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Sample records for sand-blended-cement pastes rheology

  1. Pasting and rheological properties of quinoa-oat composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quinoa (Chenopodium, quinoa) flour, known for its essential amino acids, was composited with oat products containing ß-glucan known for lowering blood cholesterol and preventing heart disease. Quinoa-oat composites were developed and evaluated for their pasting and rheological properties by a Rapid ...

  2. Extrusion and rheology of fine particulate ceramic pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, Fred Anthony

    A rheological study was conducted on an extruded blend of two alumina powders, Alcoa A-3500-SG and Reynolds ERC. These extruded blends were mixed in four compositions, varying in distribution modulus. This work focuses on the interaction of the composition components, mainly particle size distribution and amount of water at a constant binder amount. The rheological parameters of extruded pastes, Sigma, Tau, alpha and beta, were determined by using capillary rheometry modeling by the methodology set forth by Benbow and Bridgwater. This methodology makes use of capillary rheometer to determine extrusion parameters, which describe the flow behavior of a paste. The parameter values are indirectly determined by extrapolating high shear rate information obtained by the extrusion process. A goal of this research was to determine fundamental rheological properties directly from fundamental rheological equations of state. This was accomplished by assessing the material properties by using a dynamic stress rheometer. The rheological parameters used in this study to characterize the paste are elastic modulus, viscosity, tan delta, and relaxation time. This technique approaches a step closer in understanding the microstructural influence on flow behavior of a paste. This method directly determines rheological properties by using linear viscoelastic theory, giving a quantitative analysis of material properties. A strong correlation between the elastic modulus and sigma, and viscosity and alpha is shown to exist, indicating a relationship between these two techniques. Predictive process control methodology, based on particle packing modeling, quantitatively determined structural parameters useful in evaluating a composition. The determined parameters are: distribution modulus, interparticle separation distance, porosity, and particle crowding index, which are important to understand the extrudates packed state. A connection between the physical structure of the extrudate and its

  3. Correlating cement characteristics with rheology of paste

    SciTech Connect

    Vikan, H. Justnes, H.; Winnefeld, F.; Figi, R.

    2007-11-15

    The influence of cement characteristics such as cement fineness and clinker composition on the 'flow resistance' measured as the area under the shear stress-shear rate flow curve has been investigated. Three different types of plasticizers namely naphthalene sulphonate-formaldehyde condensate, polyether grafted polyacrylate, and lignosulphonate have been tested in this context on 6 different cements. The flow resistance correlated well with the cement characteristic (Blaine.{l_brace}d.cC{sub 3}A + [1 - d].C{sub 3}S{r_brace}) where the factor d represents relative reactivity of cubic C{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S while cC{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S represent the content of these minerals. It was found to be either a linear or exponential function of the combined cement characteristic depending on plasticizer type and dosage. The correlation was valid for a mix of pure cement and cement with fly ash, limestone filler (4%), as well as pastes with constant silica fume dosage, when the mineral contents were determined by Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffractograms.

  4. Rheological and pasting properties of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) flours with and without jet-cooking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pasting, rheological and water-holding properties of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) flour obtained from whole achenes separated into three particle sizes, and three commercial flours (Fancy, Supreme and Farinetta) were measured with or without jet-cooking. Fancy had instantaneous paste viscosity ...

  5. Rheological evaluation of dense suspensions; Simulation of a fresh cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.E. ); Shaughnessy, R.J. III )

    1990-05-01

    The rheology of fresh cement pasts is a function of not only particle size, shape, and concentration, but also the cement setting reactions. This greatly complicates the analysis of data obtained in any rheological experiment. To separate the slurry contribution to the system rheology from the chemical reaction component, a slurry of marble-dust particles is used to represent a cement slurry. In this study, both tube-flow and concentric-cylinder rheometers are used to evaluate the rheological behavior of the dense suspensions. The apparent slip of the suspension makes correlation of the flow curves generated from the two viscometers difficult. The degree of slip in both viscometers becomes increasingly significant as the marble-dust concentration increases. The use of a grooved bob in the concentric-cylinder viscometer considerably reduces the amount of slip. Large annular gaps also contribute to inconsistent results. An analysis of the data from both types of viscometers is presented.

  6. Pasting and rheological properties of ß-glucan-enriched hydrocolloids from oat bran concentrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pasting and rheological properties of four oat hydrocolloids with different contents of ß-glucan (Nutrim10, C-Trim20, C-Trim30, and C-Trim50) were characterized and compared with oat bran concentrate (OBC) and ß-Glucan 95%. C-Trim30 and C-Trim50 had significantly higher water holding capacities comp...

  7. Influence of superplasticizers on the rheology and stability of limestone and cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mikanovic, Nikola Jolicoeur, Carmel

    2008-07-15

    The influence of superplasticizers on the rheological properties and dynamic stability of cement and reference limestone pastes were examined at room temperature. The pastes