sampling with Memory (RSwM). This method utilizes a stack data structure to do rejection sampling, costing only a few floating point calculations. We show numerically that the methods generate statistically-correct and tolerance-controlled solutions. Lastly, we show that this form of adaptivity can be applied to systems of equations, and demonstrate that it solves a stiff biological model 12.28x faster than common fixed timestep algorithms. Our approach only requires the solution to a bridging problem and thus lends itself to natural generalizations beyond SDEs.

  5. ADAPTIVE METHODS FOR STOCHASTIC DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS VIA NATURAL EMBEDDINGS AND REJECTION SAMPLING WITH MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Rackauckas, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive time-stepping with high-order embedded Runge-Kutta pairs and rejection sampling provides efficient approaches for solving differential equations. While many such methods exist for solving deterministic systems, little progress has been made for stochastic variants. One challenge in developing adaptive methods for stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is the construction of embedded schemes with direct error estimates. We present a new class of embedded stochastic Runge-Kutta (SRK) methods with strong order 1.5 which have a natural embedding of strong order 1.0 methods. This allows for the derivation of an error estimate which requires no additional function evaluations. Next we derive a general method to reject the time steps without losing information about the future Brownian path termed Rejection Sampling with Memory (RSwM). This method utilizes a stack data structure to do rejection sampling, costing only a few floating point calculations. We show numerically that the methods generate statistically-correct and tolerance-controlled solutions. Lastly, we show that this form of adaptivity can be applied to systems of equations, and demonstrate that it solves a stiff biological model 12.28x faster than common fixed timestep algorithms. Our approach only requires the solution to a bridging problem and thus lends itself to natural generalizations beyond SDEs. PMID:29527134

  6. IN-SYNC. IV. The Young Stellar Population in the Orion A Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Covey, Kevin R.; Cottaar, Michiel; Foster, Jonathan B.; Cullen, Nicholas C.; Tobin, John J.; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Meyer, Michael R.; Nidever, David L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Majewski, Steve; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Zasowski, Gail; Pan, Kaike

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey APOGEE INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters program (IN-SYNC) survey of the Orion A molecular cloud. This survey obtained high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of about 2700 young pre-main-sequence stars on a ˜ 6^\\circ field of view. We have measured accurate stellar parameters ({T}{{eff}}, {log}g, v{sin}I) and extinctions and placed the sources in the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram (HRD). We have also extracted radial velocities for the kinematic characterization of the population. We compare our measurements with literature results to assess the performance and accuracy of the survey. Source extinction shows evidence for dust grains that are larger than those in the diffuse interstellar medium: we estimate an average RV = 5.5 in the region. Importantly, we find a clear correlation between HRD inferred ages and spectroscopic surface-gravity-inferred ages and between extinction and disk presence; this strongly suggests a real spread of ages larger than a few Myr. Focusing on the young population around NGC 1980/ι Ori, which has previously been suggested to be a separate, foreground, older cluster, we confirm its older (˜5 Myr) age and low AV, but considering that its radial velocity distribution is indistinguishable from Orion A’s population, we suggest that NGC 1980 is part of Orion A’s star formation activity. Based on their stellar parameters and kinematic properties, we identify 383 new candidate members of Orion A, most of which are diskless sources in areas of the region poorly studied by previous works.

  7. Incremental Validity of the Durand Adaptive Psychopathic Traits Questionnaire Above Self-Report Psychopathy Measures in Community Samples.

    PubMed

    Durand, Guillaume

    2018-05-03

    Although highly debated, the notion of the existence of an adaptive side to psychopathy is supported by some researchers. Currently, 2 instruments assessing psychopathic traits include an adaptive component, which might not cover the full spectrum of adaptive psychopathic traits. The Durand Adaptive Psychopathic Traits Questionnaire (DAPTQ; Durand, 2017 ) is a 41-item self-reported instrument assessing adaptive traits known to correlate with the psychopathic personality. In this study, I investigated in 2 samples (N = 263 and N = 262) the incremental validity of the DAPTQ over the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Short Form (PPI-SF) and the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (TriPM) using multiple criterion measures. Results showed that the DAPTQ significantly increased the predictive validity over the PPI-SF on 5 factors of the HEXACO. Additionally, the DAPTQ provided incremental validity over both the PPI-SF and the TriPM on measures of communication adaptability, perceived stress, and trait anxiety. Overall, these results support the validity of the DAPTQ in community samples. Directions for future studies to further validate the DAPTQ are discussed.

  8. Sensory adaptation for timing perception.

    PubMed

    Roseboom, Warrick; Linares, Daniel; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-04-22

    Recent sensory experience modifies subjective timing perception. For example, when visual events repeatedly lead auditory events, such as when the sound and video tracks of a movie are out of sync, subsequent vision-leads-audio presentations are reported as more simultaneous. This phenomenon could provide insights into the fundamental problem of how timing is represented in the brain, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that the effect of recent experience on timing perception is not just subjective; recent sensory experience also modifies relative timing discrimination. This result indicates that recent sensory history alters the encoding of relative timing in sensory areas, excluding explanations of the subjective phenomenon based only on decision-level changes. The pattern of changes in timing discrimination suggests the existence of two sensory components, similar to those previously reported for visual spatial attributes: a lateral shift in the nonlinear transducer that maps relative timing into perceptual relative timing and an increase in transducer slope around the exposed timing. The existence of these components would suggest that previous explanations of how recent experience may change the sensory encoding of timing, such as changes in sensory latencies or simple implementations of neural population codes, cannot account for the effect of sensory adaptation on timing perception.

  9. Results from the APOGEE IN-SYNC Orion: parameters and radial velocities for thousands of young stars in the Orion Complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Rio, Nicola; SDSS Apogee IN-SYNC ancillary program Team

    2015-01-01

    I will present the results of our characterization of the dynamical status of the young stellar population in the Orion A star forming region. This is based on radial velocity measurements obtained within the SDSS-III Apogee IN-SYNC Orion Survey, which obtained high-resolution spectroscopy of ~3000 objects in the region, from the dense Orion Nebula Cluster - the prototypical nearby region of active massive star formation - to the low-density environments of the L1641 region. We find evidence for kinematic subclustering along the star forming filament, where the stellar component remains kinematically associated to the gas; in the ONC we find that the stellar population is supervirial and currently expanding. We rule out the existence of a controversial candidate foreground cluster to the south of the ONC. These results, complemented with an analysis of the spatial structure of the population, enables critical tests of theories that describe the formation and early evolution of Orion and young clusters in general.

  10. Optimal micro-mirror tilt angle and sync mark design for digital micro-mirror device based collinear holographic data storage system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinpeng; Horimai, Hideyoshi; Lin, Xiao; Liu, Jinyan; Huang, Yong; Tan, Xiaodi

    2017-06-01

    The collinear holographic data storage system (CHDSS) is a very promising storage system due to its large storage capacities and high transfer rates in the era of big data. The digital micro-mirror device (DMD) as a spatial light modulator is the key device of the CHDSS due to its high speed, high precision, and broadband working range. To improve the system stability and performance, an optimal micro-mirror tilt angle was theoretically calculated and experimentally confirmed by analyzing the relationship between the tilt angle of the micro-mirror on the DMD and the power profiles of diffraction patterns of the DMD at the Fourier plane. In addition, we proposed a novel chess board sync mark design in the data page to reduce the system bit error rate in circumstances of reduced aperture required to decrease noise and median exposure amount. It will provide practical guidance for future DMD based CHDSS development.

  11. An efficient adaptive sampling strategy for global surrogate modeling with applications in multiphase flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, S.; Lu, D.; Shi, X.; Zhang, G.; Ye, M.; Wu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Surrogate models have shown remarkable computational efficiency in hydrological simulations involving design space exploration, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty quantification, etc. The central task of constructing a global surrogate models is to achieve a prescribed approximation accuracy with as few original model executions as possible, which requires a good design strategy to optimize the distribution of data points in the parameter domains and an effective stopping criterion to automatically terminate the design process when desired approximation accuracy is achieved. This study proposes a novel adaptive sampling strategy, which starts from a small number of initial samples and adaptively selects additional samples by balancing the collection in unexplored regions and refinement in interesting areas. We define an efficient and effective evaluation metric basing on Taylor expansion to select the most promising potential samples from candidate points, and propose a robust stopping criterion basing on the approximation accuracy at new points to guarantee the achievement of desired accuracy. The numerical results of several benchmark analytical functions indicate that the proposed approach is more computationally efficient and robust than the widely used maximin distance design and two other well-known adaptive sampling strategies. The application to two complicated multiphase flow problems further demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of our method in constructing global surrogate models for high-dimensional and highly nonlinear problems. Acknowledgements: This work was financially supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China grants No. 41030746 and 41172206.

  12. A novel heterogeneous training sample selection method on space-time adaptive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Yongshun; Guo, Yiduo

    2018-04-01

    The performance of ground target detection about space-time adaptive processing (STAP) decreases when non-homogeneity of clutter power is caused because of training samples contaminated by target-like signals. In order to solve this problem, a novel nonhomogeneous training sample selection method based on sample similarity is proposed, which converts the training sample selection into a convex optimization problem. Firstly, the existing deficiencies on the sample selection using generalized inner product (GIP) are analyzed. Secondly, the similarities of different training samples are obtained by calculating mean-hausdorff distance so as to reject the contaminated training samples. Thirdly, cell under test (CUT) and the residual training samples are projected into the orthogonal subspace of the target in the CUT, and mean-hausdorff distances between the projected CUT and training samples are calculated. Fourthly, the distances are sorted in order of value and the training samples which have the bigger value are selective preference to realize the reduced-dimension. Finally, simulation results with Mountain-Top data verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Adaptive sampling dual terahertz comb spectroscopy using dual free-running femtosecond lasers.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Ryuji; Hsieh, Yi-Da; Hayashi, Kenta; Cahyadi, Harsono; Hindle, Francis; Sakaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Iwata, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Minoshima, Kaoru; Inaba, Hajime

    2015-06-02

    Terahertz (THz) dual comb spectroscopy (DCS) is a promising method for high-accuracy, high-resolution, broadband THz spectroscopy because the mode-resolved THz comb spectrum includes both broadband THz radiation and narrow-line CW-THz radiation characteristics. In addition, all frequency modes of a THz comb can be phase-locked to a microwave frequency standard, providing excellent traceability. However, the need for stabilization of dual femtosecond lasers has often hindered its wide use. To overcome this limitation, here we have demonstrated adaptive-sampling THz-DCS, allowing the use of free-running femtosecond lasers. To correct the fluctuation of the time and frequency scales caused by the laser timing jitter, an adaptive sampling clock is generated by dual THz-comb-referenced spectrum analysers and is used for a timing clock signal in a data acquisition board. The results not only indicated the successful implementation of THz-DCS with free-running lasers but also showed that this configuration outperforms standard THz-DCS with stabilized lasers due to the slight jitter remained in the stabilized lasers.

  14. Adaptive sampling dual terahertz comb spectroscopy using dual free-running femtosecond lasers

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Ryuji; Hsieh, Yi-Da; Hayashi, Kenta; Cahyadi, Harsono; Hindle, Francis; Sakaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Iwata, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Minoshima, Kaoru; Inaba, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) dual comb spectroscopy (DCS) is a promising method for high-accuracy, high-resolution, broadband THz spectroscopy because the mode-resolved THz comb spectrum includes both broadband THz radiation and narrow-line CW-THz radiation characteristics. In addition, all frequency modes of a THz comb can be phase-locked to a microwave frequency standard, providing excellent traceability. However, the need for stabilization of dual femtosecond lasers has often hindered its wide use. To overcome this limitation, here we have demonstrated adaptive-sampling THz-DCS, allowing the use of free-running femtosecond lasers. To correct the fluctuation of the time and frequency scales caused by the laser timing jitter, an adaptive sampling clock is generated by dual THz-comb-referenced spectrum analysers and is used for a timing clock signal in a data acquisition board. The results not only indicated the successful implementation of THz-DCS with free-running lasers but also showed that this configuration outperforms standard THz-DCS with stabilized lasers due to the slight jitter remained in the stabilized lasers. PMID:26035687

  15. Optimal updating magnitude in adaptive flat-distribution sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Drake, Justin A.; Ma, Jianpeng; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2017-11-01

    We present a study on the optimization of the updating magnitude for a class of free energy methods based on flat-distribution sampling, including the Wang-Landau (WL) algorithm and metadynamics. These methods rely on adaptive construction of a bias potential that offsets the potential of mean force by histogram-based updates. The convergence of the bias potential can be improved by decreasing the updating magnitude with an optimal schedule. We show that while the asymptotically optimal schedule for the single-bin updating scheme (commonly used in the WL algorithm) is given by the known inverse-time formula, that for the Gaussian updating scheme (commonly used in metadynamics) is often more complex. We further show that the single-bin updating scheme is optimal for very long simulations, and it can be generalized to a class of bandpass updating schemes that are similarly optimal. These bandpass updating schemes target only a few long-range distribution modes and their optimal schedule is also given by the inverse-time formula. Constructed from orthogonal polynomials, the bandpass updating schemes generalize the WL and Langfeld-Lucini-Rago algorithms as an automatic parameter tuning scheme for umbrella sampling.

  16. Optimal updating magnitude in adaptive flat-distribution sampling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Drake, Justin A; Ma, Jianpeng; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2017-11-07

    We present a study on the optimization of the updating magnitude for a class of free energy methods based on flat-distribution sampling, including the Wang-Landau (WL) algorithm and metadynamics. These methods rely on adaptive construction of a bias potential that offsets the potential of mean force by histogram-based updates. The convergence of the bias potential can be improved by decreasing the updating magnitude with an optimal schedule. We show that while the asymptotically optimal schedule for the single-bin updating scheme (commonly used in the WL algorithm) is given by the known inverse-time formula, that for the Gaussian updating scheme (commonly used in metadynamics) is often more complex. We further show that the single-bin updating scheme is optimal for very long simulations, and it can be generalized to a class of bandpass updating schemes that are similarly optimal. These bandpass updating schemes target only a few long-range distribution modes and their optimal schedule is also given by the inverse-time formula. Constructed from orthogonal polynomials, the bandpass updating schemes generalize the WL and Langfeld-Lucini-Rago algorithms as an automatic parameter tuning scheme for umbrella sampling.

  17. Robust online tracking via adaptive samples selection with saliency detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jia; Chen, Xi; Zhu, QiuPing

    2013-12-01

    Online tracking has shown to be successful in tracking of previously unknown objects. However, there are two important factors which lead to drift problem of online tracking, the one is how to select the exact labeled samples even when the target locations are inaccurate, and the other is how to handle the confusors which have similar features with the target. In this article, we propose a robust online tracking algorithm with adaptive samples selection based on saliency detection to overcome the drift problem. To deal with the problem of degrading the classifiers using mis-aligned samples, we introduce the saliency detection method to our tracking problem. Saliency maps and the strong classifiers are combined to extract the most correct positive samples. Our approach employs a simple yet saliency detection algorithm based on image spectral residual analysis. Furthermore, instead of using the random patches as the negative samples, we propose a reasonable selection criterion, in which both the saliency confidence and similarity are considered with the benefits that confusors in the surrounding background are incorporated into the classifiers update process before the drift occurs. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via online boosting framework. Experiment results in several challenging video sequences demonstrate the accuracy and stability of our tracker.

  18. Adaptation of G-TAG Software for Validating Touch-and-Go Comet Surface Sampling Design Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandic, Milan; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The G-TAG software tool was developed under the R&TD on Integrated Autonomous Guidance, Navigation, and Control for Comet Sample Return, and represents a novel, multi-body dynamics simulation software tool for studying TAG sampling. The G-TAG multi-body simulation tool provides a simulation environment in which a Touch-and-Go (TAG) sampling event can be extensively tested. TAG sampling requires the spacecraft to descend to the surface, contact the surface with a sampling collection device, and then to ascend to a safe altitude. The TAG event lasts only a few seconds but is mission-critical with potentially high risk. Consequently, there is a need for the TAG event to be well characterized and studied by simulation and analysis in order for the proposal teams to converge on a reliable spacecraft design. This adaptation of the G-TAG tool was developed to support the Comet Odyssey proposal effort, and is specifically focused to address comet sample return missions. In this application, the spacecraft descends to and samples from the surface of a comet. Performance of the spacecraft during TAG is assessed based on survivability and sample collection performance. For the adaptation of the G-TAG simulation tool to comet scenarios, models are developed that accurately describe the properties of the spacecraft, approach trajectories, and descent velocities, as well as the models of the external forces and torques acting on the spacecraft. The adapted models of the spacecraft, descent profiles, and external sampling forces/torques were more sophisticated and customized for comets than those available in the basic G-TAG simulation tool. Scenarios implemented include the study of variations in requirements, spacecraft design (size, locations, etc. of the spacecraft components), and the environment (surface properties, slope, disturbances, etc.). The simulations, along with their visual representations using G-View, contributed to the Comet Odyssey New Frontiers proposal

  19. Adaptive single-pixel imaging with aggregated sampling and continuous differential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yaoran; He, Hongjie; Chen, Fan; Tai, Heng-Ming

    2018-06-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive compressive imaging technique with one single-pixel detector and single arm. The aggregated sampling (AS) method enables the reduction of resolutions of the reconstructed images. It aims to reduce the time and space consumption. The target image with a resolution up to 1024 × 1024 can be reconstructed successfully at the 20% sampling rate. The continuous differential measurement (CDM) method combined with a ratio factor of significant coefficient (RFSC) improves the imaging quality. Moreover, RFSC reduces the human intervention in parameter setting. This technique enhances the practicability of single-pixel imaging with the benefits from less time and space consumption, better imaging quality and less human intervention.

  20. Adaptive reference voltage generator for firing angle control of line-commutated inverters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolland, C. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A control system for a permanent-magnet motor driven by a multiphase line-commulated inverter is described. It is provided with integrators for integrating the back EMF of each phase of the motor for use in generating system control signals for an inverter gate logic using a sync and firing angle control generator connected to the outputs of the integrators. The firing angle control signals are produced by the control generator by means for combining 120 deg segments of the integrated back EMF signals symmetrical about their maxima into composite positive and negative waveforms, and means for sampling the maxima of each waveform every 120 deg. These samples are then used as positive and negative firing angle control signals. Whereby any change in amplitude of the integrated back EMF signals will not affect a change in the operating power factor of the motor and inverter.

  1. Coherent optical adaptive technique improves the spatial resolution of STED microscopy in thick samples

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Yang, Yanlong; Tan, Yu; Chen, Xun; Li, Yang; Qu, Junle; Ye, Tong

    2018-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) is one of far-field optical microscopy techniques that can provide sub-diffraction spatial resolution. The spatial resolution of the STED microscopy is determined by the specially engineered beam profile of the depletion beam and its power. However, the beam profile of the depletion beam may be distorted due to aberrations of optical systems and inhomogeneity of specimens’ optical properties, resulting in a compromised spatial resolution. The situation gets deteriorated when thick samples are imaged. In the worst case, the sever distortion of the depletion beam profile may cause complete loss of the super resolution effect no matter how much depletion power is applied to specimens. Previously several adaptive optics approaches have been explored to compensate aberrations of systems and specimens. However, it is hard to correct the complicated high-order optical aberrations of specimens. In this report, we demonstrate that the complicated distorted wavefront from a thick phantom sample can be measured by using the coherent optical adaptive technique (COAT). The full correction can effectively maintain and improve the spatial resolution in imaging thick samples. PMID:29400356

  2. Maximum type 1 error rate inflation in multiarmed clinical trials with adaptive interim sample size modifications.

    PubMed

    Graf, Alexandra C; Bauer, Peter; Glimm, Ekkehard; Koenig, Franz

    2014-07-01

    Sample size modifications in the interim analyses of an adaptive design can inflate the type 1 error rate, if test statistics and critical boundaries are used in the final analysis as if no modification had been made. While this is already true for designs with an overall change of the sample size in a balanced treatment-control comparison, the inflation can be much larger if in addition a modification of allocation ratios is allowed as well. In this paper, we investigate adaptive designs with several treatment arms compared to a single common control group. Regarding modifications, we consider treatment arm selection as well as modifications of overall sample size and allocation ratios. The inflation is quantified for two approaches: a naive procedure that ignores not only all modifications, but also the multiplicity issue arising from the many-to-one comparison, and a Dunnett procedure that ignores modifications, but adjusts for the initially started multiple treatments. The maximum inflation of the type 1 error rate for such types of design can be calculated by searching for the "worst case" scenarios, that are sample size adaptation rules in the interim analysis that lead to the largest conditional type 1 error rate in any point of the sample space. To show the most extreme inflation, we initially assume unconstrained second stage sample size modifications leading to a large inflation of the type 1 error rate. Furthermore, we investigate the inflation when putting constraints on the second stage sample sizes. It turns out that, for example fixing the sample size of the control group, leads to designs controlling the type 1 error rate. © 2014 The Author. Biometrical Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Study of a MEMS-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with adjustable pupil sampling for astronomical adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Baranec, Christoph; Dekany, Richard

    2008-10-01

    We introduce a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for adaptive optics that enables dynamic control of the spatial sampling of an incoming wavefront using a segmented mirror microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) device. Unlike a conventional lenslet array, subapertures are defined by either segments or groups of segments of a mirror array, with the ability to change spatial pupil sampling arbitrarily by redefining the segment grouping. Control over the spatial sampling of the wavefront allows for the minimization of wavefront reconstruction error for different intensities of guide source and different atmospheric conditions, which in turn maximizes an adaptive optics system's delivered Strehl ratio. Requirements for the MEMS devices needed in this Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor are also presented.

  4. Ensemble based adaptive over-sampling method for imbalanced data learning in computer aided detection of microaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fulong; Cao, Peng; Li, Wei; Zhao, Dazhe; Zaiane, Osmar

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a progressive disease, and its detection at an early stage is crucial for saving a patient's vision. An automated screening system for DR can help in reduce the chances of complete blindness due to DR along with lowering the work load on ophthalmologists. Among the earliest signs of DR are microaneurysms (MAs). However, current schemes for MA detection appear to report many false positives because detection algorithms have high sensitivity. Inevitably some non-MAs structures are labeled as MAs in the initial MAs identification step. This is a typical "class imbalance problem". Class imbalanced data has detrimental effects on the performance of conventional classifiers. In this work, we propose an ensemble based adaptive over-sampling algorithm for overcoming the class imbalance problem in the false positive reduction, and we use Boosting, Bagging, Random subspace as the ensemble framework to improve microaneurysm detection. The ensemble based over-sampling methods we proposed combine the strength of adaptive over-sampling and ensemble. The objective of the amalgamation of ensemble and adaptive over-sampling is to reduce the induction biases introduced from imbalanced data and to enhance the generalization classification performance of extreme learning machines (ELM). Experimental results show that our ASOBoost method has higher area under the ROC curve (AUC) and G-mean values than many existing class imbalance learning methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparison of adaptive sampling designs and binary spatial models: A simulation study using a census of Bromus inermis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Thornton, Jamie; Backus, Vickie M.; Hohmann, Matthew G.; Lehnhoff, Erik A.; Maxwell, Bruce D.; Michels, Kurt; Rew, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Commonly in environmental and ecological studies, species distribution data are recorded as presence or absence throughout a spatial domain of interest. Field based studies typically collect observations by sampling a subset of the spatial domain. We consider the effects of six different adaptive and two non-adaptive sampling designs and choice of three binary models on both predictions to unsampled locations and parameter estimation of the regression coefficients (species–environment relationships). Our simulation study is unique compared to others to date in that we virtually sample a true known spatial distribution of a nonindigenous plant species, Bromus inermis. The census of B. inermis provides a good example of a species distribution that is both sparsely (1.9 % prevalence) and patchily distributed. We find that modeling the spatial correlation using a random effect with an intrinsic Gaussian conditionally autoregressive prior distribution was equivalent or superior to Bayesian autologistic regression in terms of predicting to un-sampled areas when strip adaptive cluster sampling was used to survey B. inermis. However, inferences about the relationships between B. inermis presence and environmental predictors differed between the two spatial binary models. The strip adaptive cluster designs we investigate provided a significant advantage in terms of Markov chain Monte Carlo chain convergence when trying to model a sparsely distributed species across a large area. In general, there was little difference in the choice of neighborhood, although the adaptive king was preferred when transects were randomly placed throughout the spatial domain.

  6. An unbiased adaptive sampling algorithm for the exploration of RNA mutational landscapes under evolutionary pressure.

    PubMed

    Waldispühl, Jérôme; Ponty, Yann

    2011-11-01

    The analysis of the relationship between sequences and structures (i.e., how mutations affect structures and reciprocally how structures influence mutations) is essential to decipher the principles driving molecular evolution, to infer the origins of genetic diseases, and to develop bioengineering applications such as the design of artificial molecules. Because their structures can be predicted from the sequence data only, RNA molecules provide a good framework to study this sequence-structure relationship. We recently introduced a suite of algorithms called RNAmutants which allows a complete exploration of RNA sequence-structure maps in polynomial time and space. Formally, RNAmutants takes an input sequence (or seed) to compute the Boltzmann-weighted ensembles of mutants with exactly k mutations, and sample mutations from these ensembles. However, this approach suffers from major limitations. Indeed, since the Boltzmann probabilities of the mutations depend of the free energy of the structures, RNAmutants has difficulties to sample mutant sequences with low G+C-contents. In this article, we introduce an unbiased adaptive sampling algorithm that enables RNAmutants to sample regions of the mutational landscape poorly covered by classical algorithms. We applied these methods to sample mutations with low G+C-contents. These adaptive sampling techniques can be easily adapted to explore other regions of the sequence and structural landscapes which are difficult to sample. Importantly, these algorithms come at a minimal computational cost. We demonstrate the insights offered by these techniques on studies of complete RNA sequence structures maps of sizes up to 40 nucleotides. Our results indicate that the G+C-content has a strong influence on the size and shape of the evolutionary accessible sequence and structural spaces. In particular, we show that low G+C-contents favor the apparition of internal loops and thus possibly the synthesis of tertiary structure motifs. On

  7. Calibration model maintenance in melamine resin production: Integrating drift detection, smart sample selection and model adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nikzad-Langerodi, Ramin; Lughofer, Edwin; Cernuda, Carlos; Reischer, Thomas; Kantner, Wolfgang; Pawliczek, Marcin; Brandstetter, Markus

    2018-07-12

    The physico-chemical properties of Melamine Formaldehyde (MF) based thermosets are largely influenced by the degree of polymerization (DP) in the underlying resin. On-line supervision of the turbidity point by means of vibrational spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising technique to monitor the DP of MF resins. However, spectroscopic determination of the DP relies on chemometric models, which are usually sensitive to drifts caused by instrumental and/or sample-associated changes occurring over time. In order to detect the time point when drifts start causing prediction bias, we here explore a universal drift detector based on a faded version of the Page-Hinkley (PH) statistic, which we test in three data streams from an industrial MF resin production process. We employ committee disagreement (CD), computed as the variance of model predictions from an ensemble of partial least squares (PLS) models, as a measure for sample-wise prediction uncertainty and use the PH statistic to detect changes in this quantity. We further explore supervised and unsupervised strategies for (semi-)automatic model adaptation upon detection of a drift. For the former, manual reference measurements are requested whenever statistical thresholds on Hotelling's T 2 and/or Q-Residuals are violated. Models are subsequently re-calibrated using weighted partial least squares in order to increase the influence of newer samples, which increases the flexibility when adapting to new (drifted) states. Unsupervised model adaptation is carried out exploiting the dual antecedent-consequent structure of a recently developed fuzzy systems variant of PLS termed FLEXFIS-PLS. In particular, antecedent parts are updated while maintaining the internal structure of the local linear predictors (i.e. the consequents). We found improved drift detection capability of the CD compared to Hotelling's T 2 and Q-Residuals when used in combination with the proposed PH test. Furthermore, we found that active

  8. Studying the Global Bifurcation Involving Wada Boundary Metamorphosis by a Method of Generalized Cell Mapping with Sampling-Adaptive Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Jiang, Jun; Hong, Ling; Tang, Dafeng

    In this paper, a new method of Generalized Cell Mapping with Sampling-Adaptive Interpolation (GCMSAI) is presented in order to enhance the efficiency of the computation of one-step probability transition matrix of the Generalized Cell Mapping method (GCM). Integrations with one mapping step are replaced by sampling-adaptive interpolations of third order. An explicit formula of interpolation error is derived for a sampling-adaptive control to switch on integrations for the accuracy of computations with GCMSAI. By applying the proposed method to a two-dimensional forced damped pendulum system, global bifurcations are investigated with observations of boundary metamorphoses including full to partial and partial to partial as well as the birth of fully Wada boundary. Moreover GCMSAI requires a computational time of one thirtieth up to one fiftieth compared to that of the previous GCM.

  9. Evaluation of single and two-stage adaptive sampling designs for estimation of density and abundance of freshwater mussels in a large river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.; Rogala, J.T.; Gray, B.R.; Zigler, S.J.; Newton, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable estimates of abundance are needed to assess consequences of proposed habitat restoration and enhancement projects on freshwater mussels in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR). Although there is general guidance on sampling techniques for population assessment of freshwater mussels, the actual performance of sampling designs can depend critically on the population density and spatial distribution at the project site. To evaluate various sampling designs, we simulated sampling of populations, which varied in density and degree of spatial clustering. Because of logistics and costs of large river sampling and spatial clustering of freshwater mussels, we focused on adaptive and non-adaptive versions of single and two-stage sampling. The candidate designs performed similarly in terms of precision (CV) and probability of species detection for fixed sample size. Both CV and species detection were determined largely by density, spatial distribution and sample size. However, designs did differ in the rate that occupied quadrats were encountered. Occupied units had a higher probability of selection using adaptive designs than conventional designs. We used two measures of cost: sample size (i.e. number of quadrats) and distance travelled between the quadrats. Adaptive and two-stage designs tended to reduce distance between sampling units, and thus performed better when distance travelled was considered. Based on the comparisons, we provide general recommendations on the sampling designs for the freshwater mussels in the UMR, and presumably other large rivers.

  10. An evaluation of inferential procedures for adaptive clinical trial designs with pre-specified rules for modifying the sample size.

    PubMed

    Levin, Gregory P; Emerson, Sarah C; Emerson, Scott S

    2014-09-01

    Many papers have introduced adaptive clinical trial methods that allow modifications to the sample size based on interim estimates of treatment effect. There has been extensive commentary on type I error control and efficiency considerations, but little research on estimation after an adaptive hypothesis test. We evaluate the reliability and precision of different inferential procedures in the presence of an adaptive design with pre-specified rules for modifying the sampling plan. We extend group sequential orderings of the outcome space based on the stage at stopping, likelihood ratio statistic, and sample mean to the adaptive setting in order to compute median-unbiased point estimates, exact confidence intervals, and P-values uniformly distributed under the null hypothesis. The likelihood ratio ordering is found to average shorter confidence intervals and produce higher probabilities of P-values below important thresholds than alternative approaches. The bias adjusted mean demonstrates the lowest mean squared error among candidate point estimates. A conditional error-based approach in the literature has the benefit of being the only method that accommodates unplanned adaptations. We compare the performance of this and other methods in order to quantify the cost of failing to plan ahead in settings where adaptations could realistically be pre-specified at the design stage. We find the cost to be meaningful for all designs and treatment effects considered, and to be substantial for designs frequently proposed in the literature. © 2014, The International Biometric Society.

  11. A novel multi-scale adaptive sampling-based approach for energy saving in leak detection for WSN-based water pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saqib, Najam us; Faizan Mysorewala, Muhammad; Cheded, Lahouari

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel monitoring strategy for a wireless sensor networks (WSNs)-based water pipeline network. Our strategy uses a multi-pronged approach to reduce energy consumption based on the use of two types of vibration sensors and pressure sensors, all having different energy levels, and a hierarchical adaptive sampling mechanism to determine the sampling frequency. The sampling rate of the sensors is adjusted according to the bandwidth of the vibration signal being monitored by using a wavelet-based adaptive thresholding scheme that calculates the new sampling frequency for the following cycle. In this multimodal sensing scheme, the duty-cycling approach is used for all sensors to reduce the sampling instances, such that the high-energy, high-precision (HE-HP) vibration sensors have low duty cycles, and the low-energy, low-precision (LE-LP) vibration sensors have high duty cycles. The low duty-cycling (HE-HP) vibration sensor adjusts the sampling frequency of the high duty-cycling (LE-LP) vibration sensor. The simulated test bed considered here consists of a water pipeline network which uses pressure and vibration sensors, with the latter having different energy consumptions and precision levels, at various locations in the network. This is all the more useful for energy conservation for extended monitoring. It is shown that by using the novel features of our proposed scheme, a significant reduction in energy consumption is achieved and the leak is effectively detected by the sensor node that is closest to it. Finally, both the total energy consumed by monitoring as well as the time to detect the leak by a WSN node are computed, and show the superiority of our proposed hierarchical adaptive sampling algorithm over a non-adaptive sampling approach.

  12. Effects of Calibration Sample Size and Item Bank Size on Ability Estimation in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Alper; Weiss, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of calibration sample size and item bank size on examinee ability estimation in computerized adaptive testing (CAT). For this purpose, a 500-item bank pre-calibrated using the three-parameter logistic model with 10,000 examinees was simulated. Calibration samples of varying sizes (150, 250, 350, 500,…

  13. Adaptation and Validation of the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a Sample of Male Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Medina, Pablo; Sierra, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-21

    The aim of the present study was to adapt and validate the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a sample of male drug users. A sample of 326 male drug users and 322 non-clinical males was selected by cluster sampling and convenience sampling, respectively. Results showed that the scale had good psychometric properties and adequate internal consistency reliability (Initiation = .66, Refusal = .74 and STD-P = .79). An evaluation of the invariance showed strong factor equivalence between both samples. A high and moderate effect of Differential Item Functioning was only found in items 1 and 14 (∆R 2 Nagelkerke = .076 and .037, respectively). We strongly recommend not using item 1 if the goal is to compare the scores of both groups, otherwise the comparison will be biased. Correlations obtained between the CSFQ-14 and the safe sex ratio and the SAS subscales were significant (CI = 95%) and indicated good concurrent validity. Scores of male drug users were similar to those of non-clinical males. Therefore, the adaptation of the SAS to drug users provides enough guarantees for reliable and valid use in both clinical practice and research, although care should be taken with item 1.

  14. In Sync: The Effect of Physiology Feedback on the Match between Heart Rate and Self-Reported Stress.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Elisabeth T; Westerink, Joyce H D M; Beute, Femke; IJsselsteijn, Wijnand A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past years self-tracking of physiological parameters has become increasingly common: more and more people are keeping track of aspects of their physiological state (e.g., heart rate, blood sugar, and blood pressure). To shed light on the possible effects of self-tracking of physiology, a study was conducted to test whether physiology feedback has acute effects on self-reported stress and the extent to which self-reported stress corresponds to physiological stress. In this study, participants executed several short tasks, while they were either shown visual feedback about their heart rate or not. Results show that self-reported stress is more in sync with heart rate for participants who received physiology feedback. Interactions between two personality factors (neuroticism and anxiety sensitivity) and feedback on the level of self-reported stress were found, indicating that while physiology feedback may be beneficial for individuals high in neuroticism, it may be detrimental for those high in anxiety sensitivity. Additional work is needed to establish how the results of this study may extend beyond immediate effects in a controlled lab setting, but our results do provide a first indication of how self-tracking of physiology may lead to better body awareness and how personality characteristics can help us predict which individuals are most likely to benefit from self-tracking of physiology.

  15. In Sync: The Effect of Physiology Feedback on the Match between Heart Rate and Self-Reported Stress

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Elisabeth T.; Westerink, Joyce H. D. M.; Beute, Femke; IJsselsteijn, Wijnand A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past years self-tracking of physiological parameters has become increasingly common: more and more people are keeping track of aspects of their physiological state (e.g., heart rate, blood sugar, and blood pressure). To shed light on the possible effects of self-tracking of physiology, a study was conducted to test whether physiology feedback has acute effects on self-reported stress and the extent to which self-reported stress corresponds to physiological stress. In this study, participants executed several short tasks, while they were either shown visual feedback about their heart rate or not. Results show that self-reported stress is more in sync with heart rate for participants who received physiology feedback. Interactions between two personality factors (neuroticism and anxiety sensitivity) and feedback on the level of self-reported stress were found, indicating that while physiology feedback may be beneficial for individuals high in neuroticism, it may be detrimental for those high in anxiety sensitivity. Additional work is needed to establish how the results of this study may extend beyond immediate effects in a controlled lab setting, but our results do provide a first indication of how self-tracking of physiology may lead to better body awareness and how personality characteristics can help us predict which individuals are most likely to benefit from self-tracking of physiology. PMID:26146611

  16. Statistical analysis of hydrological response in urbanising catchments based on adaptive sampling using inter-amount times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Veldhuis, Marie-Claire; Schleiss, Marc

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we introduced an alternative approach for analysis of hydrological flow time series, using an adaptive sampling framework based on inter-amount times (IATs). The main difference with conventional flow time series is the rate at which low and high flows are sampled: the unit of analysis for IATs is a fixed flow amount, instead of a fixed time window. We analysed statistical distributions of flows and IATs across a wide range of sampling scales to investigate sensitivity of statistical properties such as quantiles, variance, skewness, scaling parameters and flashiness indicators to the sampling scale. We did this based on streamflow time series for 17 (semi)urbanised basins in North Carolina, US, ranging from 13 km2 to 238 km2 in size. Results showed that adaptive sampling of flow time series based on inter-amounts leads to a more balanced representation of low flow and peak flow values in the statistical distribution. While conventional sampling gives a lot of weight to low flows, as these are most ubiquitous in flow time series, IAT sampling gives relatively more weight to high flow values, when given flow amounts are accumulated in shorter time. As a consequence, IAT sampling gives more information about the tail of the distribution associated with high flows, while conventional sampling gives relatively more information about low flow periods. We will present results of statistical analyses across a range of subdaily to seasonal scales and will highlight some interesting insights that can be derived from IAT statistics with respect to basin flashiness and impact urbanisation on hydrological response.

  17. Age of Creative Insecurity: Student-Centered Learning. Historical Paper 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martell, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Trapped by inflexible mechanisms, many institutions are unable to adapt smoothly to the changing expectations and needs of their clients. Our educational system is particularly out-of-sync. Student-centered teaching--participative education--through unstructuring is one method for encouraging a flexible, creative, classroom environment. However,…

  18. Adaptive Sampling approach to environmental site characterization at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant: Phase 2 demonstration

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bujewski, G.E.; Johnson, R.L.

    1996-04-01

    Adaptive sampling programs provide real opportunities to save considerable time and money when characterizing hazardous waste sites. This Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project demonstrated two decision-support technologies, SitePlanner{trademark} and Plume{trademark}, that can facilitate the design and deployment of an adaptive sampling program. A demonstration took place at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP), and was unique in that it was tightly coupled with ongoing Army characterization work at the facility, with close scrutiny by both state and federal regulators. The demonstration was conducted in partnership with the Army Environmental Center`s (AEC) Installation Restoration Program and AEC`s Technology Developmentmore » Program. AEC supported researchers from Tufts University who demonstrated innovative field analytical techniques for the analysis of TNT and DNT. SitePlanner{trademark} is an object-oriented database specifically designed for site characterization that provides an effective way to compile, integrate, manage and display site characterization data as it is being generated. Plume{trademark} uses a combination of Bayesian analysis and geostatistics to provide technical staff with the ability to quantitatively merge soft and hard information for an estimate of the extent of contamination. Plume{trademark} provides an estimate of contamination extent, measures the uncertainty associated with the estimate, determines the value of additional sampling, and locates additional samples so that their value is maximized.« less

  19. Shear wave speed estimation by adaptive random sample consensus method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haoming; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for shear wave velocity estimation that is capable of extruding outliers automatically without preset threshold. The proposed method is an adaptive random sample consensus (ARANDSAC) and the metric used here is finding the certain percentage of inliers according to the closest distance criterion. To evaluate the method, the simulation and phantom experiment results were compared using linear regression with all points (LRWAP) and radon sum transform (RS) method. The assessment reveals that the relative biases of mean estimation are 20.00%, 4.67% and 5.33% for LRWAP, ARANDSAC and RS respectively for simulation, 23.53%, 4.08% and 1.08% for phantom experiment. The results suggested that the proposed ARANDSAC algorithm is accurate in shear wave speed estimation.

  20. Self-Learning Adaptive Umbrella Sampling Method for the Determination of Free Energy Landscapes in Multiple Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Wojtas-Niziurski, Wojciech; Meng, Yilin; Roux, Benoit; Bernèche, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The potential of mean force describing conformational changes of biomolecules is a central quantity that determines the function of biomolecular systems. Calculating an energy landscape of a process that depends on three or more reaction coordinates might require a lot of computational power, making some of multidimensional calculations practically impossible. Here, we present an efficient automatized umbrella sampling strategy for calculating multidimensional potential of mean force. The method progressively learns by itself, through a feedback mechanism, which regions of a multidimensional space are worth exploring and automatically generates a set of umbrella sampling windows that is adapted to the system. The self-learning adaptive umbrella sampling method is first explained with illustrative examples based on simplified reduced model systems, and then applied to two non-trivial situations: the conformational equilibrium of the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin in solution and ion permeation in the KcsA potassium channel. With this method, it is demonstrated that a significant smaller number of umbrella windows needs to be employed to characterize the free energy landscape over the most relevant regions without any loss in accuracy. PMID:23814508

  1. Sampling-free Bayesian inversion with adaptive hierarchical tensor representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigel, Martin; Marschall, Manuel; Schneider, Reinhold

    2018-03-01

    A sampling-free approach to Bayesian inversion with an explicit polynomial representation of the parameter densities is developed, based on an affine-parametric representation of a linear forward model. This becomes feasible due to the complete treatment in function spaces, which requires an efficient model reduction technique for numerical computations. The advocated perspective yields the crucial benefit that error bounds can be derived for all occuring approximations, leading to provable convergence subject to the discretization parameters. Moreover, it enables a fully adaptive a posteriori control with automatic problem-dependent adjustments of the employed discretizations. The method is discussed in the context of modern hierarchical tensor representations, which are used for the evaluation of a random PDE (the forward model) and the subsequent high-dimensional quadrature of the log-likelihood, alleviating the ‘curse of dimensionality’. Numerical experiments demonstrate the performance and confirm the theoretical results.

  2. IN-SYNC I: Homogeneous stellar parameters from high-resolution apogee spectra for thousands of pre-main sequence stars

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cottaar, Michiel; Meyer, Michael R.; Covey, Kevin R.

    2014-10-20

    Over two years, 8859 high-resolution H-band spectra of 3493 young (1-10 Myr) stars were gathered by the multi-object spectrograph of the APOGEE project as part of the IN-SYNC ancillary program of the SDSS-III survey. Here we present the forward modeling approach used to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, radial velocities, rotational velocities, and H-band veiling from these near-infrared spectra. We discuss in detail the statistical and systematic uncertainties in these stellar parameters. In addition, we present accurate extinctions by measuring the E(J – H) of these young stars with respect to the single-star photometric locus in the Pleiades. Finally, wemore » identify an intrinsic stellar radius spread of about 25% for late-type stars in IC 348 using three (nearly) independent measures of stellar radius, namely, the extinction-corrected J-band magnitude, the surface gravity, and the Rsin i from the rotational velocities and literature rotation periods. We exclude that this spread is caused by uncertainties in the stellar parameters by showing that the three estimators of stellar radius are correlated, so that brighter stars tend to have lower surface gravities and larger Rsin i than fainter stars at the same effective temperature. Tables providing the spectral and photometric parameters for the Pleiades and IC 348 have been provided online.« less

  3. IN-SYNC I: Homogeneous Stellar Parameters from High-resolution APOGEE Spectra for Thousands of Pre-main Sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaar, Michiel; Covey, Kevin R.; Meyer, Michael R.; Nidever, David L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Foster, Jonathan B.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; da Rio, Nicola; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Skrutskie, Michael; Majewski, Steven R.; Wilson, John C.; Zasowski, Gail

    2014-10-01

    Over two years, 8859 high-resolution H-band spectra of 3493 young (1-10 Myr) stars were gathered by the multi-object spectrograph of the APOGEE project as part of the IN-SYNC ancillary program of the SDSS-III survey. Here we present the forward modeling approach used to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, radial velocities, rotational velocities, and H-band veiling from these near-infrared spectra. We discuss in detail the statistical and systematic uncertainties in these stellar parameters. In addition, we present accurate extinctions by measuring the E(J - H) of these young stars with respect to the single-star photometric locus in the Pleiades. Finally, we identify an intrinsic stellar radius spread of about 25% for late-type stars in IC 348 using three (nearly) independent measures of stellar radius, namely, the extinction-corrected J-band magnitude, the surface gravity, and the Rsin i from the rotational velocities and literature rotation periods. We exclude that this spread is caused by uncertainties in the stellar parameters by showing that the three estimators of stellar radius are correlated, so that brighter stars tend to have lower surface gravities and larger Rsin i than fainter stars at the same effective temperature. Tables providing the spectral and photometric parameters for the Pleiades and IC 348 have been provided online.

  4. Noncoherent Symbol Synchronization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods for establishing symbol synchronization (sync) in digital communication receivers assume that carrier sync has already been established, i.e., the problem is addressed at the baseband level assuming that a 'perfect' estimate of carrier phase is available. We refer to this approach as coherent symbol sync. Since, for NRZ signaling, a suppressed carrier sync loop such as an I-Q Costas loop includes integrate-and-dump (I and D) filters in its in-phase (1) and quadrature (Q) arms, the traditional approach is to first track the carrier in the absence of symbol sync information, then feed back the symbol sync estimate to these filters, and then iterate between the two to a desirable operating level In this paper, we revisit the symbol sync problem by examining methods for obtaining such sync in the absence of carrier phase information, i.e., so-called noncoherent symbol sync loops. We compare the performance of these loops with that of a well-known coherent symbol sync loop and examine the conditions under which one is preferable over the other.

  5. An adaptive sampling method for variable-fidelity surrogate models using improved hierarchical kriging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiexiang; Zhou, Qi; Jiang, Ping; Shao, Xinyu; Xie, Tingli

    2018-01-01

    Variable-fidelity (VF) modelling methods have been widely used in complex engineering system design to mitigate the computational burden. Building a VF model generally includes two parts: design of experiments and metamodel construction. In this article, an adaptive sampling method based on improved hierarchical kriging (ASM-IHK) is proposed to refine the improved VF model. First, an improved hierarchical kriging model is developed as the metamodel, in which the low-fidelity model is varied through a polynomial response surface function to capture the characteristics of a high-fidelity model. Secondly, to reduce local approximation errors, an active learning strategy based on a sequential sampling method is introduced to make full use of the already required information on the current sampling points and to guide the sampling process of the high-fidelity model. Finally, two numerical examples and the modelling of the aerodynamic coefficient for an aircraft are provided to demonstrate the approximation capability of the proposed approach, as well as three other metamodelling methods and two sequential sampling methods. The results show that ASM-IHK provides a more accurate metamodel at the same simulation cost, which is very important in metamodel-based engineering design problems.

  6. Resilient microorganisms in dust samples of the International Space Station-survival of the adaptation specialists.

    PubMed

    Mora, Maximilian; Perras, Alexandra; Alekhova, Tatiana A; Wink, Lisa; Krause, Robert; Aleksandrova, Alina; Novozhilova, Tatiana; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2016-12-20

    The International Space Station (ISS) represents a unique biotope for the human crew but also for introduced microorganisms. Microbes experience selective pressures such as microgravity, desiccation, poor nutrient-availability due to cleaning, and an increased radiation level. We hypothesized that the microbial community inside the ISS is modified by adapting to these stresses. For this reason, we analyzed 8-12 years old dust samples from Russian ISS modules with major focus on the long-time surviving portion of the microbial community. We consequently assessed the cultivable microbiota of these samples in order to analyze their extremotolerant potential against desiccation, heat-shock, and clinically relevant antibiotics. In addition, we studied the bacterial and archaeal communities from the stored Russian dust samples via molecular methods (next-generation sequencing, NGS) and compared our new data with previously derived information from the US American ISS dust microbiome. We cultivated and identified in total 85 bacterial, non-pathogenic isolates (17 different species) and 1 fungal isolate from the 8-12 year old dust samples collected in the Russian segment of the ISS. Most of these isolates exhibited robust resistance against heat-shock and clinically relevant antibiotics. Microbial 16S rRNA gene and archaeal 16S rRNA gene targeting Next Generation Sequencing showed signatures of human-associated microorganisms (Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus, Coprococcus etc.), but also specifically adapted extremotolerant microorganisms. Besides bacteria, the detection of archaeal signatures in higher abundance was striking. Our findings reveal (i) the occurrence of living, hardy microorganisms in archived Russian ISS dust samples, (ii) a profound resistance capacity of ISS microorganisms against environmental stresses, and (iii) the presence of archaeal signatures on board. In addition, we found indications that the microbial community in the Russian segment dust

  7. Differentially Private Histogram Publication For Dynamic Datasets: An Adaptive Sampling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Xiong, Li; Liu, Jinfei

    2016-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently become a de facto standard for private statistical data release. Many algorithms have been proposed to generate differentially private histograms or synthetic data. However, most of them focus on “one-time” release of a static dataset and do not adequately address the increasing need of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time. A straightforward application of existing histogram methods on each snapshot of such dynamic datasets will incur high accumulated error due to the composibility of differential privacy and correlations or overlapping users between the snapshots. In this paper, we address the problem of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time with differential privacy, using a novel adaptive distance-based sampling approach. Our first method, DSFT, uses a fixed distance threshold and releases a differentially private histogram only when the current snapshot is sufficiently different from the previous one, i.e., with a distance greater than a predefined threshold. Our second method, DSAT, further improves DSFT and uses a dynamic threshold adaptively adjusted by a feedback control mechanism to capture the data dynamics. Extensive experiments on real and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our approach achieves better utility than baseline methods and existing state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26973795

  8. Inexpensive driver for stereo videogame glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pique, Michael; Coogan, Anthony

    1990-09-01

    We have adapted home videogame glasses from Sega as workstation stereo viewers. A small (4x7x9 cm.) box of electronics receives sync signals in parallel with the monitor (either separate ROB-Sync or composite video) and drives the glasses.The view is dimmer than with costlier shutters, there is more ghosting, and the user is feuered by the wires. But the glasses are so much cheaper than the full-screen shutters (250 instead of about 10 000) that it is practical to provide the benefits of stereo to many more workstation users. We are using them with Sun TAAC-1 workstations; the interlaced video can also be recorded on ordinary NTSC videotape and played on television monitors.

  9. Miniature multichannel biotelemeter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J. B.; Sumida, J. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A miniature multichannel biotelemeter system is described. The system includes a transmitter where signals from different sources are sampled to produce a wavetrain of pulses. The transmitter also separates signals by sync pulses. The pulses amplitude modulate a radio frequency carrier which is received at a receiver unit. There the sync pulses are detected by a demultiplexer which routes the pulses from each different source to a separate output channel where the pulses are used to reconstruct the signals from the particular source.

  10. Hormonal profile and follicular dynamics concurrent with CIDR and insulin modified Ovsync TAI programs and their impacts on the fertility response in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Ramoun, A A; Emara, A M; Heleil, B A; Darweish, S A; Abou-Ghait, H A

    2017-12-01

    Fifty one cyclic Egyptian buffaloes were used to study the hormonal profile and follicular dynamics concurrent with CIDR and insulin modified Ovsync TAI programs and their impacts on the consequent fertility responses. The buffaloes were randomly assigned into 3 ovulation synchronization protocols: Ovsync-alone (n = 13, control) CIDR-sync (n = 20) and Insulin-sync (n = 18). Ovsync-alone protocol consisted of two im injections of 20 μg bueserlin (GnRHa) on Day 0 (GnRH 1) and on Day 9 (GnRH 2) with an im injection of 500 μg of cloprostenol sodium (PGF 2 α) on Day 7. The CIDR-sync protocol consisted of the same treatment protocol as in Ovsync in addition to intra-vaginal insertion of CIDR (contains 1.38 gm of progesterone) on Day 0 followed by removal on Day 7. The Insulin-sync protocol consisted of the same treatment protocol as in Ovsync plus 3 sc injections of insulin at a dose of 0.25 i.u/1 kg, on Days 7, 8, and 9. Buffaloes in all groups were inseminated 16 h after GnRH2 by the same inseminator using frozen semen in straws. Blood samples were collected on Days 0, 3, 5 for serum progesterone assay and on Day 9 to measure serum concentrations of estradiol, insulin and IGF-1. Transrectal ultrasonographic scanning of the ovaries was conducted on Days 7, 8 and 9 to record the diameter of the largest follicle. Pregnancy diagnosis was conducted on Day 30 post-TAI by trans-rectal ultrasonographic scanning of the uterus to calculate conception rate. The serum progesterone concentration showed an increase (p < 0.01) in pregnant compared with non-pregnant buffaloes in both Ovsync-alone and Insulin-sync groups, but not in CIDR-sync group (p > 0.05) on Days 3 and 5. The serum estradiol concentration on Day 9 showed an increase (p < 0.01) in pregnant compared with the non-pregnant buffaloes in all of the treated groups. In Insulin-sync and Ovsync-alone groups, the diameter of the largest follicle (LF) was larger (p < 0.01) in pregnant compared with non

  11. A neural algorithm for the non-uniform and adaptive sampling of biomedical data.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Body sensors are finding increasing applications in the self-monitoring for health-care and in the remote surveillance of sensitive people. The physiological data to be sampled can be non-stationary, with bursts of high amplitude and frequency content providing most information. Such data could be sampled efficiently with a non-uniform schedule that increases the sampling rate only during activity bursts. A real time and adaptive algorithm is proposed to select the sampling rate, in order to reduce the number of measured samples, but still recording the main information. The algorithm is based on a neural network which predicts the subsequent samples and their uncertainties, requiring a measurement only when the risk of the prediction is larger than a selectable threshold. Four examples of application to biomedical data are discussed: electromyogram, electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, and body acceleration. Sampling rates are reduced under the Nyquist limit, still preserving an accurate representation of the data and of their power spectral densities (PSD). For example, sampling at 60% of the Nyquist frequency, the percentage average rectified errors in estimating the signals are on the order of 10% and the PSD is fairly represented, until the highest frequencies. The method outperforms both uniform sampling and compressive sensing applied to the same data. The discussed method allows to go beyond Nyquist limit, still preserving the information content of non-stationary biomedical signals. It could find applications in body sensor networks to lower the number of wireless communications (saving sensor power) and to reduce the occupation of memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Virtual-system-coupled adaptive umbrella sampling to compute free-energy landscape for flexible molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Higo, Junichi; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Kasahara, Kota; Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2015-07-30

    A novel enhanced conformational sampling method, virtual-system-coupled adaptive umbrella sampling (V-AUS), was proposed to compute 300-K free-energy landscape for flexible molecular docking, where a virtual degrees of freedom was introduced to control the sampling. This degree of freedom interacts with the biomolecular system. V-AUS was applied to complex formation of two disordered amyloid-β (Aβ30-35 ) peptides in a periodic box filled by an explicit solvent. An interpeptide distance was defined as the reaction coordinate, along which sampling was enhanced. A uniform conformational distribution was obtained covering a wide interpeptide distance ranging from the bound to unbound states. The 300-K free-energy landscape was characterized by thermodynamically stable basins of antiparallel and parallel β-sheet complexes and some other complex forms. Helices were frequently observed, when the two peptides contacted loosely or fluctuated freely without interpeptide contacts. We observed that V-AUS converged to uniform distribution more effectively than conventional AUS sampling did. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Circular zig-zag scan video format

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, C. Glen; Simmons, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    A circular, ziz-zag scan for use with vidicon tubes. A sine wave is generated, rectified and its fourth root extracted. The fourth root, and its inverse, are used to generate horizontal ramp and sync signals. The fourth root is also used to generate a vertical sync signal, and the vertical sync signal, along with the horizontal sync signal, are used to generate the vertical ramp signal. Cathode blanking and preamplifier clamp signals are also obtained from the vertical sync signal.

  14. High-throughput adaptive sampling for whole-slide histopathology image analysis (HASHI) via convolutional neural networks: Application to invasive breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gilmore, Hannah; Basavanhally, Ajay; Feldman, Michael; Ganesan, Shridar; Shih, Natalie; Tomaszewski, John; Madabhushi, Anant; González, Fabio

    2018-01-01

    Precise detection of invasive cancer on whole-slide images (WSI) is a critical first step in digital pathology tasks of diagnosis and grading. Convolutional neural network (CNN) is the most popular representation learning method for computer vision tasks, which have been successfully applied in digital pathology, including tumor and mitosis detection. However, CNNs are typically only tenable with relatively small image sizes (200 × 200 pixels). Only recently, Fully convolutional networks (FCN) are able to deal with larger image sizes (500 × 500 pixels) for semantic segmentation. Hence, the direct application of CNNs to WSI is not computationally feasible because for a WSI, a CNN would require billions or trillions of parameters. To alleviate this issue, this paper presents a novel method, High-throughput Adaptive Sampling for whole-slide Histopathology Image analysis (HASHI), which involves: i) a new efficient adaptive sampling method based on probability gradient and quasi-Monte Carlo sampling, and, ii) a powerful representation learning classifier based on CNNs. We applied HASHI to automated detection of invasive breast cancer on WSI. HASHI was trained and validated using three different data cohorts involving near 500 cases and then independently tested on 195 studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The results show that (1) the adaptive sampling method is an effective strategy to deal with WSI without compromising prediction accuracy by obtaining comparative results of a dense sampling (∼6 million of samples in 24 hours) with far fewer samples (∼2,000 samples in 1 minute), and (2) on an independent test dataset, HASHI is effective and robust to data from multiple sites, scanners, and platforms, achieving an average Dice coefficient of 76%.

  15. High-throughput adaptive sampling for whole-slide histopathology image analysis (HASHI) via convolutional neural networks: Application to invasive breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Hannah; Basavanhally, Ajay; Feldman, Michael; Ganesan, Shridar; Shih, Natalie; Tomaszewski, John; Madabhushi, Anant; González, Fabio

    2018-01-01

    Precise detection of invasive cancer on whole-slide images (WSI) is a critical first step in digital pathology tasks of diagnosis and grading. Convolutional neural network (CNN) is the most popular representation learning method for computer vision tasks, which have been successfully applied in digital pathology, including tumor and mitosis detection. However, CNNs are typically only tenable with relatively small image sizes (200 × 200 pixels). Only recently, Fully convolutional networks (FCN) are able to deal with larger image sizes (500 × 500 pixels) for semantic segmentation. Hence, the direct application of CNNs to WSI is not computationally feasible because for a WSI, a CNN would require billions or trillions of parameters. To alleviate this issue, this paper presents a novel method, High-throughput Adaptive Sampling for whole-slide Histopathology Image analysis (HASHI), which involves: i) a new efficient adaptive sampling method based on probability gradient and quasi-Monte Carlo sampling, and, ii) a powerful representation learning classifier based on CNNs. We applied HASHI to automated detection of invasive breast cancer on WSI. HASHI was trained and validated using three different data cohorts involving near 500 cases and then independently tested on 195 studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The results show that (1) the adaptive sampling method is an effective strategy to deal with WSI without compromising prediction accuracy by obtaining comparative results of a dense sampling (∼6 million of samples in 24 hours) with far fewer samples (∼2,000 samples in 1 minute), and (2) on an independent test dataset, HASHI is effective and robust to data from multiple sites, scanners, and platforms, achieving an average Dice coefficient of 76%. PMID:29795581

  16. A Kinematic Survey in the Perseus Molecular Cloud: Results from the APOGEE Infrared Survey of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Kevin R.; Cottaar, M.; Foster, J. B.; Nidever, D. L.; Meyer, M.; Tan, J.; Da Rio, N.; Flaherty, K. M.; Stassun, K.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Majewski, S.; APOGEE IN-SYNC Team

    2014-01-01

    Demographic studies of stellar clusters indicate that relatively few persist as bound structures for 100 Myrs or longer. If cluster dispersal is a 'violent' process, it could strongly influence the formation and early evolution of stellar binaries and planetary systems. Unfortunately, measuring the dynamical state of 'typical' (i.e., ~300-1000 member) young star clusters has been difficult, particularly for clusters still embedded within their parental molecular cloud. The near-infrared spectrograph for the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which can measure precise radial velocities for 230 cluster stars simultaneously, is uniquely suited to diagnosing the dynamics of Galactic star formation regions. We give an overview of the INfrared Survey of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC), an APOGEE ancillary science program that is carrying out a comparative study of young clusters in the Perseus molecular cloud: NGC 1333, a heavily embedded cluster, and IC 348, which has begun to disperse its surrounding molecular gas. These observations appear to rule out a significantly super-virial velocity dispersion in IC 348, contrary to predictions of models where a cluster's dynamics is strongly influenced by the dispersal of its primordial gas. We also summarize the properties of two newly identified spectroscopic binaries; binary systems such as these play a key role in the dynamical evolution of young clusters, and introduce velocity offsets that must be accounted for in measuring cluster velocity dispersions.

  17. The Portuguese adaptation of the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale (GSS1) in a sample of inmates.

    PubMed

    Pires, Rute; Silva, Danilo R; Ferreira, Ana Sousa

    2014-01-01

    This paper comprises two studies which address the validity of the Portuguese adaptation of the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale, GSS1. In study 1, the means and standard deviations for the suggestibility results of a sample of Portuguese inmates (N=40, Mage=37.5 years, SD=8.1) were compared to those of a sample of Icelandic inmates (Gudjonsson, 1997; Gudjonsson & Sigurdsson, 1996). Portuguese inmates' results were in line with the original results. In study 2, the means and standard deviations for the suggestibility results of the sample of Portuguese inmates were compared to those of a general Portuguese population sample (N=57, Mage=36.1 years, SD=12.7). The forensic sample obtained significantly higher scores in suggestibility measures than the general population sample. ANOVA confirmed that the increased suggestibility in the inmates sample was due to the limited memory capacity of this latter group. Given that the results of both studies 1 and 2 are in keeping with the author's original results (Gudjonsson, 1997), this may be regarded as a confirmation of the validity of the Portuguese GSS1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Circular zig-zag scan video format

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, C.G.; Simmons, C.M.

    1992-06-09

    A circular, ziz-zag scan for use with vidicon tubes is disclosed. A sine wave is generated, rectified and its fourth root extracted. The fourth root, and its inverse, are used to generate horizontal ramp and sync signals. The fourth root is also used to generate a vertical sync signal, and the vertical sync signal, along with the horizontal sync signal, are used to generate the vertical ramp signal. Cathode blanking and preamplifier clamp signals are also obtained from the vertical sync signal. 10 figs.

  19. Efficiency of Adaptive Temperature-Based Replica Exchange for Sampling Large-Scale Protein Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihong; Chen, Jianhan

    2013-06-11

    Temperature-based replica exchange (RE) is now considered a principal technique for enhanced sampling of protein conformations. It is also recognized that existence of sharp cooperative transitions (such as protein folding/unfolding) can lead to temperature exchange bottlenecks and significantly reduce the sampling efficiency. Here, we revisit two adaptive temperature-based RE protocols, namely, exchange equalization (EE) and current maximization (CM), that were previously examined using atomistic simulations (Lee and Olson, J. Chem. Physics2011, 134, 24111). Both protocols aim to overcome exchange bottlenecks by adaptively adjusting the simulation temperatures, either to achieve uniform exchange rates (in EE) or to maximize temperature diffusion (CM). By designing a realistic yet computationally tractable coarse-grained protein model, one can sample many reversible folding/unfolding transitions using conventional constant temperature molecular dynamics (MD), standard REMD, EE-REMD, and CM-REMD. This allows rigorous evaluation of the sampling efficiency, by directly comparing the rates of folding/unfolding transitions and convergence of various thermodynamic properties of interest. The results demonstrate that both EE and CM can indeed enhance temperature diffusion compared to standard RE, by ∼3- and over 10-fold, respectively. Surprisingly, the rates of reversible folding/unfolding transitions are similar in all three RE protocols. The convergence rates of several key thermodynamic properties, including the folding stability and various 1D and 2D free energy surfaces, are also similar. Therefore, the efficiency of RE protocols does not appear to be limited by temperature diffusion, but by the inherent rates of spontaneous large-scale conformational rearrangements. This is particularly true considering that virtually all RE simulations of proteins in practice involve exchange attempt frequencies (∼ps(-1)) that are several orders of magnitude faster than the

  20. Optimal Asset Distribution for Environmental Assessment and Forecasting Based on Observations, Adaptive Sampling, and Numerical Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    and Forecasting Based on Observations, Adaptive Sampling, and Numerical Prediction Steven R. Ramp Soliton Ocean Services, Inc. 691 Country Club... Soliton Ocean Services, Inc,691 Country Club Drive,Monterey,CA,93924 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...shortwave. The results show that the incoming shortwave radiation was the dominant term, even when averaged over the dark hours, which accounts

  1. Improving the performances of autofocus based on adaptive retina-like sampling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qun; Xiao, Yuqing; Cao, Jie; Cheng, Yang; Sun, Ce

    2018-03-01

    An adaptive retina-like sampling model (ARSM) is proposed to balance autofocusing accuracy and efficiency. Based on the model, we carry out comparative experiments between the proposed method and the traditional method in terms of accuracy, the full width of the half maxima (FWHM) and time consumption. Results show that the performances of our method are better than that of the traditional method. Meanwhile, typical autofocus functions, including sum-modified-Laplacian (SML), Laplacian (LAP), Midfrequency-DCT (MDCT) and Absolute Tenengrad (ATEN) are compared through comparative experiments. The smallest FWHM is obtained by the use of LAP, which is more suitable for evaluating accuracy than other autofocus functions. The autofocus function of MDCT is most suitable to evaluate the real-time ability.

  2. A Surrogate-based Adaptive Sampling Approach for History Matching and Uncertainty Quantification

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Li, Weixuan; Zhang, Dongxiao; Lin, Guang

    A critical procedure in reservoir simulations is history matching (or data assimilation in a broader sense), which calibrates model parameters such that the simulation results are consistent with field measurements, and hence improves the credibility of the predictions given by the simulations. Often there exist non-unique combinations of parameter values that all yield the simulation results matching the measurements. For such ill-posed history matching problems, Bayesian theorem provides a theoretical foundation to represent different solutions and to quantify the uncertainty with the posterior PDF. Lacking an analytical solution in most situations, the posterior PDF may be characterized with a samplemore » of realizations, each representing a possible scenario. A novel sampling algorithm is presented here for the Bayesian solutions to history matching problems. We aim to deal with two commonly encountered issues: 1) as a result of the nonlinear input-output relationship in a reservoir model, the posterior distribution could be in a complex form, such as multimodal, which violates the Gaussian assumption required by most of the commonly used data assimilation approaches; 2) a typical sampling method requires intensive model evaluations and hence may cause unaffordable computational cost. In the developed algorithm, we use a Gaussian mixture model as the proposal distribution in the sampling process, which is simple but also flexible to approximate non-Gaussian distributions and is particularly efficient when the posterior is multimodal. Also, a Gaussian process is utilized as a surrogate model to speed up the sampling process. Furthermore, an iterative scheme of adaptive surrogate refinement and re-sampling ensures sampling accuracy while keeping the computational cost at a minimum level. The developed approach is demonstrated with an illustrative example and shows its capability in handling the above-mentioned issues. Multimodal posterior of the history

  3. Adaptive Sampling in Autonomous Marine Sensor Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Analog Processing Section A high-performance preamplifier with low noise characteristics is vital to obtaining quality sonar data. The preamplifier ...research assistantships through the Generic Ocean Array Technology Sonar (GOATS) project, contract N00014-97-1-0202 and contract N00014-05-G-0106 Delivery...Formation Behavior ..................................... 60 5 An AUV Intelligent Sensor for Real-Time Adaptive Sensing 63 5.1 A Logical Sonar Sensor

  4. Adaption of egg and larvae sampling techniques for lake sturgeon and broadcast spawning fishes in a deep river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, Edward F.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Craig, Jaquelyn; Boase, James; Soper, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this report we describe how we adapted two techniques for sampling lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) and other fish early life history stages to meet our research needs in the Detroit River, a deep, flowing Great Lakes connecting channel. First, we developed a buoy-less method for sampling fish eggs and spawning activity using egg mats deployed on the river bottom. The buoy-less method allowed us to fish gear in areas frequented by boaters and recreational anglers, thus eliminating surface obstructions that interfered with recreational and boating activities. The buoy-less method also reduced gear loss due to drift when masses of floating aquatic vegetation would accumulate on buoys and lines, increasing the drag on the gear and pulling it downstream. Second, we adapted a D-frame drift net system formerly employed in shallow streams to assess larval lake sturgeon dispersal for use in the deeper (>8 m) Detroit River using an anchor and buoy system.

  5. Adaption of egg and larvae sampling techniques for lake sturgeon and broadcast spawning fishes in a deep river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, E.F.; Boase, J.; Kennedy, G.; Craig, J.; Soper, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this report we describe how we adapted two techniques for sampling lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) and other fish early life history stages to meet our research needs in the Detroit River, a deep, flowing Great Lakes connecting channel. First, we developed a buoy-less method for sampling fish eggs and spawning activity using egg mats deployed on the river bottom. The buoy-less method allowed us to fish gear in areas frequented by boaters and recreational anglers, thus eliminating surface obstructions that interfered with recreational and boating activities. The buoy-less method also reduced gear loss due to drift when masses of floating aquatic vegetation would accumulate on buoys and lines, increasing the drag on the gear and pulling it downstream. Second, we adapted a D-frame drift net system formerly employed in shallow streams to assess larval lake sturgeon dispersal for use in the deeper (>8m) Detroit River using an anchor and buoy system. ?? 2011 Blackwell Verlag, Berlin.

  6. NeuronDepot: keeping your colleagues in sync by combining modern cloud storage services, the local file system, and simple web applications.

    PubMed

    Rautenberg, Philipp L; Kumaraswamy, Ajayrama; Tejero-Cantero, Alvaro; Doblander, Christoph; Norouzian, Mohammad R; Kai, Kazuki; Jacobsen, Hans-Arno; Ai, Hiroyuki; Wachtler, Thomas; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience today deals with a "data deluge" derived from the availability of high-throughput sensors of brain structure and brain activity, and increased computational resources for detailed simulations with complex output. We report here (1) a novel approach to data sharing between collaborating scientists that brings together file system tools and cloud technologies, (2) a service implementing this approach, called NeuronDepot, and (3) an example application of the service to a complex use case in the neurosciences. The main drivers for our approach are to facilitate collaborations with a transparent, automated data flow that shields scientists from having to learn new tools or data structuring paradigms. Using NeuronDepot is simple: one-time data assignment from the originator and cloud based syncing-thus making experimental and modeling data available across the collaboration with minimum overhead. Since data sharing is cloud based, our approach opens up the possibility of using new software developments and hardware scalabitliy which are associated with elastic cloud computing. We provide an implementation that relies on existing synchronization services and is usable from all devices via a reactive web interface. We are motivating our solution by solving the practical problems of the GinJang project, a collaboration of three universities across eight time zones with a complex workflow encompassing data from electrophysiological recordings, imaging, morphological reconstructions, and simulations.

  7. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  8. An Energy Aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm for Energy Harvesting WSN with Energy Hungry Sensors.

    PubMed

    Srbinovski, Bruno; Magno, Michele; Edwards-Murphy, Fiona; Pakrashi, Vikram; Popovici, Emanuel

    2016-03-28

    Wireless sensor nodes have a limited power budget, though they are often expected to be functional in the field once deployed for extended periods of time. Therefore, minimization of energy consumption and energy harvesting technology in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are key tools for maximizing network lifetime, and achieving self-sustainability. This paper proposes an energy aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm (ASA) for WSN with power hungry sensors and harvesting capabilities, an energy management technique that can be implemented on any WSN platform with enough processing power to execute the proposed algorithm. An existing state-of-the-art ASA developed for wireless sensor networks with power hungry sensors is optimized and enhanced to adapt the sampling frequency according to the available energy of the node. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using two in-field testbeds that are supplied by two different energy harvesting sources (solar and wind). Simulation and comparison between the state-of-the-art ASA and the proposed energy aware ASA (EASA) in terms of energy durability are carried out using in-field measured harvested energy (using both wind and solar sources) and power hungry sensors (ultrasonic wind sensor and gas sensors). The simulation results demonstrate that using ASA in combination with an energy aware function on the nodes can drastically increase the lifetime of a WSN node and enable self-sustainability. In fact, the proposed EASA in conjunction with energy harvesting capability can lead towards perpetual WSN operation and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art ASA.

  9. An Energy Aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm for Energy Harvesting WSN with Energy Hungry Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Srbinovski, Bruno; Magno, Michele; Edwards-Murphy, Fiona; Pakrashi, Vikram; Popovici, Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor nodes have a limited power budget, though they are often expected to be functional in the field once deployed for extended periods of time. Therefore, minimization of energy consumption and energy harvesting technology in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are key tools for maximizing network lifetime, and achieving self-sustainability. This paper proposes an energy aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm (ASA) for WSN with power hungry sensors and harvesting capabilities, an energy management technique that can be implemented on any WSN platform with enough processing power to execute the proposed algorithm. An existing state-of-the-art ASA developed for wireless sensor networks with power hungry sensors is optimized and enhanced to adapt the sampling frequency according to the available energy of the node. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using two in-field testbeds that are supplied by two different energy harvesting sources (solar and wind). Simulation and comparison between the state-of-the-art ASA and the proposed energy aware ASA (EASA) in terms of energy durability are carried out using in-field measured harvested energy (using both wind and solar sources) and power hungry sensors (ultrasonic wind sensor and gas sensors). The simulation results demonstrate that using ASA in combination with an energy aware function on the nodes can drastically increase the lifetime of a WSN node and enable self-sustainability. In fact, the proposed EASA in conjunction with energy harvesting capability can lead towards perpetual WSN operation and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art ASA. PMID:27043559

  10. Adaptive kernel function using line transect sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albadareen, Baker; Ismail, Noriszura

    2018-04-01

    The estimation of f(0) is crucial in the line transect method which is used for estimating population abundance in wildlife survey's. The classical kernel estimator of f(0) has a high negative bias. Our study proposes an adaptation in the kernel function which is shown to be more efficient than the usual kernel estimator. A simulation study is adopted to compare the performance of the proposed estimators with the classical kernel estimators.

  11. The Self-Adapting Focused Review System. Probability sampling of medical records to monitor utilization and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Ash, A; Schwartz, M; Payne, S M; Restuccia, J D

    1990-11-01

    Medical record review is increasing in importance as the need to identify and monitor utilization and quality of care problems grow. To conserve resources, reviews are usually performed on a subset of cases. If judgment is used to identify subgroups for review, this raises the following questions: How should subgroups be determined, particularly since the locus of problems can change over time? What standard of comparison should be used in interpreting rates of problems found in subgroups? How can population problem rates be estimated from observed subgroup rates? How can the bias be avoided that arises because reviewers know that selected cases are suspected of having problems? How can changes in problem rates over time be interpreted when evaluating intervention programs? Simple random sampling, an alternative to subgroup review, overcomes the problems implied by these questions but is inefficient. The Self-Adapting Focused Review System (SAFRS), introduced and described here, provides an adaptive approach to record selection that is based upon model-weighted probability sampling. It retains the desirable inferential properties of random sampling while allowing reviews to be concentrated on cases currently thought most likely to be problematic. Model development and evaluation are illustrated using hospital data to predict inappropriate admissions.

  12. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  13. Adaptive Learning and Risk Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denrell, Jerker

    2007-01-01

    Humans and animals learn from experience by reducing the probability of sampling alternatives with poor past outcomes. Using simulations, J. G. March (1996) illustrated how such adaptive sampling could lead to risk-averse as well as risk-seeking behavior. In this article, the author develops a formal theory of how adaptive sampling influences risk…

  14. Surface sampling techniques for 3D object inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chihhsiong S.; Gerhardt, Lester A.

    1995-03-01

    While the uniform sampling method is quite popular for pointwise measurement of manufactured parts, this paper proposes three novel sampling strategies which emphasize 3D non-uniform inspection capability. They are: (a) the adaptive sampling, (b) the local adjustment sampling, and (c) the finite element centroid sampling techniques. The adaptive sampling strategy is based on a recursive surface subdivision process. Two different approaches are described for this adaptive sampling strategy. One uses triangle patches while the other uses rectangle patches. Several real world objects were tested using these two algorithms. Preliminary results show that sample points are distributed more closely around edges, corners, and vertices as desired for many classes of objects. Adaptive sampling using triangle patches is shown to generally perform better than both uniform and adaptive sampling using rectangle patches. The local adjustment sampling strategy uses a set of predefined starting points and then finds the local optimum position of each nodal point. This method approximates the object by moving the points toward object edges and corners. In a hybrid approach, uniform points sets and non-uniform points sets, first preprocessed by the adaptive sampling algorithm on a real world object were then tested using the local adjustment sampling method. The results show that the initial point sets when preprocessed by adaptive sampling using triangle patches, are moved the least amount of distance by the subsequently applied local adjustment method, again showing the superiority of this method. The finite element sampling technique samples the centroids of the surface triangle meshes produced from the finite element method. The performance of this algorithm was compared to that of the adaptive sampling using triangular patches. The adaptive sampling with triangular patches was once again shown to be better on different classes of objects.

  15. Adaptive Metropolis Sampling with Product Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Lee, Chiu Fan

    2005-01-01

    The Metropolis-Hastings (MH) algorithm is a way to sample a provided target distribution pi(z). It works by repeatedly sampling a separate proposal distribution T(x,x') to generate a random walk {x(t)}. We consider a modification of the MH algorithm in which T is dynamically updated during the walk. The update at time t uses the {x(t' less than t)} to estimate the product distribution that has the least Kullback-Leibler distance to pi. That estimate is the information-theoretically optimal mean-field approximation to pi. We demonstrate through computer experiments that our algorithm produces samples that are superior to those of the conventional MH algorithm.

  16. Real-time nutrient monitoring in rivers: adaptive sampling strategies, technological challenges and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaen, Phillip; Khamis, Kieran; Lloyd, Charlotte; Bradley, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Excessive nutrient concentrations in river waters threaten aquatic ecosystem functioning and can pose substantial risks to human health. Robust monitoring strategies are therefore required to generate reliable estimates of river nutrient loads and to improve understanding of the catchment processes that drive spatiotemporal patterns in nutrient fluxes. Furthermore, these data are vital for prediction of future trends under changing environmental conditions and thus the development of appropriate mitigation measures. In recent years, technological developments have led to an increase in the use of continuous in-situ nutrient analysers, which enable measurements at far higher temporal resolutions than can be achieved with discrete sampling and subsequent laboratory analysis. However, such instruments can be costly to run and difficult to maintain (e.g. due to high power consumption and memory requirements), leading to trade-offs between temporal and spatial monitoring resolutions. Here, we highlight how adaptive monitoring strategies, comprising a mixture of temporal sample frequencies controlled by one or more 'trigger variables' (e.g. river stage, turbidity, or nutrient concentration), can advance our understanding of catchment nutrient dynamics while simultaneously overcoming many of the practical and economic challenges encountered in typical in-situ river nutrient monitoring applications. We present examples of short-term variability in river nutrient dynamics, driven by complex catchment behaviour, which support our case for the development of monitoring systems that can adapt in real-time to rapid environmental changes. In addition, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of current nutrient monitoring techniques, and suggest new research directions based on emerging technologies and highlight how these might improve: 1) monitoring strategies, and 2) understanding of linkages between catchment processes and river nutrient fluxes.

  17. Deterministic and reliability based optimization of integrated thermal protection system composite panel using adaptive sampling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravishankar, Bharani

    Conventional space vehicles have thermal protection systems (TPS) that provide protection to an underlying structure that carries the flight loads. In an attempt to save weight, there is interest in an integrated TPS (ITPS) that combines the structural function and the TPS function. This has weight saving potential, but complicates the design of the ITPS that now has both thermal and structural failure modes. The main objectives of this dissertation was to optimally design the ITPS subjected to thermal and mechanical loads through deterministic and reliability based optimization. The optimization of the ITPS structure requires computationally expensive finite element analyses of 3D ITPS (solid) model. To reduce the computational expenses involved in the structural analysis, finite element based homogenization method was employed, homogenizing the 3D ITPS model to a 2D orthotropic plate. However it was found that homogenization was applicable only for panels that are much larger than the characteristic dimensions of the repeating unit cell in the ITPS panel. Hence a single unit cell was used for the optimization process to reduce the computational cost. Deterministic and probabilistic optimization of the ITPS panel required evaluation of failure constraints at various design points. This further demands computationally expensive finite element analyses which was replaced by efficient, low fidelity surrogate models. In an optimization process, it is important to represent the constraints accurately to find the optimum design. Instead of building global surrogate models using large number of designs, the computational resources were directed towards target regions near constraint boundaries for accurate representation of constraints using adaptive sampling strategies. Efficient Global Reliability Analyses (EGRA) facilitates sequentially sampling of design points around the region of interest in the design space. EGRA was applied to the response surface construction of

  18. Social Daydreaming and Adjustment: An Experience-Sampling Study of Socio-Emotional Adaptation During a Life Transition

    PubMed Central

    Poerio, Giulia L.; Totterdell, Peter; Emerson, Lisa-Marie; Miles, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Estimates suggest that up to half of waking life is spent daydreaming; that is, engaged in thought that is independent of, and unrelated to, one’s current task. Emerging research indicates that daydreams are predominately social suggesting that daydreams may serve socio-emotional functions. Here we explore the functional role of social daydreaming for socio-emotional adjustment during an important and stressful life transition (the transition to university) using experience-sampling with 103 participants over 28 days. Over time, social daydreams increased in their positive characteristics and positive emotional outcomes; specifically, participants reported that their daydreams made them feel more socially connected and less lonely, and that the content of their daydreams became less fanciful and involved higher quality relationships. These characteristics then predicted less loneliness at the end of the study, which, in turn was associated with greater social adaptation to university. Feelings of connection resulting from social daydreams were also associated with less emotional inertia in participants who reported being less socially adapted to university. Findings indicate that social daydreaming is functional for promoting socio-emotional adjustment to an important life event. We highlight the need to consider the social content of stimulus-independent cognitions, their characteristics, and patterns of change, to specify how social thoughts enable socio-emotional adaptation. PMID:26834685

  19. TV synchronization system features stability and noise immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landauer, F. P.

    1967-01-01

    Horizontal jitter in the video presentation in television systems is prevented by using an additional sync level. This circuitry uses simultaneous signals at both sync and porch frequencies, providing a sync identification from which a coincidence circuit can generate pulses having the required stability and noise immunity.

  20. Efficient estimation of abundance for patchily distributed populations via two-phase, adaptive sampling.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Runge, J.P.; Barker, R.J.; Schofield, M.R.; Fonnesbeck, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Many organisms are patchily distributed, with some patches occupied at high density, others at lower densities, and others not occupied. Estimation of overall abundance can be difficult and is inefficient via intensive approaches such as capture-mark-recapture (CMR) or distance sampling. We propose a two-phase sampling scheme and model in a Bayesian framework to estimate abundance for patchily distributed populations. In the first phase, occupancy is estimated by binomial detection samples taken on all selected sites, where selection may be of all sites available, or a random sample of sites. Detection can be by visual surveys, detection of sign, physical captures, or other approach. At the second phase, if a detection threshold is achieved, CMR or other intensive sampling is conducted via standard procedures (grids or webs) to estimate abundance. Detection and CMR data are then used in a joint likelihood to model probability of detection in the occupancy sample via an abundance-detection model. CMR modeling is used to estimate abundance for the abundance-detection relationship, which in turn is used to predict abundance at the remaining sites, where only detection data are collected. We present a full Bayesian modeling treatment of this problem, in which posterior inference on abundance and other parameters (detection, capture probability) is obtained under a variety of assumptions about spatial and individual sources of heterogeneity. We apply the approach to abundance estimation for two species of voles (Microtus spp.) in Montana, USA. We also use a simulation study to evaluate the frequentist properties of our procedure given known patterns in abundance and detection among sites as well as design criteria. For most population characteristics and designs considered, bias and mean-square error (MSE) were low, and coverage of true parameter values by Bayesian credibility intervals was near nominal. Our two-phase, adaptive approach allows efficient estimation of

  1. Apparatus and method for handheld sampling

    DOEpatents

    Staab, Torsten A.

    2005-09-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus, and corresponding method, for taking a sample. The apparatus is built around a frame designed to be held in at least one hand. A sample media is used to secure the sample. A sample media adapter for securing the sample media is operated by a trigger mechanism connectively attached within the frame to the sample media adapter.

  2. Adaption of G-TAG Software for Validating Touch and Go Asteroid Sample Return Design Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars James C.; Acikmese, Behcet; Mandic, Milan

    2012-01-01

    A software tool is used to demonstrate the feasibility of Touch and Go (TAG) sampling for Asteroid Sample Return missions. TAG is a concept whereby a spacecraft is in contact with the surface of a small body, such as a comet or asteroid, for a few seconds or less before ascending to a safe location away from the small body. Previous work at JPL developed the G-TAG simulation tool, which provides a software environment for fast, multi-body simulations of the TAG event. G-TAG is described in Multibody Simulation Software Testbed for Small-Body Exploration and Sampling, (NPO-47196) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 11 (November 2011), p.54. This current innovation adapts this tool to a mission that intends to return a sample from the surface of an asteroid. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the TAG concept, the new software tool was used to generate extensive simulations that demonstrate the designed spacecraft meets key requirements. These requirements state that contact force and duration must be sufficient to ensure that enough material from the surface is collected in the brushwheel sampler (BWS), and that the spacecraft must survive the contact and must be able to recover and ascend to a safe position, and maintain velocity and orientation after the contact.

  3. Adapted random sampling patterns for accelerated MRI.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Florian; Clason, Christian; Diwoky, Clemens; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2011-02-01

    Variable density random sampling patterns have recently become increasingly popular for accelerated imaging strategies, as they lead to incoherent aliasing artifacts. However, the design of these sampling patterns is still an open problem. Current strategies use model assumptions like polynomials of different order to generate a probability density function that is then used to generate the sampling pattern. This approach relies on the optimization of design parameters which is very time consuming and therefore impractical for daily clinical use. This work presents a new approach that generates sampling patterns by making use of power spectra of existing reference data sets and hence requires neither parameter tuning nor an a priori mathematical model of the density of sampling points. The approach is validated with downsampling experiments, as well as with accelerated in vivo measurements. The proposed approach is compared with established sampling patterns, and the generalization potential is tested by using a range of reference images. Quantitative evaluation is performed for the downsampling experiments using RMS differences to the original, fully sampled data set. Our results demonstrate that the image quality of the method presented in this paper is comparable to that of an established model-based strategy when optimization of the model parameter is carried out and yields superior results to non-optimized model parameters. However, no random sampling pattern showed superior performance when compared to conventional Cartesian subsampling for the considered reconstruction strategy.

  4. A Feedfordward Adaptive Controller to Reduce the Imaging Time of Large-Sized Biological Samples with a SPM-Based Multiprobe Station

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Jorge; Guerrero, Hector; Gonzalez, Laura; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2012-01-01

    The time required to image large samples is an important limiting factor in SPM-based systems. In multiprobe setups, especially when working with biological samples, this drawback can make impossible to conduct certain experiments. In this work, we present a feedfordward controller based on bang-bang and adaptive controls. The controls are based in the difference between the maximum speeds that can be used for imaging depending on the flatness of the sample zone. Topographic images of Escherichia coli bacteria samples were acquired using the implemented controllers. Results show that to go faster in the flat zones, rather than using a constant scanning speed for the whole image, speeds up the imaging process of large samples by up to a 4× factor. PMID:22368491

  5. Survey of adaptive image coding techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habibi, A.

    1977-01-01

    The general problem of image data compression is discussed briefly with attention given to the use of Karhunen-Loeve transforms, suboptimal systems, and block quantization. A survey is then conducted encompassing the four categories of adaptive systems: (1) adaptive transform coding (adaptive sampling, adaptive quantization, etc.), (2) adaptive predictive coding (adaptive delta modulation, adaptive DPCM encoding, etc.), (3) adaptive cluster coding (blob algorithms and the multispectral cluster coding technique), and (4) adaptive entropy coding.

  6. The Parent Version of the Preschool Social Skills Rating System: Psychometric Analysis and Adaptation with a German Preschool Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Markus; Scheithauer, Herbert; Kleiber, Dieter; Wille, Nora; Erhart, Michael; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    The Social Skills Rating System (SSRS) developed by Gresham and Elliott (1990) is a multirater, norm-referenced instrument measuring social skills and adaptive behavior in preschool children. The aims of the present study were (a) to test the factorial structure of the Parent Form of the SSRS for the first time with a German preschool sample (391…

  7. High-throughput sample adaptive offset hardware architecture for high-efficiency video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Yan, Chang; Zhang, Jingzhi; Zhou, Xin

    2018-03-01

    A high-throughput hardware architecture for a sample adaptive offset (SAO) filter in the high-efficiency video coding video coding standard is presented. First, an implementation-friendly and simplified bitrate estimation method of rate-distortion cost calculation is proposed to reduce the computational complexity in the mode decision of SAO. Then, a high-throughput VLSI architecture for SAO is presented based on the proposed bitrate estimation method. Furthermore, multiparallel VLSI architecture for in-loop filters, which integrates both deblocking filter and SAO filter, is proposed. Six parallel strategies are applied in the proposed in-loop filters architecture to improve the system throughput and filtering speed. Experimental results show that the proposed in-loop filters architecture can achieve up to 48% higher throughput in comparison with prior work. The proposed architecture can reach a high-operating clock frequency of 297 MHz with TSMC 65-nm library and meet the real-time requirement of the in-loop filters for 8 K × 4 K video format at 132 fps.

  8. Utility of the Mayo-Portland adaptability inventory-4 for self-reported outcomes in a military sample with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kean, Jacob; Malec, James F; Cooper, Douglas B; Bowles, Amy O

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the psychometric properties of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4) obtained by self-report in a large sample of active duty military personnel with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Consecutive cohort who completed the MPAI-4 as a part of a larger battery of clinical outcome measures at the time of intake to an outpatient brain injury clinic. Medical center. Consecutively referred sample of active duty military personnel (N=404) who suffered predominantly mild (n=355), but also moderate (n=37) and severe (n=12), TBI. Not applicable. MPAI-4 RESULTS: Initial factor analysis suggested 2 salient dimensions. In subsequent analysis, the ratio of the first and second eigenvalues (6.84:1) and parallel analysis indicated sufficient unidimensionality in 26 retained items. Iterative Rasch analysis resulted in the rescaling of the measure and the removal of 5 additional items for poor fit. The items of the final 21-item Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-military were locally independent, demonstrated monotonically increasing responses, adequately fit the item response model, and permitted the identification of nearly 5 statistically distinct levels of disability in the study population. Slight mistargeting of the population resulted in the global outcome, as measured by the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-military, tending to be less reflective of very mild levels of disability. These data collected in a relatively large sample of active duty service members with TBI provide insight into the ability of patients to self-report functional impairment and the distinct effects of military deployment on outcome, providing important guidance for the meaningful measurement of outcome in this population. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Mobile App for Synchronizing Glucometer Data: Impact on Adherence and Glycemic Control Among Youths With Type 1 Diabetes in Routine Care.

    PubMed

    Clements, Mark A; Staggs, Vincent S

    2017-05-01

    Many individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) upload and review blood glucose data between clinic visits. Mobile phone applications that receive data from a "connected" glucometer and that support pattern management are available and have the capacity to make data upload and review less burdensome. Whether mobile apps can improve diabetes self-management among individuals with type 1 diabetes remains unknown. We analyzed retrospective data on 81 youths with T1D who were trained to use a glucometer-connected mobile app in their self-management. To assess the effect of glucometer synchronization ("sync") rate on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), mean blood glucose (mBG), and daily frequency of SMBG, we regressed those clinical outcomes on the frequency of glucometer syncs with the mobile app after controlling for other clinical care variables. Median age was 14.0 (IQR 10.4-15.9) years, median duration of diabetes was 4.9 (2.7, 7.5) years, and median baseline HbA1c was 8.6% (7.9, 9.8). The sample was 49% male and 86% white. Youths with T1D synchronized glucometer data with the mobile app an average of 0.22 times per week (range 0-2.25). The glucometer sync rate did not have a statistically significant association with HbA1c or mean BG; in contrast, data sync frequency was associated with the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) such that each additional sync was associated with a 2.3-fold increase in SMBG frequency ( P < .01). A glucometer-connected mobile app may increase an individual's engagement with other aspects of care (eg, SMBG frequency). Whether diabetes device-connected mobile apps can improve glycemic control remains to be determined.

  10. The INfrared Survey of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC): Surveying the Dynamics and Star Formation Histories of Young Clusters with APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Kevin R.; Cottaar, Michiel; Foster, Jonathan B.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan; Meyer, Michael; Nidever, David L.; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Arce, Hector G.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Stassun, Keivan; Wilson, John C.; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Young clusters are the most prolific sites of star formation in the Milky Way, but demographic studies indicate that relatively few of the Milky Way's stellar clusters persist as bound structures for 100 Myrs or longer. Uniform & precise measurements of the stellar populations and internal dynamics of these regions are difficult to obtain, however, particularly for extremely young clusters whose optical visibility is greatly hampered by their parental molecular cloud. The INfrared Survey of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC), an SDSS-III ancillary science program, leverages the stability and multiplex capability of the APOGEE spectrograph to obtain high resolution spectra at near-infrared wavelengths, where photospheric emission is better able to penetrate the dusty shrouds that surround sites of active star formation. We summarize our recent measurements of the kinematics and stellar populations of IC 348 and NGC 1333, two young clusters in the Perseus Molecular Cloud, and of the members of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and L1641 filament in the Orion molecular complex. These measurements highlight the dynamically 'warm' environment within these young clusters, and suggest a range of stellar radii within these quasi-single-age populations. We close with a preview of plans for continuing this work as part of the APOGEE-2 science portfolio: self-consistent measurements of the kinematics and star formation histories for clusters spanning a range of initial conditions and ages will provide a opportunity to disentangle the mechanisms that drive the formation and dissolution of sites of active star formation.

  11. Adaptively biased molecular dynamics: An umbrella sampling method with a time-dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Volodymyr; Karpusenka, Vadzim; Moradi, Mahmoud; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    We discuss an adaptively biased molecular dynamics (ABMD) method for the computation of a free energy surface for a set of reaction coordinates. The ABMD method belongs to the general category of umbrella sampling methods with an evolving biasing potential. It is characterized by a small number of control parameters and an O(t) numerical cost with simulation time t. The method naturally allows for extensions based on multiple walkers and replica exchange mechanism. The workings of the method are illustrated with a number of examples, including sugar puckering, and free energy landscapes for polymethionine and polyproline peptides, and for a short β-turn peptide. ABMD has been implemented into the latest version (Case et al., AMBER 10; University of California: San Francisco, 2008) of the AMBER software package and is freely available to the simulation community.

  12. Optimizing trial design in pharmacogenetics research: comparing a fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection design on sample size requirements.

    PubMed

    Boessen, Ruud; van der Baan, Frederieke; Groenwold, Rolf; Egberts, Antoine; Klungel, Olaf; Grobbee, Diederick; Knol, Mirjam; Roes, Kit

    2013-01-01

    Two-stage clinical trial designs may be efficient in pharmacogenetics research when there is some but inconclusive evidence of effect modification by a genomic marker. Two-stage designs allow to stop early for efficacy or futility and can offer the additional opportunity to enrich the study population to a specific patient subgroup after an interim analysis. This study compared sample size requirements for fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection designs with equal overall power and control of the family-wise type I error rate. The designs were evaluated across scenarios that defined the effect sizes in the marker positive and marker negative subgroups and the prevalence of marker positive patients in the overall study population. Effect sizes were chosen to reflect realistic planning scenarios, where at least some effect is present in the marker negative subgroup. In addition, scenarios were considered in which the assumed 'true' subgroup effects (i.e., the postulated effects) differed from those hypothesized at the planning stage. As expected, both two-stage designs generally required fewer patients than a fixed parallel group design, and the advantage increased as the difference between subgroups increased. The adaptive selection design added little further reduction in sample size, as compared with the group sequential design, when the postulated effect sizes were equal to those hypothesized at the planning stage. However, when the postulated effects deviated strongly in favor of enrichment, the comparative advantage of the adaptive selection design increased, which precisely reflects the adaptive nature of the design. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Adaptive Biasing Combined with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange to Improve Umbrella Sampling Free Energy Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Fabian; Zacharias, Martin

    2014-02-11

    The accurate calculation of potentials of mean force for ligand-receptor binding is one of the most important applications of molecular simulation techniques. Typically, the separation distance between ligand and receptor is chosen as a reaction coordinate along which a PMF can be calculated with the aid of umbrella sampling (US) techniques. In addition, restraints can be applied on the relative position and orientation of the partner molecules to reduce accessible phase space. An approach combining such phase space reduction with flattening of the free energy landscape and configurational exchanges has been developed, which significantly improves the convergence of PMF calculations in comparison with standard umbrella sampling. The free energy surface along the reaction coordinate is smoothened by iteratively adapting biasing potentials corresponding to previously calculated PMFs. Configurations are allowed to exchange between the umbrella simulation windows via the Hamiltonian replica exchange method. The application to a DNA molecule in complex with a minor groove binding ligand indicates significantly improved convergence and complete reversibility of the sampling along the pathway. The calculated binding free energy is in excellent agreement with experimental results. In contrast, the application of standard US resulted in large differences between PMFs calculated for association and dissociation pathways. The approach could be a useful alternative to standard US for computational studies on biomolecular recognition processes.

  14. Analysis of space telescope data collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingles, F.; Schoggen, W. O.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of frame synchronization loss were analyzed. A frame sync loss will create loss of data for the frame in which it occurs (since one would not know whether the preceding data was properly in sync or not) and during search from frame sync the system would be losing data. The search mode for reacquisition utilizes multiple search procedures.

  15. Adapting Champion's Breast Cancer Fear Scale to colorectal cancer: psychometric testing in a sample of older Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Leung, Doris Y P; Wong, Eliza M L; Chan, Carmen W H

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common type of cancer in both men and women, and older adults are more susceptible to this disease. Previous studies suggest that cancer fear may be a key predictor of participation in cancer screening. Yet there is a lack of validated measuring tools of fear relating to CRC for the Chinese older adult population. This study aims to test the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Colorectal Cancer Fear Scale (CRCFS), adapting from the Champion's Breast Cancer Fear Scale. The CRCFS was developed by altering the wording 'breast cancer' to 'colorectal cancer'. Interviewer-administered surveys were carried out with a convenience sample of 250 community-dwelling adults aged at least 60 years old without a history of cancer. A subsample of 40 participants completed the scale again at one-month. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the one-factor model provided excellent fits to the overall data, and two randomly split samples. Cronbach's alpha of the scale was 0.95 and test-retest reliability was 0.52. Positive and significant correlations of CRC Cancer Fear with CRC-related susceptibility, severity and barriers were observed. A non-linear relationship with benefits was found. The findings provide support for the psychometric properties of a Chinese version of the Champion Cancer Fear with an adaption to CRC in a sample of community dwelling older Chinese adults. The scale provides a useful tool to assess CRC-related fear, which interventions should address in order to improve screening rates among older Chinese adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Shi, Xin, E-mail: xinshih86029@gmail.com; Zhao, Xiangmo, E-mail: xinshih86029@gmail.com; Hui, Fei, E-mail: xinshih86029@gmail.com

    Clock synchronization in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has been studied extensively in recent years and many protocols are put forward based on the point of statistical signal processing, which is an effective way to optimize accuracy. However, the accuracy derived from the statistical data can be improved mainly by sufficient packets exchange, which will consume the limited power resources greatly. In this paper, a reliable clock estimation using linear weighted fusion based on pairwise broadcast synchronization is proposed to optimize sync accuracy without expending additional sync packets. As a contribution, a linear weighted fusion scheme for multiple clock deviations ismore » constructed with the collaborative sensing of clock timestamp. And the fusion weight is defined by the covariance of sync errors for different clock deviations. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed approach can achieve better performance in terms of sync overhead and sync accuracy.« less

  17. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del [Livermore, CA; Klunder, Gregory L [Oakland, CA

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  18. Systems and methods for self-synchronized digital sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, Jr., John R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Systems and methods for self-synchronized data sampling are provided. In one embodiment, a system for capturing synchronous data samples is provided. The system includes an analog to digital converter adapted to capture signals from one or more sensors and convert the signals into a stream of digital data samples at a sampling frequency determined by a sampling control signal; and a synchronizer coupled to the analog to digital converter and adapted to receive a rotational frequency signal from a rotating machine, wherein the synchronizer is further adapted to generate the sampling control signal, and wherein the sampling control signal is based on the rotational frequency signal.

  19. Fault-Tolerant Self-Stabilizing Distributed Clock Synchronization Protocol for Arbitrary Digraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A self-stabilizing network in the form of an arbitrary, non-partitioned digraph includes K nodes having a synchronizer executing a protocol. K-1 monitors of each node may receive a Sync message transmitted from a directly connected node. When the Sync message is received, the logical clock value for the receiving node is set to between 0 and a communication latency value (gamma) if the clock value is less than a minimum event-response delay (D). A new Sync message is also transmitted to any directly connected nodes if the clock value is greater than or equal to both D and a graph threshold (T(sub S)). When the Sync message is not received the synchronizer increments the clock value if the clock value is less than a resynchronization period (P), and resets the clock value and transmits a new Sync message to all directly connected nodes when the clock value equals or exceeds P.

  20. Cultural adaptation in measuring common client characteristics with an urban Mainland Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoxia; Anderson, Timothy; Beutler, Larry E; Sun, Shijin; Wu, Guohong; Kimpara, Satoko

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a culturally adapted version of the Systematic Treatment Selection-Innerlife (STS) in China. A total of 300 nonclinical participants collected from Mainland China and 240 nonclinical US participants were drawn from archival data. A Chinese version of the STS was developed, using translation and back-translation procedures. After confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the original STS sub scales failed on both samples, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was then used to access whether a simple structure would emerge on these STS treatment items. Parallel analysis and minimum average partial were used to determine the number of factor to retain. Three cross-cultural factors were found in this study, Internalized Distress, Externalized Distress and interpersonal relations. This supported that regardless of whether one is in presumably different cultural contexts of the USA or China, psychological distress is expressed in a few basic channels of internalized distress, externalized distress, and interpersonal relations, from which different manifestations in different culture were also discussed.

  1. Accelerating the Convergence of Replica Exchange Simulations Using Gibbs Sampling and Adaptive Temperature Sets

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, Thomas; Perez, Danny

    2015-08-28

    We recently introduced a novel replica-exchange scheme in which an individual replica can sample from states encountered by other replicas at any previous time by way of a global configuration database, enabling the fast propagation of relevant states through the whole ensemble of replicas. This mechanism depends on the knowledge of global thermodynamic functions which are measured during the simulation and not coupled to the heat bath temperatures driving the individual simulations. Therefore, this setup also allows for a continuous adaptation of the temperature set. In this paper, we will review the new scheme and demonstrate its capability. Furthermore, themore » method is particularly useful for the fast and reliable estimation of the microcanonical temperature T(U) or, equivalently, of the density of states g(U) over a wide range of energies.« less

  2. Defibrillator synchronization tester.

    PubMed

    Demirbilek, Fatma N; Krajnak, Mike; Stolarczyk, George

    2009-01-01

    A defibrillator sync output signal connector provides an ECG synchronization signal that can be used by some defibrillators for the purpose of performing synchronized cardioversion [1]. This process is used to stop an abnormally fast heart rate or cardiac arrhythmia by the delivery of a therapeutic dose of electric current to the heart during the R-wave of the cardiac cycle. Timing the shock to the R-wave prevents the delivery of the shock during the vulnerable period of the cardiac cycle, which could induce ventricular fibrillation [2]. GE patient monitors include a selectable analog output feature, which provides an analog ECG or arterial blood pressure signal. The blood pressure signal can be used to synchronize balloon pumps to provide cardiac assist to post-MI patients with poor injection fraction. Proper operation requires the defibrillator sync and analog output function to be checked. Checkouts are typically done during planned maintenance and after major part replacements such as patient monitor's main CPU board. Checking out defibrillator sync signals could be done using a GE defibrillator sync tester. The defibrillator sync tester provides a loop back path for the defibrillator sync signals to be displayed on the patient monitor screen and eliminates the need for an external oscilloscope.

  3. Adaptive decision making in a dynamic environment: a test of a sequential sampling model of relative judgment.

    PubMed

    Vuckovic, Anita; Kwantes, Peter J; Neal, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Research has identified a wide range of factors that influence performance in relative judgment tasks. However, the findings from this research have been inconsistent. Studies have varied with respect to the identification of causal variables and the perceptual and decision-making mechanisms underlying performance. Drawing on the ecological rationality approach, we present a theory of the judgment and decision-making processes involved in a relative judgment task that explains how people judge a stimulus and adapt their decision process to accommodate their own uncertainty associated with those judgments. Undergraduate participants performed a simulated air traffic control conflict detection task. Across two experiments, we systematically manipulated variables known to affect performance. In the first experiment, we manipulated the relative distances of aircraft to a common destination while holding aircraft speeds constant. In a follow-up experiment, we introduced a direct manipulation of relative speed. We then fit a sequential sampling model to the data, and used the best fitting parameters to infer the decision-making processes responsible for performance. Findings were consistent with the theory that people adapt to their own uncertainty by adjusting their criterion and the amount of time they take to collect evidence in order to make a more accurate decision. From a practical perspective, the paper demonstrates that one can use a sequential sampling model to understand performance in a dynamic environment, allowing one to make sense of and interpret complex patterns of empirical findings that would otherwise be difficult to interpret using standard statistical analyses. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Statistical Inference for Data Adaptive Target Parameters.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Alan E; Kherad-Pajouh, Sara; van der Laan, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Consider one observes n i.i.d. copies of a random variable with a probability distribution that is known to be an element of a particular statistical model. In order to define our statistical target we partition the sample in V equal size sub-samples, and use this partitioning to define V splits in an estimation sample (one of the V subsamples) and corresponding complementary parameter-generating sample. For each of the V parameter-generating samples, we apply an algorithm that maps the sample to a statistical target parameter. We define our sample-split data adaptive statistical target parameter as the average of these V-sample specific target parameters. We present an estimator (and corresponding central limit theorem) of this type of data adaptive target parameter. This general methodology for generating data adaptive target parameters is demonstrated with a number of practical examples that highlight new opportunities for statistical learning from data. This new framework provides a rigorous statistical methodology for both exploratory and confirmatory analysis within the same data. Given that more research is becoming "data-driven", the theory developed within this paper provides a new impetus for a greater involvement of statistical inference into problems that are being increasingly addressed by clever, yet ad hoc pattern finding methods. To suggest such potential, and to verify the predictions of the theory, extensive simulation studies, along with a data analysis based on adaptively determined intervention rules are shown and give insight into how to structure such an approach. The results show that the data adaptive target parameter approach provides a general framework and resulting methodology for data-driven science.

  5. 120nm resolution in thick samples with structured illumination and adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Benjamin; Sloan, Megan; Wolstenholme, Adrian J.; Kner, Peter

    2014-03-01

    μLinear Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) provides a two-fold increase over the diffraction limited resolution. SIM produces excellent images with 120nm resolution in tissue culture cells in two and three dimensions. For SIM to work correctly, the point spread function (PSF) and optical transfer function (OTF) must be known, and, ideally, should be unaberrated. When imaging through thick samples, aberrations will be introduced into the optical system which will reduce the peak intensity and increase the width of the PSF. This will lead to reduced resolution and artifacts in SIM images. Adaptive optics can be used to correct the optical wavefront restoring the PSF to its unaberrated state, and AO has been used in several types of fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that AO can be used with SIM to achieve 120nm resolution through 25m of tissue by imaging through the full thickness of an adult C. elegans roundworm. The aberrations can be corrected over a 25μm × 45μm field of view with one wavefront correction setting, demonstrating that AO can be used effectively with widefield superresolution techniques.

  6. Design of Field Experiments for Adaptive Sampling of the Ocean with Autonomous Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Ooi, B. H.; Cho, W.; Dao, M. H.; Tkalich, P.; Patrikalakis, N. M.

    2010-05-01

    Due to the highly non-linear and dynamical nature of oceanic phenomena, the predictive capability of various ocean models depends on the availability of operational data. A practical method to improve the accuracy of the ocean forecast is to use a data assimilation methodology to combine in-situ measured and remotely acquired data with numerical forecast models of the physical environment. Autonomous surface and underwater vehicles with various sensors are economic and efficient tools for exploring and sampling the ocean for data assimilation; however there is an energy limitation to such vehicles, and thus effective resource allocation for adaptive sampling is required to optimize the efficiency of exploration. In this paper, we use physical oceanography forecasts of the coastal zone of Singapore for the design of a set of field experiments to acquire useful data for model calibration and data assimilation. The design process of our experiments relied on the oceanography forecast including the current speed, its gradient, and vorticity in a given region of interest for which permits for field experiments could be obtained and for time intervals that correspond to strong tidal currents. Based on these maps, resources available to our experimental team, including Autonomous Surface Craft (ASC) are allocated so as to capture the oceanic features that result from jets and vortices behind bluff bodies (e.g., islands) in the tidal current. Results are summarized from this resource allocation process and field experiments conducted in January 2009.

  7. Sexual Health Concerns Among Cancer Survivors: Testing a Novel Information-Need Measure Among Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Sheila A; Foley, Sallie M; Wittmann, Daniela; Jagielski, Christina H; Dunn, Rodney L; Clark, Patricia M; Griggs, Jennifer J; Peterson, Catherine; Leonard, Marcia; An, Lawrence C; Wei, John T; Montie, James E; Janz, Nancy K

    2016-09-01

    While it is recognized that cancer treatment can contribute to problems in sexual function, much less is currently known about the specific sexual health concerns and information needs of cancer survivors. This study tested a new instrument to measure cancer survivors' sexual health concerns and needs for sexual information after cancer treatment. The Information on Sexual Health: Your Needs after Cancer (InSYNC), developed by a multidisciplinary team of experts, is a novel 12-item questionnaire to measure sexual health concerns and information needs of cancer survivors. We tested the measure with a sample of breast and prostate cancer survivors. A convenience sample of 114 cancer survivors (58 breast, 56 prostate) was enrolled. Results of the InSYNC questionnaire showed high levels of sexual concern among cancer survivors. Areas of concern differed by cancer type. Prostate cancer survivors were most concerned about being able to satisfy their partners (57 %) while breast cancer survivors were most concerned with changes in how their bodies worked sexually (46 %). Approximately 35 % of all cancer survivors wanted more information about sexual health. Sexual health concerns and unmet information needs are common among breast and prostate cancer survivors, varying in some aspects by type of cancer. Routine screening for sexual health concerns should be included in comprehensive cancer survivorship care to appropriately address health care needs. The InSYNC questionnaire is one tool that may help clinicians identify concerns facing their patients.

  8. Cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the family questionnaire in a Brazilian sample of relatives of schizophrenia outpatients.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Ana C G; Wiedemann, Georg; Dantas, Rosana A S; Hayashida, Miyeko; de Azevedo-Marques, João M; Galera, Sueli A F

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the internal reliability and validity of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Family Questionnaire among families of schizophrenia outpatients. The main studies about the family environment of schizophrenia patients are related to the concept of Expressed Emotion. There is currently no instrument to evaluate this concept in Brazil that is easily applicable and comparable with studies from other countries. Methodological and cross-sectional research design. A convenience sample of 130 relatives of schizophrenia outpatients was selected. The translation and cultural adaptation of the instrument involved experts in mental health and experts in the German language and included back translation, semantic evaluation of items and pretesting of the instrument with 30 relatives of schizophrenia outpatients. The psychometric properties of the instrument were studied with another 100 relatives, which fulfilled the requirements for the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument. The psychometric properties of the instrument were assessed by construct validity (using an analysis of its key components, comparisons between distinct groups-convergent validity with the Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence Scale) and reliability (checking the internal consistency of its items and its test-retest reproducibility). The analysis of main components confirmed dimensionality patterns that were comparable between the original and adapted versions. In two domains of the instrument, critical comments and emotional over-involvement had moderate and significant correlations, respectively, with Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence Scale, appropriate values of Cronbach's alpha and strong and significant correlations, respectively, in test-retest reproducibility. We observed significant differences between distinct groups of parents in the category of emotional over-involvement. We conclude that the Portuguese-adapted version of the Family Questionnaire is valid and reliable for the

  9. Adaptive sampling of information in perceptual decision-making.

    PubMed

    Cassey, Thomas C; Evens, David R; Bogacz, Rafal; Marshall, James A R; Ludwig, Casimir J H

    2013-01-01

    In many perceptual and cognitive decision-making problems, humans sample multiple noisy information sources serially, and integrate the sampled information to make an overall decision. We derive the optimal decision procedure for two-alternative choice tasks in which the different options are sampled one at a time, sources vary in the quality of the information they provide, and the available time is fixed. To maximize accuracy, the optimal observer allocates time to sampling different information sources in proportion to their noise levels. We tested human observers in a corresponding perceptual decision-making task. Observers compared the direction of two random dot motion patterns that were triggered only when fixated. Observers allocated more time to the noisier pattern, in a manner that correlated with their sensory uncertainty about the direction of the patterns. There were several differences between the optimal observer predictions and human behaviour. These differences point to a number of other factors, beyond the quality of the currently available sources of information, that influences the sampling strategy.

  10. Assessment of Different Sampling Methods for Measuring and Representing Macular Cone Density Using Flood-Illuminated Adaptive Optics.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu; Gale, Michael J; Fay, Jonathan D; Faridi, Ambar; Titus, Hope E; Garg, Anupam K; Michaels, Keith V; Erker, Laura R; Peters, Dawn; Smith, Travis B; Pennesi, Mark E

    2015-09-01

    To describe a standardized flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) imaging protocol suitable for the clinical setting and to assess sampling methods for measuring cone density. Cone density was calculated following three measurement protocols: 50 × 50-μm sampling window values every 0.5° along the horizontal and vertical meridians (fixed-interval method), the mean density of expanding 0.5°-wide arcuate areas in the nasal, temporal, superior, and inferior quadrants (arcuate mean method), and the peak cone density of a 50 × 50-μm sampling window within expanding arcuate areas near the meridian (peak density method). Repeated imaging was performed in nine subjects to determine intersession repeatability of cone density. Cone density montages could be created for 67 of the 74 subjects. Image quality was determined to be adequate for automated cone counting for 35 (52%) of the 67 subjects. We found that cone density varied with different sampling methods and regions tested. In the nasal and temporal quadrants, peak density most closely resembled histological data, whereas the arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods tended to underestimate the density compared with histological data. However, in the inferior and superior quadrants, arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods most closely matched histological data, whereas the peak density method overestimated cone density compared with histological data. Intersession repeatability testing showed that repeatability was greatest when sampling by arcuate mean and lowest when sampling by fixed interval. We show that different methods of sampling can significantly affect cone density measurements. Therefore, care must be taken when interpreting cone density results, even in a normal population.

  11. Assessment of Different Sampling Methods for Measuring and Representing Macular Cone Density Using Flood-Illuminated Adaptive Optics

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shu; Gale, Michael J.; Fay, Jonathan D.; Faridi, Ambar; Titus, Hope E.; Garg, Anupam K.; Michaels, Keith V.; Erker, Laura R.; Peters, Dawn; Smith, Travis B.; Pennesi, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a standardized flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) imaging protocol suitable for the clinical setting and to assess sampling methods for measuring cone density. Methods Cone density was calculated following three measurement protocols: 50 × 50-μm sampling window values every 0.5° along the horizontal and vertical meridians (fixed-interval method), the mean density of expanding 0.5°-wide arcuate areas in the nasal, temporal, superior, and inferior quadrants (arcuate mean method), and the peak cone density of a 50 × 50-μm sampling window within expanding arcuate areas near the meridian (peak density method). Repeated imaging was performed in nine subjects to determine intersession repeatability of cone density. Results Cone density montages could be created for 67 of the 74 subjects. Image quality was determined to be adequate for automated cone counting for 35 (52%) of the 67 subjects. We found that cone density varied with different sampling methods and regions tested. In the nasal and temporal quadrants, peak density most closely resembled histological data, whereas the arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods tended to underestimate the density compared with histological data. However, in the inferior and superior quadrants, arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods most closely matched histological data, whereas the peak density method overestimated cone density compared with histological data. Intersession repeatability testing showed that repeatability was greatest when sampling by arcuate mean and lowest when sampling by fixed interval. Conclusions We show that different methods of sampling can significantly affect cone density measurements. Therefore, care must be taken when interpreting cone density results, even in a normal population. PMID:26325414

  12. Method and apparatus for telemetry adaptive bandwidth compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Olin L.

    1987-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for automatic and/or manual adaptive bandwidth compression of telemetry. An adaptive sampler samples a video signal from a scanning sensor and generates a sequence of sampled fields. Each field and range rate information from the sensor are hence sequentially transmitted to and stored in a multiple and adaptive field storage means. The field storage means then, in response to an automatic or manual control signal, transfers the stored sampled field signals to a video monitor in a form for sequential or simultaneous display of a desired number of stored signal fields. The sampling ratio of the adaptive sample, the relative proportion of available communication bandwidth allocated respectively to transmitted data and video information, and the number of fields simultaneously displayed are manually or automatically selectively adjustable in functional relationship to each other and detected range rate. In one embodiment, when relatively little or no scene motion is detected, the control signal maximizes sampling ratio and causes simultaneous display of all stored fields, thus maximizing resolution and bandwidth available for data transmission. When increased scene motion is detected, the control signal is adjusted accordingly to cause display of fewer fields. If greater resolution is desired, the control signal is adjusted to increase the sampling ratio.

  13. Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding may be too slow to observe on the time scales routinely accessible using molecular dynamics simulations. The adaptive integration method (AIM) leverages the notion that when a ligand is either fully coupled or decoupled, according to λ, barrier heights may change, making some conformational transitions more accessible at certain λ values. AIM adaptively changes the value of λ in a single simulation so that conformations sampled at one value of λ seed the conformational space sampled at another λ value. Adapting the value of λ throughout a simulation, however, does not resolve issues in sampling when barriers remain high regardless of the λ value. In this work, we introduce a new method, called Accelerated AIM (AcclAIM), in which the potential energy function is flattened at intermediate values of λ, promoting the exploration of conformational space as the ligand is decoupled from its receptor. We show, with both a simple model system (Bromocyclohexane) and the more complex biomolecule Thrombin, that AcclAIM is a promising approach to overcome high barriers in the calculation of free energies, without the need for any statistical reweighting or additional processors. PMID:24780083

  14. Selective data segment monitoring system. [using shift registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, M. N. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High speed data monitoring apparatus is described for displaying the bit pattern of a selected portion of a block of transmitted data comprising a shift register for receiving the transmitted data and for temporarily containing the consecutive data bits. A programmable sync detector for monitoring the contents of the shift register and for generating a sync signal when the shift register contains a predetermined sync code is included. A counter is described for counting the data bits input to the shift register after the sync signal is generated and for generating a count complete signal when a selected number of data bits have been input to the register. A data storage device is used for storing the contents of the shift register at the time the count complete signal is generated.

  15. Community-Based Adaptation To A Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This resource discusses how climate change is affecting community services, presents sample adaptation strategies, gives examples of successful community adaptation actions, and provides links to other key federal resources.

  16. IN-SYNC VI. Identification and Radial Velocity Extraction for 100+ Double-Lined Spectroscopic Binaries in the APOGEE/IN-SYNC Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, M. A.; Covey, Kevin R.; De Lee, Nathan; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Nidever, David; Ballantyne, Richard; Cottaar, Michiel; Da Rio, Nicola; Foster, Jonathan B.; Majewski, Steven R.; Meyer, Michael R.; Reyna, A. M.; Roberts, G. W.; Skinner, Jacob; Stassun, Keivan; Tan, Jonathan C.; Troup, Nicholas; Zasowski, Gail

    2017-08-01

    We present radial velocity measurements for 70 high confidence, and 34 potential binary systems in fields containing the Perseus Molecular Cloud, Pleiades, NGC 2264, and the Orion A star-forming region. Eighteen of these systems have been previously identified as binaries in the literature. Candidate double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) are identified by analyzing the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) computed during the reduction of each APOGEE spectrum. We identify sources whose CCFs are well fit as the sum of two Lorentzians as likely binaries, and provide an initial characterization of the system based on the radial velocities indicated by that dual fit. For systems observed over several epochs, we present mass ratios and systemic velocities; for two systems with observations on eight or more epochs, and which meet our criteria for robust orbital coverage, we derive initial orbital parameters. The distribution of mass ratios for multi-epoch sources in our sample peaks at q = 1, but with a significant tail toward lower q values. Tables reporting radial velocities, systemic velocities, and mass ratios are provided online. We discuss future improvements to the radial velocity extraction method we employ, as well as limitations imposed by the number of epochs currently available in the APOGEE database. The Appendix contains brief notes from the literature on each system in the sample, and more extensive notes for select sources of interest.

  17. Adaptive Caching Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-10

    This diagram, superimposed on a photo of Martian landscape, illustrates a concept called "adaptive caching," which is in development for NASA's 2020 Mars rover mission. In addition to the investigations that the Mars 2020 rover will conduct on Mars, the rover will collect carefully selected samples of Mars rock and soil and cache them to be available for possible return to Earth if a Mars sample-return mission is scheduled and flown. Each sample will be stored in a sealed tube. Adaptive caching would result in a set of samples, up to the maximum number of tubes carried on the rover, being placed on the surface at the discretion of the mission operators. The tubes holding the collected samples would not go into a surrounding container. In this illustration, green dots indicate "regions of interest," where samples might be collected. The green diamond indicates one region of interest serving as the depot for the cache. The green X at upper right represents the landing site. The solid black line indicates the rover's route during its prime mission, and the dashed black line indicates its route during an extension of the mission. The base image is a portion of the "Everest Panorama" taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit at the top of Husband Hill in 2005. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19150

  18. Adaptive Water Sampling based on Unsupervised Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Py, F.; Ryan, J.; Rajan, K.; Sherman, A.; Bird, L.; Fox, M.; Long, D.

    2007-12-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are widely used for oceanographic surveys, during which data is collected from a number of on-board sensors. Engineers and scientists at MBARI have extended this approach by developing a water sampler specialy for the AUV, which can sample a specific patch of water at a specific time. The sampler, named the Gulper, captures 2 liters of seawater in less than 2 seconds on a 21" MBARI Odyssey AUV. Each sample chamber of the Gulper is filled with seawater through a one-way valve, which protrudes through the fairing of the AUV. This new kind of device raises a new problem: when to trigger the gulper autonomously? For example, scientists interested in studying the mobilization and transport of shelf sediments would like to detect intermediate nepheloïd layers (INLs). To be able to detect this phenomenon we need to extract a model based on AUV sensors that can detect this feature in-situ. The formation of such a model is not obvious as identification of this feature is generally based on data from multiple sensors. We have developed an unsupervised data clustering technique to extract the different features which will then be used for on-board classification and triggering of the Gulper. We use a three phase approach: 1) use data from past missions to learn the different classes of data from sensor inputs. The clustering algorithm will then extract the set of features that can be distinguished within this large data set. 2) Scientists on shore then identify these features and point out which correspond to those of interest (e.g. nepheloïd layer, upwelling material etc) 3) Embed the corresponding classifier into the AUV control system to indicate the most probable feature of the water depending on sensory input. The triggering algorithm looks to this result and triggers the Gulper if the classifier indicates that we are within the feature of interest with a predetermined threshold of confidence. We have deployed this method of online

  19. Adaptive Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasnacht, Marc

    We develop adaptive Monte Carlo methods for the calculation of the free energy as a function of a parameter of interest. The methods presented are particularly well-suited for systems with complex energy landscapes, where standard sampling techniques have difficulties. The Adaptive Histogram Method uses a biasing potential derived from histograms recorded during the simulation to achieve uniform sampling in the parameter of interest. The Adaptive Integration method directly calculates an estimate of the free energy from the average derivative of the Hamiltonian with respect to the parameter of interest and uses it as a biasing potential. We compare both methods to a state of the art method, and demonstrate that they compare favorably for the calculation of potentials of mean force of dense Lennard-Jones fluids. We use the Adaptive Integration Method to calculate accurate potentials of mean force for different types of simple particles in a Lennard-Jones fluid. Our approach allows us to separate the contributions of the solvent to the potential of mean force from the effect of the direct interaction between the particles. With contributions of the solvent determined, we can find the potential of mean force directly for any other direct interaction without additional simulations. We also test the accuracy of the Adaptive Integration Method on a thermodynamic cycle, which allows us to perform a consistency check between potentials of mean force and chemical potentials calculated using the Adaptive Integration Method. The results demonstrate a high degree of consistency of the method.

  20. Adaptively biased sequential importance sampling for rare events in reaction networks with comparison to exact solutions from finite buffer dCME method

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Critical events that occur rarely in biological processes are of great importance, but are challenging to study using Monte Carlo simulation. By introducing biases to reaction selection and reaction rates, weighted stochastic simulation algorithms based on importance sampling allow rare events to be sampled more effectively. However, existing methods do not address the important issue of barrier crossing, which often arises from multistable networks and systems with complex probability landscape. In addition, the proliferation of parameters and the associated computing cost pose significant problems. Here we introduce a general theoretical framework for obtaining optimized biases in sampling individual reactions for estimating probabilities of rare events. We further describe a practical algorithm called adaptively biased sequential importance sampling (ABSIS) method for efficient probability estimation. By adopting a look-ahead strategy and by enumerating short paths from the current state, we estimate the reaction-specific and state-specific forward and backward moving probabilities of the system, which are then used to bias reaction selections. The ABSIS algorithm can automatically detect barrier-crossing regions, and can adjust bias adaptively at different steps of the sampling process, with bias determined by the outcome of exhaustively generated short paths. In addition, there are only two bias parameters to be determined, regardless of the number of the reactions and the complexity of the network. We have applied the ABSIS method to four biochemical networks: the birth-death process, the reversible isomerization, the bistable Schlögl model, and the enzymatic futile cycle model. For comparison, we have also applied the finite buffer discrete chemical master equation (dCME) method recently developed to obtain exact numerical solutions of the underlying discrete chemical master equations of these problems. This allows us to assess sampling results objectively

  1. Adaptively biased sequential importance sampling for rare events in reaction networks with comparison to exact solutions from finite buffer dCME method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2013-07-01

    Critical events that occur rarely in biological processes are of great importance, but are challenging to study using Monte Carlo simulation. By introducing biases to reaction selection and reaction rates, weighted stochastic simulation algorithms based on importance sampling allow rare events to be sampled more effectively. However, existing methods do not address the important issue of barrier crossing, which often arises from multistable networks and systems with complex probability landscape. In addition, the proliferation of parameters and the associated computing cost pose significant problems. Here we introduce a general theoretical framework for obtaining optimized biases in sampling individual reactions for estimating probabilities of rare events. We further describe a practical algorithm called adaptively biased sequential importance sampling (ABSIS) method for efficient probability estimation. By adopting a look-ahead strategy and by enumerating short paths from the current state, we estimate the reaction-specific and state-specific forward and backward moving probabilities of the system, which are then used to bias reaction selections. The ABSIS algorithm can automatically detect barrier-crossing regions, and can adjust bias adaptively at different steps of the sampling process, with bias determined by the outcome of exhaustively generated short paths. In addition, there are only two bias parameters to be determined, regardless of the number of the reactions and the complexity of the network. We have applied the ABSIS method to four biochemical networks: the birth-death process, the reversible isomerization, the bistable Schlögl model, and the enzymatic futile cycle model. For comparison, we have also applied the finite buffer discrete chemical master equation (dCME) method recently developed to obtain exact numerical solutions of the underlying discrete chemical master equations of these problems. This allows us to assess sampling results objectively

  2. Adaptively biased sequential importance sampling for rare events in reaction networks with comparison to exact solutions from finite buffer dCME method.

    PubMed

    Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2013-07-14

    Critical events that occur rarely in biological processes are of great importance, but are challenging to study using Monte Carlo simulation. By introducing biases to reaction selection and reaction rates, weighted stochastic simulation algorithms based on importance sampling allow rare events to be sampled more effectively. However, existing methods do not address the important issue of barrier crossing, which often arises from multistable networks and systems with complex probability landscape. In addition, the proliferation of parameters and the associated computing cost pose significant problems. Here we introduce a general theoretical framework for obtaining optimized biases in sampling individual reactions for estimating probabilities of rare events. We further describe a practical algorithm called adaptively biased sequential importance sampling (ABSIS) method for efficient probability estimation. By adopting a look-ahead strategy and by enumerating short paths from the current state, we estimate the reaction-specific and state-specific forward and backward moving probabilities of the system, which are then used to bias reaction selections. The ABSIS algorithm can automatically detect barrier-crossing regions, and can adjust bias adaptively at different steps of the sampling process, with bias determined by the outcome of exhaustively generated short paths. In addition, there are only two bias parameters to be determined, regardless of the number of the reactions and the complexity of the network. We have applied the ABSIS method to four biochemical networks: the birth-death process, the reversible isomerization, the bistable Schlögl model, and the enzymatic futile cycle model. For comparison, we have also applied the finite buffer discrete chemical master equation (dCME) method recently developed to obtain exact numerical solutions of the underlying discrete chemical master equations of these problems. This allows us to assess sampling results objectively

  3. Mobile membrane introduction tandem mass spectrometry for on-the-fly measurements and adaptive sampling of VOCs around oil and gas projects in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogh, E.; Gill, C.; Bell, R.; Davey, N.; Martinsen, M.; Thompson, A.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The release of hydrocarbons into the environment can have significant environmental and economic consequences. The evolution of smaller, more portable mass spectrometers to the field can provide spatially and temporally resolved information for rapid detection, adaptive sampling and decision support. We have deployed a mobile platform membrane introduction mass spectrometer (MIMS) for the in-field simultaneous measurement of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. In this work, we report instrument and data handling advances that produce geographically referenced data in real-time and preliminary data where these improvements have been combined with high precision ultra-trace VOCs analysis to adaptively sample air plumes near oil and gas operations in Alberta, Canada. We have modified a commercially available ion-trap mass spectrometer (Griffin ICX 400) with an in-house temperature controlled capillary hollow fibre polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer membrane interface and in-line permeation tube flow cell for a continuously infused internal standard. The system is powered by 24 VDC for remote operations in a moving vehicle. Software modifications include the ability to run continuous, interlaced tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments for multiple contaminants/internal standards. All data are time and location stamped with on-board GPS and meteorological data to facilitate spatial and temporal data mapping. Tandem MS/MS scans were employed to simultaneously monitor ten volatile and semi-volatile analytes, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX), reduced sulfur compounds, halogenated organics and naphthalene. Quantification was achieved by calibrating against a continuously infused deuterated internal standard (toluene-d8). Time referenced MS/MS data were correlated with positional data and processed using Labview and Matlab to produce calibrated, geographical Google Earth data-visualizations that enable adaptive sampling protocols

  4. French Adaptation of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory in a Belgian French-Speaking Sample.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stéphanie; Kempenaers, Chantal; Linkowski, Paul; Loas, Gwenolé

    2016-01-01

    The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is the most widely used self-report scale to assess the construct of narcissism, especially in its grandiosity expression. Over the years, several factor models have been proposed in order to improve the understanding of the multidimensional aspect of this construct. The available data are heterogeneous, suggesting one to at least seven factors. In this study, we propose a French adaptation of the NPI submitted to a sample of Belgian French-speaking students ( n = 942). We performed a principal component analysis on a tetrachoric correlation matrix to explore its factor structure. Unlike previous studies, our study shows that a first factor explains the largest part of the variance. Internal consistency is excellent and we reproduced the sex differences reported when using the original scale. Correlations with social desirability are taken into account in the interpretation of our results. Altogether, the results of this study support a unidimensional structure for the NPI using the total score as a self-report measure of the Narcissistic Personality Disorder in its grandiose form. Future studies including confirmatory factor analysis and gender invariance measurement are also discussed.

  5. French Adaptation of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory in a Belgian French-Speaking Sample

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Stéphanie; Kempenaers, Chantal; Linkowski, Paul; Loas, Gwenolé

    2016-01-01

    The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is the most widely used self-report scale to assess the construct of narcissism, especially in its grandiosity expression. Over the years, several factor models have been proposed in order to improve the understanding of the multidimensional aspect of this construct. The available data are heterogeneous, suggesting one to at least seven factors. In this study, we propose a French adaptation of the NPI submitted to a sample of Belgian French-speaking students (n = 942). We performed a principal component analysis on a tetrachoric correlation matrix to explore its factor structure. Unlike previous studies, our study shows that a first factor explains the largest part of the variance. Internal consistency is excellent and we reproduced the sex differences reported when using the original scale. Correlations with social desirability are taken into account in the interpretation of our results. Altogether, the results of this study support a unidimensional structure for the NPI using the total score as a self-report measure of the Narcissistic Personality Disorder in its grandiose form. Future studies including confirmatory factor analysis and gender invariance measurement are also discussed. PMID:28066299

  6. On Frequency Offset Estimation Using the iNET Preamble in Frequency Selective Fading Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    ASM fields; (bottom) the relationship between the indexes of the received samples r(n), the signal samples s(n), the preamble samples p (n) and the short...frequency offset estimators for SOQPSK-TG equipped with the iNET preamble and operating in ISI channels. Four of the five estimators exam - ined here are...sync marker ( ASM ), and data bits (an LDPC codeword). The availability of a preamble introduces the possibility of data-aided synchro- nization in

  7. POF-Darts: Geometric adaptive sampling for probability of failure

    DOE PAGES

    Ebeida, Mohamed S.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Swiler, Laura P.; ...

    2016-06-18

    We introduce a novel technique, POF-Darts, to estimate the Probability Of Failure based on random disk-packing in the uncertain parameter space. POF-Darts uses hyperplane sampling to explore the unexplored part of the uncertain space. We use the function evaluation at a sample point to determine whether it belongs to failure or non-failure regions, and surround it with a protection sphere region to avoid clustering. We decompose the domain into Voronoi cells around the function evaluations as seeds and choose the radius of the protection sphere depending on the local Lipschitz continuity. As sampling proceeds, regions uncovered with spheres will shrink,more » improving the estimation accuracy. After exhausting the function evaluation budget, we build a surrogate model using the function evaluations associated with the sample points and estimate the probability of failure by exhaustive sampling of that surrogate. In comparison to other similar methods, our algorithm has the advantages of decoupling the sampling step from the surrogate construction one, the ability to reach target POF values with fewer samples, and the capability of estimating the number and locations of disconnected failure regions, not just the POF value. Furthermore, we present various examples to demonstrate the efficiency of our novel approach.« less

  8. Practical guidelines for implementing adaptive optics in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilding, Dean; Pozzi, Paolo; Soloviev, Oleg; Vdovin, Gleb; Verhaegen, Michel

    2018-02-01

    In life sciences, interest in the microscopic imaging of increasingly complex three dimensional samples, such as cell spheroids, zebrafish embryos, and in vivo applications in small animals, is growing quickly. Due to the increasing complexity of samples, more and more life scientists are considering the implementation of adaptive optics in their experimental setups. While several approaches to adaptive optics in microscopy have been reported, it is often difficult and confusing for the microscopist to choose from the array of techniques and equipment. In this poster presentation we offer a small guide to adaptive optics providing general guidelines for successful adaptive optics implementation.

  9. Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change in Canadian Jurisdictions

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Stephanie E.; Ford, James D.; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Araos, Malcolm; Parker, Stephen; Fleury, Manon D.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change poses numerous risks to the health of Canadians. Extreme weather events, poor air quality, and food insecurity in northern regions are likely to increase along with the increasing incidence and range of infectious diseases. In this study we identify and characterize Canadian federal, provincial, territorial and municipal adaptation to these health risks based on publically available information. Federal health adaptation initiatives emphasize capacity building and gathering information to address general health, infectious disease and heat-related risks. Provincial and territorial adaptation is varied. Quebec is a leader in climate change adaptation, having a notably higher number of adaptation initiatives reported, addressing almost all risks posed by climate change in the province, and having implemented various adaptation types. Meanwhile, all other Canadian provinces and territories are in the early stages of health adaptation. Based on publically available information, reported adaptation also varies greatly by municipality. The six sampled Canadian regional health authorities (or equivalent) are not reporting any adaptation initiatives. We also find little relationship between the number of initiatives reported in the six sampled municipalities and their provinces, suggesting that municipalities are adapting (or not adapting) autonomously. PMID:25588156

  10. Public health adaptation to climate change in Canadian jurisdictions.

    PubMed

    Austin, Stephanie E; Ford, James D; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Araos, Malcolm; Parker, Stephen; Fleury, Manon D

    2015-01-12

    Climate change poses numerous risks to the health of Canadians. Extreme weather events, poor air quality, and food insecurity in northern regions are likely to increase along with the increasing incidence and range of infectious diseases. In this study we identify and characterize Canadian federal, provincial, territorial and municipal adaptation to these health risks based on publically available information. Federal health adaptation initiatives emphasize capacity building and gathering information to address general health, infectious disease and heat-related risks. Provincial and territorial adaptation is varied. Quebec is a leader in climate change adaptation, having a notably higher number of adaptation initiatives reported, addressing almost all risks posed by climate change in the province, and having implemented various adaptation types. Meanwhile, all other Canadian provinces and territories are in the early stages of health adaptation. Based on publically available information, reported adaptation also varies greatly by municipality. The six sampled Canadian regional health authorities (or equivalent) are not reporting any adaptation initiatives. We also find little relationship between the number of initiatives reported in the six sampled municipalities and their provinces, suggesting that municipalities are adapting (or not adapting) autonomously.

  11. Adaptive vehicle motion estimation and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Thorpe, Chuck E.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate motion estimation and reliable maneuver prediction enable an automated car to react quickly and correctly to the rapid maneuvers of the other vehicles, and so allow safe and efficient navigation. In this paper, we present a car tracking system which provides motion estimation, maneuver prediction and detection of the tracked car. The three strategies employed - adaptive motion modeling, adaptive data sampling, and adaptive model switching probabilities - result in an adaptive interacting multiple model algorithm (AIMM). The experimental results on simulated and real data demonstrate that our tracking system is reliable, flexible, and robust. The adaptive tracking makes the system intelligent and useful in various autonomous driving tasks.

  12. The telomeric sync model of speciation: species-wide telomere erosion triggers cycles of transposon-mediated genomic rearrangements, which underlie the saltatory appearance of nonadaptive characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stindl, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    Charles Darwin knew that the fossil record is not overwhelmingly supportive of genetic and phenotypic gradualism; therefore, he developed the core of his theory on the basis of breeding experiments. Here, I present evidence for the existence of a cell biological mechanism that strongly points to the almost forgotten European concept of saltatory evolution of nonadaptive characters, which is in perfect agreement with the gaps in the fossil record. The standard model of chromosomal evolution has always been handicapped by a paradox, namely, how speciation can occur by spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements that are known to decrease the fertility of heterozygotes in a population. However, the hallmark of almost all closely related species is a differing chromosome complement and therefore chromosomal rearrangements seem to be crucial for speciation. Telomeres, the caps of eukaryotic chromosomes, erode in somatic tissues during life, but have been thought to remain stable in the germline of a species. Recently, a large human study spanning three healthy generations clearly found a cumulative telomere effect, which is indicative of transgenerational telomere erosion in the human species. The telomeric sync model of speciation presented here is based on telomere erosion between generations, which leads to identical fusions of chromosomes and triggers a transposon-mediated genomic repatterning in the germline of many individuals of a species. The phenotypic outcome of the telomere-triggered transposon activity is the saltatory appearance of nonadaptive characters simultaneously in many individuals. Transgenerational telomere erosion is therefore the material basis of aging at the species level.

  13. A Structure-Adaptive Hybrid RBF-BP Classifier with an Optimized Learning Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hui; Xie, Weixin; Pei, Jihong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a structure-adaptive hybrid RBF-BP (SAHRBF-BP) classifier with an optimized learning strategy. SAHRBF-BP is composed of a structure-adaptive RBF network and a BP network of cascade, where the number of RBF hidden nodes is adjusted adaptively according to the distribution of sample space, the adaptive RBF network is used for nonlinear kernel mapping and the BP network is used for nonlinear classification. The optimized learning strategy is as follows: firstly, a potential function is introduced into training sample space to adaptively determine the number of initial RBF hidden nodes and node parameters, and a form of heterogeneous samples repulsive force is designed to further optimize each generated RBF hidden node parameters, the optimized structure-adaptive RBF network is used for adaptively nonlinear mapping the sample space; then, according to the number of adaptively generated RBF hidden nodes, the number of subsequent BP input nodes can be determined, and the overall SAHRBF-BP classifier is built up; finally, different training sample sets are used to train the BP network parameters in SAHRBF-BP. Compared with other algorithms applied to different data sets, experiments show the superiority of SAHRBF-BP. Especially on most low dimensional and large number of data sets, the classification performance of SAHRBF-BP outperforms other training SLFNs algorithms. PMID:27792737

  14. A Mobile App for Synchronizing Glucometer Data: Impact on Adherence and Glycemic Control Among Youths With Type 1 Diabetes in Routine Care

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Mark A.; Staggs, Vincent S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) upload and review blood glucose data between clinic visits. Mobile phone applications that receive data from a “connected” glucometer and that support pattern management are available and have the capacity to make data upload and review less burdensome. Whether mobile apps can improve diabetes self-management among individuals with type 1 diabetes remains unknown. Method: We analyzed retrospective data on 81 youths with T1D who were trained to use a glucometer-connected mobile app in their self-management. To assess the effect of glucometer synchronization (“sync”) rate on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), mean blood glucose (mBG), and daily frequency of SMBG, we regressed those clinical outcomes on the frequency of glucometer syncs with the mobile app after controlling for other clinical care variables. Results: Median age was 14.0 (IQR 10.4-15.9) years, median duration of diabetes was 4.9 (2.7, 7.5) years, and median baseline HbA1c was 8.6% (7.9, 9.8). The sample was 49% male and 86% white. Youths with T1D synchronized glucometer data with the mobile app an average of 0.22 times per week (range 0-2.25). The glucometer sync rate did not have a statistically significant association with HbA1c or mean BG; in contrast, data sync frequency was associated with the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) such that each additional sync was associated with a 2.3-fold increase in SMBG frequency (P < .01). Conclusion: A glucometer-connected mobile app may increase an individual’s engagement with other aspects of care (eg, SMBG frequency). Whether diabetes device-connected mobile apps can improve glycemic control remains to be determined. PMID:28745097

  15. US forests are showing increased rates of decline in response to a changing climate

    Treesearch

    Warren B. Cohen; Zhiqiang Yang; David M. Bell; Stephen V. Stehman

    2015-01-01

    How vulnerable are US forest to a changing climate? We answer this question using Landsat time series data and a unique interpretation approach, TimeSync, a plot-based Landsat visualization and data collection tool. Original analyses were based on a stratified two-stage cluster sample design that included interpretation of 3858 forested plots. From these data, we...

  16. Application of surface enhanced Raman scattering and competitive adaptive reweighted sampling on detecting furfural dissolved in transformer oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weigen; Zou, Jingxin; Wan, Fu; Fan, Zhou; Yang, Dingkun

    2018-03-01

    Detecting the dissolving furfural in mineral oil is an essential technical method to evaluate the ageing condition of oil-paper insulation and the degradation of mechanical properties. Compared with the traditional detection method, Raman spectroscopy is obviously convenient and timesaving in operation. This study explored the method of applying surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on quantitative analysis of the furfural dissolved in oil. Oil solution with different concentration of furfural were prepared and calibrated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Confocal laser Raman spectroscopy (CLRS) and SERS technology were employed to acquire Raman spectral data. Monte Carlo cross validation (MCCV) was used to eliminate the outliers in sample set, then competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) was developed to select an optimal combination of informative variables that most reflect the chemical properties of concern. Based on selected Raman spectral features, support vector machine (SVM) combined with particle swarm algorithm (PSO) was used to set up a furfural quantitative analysis model. Finally, the generalization ability and prediction precision of the established method were verified by the samples made in lab. In summary, a new spectral method is proposed to quickly detect furfural in oil, which lays a foundation for evaluating the ageing of oil-paper insulation in oil immersed electrical equipment.

  17. In vitro adaptation of Plasmodium falciparum reveal variations in cultivability.

    PubMed

    White, John; Mascarenhas, Anjali; Pereira, Ligia; Dash, Rashmi; Walke, Jayashri T; Gawas, Pooja; Sharma, Ambika; Manoharan, Suresh Kumar; Guler, Jennifer L; Maki, Jennifer N; Kumar, Ashwani; Mahanta, Jagadish; Valecha, Neena; Dubhashi, Nagesh; Vaz, Marina; Gomes, Edwin; Chery, Laura; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2016-01-22

    Culture-adapted Plasmodium falciparum parasites can offer deeper understanding of geographic variations in drug resistance, pathogenesis and immune evasion. To help ground population-based calculations and inferences from culture-adapted parasites, the complete range of parasites from a study area must be well represented in any collection. To this end, standardized adaptation methods and determinants of successful in vitro adaption were sought. Venous blood was collected from 33 P. falciparum-infected individuals at Goa Medical College and Hospital (Bambolim, Goa, India). Culture variables such as whole blood versus washed blood, heat-inactivated plasma versus Albumax, and different starting haematocrit levels were tested on fresh blood samples from patients. In vitro adaptation was considered successful when two four-fold or greater increases in parasitaemia were observed within, at most, 33 days of attempted culture. Subsequently, parasites from the same patients, which were originally cryopreserved following blood draw, were retested for adaptability for 45 days using identical host red blood cells (RBCs) and culture media. At a new endemic area research site, ~65% of tested patient samples, with varied patient history and clinical presentation, were successfully culture-adapted immediately after blood collection. Cultures set up at 1% haematocrit and 0.5% Albumax adapted most rapidly, but no single test condition was uniformly fatal to culture adaptation. Success was not limited by low patient parasitaemia nor by patient age. Some parasites emerged even after significant delays in sample processing and even after initiation of treatment with anti-malarials. When 'day 0' cryopreserved samples were retested in parallel many months later using identical host RBCs and media, speed to adaptation appeared to be an intrinsic property of the parasites collected from individual patients. Culture adaptation of P. falciparum in a field setting is formally shown to be

  18. Exploring equivalence domain in nonlinear inverse problems using Covariance Matrix Adaption Evolution Strategy (CMAES) and random sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Kuvshinov, Alexey V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology to sample equivalence domain (ED) in nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE)-constrained inverse problems. For this purpose, we first applied state-of-the-art stochastic optimization algorithm called Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMAES) to identify low-misfit regions of the model space. These regions were then randomly sampled to create an ensemble of equivalent models and quantify uncertainty. CMAES is aimed at exploring model space globally and is robust on very ill-conditioned problems. We show that the number of iterations required to converge grows at a moderate rate with respect to number of unknowns and the algorithm is embarrassingly parallel. We formulated the problem by using the generalized Gaussian distribution. This enabled us to seamlessly use arbitrary norms for residual and regularization terms. We show that various regularization norms facilitate studying different classes of equivalent solutions. We further show how performance of the standard Metropolis-Hastings Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm can be substantially improved by using information CMAES provides. This methodology was tested by using individual and joint inversions of magneotelluric, controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) and global EM induction data.

  19. Memory-based frame synchronizer. [for digital communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stattel, R. J.; Niswander, J. K. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A frame synchronizer for use in digital communications systems wherein data formats can be easily and dynamically changed is described. The use of memory array elements provide increased flexibility in format selection and sync word selection in addition to real time reconfiguration ability. The frame synchronizer comprises a serial-to-parallel converter which converts a serial input data stream to a constantly changing parallel data output. This parallel data output is supplied to programmable sync word recognizers each consisting of a multiplexer and a random access memory (RAM). The multiplexer is connected to both the parallel data output and an address bus which may be connected to a microprocessor or computer for purposes of programming the sync word recognizer. The RAM is used as an associative memory or decorder and is programmed to identify a specific sync word. Additional programmable RAMs are used as counter decoders to define word bit length, frame word length, and paragraph frame length.

  20. A sub-sampled approach to extremely low-dose STEM

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Stevens, A.; Luzi, L.; Yang, H.

    The inpainting of randomly sub-sampled images acquired by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is an attractive method for imaging under low-dose conditions (≤ 1 e -Å 2) without changing either the operation of the microscope or the physics of the imaging process. We show that 1) adaptive sub-sampling increases acquisition speed, resolution, and sensitivity; and 2) random (non-adaptive) sub-sampling is equivalent, but faster than, traditional low-dose techniques. Adaptive sub-sampling opens numerous possibilities for the analysis of beam sensitive materials and in-situ dynamic processes at the resolution limit of the aberration corrected microscope and is demonstrated here for the analysis ofmore » the node distribution in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs).« less

  1. Quality based approach for adaptive face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Ali J.; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in biometric technology have pushed towards more robust and reliable systems. We aim to build systems that have low recognition errors and are less affected by variation in recording conditions. Recognition errors are often attributed to the usage of low quality biometric samples. Hence, there is a need to develop new intelligent techniques and strategies to automatically measure/quantify the quality of biometric image samples and if necessary restore image quality according to the need of the intended application. In this paper, we present no-reference image quality measures in the spatial domain that have impact on face recognition. The first is called symmetrical adaptive local quality index (SALQI) and the second is called middle halve (MH). Also, an adaptive strategy has been developed to select the best way to restore the image quality, called symmetrical adaptive histogram equalization (SAHE). The main benefits of using quality measures for adaptive strategy are: (1) avoidance of excessive unnecessary enhancement procedures that may cause undesired artifacts, and (2) reduced computational complexity which is essential for real time applications. We test the success of the proposed measures and adaptive approach for a wavelet-based face recognition system that uses the nearest neighborhood classifier. We shall demonstrate noticeable improvements in the performance of adaptive face recognition system over the corresponding non-adaptive scheme.

  2. Getting in Sync

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2017-01-01

    Community college presidents and board members come and go. But a major driver of the continued success of two-year colleges is how fruitfully the relationships between CEOs and their boards evolve over time--from the onboarding process when a president first takes the helm to the "outboarding" process that starts with them giving…

  3. Evaluating sampling designs by computer simulation: A case study with the Missouri bladderpod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, L.W.; Smith, D.R.; Young, C.; Nichols, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    To effectively manage rare populations, accurate monitoring data are critical. Yet many monitoring programs are initiated without careful consideration of whether chosen sampling designs will provide accurate estimates of population parameters. Obtaining accurate estimates is especially difficult when natural variability is high, or limited budgets determine that only a small fraction of the population can be sampled. The Missouri bladderpod, Lesquerella filiformis Rollins, is a federally threatened winter annual that has an aggregated distribution pattern and exhibits dramatic interannual population fluctuations. Using the simulation program SAMPLE, we evaluated five candidate sampling designs appropriate for rare populations, based on 4 years of field data: (1) simple random sampling, (2) adaptive simple random sampling, (3) grid-based systematic sampling, (4) adaptive grid-based systematic sampling, and (5) GIS-based adaptive sampling. We compared the designs based on the precision of density estimates for fixed sample size, cost, and distance traveled. Sampling fraction and cost were the most important factors determining precision of density estimates, and relative design performance changed across the range of sampling fractions. Adaptive designs did not provide uniformly more precise estimates than conventional designs, in part because the spatial distribution of L. filiformis was relatively widespread within the study site. Adaptive designs tended to perform better as sampling fraction increased and when sampling costs, particularly distance traveled, were taken into account. The rate that units occupied by L. filiformis were encountered was higher for adaptive than for conventional designs. Overall, grid-based systematic designs were more efficient and practically implemented than the others. ?? 2008 The Society of Population Ecology and Springer.

  4. Putative mechanisms mediating tolerance for audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Jyoti; Miller, Lee M; Pitt, Mark A; Shahin, Antoine J

    2015-03-01

    Audiovisual (AV) speech perception is robust to temporal asynchronies between visual and auditory stimuli. We investigated the neural mechanisms that facilitate tolerance for audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony (AVOA) with EEG. Individuals were presented with AV words that were asynchronous in onsets of voice and mouth movement and judged whether they were synchronous or not. Behaviorally, individuals tolerated (perceived as synchronous) longer AVOAs when mouth movement preceded the speech (V-A) stimuli than when the speech preceded mouth movement (A-V). Neurophysiologically, the P1-N1-P2 auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), time-locked to sound onsets and known to arise in and surrounding the primary auditory cortex (PAC), were smaller for the in-sync than the out-of-sync percepts. Spectral power of oscillatory activity in the beta band (14-30 Hz) following the AEPs was larger during the in-sync than out-of-sync perception for both A-V and V-A conditions. However, alpha power (8-14 Hz), also following AEPs, was larger for the in-sync than out-of-sync percepts only in the V-A condition. These results demonstrate that AVOA tolerance is enhanced by inhibiting low-level auditory activity (e.g., AEPs representing generators in and surrounding PAC) that code for acoustic onsets. By reducing sensitivity to acoustic onsets, visual-to-auditory onset mapping is weakened, allowing for greater AVOA tolerance. In contrast, beta and alpha results suggest the involvement of higher-level neural processes that may code for language cues (phonetic, lexical), selective attention, and binding of AV percepts, allowing for wider neural windows of temporal integration, i.e., greater AVOA tolerance. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Compact Ocean Models Enable Onboard AUV Autonomy and Decentralized Adaptive Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Compact Ocean Models Enable Onboard AUV Autonomy and...transmitted onboard an AUV . 3. Develop algorithms for adaptive planning of AUV surveys. 4. Demonstrate use of compact ocean models onboard a long...range AUV during a field deployment. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of

  6. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  7. Continuous-time adaptive critics.

    PubMed

    Hanselmann, Thomas; Noakes, Lyle; Zaknich, Anthony

    2007-05-01

    A continuous-time formulation of an adaptive critic design (ACD) is investigated. Connections to the discrete case are made, where backpropagation through time (BPTT) and real-time recurrent learning (RTRL) are prevalent. Practical benefits are that this framework fits in well with plant descriptions given by differential equations and that any standard integration routine with adaptive step-size does an adaptive sampling for free. A second-order actor adaptation using Newton's method is established for fast actor convergence for a general plant and critic. Also, a fast critic update for concurrent actor-critic training is introduced to immediately apply necessary adjustments of critic parameters induced by actor updates to keep the Bellman optimality correct to first-order approximation after actor changes. Thus, critic and actor updates may be performed at the same time until some substantial error build up in the Bellman optimality or temporal difference equation, when a traditional critic training needs to be performed and then another interval of concurrent actor-critic training may resume.

  8. Traffic-Adaptive, Flow-Specific Medium Access for Wireless Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    hybrid, contention and non-contention schemes are shown to be special cases. This work also compares the energy efficiency of centralized and distributed...solutions and proposes an energy efficient version of traffic-adaptive CWS-MAC that includes an adaptive sleep cycle coordinated through the use of...preamble sampling. A preamble sampling probability parameter is introduced to manage the trade-off between energy efficiency and throughput and delay

  9. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer. PMID:27499762

  10. Towards psychologically adaptive brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrden, A.; Chau, T.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) performance is sensitive to short-term changes in psychological states such as fatigue, frustration, and attention. This paper explores the design of a BCI that can adapt to these short-term changes. Approach. Eleven able-bodied individuals participated in a study during which they used a mental task-based EEG-BCI to play a simple maze navigation game while self-reporting their perceived levels of fatigue, frustration, and attention. In an offline analysis, a regression algorithm was trained to predict changes in these states, yielding Pearson correlation coefficients in excess of 0.45 between the self-reported and predicted states. Two means of fusing the resultant mental state predictions with mental task classification were investigated. First, single-trial mental state predictions were used to predict correct classification by the BCI during each trial. Second, an adaptive BCI was designed that retrained a new classifier for each testing sample using only those training samples for which predicted mental state was similar to that predicted for the current testing sample. Main results. Mental state-based prediction of BCI reliability exceeded chance levels. The adaptive BCI exhibited significant, but practically modest, increases in classification accuracy for five of 11 participants and no significant difference for the remaining six despite a smaller average training set size. Significance. Collectively, these findings indicate that adaptation to psychological state may allow the design of more accurate BCIs.

  11. Model-Based Adaptive Event-Triggered Control of Strict-Feedback Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Xin; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2018-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the adaptive event-triggered control problem of nonlinear continuous-time systems in strict-feedback form. By using the event-sampled neural network (NN) to approximate the unknown nonlinear function, an adaptive model and an associated event-triggered controller are designed by exploiting the backstepping method. In the proposed method, the feedback signals and the NN weights are aperiodically updated only when the event-triggered condition is violated. A positive lower bound on the minimum intersample time is guaranteed to avoid accumulation point. The closed-loop stability of the resulting nonlinear impulsive dynamical system is rigorously proved via Lyapunov analysis under an adaptive event sampling condition. In comparing with the traditional adaptive backstepping design with a fixed sample period, the event-triggered method samples the state and updates the NN weights only when it is necessary. Therefore, the number of transmissions can be significantly reduced. Finally, two simulation examples are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  12. Adaptive classifier for steel strip surface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingming; Li, Guangyao; Xie, Li; Xiao, Mang; Yi, Li

    2017-01-01

    Surface defects detection system has been receiving increased attention as its precision, speed and less cost. One of the most challenges is reacting to accuracy deterioration with time as aged equipment and changed processes. These variables will make a tiny change to the real world model but a big impact on the classification result. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive classifier with a Bayes kernel (BYEC) which update the model with small sample to it adaptive for accuracy deterioration. Firstly, abundant features were introduced to cover lots of information about the defects. Secondly, we constructed a series of SVMs with the random subspace of the features. Then, a Bayes classifier was trained as an evolutionary kernel to fuse the results from base SVMs. Finally, we proposed the method to update the Bayes evolutionary kernel. The proposed algorithm is experimentally compared with different algorithms, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can be updated with small sample and fit the changed model well. Robustness, low requirement for samples and adaptive is presented in the experiment.

  13. Adaptive control of theophylline therapy: importance of blood sampling times.

    PubMed

    D'Argenio, D Z; Khakmahd, K

    1983-10-01

    A two-observation protocol for estimating theophylline clearance during a constant-rate intravenous infusion is used to examine the importance of blood sampling schedules with regard to the information content of resulting concentration data. Guided by a theory for calculating maximally informative sample times, population simulations are used to assess the effect of specific sampling times on the precision of resulting clearance estimates and subsequent predictions of theophylline plasma concentrations. The simulations incorporated noise terms for intersubject variability, dosing errors, sample collection errors, and assay error. Clearance was estimated using Chiou's method, least squares, and a Bayesian estimation procedure. The results of these simulations suggest that clinically significant estimation and prediction errors may result when using the above two-point protocol for estimating theophylline clearance if the time separating the two blood samples is less than one population mean elimination half-life.

  14. Adaptive hybrid control of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Simple methods for the design of adaptive force and position controllers for robot manipulators within the hybrid control architecuture is presented. The force controller is composed of an adaptive PID feedback controller, an auxiliary signal and a force feedforward term, and it achieves tracking of desired force setpoints in the constraint directions. The position controller consists of adaptive feedback and feedforward controllers and an auxiliary signal, and it accomplishes tracking of desired position trajectories in the free directions. The controllers are capable of compensating for dynamic cross-couplings that exist between the position and force control loops in the hybrid control architecture. The adaptive controllers do not require knowledge of the complex dynamic model or parameter values of the manipulator or the environment. The proposed control schemes are computationally fast and suitable for implementation in on-line control with high sampling rates.

  15. Wavefront measurement using computational adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    South, Fredrick A; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Bower, Andrew J; Xu, Yang; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2018-03-01

    In many optical imaging applications, it is necessary to correct for aberrations to obtain high quality images. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides access to the amplitude and phase of the backscattered optical field for three-dimensional (3D) imaging samples. Computational adaptive optics (CAO) modifies the phase of the OCT data in the spatial frequency domain to correct optical aberrations without using a deformable mirror, as is commonly done in hardware-based adaptive optics (AO). This provides improvement of image quality throughout the 3D volume, enabling imaging across greater depth ranges and in highly aberrated samples. However, the CAO aberration correction has a complicated relation to the imaging pupil and is not a direct measurement of the pupil aberrations. Here we present new methods for recovering the wavefront aberrations directly from the OCT data without the use of hardware adaptive optics. This enables both computational measurement and correction of optical aberrations.

  16. Sampling procedures for inventory of commercial volume tree species in Amazon Forest.

    PubMed

    Netto, Sylvio P; Pelissari, Allan L; Cysneiros, Vinicius C; Bonazza, Marcelo; Sanquetta, Carlos R

    2017-01-01

    The spatial distribution of tropical tree species can affect the consistency of the estimators in commercial forest inventories, therefore, appropriate sampling procedures are required to survey species with different spatial patterns in the Amazon Forest. For this, the present study aims to evaluate the conventional sampling procedures and introduce the adaptive cluster sampling for volumetric inventories of Amazonian tree species, considering the hypotheses that the density, the spatial distribution and the zero-plots affect the consistency of the estimators, and that the adaptive cluster sampling allows to obtain more accurate volumetric estimation. We use data from a census carried out in Jamari National Forest, Brazil, where trees with diameters equal to or higher than 40 cm were measured in 1,355 plots. Species with different spatial patterns were selected and sampled with simple random sampling, systematic sampling, linear cluster sampling and adaptive cluster sampling, whereby the accuracy of the volumetric estimation and presence of zero-plots were evaluated. The sampling procedures applied to species were affected by the low density of trees and the large number of zero-plots, wherein the adaptive clusters allowed concentrating the sampling effort in plots with trees and, thus, agglutinating more representative samples to estimate the commercial volume.

  17. Adaptive Importance Sampling for Control and Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappen, H. J.; Ruiz, H. C.

    2016-03-01

    Path integral (PI) control problems are a restricted class of non-linear control problems that can be solved formally as a Feynman-Kac PI and can be estimated using Monte Carlo sampling. In this contribution we review PI control theory in the finite horizon case. We subsequently focus on the problem how to compute and represent control solutions. We review the most commonly used methods in robotics and control. Within the PI theory, the question of how to compute becomes the question of importance sampling. Efficient importance samplers are state feedback controllers and the use of these requires an efficient representation. Learning and representing effective state-feedback controllers for non-linear stochastic control problems is a very challenging, and largely unsolved, problem. We show how to learn and represent such controllers using ideas from the cross entropy method. We derive a gradient descent method that allows to learn feed-back controllers using an arbitrary parametrisation. We refer to this method as the path integral cross entropy method or PICE. We illustrate this method for some simple examples. The PI control methods can be used to estimate the posterior distribution in latent state models. In neuroscience these problems arise when estimating connectivity from neural recording data using EM. We demonstrate the PI control method as an accurate alternative to particle filtering.

  18. A Novel Approach to Adaptive Flow Separation Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-03

    particular, it considers control of flow separation over a NACA-0025 airfoil using microjet actuators and develops Adaptive Sampling Based Model...Predictive Control ( Adaptive SBMPC), a novel approach to Nonlinear Model Predictive Control that applies the Minimal Resource Allocation Network...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 03-09-2016 1-May-2013 30-Apr-2016 Final Report: A Novel Approach to Adaptive Flow Separation Control The views, opinions

  19. Haptic adaptation to slant: No transfer between exploration modes

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, Loes C. J.; Plaisier, Myrthe A.; Glowania, Catharina; Ernst, Marc O.

    2016-01-01

    Human touch is an inherently active sense: to estimate an object’s shape humans often move their hand across its surface. This way the object is sampled both in a serial (sampling different parts of the object across time) and parallel fashion (sampling using different parts of the hand simultaneously). Both the serial (moving a single finger) and parallel (static contact with the entire hand) exploration modes provide reliable and similar global shape information, suggesting the possibility that this information is shared early in the sensory cortex. In contrast, we here show the opposite. Using an adaptation-and-transfer paradigm, a change in haptic perception was induced by slant-adaptation using either the serial or parallel exploration mode. A unified shape-based coding would predict that this would equally affect perception using other exploration modes. However, we found that adaptation-induced perceptual changes did not transfer between exploration modes. Instead, serial and parallel exploration components adapted simultaneously, but to different kinaesthetic aspects of exploration behaviour rather than object-shape per se. These results indicate that a potential combination of information from different exploration modes can only occur at down-stream cortical processing stages, at which adaptation is no longer effective. PMID:27698392

  20. Surface tension determination using liquid sample micromirror property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hošek, Jan

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents an application of adaptive optics principle onto small sample of liquid surface tension measurement. The principle of experimental method devised by Ferguson (1924) is based on measurement of pressure difference across a liquid sample placed into small diameter capillary on condition of one flat meniscus of the liquid sample. Planarity or curvature radius of the capillary tip meniscus has to be measured and controlled, in order to fulfill this condition during measurement. Two different optical set-ups using liquid meniscus micromirror property are presented and its suitability for meniscus profile determination is compared. Meniscus radius optical measurement, data processing and control algorithm of the adaptive micromirror profile set are presented too. The presented adaptive optics system can be used for focal length control of microsystems based on liquid micromirrors or microlenses with long focal distances especially.

  1. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  2. Practical characteristics of adaptive design in phase 2 and 3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Shimura, M; Gosho, M

    2018-04-01

    Adaptive design methods are expected to be ethical, reflect real medical practice, increase the likelihood of research and development success and reduce the allocation of patients into ineffective treatment groups by the early termination of clinical trials. However, the comprehensive details regarding which types of clinical trials will include adaptive designs remain unclear. We examined the practical characteristics of adaptive design used in clinical trials. We conducted a literature search of adaptive design clinical trials published from 2012 to 2015 using PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, with common search terms related to adaptive design. We systematically assessed the types and characteristics of adaptive designs and disease areas employed in the adaptive design trials. Our survey identified 245 adaptive design clinical trials. The number of trials by the publication year increased from 2012 to 2013 and did not greatly change afterwards. The most frequently used adaptive design was group sequential design (n = 222, 90.6%), especially for neoplasm or cardiovascular disease trials. Among the other types of adaptive design, adaptive dose/treatment group selection (n = 21, 8.6%) and adaptive sample-size adjustment (n = 19, 7.8%) were frequently used. The adaptive randomization (n = 8, 3.3%) and adaptive seamless design (n = 6, 2.4%) were less frequent. Adaptive dose/treatment group selection and adaptive sample-size adjustment were frequently used (up to 23%) in "certain infectious and parasitic diseases," "diseases of nervous system," and "mental and behavioural disorders" in comparison with "neoplasms" (<6.6%). For "mental and behavioural disorders," adaptive randomization was used in two trials of eight trials in total (25%). Group sequential design and adaptive sample-size adjustment were used frequently in phase 3 trials or in trials where study phase was not specified, whereas the other types of adaptive

  3. The Relationship between Spirituality, Religiousness, and Career Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Blustein, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between spirituality, religiousness, and career adaptability using a sample of undergraduate students (N=144). We proposed that higher levels of religiousness and spirituality would predict higher levels of career adaptability, defined in this study by career decision self-efficacy and career choice…

  4. Adaptive measurements of urban runoff quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Brandon P.; Kerkez, Branko

    2016-11-01

    An approach to adaptively measure runoff water quality dynamics is introduced, focusing specifically on characterizing the timing and magnitude of urban pollutographs. Rather than relying on a static schedule or flow-weighted sampling, which can miss important water quality dynamics if parameterized inadequately, novel Internet-enabled sensor nodes are used to autonomously adapt their measurement frequency to real-time weather forecasts and hydrologic conditions. This dynamic approach has the potential to significantly improve the use of constrained experimental resources, such as automated grab samplers, which continue to provide a strong alternative to sampling water quality dynamics when in situ sensors are not available. Compared to conventional flow-weighted or time-weighted sampling schemes, which rely on preset thresholds, a major benefit of the approach is the ability to dynamically adapt to features of an underlying hydrologic signal. A 28 km2 urban watershed was studied to characterize concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) and total phosphorus. Water quality samples were autonomously triggered in response to features in the underlying hydrograph and real-time weather forecasts. The study watershed did not exhibit a strong first flush and intraevent concentration variability was driven by flow acceleration, wherein the largest loadings of TSS and total phosphorus corresponded with the steepest rising limbs of the storm hydrograph. The scalability of the proposed method is discussed in the context of larger sensor network deployments, as well the potential to improving control of urban water quality.

  5. Accelerated Dimension-Independent Adaptive Metropolis

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Yuxin; Keyes, David E.; Law, Kody J.; ...

    2016-10-27

    This work describes improvements from algorithmic and architectural means to black-box Bayesian inference over high-dimensional parameter spaces. The well-known adaptive Metropolis (AM) algorithm [33] is extended herein to scale asymptotically uniformly with respect to the underlying parameter dimension for Gaussian targets, by respecting the variance of the target. The resulting algorithm, referred to as the dimension-independent adaptive Metropolis (DIAM) algorithm, also shows improved performance with respect to adaptive Metropolis on non-Gaussian targets. This algorithm is further improved, and the possibility of probing high-dimensional (with dimension d 1000) targets is enabled, via GPU-accelerated numerical libraries and periodically synchronized concurrent chains (justimore » ed a posteriori). Asymptotically in dimension, this GPU implementation exhibits a factor of four improvement versus a competitive CPU-based Intel MKL parallel version alone. Strong scaling to concurrent chains is exhibited, through a combination of longer time per sample batch (weak scaling) and yet fewer necessary samples to convergence. The algorithm performance is illustrated on several Gaussian and non-Gaussian target examples, in which the dimension may be in excess of one thousand.« less

  6. Accelerated Dimension-Independent Adaptive Metropolis

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chen, Yuxin; Keyes, David E.; Law, Kody J.

    This work describes improvements from algorithmic and architectural means to black-box Bayesian inference over high-dimensional parameter spaces. The well-known adaptive Metropolis (AM) algorithm [33] is extended herein to scale asymptotically uniformly with respect to the underlying parameter dimension for Gaussian targets, by respecting the variance of the target. The resulting algorithm, referred to as the dimension-independent adaptive Metropolis (DIAM) algorithm, also shows improved performance with respect to adaptive Metropolis on non-Gaussian targets. This algorithm is further improved, and the possibility of probing high-dimensional (with dimension d 1000) targets is enabled, via GPU-accelerated numerical libraries and periodically synchronized concurrent chains (justimore » ed a posteriori). Asymptotically in dimension, this GPU implementation exhibits a factor of four improvement versus a competitive CPU-based Intel MKL parallel version alone. Strong scaling to concurrent chains is exhibited, through a combination of longer time per sample batch (weak scaling) and yet fewer necessary samples to convergence. The algorithm performance is illustrated on several Gaussian and non-Gaussian target examples, in which the dimension may be in excess of one thousand.« less

  7. Effect of adaptation and pulp density on bioleaching of mine waste using indigenous acidophilic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K.; Kim, B.; Lee, D.; Choi, N.; Park, C.

    2011-12-01

    Adaptation to environment is a natural phenomena that takes place in many animals, plants and microorganisms. These adapted organisms achieve stronger applicability than unadapted organisms after habitation in a specific environment for a long time. In the biohydrometallurgical industry, adaptation to special environment conditions by selective culturing is the most popular method for improving bioleaching activity of strains-although that is time consuming. This study investigated the influence of the bioleaching efficiency of mine waste under batch experimental conditions (adaptation and pulp density) using the indigenous acidophilic bacteria collected from acid mine drainage in Go-seong and Yeon-hwa, Korea. We conducted the batch experiments at the influences of parameters, such as the adaptation of bacteria and pulp density of the mine waste. In the adaptation case, the value of pH in 1'st adaptation bacteria sample exhibited lower than in 2'nd adaptation bacteria sample. And the content of both Cu and Zn at 1'st adaptation bacteria sample appeared lower than at 2'nd adaptation bacteria sample. In the SEM analysis, the rod-shaped bacteria with 1μm in length were observed on the filter paper (pore size - 0.45μm). The results of pulp density experiments revealed that the content of both Cu and Zn increased with increasing pulp density, since the increment of pulp density resulted in the enhancement of bioleaching capacity.

  8. An adaptive Cartesian control scheme for manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    A adaptive control scheme for direct control of manipulator end-effectors to achieve trajectory tracking in Cartesian space is developed. The control structure is obtained from linear multivariable theory and is composed of simple feedforward and feedback controllers and an auxiliary input. The direct adaptation laws are derived from model reference adaptive control theory and are not based on parameter estimation of the robot model. The utilization of feedforward control and the inclusion of auxiliary input are novel features of the present scheme and result in improved dynamic performance over existing adaptive control schemes. The adaptive controller does not require the complex mathematical model of the robot dynamics or any knowledge of the robot parameters or the payload, and is computationally fast for online implementation with high sampling rates.

  9. Adaptive control of dual-arm robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Three strategies for adaptive control of cooperative dual-arm robots are described. In the position-position control strategy, the adaptive controllers ensure that the end-effector positions of both arms track desired trajectories in Cartesian space despite unknown time-varying interaction forces exerted through the load. In the position-hybrid control strategy, the adaptive controller of one arm controls end-effector motions in the free directions and applied forces in the constraint directions, while the adaptive controller of the other arm ensures that the end-effector tracks desired position trajectories. In the hybrid-hybrid control strategy, the adaptive controllers ensure that both end-effectors track reference position trajectories while simultaneously applying desired forces on the load. In all three control strategies, the cross-coupling effects between the arms are treated as disturbances which are rejected by the adaptive controllers while following desired commands in a common frame of reference. The adaptive controllers do not require the complex mathematical model of the arm dynamics or any knowledge of the arm dynamic parameters or the load parameters such as mass and stiffness. The controllers have simple structures and are computationally fast for on-line implementation with high sampling rates.

  10. Methodological issues with adaptation of clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Hung, H M James; Wang, Sue-Jane; O'Neill, Robert T

    2006-01-01

    Adaptation of clinical trial design generates many issues that have not been resolved for practical applications, though statistical methodology has advanced greatly. This paper focuses on some methodological issues. In one type of adaptation such as sample size re-estimation, only the postulated value of a parameter for planning the trial size may be altered. In another type, the originally intended hypothesis for testing may be modified using the internal data accumulated at an interim time of the trial, such as changing the primary endpoint and dropping a treatment arm. For sample size re-estimation, we make a contrast between an adaptive test weighting the two-stage test statistics with the statistical information given by the original design and the original sample mean test with a properly corrected critical value. We point out the difficulty in planning a confirmatory trial based on the crude information generated by exploratory trials. In regards to selecting a primary endpoint, we argue that the selection process that allows switching from one endpoint to the other with the internal data of the trial is not very likely to gain a power advantage over the simple process of selecting one from the two endpoints by testing them with an equal split of alpha (Bonferroni adjustment). For dropping a treatment arm, distributing the remaining sample size of the discontinued arm to other treatment arms can substantially improve the statistical power of identifying a superior treatment arm in the design. A common difficult methodological issue is that of how to select an adaptation rule in the trial planning stage. Pre-specification of the adaptation rule is important for the practicality consideration. Changing the originally intended hypothesis for testing with the internal data generates great concerns to clinical trial researchers.

  11. An experimental SMI adaptive antenna array simulator for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, Ronald S.; Gupta, Inder J.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental sample matrix inversion (SMI) adaptive antenna array for suppressing weak interfering signals is described. The experimental adaptive array uses a modified SMI algorithm to increase the interference suppression. In the modified SMI algorithm, the sample covariance matrix is redefined to reduce the effect of thermal noise on the weights of an adaptive array. This is accomplished by subtracting a fraction of the smallest eigenvalue of the original covariance matrix from its diagonal entries. The test results obtained using the experimental system are compared with theoretical results. The two show a good agreement.

  12. Development and Standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Tassé, Marc J; Schalock, Robert L; Thissen, David; Balboni, Giulia; Bersani, Henry Hank; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon A; Spreat, Scott; Widaman, Keith F; Zhang, Dalun; Navas, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT modeling and a nationally representative standardization sample, the item set was reduced to 75 items that provide the most precise adaptive behavior information at the cutoff area determining the presence or not of significant adaptive behavior deficits across conceptual, social, and practical skills. The standardization of the DABS is described and discussed.

  13. Biological sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Gloria A [French Camp, CA

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  14. Sampling for Contaminants in Ecological Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhardt, L. Lee; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This paper is concerned with problems in assessing the behavior of trace substances introduced into natural systems, sampling models of five classes that might be used in the study of contaminants are reviewed. Adaptation of an industrial experimentation method and techniques used in economic geology to ecological sampling is recommended.…

  15. Genealogies of rapidly adapting populations

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Richard A.; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity of a species is shaped by its recent evolutionary history and can be used to infer demographic events or selective sweeps. Most inference methods are based on the null hypothesis that natural selection is a weak or infrequent evolutionary force. However, many species, particularly pathogens, are under continuous pressure to adapt in response to changing environments. A statistical framework for inference from diversity data of such populations is currently lacking. Towards this goal, we explore the properties of genealogies in a model of continual adaptation in asexual populations. We show that lineages trace back to a small pool of highly fit ancestors, in which almost simultaneous coalescence of more than two lineages frequently occurs. Whereas such multiple mergers are unlikely under the neutral coalescent, they create a unique genetic footprint in adapting populations. The site frequency spectrum of derived neutral alleles, for example, is nonmonotonic and has a peak at high frequencies, whereas Tajima’s D becomes more and more negative with increasing sample size. Because multiple merger coalescents emerge in many models of rapid adaptation, we argue that they should be considered as a null model for adapting populations. PMID:23269838

  16. SMI adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of adaptive antenna arrays is studied when a sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm is used to control array weights. It is shown that conventional SMI adaptive antennas, like other adaptive antennas, are unable to suppress weak interfering signals (below thermal noise) encountered in broadcasting satellite communication systems. To overcome this problem, the SMI algorithm is modified. In the modified algorithm, the covariance matrix is modified such that the effect of thermal noise on the weights of the adaptive array is reduced. Thus, the weights are dictated by relatively weak coherent signals. It is shown that the modified algorithm provides the desired interference protection. The use of defocused feeds as auxiliary elements of an SMI adaptive array is also discussed.

  17. Adaptive cluster sampling: An efficient method for assessing inconspicuous species

    Treesearch

    Andrea M. Silletti; Joan Walker

    2003-01-01

    Restorationistis typically evaluate the success of a project by estimating the population sizes of species that have been planted or seeded. Because total census is raely feasible, they must rely on sampling methods for population estimates. However, traditional random sampling designs may be inefficient for species that, for one reason or another, are challenging to...

  18. Adaptive-numerical-bias metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Khanjari, Neda; Eslami, Hossein; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-12-05

    A metadynamics scheme is presented in which the free energy surface is filled with progressively adding adaptive biasing potentials, obtained from the accumulated probability distribution of the collective variables. Instead of adding Gaussians with assigned height and width in conventional metadynamics method, here we add a more realistic adaptive biasing potential to the Hamiltonian of the system. The shape of the adaptive biasing potential is adjusted on the fly by sampling over the visited states. As the top of the barrier is approached, the biasing potentials become wider. This decreases the problem of trapping the system in the niches, introduced by the addition of Gaussians of fixed height in metadynamics. Our results for the free energy profiles of three test systems show that this method is more accurate and converges more quickly than the conventional metadynamics, and is quite comparable (in accuracy and convergence rate) with the well-tempered metadynamics method. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Further psychometric evaluation and revision of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory in a national sample.

    PubMed

    Malec, James F; Kragness, Miriam; Evans, Randall W; Finlay, Karen L; Kent, Ann; Lezak, Muriel D

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the internal consistency of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI), further refine the instrument, and provide reference data based on a large, geographically diverse sample of persons with acquired brain injury (ABI). 386 persons, most with moderate to severe ABI. Outpatient, community-based, and residential rehabilitation facilities for persons with ABI located in the United States: West, Midwest, and Southeast. Rasch, item cluster, principal components, and traditional psychometric analyses for internal consistency of MPAI data and subscales. With rescoring of rating scales for 4 items, a 29-item version of the MPAI showed satisfactory internal consistency by Rasch (Person Reliability=.88; Item Reliability=.99) and traditional psychometric indicators (Cronbach's alpha=.89). Three rationally derived subscales for Ability, Activity, and Participation demonstrated psychometric properties that were equivalent to subscales derived empirically through item cluster and factor analyses. For the 3 subscales, Person Reliability ranged from.78 to.79; Item Reliability, from.98 to.99; and Cronbach's alpha, from.76 to.83. Subscales correlated moderately (Pearson r =.49-.65) with each other and strongly with the overall scale (Pearson r=.82-.86). Outcome after ABI is represented by the unitary dimension described by the MPAI. MPAI subscales further define regions of this dimension that may be useful for evaluation of clinical cases and program evaluation.

  20. Adaptive Annealed Importance Sampling for Multimodal Posterior Exploration and Model Selection with Application to Extrasolar Planet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin

    2014-07-01

    We describe an algorithm that can adaptively provide mixture summaries of multimodal posterior distributions. The parameter space of the involved posteriors ranges in size from a few dimensions to dozens of dimensions. This work was motivated by an astrophysical problem called extrasolar planet (exoplanet) detection, wherein the computation of stochastic integrals that are required for Bayesian model comparison is challenging. The difficulty comes from the highly nonlinear models that lead to multimodal posterior distributions. We resort to importance sampling (IS) to estimate the integrals, and thus translate the problem to be how to find a parametric approximation of the posterior. To capture the multimodal structure in the posterior, we initialize a mixture proposal distribution and then tailor its parameters elaborately to make it resemble the posterior to the greatest extent possible. We use the effective sample size (ESS) calculated based on the IS draws to measure the degree of approximation. The bigger the ESS is, the better the proposal resembles the posterior. A difficulty within this tailoring operation lies in the adjustment of the number of mixing components in the mixture proposal. Brute force methods just preset it as a large constant, which leads to an increase in the required computational resources. We provide an iterative delete/merge/add process, which works in tandem with an expectation-maximization step to tailor such a number online. The efficiency of our proposed method is tested via both simulation studies and real exoplanet data analysis.

  1. Comparative Evolution of an Archetypal Adaptive Radiation: Innovation and Opportunity in Anolis Lizards.

    PubMed

    Poe, Steven; de Oca, Adrián Nieto-Montes; Torres-Carvajal, Omar; de Queiroz, Kevin; Velasco, Julián A; Truett, Brad; Gray, Levi N; Ryan, Mason J; Köhler, Gunther; Ayala-Varela, Fernando; Latella, Ian

    2018-06-01

    Adaptive radiation is a widely recognized pattern of evolution wherein substantial phenotypic change accompanies rapid speciation. Adaptive radiation may be triggered by environmental opportunities resulting from dispersal to new areas or via the evolution of traits, called key innovations, that allow for invasion of new niches. Species sampling is a known source of bias in many comparative analyses, yet classic adaptive radiations have not been studied comparatively with comprehensively sampled phylogenies. In this study, we use unprecedented comprehensive phylogenetic sampling of Anolis lizard species to examine comparative evolution in this well-studied adaptive radiation. We compare adaptive radiation models within Anolis and in the Anolis clade and a potential sister lineage, the Corytophanidae. We find evidence for island (i.e., opportunity) effects and no evidence for trait (i.e., key innovation) effects causing accelerated body size evolution within Anolis. However, island effects are scale dependent: when Anolis and Corytophanidae are analyzed together, no island effect is evident. We find no evidence for an island effect on speciation rate and tenuous evidence for greater speciation rate due to trait effects. These results suggest the need for precision in treatments of classic adaptive radiations such as Anolis and further refinement of the concept of adaptive radiation.

  2. Linking inter-individual differences in the conflict adaptation effect to spontaneous brain activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Zhencai; Zhao, Guang; Hitchman, Glenn; Liu, Congcong; Zhao, Xiaoyue; Liu, Yijun; Chen, Antao

    2014-04-15

    Conflict adaptation has been widely researched in normal and clinical populations. There are large individual differences in conflict adaptation, and it has been linked to the schizotypal trait. However, no study to date has examined how individual differences in spontaneous brain activity are related to behavioral conflict adaptation (performance). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) is a promising tool to investigate this issue. The present study evaluated the regional homogeneity (ReHo) of RS-fMRI signals in order to explore the neural basis of individual differences in conflict adaptation across two independent samples comprising a total of 67 normal subjects. A partial correlation analysis was carried out to examine the relationship between ReHo and behavioral conflict adaptation, while controlling for reaction time, standard deviation and flanker interference effects. This analysis was conducted on 39 subjects' data (sample 1); the results showed significant positive correlations in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. We then conducted a test-validation procedure on the remaining 28 subjects' data (sample 2) to examine the reliability of the results. Regions of interest were defined based on the correlation results. Regression analysis showed that variability in ReHo values in the DLPFC accounted for 48% of the individual differences in the conflict adaptation effect in sample 2. The present findings provide further support for the importance of the DLPFC in the conflict adaptation process. More importantly, we demonstrated that ReHo of RS-fMRI signals in the DLPFC can predict behavioral performance in conflict adaptation, which provides potential biomarkers for the early detection of cognitive control deterioration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Some challenges with statistical inference in adaptive designs.

    PubMed

    Hung, H M James; Wang, Sue-Jane; Yang, Peiling

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive designs have generated a great deal of attention to clinical trial communities. The literature contains many statistical methods to deal with added statistical uncertainties concerning the adaptations. Increasingly encountered in regulatory applications are adaptive statistical information designs that allow modification of sample size or related statistical information and adaptive selection designs that allow selection of doses or patient populations during the course of a clinical trial. For adaptive statistical information designs, a few statistical testing methods are mathematically equivalent, as a number of articles have stipulated, but arguably there are large differences in their practical ramifications. We pinpoint some undesirable features of these methods in this work. For adaptive selection designs, the selection based on biomarker data for testing the correlated clinical endpoints may increase statistical uncertainty in terms of type I error probability, and most importantly the increased statistical uncertainty may be impossible to assess.

  4. Direct adaptive control of manipulators in Cartesian space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    A new adaptive-control scheme for direct control of manipulator end effector to achieve trajectory tracking in Cartesian space is developed in this article. The control structure is obtained from linear multivariable theory and is composed of simple feedforward and feedback controllers and an auxiliary input. The direct adaptation laws are derived from model reference adaptive control theory and are not based on parameter estimation of the robot model. The utilization of adaptive feedforward control and the inclusion of auxiliary input are novel features of the present scheme and result in improved dynamic performance over existing adaptive control schemes. The adaptive controller does not require the complex mathematical model of the robot dynamics or any knowledge of the robot parameters or the payload, and is computationally fast for on-line implementation with high sampling rates. The control scheme is applied to a two-link manipulator for illustration.

  5. Complex Patterns of Local Adaptation in Teosinte

    PubMed Central

    Pyhäjärvi, Tanja; Hufford, Matthew B.; Mezmouk, Sofiane; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Populations of widely distributed species encounter and must adapt to local environmental conditions. However, comprehensive characterization of the genetic basis of adaptation is demanding, requiring genome-wide genotype data, multiple sampled populations, and an understanding of population structure and potential selection pressures. Here, we used single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and data on numerous environmental variables to describe the genetic basis of local adaptation in 21 populations of teosinte, the wild ancestor of maize. We found complex hierarchical genetic structure created by altitude, dispersal events, and admixture among subspecies, which complicated identification of locally beneficial alleles. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium revealed four large putative inversion polymorphisms showing clinal patterns of frequency. Population differentiation and environmental correlations suggest that both inversions and intergenic polymorphisms are involved in local adaptation. PMID:23902747

  6. Small RNA Library Preparation Method for Next-Generation Sequencing Using Chemical Modifications to Prevent Adapter Dimer Formation.

    PubMed

    Shore, Sabrina; Henderson, Jordana M; Lebedev, Alexandre; Salcedo, Michelle P; Zon, Gerald; McCaffrey, Anton P; Paul, Natasha; Hogrefe, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    For most sample types, the automation of RNA and DNA sample preparation workflows enables high throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) library preparation. Greater adoption of small RNA (sRNA) sequencing has been hindered by high sample input requirements and inherent ligation side products formed during library preparation. These side products, known as adapter dimer, are very similar in size to the tagged library. Most sRNA library preparation strategies thus employ a gel purification step to isolate tagged library from adapter dimer contaminants. At very low sample inputs, adapter dimer side products dominate the reaction and limit the sensitivity of this technique. Here we address the need for improved specificity of sRNA library preparation workflows with a novel library preparation approach that uses modified adapters to suppress adapter dimer formation. This workflow allows for lower sample inputs and elimination of the gel purification step, which in turn allows for an automatable sRNA library preparation protocol.

  7. Texture-adaptive hyperspectral video acquisition system with a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaojing; Feng, Jiao; Wang, Yongjin

    2014-10-01

    We present a new hybrid camera system based on spatial light modulator (SLM) to capture texture-adaptive high-resolution hyperspectral video. The hybrid camera system records a hyperspectral video with low spatial resolution using a gray camera and a high-spatial resolution video using a RGB camera. The hyperspectral video is subsampled by the SLM. The subsampled points can be adaptively selected according to the texture characteristic of the scene by combining with digital imaging analysis and computational processing. In this paper, we propose an adaptive sampling method utilizing texture segmentation and wavelet transform (WT). We also demonstrate the effectiveness of the sampled pattern on the SLM with the proposed method.

  8. Computationally efficient video restoration for Nyquist sampled imaging sensors combining an affine-motion-based temporal Kalman filter and adaptive Wiener filter.

    PubMed

    Rucci, Michael; Hardie, Russell C; Barnard, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient video restoration algorithm to address both blur and noise for a Nyquist sampled imaging system. The proposed method utilizes a temporal Kalman filter followed by a correlation-model based spatial adaptive Wiener filter (AWF). The Kalman filter employs an affine background motion model and novel process-noise variance estimate. We also propose and demonstrate a new multidelay temporal Kalman filter designed to more robustly treat local motion. The AWF is a spatial operation that performs deconvolution and adapts to the spatially varying residual noise left in the Kalman filter stage. In image areas where the temporal Kalman filter is able to provide significant noise reduction, the AWF can be aggressive in its deconvolution. In other areas, where less noise reduction is achieved with the Kalman filter, the AWF balances the deconvolution with spatial noise reduction. In this way, the Kalman filter and AWF work together effectively, but without the computational burden of full joint spatiotemporal processing. We also propose a novel hybrid system that combines a temporal Kalman filter and BM3D processing. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods, we test the algorithms on both simulated imagery and video collected with a visible camera.

  9. Modular Multi-Sensor Display System Design Study. Volume 2. Detail Design and Application Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    control grid . 2. Horizontal AFC/Deflection Module - Generates horizontal sweep signals from input syncs to provide 525 to 1023 line television raster...separation, and gener- ate composite blanking for the CRT control grid . Signal Number of Lines Signal Type Characteristics Input Interface Composite...SEPERATOR DC RESTORA- TION l_i BLANKING VERT DRIVE ■♦ Bl" CRT " CATHODE * _fc> BRIGHTNESS ^ (FRONT PANEL) .CRT GRID ■♦• COMP SYNC Figure

  10. Communication: Adaptive boundaries in multiscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagoner, Jason A.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2018-04-01

    Combined-resolution simulations are an effective way to study molecular properties across a range of length and time scales. These simulations can benefit from adaptive boundaries that allow the high-resolution region to adapt (change size and/or shape) as the simulation progresses. The number of degrees of freedom required to accurately represent even a simple molecular process can vary by several orders of magnitude throughout the course of a simulation, and adaptive boundaries react to these changes to include an appropriate but not excessive amount of detail. Here, we derive the Hamiltonian and distribution function for such a molecular simulation. We also design an algorithm that can efficiently sample the boundary as a new coordinate of the system. We apply this framework to a mixed explicit/continuum simulation of a peptide in solvent. We use this example to discuss the conditions necessary for a successful implementation of adaptive boundaries that is both efficient and accurate in reproducing molecular properties.

  11. Adaptive frequency-domain equalization in digital coherent optical receivers.

    PubMed

    Faruk, Md Saifuddin; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2011-06-20

    We propose a novel frequency-domain adaptive equalizer in digital coherent optical receivers, which can reduce computational complexity of the conventional time-domain adaptive equalizer based on finite-impulse-response (FIR) filters. The proposed equalizer can operate on the input sequence sampled by free-running analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) at the rate of two samples per symbol; therefore, the arbitrary initial sampling phase of ADCs can be adjusted so that the best symbol-spaced sequence is produced. The equalizer can also be configured in the butterfly structure, which enables demultiplexing of polarization tributaries apart from equalization of linear transmission impairments. The performance of the proposed equalization scheme is verified by 40-Gbits/s dual-polarization quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) transmission experiments.

  12. Adaptive phase k-means algorithm for waveform classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chengyun; Liu, Zhining; Wang, Yaojun; Xu, Feng; Li, Xingming; Hu, Guangmin

    2018-01-01

    Waveform classification is a powerful technique for seismic facies analysis that describes the heterogeneity and compartments within a reservoir. Horizon interpretation is a critical step in waveform classification. However, the horizon often produces inconsistent waveform phase, and thus results in an unsatisfied classification. To alleviate this problem, an adaptive phase waveform classification method called the adaptive phase k-means is introduced in this paper. Our method improves the traditional k-means algorithm using an adaptive phase distance for waveform similarity measure. The proposed distance is a measure with variable phases as it moves from sample to sample along the traces. Model traces are also updated with the best phase interference in the iterative process. Therefore, our method is robust to phase variations caused by the interpretation horizon. We tested the effectiveness of our algorithm by applying it to synthetic and real data. The satisfactory results reveal that the proposed method tolerates certain waveform phase variation and is a good tool for seismic facies analysis.

  13. Genetics of climate change adaptation.

    PubMed

    Franks, Steven J; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rate of current global climate change is having strong effects on many species and, at least in some cases, is driving evolution, particularly when changes in conditions alter patterns of selection. Climate change thus provides an opportunity for the study of the genetic basis of adaptation. Such studies include a variety of observational and experimental approaches, such as sampling across clines, artificial evolution experiments, and resurrection studies. These approaches can be combined with a number of techniques in genetics and genomics, including association and mapping analyses, genome scans, and transcription profiling. Recent research has revealed a number of candidate genes potentially involved in climate change adaptation and has also illustrated that genetic regulatory networks and epigenetic effects may be particularly relevant for evolution driven by climate change. Although genetic and genomic data are rapidly accumulating, we still have much to learn about the genetic architecture of climate change adaptation.

  14. The effect of creative problem solving on students’ mathematical adaptive reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muin, A.; Hanifah, S. H.; Diwidian, F.

    2018-01-01

    This research was conducted to analyse the effect of creative problem solving (CPS) learning model on the students’ mathematical adaptive reasoning. The method used in this study was a quasi-experimental with randomized post-test only control group design. Samples were taken as many as two classes by cluster random sampling technique consisting of experimental class (CPS) as many as 40 students and control class (conventional) as many as 40 students. Based on the result of hypothesis testing with the t-test at the significance level of 5%, it was obtained that significance level of 0.0000 is less than α = 0.05. This shows that the students’ mathematical adaptive reasoning skills who were taught by CPS model were higher than the students’ mathematical adaptive reasoning skills of those who were taught by conventional model. The result of this research showed that the most prominent aspect of adaptive reasoning that could be developed through a CPS was inductive intuitive. Two aspects of adaptive reasoning, which were inductive intuitive and deductive intuitive, were mostly balanced. The different between inductive intuitive and deductive intuitive aspect was not too big. CPS model can develop student mathematical adaptive reasoning skills. CPS model can facilitate development of mathematical adaptive reasoning skills thoroughly.

  15. ADAPTIVE ANNEALED IMPORTANCE SAMPLING FOR MULTIMODAL POSTERIOR EXPLORATION AND MODEL SELECTION WITH APPLICATION TO EXTRASOLAR PLANET DETECTION

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Liu, Bin, E-mail: bins@ieee.org

    2014-07-01

    We describe an algorithm that can adaptively provide mixture summaries of multimodal posterior distributions. The parameter space of the involved posteriors ranges in size from a few dimensions to dozens of dimensions. This work was motivated by an astrophysical problem called extrasolar planet (exoplanet) detection, wherein the computation of stochastic integrals that are required for Bayesian model comparison is challenging. The difficulty comes from the highly nonlinear models that lead to multimodal posterior distributions. We resort to importance sampling (IS) to estimate the integrals, and thus translate the problem to be how to find a parametric approximation of the posterior.more » To capture the multimodal structure in the posterior, we initialize a mixture proposal distribution and then tailor its parameters elaborately to make it resemble the posterior to the greatest extent possible. We use the effective sample size (ESS) calculated based on the IS draws to measure the degree of approximation. The bigger the ESS is, the better the proposal resembles the posterior. A difficulty within this tailoring operation lies in the adjustment of the number of mixing components in the mixture proposal. Brute force methods just preset it as a large constant, which leads to an increase in the required computational resources. We provide an iterative delete/merge/add process, which works in tandem with an expectation-maximization step to tailor such a number online. The efficiency of our proposed method is tested via both simulation studies and real exoplanet data analysis.« less

  16. Childhood Epilepsy and Asthma: Family Strengths Associated with Child Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Joan Kessner

    This study aimed to describe demographic, seizure, and family characteristics associated with good and poor adaptation to childhood epilepsy and contrast them with demographic, asthma, and family characteristics associated with good and poor adaptation to childhood asthma. Children with asthma were selected as a comparison sample because epilepsy…

  17. Fourth Graders Make Inventions Using SCAMPER and Animal Adaptation Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Mahjabeen; Carignan, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    This study explores to what extent the SCAMPER (Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Modify, Put to another use, Eliminate, and Rearrange) technique combined with animal adaptation ideas learned through form and function analogy activities can help fourth graders generate creative ideas while augmenting their inventiveness. The sample consisted of 24…

  18. Frame synchronization methods based on channel symbol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, S.; Cheung, K.-M.

    1989-01-01

    The current DSN frame synchronization procedure is based on monitoring the decoded bit stream for the appearance of a sync marker sequence that is transmitted once every data frame. The possibility of obtaining frame synchronization by processing the raw received channel symbols rather than the decoded bits is explored. Performance results are derived for three channel symbol sync methods, and these are compared with results for decoded bit sync methods reported elsewhere. It is shown that each class of methods has advantages or disadvantages under different assumptions on the frame length, the global acquisition strategy, and the desired measure of acquisition timeliness. It is shown that the sync statistics based on decoded bits are superior to the statistics based on channel symbols, if the desired operating region utilizes a probability of miss many orders of magnitude higher than the probability of false alarm. This operating point is applicable for very large frame lengths and minimal frame-to-frame verification strategy. On the other hand, the statistics based on channel symbols are superior if the desired operating point has a miss probability only a few orders of magnitude greater than the false alarm probability. This happens for small frames or when frame-to-frame verifications are required.

  19. Nonlinear effects of respiration on the crosstalk between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Vlasta; Marchi, Andrea; De Maria, Beatrice; Rossato, Gianluca; Nollo, Giandomenico; Faes, Luca; Porta, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems are vital control mechanisms responsible for guaranteeing homeostasis and are affected by respiration. This work proposes the investigation of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems and the nonlinear influences of respiration on both regulations through joint symbolic analysis (JSA), conditioned or unconditioned on respiration. Interactions between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems were evaluated as well by performing correlation analysis between JSA indexes describing the two control systems. Heart period, systolic and mean arterial pressure, mean cerebral blood flow velocity and respiration were acquired on a beat-to-beat basis in 13 subjects experiencing recurrent syncope episodes (SYNC) and 13 healthy individuals (non-SYNC) in supine resting condition and during head-up tilt test at 60° (TILT). Results showed that JSA distinguished conditions and groups, whereas time domain parameters detected only the effect of TILT. Respiration affected cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems in a nonlinear way and was able to modulate the interactions between the two control systems with different outcome in non-SYNC and SYNC groups, thus suggesting that the analysis of the impact of respiration on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems might improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the development of postural-related syncope.

  20. Exposing USGS sample collections for broader discovery and access: collaboration between ScienceBase, IEDA:SESAR, and Paleobiology Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Bristol, S.; Lehnert, K. A.; Arko, R. A.; Peters, S. E.; Uhen, M. D.; Song, L.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is an exemplar of the need for improved cyberinfrastructure for its vast holdings of invaluable physical geoscience data. Millions of discrete paleobiological and geological specimens lie in USGS warehouses and at the Smithsonian Institution. These specimens serve as the basis for many geologic maps and geochemical databases, and are a potential treasure trove of new scientific knowledge. The extent of this treasure is virtually unknown and inaccessible outside a small group of paleogeoscientists and geochemists. A team from the USGS, the Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) facility, and the Paleobiology Database (PBDB) are working to expose information on paleontological and geochemical specimens for discovery by scientists and citizens. This project uses existing infrastructure of the System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR) and PBDB, which already contains much of the fundamental data schemas that are necessary to accommodate USGS records. The project is also developing a new Linked Data interface for the USGS National Geochemical Database (NGDB). The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) is the identifier that links samples between all systems. For paleontological specimens, SESAR and PBDB will be the primary repositories for USGS records, with a data syncing process to archive records within the USGS ScienceBase system. The process began with mapping the metadata fields necessary for USGS collections to the existing SESAR and PBDB data structures, while aligning them with the Observations & Measurements and Darwin Core standards. New functionality needed in SESAR included links to a USGS locality registry, fossil classifications, a spatial qualifier attribution for samples with sensitive locations, and acknowledgement of data and metadata licensing. The team is developing a harvesting mechanism to periodically transfer USGS records from within PBDB and SESAR to ScienceBase. For the NGDB, the samples are being

  1. Wheelchair users' experience of non-adapted and adapted clothes during sailing, quad rugby or wheel-walking.

    PubMed

    Kratz, G; Söderback, I; Guidetti, S; Hultling, C; Rykatkin, T; Söderström, M

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present quasi-experimental post-test-design study was to compare 32 wheelchair users' (mostly para/tetraplegics) experience of wearing specially adapted clothes and non-adapted clothes for sailing, quad rugby or wheel-walking. Four existing assessment instruments were used: the Klein-Bell Activities of Daily Living Scale; a two-part Basic Information Questionnaire eliciting experience of effort, comfort and feeling of physical condition; the Experience Sampling Form for investigating the individuals' attitudes in terms of involvement and affective and activity mood states, and the Occupational Therapy Assessment of Leisure Time interview framework for collecting data about experience of leisure time. The wheelchair users all associated significantly greater comfort with use of the adapted clothes and, particularly the 'sailors', better physical condition. Overall, significantly greater involvement and more positive affect states were associated with the adapted clothes than with conventional garments, and mood state changed for the better. The wheelchair users set a higher priority upon work or leisure activities than upon independence in activities of daily living, and for this reason the Klein-Bell ratings showed great variation between the 'sailors' and the 'quad rugby players' (range 57%-93%), though these groups demonstrated more independence than the 'wheel-walkers'. The results of the study confirm the value of adapting sportswear for handicapped people. Such adaptations should also be of benefit for other activities than those studied.

  2. CERNBox + EOS: end-user storage for science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascetti, L.; Gonzalez Labrador, H.; Lamanna, M.; Mościcki, JT; Peters, AJ

    2015-12-01

    CERNBox is a cloud synchronisation service for end-users: it allows syncing and sharing files on all major mobile and desktop platforms (Linux, Windows, MacOSX, Android, iOS) aiming to provide offline availability to any data stored in the CERN EOS infrastructure. The successful beta phase of the service confirmed the high demand in the community for an easily accessible cloud storage solution such as CERNBox. Integration of the CERNBox service with the EOS storage back-end is the next step towards providing “sync and share” capabilities for scientific and engineering use-cases. In this report we will present lessons learnt in offering the CERNBox service, key technical aspects of CERNBox/EOS integration and new, emerging usage possibilities. The latter includes the ongoing integration of “sync and share” capabilities with the LHC data analysis tools and transfer services.

  3. How Big Is Big Enough? Sample Size Requirements for CAST Item Parameter Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuah, Siang Chee; Drasgow, Fritz; Luecht, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive tests offer the advantages of reduced test length and increased accuracy in ability estimation. However, adaptive tests require large pools of precalibrated items. This study looks at the development of an item pool for 1 type of adaptive administration: the computer-adaptive sequential test. An important issue is the sample size required…

  4. Next generation sensing platforms for extended deployments in large-scale, multidisciplinary, adaptive sampling and observational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. N.; Meinig, C.; Mordy, C. W.; Lawrence-Slavas, N.; Cokelet, E. D.; Jenkins, R.; Tabisola, H. M.; Stabeno, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    New autonomous sensors have dramatically increased the resolution and accuracy of oceanographic data collection, enabling rapid sampling over extremely fine scales. Innovative new autonomous platofrms like floats, gliders, drones, and crawling moorings leverage the full potential of these new sensors by extending spatiotemporal reach across varied environments. During 2015 and 2016, The Innovative Technology for Arctic Exploration Program at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory tested several new types of fully autonomous platforms with increased speed, durability, and power and payload capacity designed to deliver cutting-edge ecosystem assessment sensors to remote or inaccessible environments. The Expendable Ice-Tracking (EXIT) gloat developed by the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) is moored near bottom during the ice-free season and released on an autonomous timer beneath the ice during the following winter. The float collects a rapid profile during ascent, and continues to collect critical, poorly-accessible under-ice data until melt, when data is transmitted via satellite. The autonomous Oculus sub-surface glider developed by the University of Washington and PMEL has a large power and payload capacity and an enhanced buoyancy engine. This 'coastal truck' is designed for the rapid water column ascent required by optical imaging systems. The Saildrone is a solar and wind powered ocean unmanned surface vessel (USV) developed by Saildrone, Inc. in partnership with PMEL. This large-payload (200 lbs), fast (1-7 kts), durable (46 kts winds) platform was equipped with 15 sensors designed for ecosystem assessment during 2016, including passive and active acoustic systems specially redesigned for autonomous vehicle deployments. The senors deployed on these platforms achieved rigorous accuracy and precision standards. These innovative platforms provide new sampling capabilities and cost efficiencies in high-resolution sensor deployment

  5. Adaptation of Methanogenic Inocula to Anaerobic Digestion of Maize Silage

    PubMed Central

    Wojcieszak, Martyna; Pyzik, Adam; Poszytek, Krzysztof; Krawczyk, Pawel S.; Sobczak, Adam; Lipinski, Leszek; Roubinek, Otton; Palige, Jacek; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    A well-balanced microbial consortium is crucial for efficient biogas production. In turn, one of a major factor that influence on the structure of anaerobic digestion (AD) consortium is a source of microorganisms which are used as an inoculum. This study evaluated the influence of inoculum sources (with various origin) on adaptation of a biogas community and the efficiency of the biomethanization of maize silage. As initial inocula for AD of maize silage the samples from: (i) an agricultural biogas plant (ABP) which utilizes maize silage as a main substrate, (ii) cattle slurry (CS), which contain elevated levels of lignocelluloses materials, and (iii) raw sewage sludge (RSS) with low content of plant origin materials were used. The adaptation of methanogenic consortia was monitored during a series of passages, and the functionality of the adapted consortia was verified through start-up operation of AD in two-stage reactors. During the first stages of the adaptation phase, methanogenic consortia occurred very slowly, and only after several passages did the microbial community adapts to allow production of biogas with high methane content. The ABP consortium revealed highest biogas production in the adaptation and in the start-up process. The biodiversity dynamics monitored during adaptation and start-up process showed that community profile changed in a similar direction in three studied consortia. Native communities were very distinct to each other, while at the end of the Phase II of the start-up process microbial diversity profile was similar in all consortia. All adopted bacterial communities were dominated by representatives of Porphyromonadaceae, Rikenellaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Synergistaceae. A shift from low acetate-preferring acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae (ABP and RSS) and/or hydrogenotrophic Archaea, e.g., Methanomicrobiaceae (CS) prevailing in the inoculum samples to larger populations of high acetate-preferring acetoclastic Methanosarcinaceae was

  6. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  7. Culture adaptation of malaria parasites selects for convergent loss-of-function mutants.

    PubMed

    Claessens, Antoine; Affara, Muna; Assefa, Samuel A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Conway, David J

    2017-01-24

    Cultured human pathogens may differ significantly from source populations. To investigate the genetic basis of laboratory adaptation in malaria parasites, clinical Plasmodium falciparum isolates were sampled from patients and cultured in vitro for up to three months. Genome sequence analysis was performed on multiple culture time point samples from six monoclonal isolates, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants emerging over time were detected. Out of a total of five positively selected SNPs, four represented nonsense mutations resulting in stop codons, three of these in a single ApiAP2 transcription factor gene, and one in SRPK1. To survey further for nonsense mutants associated with culture, genome sequences of eleven long-term laboratory-adapted parasite strains were examined, revealing four independently acquired nonsense mutations in two other ApiAP2 genes, and five in Epac. No mutants of these genes exist in a large database of parasite sequences from uncultured clinical samples. This implicates putative master regulator genes in which multiple independent stop codon mutations have convergently led to culture adaptation, affecting most laboratory lines of P. falciparum. Understanding the adaptive processes should guide development of experimental models, which could include targeted gene disruption to adapt fastidious malaria parasite species to culture.

  8. Psychometric Properties of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality in a PTSD Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Erika J.; Harrington, Kelly M.; Miller, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric characteristics of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP; Clark, 1996) in 280 individuals who screened positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The SNAP validity, trait, temperament, and personality disorder (PD) scales were compared with scales on the Brief Form of the…

  9. International Postgraduate Students' Cross-Cultural Adaptation in Malaysia: Antecedents and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafaei, Azadeh; Razak, Nordin Abd

    2016-01-01

    This study develops and empirically tests a conceptual model capturing the factors impacting students' cross-cultural adaptation and the outcomes resulting from such adaption. Data were obtained from a sample of international postgraduate students from six Malaysian public universities using a structured questionnaire. Structural equation…

  10. Urn models for response-adaptive randomized designs: a simulation study based on a non-adaptive randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ghiglietti, Andrea; Scarale, Maria Giovanna; Miceli, Rosalba; Ieva, Francesca; Mariani, Luigi; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Edefonti, Valeria

    2018-03-22

    Recently, response-adaptive designs have been proposed in randomized clinical trials to achieve ethical and/or cost advantages by using sequential accrual information collected during the trial to dynamically update the probabilities of treatment assignments. In this context, urn models-where the probability to assign patients to treatments is interpreted as the proportion of balls of different colors available in a virtual urn-have been used as response-adaptive randomization rules. We propose the use of Randomly Reinforced Urn (RRU) models in a simulation study based on a published randomized clinical trial on the efficacy of home enteral nutrition in cancer patients after major gastrointestinal surgery. We compare results with the RRU design with those previously published with the non-adaptive approach. We also provide a code written with the R software to implement the RRU design in practice. In detail, we simulate 10,000 trials based on the RRU model in three set-ups of different total sample sizes. We report information on the number of patients allocated to the inferior treatment and on the empirical power of the t-test for the treatment coefficient in the ANOVA model. We carry out a sensitivity analysis to assess the effect of different urn compositions. For each sample size, in approximately 75% of the simulation runs, the number of patients allocated to the inferior treatment by the RRU design is lower, as compared to the non-adaptive design. The empirical power of the t-test for the treatment effect is similar in the two designs.

  11. Adaptive graph-based multiple testing procedures

    PubMed Central

    Klinglmueller, Florian; Posch, Martin; Koenig, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Multiple testing procedures defined by directed, weighted graphs have recently been proposed as an intuitive visual tool for constructing multiple testing strategies that reflect the often complex contextual relations between hypotheses in clinical trials. Many well-known sequentially rejective tests, such as (parallel) gatekeeping tests or hierarchical testing procedures are special cases of the graph based tests. We generalize these graph-based multiple testing procedures to adaptive trial designs with an interim analysis. These designs permit mid-trial design modifications based on unblinded interim data as well as external information, while providing strong family wise error rate control. To maintain the familywise error rate, it is not required to prespecify the adaption rule in detail. Because the adaptive test does not require knowledge of the multivariate distribution of test statistics, it is applicable in a wide range of scenarios including trials with multiple treatment comparisons, endpoints or subgroups, or combinations thereof. Examples of adaptations are dropping of treatment arms, selection of subpopulations, and sample size reassessment. If, in the interim analysis, it is decided to continue the trial as planned, the adaptive test reduces to the originally planned multiple testing procedure. Only if adaptations are actually implemented, an adjusted test needs to be applied. The procedure is illustrated with a case study and its operating characteristics are investigated by simulations. PMID:25319733

  12. Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale for Colombian Nursing Professionals.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Hahn, Raquel; Rojas, Juan Guillermo; Ospina-Díaz, Juan Manuel; Montoya-Juárez, Rafael; Restrepo-Medrano, Juan Carlos; Hueso-Montoro, César

    2017-03-01

    The level of cultural self-efficacy indicates the degree of confidence nursing professionals possess for their ability to provide culturally competent care. Cultural adaptation and validation of the Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale was performed for nursing professionals in Colombia. A scale validation study was conducted. Cultural adaptation and validation of the Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale was performed using a sample of 190 nurses in Colombia, between September 2013 and April 2014. This sample was chosen via systematic random sampling from a finite population. The scale was culturally adapted. Cronbach's alpha for the revised scale was .978. Factor analysis revealed the existence of six factors grouped in three dimensions that explained 68% of the variance. The results demonstrated that the version of the Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale adapted to the Colombian context is a valid and reliable instrument for determining the level of cultural self-efficacy of nursing professionals.

  13. Pick a Color MARIA: Adaptive Sampling Enables the Rapid Identification of Complex Perovskite Nanocrystal Compositions with Defined Emission Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bezinge, Leonard; Maceiczyk, Richard M; Lignos, Ioannis; Kovalenko, Maksym V; deMello, Andrew J

    2018-06-06

    Recent advances in the development of hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite (LHP) nanocrystals (NCs) have demonstrated their versatility and potential application in photovoltaics and as light sources through compositional tuning of optical properties. That said, due to their compositional complexity, the targeted synthesis of mixed-cation and/or mixed-halide LHP NCs still represents an immense challenge for traditional batch-scale chemistry. To address this limitation, we herein report the integration of a high-throughput segmented-flow microfluidic reactor and a self-optimizing algorithm for the synthesis of NCs with defined emission properties. The algorithm, named Multiparametric Automated Regression Kriging Interpolation and Adaptive Sampling (MARIA), iteratively computes optimal sampling points at each stage of an experimental sequence to reach a target emission peak wavelength based on spectroscopic measurements. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method through the synthesis of multinary LHP NCs, (Cs/FA)Pb(I/Br) 3 (FA = formamidinium) and (Rb/Cs/FA)Pb(I/Br) 3 NCs, using MARIA to rapidly identify reagent concentrations that yield user-defined photoluminescence peak wavelengths in the green-red spectral region. The procedure returns a robust model around a target output in far fewer measurements than systematic screening of parametric space and additionally enables the prediction of other spectral properties, such as, full-width at half-maximum and intensity, for conditions yielding NCs with similar emission peak wavelength.

  14. Multi-rate cubature Kalman filter based data fusion method with residual compensation to adapt to sampling rate discrepancy in attitude measurement system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoting; Sun, Changku; Wang, Peng

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the multi-rate inertial and vision data fusion problem in nonlinear attitude measurement systems, where the sampling rate of the inertial sensor is much faster than that of the vision sensor. To fully exploit the high frequency inertial data and obtain favorable fusion results, a multi-rate CKF (Cubature Kalman Filter) algorithm with estimated residual compensation is proposed in order to adapt to the problem of sampling rate discrepancy. During inter-sampling of slow observation data, observation noise can be regarded as infinite. The Kalman gain is unknown and approaches zero. The residual is also unknown. Therefore, the filter estimated state cannot be compensated. To obtain compensation at these moments, state error and residual formulas are modified when compared with the observation data available moments. Self-propagation equation of the state error is established to propagate the quantity from the moments with observation to the moments without observation. Besides, a multiplicative adjustment factor is introduced as Kalman gain, which acts on the residual. Then the filter estimated state can be compensated even when there are no visual observation data. The proposed method is tested and verified in a practical setup. Compared with multi-rate CKF without residual compensation and single-rate CKF, a significant improvement is obtained on attitude measurement by using the proposed multi-rate CKF with inter-sampling residual compensation. The experiment results with superior precision and reliability show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Hybrid Adaptive Flight Control with Model Inversion Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates a hybrid adaptive flight control method as a design possibility for a flight control system that can enable an effective adaptation strategy to deal with off-nominal flight conditions. The hybrid adaptive control blends both direct and indirect adaptive control in a model inversion flight control architecture. The blending of both direct and indirect adaptive control provides a much more flexible and effective adaptive flight control architecture than that with either direct or indirect adaptive control alone. The indirect adaptive control is used to update the model inversion controller by an on-line parameter estimation of uncertain plant dynamics based on two methods. The first parameter estimation method is an indirect adaptive law based on the Lyapunov theory, and the second method is a recursive least-squares indirect adaptive law. The model inversion controller is therefore made to adapt to changes in the plant dynamics due to uncertainty. As a result, the modeling error is reduced that directly leads to a decrease in the tracking error. In conjunction with the indirect adaptive control that updates the model inversion controller, a direct adaptive control is implemented as an augmented command to further reduce any residual tracking error that is not entirely eliminated by the indirect adaptive control.

  16. Context-aware adaptive spelling in motor imagery BCI.

    PubMed

    Perdikis, S; Leeb, R; Millán, J D R

    2016-06-01

    This work presents a first motor imagery-based, adaptive brain-computer interface (BCI) speller, which is able to exploit application-derived context for improved, simultaneous classifier adaptation and spelling. Online spelling experiments with ten able-bodied users evaluate the ability of our scheme, first, to alleviate non-stationarity of brain signals for restoring the subject's performances, second, to guide naive users into BCI control avoiding initial offline BCI calibration and, third, to outperform regular unsupervised adaptation. Our co-adaptive framework combines the BrainTree speller with smooth-batch linear discriminant analysis adaptation. The latter enjoys contextual assistance through BrainTree's language model to improve online expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood estimation. Our results verify the possibility to restore single-sample classification and BCI command accuracy, as well as spelling speed for expert users. Most importantly, context-aware adaptation performs significantly better than its unsupervised equivalent and similar to the supervised one. Although no significant differences are found with respect to the state-of-the-art PMean approach, the proposed algorithm is shown to be advantageous for 30% of the users. We demonstrate the possibility to circumvent supervised BCI recalibration, saving time without compromising the adaptation quality. On the other hand, we show that this type of classifier adaptation is not as efficient for BCI training purposes.

  17. Optimal Bayesian Adaptive Design for Test-Item Calibration.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Wim J; Ren, Hao

    2015-06-01

    An optimal adaptive design for test-item calibration based on Bayesian optimality criteria is presented. The design adapts the choice of field-test items to the examinees taking an operational adaptive test using both the information in the posterior distributions of their ability parameters and the current posterior distributions of the field-test parameters. Different criteria of optimality based on the two types of posterior distributions are possible. The design can be implemented using an MCMC scheme with alternating stages of sampling from the posterior distributions of the test takers' ability parameters and the parameters of the field-test items while reusing samples from earlier posterior distributions of the other parameters. Results from a simulation study demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed MCMC implementation for operational item calibration. A comparison of performances for different optimality criteria showed faster calibration of substantial numbers of items for the criterion of D-optimality relative to A-optimality, a special case of c-optimality, and random assignment of items to the test takers.

  18. First record and five new species of Xylographellini (Coleoptera: Ciidae) from China, with online DNA barcode library of the family.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano; Grebennikov, Vasily V

    2015-08-25

    We report the first record of the beetle tribe Xylographellini (Ciidae) from the continental Palaearctic Region, represented by five new species discovered in Yunnan and Sichuan provinces, China: Scolytocis danae sp. nov., Syncosmetus euryale sp. nov., Sync. medusa sp. nov., Sync. perseus sp. nov. and Sync. stheno sp. nov. Illustrations and identification keys are provided for these new species, and in order to facilitate further research of Ciidae we present an open-access DNA barcode library (dx.doi.org/10.5883/DS-SYNCOSM) containing 114 records (of 44 species in 14 genera), 15 of which belong to the newly described species. A phylogenetic analysis based on the barcode fragment of the cytochrome oxidase I gene did not recover much tree structure within Ciidae, however both Xylographus Mellié and Syncosmetus Sharp were recovered as clades, with a single Scolytocis Blair being the sister to the latter.

  19. Using Bayesian Adaptive Trial Designs for Comparative Effectiveness Research: A Virtual Trial Execution.

    PubMed

    Luce, Bryan R; Connor, Jason T; Broglio, Kristine R; Mullins, C Daniel; Ishak, K Jack; Saunders, Elijah; Davis, Barry R

    2016-09-20

    Bayesian and adaptive clinical trial designs offer the potential for more efficient processes that result in lower sample sizes and shorter trial durations than traditional designs. To explore the use and potential benefits of Bayesian adaptive clinical trial designs in comparative effectiveness research. Virtual execution of ALLHAT (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial) as if it had been done according to a Bayesian adaptive trial design. Comparative effectiveness trial of antihypertensive medications. Patient data sampled from the more than 42 000 patients enrolled in ALLHAT with publicly available data. Number of patients randomly assigned between groups, trial duration, observed numbers of events, and overall trial results and conclusions. The Bayesian adaptive approach and original design yielded similar overall trial conclusions. The Bayesian adaptive trial randomly assigned more patients to the better-performing group and would probably have ended slightly earlier. This virtual trial execution required limited resampling of ALLHAT patients for inclusion in RE-ADAPT (REsearch in ADAptive methods for Pragmatic Trials). Involvement of a data monitoring committee and other trial logistics were not considered. In a comparative effectiveness research trial, Bayesian adaptive trial designs are a feasible approach and potentially generate earlier results and allocate more patients to better-performing groups. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

  20. Adaptive Conditioning of Multiple-Point Geostatistical Facies Simulation to Flow Data with Facies Probability Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodabakhshi, M.; Jafarpour, B.

    2013-12-01

    Characterization of complex geologic patterns that create preferential flow paths in certain reservoir systems requires higher-order geostatistical modeling techniques. Multipoint statistics (MPS) provides a flexible grid-based approach for simulating such complex geologic patterns from a conceptual prior model known as a training image (TI). In this approach, a stationary TI that encodes the higher-order spatial statistics of the expected geologic patterns is used to represent the shape and connectivity of the underlying lithofacies. While MPS is quite powerful for describing complex geologic facies connectivity, the nonlinear and complex relation between the flow data and facies distribution makes flow data conditioning quite challenging. We propose an adaptive technique for conditioning facies simulation from a prior TI to nonlinear flow data. Non-adaptive strategies for conditioning facies simulation to flow data can involves many forward flow model solutions that can be computationally very demanding. To improve the conditioning efficiency, we develop an adaptive sampling approach through a data feedback mechanism based on the sampling history. In this approach, after a short period of sampling burn-in time where unconditional samples are generated and passed through an acceptance/rejection test, an ensemble of accepted samples is identified and used to generate a facies probability map. This facies probability map contains the common features of the accepted samples and provides conditioning information about facies occurrence in each grid block, which is used to guide the conditional facies simulation process. As the sampling progresses, the initial probability map is updated according to the collective information about the facies distribution in the chain of accepted samples to increase the acceptance rate and efficiency of the conditioning. This conditioning process can be viewed as an optimization approach where each new sample is proposed based on the

  1. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  2. Activity and adaptation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-degrading bacteria: field and laboratory studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; Egli, T.; Wilberg, E.; Alder, A.; Schneider, R.; Suozzi, M.; Giger, W.

    1990-01-01

    Adaptation of bacterial activity for the degradation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) was studied using natural sediment samples and an NTA-degrading bacterium (strain ATCC 29600). Sediment samples from a river with persistent levels of NTA had much higher NTA-degradative activity than comparable samples from a less contaminated control site. When sediment from the control site was exposed to high levels of NTA a 5 day lag preceded an abrupt increase in NTA degradation while strain 29600 colonized on sand and grown in the absence of NTA became induced within eight hours. The induction of strain 29600 was compared between bacteria in suspension and cells attached to sand. The sand-associated bacteria became induced 4 to 5 h before the planktonic suspension and displayed over threefold greater specific activity. Suspensions of strain 29600 became adapted within 8 h when placed in membrane diffusion chambers that were immersed within a municipal wastewater reactor containing NTA. These findings support the concept that induction is a part of the process of bacterial adaptation to degrade NTA and sand-associated bacteria can adapt more quickly to and have a greater degradative activity for NTA than planktonic cells.

  3. Measuring working memory capacity in children using adaptive tasks: Example validation of an adaptive complex span.

    PubMed

    Gonthier, Corentin; Aubry, Alexandre; Bourdin, Béatrice

    2018-06-01

    Working memory tasks designed for children usually present trials in order of ascending difficulty, with testing discontinued when the child fails a particular level. Unfortunately, this procedure comes with a number of issues, such as decreased engagement from high-ability children, vulnerability of the scores to temporary mind-wandering, and large between-subjects variations in number of trials, testing time, and proactive interference. To circumvent these problems, the goal of the present study was to demonstrate the feasibility of assessing working memory using an adaptive testing procedure. The principle of adaptive testing is to dynamically adjust the level of difficulty as the task progresses to match the participant's ability. We used this method to develop an adaptive complex span task (the ACCES) comprising verbal and visuo-spatial subtests. The task presents a fixed number of trials to all participants, allows for partial credit scoring, and can be used with children regardless of ability level. The ACCES demonstrated satisfying psychometric properties in a sample of 268 children aged 8-13 years, confirming the feasibility of using adaptive tasks to measure working memory capacity in children. A free-to-use implementation of the ACCES is provided.

  4. Paradigms for adaptive statistical information designs: practical experiences and strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sue-Jane; Hung, H M James; O'Neill, Robert

    2012-11-10

    In the last decade or so, interest in adaptive design clinical trials has gradually been directed towards their use in regulatory submissions by pharmaceutical drug sponsors to evaluate investigational new drugs. Methodological advances of adaptive designs are abundant in the statistical literature since the 1970s. The adaptive design paradigm has been enthusiastically perceived to increase the efficiency and to be more cost-effective than the fixed design paradigm for drug development. Much interest in adaptive designs is in those studies with two-stages, where stage 1 is exploratory and stage 2 depends upon stage 1 results, but where the data of both stages will be combined to yield statistical evidence for use as that of a pivotal registration trial. It was not until the recent release of the US Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Adaptive Design Clinical Trials for Drugs and Biologics (2010) that the boundaries of flexibility for adaptive designs were specifically considered for regulatory purposes, including what are exploratory goals, and what are the goals of adequate and well-controlled (A&WC) trials (2002). The guidance carefully described these distinctions in an attempt to minimize the confusion between the goals of preliminary learning phases of drug development, which are inherently substantially uncertain, and the definitive inference-based phases of drug development. In this paper, in addition to discussing some aspects of adaptive designs in a confirmatory study setting, we underscore the value of adaptive designs when used in exploratory trials to improve planning of subsequent A&WC trials. One type of adaptation that is receiving attention is the re-estimation of the sample size during the course of the trial. We refer to this type of adaptation as an adaptive statistical information design. Specifically, a case example is used to illustrate how challenging it is to plan a confirmatory adaptive statistical information

  5. Transcultural adaptation of the Breast Cancer Awareness Measure.

    PubMed

    Al-Khasawneh, E M; Leocadio, M; Seshan, V; Siddiqui, S T; Khan, A N; Al-Manaseer, M M

    2016-09-01

    To overcome the lack of a validated and robust Arabic instrument to measure breast cancer awareness. Currently, there is no validated Arabic instrument for measuring breast cancer awareness levels. We adapted, translated and validated the Breast Cancer Awareness Measure developed by Cancer Research UK. The instrument was translated into Arabic and back-translated for validation. Validation and reliability tests were conducted using purposively sampled 972 Arab women older than 20 years, living in Oman. The adapted content was validated by a panel of medical, linguistic and cultural experts, followed by cognitive interviews (n = 10), behavioural coding (n = 30) and criterion validation (n = 646). The instrument was tested for acceptability and its subscales for internal consistency. Inter-rater reliability was estimated between two similar groups (n = 144 and n = 142) to test homogeneity. The adapted and translated instrument had a high acceptability (98.7% completed). The validation process shaped the adaptation, and resulted in strong criterion validity (R = 0.58, P < 0.01). The instrument subscales for risk factors and warning signs had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.856 and 0.890, respectively), with all floor and ceiling effects less than 15%. The correlation measure for inter-rater reliability was 0.97 (P < 0.01). Through the incorporation of contextual characteristics and prevalent beliefs among Arab populations, the adapted Best Cancer Awareness Measure is a robust Arabic instrument for the measurement of breast cancer awareness and early detection practices among Arab women. The purposively selected sample may not be representative of the population. Improvement of awareness and early detection of breast cancer can contribute towards reducing mortality from the disease. The adapted instrument has policy implications, since measurement of awareness levels is essential towards breast health promotion policies in Arab countries

  6. Adaptive optical fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na

    2017-03-31

    The past quarter century has witnessed rapid developments of fluorescence microscopy techniques that enable structural and functional imaging of biological specimens at unprecedented depth and resolution. The performance of these methods in multicellular organisms, however, is degraded by sample-induced optical aberrations. Here I review recent work on incorporating adaptive optics, a technology originally applied in astronomical telescopes to combat atmospheric aberrations, to improve image quality of fluorescence microscopy for biological imaging.

  7. Adaptive Sensing of Time Series with Application to Remote Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Furlong, Michael; Hardgrove, Craig; Low, Bryan K. H.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Wettergreen, David

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of adaptive informationoptimal data collection in time series. Here a remote sensor or explorer agent throttles its sampling rate in order to track anomalous events while obeying constraints on time and power. This problem is challenging because the agent has limited visibility -- all collected datapoints lie in the past, but its resource allocation decisions require predicting far into the future. Our solution is to continually fit a Gaussian process model to the latest data and optimize the sampling plan on line to maximize information gain. We compare the performance characteristics of stationary and nonstationary Gaussian process models. We also describe an application based on geologic analysis during planetary rover exploration. Here adaptive sampling can improve coverage of localized anomalies and potentially benefit mission science yield of long autonomous traverses.

  8. Adaptability: Conceptual and Empirical Perspectives on Responses to Change, Novelty and Uncertainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Nejad, Harry; Colmar, Susan; Liem, Gregory Arief D.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptability is proposed as individuals' capacity to constructively regulate psycho-behavioral functions in response to new, changing, and/or uncertain circumstances, conditions and situations. The present investigation explored the internal and external validity of an hypothesised adaptability scale. The sample comprised 2,731 high school…

  9. Context-aware adaptive spelling in motor imagery BCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdikis, S.; Leeb, R.; Millán, J. d. R.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. This work presents a first motor imagery-based, adaptive brain-computer interface (BCI) speller, which is able to exploit application-derived context for improved, simultaneous classifier adaptation and spelling. Online spelling experiments with ten able-bodied users evaluate the ability of our scheme, first, to alleviate non-stationarity of brain signals for restoring the subject’s performances, second, to guide naive users into BCI control avoiding initial offline BCI calibration and, third, to outperform regular unsupervised adaptation. Approach. Our co-adaptive framework combines the BrainTree speller with smooth-batch linear discriminant analysis adaptation. The latter enjoys contextual assistance through BrainTree’s language model to improve online expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood estimation. Main results. Our results verify the possibility to restore single-sample classification and BCI command accuracy, as well as spelling speed for expert users. Most importantly, context-aware adaptation performs significantly better than its unsupervised equivalent and similar to the supervised one. Although no significant differences are found with respect to the state-of-the-art PMean approach, the proposed algorithm is shown to be advantageous for 30% of the users. Significance. We demonstrate the possibility to circumvent supervised BCI recalibration, saving time without compromising the adaptation quality. On the other hand, we show that this type of classifier adaptation is not as efficient for BCI training purposes.

  10. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  11. Adaptation of Aquatic Microbial Communities to Hg2+ Stress †

    PubMed Central

    Barkay, Tamar

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of adaptation to Hg2+ in four aquatic habitats was studied by correlating microbially mediated Hg2+ volatilization with the adaptive state of the exposed communities. Community diversity, heterotrophic activity, and Hg2+ resistance measurements indicated that adaptation of all four communities was stimulated by preexposure to Hg2+. In saline water communities, adaptation was associated with rapid volatilization after an initial lag period. This mechanism, however, did not promote adaptation in a freshwater sample, in which Hg2+ was volatilized slowly, regardless of the resistance level of the microbial community. Distribution of the mer operon among representative colonies of the communities was not related to adaptation to Hg2+. Thus, although volatilization enabled some microbial communities to sustain their functions in Hg2+-stressed environments, it was not mediated by the genes that serve as a model system in molecular studies of bacterial resistance to mercurials. PMID:16347488

  12. Developing an Instructional Material Using a Concept Cartoon Adapted to the 5E Model: A Sample of Teaching Erosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birisci, Salih; Metin, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Using different instructional materials adapted within the constructivist learning theory will enhance students' conceptual understanding. From this point of view, an instructional instrument using a concept cartoon adapted with 5E model has developed and introduced in this study. The study has some deficiencies in investigating students'…

  13. Object tracking with adaptive HOG detector and adaptive Rao-Blackwellised particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Stefano; Paleari, Marco; Ariano, Paolo; Bona, Basilio

    2012-01-01

    Scenarios for a manned mission to the Moon or Mars call for astronaut teams to be accompanied by semiautonomous robots. A prerequisite for human-robot interaction is the capability of successfully tracking humans and objects in the environment. In this paper we present a system for real-time visual object tracking in 2D images for mobile robotic systems. The proposed algorithm is able to specialize to individual objects and to adapt to substantial changes in illumination and object appearance during tracking. The algorithm is composed by two main blocks: a detector based on Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) descriptors and linear Support Vector Machines (SVM), and a tracker which is implemented by an adaptive Rao-Blackwellised particle filter (RBPF). The SVM is re-trained online on new samples taken from previous predicted positions. We use the effective sample size to decide when the classifier needs to be re-trained. Position hypotheses for the tracked object are the result of a clustering procedure applied on the set of particles. The algorithm has been tested on challenging video sequences presenting strong changes in object appearance, illumination, and occlusion. Experimental tests show that the presented method is able to achieve near real-time performances with a precision of about 7 pixels on standard video sequences of dimensions 320 × 240.

  14. Speckle imaging through turbulent atmosphere based on adaptable pupil segmentation.

    PubMed

    Loktev, Mikhail; Soloviev, Oleg; Savenko, Svyatoslav; Vdovin, Gleb

    2011-07-15

    We report on the first results to our knowledge obtained with adaptable multiaperture imaging through turbulence on a horizontal atmospheric path. We show that the resolution can be improved by adaptively matching the size of the subaperture to the characteristic size of the turbulence. Further improvement is achieved by the deconvolution of a number of subimages registered simultaneously through multiple subapertures. Different implementations of multiaperture geometry, including pupil multiplication, pupil image sampling, and a plenoptic telescope, are considered. Resolution improvement has been demonstrated on a ∼550 m horizontal turbulent path, using a combination of aperture sampling, speckle image processing, and, optionally, frame selection. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  15. Speckle imaging through turbulent atmosphere based on adaptable pupil segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktev, Mikhail; Soloviev, Oleg; Savenko, Svyatoslav; Vdovin, Gleb

    2011-07-01

    We report on the first results to our knowledge obtained with adaptable multiaperture imaging through turbulence on a horizontal atmospheric path. We show that the resolution can be improved by adaptively matching the size of the subaperture to the characteristic size of the turbulence. Further improvement is achieved by the deconvolution of a number of subimages registered simultaneously through multiple subapertures. Different implementations of multiaperture geometry, including pupil multiplication, pupil image sampling, and a plenoptic telescope, are considered. Resolution improvement has been demonstrated on a ˜550m horizontal turbulent path, using a combination of aperture sampling, speckle image processing, and, optionally, frame selection.

  16. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-09-07

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  17. Brief Report: Developmental Trajectories of Adaptive Behavior in Children and Adolescents with ASD.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Allison T; Powell, Patrick S; Butera, Nicole; Klinger, Mark R; Klinger, Laura G

    2018-03-17

    Research suggests that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have significant difficulties with adaptive behavior skills including daily living and functional communication skills. Few studies have examined the developmental trajectory of adaptive behavior across childhood and adolescence. The present study examined longitudinal trajectories of adaptive behavior in a community-based clinic sample of 186 individuals with ASD. The overall pattern indicated an initial increase in adaptive behavior during early childhood followed by a plateau in skills during adolescence for individuals of all IQ groups. Given the importance of adaptive behavior for employment and quality of life, this study emphasizes the importance of targeting adaptive behavior during adolescence to insure continued gains.

  18. Screenometer: a device for sampling vegetative screening in forested areas

    Treesearch

    Victor A. Rudis

    1985-01-01

    A-device for estimating the degree to which vegetation and other obstructions screen forested areas has been adapted to an extensive sampling design for forest surveys. Procedures are recommended to assure that uniform measurements can be made. Examination of sources of sampling variation (observers, points within sampled locations, series of observations within points...

  19. A Bayesian sequential design with adaptive randomization for 2-sided hypothesis test.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qingzhao; Zhu, Lin; Zhu, Han

    2017-11-01

    Bayesian sequential and adaptive randomization designs are gaining popularity in clinical trials thanks to their potentials to reduce the number of required participants and save resources. We propose a Bayesian sequential design with adaptive randomization rates so as to more efficiently attribute newly recruited patients to different treatment arms. In this paper, we consider 2-arm clinical trials. Patients are allocated to the 2 arms with a randomization rate to achieve minimum variance for the test statistic. Algorithms are presented to calculate the optimal randomization rate, critical values, and power for the proposed design. Sensitivity analysis is implemented to check the influence on design by changing the prior distributions. Simulation studies are applied to compare the proposed method and traditional methods in terms of power and actual sample sizes. Simulations show that, when total sample size is fixed, the proposed design can obtain greater power and/or cost smaller actual sample size than the traditional Bayesian sequential design. Finally, we apply the proposed method to a real data set and compare the results with the Bayesian sequential design without adaptive randomization in terms of sample sizes. The proposed method can further reduce required sample size. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. SAS procedures for designing and analyzing sample surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, Joshua D.; Reinecke, Kenneth J.; Kaminski, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    Complex surveys often are necessary to estimate occurrence (or distribution), density, and abundance of plants and animals for purposes of re-search and conservation. Most scientists are familiar with simple random sampling, where sample units are selected from a population of interest (sampling frame) with equal probability. However, the goal of ecological surveys often is to make inferences about populations over large or complex spatial areas where organisms are not homogeneously distributed or sampling frames are in-convenient or impossible to construct. Candidate sampling strategies for such complex surveys include stratified,multistage, and adaptive sampling (Thompson 1992, Buckland 1994).

  1. Adaptive Identification and Control of Flow-Induced Cavity Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, M. A.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Ha, C.

    2002-01-01

    Progress towards an adaptive self-tuning regulator (STR) for the cavity tone problem is discussed in this paper. Adaptive system identification algorithms were applied to an experimental cavity-flow tested as a prerequisite to control. In addition, a simple digital controller and a piezoelectric bimorph actuator were used to demonstrate multiple tone suppression. The control tests at Mach numbers of 0.275, 0.40, and 0.60 indicated approx. = 7dB tone reductions at multiple frequencies. Several different adaptive system identification algorithms were applied at a single freestream Mach number of 0.275. Adaptive finite-impulse response (FIR) filters of orders up to N = 100 were found to be unsuitable for modeling the cavity flow dynamics. Adaptive infinite-impulse response (IIR) filters of comparable order better captured the system dynamics. Two recursive algorithms, the least-mean square (LMS) and the recursive-least square (RLS), were utilized to update the adaptive filter coefficients. Given the sample-time requirements imposed by the cavity flow dynamics, the computational simplicity of the least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is advantageous for real-time control.

  2. Possible stimuli for strength and power adaptation : acute metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Crewther, Blair; Cronin, John; Keogh, Justin

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic response to resistance exercise, in particular lactic acid or lactate, has a marked influence upon the muscular environment, which may enhance the training stimulus (e.g. motor unit activation, hormones or muscle damage) and thereby contribute to strength and power adaptation. Hypertrophy schemes have resulted in greater lactate responses (%) than neuronal and dynamic power schemes, suggesting possible metabolic-mediated changes in muscle growth. Factors such as age, sex, training experience and nutrition may also influence the lactate responses to resistance exercise and thereafter, muscular adaptation. Although the importance of the mechanical and hormonal stimulus to strength and power adaptation is well recognised, the contribution of the metabolic stimulus is largely unknown. Relatively few studies for example, have examined metabolic change across neuronal and dynamic power schemes, and not withstanding the fact that those mechanisms underpinning muscular adaptation, in relation to the metabolic stimulus, remain highly speculative. Inconsistent findings and methodological limitations within research (e.g. programme design, sampling period, number of samples) make interpretation further difficult. We contend that strength and power research needs to investigate those metabolic mechanisms likely to contribute to weight-training adaptation. Further research is also needed to examine the metabolic responses to different loading schemes, as well as interactions across age, sex and training status, so our understanding of how to optimise strength and power development is improved.

  3. An adaptive interpolation scheme for molecular potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Larsson, Elisabeth; Heryudono, Alfa

    2016-08-01

    The calculation of potential energy surfaces for quantum dynamics can be a time consuming task—especially when a high level of theory for the electronic structure calculation is required. We propose an adaptive interpolation algorithm based on polyharmonic splines combined with a partition of unity approach. The adaptive node refinement allows to greatly reduce the number of sample points by employing a local error estimate. The algorithm and its scaling behavior are evaluated for a model function in 2, 3, and 4 dimensions. The developed algorithm allows for a more rapid and reliable interpolation of a potential energy surface within a given accuracy compared to the non-adaptive version.

  4. Rasch Measurement Analysis of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) in a Community-Based Rehabilitation Sample

    PubMed Central

    Malec, James F.; Altman, Irwin M.; Swick, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The precise measurement of patient outcomes depends upon clearly articulated constructs and refined clinical assessment instruments that work equally well for all subgroups within a population. This is a challenging task in those with acquired brain injury (ABI) because of the marked heterogeneity of the disorder and subsequent outcomes. Alhough essential, the iterative process of instrument refinement is often neglected. This present study was undertaken to examine validity, reliability, dimensionality and item estimate invariance of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory – 4 (MPAI-4), an outcome measure for persons with ABI. The sampled population included 603 persons with traumatic ABI participating in a home- and community-based rehabilitation program. Results indicated that the MPAI-4 is a valid, reliable measure of outcome following traumatic ABI, which measures a broad but unitary core construct of outcome after ABI. Further, the MPAI-4 is composed of items that are unbiased toward selected subgroups except where differences could be expected [e.g., more chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients are better able to negotiate demands of transportation than more acute TBI patients]. We address the trade-offs between strict unidimensionality and clinical applicability in measuring outcome, and illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of applying single-parameter measurement models to broad constructs. PMID:21332409

  5. Rasch measurement analysis of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) in a community-based rehabilitation sample.

    PubMed

    Kean, Jacob; Malec, James F; Altman, Irwin M; Swick, Shannon

    2011-05-01

    The precise measurement of patient outcomes depends upon clearly articulated constructs and refined clinical assessment instruments that work equally well for all subgroups within a population. This is a challenging task in those with acquired brain injury (ABI) because of the marked heterogeneity of the disorder and subsequent outcomes. Although essential, the iterative process of instrument refinement is often neglected. This present study was undertaken to examine validity, reliability, dimensionality and item estimate invariance of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory - 4 (MPAI-4), an outcome measure for persons with ABI. The sampled population included 603 persons with traumatic ABI participating in a home- and community-based rehabilitation program. Results indicated that the MPAI-4 is a valid, reliable measure of outcome following traumatic ABI, which measures a broad but unitary core construct of outcome after ABI. Further, the MPAI-4 is composed of items that are unbiased toward selected subgroups except where differences could be expected [e.g., more chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients are better able to negotiate demands of transportation than more acute TBI patients]. We address the trade-offs between strict unidimensionality and clinical applicability in measuring outcome, and illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of applying single-parameter measurement models to broad constructs.

  6. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of In situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    integrated observation system that is being coupled to a data assimilative hydrodynamic bio-optical ecosystem model. The system was used adaptively to develop hyperspectral remote sensing techniques in optically complex nearshore coastal waters.

  7. Adaptation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV) for Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hoang-Minh; Weiss, Bahr; Pollack, Amie; Nguyen, Minh Cao

    2012-12-01

    Intelligence testing is used for many purposes including identification of children for proper educational placement (e.g., children with learning disabilities, or intellectually gifted students), and to guide education by identifying cognitive strengths and weaknesses so that teachers can adapt their instructional style to students' specific learning styles. Most of the research involving intelligence tests has been conducted in highly developed Western countries, yet the need for intelligence testing is as or even more important in developing countries. The present study, conducted through the Vietnam National University Clinical Psychology CRISP Center , focused on the cultural adaptation of the WISC-IV intelligence test for Vietnam. We report on (a) the adaptation process including the translation, cultural analysis and modifications involved in adaptation, (b) present results of two pilot studies, and (c) describe collection of the standardization sample and results of analyses with the standardization sample, with the goal of sharing our experience with other researchers who may be involved in or interested in adapting or developing IQ tests for non-Western, non-English speaking cultures.

  8. Adaptive image coding based on cubic-spline interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-Xing; Hong, Shao-Hua; Lin, Tsung-Ching; Wang, Lin; Truong, Trieu-Kien

    2014-09-01

    It has been investigated that at low bit rates, downsampling prior to coding and upsampling after decoding can achieve better compression performance than standard coding algorithms, e.g., JPEG and H. 264/AVC. However, at high bit rates, the sampling-based schemes generate more distortion. Additionally, the maximum bit rate for the sampling-based scheme to outperform the standard algorithm is image-dependent. In this paper, a practical adaptive image coding algorithm based on the cubic-spline interpolation (CSI) is proposed. This proposed algorithm adaptively selects the image coding method from CSI-based modified JPEG and standard JPEG under a given target bit rate utilizing the so called ρ-domain analysis. The experimental results indicate that compared with the standard JPEG, the proposed algorithm can show better performance at low bit rates and maintain the same performance at high bit rates.

  9. Note: A simple sample transfer alignment for ultra-high vacuum systems.

    PubMed

    Tamtögl, A; Carter, E A; Ward, D J; Avidor, N; Kole, P R; Jardine, A P; Allison, W

    2016-06-01

    The alignment of ultra-high-vacuum sample transfer systems can be problematic when there is no direct line of sight to assist the user. We present the design of a simple and cheap system which greatly simplifies the alignment of sample transfer devices. Our method is based on the adaptation of a commercial digital camera which provides live views from within the vacuum chamber. The images of the camera are further processed using an image recognition and processing code which determines any misalignments and reports them to the user. Installation has proven to be extremely useful in order to align the sample with respect to the transfer mechanism. Furthermore, the alignment software can be easily adapted for other systems.

  10. Word and frame synchronization with verification for PPM optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for obtaining word and frame synchronization in pulse position modulated optical communication systems is described. The method uses a short sync sequence inserted at the beginning of each data frame and a verification procedure to distinguish between inserted and randomly occurring sequences at the receiver. This results in an easy to implement sync system which provides reliable synchronization even at high symbol error rates. Results are given for the application of this approach to a highly energy efficient 256-ary PPM test system.

  11. Discriminative clustering on manifold for adaptive transductive classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Jia, Lei; Zhang, Min; Li, Bing; Zhang, Li; Li, Fanzhang

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we mainly propose a novel adaptive transductive label propagation approach by joint discriminative clustering on manifolds for representing and classifying high-dimensional data. Our framework seamlessly combines the unsupervised manifold learning, discriminative clustering and adaptive classification into a unified model. Also, our method incorporates the adaptive graph weight construction with label propagation. Specifically, our method is capable of propagating label information using adaptive weights over low-dimensional manifold features, which is different from most existing studies that usually predict the labels and construct the weights in the original Euclidean space. For transductive classification by our formulation, we first perform the joint discriminative K-means clustering and manifold learning to capture the low-dimensional nonlinear manifolds. Then, we construct the adaptive weights over the learnt manifold features, where the adaptive weights are calculated through performing the joint minimization of the reconstruction errors over features and soft labels so that the graph weights can be joint-optimal for data representation and classification. Using the adaptive weights, we can easily estimate the unknown labels of samples. After that, our method returns the updated weights for further updating the manifold features. Extensive simulations on image classification and segmentation show that our proposed algorithm can deliver the state-of-the-art performance on several public datasets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Maternal Infancy Predictors of School Adaptation of Low-Income Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Earl S.; Edgerton, Marianna

    An analysis of longitudinal data on a sample of low-income mothers and children was conducted to identify maternal characteristics during pregnancy and infancy that predict child school adaptation during kindergarten. The sample consisted of low-income mothers recruited while receiving prenatal services from public health clinics. The children,…

  13. Examining the impact of differential cultural adaptation with Latina/o immigrants exposed to adapted parent training interventions

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Cardona, J. Rubén; Bybee, Deborah; Sullivan, Cris M.; Domenech Rodríguez, Melanie M.; Dates, Brian; Tams, Lisa; Bernal, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a dearth of empirical studies aimed at examining the impact of differential cultural adaptation of evidence-based clinical and prevention interventions. This prevention study consisted of a randomized controlled trial aimed at comparing the impact of two differentially culturally adapted versions of the evidence-based parenting intervention known as Parent Management Training, the Oregon Model (PMTOR). Method The sample consisted of 103 Latina/o immigrant families (190 individual parents). Each family was allocated to one of three conditions: (a) a culturally adapted PMTO (CA), (b) culturally adapted and enhanced PMTO (CE), and (c) a wait-list control. Measurements were implemented at baseline (T1), treatment completion (T2) and 6-month follow up (T3). Results Multi-level growth modeling analyses indicated statistically significant improvements on parenting skills for fathers and mothers (main effect) at 6-month follow-up in both adapted interventions, when compared to the control condition. With regards to parent-reported child behaviors, child internalizing behaviors were significantly lower for both parents in the CE intervention (main effect), compared with control at 6-month follow-up. No main effect was found for child externalizing behaviors. However, a Parent x Condition effect was found indicating a significant reduction of child externalizing behaviors for CE fathers compared to CA and control fathers at posttest and 6-month follow-up. Conclusion Present findings indicate the value of differential cultural adaptation research designs and the importance of examining effects for both mothers and fathers, particularly when culturally-focused and gender variables are considered for intervention design and implementation. PMID:28045288

  14. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  15. Use of adaptive walls in 2D tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archambaud, J. P.; Chevallier, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A new method for computing the wall effects gives precise answers to some questions arising in adaptive wall concept applications: length of adapted regions, fairings with up and downstream regions, residual misadjustments effects, reference conditions. The acceleration of the iterative process convergence and the development of an efficient technology used in CERT T2 wind tunnels give in a single run the required test conditions. Samples taken from CAST 7 tests demonstrate the efficiency of the whole process to obtain significant results with considerations of tridimensional case extension.

  16. Parallel Workflow for High-Throughput (>1,000 Samples/Day) Quantitative Analysis of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Using Mass Spectrometric Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Paul E.; Trenchevska, Olgica; Nedelkov, Dobrin; Borges, Chad R.; Schaab, Matthew R.; Rehder, Douglas S.; Jarvis, Jason W.; Sherma, Nisha D.; Shen, Luhui; Krastins, Bryan; Lopez, Mary F.; Schwenke, Dawn C.; Reaven, Peter D.; Nelson, Randall W.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is an important biomarker for the management of growth hormone disorders. Recently there has been rising interest in deploying mass spectrometric (MS) methods of detection for measuring IGF1. However, widespread clinical adoption of any MS-based IGF1 assay will require increased throughput and speed to justify the costs of analyses, and robust industrial platforms that are reproducible across laboratories. Presented here is an MS-based quantitative IGF1 assay with performance rating of >1,000 samples/day, and a capability of quantifying IGF1 point mutations and posttranslational modifications. The throughput of the IGF1 mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA) benefited from a simplified sample preparation step, IGF1 immunocapture in a tip format, and high-throughput MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The Limit of Detection and Limit of Quantification of the resulting assay were 1.5 μg/L and 5 μg/L, respectively, with intra- and inter-assay precision CVs of less than 10%, and good linearity and recovery characteristics. The IGF1 MSIA was benchmarked against commercially available IGF1 ELISA via Bland-Altman method comparison test, resulting in a slight positive bias of 16%. The IGF1 MSIA was employed in an optimized parallel workflow utilizing two pipetting robots and MALDI-TOF-MS instruments synced into one-hour phases of sample preparation, extraction and MSIA pipette tip elution, MS data collection, and data processing. Using this workflow, high-throughput IGF1 quantification of 1,054 human samples was achieved in approximately 9 hours. This rate of assaying is a significant improvement over existing MS-based IGF1 assays, and is on par with that of the enzyme-based immunoassays. Furthermore, a mutation was detected in ∼1% of the samples (SNP: rs17884626, creating an A→T substitution at position 67 of the IGF1), demonstrating the capability of IGF1 MSIA to detect point mutations and posttranslational modifications. PMID:24664114

  17. Climate Change Adaptation Science Activities at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Lulla, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC), located in the southeast metropolitan region of Houston, TX is the prime NASA center for human spaceflight operations and astronaut training, but it also houses the unique collection of returned extraterrestrial samples, including lunar samples from the Apollo missions. The Center's location adjacent to Clear Lake and the Clear Creek watershed, an estuary of Galveston Bay, puts it at direct annual risk from hurricanes, but also from a number of other climate-related hazards including drought, floods, sea level rise, heat waves, and high wind events all assigned Threat Levels of 2 or 3 in the most recent NASA Center Disaster/Risk Matrix produced by the Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group. Based on prior CASI workshops at other NASA centers, it is recognized that JSC is highly vulnerable to climate-change related hazards and has a need for adaptation strategies. We will present an overview of prior CASI-related work at JSC, including publication of a climate change and adaptation informational data brochure, and a Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Risks Workshop that was held at JSC in early March 2012. Major outcomes of that workshop that form a basis for work going forward are 1) a realization that JSC is embedded in a regional environmental and social context, and that potential climate change effects and adaptation strategies will not, and should not, be constrained by the Center fence line; 2) a desire to coordinate data collection and adaptation planning activities with interested stakeholders to form a regional climate change adaptation center that could facilitate interaction with CASI; 3) recognition that there is a wide array of basic data (remotely sensed, in situ, GIS/mapping, and historical) available through JSC and other stakeholders, but this data is not yet centrally accessible for planning purposes.

  18. Bayesian selective response-adaptive design using the historical control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Ok; Harun, Nusrat; Liu, Chunyan; Khoury, Jane C; Broderick, Joseph P

    2018-06-13

    High quality historical control data, if incorporated, may reduce sample size, trial cost, and duration. A too optimistic use of the data, however, may result in bias under prior-data conflict. Motivated by well-publicized two-arm comparative trials in stroke, we propose a Bayesian design that both adaptively incorporates historical control data and selectively adapt the treatment allocation ratios within an ongoing trial responsively to the relative treatment effects. The proposed design differs from existing designs that borrow from historical controls. As opposed to reducing the number of subjects assigned to the control arm blindly, this design does so adaptively to the relative treatment effects only if evaluation of cumulated current trial data combined with the historical control suggests the superiority of the intervention arm. We used the effective historical sample size approach to quantify borrowed information on the control arm and modified the treatment allocation rules of the doubly adaptive biased coin design to incorporate the quantity. The modified allocation rules were then implemented under the Bayesian framework with commensurate priors addressing prior-data conflict. Trials were also more frequently concluded earlier in line with the underlying truth, reducing trial cost, and duration and yielded parameter estimates with smaller standard errors. © 2018 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Super-Gaussian laser intensity output formation by means of adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherezova, T. Y.; Chesnokov, S. S.; Kaptsov, L. N.; Kudryashov, A. V.

    1998-10-01

    An optical resonator using an intracavity adaptive mirror with three concentric rings of controlling electrodes, which produc low loss and large beamwidth super-Gaussian output of order 4, 6, 8, is analyzed. An inverse propagation method is used to determine the appropriate shape of the adaptive mirror. The mirror reproduces the shape with minimal RMS error by combining weights of experimentally measured response functions of the mirror sample. The voltages applied to each mirror electrode are calculated. Practical design parameters such as construction of an adaptive mirror, Fresnel numbers, and geometric factor are discussed.

  20. Design of the Trigger Interface and Distribution Board for CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gu, Jianhui; Dong, Hai; Cuevas, R

    The design of the Trigger Interface and Distribution (TID) board for the 12 GeV Upgrade at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at TJNAL is described. The TID board distributes a low jitter system clock, synchronized trigger, and synchronized multi-purpose SYNC signal. The TID also initiates data acquisition for the crate. With the TID boards, a multi-crate system can be setup for experiment test and commissioning. The TID board can be selectively populated as a Trigger Interface (TI) board, or a Trigger Distribution (TD) board for the 12 GeV upgrade experiments. When the TID is populated as a TI,more » it can be located in the VXS crate and distribute the CLOCK/TRIGGER/SYNC through the VXS P0 connector; it can also be located in the standard VME64 crate, and distribute the CLOCK/TRIGGER/SYNC through the VME P2 connector or front panel. It initiates the data acquisition for the front crate where the TI is positioned in. When the TID is populated as a TD, it fans out the CLOCK/TRIGGER/SYNC from trigger supervisor to the front end crates through optical fibres. The TD monitors the trigger processing on the TIs, and gives feedback to the TS for trigger flow control. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) is utilised on TID board to provide programmability. The TID boards were intensively tested on the bench, and various setups.« less

  1. Sampling in the light of Wigner distribution.

    PubMed

    Stern, Adrian; Javidi, Bahram

    2004-03-01

    We propose a new method for analysis of the sampling and reconstruction conditions of real and complex signals by use of the Wigner domain. It is shown that the Wigner domain may provide a better understanding of the sampling process than the traditional Fourier domain. For example, it explains how certain non-bandlimited complex functions can be sampled and perfectly reconstructed. On the basis of observations in the Wigner domain, we derive a generalization to the Nyquist sampling criterion. By using this criterion, we demonstrate simple preprocessing operations that can adapt a signal that does not fulfill the Nyquist sampling criterion. The preprocessing operations demonstrated can be easily implemented by optical means.

  2. An adaptive interpolation scheme for molecular potential energy surfaces

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kowalewski, Markus, E-mail: mkowalew@uci.edu; Larsson, Elisabeth; Heryudono, Alfa

    The calculation of potential energy surfaces for quantum dynamics can be a time consuming task—especially when a high level of theory for the electronic structure calculation is required. We propose an adaptive interpolation algorithm based on polyharmonic splines combined with a partition of unity approach. The adaptive node refinement allows to greatly reduce the number of sample points by employing a local error estimate. The algorithm and its scaling behavior are evaluated for a model function in 2, 3, and 4 dimensions. The developed algorithm allows for a more rapid and reliable interpolation of a potential energy surface within amore » given accuracy compared to the non-adaptive version.« less

  3. User-Adapted Recommendation of Content on Mobile Devices Using Bayesian Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Hirotoshi; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Hara, Kousuke; Motomura, Yoichi

    Mobile devices, such as cellular phones and car navigation systems, are essential to daily life. People acquire necessary information and preferred content over communication networks anywhere, anytime. However, usability issues arise from the simplicity of user interfaces themselves. Thus, a recommendation of content that is adapted to a user's preference and situation will help the user select content. In this paper, we describe a method to realize such a system using Bayesian networks. This user-adapted mobile system is based on a user model that provides recommendation of content (i.e., restaurants, shops, and music that are suitable to the user and situation) and that learns incrementally based on accumulated usage history data. However, sufficient samples are not always guaranteed, since a user model would require combined dependency among users, situations, and contents. Therefore, we propose the LK method for modeling, which complements incomplete and insufficient samples using knowledge data, and CPT incremental learning for adaptation based on a small number of samples. In order to evaluate the methods proposed, we applied them to restaurant recommendations made on car navigation systems. The evaluation results confirmed that our model based on the LK method can be expected to provide better generalization performance than that of the conventional method. Furthermore, our system would require much less operation than current car navigation systems from the beginning of use. Our evaluation results also indicate that learning a user's individual preference through CPT incremental learning would be beneficial to many users, even with only a few samples. As a result, we have developed the technology of a system that becomes more adapted to a user the more it is used.

  4. Pupil-segmentation-based adaptive optics for microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Na; Milkie, Daniel E.; Betzig, Eric

    2011-03-01

    Inhomogeneous optical properties of biological samples make it difficult to obtain diffraction-limited resolution in depth. Correcting the sample-induced optical aberrations needs adaptive optics (AO). However, the direct wavefront-sensing approach commonly used in astronomy is not suitable for most biological samples due to their strong scattering of light. We developed an image-based AO approach that is insensitive to sample scattering. By comparing images of the sample taken with different segments of the pupil illuminated, local tilt in the wavefront is measured from image shift. The aberrated wavefront is then obtained either by measuring the local phase directly using interference or with phase reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in astronomical AO. We implemented this pupil-segmentation-based approach in a two-photon fluorescence microscope and demonstrated that diffraction-limited resolution can be recovered from nonbiological and biological samples.

  5. Capillary Electrophoresis Sensitivity Enhancement Based on Adaptive Moving Average Method.

    PubMed

    Drevinskas, Tomas; Telksnys, Laimutis; Maruška, Audrius; Gorbatsova, Jelena; Kaljurand, Mihkel

    2018-06-05

    In the present work, we demonstrate a novel approach to improve the sensitivity of the "out of lab" portable capillary electrophoretic measurements. Nowadays, many signal enhancement methods are (i) underused (nonoptimal), (ii) overused (distorts the data), or (iii) inapplicable in field-portable instrumentation because of a lack of computational power. The described innovative migration velocity-adaptive moving average method uses an optimal averaging window size and can be easily implemented with a microcontroller. The contactless conductivity detection was used as a model for the development of a signal processing method and the demonstration of its impact on the sensitivity. The frequency characteristics of the recorded electropherograms and peaks were clarified. Higher electrophoretic mobility analytes exhibit higher-frequency peaks, whereas lower electrophoretic mobility analytes exhibit lower-frequency peaks. On the basis of the obtained data, a migration velocity-adaptive moving average algorithm was created, adapted, and programmed into capillary electrophoresis data-processing software. Employing the developed algorithm, each data point is processed depending on a certain migration time of the analyte. Because of the implemented migration velocity-adaptive moving average method, the signal-to-noise ratio improved up to 11 times for sampling frequency of 4.6 Hz and up to 22 times for sampling frequency of 25 Hz. This paper could potentially be used as a methodological guideline for the development of new smoothing algorithms that require adaptive conditions in capillary electrophoresis and other separation methods.

  6. Adapting populations in space: clonal interference and genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Daniel; Barton, Nick

    Most species inhabit ranges much larger than the scales over which individuals interact. How does this spatial structure interact with adaptive evolution? We consider a simple model of a spatially-extended, adapting population and show that, while clonal interference severely limits the adaptation of purely asexual populations, even rare recombination is enough to allow adaptation at rates approaching those of well-mixed populations. We also find that the genetic hitchhiking produced by the adaptive alleles sweeping through the population has strange effects on the patterns of genetic diversity. In large spatial ranges, even low rates of adaptation cause all individuals in the population to rapidly trace their ancestry back to individuals living in a small region in the center of the range. The probability of fixation of an allele is thus strongly dependent on the allele's spatial location, with alleles from the center favored. Surprisingly, these effects are seen genome-wide (instead of being localized to the regions of the genome undergoing the sweeps). The spatial concentration of ancestry produces a power-law dependence of relatedness on distance, so that even individuals sampled far apart are likely to be fairly closely related, masking the underlying spatial structure.

  7. Psychometrics behind Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-03-01

    The paper provides a survey of 18 years' progress that my colleagues, students (both former and current) and I made in a prominent research area in Psychometrics-Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). We start with a historical review of the establishment of a large sample foundation for CAT. It is worth noting that the asymptotic results were derived under the framework of Martingale Theory, a very theoretical perspective of Probability Theory, which may seem unrelated to educational and psychological testing. In addition, we address a number of issues that emerged from large scale implementation and show that how theoretical works can be helpful to solve the problems. Finally, we propose that CAT technology can be very useful to support individualized instruction on a mass scale. We show that even paper and pencil based tests can be made adaptive to support classroom teaching.

  8. Factors Influencing Students' Adaptability in School: A Production Function Model and Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Ping

    2008-01-01

    This study used sampling survey data from rural elementary schools in western China to analyze school adaptability, which is the representative noncognitive development of rural elementary students. It also investigated factors influencing the school adaptability of elementary school students at an individual and school level by using production…

  9. 75 FR 57859 - Specially Adapted Housing and Special Home Adaptation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... Home Adaptation AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of... specially adapted housing and special home adaptation grants. This final rule incorporates certain... regulations pertaining to eligibility for specially adapted housing (SAH) grants and special home adaptation...

  10. Maternal Identity Formation in a Military Sample: A Longitudinal Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-08

    effective interventions. Successful interventions to assist military wives with maternal adaptation and role adjustment will be possible with a greater 7...maternal identity formation and role adaptation. Despite the obvious need for focused interventions to assist women with maternal identity formation and...pregnancies tended to be unwanted and remain unwanted even in late gestation . In her sample, the women describing the greatest number of unplanned

  11. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular variability interactions investigated through conditional joint transfer entropy in subjects prone to postural syncope.

    PubMed

    Bari, Vlasta; De Maria, Beatrice; Mazzucco, Claudio Enrico; Rossato, Gianluca; Tonon, Davide; Nollo, Giandomenico; Faes, Luca; Porta, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    A model-based conditional transfer entropy approach was exploited to quantify the information transfer in cerebrovascular (CBV) and cardiovascular (CV) systems in subjects prone to develop postural syncope. Spontaneous beat-to-beat variations of mean cerebral blood flow velocity (MCBFV) derived from a transcranial Doppler device, heart period (HP) derived from surface electrocardiogram, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) derived from finger plethysmographic arterial pressure device were monitored at rest in supine position (REST) and during 60° head-up tilt (TILT) in 13 individuals (age mean  ±  standard deviation: 28  ±  9 years, min-max range: 18-44 years, 5 males) with a history of recurrent episodes of syncope (SYNC) and in 13 age- and gender-matched controls (NonSYNC). Respiration (R) obtained from a thoracic belt was acquired as well and considered as a conditioning signal in transfer entropy assessment. Synchronous sequences of 250 consecutive MCBFV, HP, MAP, SAP and R values were utilized to estimate the information genuinely transferred from MAP to MCBFV (i.e. disambiguated from R influences) and vice versa. Analogous indexes were computed from SAP to HP and vice versa. Traditional time and frequency domain analyses were carried out as well. SYNC subjects showed an increased genuine information transfer from MAP to MCBFV during TILT, while they did not exhibit the expected rise of the genuine information transfer from SAP to HP. We conclude that SYNC individuals featured an impaired cerebral autoregulation visible during TILT and were unable to activate cardiac baroreflex to cope with the postural challenge. Traditional frequency domain markers based on transfer function modulus, phase and coherence functions were less powerful or less specific in typifying the CBV and CV controls of SYNC individuals. Conditional transfer entropy approach can identify the impairment of CBV and CV controls and provide

  12. Examining the impact of differential cultural adaptation with Latina/o immigrants exposed to adapted parent training interventions.

    PubMed

    Parra-Cardona, J Rubén; Bybee, Deborah; Sullivan, Cris M; Rodríguez, Melanie M Domenech; Dates, Brian; Tams, Lisa; Bernal, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    There is a dearth of empirical studies aimed at examining the impact of differential cultural adaptation of evidence-based clinical and prevention interventions. This prevention study consisted of a randomized controlled trial aimed at comparing the impact of 2 differentially culturally adapted versions of the evidence-based parenting intervention known as Parent Management Training, the Oregon Model (PMTOR). The sample consisted of 103 Latina/o immigrant families (190 individual parents). Each family was allocated to 1 of 3 conditions: (a) a culturally adapted PMTO (CA), (b) culturally adapted and enhanced PMTO (CE), and (c) a wait-list control. Measurements were implemented at baseline (T1), treatment completion (T2) and 6-month follow up (T3). Multilevel growth modeling analyses indicated statistically significant improvements on parenting skills for fathers and mothers (main effect) at 6-month follow-up in both adapted interventions, when compared with the control condition. With regard to parent-reported child behaviors, child internalizing behaviors were significantly lower for both parents in the CE intervention (main effect), compared with control at 6-month follow-up. No main effect was found for child externalizing behaviors. However, a Parent × Condition effect was found indicating a significant reduction of child externalizing behaviors for CE fathers compared with CA and control fathers at posttest and 6-month follow-up. Present findings indicate the value of differential cultural adaptation research designs and the importance of examining effects for both mothers and fathers, particularly when culturally focused and gender variables are considered for intervention design and implementation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Adaptive and non-adaptive models of depression: A comparison using register data on antidepressant medication during divorce.

    PubMed

    Rosenström, Tom; Fawcett, Tim W; Higginson, Andrew D; Metsä-Simola, Niina; Hagen, Edward H; Houston, Alasdair I; Martikainen, Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Divorce is associated with an increased probability of a depressive episode, but the causation of events remains unclear. Adaptive models of depression propose that depression is a social strategy in part, whereas non-adaptive models tend to propose a diathesis-stress mechanism. We compare an adaptive evolutionary model of depression to three alternative non-adaptive models with respect to their ability to explain the temporal pattern of depression around the time of divorce. Register-based data (304,112 individuals drawn from a random sample of 11% of Finnish people) on antidepressant purchases is used as a proxy for depression. This proxy affords an unprecedented temporal resolution (a 3-monthly prevalence estimates over 10 years) without any bias from non-compliance, and it can be linked with underlying episodes via a statistical model. The evolutionary-adaptation model (all time periods with risk of divorce are depressogenic) was the best quantitative description of the data. The non-adaptive stress-relief model (period before divorce is depressogenic and period afterwards is not) provided the second best quantitative description of the data. The peak-stress model (periods before and after divorce can be depressogenic) fit the data less well, and the stress-induction model (period following divorce is depressogenic and the preceding period is not) did not fit the data at all. The evolutionary model was the most detailed mechanistic description of the divorce-depression link among the models, and the best fit in terms of predicted curvature; thus, it offers most rigorous hypotheses for further study. The stress-relief model also fit very well and was the best model in a sensitivity analysis, encouraging development of more mechanistic models for that hypothesis.

  14. Enhanced Ligand Sampling for Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations are used to study how strongly potential drug molecules interact with their target receptors. The accuracy of these calculations depends on the accuracy of the molecular dynamics (MD) force field as well as proper sampling of the major conformations of each molecule. However, proper sampling of ligand conformations can be difficult when there are large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. An example of this is for ligands with an asymmetrically substituted phenyl ring, where the presence of protein loops hinders the proper sampling of the different ring conformations. These ring conformations become more difficult to sample when the size of the functional groups attached to the ring increases. The Adaptive Integration Method (AIM) has been developed, which adaptively changes the alchemical coupling parameter λ during the MD simulation so that conformations sampled at one λ can aid sampling at the other λ values. The Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method (AcclAIM) builds on AIM by lowering potential barriers for specific degrees of freedom at intermediate λ values. However, these methods may not work when there are very large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. In this work, we describe a modification to AIM that improves sampling of the different ring conformations, even when there is a very large barrier between them. This method combines AIM with conformational Monte Carlo sampling, giving improved convergence of ring populations and the resulting free energy. This method, called AIM/MC, is applied to study the relative binding free energy for a pair of ligands that bind to thrombin and a different pair of ligands that bind to aspartyl protease β-APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). These protein–ligand binding free energy calculations illustrate the improvements in conformational sampling and the convergence of the free energy compared to both AIM and AcclAIM. PMID:25906170

  15. Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death.

    PubMed

    Gorban, Alexander N; Tyukina, Tatiana A; Smirnova, Elena V; Pokidysheva, Lyudmila I

    2016-09-21

    In 1938, Selye proposed the notion of adaptation energy and published 'Experimental evidence supporting the conception of adaptation energy.' Adaptation of an animal to different factors appears as the spending of one resource. Adaptation energy is a hypothetical extensive quantity spent for adaptation. This term causes much debate when one takes it literally, as a physical quantity, i.e. a sort of energy. The controversial points of view impede the systematic use of the notion of adaptation energy despite experimental evidence. Nevertheless, the response to many harmful factors often has general non-specific form and we suggest that the mechanisms of physiological adaptation admit a very general and nonspecific description. We aim to demonstrate that Selye׳s adaptation energy is the cornerstone of the top-down approach to modelling of non-specific adaptation processes. We analyze Selye׳s axioms of adaptation energy together with Goldstone׳s modifications and propose a series of models for interpretation of these axioms. Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the 'dominant path' in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of 'oscillating death' and 'oscillating remission' are predicted on the base of the dynamical models of adaptation. Natural selection plays a key role in the evolution of mechanisms of physiological adaptation. We use the fitness optimization approach to study of the distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors, during adaptation to a multifactor environment, and analyze the optimal strategies for different systems of factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptive variable-length coding for efficient compression of spacecraft television data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Plaunt, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    An adaptive variable length coding system is presented. Although developed primarily for the proposed Grand Tour missions, many features of this system clearly indicate a much wider applicability. Using sample to sample prediction, the coding system produces output rates within 0.25 bit/picture element (pixel) of the one-dimensional difference entropy for entropy values ranging from 0 to 8 bit/pixel. This is accomplished without the necessity of storing any code words. Performance improvements of 0.5 bit/pixel can be simply achieved by utilizing previous line correlation. A Basic Compressor, using concatenated codes, adapts to rapid changes in source statistics by automatically selecting one of three codes to use for each block of 21 pixels. The system adapts to less frequent, but more dramatic, changes in source statistics by adjusting the mode in which the Basic Compressor operates on a line-to-line basis. Furthermore, the compression system is independent of the quantization requirements of the pulse-code modulation system.

  17. Oscillators that sync and swarm.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Kevin P; Hong, Hyunsuk; Strogatz, Steven H

    2017-11-15

    Synchronization occurs in many natural and technological systems, from cardiac pacemaker cells to coupled lasers. In the synchronized state, the individual cells or lasers coordinate the timing of their oscillations, but they do not move through space. A complementary form of self-organization occurs among swarming insects, flocking birds, or schooling fish; now the individuals move through space, but without conspicuously altering their internal states. Here we explore systems in which both synchronization and swarming occur together. Specifically, we consider oscillators whose phase dynamics and spatial dynamics are coupled. We call them swarmalators, to highlight their dual character. A case study of a generalized Kuramoto model predicts five collective states as possible long-term modes of organization. These states may be observable in groups of sperm, Japanese tree frogs, colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, and other biological and physical systems in which self-assembly and synchronization interact.

  18. In Sync with Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scribner-MacLean, Michelle; Nikonchuk, Andrew; Kaplo, Patrick; Wall, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Science educators are often among the first to use emerging technologies in the classroom and laboratory. For the technologically savvy science teacher, the handheld computer is a terrific tool. A handheld computer is a portable electronic device that helps organize (via calendars, contact lists, to-do lists) and integrate electronic data…

  19. Adaptive allocation for binary outcomes using decreasingly informative priors.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Roy T

    2014-01-01

    A method of outcome-adaptive allocation is presented using Bayes methods, where a natural lead-in is incorporated through the use of informative yet skeptical prior distributions for each treatment group. These prior distributions are modeled on unobserved data in such a way that their influence on the allocation scheme decreases as the trial progresses. Simulation studies show this method to behave comparably to the Bayesian adaptive allocation method described by Thall and Wathen (2007), who incorporate a natural lead-in through sample-size-based exponents.

  20. Adaptive Optics Imaging Survey of Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Laag, E A; Canalizo, G; van Breugel, W

    2006-03-13

    We present high resolution imaging observations of a sample of previously unidentified far-infrared galaxies at z < 0.3. The objects were selected by cross-correlating the IRAS Faint Source Catalog with the VLA FIRST catalog and the HST Guide Star Catalog to allow for adaptive optics observations. We found two new ULIGs (with L{sub FIR} {ge} 10{sup 12} L{sub {circle_dot}}) and 19 new LIGs (with L{sub FIR} {ge} 10{sup 11} L{sub {circle_dot}}). Twenty of the galaxies in the sample were imaged with either the Lick or Keck adaptive optics systems in H or K{prime}. Galaxy morphologies were determined using the twomore » dimensional fitting program GALFIT and the residuals examined to look for interesting structure. The morphologies reveal that at least 30% are involved in tidal interactions, with 20% being clear mergers. An additional 50% show signs of possible interaction. Line ratios were used to determine powering mechanism; of the 17 objects in the sample showing clear emission lines--four are active galactic nuclei and seven are starburst galaxies. The rest exhibit a combination of both phenomena.« less

  1. High quality adaptive optics zoom with adaptive lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintavalla, M.; Santiago, F.; Bonora, S.; Restaino, S.

    2018-02-01

    We present the combined use of large aperture adaptive lens with large optical power modulation with a multi actuator adaptive lens. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens (M-AL) can correct up to the 4th radial order of Zernike polynomials, without any obstructions (electrodes and actuators) placed inside its clear aperture. We demonstrated that the use of both lenses together can lead to better image quality and to the correction of aberrations of adaptive optics optical systems.

  2. Ultra-fast ipsilateral DPOAE adaptation not modulated by attention?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalhoff, Ernst; Zelle, Dennis; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2018-05-01

    Efferent stimulation of outer hair cells is supposed to attenuate cochlear amplification of sound waves and is accompanied by reduced DPOAE amplitudes. Recently, a method using two subsequent f2 pulses during presentation of a longer f1 pulse was introduced to measure fast ipsilateral adaptation effects on separated DPOAE components. Compensating primary-tone onsets for their latencies at the f2-tonotopic place, the average adaptation measured in four normal-hearing subjects was 5.0 dB with a time constant below 5 ms. In the present study, two experiments were performed to determine the origin of this ultra-fast ipsilateral adaptation effect. The first experiment measured ultra-fast ipsilateral adaptation using a two-pulse paradigm at three frequencies in the four subjects, while controlling for visual attention of the subjects. The other experiment also controlled for visual attention, but utilized a sequence of f2 short pulses in the presence of a continuous f1 tone to sample ipsilateral adaptation effects with longer time constants in eight subjects. In the first experiment, no significant change in the ultra-fast adaptation between non-directed attention and visual attention could be detected. In contrast, the second experiment revealed significant changes in the magnitude of the slower ipsilateral adaptation in the visual-attention condition. In conclusion, the lack of an attentional influence indicates that the ultra-fast ipsilateral DPOAE adaptation is not solely mediated by the medial olivocochlear reflex.

  3. Adaptive trial designs: a review of barriers and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on data accumulating within a study. The promise of greater flexibility and efficiency stimulates increasing interest in adaptive designs from clinical, academic, and regulatory parties. When adaptive designs are used properly, efficiencies can include a smaller sample size, a more efficient treatment development process, and an increased chance of correctly answering the clinical question of interest. However, improper adaptations can lead to biased studies. A broad definition of adaptive designs allows for countless variations, which creates confusion as to the statistical validity and practical feasibility of many designs. Determining properties of a particular adaptive design requires careful consideration of the scientific context and statistical assumptions. We first review several adaptive designs that garner the most current interest. We focus on the design principles and research issues that lead to particular designs being appealing or unappealing in particular applications. We separately discuss exploratory and confirmatory stage designs in order to account for the differences in regulatory concerns. We include adaptive seamless designs, which combine stages in a unified approach. We also highlight a number of applied areas, such as comparative effectiveness research, that would benefit from the use of adaptive designs. Finally, we describe a number of current barriers and provide initial suggestions for overcoming them in order to promote wider use of appropriate adaptive designs. Given the breadth of the coverage all mathematical and most implementation details are omitted for the sake of brevity. However, the interested reader will find that we provide current references to focused reviews and original theoretical sources which lead to details of the current state of the art in theory and practice. PMID:22917111

  4. Utilizing feedback in adaptive SAR ATR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, Owen; Blacknell, David

    2009-05-01

    Existing SAR ATR systems are usually trained off-line with samples of target imagery or CAD models, prior to conducting a mission. If the training data is not representative of mission conditions, then poor performance may result. In addition, it is difficult to acquire suitable training data for the many target types of interest. The Adaptive SAR ATR Problem Set (AdaptSAPS) program provides a MATLAB framework and image database for developing systems that adapt to mission conditions, meaning less reliance on accurate training data. A key function of an adaptive system is the ability to utilise truth feedback to improve performance, and it is this feature which AdaptSAPS is intended to exploit. This paper presents a new method for SAR ATR that does not use training data, based on supervised learning. This is achieved by using feature-based classification, and several new shadow features have been developed for this purpose. These features allow discrimination of vehicles from clutter, and classification of vehicles into two classes: targets, comprising military combat types, and non-targets, comprising bulldozers and trucks. The performance of the system is assessed using three baseline missions provided with AdaptSAPS, as well as three additional missions. All performance metrics indicate a distinct learning trend over the course of a mission, with most third and fourth quartile performance levels exceeding 85% correct classification. It has been demonstrated that these performance levels can be maintained even when truth feedback rates are reduced by up to 55% over the course of a mission.

  5. The Psychological Well-Being and Sociocultural Adaptation of Short-Term International Students in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Aileen; Ryan, Dermot; Hickey, Tina

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an empirical study of the psychosocial adaptation of international students in Ireland. Using measures of social support, loneliness, stress, psychological well-being, and sociocultural adaptation, data were obtained from international students and a comparison sample of Irish students. The study found that, although…

  6. SAGE - MULTIDIMENSIONAL SELF-ADAPTIVE GRID CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    acceptable since it makes possible an overall and local error reduction through grid redistribution. SAGE includes the ability to modify the adaption techniques in boundary regions, which substantially improves the flexibility of the adaptive scheme. The vectorial approach used in the analysis also provides flexibility. The user has complete choice of adaption direction and order of sequential adaptions without concern for the computational data structure. Multiple passes are available with no restraint on stepping directions; for each adaptive pass the user can choose a completely new set of adaptive parameters. This facility, combined with the capability of edge boundary control, enables the code to individually adapt multi-dimensional multiple grids. Zonal grids can be adapted while maintaining continuity along the common boundaries. For patched grids, the multiple-pass capability enables complete adaption. SAGE is written in FORTRAN 77 and is intended to be machine independent; however, it requires a FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST input. It has been successfully implemented on Sun series computers, SGI IRIS's, DEC MicroVAX computers, HP series computers, the Cray YMP, and IBM PC compatibles. Source code is provided, but no sample input and output files are provided. The code reads three datafiles: one that contains the initial grid coordinates (x,y,z), one that contains corresponding flow-field variables, and one that contains the user control parameters. It is assumed that the first two datasets are formatted as defined in the plotting software package PLOT3D. Several machine versions of PLOT3D are available from COSMIC. The amount of main memory is dependent on the size of the matrix. The standard distribution medium for SAGE is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. It is also available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format or on a 9-track 1600 BPI ASCII CARD IMAGE format magnetic tape. SAGE was developed in 1989, first

  7. Population Education in Mathematics: Some Sample Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This mathematics teacher's manual contains ten sample lessons on population growth and demography that were adapted from materials produced in several countries in Asia and Oceania. Among the mathematics concepts and skills students apply during these lessons are set theory, cardinal and ordinal numbers, frequency tallies, percentages, ratios,…

  8. Population Education in Science: Some Sample Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This science teacher's manual contains nine sample population education lessons adapted from materials produced in several countries in Asia and Oceania. Activities are designed for lower primary through high school students. Included are class discussions, small group activities, and a role-playing situation. Food chains, human dependence upon…

  9. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  10. Transformational adaptation when incremental adaptations to climate change are insufficient

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Robert W.; Travis, William R.; Wilbanks, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    All human–environment systems adapt to climate and its natural variation. Adaptation to human-induced change in climate has largely been envisioned as increments of these adaptations intended to avoid disruptions of systems at their current locations. In some places, for some systems, however, vulnerabilities and risks may be so sizeable that they require transformational rather than incremental adaptations. Three classes of transformational adaptations are those that are adopted at a much larger scale, that are truly new to a particular region or resource system, and that transform places and shift locations. We illustrate these with examples drawn from Africa, Europe, and North America. Two conditions set the stage for transformational adaptation to climate change: large vulnerability in certain regions, populations, or resource systems; and severe climate change that overwhelms even robust human use systems. However, anticipatory transformational adaptation may be difficult to implement because of uncertainties about climate change risks and adaptation benefits, the high costs of transformational actions, and institutional and behavioral actions that tend to maintain existing resource systems and policies. Implementing transformational adaptation requires effort to initiate it and then to sustain the effort over time. In initiating transformational adaptation focusing events and multiple stresses are important, combined with local leadership. In sustaining transformational adaptation, it seems likely that supportive social contexts and the availability of acceptable options and resources for actions are key enabling factors. Early steps would include incorporating transformation adaptation into risk management and initiating research to expand the menu of innovative transformational adaptations. PMID:22509036

  11. Transformational adaptation when incremental adaptations to climate change are insufficient.

    PubMed

    Kates, Robert W; Travis, William R; Wilbanks, Thomas J

    2012-05-08

    All human-environment systems adapt to climate and its natural variation. Adaptation to human-induced change in climate has largely been envisioned as increments of these adaptations intended to avoid disruptions of systems at their current locations. In some places, for some systems, however, vulnerabilities and risks may be so sizeable that they require transformational rather than incremental adaptations. Three classes of transformational adaptations are those that are adopted at a much larger scale, that are truly new to a particular region or resource system, and that transform places and shift locations. We illustrate these with examples drawn from Africa, Europe, and North America. Two conditions set the stage for transformational adaptation to climate change: large vulnerability in certain regions, populations, or resource systems; and severe climate change that overwhelms even robust human use systems. However, anticipatory transformational adaptation may be difficult to implement because of uncertainties about climate change risks and adaptation benefits, the high costs of transformational actions, and institutional and behavioral actions that tend to maintain existing resource systems and policies. Implementing transformational adaptation requires effort to initiate it and then to sustain the effort over time. In initiating transformational adaptation focusing events and multiple stresses are important, combined with local leadership. In sustaining transformational adaptation, it seems likely that supportive social contexts and the availability of acceptable options and resources for actions are key enabling factors. Early steps would include incorporating transformation adaptation into risk management and initiating research to expand the menu of innovative transformational adaptations.

  12. A Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Management of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sea level rise is causing shoreline erosion, increased coastal flooding, and marsh vulnerability to the impact of storms. Coastal marshes provide flood abatement, carbon and nutrient sequestration, water quality maintenance, and habitat for fish, shellfish, and wildlife, including species of concern, such as the saltmarsh sparrow (Ammodramus caudacutus). We present a climate change adaptation strategy (CCAS) adopted by scientific, management, and policy stakeholders for managing coastal marshes and enhancing system resiliency. A common adaptive management approach previously used for restoration projects was modified to identify climate-related vulnerabilities and plan climate change adaptive actions. As an example of implementation of the CCAS, we describe the stakeholder plans and management actions the US Fish and Wildlife Service and partners developed to build coastal resiliency in the Narrow River Estuary, RI, in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. When possible, an experimental BACI (before-after, control-impact) design, described as pre- and post-sampling at the impact site and one or more control sites, was incorporated into the climate change adaptation and implementation plans. Specific climate change adaptive actions and monitoring plans are described and include shoreline stabilization, restoring marsh drainage, increasing marsh elevation, and enabling upland marsh migration. The CCAS provides a framework and methodology for successfully managing coa

  13. Adaptive and non-adaptive models of depression: A comparison using register data on antidepressant medication during divorce

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, Tim W.; Higginson, Andrew D.; Metsä-Simola, Niina; Hagen, Edward H.; Houston, Alasdair I.; Martikainen, Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Divorce is associated with an increased probability of a depressive episode, but the causation of events remains unclear. Adaptive models of depression propose that depression is a social strategy in part, whereas non-adaptive models tend to propose a diathesis-stress mechanism. We compare an adaptive evolutionary model of depression to three alternative non-adaptive models with respect to their ability to explain the temporal pattern of depression around the time of divorce. Register-based data (304,112 individuals drawn from a random sample of 11% of Finnish people) on antidepressant purchases is used as a proxy for depression. This proxy affords an unprecedented temporal resolution (a 3-monthly prevalence estimates over 10 years) without any bias from non-compliance, and it can be linked with underlying episodes via a statistical model. The evolutionary-adaptation model (all time periods with risk of divorce are depressogenic) was the best quantitative description of the data. The non-adaptive stress-relief model (period before divorce is depressogenic and period afterwards is not) provided the second best quantitative description of the data. The peak-stress model (periods before and after divorce can be depressogenic) fit the data less well, and the stress-induction model (period following divorce is depressogenic and the preceding period is not) did not fit the data at all. The evolutionary model was the most detailed mechanistic description of the divorce-depression link among the models, and the best fit in terms of predicted curvature; thus, it offers most rigorous hypotheses for further study. The stress-relief model also fit very well and was the best model in a sensitivity analysis, encouraging development of more mechanistic models for that hypothesis. PMID:28614385

  14. Considerations about expected a posteriori estimation in adaptive testing: adaptive a priori, adaptive correction for bias, and adaptive integration interval.

    PubMed

    Raiche, Gilles; Blais, Jean-Guy

    2009-01-01

    In a computerized adaptive test, we would like to obtain an acceptable precision of the proficiency level estimate using an optimal number of items. Unfortunately, decreasing the number of items is accompanied by a certain degree of bias when the true proficiency level differs significantly from the a priori estimate. The authors suggest that it is possible to reduced the bias, and even the standard error of the estimate, by applying to each provisional estimation one or a combination of the following strategies: adaptive correction for bias proposed by Bock and Mislevy (1982), adaptive a priori estimate, and adaptive integration interval.

  15. Energetics, adaptation, and adaptability.

    PubMed

    Ulijaszek, Stanley J

    1996-01-01

    Energy capture and conversion are fundamental to human existence, and over the past three decades biological anthropologists have used a number of approaches which incorporate energetics measures in studies of human population biology. Human groups can vary enormously in their energy expenditure. This review considers evidence for genetic adaptation and presents models for physiological adaptability to reduced physiological energy availability and/or negative energy balance. In industrialized populations, different aspects of energy expenditure have been shown to have a genetic component, including basal metabolic rate, habitual physical activity level, mechanical efficiency of work performance, and thermic effect of food. Metabolic adaptation to low energy intakes has been demonstrated in populations in both developing and industrialized nations. Thyroid hormone-related effects on energy metabolic responses to low physiological energy availability are unified in a model, linking energetic adaptability in physical activity and maintenance metabolism. Negative energy balance has been shown to be associated with reduced reproductive function in women experiencing seasonal environments in some developing countries. Existing models relating negative energy balance to menstrual or ovulatory function are largely descriptive, and do not propose any physiological mechanisms for this phenomenon. A model is proposed whereby reduced physiological energy availability could influence ovulatory function via low serum levels of the amino acid aspartate and reduced sympathetic nervous system activity. © 1996 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright © 1996 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Iterative learning-based decentralized adaptive tracker for large-scale systems: a digital redesign approach.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jason Sheng-Hong; Du, Yan-Yi; Huang, Pei-Hsiang; Guo, Shu-Mei; Shieh, Leang-San; Chen, Yuhua

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a digital redesign methodology of the iterative learning-based decentralized adaptive tracker is proposed to improve the dynamic performance of sampled-data linear large-scale control systems consisting of N interconnected multi-input multi-output subsystems, so that the system output will follow any trajectory which may not be presented by the analytic reference model initially. To overcome the interference of each sub-system and simplify the controller design, the proposed model reference decentralized adaptive control scheme constructs a decoupled well-designed reference model first. Then, according to the well-designed model, this paper develops a digital decentralized adaptive tracker based on the optimal analog control and prediction-based digital redesign technique for the sampled-data large-scale coupling system. In order to enhance the tracking performance of the digital tracker at specified sampling instants, we apply the iterative learning control (ILC) to train the control input via continual learning. As a result, the proposed iterative learning-based decentralized adaptive tracker not only has robust closed-loop decoupled property but also possesses good tracking performance at both transient and steady state. Besides, evolutionary programming is applied to search for a good learning gain to speed up the learning process of ILC. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nonlinear discrete-time multirate adaptive control of non-linear vibrations of smart beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Georgios; Foutsitzi, Georgia A.; Stavroulakis, Georgios E.

    2018-06-01

    The nonlinear adaptive digital control of a smart piezoelectric beam is considered. It is shown that in the case of a sampled-data context, a multirate control strategy provides an appropriate framework in order to achieve vibration regulation, ensuring the stability of the whole control system. Under parametric uncertainties in the model parameters (damping ratios, frequencies, levels of non linearities and cross coupling, control input parameters), the scheme is completed with an adaptation law deduced from hyperstability concepts. This results in the asymptotic satisfaction of the control objectives at the sampling instants. Simulation results are presented.

  18. The continuous Wagon Wheel Illusion depends on, but is not identical to neuronal adaptation.

    PubMed

    VanRullen, Rufin

    2007-07-01

    The occurrence of perceived reversed motion while observers view a continuous, periodically moving stimulus (a bistable phenomenon coined the "continuous Wagon Wheel Illusion" or "c-WWI") has been taken as evidence that some aspects of motion perception rely on discrete sampling of visual information. Alternative accounts rely on the possibility of a motion aftereffect that may become visible even while the adapting stimulus is present. Here I show that motion adaptation might be necessary, but is not sufficient to explain the illusion. When local adaptation is prevented by slowly drifting the moving wheel across the retina, the c-WWI illusion tends to decrease, as do other bistable percepts (e.g. binocular rivalry). However, the strength of the c-WWI and that of adaptation (as measured by either the static or flicker motion aftereffects) are not directly related: although the c-WWI decreases with increasing eccentricity, the aftereffects actually intensify concurrently. A similar dissociation can be induced by manipulating stimulus contrast. This indicates that the c-WWI may be enabled by, but is not equivalent to, local motion adaptation - and that other factors such as discrete sampling may be involved in its generation.

  19. Prediction of human adaptation and performance in underwater environments.

    PubMed

    Colodro Plaza, Joaquín; Garcés de los Fayos Ruiz, Enrique J; López García, Juan J; Colodro Conde, Lucía

    2014-01-01

    Environmental stressors require the professional diver to undergo a complex process of psychophysiological adaptation in order to overcome the demands of an extreme environment and carry out effective and efficient work under water. The influence of cognitive and personality traits in predicting underwater performance and adaptation has been a common concern for diving psychology, and definitive conclusions have not been reached. In this ex post facto study, psychological and academic data were analyzed from a large sample of personnel participating in scuba diving courses carried out in the Spanish Navy Diving Center. In order to verify the relevance of individual differences in adaptation to a hostile environment, we evaluated the predictive validity of general mental ability and personality traits with regression techniques. The data indicated the existence of psychological variables that can predict the performance ( R² = .30, p <.001) and adaptation ( R²(N) = .51, p <.001) of divers in underwater environment. These findings support the hypothesis that individual differences are related to the probability of successful adaptation and effective performance in professional diving. These results also verify that dispositional traits play a decisive role in diving training and are significant factors in divers' psychological fitness.

  20. Translation, Adaptation, and Preliminary Validation of the Female Sexual Function Index into Spanish (Colombia).

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Medina, Pablo; Pérez-Durán, Claudia; Saavedra-Roa, Alejandro

    2018-04-01

    The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) subjectively explores the dimensions of female sexual functioning. This research undertook to adapt and validate the FSFI to Spanish language in a Colombian sample. To this effect, this study was conducted in two steps, namely: (1) cultural adaptation of the scale with the collaboration of seven experts; and (2) preliminary validation of the scale in a sample of 925 participants. Reliability indices were appropriate in this sample, and external validity in relation to other measures showed significant relationships. Findings suggest that the FSFI is reliable and valid in Spanish for a Colombian population. Further research is needed to establish the test-retest reliability and discriminant validity of this Spanish version.

  1. Mutual information estimation for irregularly sampled time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehfeld, K.; Marwan, N.; Heitzig, J.; Kurths, J.

    2012-04-01

    For the automated, objective and joint analysis of time series, similarity measures are crucial. Used in the analysis of climate records, they allow for a complimentary, unbiased view onto sparse datasets. The irregular sampling of many of these time series, however, makes it necessary to either perform signal reconstruction (e.g. interpolation) or to develop and use adapted measures. Standard linear interpolation comes with an inevitable loss of information and bias effects. We have recently developed a Gaussian kernel-based correlation algorithm with which the interpolation error can be substantially lowered, but this would not work should the functional relationship in a bivariate setting be non-linear. We therefore propose an algorithm to estimate lagged auto and cross mutual information from irregularly sampled time series. We have extended the standard and adaptive binning histogram estimators and use Gaussian distributed weights in the estimation of the (joint) probabilities. To test our method we have simulated linear and nonlinear auto-regressive processes with Gamma-distributed inter-sampling intervals. We have then performed a sensitivity analysis for the estimation of actual coupling length, the lag of coupling and the decorrelation time in the synthetic time series and contrast our results to the performance of a signal reconstruction scheme. Finally we applied our estimator to speleothem records. We compare the estimated memory (or decorrelation time) to that from a least-squares estimator based on fitting an auto-regressive process of order 1. The calculated (cross) mutual information results are compared for the different estimators (standard or adaptive binning) and contrasted with results from signal reconstruction. We find that the kernel-based estimator has a significantly lower root mean square error and less systematic sampling bias than the interpolation-based method. It is possible that these encouraging results could be further improved by

  2. Guideline adaptation and implementation planning: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adaptation of high-quality practice guidelines for local use has been advanced as an efficient means to improve acceptability and applicability of evidence-informed care. In a pan-Canadian study, we examined how cancer care groups adapted pre-existing guidelines to their unique context and began implementation planning. Methods Using a mixed-methods, case-study design, five cases were purposefully sampled from self-identified groups and followed as they used a structured method and resources for guideline adaptation. Cases received the ADAPTE Collaboration toolkit, facilitation, methodological and logistical support, resources and assistance as required. Documentary and primary data collection methods captured individual case experience, including monthly summaries of meeting and field notes, email/telephone correspondence, and project records. Site visits, process audits, interviews, and a final evaluation forum with all cases contributed to a comprehensive account of participant experience. Results Study cases took 12 to >24 months to complete guideline adaptation. Although participants appreciated the structure, most found the ADAPTE method complex and lacking practical aspects. They needed assistance establishing individual guideline mandate and infrastructure, articulating health questions, executing search strategies, appraising evidence, and achieving consensus. Facilitation was described as a multi-faceted process, a team effort, and an essential ingredient for guideline adaptation. While front-line care providers implicitly identified implementation issues during adaptation, they identified a need to add an explicit implementation planning component. Conclusions Guideline adaptation is a positive initial step toward evidence-informed care, but adaptation (vs. ‘de novo’ development) did not meet expectations for reducing time or resource commitments. Undertaking adaptation is as much about the process (engagement and capacity building) as it

  3. Adaptive Patterns of Stress Responsivity: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giudice, Marco; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Ellis, Bruce J.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive calibration model (ACM) is an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in stress responsivity. In this article, we tested some key predictions of the ACM in a middle childhood sample (N = 256). Measures of autonomic nervous system activity across the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches validated the 4-pattern…

  4. Preparing Adapted Physical Educators to Teach Students with Autism: Current Practices and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Sean; Judge, Joann P.; Block, Martin E.; Kwon, Eun Hye

    2016-01-01

    For many students with autism spectrum disorder, physical education is the responsibility of an adapted physical education specialist. In this study, we examined the training focused on teaching students with autism spectrum disorder received by a sample of 106 adapted physical education specialists. Competencies necessary on a course to train…

  5. Solving delay differential equations in S-ADAPT by method of steps.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert J; Mo, Gary; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2013-09-01

    S-ADAPT is a version of the ADAPT program that contains additional simulation and optimization abilities such as parametric population analysis. S-ADAPT utilizes LSODA to solve ordinary differential equations (ODEs), an algorithm designed for large dimension non-stiff and stiff problems. However, S-ADAPT does not have a solver for delay differential equations (DDEs). Our objective was to implement in S-ADAPT a DDE solver using the methods of steps. The method of steps allows one to solve virtually any DDE system by transforming it to an ODE system. The solver was validated for scalar linear DDEs with one delay and bolus and infusion inputs for which explicit analytic solutions were derived. Solutions of nonlinear DDE problems coded in S-ADAPT were validated by comparing them with ones obtained by the MATLAB DDE solver dde23. The estimation of parameters was tested on the MATLB simulated population pharmacodynamics data. The comparison of S-ADAPT generated solutions for DDE problems with the explicit solutions as well as MATLAB produced solutions which agreed to at least 7 significant digits. The population parameter estimates from using importance sampling expectation-maximization in S-ADAPT agreed with ones used to generate the data. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Differences in intersaccadic adaptation transfer between inward and outward adaptation.

    PubMed

    Schnier, Fabian; Lappe, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Saccadic adaptation is a mechanism to increase or decrease the amplitude gain of subsequent saccades, if a saccade is not on target. Recent research has shown that the mechanism of gain increasing, or outward adaptation, and the mechanism of gain decreasing, or inward adaptation, rely on partly different processes. We investigate how outward and inward adaptation of reactive saccades transfer to other types of saccades, namely scanning, overlap, memory-guided, and gap saccades. Previous research has shown that inward adaptation of reactive saccades transfers only partially to these other saccade types, suggesting differences in the control mechanisms between these saccade categories. We show that outward adaptation transfers stronger to scanning and overlap saccades than inward adaptation, and that the strength of transfer depends on the duration for which the saccade target is visible before saccade onset. Furthermore, we show that this transfer is mainly driven by an increase in saccade duration, which is apparent for all saccade categories. Inward adaptation, in contrast, is accompanied by a decrease in duration and in peak velocity, but only the peak velocity decrease transfers from reactive saccades to other saccade categories, i.e., saccadic duration remains constant or even increases for test saccades of the other categories. Our results, therefore, show that duration and peak velocity are independent parameters of saccadic adaptation and that they are differently involved in the transfer of adaptation between saccade categories. Furthermore, our results add evidence that inward and outward adaptation are different processes.

  7. Adaptive EAGLE dynamic solution adaptation and grid quality enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luong, Phu Vinh; Thompson, J. F.; Gatlin, B.; Mastin, C. W.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the effort described here, the elliptic grid generation procedure in the EAGLE grid code was separated from the main code into a subroutine, and a new subroutine which evaluates several grid quality measures at each grid point was added. The elliptic grid routine can now be called, either by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to generate a new adaptive grid based on flow variables and quality measures through multiple adaptation, or by the EAGLE main code to generate a grid based on quality measure variables through static adaptation. Arrays of flow variables can be read into the EAGLE grid code for use in static adaptation as well. These major changes in the EAGLE adaptive grid system make it easier to convert any CFD code that operates on a block-structured grid (or single-block grid) into a multiple adaptive code.

  8. Adaptive steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramouli, Rajarathnam; Li, Grace; Memon, Nasir D.

    2002-04-01

    Steganalysis techniques attempt to differentiate between stego-objects and cover-objects. In recent work we developed an explicit analytic upper bound for the steganographic capacity of LSB based steganographic techniques for a given false probability of detection. In this paper we look at adaptive steganographic techniques. Adaptive steganographic techniques take explicit steps to escape detection. We explore different techniques that can be used to adapt message embedding to the image content or to a known steganalysis technique. We investigate the advantages of adaptive steganography within an analytical framework. We also give experimental results with a state-of-the-art steganalysis technique demonstrating that adaptive embedding results in a significant number of bits embedded without detection.

  9. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  10. Resilience through adaptation

    PubMed Central

    van Voorn, George A. K.; Ligtenberg, Arend; Molenaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of agents through learning or evolution is an important component of the resilience of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). Without adaptation, the flexibility of such systems to cope with outside pressures would be much lower. To study the capabilities of CAS to adapt, social simulations with agent-based models (ABMs) provide a helpful tool. However, the value of ABMs for studying adaptation depends on the availability of methodologies for sensitivity analysis that can quantify resilience and adaptation in ABMs. In this paper we propose a sensitivity analysis methodology that is based on comparing time-dependent probability density functions of output of ABMs with and without agent adaptation. The differences between the probability density functions are quantified by the so-called earth-mover’s distance. We use this sensitivity analysis methodology to quantify the probability of occurrence of critical transitions and other long-term effects of agent adaptation. To test the potential of this new approach, it is used to analyse the resilience of an ABM of adaptive agents competing for a common-pool resource. Adaptation is shown to contribute positively to the resilience of this ABM. If adaptation proceeds sufficiently fast, it may delay or avert the collapse of this system. PMID:28196372

  11. Resilience through adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ten Broeke, Guus A; van Voorn, George A K; Ligtenberg, Arend; Molenaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of agents through learning or evolution is an important component of the resilience of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). Without adaptation, the flexibility of such systems to cope with outside pressures would be much lower. To study the capabilities of CAS to adapt, social simulations with agent-based models (ABMs) provide a helpful tool. However, the value of ABMs for studying adaptation depends on the availability of methodologies for sensitivity analysis that can quantify resilience and adaptation in ABMs. In this paper we propose a sensitivity analysis methodology that is based on comparing time-dependent probability density functions of output of ABMs with and without agent adaptation. The differences between the probability density functions are quantified by the so-called earth-mover's distance. We use this sensitivity analysis methodology to quantify the probability of occurrence of critical transitions and other long-term effects of agent adaptation. To test the potential of this new approach, it is used to analyse the resilience of an ABM of adaptive agents competing for a common-pool resource. Adaptation is shown to contribute positively to the resilience of this ABM. If adaptation proceeds sufficiently fast, it may delay or avert the collapse of this system.

  12. Expressing Adaptation Strategies Using Adaptation Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemirline, N.; Bourda, Y.; Reynaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a real challenge to enable personalized access to information. Several systems have been proposed to address this challenge including Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs). However, the specification of adaptation strategies remains a difficult task for creators of such systems. In this paper, we consider the problem of the definition…

  13. Adaptive Controller Adaptation Time and Available Control Authority Effects on Piloting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna; Gregory, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive control is considered for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic of adverse conditions. This experiment looked at how adaptive controller adaptation time to recover nominal aircraft dynamics affects pilots and how pilots want information about available control authority transmitted. Results indicate that an adaptive controller that takes three seconds to adapt helped pilots when looking at lateral and longitudinal errors. The controllability ratings improved with the adaptive controller, again the most for the three seconds adaptation time while workload decreased with the adaptive controller. The effects of the displays showing the percentage amount of available safe flight envelope used in the maneuver were dominated by the adaptation time. With the displays, the altitude error increased, controllability slightly decreased, and mental demand increased. Therefore, the displays did require some of the subjects resources but these negatives may be outweighed by pilots having more situation awareness of their aircraft.

  14. Hybrid selection for sequencing pathogen genomes from clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We have adapted a solution hybrid selection protocol to enrich pathogen DNA in clinical samples dominated by human genetic material. Using mock mixtures of human and Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite DNA as well as clinical samples from infected patients, we demonstrate an average of approximately 40-fold enrichment of parasite DNA after hybrid selection. This approach will enable efficient genome sequencing of pathogens from clinical samples, as well as sequencing of endosymbiotic organisms such as Wolbachia that live inside diverse metazoan phyla. PMID:21835008

  15. Religious Involvement and Adaptation in Female Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Harold G; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F; Saxena, Salil; Cohen, Harvey Jay

    2016-03-01

    To examine the relationship between religious involvement (RI) and adaptation of women caring for family members with severe physical or neurological disability. Two-site cross-sectional study. Community. A convenience sample of 251 caregivers was recruited. RI and caregiver adaptation (assessed by perceived stress, caregiver burden, and depressive symptoms) were measured using standard scales, along with caregiver characteristics, social support, and health behaviors. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify relationships and mediating and moderating factors. Religious involvement (RI) was associated with better caregiver adaptation independent of age, race, education, caregiver health, care recipient's health, social support, and health behaviors (B = -0.09, standard error = 0.04, t = -2.08, P = .04). This association was strongest in caregivers aged 58-75 and spouses and for perceived stress in blacks. Religious involvement (RI) in female caregivers is associated with better caregiver adaptation, especially for those who are older, spouses of the care recipients, and blacks. These results are relevant to the development of future interventions that provide support to family caregivers. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Adaptation of Laser Microdissection Technique for the Study of a Spontaneous Metastatic Mammary Carcinoma Mouse Model by NanoString Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Karen L.; Anver, Miriam R.; Salomon, David S.; Golubeva, Yelena G.

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of tissue is an established tool in medical research for collection of distinguished cell populations under direct microscopic visualization for molecular analysis. LCM samples have been successfully analyzed in a number of genomic and proteomic downstream molecular applications. However, LCM sample collection and preparation procedure has to be adapted to each downstream analysis platform. In this present manuscript we describe in detail the adaptation of LCM methodology for the collection and preparation of fresh frozen samples for NanoString analysis based on a study of a model of mouse mammary gland carcinoma and its lung metastasis. Our adaptation of LCM sample preparation and workflow to the requirements of the NanoString platform allowed acquiring samples with high RNA quality. The NanoString analysis of such samples provided sensitive detection of genes of interest and their associated molecular pathways. NanoString is a reliable gene expression analysis platform that can be effectively coupled with LCM. PMID:27077656

  17. Physicochemical properties and interfacial adaptation of root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, Piedad S; Berástegui, Ester; Gaton-Hernández, Patrícia; Silva, Léa A B; Leite, Giselle A; Silva, Roberto S

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the physicochemical properties and interfacial adaptation to canal walls of Endo-CPM-Sealer, Sealapex and Activ GP with the well-established AH Plus sealer. The following analyses were performed: radiopacity, pH variation and solubility using samples of each material and scanning electron microscopy of root-filled bovine incisors to evaluate the interfacial adaptation. Data were analyzed by the parametric and no-parametric tests (α=0.05). All materials were in accordance with the ANSI/ADA requirements for radiopacity. Endo-CPM-Sealer presented the lowest radiopacity values and AH Plus was the most radiopaque sealer (p=0.0001). Except for ActiV GP, which was acidic, all other sealers had basic chemical nature and released hydroxyl ions. Regarding solubility, all materials met the ANSI/ADA recommendations, with no statistically significant difference between the sealers (p=0.0834). AH Plus presented the best adaptation to canal walls in the middle (p=0.0023) and apical (p=0.0012) thirds, while the sealers Activ GP and Endo-CPM-Sealer had poor adaptation to the canal walls. All sealers, except for ActiV GP, were alkaline and all of them fulfilled the ANSI/ADA requirements for radiopacity and solubility. Regarding the interfacial adaptation, AH Plus was superior to the others considering the adaptation to the bovine root canal walls.

  18. Online participation in climate change adaptation: A case study of agricultural adaptation measures in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, Dragana; Bonzanigo, Laura; Giupponi, Carlo; Maziotis, Alexandros

    2015-07-01

    The new EU strategy on adaptation to climate change suggests flexible and participatory approaches. Face-to-face contact, although it involves time-consuming procedures with a limited audience, has often been considered the most effective participatory approach. In recent years, however, there has been an increase in the visibility of different citizens' initiatives in the online world, which strengthens the possibility of greater citizen agency. This paper investigates whether the Internet can ensure efficient public participation with meaningful engagement in climate change adaptation. In elucidating issues regarding climate change adaptation, we developed an eParticipation framework to explore adaptation capacity of agriculture to climate change in Northern Italy. Farmers were mobilised using a pre-existing online network. First they took part in an online questionnaire for revealing their perceptions of and reactions to the impacts of ongoing changes in agriculture. We used these results to suggest a portfolio of policy measures and to set evaluation criteria. Farmers then evaluated these policy options, using a multi criteria analysis tool with a simple user-friendly interface. Our results showed that eParticipation is efficient: it supports a rapid data collection, while involving high number of participants. Moreover, we demonstrated that the digital divide is decreasingly an obstacle for using online spaces for public engagement. This research does not present eParticipation as a panacea. Rather, eParticipation was implemented with well-established participatory approaches to both validate the results and, consequently, communicate meaningful messages on local agricultural adaptation practices to regional decision-makers. Feedbacks from the regional decision-makers showed their interest in using eParticipation to improve communication with farmers in the future. We expect that, with further Internet proliferation, eParticipation may allow the inclusion of

  19. Scholarly Research on Educational Adaptation of Social Media: Is There Evidence of Publication Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The sizeable majority of research findings on educational adaptation of social media (SM) is based on college student samples. A cursory review of the extant literature on the educational use of SM appears to convey an uncritical spirit regarding adaptations of modern Web 2.0 technology. This article examines the issue of whether "publication…

  20. Predicting Career Adaptability through Self-Esteem and Social Support: A Research on Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ataç, Lale Oral; Dirik, Deniz; Tetik, Hilmiye Türesin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between career adaptability and self-esteem, and analyze the moderating role of social support in this relationship on a sample of 313 young adults. The results of the study confirm that career adaptability is significantly predicted by self-esteem. Moreover, findings suggest that (1)…

  1. Tracking a changing environment: optimal sampling, adaptive memory and overnight effects.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Aimee S; Stephens, David W

    2012-02-01

    Foraging in a variable environment presents a classic problem of decision making with incomplete information. Animals must track the changing environment, remember the best options and make choices accordingly. While several experimental studies have explored the idea that sampling behavior reflects the amount of environmental change, we take the next logical step in asking how change influences memory. We explore the hypothesis that memory length should be tied to the ecological relevance and the value of the information learned, and that environmental change is a key determinant of the value of memory. We use a dynamic programming model to confirm our predictions and then test memory length in a factorial experiment. In our experimental situation we manipulate rates of change in a simple foraging task for blue jays over a 36 h period. After jays experienced an experimentally determined change regime, we tested them at a range of retention intervals, from 1 to 72 h. Manipulated rates of change influenced learning and sampling rates: subjects sampled more and learned more quickly in the high change condition. Tests of retention revealed significant interactions between retention interval and the experienced rate of change. We observed a striking and surprising difference between the high and low change treatments at the 24h retention interval. In agreement with earlier work we find that a circadian retention interval is special, but we find that the extent of this 'specialness' depends on the subject's prior experience of environmental change. Specifically, experienced rates of change seem to influence how subjects balance recent information against past experience in a way that interacts with the passage of time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  3. System and Method for Isolation of Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye (Inventor); Wu, Honglu (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods for isolating samples are provided. The system comprises a first membrane and a second membrane disposed within an enclosure. First and second reservoirs can also be disposed within the enclosure and adapted to contain one or more reagents therein. A first valve can be disposed within the enclosure and in fluid communication with the first reservoir, the second reservoir, or both. The first valve can also be in fluid communication with the first or second membranes or both. The first valve can be adapted to selectively regulate the flow of the reagents from the first reservoir, through at least one of the first and second membranes, and into the second reservoir.

  4. Visual adaptation dominates bimodal visual-motor action adaptation

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Stephan; Ferstl, Ylva; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.

    2016-01-01

    A long standing debate revolves around the question whether visual action recognition primarily relies on visual or motor action information. Previous studies mainly examined the contribution of either visual or motor information to action recognition. Yet, the interaction of visual and motor action information is particularly important for understanding action recognition in social interactions, where humans often observe and execute actions at the same time. Here, we behaviourally examined the interaction of visual and motor action recognition processes when participants simultaneously observe and execute actions. We took advantage of behavioural action adaptation effects to investigate behavioural correlates of neural action recognition mechanisms. In line with previous results, we find that prolonged visual exposure (visual adaptation) and prolonged execution of the same action with closed eyes (non-visual motor adaptation) influence action recognition. However, when participants simultaneously adapted visually and motorically – akin to simultaneous execution and observation of actions in social interactions - adaptation effects were only modulated by visual but not motor adaptation. Action recognition, therefore, relies primarily on vision-based action recognition mechanisms in situations that require simultaneous action observation and execution, such as social interactions. The results suggest caution when associating social behaviour in social interactions with motor based information. PMID:27029781

  5. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Preschooler Sleep Patterns Related to Cognitive and Adaptive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe-Cooperman, Kathleen; Brady-Amoon, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Preschoolers' sleep patterns were examined related to cognitive and adaptive functioning. The sample consisted of 874 typically developing preschool children with a mean age of 40.01 months. Parent/caregiver reports of children's sleep pattern factors, Stanford-Binet 5 intelligence scale scores, and Behavior Assessment System…

  7. The role of career adaptability and courage on life satisfaction in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Ginevra, Maria Cristina; Magnano, Paola; Lodi, Ernesto; Annovazzi, Chiara; Camussi, Elisabetta; Patrizi, Patrizia; Nota, Laura

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to extend understanding about the relationship between career adaptability, courage, and life satisfaction in a sample of Italian adolescents. It was hypothesized that courage partially mediated the relationship between career adaptability and life satisfaction. Specifically, 1202 Italian high school students with an age from 14 to 20 years (M = 16.87; SD = 1.47), of which 600 (49.9%) boys and 602 (50.1%) girls, were involved. Using a multigroup approach across gender, it was found that courage partially mediated the relationship between career adaptability and life satisfaction in boys and girls. Results suggested the relevance of career interventions to promote career adaptability and courage for strengthening life satisfaction in adolescence. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sample preparation combined with electroanalysis to improve simultaneous determination of antibiotics in animal derived food samples.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Wesley Pereira; de Oliveira, Luiz Henrique; Santos, André Luiz Dos; Ferreira, Valdir Souza; Trindade, Magno Aparecido Gonçalves

    2018-06-01

    A procedure based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and phase separation using magnetically stirred salt-induced high-temperature liquid-liquid extraction (PS-MSSI-HT-LLE) was developed to extract and pre-concentrate ciprofloxacin (CIPRO) and enrofloxacin (ENRO) from animal food samples before electroanalysis. Firstly, simple LLE was used to extract the fluoroquinolones (FQs) from animal food samples, in which dilution was performed to reduce interference effects to below a tolerable threshold. Then, adapted PS-MSSI-HT-LLE protocols allowed re-extraction and further pre-concentration of target analytes in the diluted acid samples for simultaneous electrochemical quantification at low concentration levels. To improve the peak separation, in simultaneous detection, a baseline-corrected second-order derivative approach was processed. These approaches allowed quantification of target FQs from animal food samples spiked at levels of 0.80 to 2.00 µmol L -1 in chicken meat, with recovery values always higher than 80.5%, as well as in milk samples spiked at 4.00 µmol L -1 , with recovery values close to 70.0%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Phase Adaptation and Correction by Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiziani, Hans J.

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive optical elements and systems for imaging or laser beam propagation are used for some time in particular in astronomy, where the image quality is degraded by atmospheric turbulence. In astronomical telescopes a deformable mirror is frequently used to compensate wavefront-errors due to deformations of the large mirror, vibrations as well as turbulence and hence to increase the image quality. In the last few years interesting elements like Spatial Light Modulators, SLM's, such as photorefractive crystals, liquid crystals and micro mirrors and membrane mirrors were introduced. The development of liquid crystals and micro mirrors was driven by data projectors as consumer products. They contain typically a matrix of individually addressable pixels of liquid crystals and flip mirrors respectively or more recently piston mirrors for special applications. Pixel sizes are in the order of a few microns and therefore also appropriate as active diffractive elements in digital holography or miniature masks. Although liquid crystals are mainly optimized for intensity modulation; they can be used for phase modulation. Adaptive optics is a technology for beam shaping and wavefront adaptation. The application of spatial light modulators for wavefront adaptation and correction and defect analysis as well as sensing will be discussed. Dynamic digital holograms are generated with liquid crystal devices (LCD) and used for wavefront correction as well as for beam shaping and phase manipulation, for instance. Furthermore, adaptive optics is very useful to extend the measuring range of wavefront sensors and for the wavefront adaptation in order to measure and compare the shape of high precision aspherical surfaces.

  10. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file.

    PubMed

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-21

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases.

  11. Are adaptation costs necessary to build up a local adaptation pattern?

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Sara; Blanchet, Elodie; Egas, Martijn; Olivieri, Isabelle

    2009-08-03

    Ecological specialization is pervasive in phytophagous arthropods. In such specialization mode, limits to host range are imposed by trade-offs preventing adaptation to several hosts. The occurrence of such trade-offs is inferred by a pattern of local adaptation, i.e., a negative correlation between relative performance on different hosts. To establish a causal link between local adaptation and trade-offs, we performed experimental evolution of spider mites on cucumber, tomato and pepper, starting from a population adapted to cucumber. Spider mites adapted to each novel host within 15 generations and no further evolution was observed at generation 25. A pattern of local adaptation was found, as lines evolving on a novel host performed better on that host than lines evolving on other hosts. However, costs of adaptation were absent. Indeed, lines adapted to tomato had similar or higher performance on pepper than lines evolving on the ancestral host (which represent the initial performance of all lines) and the converse was also true, e.g. negatively correlated responses were not observed on the alternative novel host. Moreover, adapting to novel hosts did not result in decreased performance on the ancestral host. Adaptation did not modify host ranking, as all lines performed best on the ancestral host. Furthermore, mites from all lines preferred the ancestral to novel hosts. Mate choice experiments indicated that crosses between individuals from the same or from a different selection regime were equally likely, hence development of reproductive isolation among lines adapted to different hosts is unlikely. Therefore, performance and preference are not expected to impose limits to host range in our study species. Our results show that the evolution of a local adaptation pattern is not necessarily associated with the evolution of an adaptation cost.

  12. Human heat adaptation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S

    2014-01-01

    In this overview, human morphological and functional adaptations during naturally and artificially induced heat adaptation are explored. Through discussions of adaptation theory and practice, a theoretical basis is constructed for evaluating heat adaptation. It will be argued that some adaptations are specific to the treatment used, while others are generalized. Regarding ethnic differences in heat tolerance, the case is put that reported differences in heat tolerance are not due to natural selection, but can be explained on the basis of variations in adaptation opportunity. These concepts are expanded to illustrate how traditional heat adaptation and acclimatization represent forms of habituation, and thermal clamping (controlled hyperthermia) is proposed as a superior model for mechanistic research. Indeed, this technique has led to questioning the perceived wisdom of body-fluid changes, such as the expansion and subsequent decay of plasma volume, and sudomotor function, including sweat habituation and redistribution. Throughout, this contribution was aimed at taking another step toward understanding the phenomenon of heat adaptation and stimulating future research. In this regard, research questions are posed concerning the influence that variations in morphological configuration may exert upon adaptation, the determinants of postexercise plasma volume recovery, and the physiological mechanisms that modify the cholinergic sensitivity of sweat glands, and changes in basal metabolic rate and body core temperature following adaptation. © 2014 American Physiological Society.

  13. Behavior and adaptive functioning in adolescents with Down syndrome: specifying targets for intervention.

    PubMed

    Jacola, Lisa M; Hickey, Francis; Howe, Steven R; Esbensen, Anna; Shear, Paula K

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that adolescents with Down syndrome experience increased behavior problems as compared to age matched peers; however, few studies have examined how these problems relate to adaptive functioning. The primary aim of this study was to characterize behavior in a sample of adolescents with Down syndrome using two widely-used caregiver reports: the Behavioral Assessment System for Children, 2 nd Edition (BASC-2) and Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL). The clinical utility of the BASC-2 as a measure of behavior and adaptive functioning in adolescents with Down syndrome was also examined. Fifty-two adolescents with Down syndrome between the ages of 12 and 18 (24 males) completed the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, 4 th Edition (PPVT-IV) as an estimate of cognitive ability. Caregivers completed the BASC-2 and the CBCL for each participant. A significant proportion of the sample was reported to demonstrate behavior problems, particularly related to attention and social participation. The profile of adaptive function was variable, with caregivers most frequently rating impairment in skills related to activities of daily living and functional communication. Caregiver ratings did not differ by gender and were not related to age or estimated cognitive ability. Caregiver ratings of attention problems on the BASC-2 accounted for a significant proportion of variance in Activities of Daily Living ( Adj R 2 = 0.30) , Leadership ( Adj R 2 = 0.30) Functional Communication ( Adj R 2 = 0.28, Adaptability ( Adj R 2 = 0.29), and Social Skills ( Adj R 2 = 0.17). Higher frequencies of symptoms related to social withdrawal added incremental predictive validity for Functional Communication, Leadership, and Social Skills. Convergent validity between the CBCL and BASC-2 was poor when compared with expectations based on the normative sample. Our results confirm and extend previous findings by describing relationships between specific behavior problems and targeted areas of

  14. Behavior and adaptive functioning in adolescents with Down syndrome: specifying targets for intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jacola, Lisa M.; Hickey, Francis; Howe, Steven R.; Esbensen, Anna; Shear, Paula K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Research suggests that adolescents with Down syndrome experience increased behavior problems as compared to age matched peers; however, few studies have examined how these problems relate to adaptive functioning. The primary aim of this study was to characterize behavior in a sample of adolescents with Down syndrome using two widely-used caregiver reports: the Behavioral Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition (BASC-2) and Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL). The clinical utility of the BASC-2 as a measure of behavior and adaptive functioning in adolescents with Down syndrome was also examined. Methods Fifty-two adolescents with Down syndrome between the ages of 12 and 18 (24 males) completed the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, 4th Edition (PPVT-IV) as an estimate of cognitive ability. Caregivers completed the BASC-2 and the CBCL for each participant. Results A significant proportion of the sample was reported to demonstrate behavior problems, particularly related to attention and social participation. The profile of adaptive function was variable, with caregivers most frequently rating impairment in skills related to activities of daily living and functional communication. Caregiver ratings did not differ by gender and were not related to age or estimated cognitive ability. Caregiver ratings of attention problems on the BASC-2 accounted for a significant proportion of variance in Activities of Daily Living (Adj R2 = 0.30), Leadership (Adj R2 = 0.30) Functional Communication (Adj R2 = 0.28, Adaptability (Adj R2 = 0.29), and Social Skills (Adj R2 = 0.17). Higher frequencies of symptoms related to social withdrawal added incremental predictive validity for Functional Communication, Leadership, and Social Skills. Convergent validity between the CBCL and BASC-2 was poor when compared with expectations based on the normative sample. Conclusion Our results confirm and extend previous findings by describing relationships between specific behavior problems

  15. Impact of learning adaptability and time management disposition on study engagement among Chinese baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Ying; Liu, Yan-Hui; Yang, Ji-Peng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationships among study engagement, learning adaptability, and time management disposition in a sample of Chinese baccalaureate nursing students. A convenient sample of 467 baccalaureate nursing students was surveyed in two universities in Tianjin, China. Students completed a questionnaire that included their demographic information, Chinese Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student Questionnaire, Learning Adaptability Scale, and Adolescence Time Management Disposition Scale. One-way analysis of variance tests were used to assess the relationship between certain characteristics of baccalaureate nursing students. Pearson correlation was performed to test the correlation among study engagement, learning adaptability, and time management disposition. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of time management disposition. The results revealed that study engagement (F = 7.20, P < .01) and learning adaptability (F = 4.41, P < .01) differed across grade groups. Learning adaptability (r = 0.382, P < .01) and time management disposition (r = 0.741, P < .01) were positively related with study engagement. Time management disposition had a partially mediating effect on the relationship between study engagement and learning adaptability. The findings implicate that educators should not only promote interventions to increase engagement of baccalaureate nursing students but also focus on development, investment in adaptability, and time management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlejohn, Emily

    2018-01-01

    "Adaptation" originally began as a scientific term, but from 1860 to today it most often refers to an altered version of a text, film, or other literary source. When this term was first analyzed, humanities scholars often measured adaptations against their source texts, frequently privileging "original" texts. However, this…

  17. Population Education in Home Economics: Some Sample Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    Seven sample lessons on population and the family appear in this home economics teacher's manual. These activities have been adapted from materials produced in several countries in Asia and Oceania. A scope and sequence chart illustrates how teachers can integrate population-related issues into the home economics curriculum. Among the topics…

  18. Adaptive Neural Network-Based Event-Triggered Control of Single-Input Single-Output Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Avimanyu; Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel adaptive neural network (NN) control of single-input and single-output uncertain nonlinear discrete-time systems under event sampled NN inputs. In this control scheme, the feedback signals are transmitted, and the NN weights are tuned in an aperiodic manner at the event sampled instants. After reviewing the NN approximation property with event sampled inputs, an adaptive state estimator (SE), consisting of linearly parameterized NNs, is utilized to approximate the unknown system dynamics in an event sampled context. The SE is viewed as a model and its approximated dynamics and the state vector, during any two events, are utilized for the event-triggered controller design. An adaptive event-trigger condition is derived by using both the estimated NN weights and a dead-zone operator to determine the event sampling instants. This condition both facilitates the NN approximation and reduces the transmission of feedback signals. The ultimate boundedness of both the NN weight estimation error and the system state vector is demonstrated through the Lyapunov approach. As expected, during an initial online learning phase, events are observed more frequently. Over time with the convergence of the NN weights, the inter-event times increase, thereby lowering the number of triggered events. These claims are illustrated through the simulation results.

  19. Random Photon Absorption Model Elucidates How Early Gain Control in Fly Photoreceptors Arises from Quantal Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Yu; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Many diurnal photoreceptors encode vast real-world light changes effectively, but how this performance originates from photon sampling is unclear. A 4-module biophysically-realistic fly photoreceptor model, in which information capture is limited by the number of its sampling units (microvilli) and their photon-hit recovery time (refractoriness), can accurately simulate real recordings and their information content. However, sublinear summation in quantum bump production (quantum-gain-nonlinearity) may also cause adaptation by reducing the bump/photon gain when multiple photons hit the same microvillus simultaneously. Here, we use a Random Photon Absorption Model (RandPAM), which is the 1st module of the 4-module fly photoreceptor model, to quantify the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation. We show how quantum-gain-nonlinearity already results from photon sampling alone. In the extreme case, when two or more simultaneous photon-hits reduce to a single sublinear value, quantum-gain-nonlinearity is preset before the phototransduction reactions adapt the quantum bump waveform. However, the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation depends upon the likelihood of multi-photon-hits, which is strictly determined by the number of microvilli and light intensity. Specifically, its contribution to light-adaptation is marginal (≤ 1%) in fly photoreceptors with many thousands of microvilli, because the probability of simultaneous multi-photon-hits on any one microvillus is low even during daylight conditions. However, in cells with fewer sampling units, the impact of quantum-gain-nonlinearity increases with brightening light. PMID:27445779

  20. Integrating Climate Change Adaptation into Public Health Practice: Using Adaptive Management to Increase Adaptive Capacity and Build Resilience

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Julia Z.; Luber, George

    2011-01-01

    Background: Climate change is expected to have a range of health impacts, some of which are already apparent. Public health adaptation is imperative, but there has been little discussion of how to increase adaptive capacity and resilience in public health systems. Objectives: We explored possible explanations for the lack of work on adaptive capacity, outline climate–health challenges that may lie outside public health’s coping range, and consider changes in practice that could increase public health’s adaptive capacity. Methods: We conducted a substantive, interdisciplinary literature review focused on climate change adaptation in public health, social learning, and management of socioeconomic systems exhibiting dynamic complexity. Discussion: There are two competing views of how public health should engage climate change adaptation. Perspectives differ on whether climate change will primarily amplify existing hazards, requiring enhancement of existing public health functions, or present categorically distinct threats requiring innovative management strategies. In some contexts, distinctly climate-sensitive health threats may overwhelm public health’s adaptive capacity. Addressing these threats will require increased emphasis on institutional learning, innovative management strategies, and new and improved tools. Adaptive management, an iterative framework that embraces uncertainty, uses modeling, and integrates learning, may be a useful approach. We illustrate its application to extreme heat in an urban setting. Conclusions: Increasing public health capacity will be necessary for certain climate–health threats. Focusing efforts to increase adaptive capacity in specific areas, promoting institutional learning, embracing adaptive management, and developing tools to facilitate these processes are important priorities and can improve the resilience of local public health systems to climate change. PMID:21997387

  1. Computation of free energy profiles with parallel adaptive dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Tony; Rousset, Mathias; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2007-04-01

    We propose a formulation of an adaptive computation of free energy differences, in the adaptive biasing force or nonequilibrium metadynamics spirit, using conditional distributions of samples of configurations which evolve in time. This allows us to present a truly unifying framework for these methods, and to prove convergence results for certain classes of algorithms. From a numerical viewpoint, a parallel implementation of these methods is very natural, the replicas interacting through the reconstructed free energy. We demonstrate how to improve this parallel implementation by resorting to some selection mechanism on the replicas. This is illustrated by computations on a model system of conformational changes.

  2. Adapting Depression and Anxiety Questionnaire for Children into Turkish: Reliability and Validity Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ay, Ismail; Secer, Ismail; Simsek, Mustafa Kerim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to adapt anxiety and depression questionnaire for children into Turkish culture and to analyze the psychometric characteristics of it on clinical and nonclinical samples separately. The study is a descriptive survey research. The study was conducted on two different sample groups, clinical and nonclinical. The clinical…

  3. Improvement of near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) analysis of caffeine in roasted Arabica coffee by variable selection method of stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Wei; Yin, Bin; Chen, Weizhong; Kelly, Declan P.; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zheng, Kaiyi; Du, Yiping

    2013-10-01

    Coffee is the most heavily consumed beverage in the world after water, for which quality is a key consideration in commercial trade. Therefore, caffeine content which has a significant effect on the final quality of the coffee products requires to be determined fast and reliably by new analytical techniques. The main purpose of this work was to establish a powerful and practical analytical method based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and chemometrics for quantitative determination of caffeine content in roasted Arabica coffees. Ground coffee samples within a wide range of roasted levels were analyzed by NIR, meanwhile, in which the caffeine contents were quantitative determined by the most commonly used HPLC-UV method as the reference values. Then calibration models based on chemometric analyses of the NIR spectral data and reference concentrations of coffee samples were developed. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to construct the models. Furthermore, diverse spectra pretreatment and variable selection techniques were applied in order to obtain robust and reliable reduced-spectrum regression models. Comparing the respective quality of the different models constructed, the application of second derivative pretreatment and stability competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (SCARS) variable selection provided a notably improved regression model, with root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.375 mg/g and correlation coefficient (R) of 0.918 at PLS factor of 7. An independent test set was used to assess the model, with the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.378 mg/g, mean relative error of 1.976% and mean relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.707%. Thus, the results provided by the high-quality calibration model revealed the feasibility of NIR spectroscopy for at-line application to predict the caffeine content of unknown roasted coffee samples, thanks to the short analysis time of a few seconds and non

  4. Diversification and intensification of agricultural adaptation from global to local scales.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjie; Wichmann, Bruno; Luckert, Marty; Winowiecki, Leigh; Förch, Wiebke; Läderach, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Smallholder farming systems are vulnerable to a number of challenges, including continued population growth, urbanization, income disparities, land degradation, decreasing farm size and productivity, all of which are compounded by uncertainty of climatic patterns. Understanding determinants of smallholder farming practices is critical for designing and implementing successful interventions, including climate change adaptation programs. We examine two dimensions wherein smallholder farmers may adapt agricultural practices; through intensification (i.e., adopt more practices) or diversification (i.e. adopt different practices). We use data on 5314 randomly sampled households located in 38 sites in 15 countries across four regions (East and West Africa, South Asia, and Central America). We estimate empirical models designed to assess determinants of both intensification and diversification of adaptation activities at global scales. Aspects of adaptive capacity that are found to increase intensification of adaptation globally include variables associated with access to information and human capital, financial considerations, assets, household infrastructure and experience. In contrast, there are few global drivers of adaptive diversification, with a notable exception being access to weather information, which also increases adaptive intensification. Investigating reasons for adaptation indicate that conditions present in underdeveloped markets provide the primary impetus for adaptation, even in the context of climate change. We also compare determinants across spatial scales, which reveals a variety of local avenues through which policy interventions can relax economic constraints and boost agricultural adaptation for both intensification and diversification. For example, access to weather information does not affect intensification adaptation in Africa, but is significant at several sites in Bangladesh and India. Moreover, this information leads to diversification of

  5. Diversification and intensification of agricultural adaptation from global to local scales

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minjie; Wichmann, Bruno; Luckert, Marty; Winowiecki, Leigh; Förch, Wiebke

    2018-01-01

    Smallholder farming systems are vulnerable to a number of challenges, including continued population growth, urbanization, income disparities, land degradation, decreasing farm size and productivity, all of which are compounded by uncertainty of climatic patterns. Understanding determinants of smallholder farming practices is critical for designing and implementing successful interventions, including climate change adaptation programs. We examine two dimensions wherein smallholder farmers may adapt agricultural practices; through intensification (i.e., adopt more practices) or diversification (i.e. adopt different practices). We use data on 5314 randomly sampled households located in 38 sites in 15 countries across four regions (East and West Africa, South Asia, and Central America). We estimate empirical models designed to assess determinants of both intensification and diversification of adaptation activities at global scales. Aspects of adaptive capacity that are found to increase intensification of adaptation globally include variables associated with access to information and human capital, financial considerations, assets, household infrastructure and experience. In contrast, there are few global drivers of adaptive diversification, with a notable exception being access to weather information, which also increases adaptive intensification. Investigating reasons for adaptation indicate that conditions present in underdeveloped markets provide the primary impetus for adaptation, even in the context of climate change. We also compare determinants across spatial scales, which reveals a variety of local avenues through which policy interventions can relax economic constraints and boost agricultural adaptation for both intensification and diversification. For example, access to weather information does not affect intensification adaptation in Africa, but is significant at several sites in Bangladesh and India. Moreover, this information leads to diversification of

  6. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    PubMed

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Returning Samples from Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Kanik, I.; Brownlee, D.; McKay, C.; Anbar, A.; Glavin, D.; Yano, H.

    2012-12-01

    From the first half century of space exploration, we have obtained samples only from the Moon, comet Wild 2, the Solar Wind and the asteroid Itokawa. The in-depth analyses of these samples in terrestrial laboratories have yielded profound knowledge that could not have been obtained without the returned samples. While obtaining samples from Solar System bodies is crucial science, it is rarely done due to cost and complexity. Cassini's discovery of geysers on Enceladus and organic materials, indicate that there is an exceptional opportunity and science rational to do a low-cost flyby sample return mission, similar to what was done by the Stardust. The earliest low cost possible flight opportunity is the next Discovery Mission [Tsou et al 2012]. Enceladus Plume Discovery - While Voyager provided evidence for young surfaces on Enceladus, the existence of Enceladus plumes was discovered by Cassini. Enceladus and comets are the only known solar system bodies that have jets enabling sample collection without landing or surface contact. Cassini in situ Findings -Cassini's made many discoveries at Saturn, including the break up of large organics in the plumes of Enceladus. Four prime criteria for habitability are liquid water, a heat source, organics and nitrogen [McKay et al. 2008, Waite et al. 2009, Postberg et al. 2011]. Out of all the NASA designated habitability targets, Enceladus is the single body that presents evidence for all four criteria. Significant advancement in the exploration of the biological potential of Enceladus can be made on returned samples in terrestrial laboratories where the full power of state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation and procedures can be used. Without serious limits on power, mass or even cost, terrestrial laboratories provide the ultimate in analytical capability, adaptability, reproducibility and reliability. What Questions can Samples Address? - Samples collected from the Enceladus plume will enable a thorough and replicated

  8. Effects of cognitive control training on the dynamics of (mal)adaptive emotion regulation in daily life.

    PubMed

    Hoorelbeke, Kristof; Koster, Ernst H W; Demeyer, Ineke; Loeys, Tom; Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive control plays a key role in both adaptive emotion regulation, such as positive reappraisal, and maladaptive emotion regulation, such as rumination, with both strategies playing a major role in resilience and well-being. As a result, cognitive control training (CCT) targeting working memory functioning may have the potential to reduce maladaptive emotion regulation and increase adaptive emotion regulation. The current study explored the effects of CCT on positive reappraisal ability in a lab context, and deployment and efficacy of positive appraisal and rumination in daily life. A sample of undergraduates (n = 83) was allocated to CCT or an active control condition, performing 10 online training sessions over a period of 14 days. Effects on regulation of affective states in daily life were assessed using experience sampling over a 7-day posttraining period. Results revealed a positive association between baseline cognitive control and self-reported use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies, whereas maladaptive emotion regulation strategies showed a negative association. CCT showed transfer to working memory functioning on the dual n-back task. Overall, effects of CCT on emotion regulation were limited to reducing deployment of rumination in low positive affective states. However, we did not find beneficial effects on indicators of adaptive emotion regulation. These findings are in line with previous studies targeting maladaptive emotion regulation but suggest limited use in enhancing adaptive emotion regulation in a healthy sample. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Dim light adaptation attenuates acute melatonin suppression in humans.

    PubMed

    Jasser, Samar A; Hanifin, John P; Rollag, Mark D; Brainard, George C

    2006-10-01

    Abstract Studies in rodents with retinal degeneration indicated that neither the rod nor the cone photoreceptors obligatorily participate in circadian responses to light, including melatonin suppression and photoperiodic response. Yet there is a residual phase-shifting response in melanopsin knockout mice, which suggests an alternate or redundant means for light input to the SCN of the hypothalamus. The findings of Aggelopoulos and Meissl suggest a complex, dynamic interrelationship between the classic visual photoreceptors and SCN cell sensitivity to light stimuli, relative to various adaptive lighting conditions. These studies raised the possibility that the phototransductive physiology of the retinohypothalamic tract in humans might be modulated by the visual rod and cone photoreceptors. The aim of the following two-part study was to test the hypothesis that dim light adaptation will dampen the subsequent suppression of melatonin by monochromatic light in healthy human subjects. Each experiment included 5 female and 3 male human subjects between the ages of 18 and 30 years, with normal color vision. Dim white light and darkness adaptation exposures occurred between midnight and 0200 h, and a full-field 460-nm light exposure subsequently occurred between 0200 and 0330-h for each adaptation condition, at 2 different intensities. Plasma samples were drawn following the 2-h adaptation, as well as after the 460-nm monochromatic light exposure, and melatonin was measured by radioimmunoassay. Comparison of melatonin suppression responses to monochromatic light in both studies revealed a loss of significant suppression after dim white light adaptation compared with dark adaptation (p < 0.04 and p < 0.01). These findings indicate that the activity of the novel circadian photoreceptive system in humans is subject to subthreshold modulation of its sensitivity to subsequent monochromatic light exposure, varying with the conditions of light adaptation prior to exposure.

  10. ADAPT

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Reynolds, John; Jankovsky, Zachary; Metzroth, Kyle G

    2018-04-04

    The purpose of the ADAPT code is to generate Dynamic Event Trees (DET) using a user specified set of simulators. ADAPT can utilize any simulation tool which meets a minimal set of requirements. ADAPT is based on the concept of DET which uses explicit modeling of the deterministic dynamic processes that take place during a nuclear reactor plant system (or other complex system) evolution along with stochastic modeling. When DET are used to model various aspects of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), all accident progression scenarios starting from an initiating event are considered simultaneously. The DET branching occurs at user specifiedmore » times and/or when an action is required by the system and/or the operator. These outcomes then decide how the dynamic system variables will evolve in time for each DET branch. Since two different outcomes at a DET branching may lead to completely different paths for system evolution, the next branching for these paths may occur not only at separate times, but can be based on different branching criteria. The computational infrastructure allows for flexibility in ADAPT to link with different system simulation codes, parallel processing of the scenarios under consideration, on-line scenario management (initiation as well as termination), analysis of results, and user friendly graphical capabilities. The ADAPT system is designed for a distributed computing environment; the scheduler can track multiple concurrent branches simultaneously. The scheduler is modularized so that the DET branching strategy can be modified (e.g. biasing towards the worst-case scenario/event). Independent database systems store data from the simulation tasks and the DET structure so that the event tree can be constructed and analyzed later. ADAPT is provided with a user-friendly client which can easily sort through and display the results of an experiment, precluding the need for the user to manually inspect individual simulator runs.« less

  11. Evolution of the Marginal Ice Zone: Adaptive Sampling with Autonomous Gliders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    kinetic energy (ε). Gliders also sampled dissolved oxygen, optical backscatter ( chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence) and multi-spectral downwelling...Fig. 2). In the pack, Pacific Summer Water and a deep chlorophyll maximum form distinct layers at roughly 60 m and 80 m, respectively, which become...Sections across the ice edge just prior to recovery, during freeze-up, reveal elevated chlorophyll fluorescence throughout the mixed layer (Fig. 4

  12. DARK ADAPTATION IN DINEUTES

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Leonard B.

    1938-01-01

    The level of dark adaptation of the whirligig beetle can be measured in terms of the threshold intensity calling forth a response. The course of dark adaptation was determined at levels of light adaptation of 6.5, 91.6, and 6100 foot-candles. All data can be fitted by the same curve. This indicates that dark adaptation follows parts of the same course irrespective of the level of light adaptation. The intensity of the adapting light determines the level at which dark adaptation will begin. The relation between log aI 0 (instantaneous threshold) and log of adapting light intensity is linear over the range studied. PMID:19873056

  13. Astrobiology Objectives for Mars Sample Return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. A.

    2002-05-01

    Astrobiology is the study of life in the Universe, and a major objective is to understand the past, present, and future biologic potential of Mars. The current Mars Exploration Program encompasses a series of missions for reconnaissance and in-situ analyses to define in time and space the degree of habitability on Mars. Determining whether life ever existed on Mars is a more demanding question as evidenced by controversies concerning the biogenicity of features in the Mars meteorite ALH84001 and in the earliest rocks on Earth. In-situ studies may find samples of extreme interest but resolution of the life question most probably would require a sample returned to Earth. A selected sample from Mars has the many advantages: State-of-the-art instruments, precision sample handling and processing, scrutiny by different investigators employing different techniques, and adaptation of approach to any surprises It is with a returned sample from Mars that Astrobiology has the most to gain in determining whether life did, does, or could exist on Mars.

  14. A Remote Sensing Image Fusion Method based on adaptive dictionary learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tongdi; Che, Zongxi

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses using a remote sensing fusion method, based on' adaptive sparse representation (ASP)', to provide improved spectral information, reduce data redundancy and decrease system complexity. First, the training sample set is formed by taking random blocks from the images to be fused, the dictionary is then constructed using the training samples, and the remaining terms are clustered to obtain the complete dictionary by iterated processing at each step. Second, the self-adaptive weighted coefficient rule of regional energy is used to select the feature fusion coefficients and complete the reconstruction of the image blocks. Finally, the reconstructed image blocks are rearranged and an average is taken to obtain the final fused images. Experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to other traditional remote sensing image fusion methods in both spectral information preservation and spatial resolution.

  15. [A comparison of maternal psychosocial adaptation among pregnant women with different gravidity].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Ting; Chou, Fan-Hao

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine women's psychosocial adaptation during different trimesters of pregnancy and to compare maternal psychosocial adaptation between primigravida and multigravida. A cross-sectional and comparative research design was conducted. A convenience sample consisting of 717 pregnant women who made a prenatal clinical visit in southern Taiwan were recruited for this study. The sample included 369 primigravida and 348 multigravida. A Demographic Inventory and the Chinese version of the Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire (PSEQ) were used to collect data. Results found that (1) the subscale "relationship with husband" for multigravida showed statistically significant differences between the three trimesters, with scores for the third trimester higher than those for the first. Also, multigravida had poorer adaptation on "relationship with husband" in the third trimester than in the first; (2) Analysis of covariance was used to adjust for age, marital status and planned pregnancy, as the distribution of such variables was significantly different between primigravida and multigravida. Results showed significant differences between the two sample groups in terms of PSEQ total scores and scores for "concern for well-being of self and baby," "preparation for labor," and "fear of helplessness, and loss of control in labor." This indicates that primigravida had poorer maternal psychosocial adaptation than multigravida and worried more about "concern for well-being of self and baby," "preparation for labor," and "fear of helplessness, and loss of control in labor." The findings of this study provide evidence-based data to help nursing professionals provide more suitable nursing care to pregnant women. Nurses should assess pregnant women's psychosocial adaptation during their prenatal visiting and then assist them to better understand the process of childbirth and enhance their level of control during labor. In addition, nurses should appraise

  16. Digital gene expression analysis with sample multiplexing and PCR duplicate detection: A straightforward protocol.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, Andrey; Leese, Florian; Weiss, Linda C; Tollrian, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Tag-Seq is a high-throughput approach used for discovering SNPs and characterizing gene expression. In comparison to RNA-Seq, Tag-Seq eases data processing and allows detection of rare mRNA species using only one tag per transcript molecule. However, reduced library complexity raises the issue of PCR duplicates, which distort gene expression levels. Here we present a novel Tag-Seq protocol that uses the least biased methods for RNA library preparation combined with a novel approach for joint PCR template and sample labeling. In our protocol, input RNA is fragmented by hydrolysis, and poly(A)-bearing RNAs are selected and directly ligated to mixed DNA-RNA P5 adapters. The P5 adapters contain i5 barcodes composed of sample-specific (moderately) degenerate base regions (mDBRs), which later allow detection of PCR duplicates. The P7 adapter is attached via reverse transcription with individual i7 barcodes added during the amplification step. The resulting libraries can be sequenced on an Illumina sequencer. After sample demultiplexing and PCR duplicate removal with a free software tool we designed, the data are ready for downstream analysis. Our protocol was tested on RNA samples from predator-induced and control Daphnia microcrustaceans.

  17. Driver's behavioral adaptation to adaptive cruise control (ACC): the case of speed and time headway.

    PubMed

    Bianchi Piccinini, Giulio Francesco; Rodrigues, Carlos Manuel; Leitão, Miguel; Simões, Anabela

    2014-06-01

    The Adaptive Cruise Control is an Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) that allows maintaining given headway and speed, according to settings pre-defined by the users. Despite the potential benefits associated to the utilization of ACC, previous studies warned against negative behavioral adaptations that might occur while driving with the system activated. Unfortunately, up to now, there are no unanimous results about the effects induced by the usage of ACC on speed and time headway to the vehicle in front. Also, few studies were performed including actual users of ACC among the subjects. This research aimed to investigate the effect of the experience gained with ACC on speed and time headway for a group of users of the system. In addition, it explored the impact of ACC usage on speed and time headway for ACC users and regular drivers. A matched sample driving simulator study was planned as a two-way (2×2) repeated measures mixed design, with the experience with ACC as between-subjects factor and the driving condition (with ACC and manually) as within-subjects factor. The results show that the usage of ACC brought a small but not significant reduction of speed and, especially, the maintenance of safer time headways, being the latter result greater for ACC users, probably as a consequence of their experience in using the system. The usage of ACC did not cause any negative behavioral adaptations to the system regarding speed and time headway. Based on this research work, the Adaptive Cruise Control showed the potential to improve road safety for what concerns the speed and the time headway maintained by the drivers. The speed of the surrounding traffic and the minimum time headway settable through the ACC seem to have an important effect on the road safety improvement achievable with the system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Problems in the process of adapting to change among the family caregivers of elderly people with dementia].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cámara, Sara; Palomino-Moral, Pedro Ángel; Moral-Fernández, Lourdes; Frías-Osuna, Antonio; Del-Pino-Casado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    To identify and analyse problems in adapting to change among the family caregivers of relatives with dementia. Qualitative study based on the methodology of Charmaz's Constructivist Grounded Theory. Seven focus groups were conducted in different primary health care centres in the province of Jaen (Spain). Eighty-two primary family caregivers of relatives with dementia participated by purposeful maximum variation sampling and theoretical sampling. Triangulation analysis was carried out to increase internal validity. We obtained three main categories: 'Changing Care', 'Problems in the process of adapting to change' and 'Facilitators of the process of adapting to change'. Family caregivers perform their role in a context characterized by personal change, both in the person receiving the care and in the social and cultural context. The challenge of adaptation lies in the balance between the problems that hamper adaptation of the caregiver to new situations of care and the factors that facilitate the caregiver role. The adaptation of family caregivers to caring for a person with dementia is hindered by the lack of formal support and under-diagnosis of dementia. The adaptation process could be improved by strengthening formal support in the early stages of care to reduce the stress of family caregivers who must teach themselves about their task and by interventions adapted to each phase in the development of the caregiver role. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. On the role of dimensionality and sample size for unstructured and structured covariance matrix estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgera, S. D.; Cooper, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental observation that a surprisingly small sample size vis-a-vis dimension is needed to achieve good signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) performance with an adaptive predetection filter is explained. The adaptive filter requires estimates as obtained by a recursive stochastic algorithm of the inverse of the filter input data covariance matrix. The SIR performance with sample size is compared for the situations where the covariance matrix estimates are of unstructured (generalized) form and of structured (finite Toeplitz) form; the latter case is consistent with weak stationarity of the input data stochastic process.

  20. Adaptive Decentralized Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    and implementation of the decentralized controllers. It raises, however, many difficult questions regarding the conditions under which such a scheme ...adaptive controller, and a general form of the model reference adaptive controller (4]. We believe that this work represents a significant advance in the...Comparing the adaptive system with the tuned system results in the development of a generic adaptive error system. Passivity theory was used to derive

  1. Estimating Skin Cancer Risk: Evaluating Mobile Computer-Adaptive Testing.

    PubMed

    Djaja, Ngadiman; Janda, Monika; Olsen, Catherine M; Whiteman, David C; Chien, Tsair-Wei

    2016-01-22

    Response burden is a major detriment to questionnaire completion rates. Computer adaptive testing may offer advantages over non-adaptive testing, including reduction of numbers of items required for precise measurement. Our aim was to compare the efficiency of non-adaptive (NAT) and computer adaptive testing (CAT) facilitated by Partial Credit Model (PCM)-derived calibration to estimate skin cancer risk. We used a random sample from a population-based Australian cohort study of skin cancer risk (N=43,794). All 30 items of the skin cancer risk scale were calibrated with the Rasch PCM. A total of 1000 cases generated following a normal distribution (mean [SD] 0 [1]) were simulated using three Rasch models with three fixed-item (dichotomous, rating scale, and partial credit) scenarios, respectively. We calculated the comparative efficiency and precision of CAT and NAT (shortening of questionnaire length and the count difference number ratio less than 5% using independent t tests). We found that use of CAT led to smaller person standard error of the estimated measure than NAT, with substantially higher efficiency but no loss of precision, reducing response burden by 48%, 66%, and 66% for dichotomous, Rating Scale Model, and PCM models, respectively. CAT-based administrations of the skin cancer risk scale could substantially reduce participant burden without compromising measurement precision. A mobile computer adaptive test was developed to help people efficiently assess their skin cancer risk.

  2. Using lot quality-assurance sampling and area sampling to identify priority areas for trachoma control: Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Myatt, Mark; Mai, Nguyen Phuong; Quynh, Nguyen Quang; Nga, Nguyen Huy; Tai, Ha Huy; Long, Nguyen Hung; Minh, Tran Hung; Limburg, Hans

    2005-10-01

    To report on the use of lot quality-assurance sampling (LQAS) surveys undertaken within an area-sampling framework to identify priority areas for intervention with trachoma control activities in Viet Nam. The LQAS survey method for the rapid assessment of the prevalence of active trachoma was adapted for use in Viet Nam with the aim of classifying individual communes by the prevalence of active trachoma among children in primary school. School-based sampling was used; school sites to be sampled were selected using an area-sampling approach. A total of 719 communes in 41 districts in 18 provinces were surveyed. Survey staff found the LQAS survey method both simple and rapid to use after initial problems with area-sampling methods were identified and remedied. The method yielded a finer spatial resolution of prevalence than had been previously achieved in Viet Nam using semiquantitative rapid assessment surveys and multistage cluster-sampled surveys. When used with area-sampling techniques, the LQAS survey method has the potential to form the basis of survey instruments that can be used to efficiently target resources for interventions against active trachoma. With additional work, such methods could provide a generally applicable tool for effective programme planning and for the certification of the elimination of trachoma as a blinding disease.

  3. Integration and Evaluation of Microscope Adapter for the Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Dryden, S. D.; Blaney, D. L.; Van Gorp, B.; Mouroulis, P.; Green, R. O.; Sellar, R. G.; Rodriguez, J.; Wilson, D.

    2012-12-01

    Petrologic, diagenetic, impact and weathering processes often happen at scales that are not observable from orbit. On Earth, one of the most common things that a scientist does when trying to understand detailed geologic history is to create a thin section of the rock and study the mineralogy and texture. Unfortunately, sample preparation and manipulation with advanced instrumentation may be a resource intensive proposition (e.g. time, power, complexity) in-situ. Getting detailed mineralogy and textural information without sample preparation is highly desirable. Visible to short wavelength microimaging spectroscopy has the potential to provide this information without sample preparation. Wavelengths between 500-2600 nm are sensitive to a wide range of minerals including mafic, carbonates, clays, and sulfates. The Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) has been developed as a low mass (<2.0 kg), low power (~5.2 W) Offner spectrometer, ideal for use on Mars rover or other in-situ platforms. The UCIS instrument with its HgCdTe detector provides a spectral resolution of 10 nm with a range of 500-2600 nm, in addition to a 30 degree field of view and a 1.35 mrad instantaneous field of view. (Van Gorp et al. 2011). To explore applications of this technology for microscale investigations, an f/10 microimaging adapter has been designed and integrated to allow imaging of samples. The spatial coverage of the instrument is 2.56 cm with sampling of 67.5 microns (380 spatial pixels). Because the adapter is slow relative to the UCIS detector, strong sample illumination is required. Light from the lamp box was directed through optical fiber bundles, and directed onto the sample at a high angle of incidence to provide dark field imaging. For data collection, a mineral sample is mounted on the microscope adapter and scanned by the detector as it is moved horizontally via actuator. Data from the instrument is stored as a xyz cube end product with one spectral and two spatial

  4. The Emotions of Socialization-Related Learning: Understanding Workplace Adaptation as a Learning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    The influence of selected discrete emotions on socialization-related learning and perception of workplace adaptation was examined in an exploratory study. Data were collected from 233 service workers in 4 small and medium-sized companies in metropolitan Washington, D.C. The sample members' average age was 32.5 years, and the sample's racial makeup…

  5. Adaptive local linear regression with application to printer color management.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Maya R; Garcia, Eric K; Chin, Erika

    2008-06-01

    Local learning methods, such as local linear regression and nearest neighbor classifiers, base estimates on nearby training samples, neighbors. Usually, the number of neighbors used in estimation is fixed to be a global "optimal" value, chosen by cross validation. This paper proposes adapting the number of neighbors used for estimation to the local geometry of the data, without need for cross validation. The term enclosing neighborhood is introduced to describe a set of neighbors whose convex hull contains the test point when possible. It is proven that enclosing neighborhoods yield bounded estimation variance under some assumptions. Three such enclosing neighborhood definitions are presented: natural neighbors, natural neighbors inclusive, and enclosing k-NN. The effectiveness of these neighborhood definitions with local linear regression is tested for estimating lookup tables for color management. Significant improvements in error metrics are shown, indicating that enclosing neighborhoods may be a promising adaptive neighborhood definition for other local learning tasks as well, depending on the density of training samples.

  6. Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change in Large Cities: A Global Baseline.

    PubMed

    Araos, Malcolm; Austin, Stephanie E; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Ford, James D

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will have significant impacts on human health, and urban populations are expected to be highly sensitive. The health risks from climate change in cities are compounded by rapid urbanization, high population density, and climate-sensitive built environments. Local governments are positioned to protect populations from climate health risks, but it is unclear whether municipalities are producing climate-adaptive policies. In this article, we develop and apply systematic methods to assess the state of public health adaptation in 401 urban areas globally with more than 1 million people, creating the first global baseline for urban public health adaptation. We find that only 10% of the sampled urban areas report any public health adaptation initiatives. The initiatives identified most frequently address risks posed by extreme weather events and involve direct changes in management or behavior rather than capacity building, research, or long-term investments in infrastructure. Based on our characterization of the current urban health adaptation landscape, we identify several gaps: limited evidence of reporting of institutional adaptation at the municipal level in urban areas in the Global South; lack of information-based adaptation initiatives; limited focus on initiatives addressing infectious disease risks; and absence of monitoring, reporting, and evaluation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. [Validation of the Questionnaire of Emotional Maladjustment and Adaptive Resources in Infertility (DERA)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Rosset, Carmen; Antequera Jurado, Rosario; Jenaro Río, Cristina

    2009-02-01

    Validation of the Questionnaire of Emotional Maladjustment and Adaptive Resources in Infertility (DERA). Given the absence of measures to help psychologists working with infertile couples, this paper presents the process of developing a standardized measure to assess emotional maladjustment and adaptive resources in this population. A cross-sectional design was utilized to gather data from the assisted reproduction units of two public hospitals. Preliminary analyses were performed with a sample of 85 infertile patients. Psychometric properties of the measure were tested with a second sample of 490 infertile patients. Concerning reliability analyses, alpha indexes were adequate both for the measure and its factors. Concerning validity, second-order factor analysis yielded a four-factor solution that conjointly explains 56% of the total variance. Additional analyses with a third sample of 50 participants from the general population matched with a sample of 50 infertile participants were performed. In sum, this measure seems to be a useful psychological assessment tool to determine emotional adjustment, and individual, and interpersonal resources, for coping with infertility diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Differential sampling for fast frequency acquisition via adaptive extended least squares algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a differential signal model along with appropriate sampling techinques for least squares estimation of the frequency and frequency derivatives and possibly the phase and amplitude of a sinusoid received in the presence of noise. The proposed algorithm is recursive in mesurements and thus the computational requirement increases only linearly with the number of measurements. The dimension of the state vector in the proposed algorithm does not depend upon the number of measurements and is quite small, typically around four. This is an advantage when compared to previous algorithms wherein the dimension of the state vector increases monotonically with the product of the frequency uncertainty and the observation period. Such a computational simplification may possibly result in some loss of optimality. However, by applying the sampling techniques of the paper such a possible loss in optimality can made small.

  9. Cultural Adaptation, Parenting and Child Mental Health Among English Speaking Asian American Immigrant Families.

    PubMed

    Huang, Keng-Yen; Calzada, Esther; Cheng, Sabrina; Barajas-Gonzalez, R Gabriela; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2017-08-01

    Contrary to the "model minority" myth, Asian American children, especially those from low-income immigrant families, are at risk for both behavioral and emotional problems early in life. Little is known, however, about the underlying developmental mechanisms placing Asian American children at risk, including the role of cultural adaptation and parenting. This study examined cultural adaptation, parenting practices and culture related parenting values and child mental health in a sample of 157 English speaking Asian American immigrant families of children enrolled in early childhood education programs in low-income, urban neighborhoods. Overall, cultural adaptation and parenting cultural values and behaviors were related to aspects of child mental health in meaningful ways. Parents' cultural value of independence appears to be especially salient (e.g., negatively related to behavior problems and positively related to adaptive behavior) and significantly mediates the link between cultural adaptation and adaptive behavior. Study findings have implications for supporting Asian American immigrant families to promote their young children's mental health.

  10. Signatures of selection for environmental adaptation and zebu × taurine hybrid fitness in East African shorthorn zebu

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) cattle are ancient hybrid between Asian zebu × African taurine cattle preferred by local farmers due to their adaptability to the African environment. The genetic controls of these adaptabilities are not clearly understood yet. Here, we genotyped 92 EASZ sample...

  11. Non-adaptive plasticity potentiates rapid adaptive evolution of gene expression in nature.

    PubMed

    Ghalambor, Cameron K; Hoke, Kim L; Ruell, Emily W; Fischer, Eva K; Reznick, David N; Hughes, Kimberly A

    2015-09-17

    Phenotypic plasticity is the capacity for an individual genotype to produce different phenotypes in response to environmental variation. Most traits are plastic, but the degree to which plasticity is adaptive or non-adaptive depends on whether environmentally induced phenotypes are closer or further away from the local optimum. Existing theories make conflicting predictions about whether plasticity constrains or facilitates adaptive evolution. Debate persists because few empirical studies have tested the relationship between initial plasticity and subsequent adaptive evolution in natural populations. Here we show that the direction of plasticity in gene expression is generally opposite to the direction of adaptive evolution. We experimentally transplanted Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) adapted to living with cichlid predators to cichlid-free streams, and tested for evolutionary divergence in brain gene expression patterns after three to four generations. We find 135 transcripts that evolved parallel changes in expression within the replicated introduction populations. These changes are in the same direction exhibited in a native cichlid-free population, suggesting rapid adaptive evolution. We find 89% of these transcripts exhibited non-adaptive plastic changes in expression when the source population was reared in the absence of predators, as they are in the opposite direction to the evolved changes. By contrast, the remaining transcripts exhibiting adaptive plasticity show reduced population divergence. Furthermore, the most plastic transcripts in the source population evolved reduced plasticity in the introduction populations, suggesting strong selection against non-adaptive plasticity. These results support models predicting that adaptive plasticity constrains evolution, whereas non-adaptive plasticity potentiates evolution by increasing the strength of directional selection. The role of non-adaptive plasticity in evolution has received relatively

  12. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Matos; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed. PMID:24068269

  13. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata Matos da; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed.

  14. [Effects of family cohesion and adaptability on behavioral problems in preschool children].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Ni; Xue, Hong-Li; Chen, Qian

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the effects of family cohesion and adaptability on behavioral problems in preschool children. The stratified cluster multistage sampling method was used to perform a questionnaire survey in the parents of 1 284 children aged 3-6 years in the urban area of Lanzhou, China. The general status questionnaire, Conners Child Behavior Checklist (Parent Symptom Question), and Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale, Second edition, Chinese version (FACESII-CV) were used to investigate behavioral problems and family cohesion and adaptability. The overall detection rate of behavioral problems in preschool children was 17.13%. The children with different types of family cohesion had different detection rates of behavioral problems, and those with free-type family cohesion showed the highest detection rate of behavioral problems (40.2%). The children with different types of family adaptability also had different detection rates of behavioral problems, and those with stiffness type showed the highest detection rate of behavioral problems (25.1%). The behavioral problems in preschool children were negatively correlated with family cohesion and adaptability. During the growth of preschool children, family cohesion and adaptability have certain effects on the mental development of preschool children.

  15. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of In situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    We are developing an integrated rapid environmental assessment capability that will be used to feed an ocean nowcast/forecast system. The goal is to develop a capacity for predicting the dynamics in inherent optical properties in coastal waters. This is being accomplished by developing an integrated observation system that is being coupled to a data assimilative hydrodynamic bio-optical ecosystem model. The system was used adaptively to calibrate hyperspectral remote sensing sensors in optically complex nearshore coastal waters.

  16. Contrast Adaptation Implies Two Spatiotemporal Channels but Three Adapting Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, Keith; Bex, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    The contrast gain control model of adaptation predicts that the effects of contrast adaptation correlate with contrast sensitivity. This article reports that the effects of high contrast spatiotemporal adaptors are maximum when adapting around 19 Hz, which is a factor of two or more greater than the peak in contrast sensitivity. To explain the…

  17. State-space self-tuner for on-line adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic systems, such as flight vehicles, satellites and space stations, operating in real environments, constantly face parameter and/or structural variations owing to nonlinear behavior of actuators, failure of sensors, changes in operating conditions, disturbances acting on the system, etc. In the past three decades, adaptive control has been shown to be effective in dealing with dynamic systems in the presence of parameter uncertainties, structural perturbations, random disturbances and environmental variations. Among the existing adaptive control methodologies, the state-space self-tuning control methods, initially proposed by us, are shown to be effective in designing advanced adaptive controllers for multivariable systems. In our approaches, we have embedded the standard Kalman state-estimation algorithm into an online parameter estimation algorithm. Thus, the advanced state-feedback controllers can be easily established for digital adaptive control of continuous-time stochastic multivariable systems. A state-space self-tuner for a general multivariable stochastic system has been developed and successfully applied to the space station for on-line adaptive control. Also, a technique for multistage design of an optimal momentum management controller for the space station has been developed and reported in. Moreover, we have successfully developed various digital redesign techniques which can convert a continuous-time controller to an equivalent digital controller. As a result, the expensive and unreliable continuous-time controller can be implemented using low-cost and high performance microprocessors. Recently, we have developed a new hybrid state-space self tuner using a new dual-rate sampling scheme for on-line adaptive control of continuous-time uncertain systems.

  18. The Vulnerability of Threatened Species: Adaptive Capability and Adaptation Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Pam; Ogawa-Onishi, Yuko; McVey, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Global targets to halt the loss of biodiversity have not been met, and there is now an additional Aichi target for preventing the extinction of known threatened species and improving their conservation status. Climate change increasingly needs to be factored in to these, and thus there is a need to identify the extent to which it could increase species vulnerability. This paper uses the exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity framework to assess the vulnerability of a selection of WWF global priority large mammals and marine species to climate change. However, it divides adaptive capacity into adaptive capability and adaptation opportunity, in order to identify whether adaptation is more constrained by the biology of the species or by its environmental setting. Lack of evidence makes it difficult to apply the framework consistently across the species, but it was found that, particularly for the terrestrial mammals, adaptation opportunities seems to be the greater constraint. This framework and analysis could be used by conservationists and those wishing to enhance the resilience of species to climate change. PMID:24833051

  19. Face Adaptation Effects: Reviewing the Impact of Adapting Information, Time, and Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Strobach, Tilo; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2013-01-01

    The ability to adapt is essential to live and survive in an ever-changing environment such as the human ecosystem. Here we review the literature on adaptation effects of face stimuli to give an overview of existing findings in this area, highlight gaps in its research literature, initiate new directions in face adaptation research, and help to design future adaptation studies. Furthermore, this review should lead to better understanding of the processing characteristics as well as the mental representations of face-relevant information. The review systematizes studies at a behavioral level in respect of a framework which includes three dimensions representing the major characteristics of studies in this field of research. These dimensions comprise (1) the specificity of adapting face information, e.g., identity, gender, or age aspects of the material to be adapted to (2) aspects of timing (e.g., the sustainability of adaptation effects) and (3) transfer relations between face images presented during adaptation and adaptation tests (e.g., images of the same or different identities). The review concludes with options for how to combine findings across different dimensions to demonstrate the relevance of our framework for future studies. PMID:23760550

  20. The Career Futures Inventory-Revised: Measuring Dimensions of Career Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rottinghaus, Patrick J.; Buelow, Kristine L.; Matyja, Anna; Schneider, Madalyn R.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the development and initial validation of the "Career Futures Inventory-Revised" (CFI-R) in two large samples of university students. The 28-item CFI-R assesses aspects of career adaptability, including positive career planning attitudes, general outcome expectations, and components of Parsons' tripartite model and…

  1. Predictors of Psychological Adaptation of Cape Verdean Students in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neto, Félix; Wilks, Daniela C.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the predictors of psychological adaptation regarding subjective well-being and loneliness among international students. The sample included 243 Cape Verdean students attending Portuguese universities, and the control group was composed by 265 native-born Portuguese students. The latter group reported higher levels of well-being and…

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Adapted Skillstreaming Checklist for High-Functioning Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopata, Christopher; Rodgers, Jonathan D.; Donnelly, James P.; Thomeer, Marcus L.; McDonald, Christin A.; Volker, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and criterion-related validity of parent ratings on the Adapted Skillstreaming Checklist (ASC) for a sample of 275 high-functioning children, ages 6-12 years, with ASD. Internal consistency for the total sample was 0.92. For two subsamples, test-retest reliability was very good at the 6-week and good at the…

  3. Climate adaptation planning in practice: an evaluation of adaptation plans from three developed nations

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Preston, Benjamin L; Westaway, Richard M.; Yuen, Emma J.

    2011-04-01

    Formal planning for climate change adaptation is emerging rapidly at a range of geo-political scales. This first generation of adaptation plans provides useful information regarding how institutions are framing the issue of adaptation and the range of processes that are recognized as being part of an adaptation response. To better understand adaptation planning among developed nations, a set of 57 adaptation plans from Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States was evaluated against a suite of 19 planning processes identified from existing guidance instruments for adaptation planning. Total scores among evaluated plans ranged from 16% of the maximum possiblemore » score to 61%, with an average of 37%. These results suggest adaptation plans are largely under-developed. Critical weaknesses in adaptation planning are related to limited consideration for non-climatic factors as well as neglect for issues of adaptive capacity including entitlements to various forms of capital needed for effective adaptation. Such gaps in planning suggest there are opportunities for institutions to make better use of existing guidance for adaptation planning and the need to consider the broader governance context in which adaptation will occur. In addition, the adaptation options prescribed by adaptation plans reflect a preferential bias toward low-risk capacity-building (72% of identified options) over the delivery of specific actions to reduce vulnerability. To the extent these findings are representative of the state of developed nation adaptation planning, there appear to be significant deficiencies in climate change preparedness, even among those nations often assumed to have the greatest adaptive capacity.« less

  4. Gender differences in farmers' responses to climate change adaptation in Yongqiao District, China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jianjun; Wang, Xiaomin; Gao, Yiwei

    2015-12-15

    This study examines the gender differences in farmers' responses to climate change adaption in Yongqiao District, China. A random sampling technique was used to select 220 household heads, while descriptive statistics and binary logit models were used to analyze the data obtained from the households. We determine that male and female respondents are not significantly different in their knowledge and perceptions of climate change, but there is a gender difference in adopting climate change adaptation measures. Male-headed households are more likely to adopt new technology for water conservation and to increase investment in irrigation infrastructure. The research also indicates that the adaptation decisions of male and female heads are influenced by different sets of factors. The findings of this research help to elucidate the determinants of climate change adaptation decisions for male and female-headed households and the strategic interventions necessary for effective adaptation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The adaptation of non-western and Muslim immigrant adolescents in the Netherlands: An immigrant paradox?

    PubMed

    Van Geel, Mitch; Vedder, Paul

    2010-10-01

    This article addresses the possible existence of an immigrant paradox in a sample of immigrant adolescents attending vocational schools in the Netherlands. An immigrant paradox is the finding that first generation immigrants show a more positive pattern of adaptation than nationals despite poorer economic conditions. Second generation immigrants regress to the nationals in terms of adaptation. A sample of 152 first generation immigrant adolescents, 285 second generation immigrant adolescents and 406 national adolescents completed self-reports about socio-economic status, psychological problems, behavioral problems and self-esteem. The results supported the existence of an immigrant paradox in this sample. This indicates that further assimilation among immigrant adolescents does not necessarily lead to increased well being. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2010 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  6. Estimation of patient-specific imaging dose for real-time tumour monitoring in lung patients during respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Onizuka, Ryota; Kawahara, Daisuke; Suzuki, Tatsuhiko; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Hanazawa, Hideki; Shibuya, Keiko

    2018-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the patient-specific imaging dose for real-time tumour monitoring in the lung during respiratory-gated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in clinical cases using SyncTraX. Methods and Materials: Ten patients who underwent respiratory-gated SBRT with SyncTraX were enrolled in this study. The imaging procedure for real-time tumour monitoring using SyncTraX was simulated using Monte Carlo. We evaluated the dosimetric effect of a real-time tumour monitoring in a critical organ at risk (OAR) and the planning target volume (PTV) over the course of treatment. The relationship between skin dose and gating efficiency was also investigated. Results: For all patients, the mean D50 to the PTV, ipsilateral lung, liver, heart, spinal cord and skin was 118.3 (21.5–175.9), 31.9 (9.5–75.4), 15.4 (1.1–31.6), 10.1 (1.3–18.1), 25.0 (1.6–101.8), and 3.6 (0.9–7.1) mGy, respectively. The mean D2 was 352.0 (26.5–935.8), 146.4 (27.3–226.7), 90.7 (3.6–255.0), 42.2 (4.8–82.7), 88.0 (15.4–248.5), and 273.5 (98.3–611.6) mGy, respectively. The D2 of the skin dose was found to increase as the gating efficiency decreased. Conclusions: The additional dose to the PTV was at most 1.9% of the prescribed dose over the course of treatment for real-time tumour monitoring. For OARs, we could confirm the high dose region, which may not be susceptible to radiation toxicity. However, to reduce the skin dose from SyncTraX, it is necessary to increase the gating efficiency.

  7. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases. This work was partly presented at the 58th Annual meeting of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Brazilian Adaptation of the Woodcock-Johnson III Cognitive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Solange Muglia; Nunes, Carlos Sancineto; Schelini, Patricia Waltz; Pasian, Sonia Regina; Homsi, Silvia Vertoni; Moretti, Lucia; Anache, Alexandra Ayach

    2010-01-01

    An adaptation of the standard battery of Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III) for Brazilian children and youth was investigated. The sample was composed of 1094 students (54 percent girls), ages 7-17, living in Sao Paulo state (91 percent). Items from Brazilian school books as well as from the WJ-III Spanish version…

  9. Mouse EEG spike detection based on the adapted continuous wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieng, Quang M.; Kharatishvili, Irina; Chen, Min; Reutens, David C.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important tool in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Interictal spikes on EEG are used to monitor the development of epilepsy and the effects of drug therapy. EEG recordings are generally long and the data voluminous. Thus developing a sensitive and reliable automated algorithm for analyzing EEG data is necessary. Approach. A new algorithm for detecting and classifying interictal spikes in mouse EEG recordings is proposed, based on the adapted continuous wavelet transform (CWT). The construction of the adapted mother wavelet is founded on a template obtained from a sample comprising the first few minutes of an EEG data set. Main Result. The algorithm was tested with EEG data from a mouse model of epilepsy and experimental results showed that the algorithm could distinguish EEG spikes from other transient waveforms with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Significance. Differing from existing approaches, the proposed approach combines wavelet denoising, to isolate transient signals, with adapted CWT-based template matching, to detect true interictal spikes. Using the adapted wavelet constructed from a predefined template, the adapted CWT is calculated on small EEG segments to fit dynamical changes in the EEG recording.

  10. Relationships between Adaptive Behaviours, Personal Factors, and Participation of Young Children.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Hazel; Shiel, Agnes; Law, Mary; O'Donovan, Donough J; Segurado, Ricardo; Anaby, Dana

    2017-12-19

    To examine the extent to which personal factors (age, socioeconomic grouping, and preterm birth) and adaptive behaviour explain the participation patterns of young children. 65 Children 2-5 years old with and without a history of preterm birth and no physical or intellectual disability were selected by convenience sampling from Galway University Hospital, Ireland. Interviews with parents were conducted using the Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System, Second Edition (ABAS-II) and the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation (APCP). Linear regression models were used to identify associations between the ABAS-II scores, personal factors, and APCP scores for intensity and diversity of participation. Adaptive behaviour explained 21% of variance in intensity of play, 18% in intensity of Skill Development, 7% in intensity of Active Physical Recreation, and 6% in intensity of Social Activities controlling for age, preterm birth, and socioeconomic grouping. Age explained between 1% and 11% of variance in intensity of participation scores. Adapted behaviour (13%), Age (17%), and socioeconomic grouping (5%) explained a significant percentage of variance in diversity of participation controlling for the other variables.  Adaptive behaviour had a unique contribution to children's intensity and diversity of participation, suggesting its importance.

  11. Bayesian adaptive trials offer advantages in comparative effectiveness trials: an example in status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Connor, Jason T; Elm, Jordan J; Broglio, Kristine R

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel Bayesian adaptive comparative effectiveness trial comparing three treatments for status epilepticus that uses adaptive randomization with potential early stopping. The trial will enroll 720 unique patients in emergency departments and uses a Bayesian adaptive design. The trial design is compared to a trial without adaptive randomization and produces an efficient trial in which a higher proportion of patients are likely to be randomized to the most effective treatment arm while generally using fewer total patients and offers higher power than an analogous trial with fixed randomization when identifying a superior treatment. When one treatment is superior to the other two, the trial design provides better patient care, higher power, and a lower expected sample size. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluid intelligence and psychosocial outcome: from logical problem solving to social adaptation.

    PubMed

    Huepe, David; Roca, María; Salas, Natalia; Canales-Johnson, Andrés; Rivera-Rei, Álvaro A; Zamorano, Leandro; Concepción, Aimée; Manes, Facundo; Ibañez, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    While fluid intelligence has proved to be central to executive functioning, logical reasoning and other frontal functions, the role of this ability in psychosocial adaptation has not been well characterized. A random-probabilistic sample of 2370 secondary school students completed measures of fluid intelligence (Raven's Progressive Matrices, RPM) and several measures of psychological adaptation: bullying (Delaware Bullying Questionnaire), domestic abuse of adolescents (Conflict Tactic Scale), drug intake (ONUDD), self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self Esteem Scale) and the Perceived Mental Health Scale (Spanish adaptation). Lower fluid intelligence scores were associated with physical violence, both in the role of victim and victimizer. Drug intake, especially cannabis, cocaine and inhalants and lower self-esteem were also associated with lower fluid intelligence. Finally, scores on the perceived mental health assessment were better when fluid intelligence scores were higher. Our results show evidence of a strong association between psychosocial adaptation and fluid intelligence, suggesting that the latter is not only central to executive functioning but also forms part of a more general capacity for adaptation to social contexts.

  13. Fluid Intelligence and Psychosocial Outcome: From Logical Problem Solving to Social Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Huepe, David; Roca, María; Salas, Natalia; Canales-Johnson, Andrés; Rivera-Rei, Álvaro A.; Zamorano, Leandro; Concepción, Aimée; Manes, Facundo; Ibañez, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    Background While fluid intelligence has proved to be central to executive functioning, logical reasoning and other frontal functions, the role of this ability in psychosocial adaptation has not been well characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings A random-probabilistic sample of 2370 secondary school students completed measures of fluid intelligence (Raven's Progressive Matrices, RPM) and several measures of psychological adaptation: bullying (Delaware Bullying Questionnaire), domestic abuse of adolescents (Conflict Tactic Scale), drug intake (ONUDD), self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self Esteem Scale) and the Perceived Mental Health Scale (Spanish adaptation). Lower fluid intelligence scores were associated with physical violence, both in the role of victim and victimizer. Drug intake, especially cannabis, cocaine and inhalants and lower self-esteem were also associated with lower fluid intelligence. Finally, scores on the perceived mental health assessment were better when fluid intelligence scores were higher. Conclusions/Significance Our results show evidence of a strong association between psychosocial adaptation and fluid intelligence, suggesting that the latter is not only central to executive functioning but also forms part of a more general capacity for adaptation to social contexts. PMID:21957464

  14. Methylation-independent adaptation in chemotaxis of Escherichia coli involves acetylation-dependent speed adaptation.

    PubMed

    Baron, Szilvia; Afanzar, Oshri; Eisenbach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Chemoreceptor methylation and demethylation has been shown to be at the core of the adaptation mechanism in Escherichia coli chemotaxis. Nevertheless, mutants lacking the methylation machinery can adapt to some extent. Here we carried out an extensive quantitative analysis of chemotactic and chemokinetic methylation-independent adaptation. We show that partial or complete adaptation of the direction of flagellar rotation and the swimming speed in the absence of the methylation machinery each occurs in a small fraction of cells. Furthermore, deletion of the main enzyme responsible for acetylation of the signaling molecule CheY prevented speed adaptation but not adaptation of the direction of rotation. These results suggest that methylation-independent adaptation in bacterial chemotaxis involves chemokinetic adaptation, which is dependent on CheY acetylation. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. A comparison of adaptive and adaptable automation under different levels of environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Juergen; Kao, Chung-Shan; Wastell, David

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of different forms of adaptive and adaptable automation was examined under low- and high-stress conditions, in the form of different levels of noise. Thirty-six participants were assigned to one of the three types of variable automation (adaptive event-based, adaptive performance-based and adaptable serving as a control condition). Participants received 3 h of training on a simulation of a highly automated process control task and were subsequently tested during a 4-h session under noise exposure and quiet conditions. The results for performance suggested no clear benefits of one automation control mode over the other two. However, it emerged that participants under adaptable automation adopted a more active system management strategy and reported higher levels of self-confidence than in the two adaptive control modes. Furthermore, the results showed higher levels of perceived workload, fatigue and anxiety for performance-based adaptive automation control than the other two modes. This study compared two forms of adaptive automation (where the automated system flexibly allocates tasks between human and machine) with adaptable automation (where the human allocates the tasks). The adaptable mode showed marginal advantages. This is of relevance, given that this automation mode may also be easier to design.

  16. Exergaming: Syncing Physical Activity and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Lisa; Higgins, John

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses exergaming, a groundbreaking type of video game which is creating a revolution in physical education. Exergaming combines physical activity and video gaming to create an enjoyable and appealing way for students to be physically active. An extremely popular choice in this genre is the music video/dance rhythm game (MVDG). One…

  17. Weights and Measures: Out of Sync.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melone, Rudy J.

    1985-01-01

    Looks at the economic problems resulting from U.S. resistance to the metric system. Considers factors underpinning this resistance and reasons for industry and education to accelerate the pace of metric learning. Describes Gavilan College's pilot testing of metrics instructional materials. Lists organizations endorsing metrication. (DMM)

  18. Frame Synchronization Without Attached Sync Markers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method to synchronize codeword frames without making use of attached synchronization markers (ASMs). Instead, the synchronizer identifies the code structure present in the received symbols, by operating the decoder for a handful of iterations at each possible symbol offset and forming an appropriate metric. This method is computationally more complex and doesn't perform as well as frame synchronizers that utilize an ASM; nevertheless, the new synchronizer acquires frame synchronization in about two seconds when using a 600 kbps software decoder, and would take about 15 milliseconds on prototype hardware. It also eliminates the need for the ASMs, which is an attractive feature for short uplink codes whose coding gain would be diminished by the overheard of ASM bits. The lack of ASMs also would simplify clock distribution for the AR4JA low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes and adds a small amount to the coding gain as well (up to 0.2 dB).

  19. Draft evaluation of the frequency for gas sampling for the high burnup confirmatory data project

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Stockman, Christine T.; Alsaed, Halim A.; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-03-26

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-15SN0802041, “Draft Evaluation of the Frequency for Gas Sampling for the High Burn-up Storage Demonstration Project” under Work Package FT-15SN080204, “ST Field Demonstration Support – SNL”. This report provides a technically based gas sampling frequency strategy for the High Burnup (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project. The evaluation of: 1) the types and magnitudes of gases that could be present in the project cask and, 2) the degradation mechanisms that could change gas compositions culminates in an adaptive gas sampling frequency strategy. This adaptive strategy is compared against the sampling frequency that has been developed basedmore » on operational considerations. Gas sampling will provide information on the presence of residual water (and byproducts associated with its reactions and decomposition) and breach of cladding, which could inform the decision of when to open the project cask.« less

  20. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  1. Adaptive functioning and its associated factors among girl children residing in slum areas of Bhubaneswar, India.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Ansuman; Das, Sai C; Sahoo, Prabhudarsan

    2018-01-01

    Adaptive functioning develops throughout early childhood, and its limitation is a reflection that the child has developmental or emotional problems or even mental retardation. Little is known about the adaptive functioning or developmental status of slum children. The present cross-sectional study was undertaken during the year 2014 to assess the status of adaptive functioning among girl children aged between 3 and 9 years residing in slum areas of Bhubaneswar and to explore the factors associated with poor adaptive functioning. Stratified multi-stage cluster random sampling technique was used to select the study population; 256 mother-child pairs from 256 households in selected slum areas were studied. Demographic information was collected, and adaptive functioning was assessed using the modified Vineland Social Maturity Scale. Univariate and multivariate analyses was carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 21. One-fifth (54, 21%) of the girls sampled had poor adaptive functioning, and 44 (17%) had poor cognitive functioning. Multivariate analysis revealed that the age of the child, parents' education, presence of stunting in children and attending school/early childhood centre were strong predictors of adaptive functioning in slum children. One-fifth of girls from slums are developmentally vulnerable; parental education, stunting and early childhood education or exposure to schooling are modifiable factors influencing children's adaptive functioning. Health, education and welfare sectors need to be aware of this so that a multi-pronged approach can be planned to properly address this issue in one of the most disadvantaged sections of the society. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. An adaptive signal-processing approach to online adaptive tutoring.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan; Cline, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Conventional intelligent or adaptive tutoring online systems rely on domain-specific models of learner behavior based on rules, deep domain knowledge, and other resource-intensive methods. We have developed and studied a domain-independent methodology of adaptive tutoring based on domain-independent signal-processing approaches that obviate the need for the construction of explicit expert and student models. A key advantage of our method over conventional approaches is a lower barrier to entry for educators who want to develop adaptive online learning materials.

  3. System health monitoring using multiple-model adaptive estimation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifford, Stanley Ryan

    Monitoring system health for fault detection and diagnosis by tracking system parameters concurrently with state estimates is approached using a new multiple-model adaptive estimation (MMAE) method. This novel method is called GRid-based Adaptive Parameter Estimation (GRAPE). GRAPE expands existing MMAE methods by using new techniques to sample the parameter space. GRAPE expands on MMAE with the hypothesis that sample models can be applied and resampled without relying on a predefined set of models. GRAPE is initially implemented in a linear framework using Kalman filter models. A more generalized GRAPE formulation is presented using extended Kalman filter (EKF) models to represent nonlinear systems. GRAPE can handle both time invariant and time varying systems as it is designed to track parameter changes. Two techniques are presented to generate parameter samples for the parallel filter models. The first approach is called selected grid-based stratification (SGBS). SGBS divides the parameter space into equally spaced strata. The second approach uses Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) to determine the parameter locations and minimize the total number of required models. LHS is particularly useful when the parameter dimensions grow. Adding more parameters does not require the model count to increase for LHS. Each resample is independent of the prior sample set other than the location of the parameter estimate. SGBS and LHS can be used for both the initial sample and subsequent resamples. Furthermore, resamples are not required to use the same technique. Both techniques are demonstrated for both linear and nonlinear frameworks. The GRAPE framework further formalizes the parameter tracking process through a general approach for nonlinear systems. These additional methods allow GRAPE to either narrow the focus to converged values within a parameter range or expand the range in the appropriate direction to track the parameters outside the current parameter range boundary

  4. Adaptive Insecure Attachment and Resource Control Strategies during Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Bin-Bin; Chang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    By integrating the life history theory of attachment with resource control theory, the current study examines the hypothesis that insecure attachment styles reorganized in middle childhood are alternative adaptive strategies used to prepare for upcoming competition with the peer group. A sample of 654 children in the second through seventh grades…

  5. Evaluating video digitizer errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Analog output video cameras remain popular for recording meteor data. Although these cameras uniformly employ electronic detectors with fixed pixel arrays, the digitization process requires resampling the horizontal lines as they are output in order to reconstruct the pixel data, usually resulting in a new data array of different horizontal dimensions than the native sensor. Pixel timing is not provided by the camera, and must be reconstructed based on line sync information embedded in the analog video signal. Using a technique based on hot pixels, I present evidence that jitter, sync detection, and other timing errors introduce both position and intensity errors which are not present in cameras which internally digitize their sensors and output the digital data directly.

  6. Decentralized adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, B. J.; Jamshidi, M.; Seraji, H.

    1988-01-01

    A decentralized adaptive control is proposed to stabilize and track the nonlinear, interconnected subsystems with unknown parameters. The adaptation of the controller gain is derived by using model reference adaptive control theory based on Lyapunov's direct method. The adaptive gains consist of sigma, proportional, and integral combination of the measured and reference values of the corresponding subsystem. The proposed control is applied to the joint control of a two-link robot manipulator, and the performance in computer simulation corresponds with what is expected in theoretical development.

  7. Thriving While Engaging in Risk? Examining Trajectories of Adaptive Functioning, Delinquency, and Substance Use in a Nationally Representative Sample of U.S. Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michael T.; Wray-Lake, Laura; Rote, Wendy M.; Shubert, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in positive youth development theory and research explicate complex associations between adaptive functioning and risk behavior, acknowledging that high levels of both co-occur in the lives of some adolescents. However, evidence on nuanced overlapping developmental trajectories of adaptive functioning and risk has been limited to 1…

  8. Cognitive and adaptive correlates of an ADOS-derived joint attention composite

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ashley Johnson; Lu, Zhenqiu (Laura); McLean, Rebecca L.; Sheinkopf, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Joint attention skills have been shown to predict language outcomes in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Less is known about the relationship between joint attention (JA) abilities in children with ASD and cognitive and adaptive abilities. In the current study, a subset of items from the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), designed to quantify JA abilities, were used to investigate social attention among an unusually large cross-sectional sample of children with ASD (n = 1061). An examination of the association between JA and a range of functional correlates (cognitive and adaptive) revealed JA was significantly related to verbal (VIQ) and non-verbal (NVIQ) cognitive ability as well as all domains of adaptive functioning (socialization, communication, and daily living skills). Additional analyses examined the degree to which the relation between adaptive abilities (socialization, communication, and daily living skills) and JA was maintained after taking into account the potentially mediating role of verbal and nonverbal cognitive ability. Results revealed that VIQ fully mediated the relation between JA and adaptive functioning, whereas the relation between these adaptive variables and JA was only partially mediated by NVIQ. Moderation analyses were also conducted to examine how verbal and non-verbal cognitive ability and gender impacted the relation between JA and adaptive functioning. In line with research showing a relation between language and JA, this indicates that while JA is significantly related to functional outcomes, this appears to be mediated specifically through a verbal cognitive pathway. PMID:28168003

  9. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  10. AFFINE-CORRECTED PARADISE: FREE-BREATHING PATIENT-ADAPTIVE CARDIAC MRI WITH SENSITIVITY ENCODING

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Behzad; Bresler, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    We propose a real-time cardiac imaging method with parallel MRI that allows for free breathing during imaging and does not require cardiac or respiratory gating. The method is based on the recently proposed PARADISE (Patient-Adaptive Reconstruction and Acquisition Dynamic Imaging with Sensitivity Encoding) scheme. The new acquisition method adapts the PARADISE k-t space sampling pattern according to an affine model of the respiratory motion. The reconstruction scheme involves multi-channel time-sequential imaging with time-varying channels. All model parameters are adapted to the imaged patient as part of the experiment and drive both data acquisition and cine reconstruction. Simulated cardiac MRI experiments using the realistic NCAT phantom show high quality cine reconstructions and robustness to modeling inaccuracies. PMID:24390159

  11. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and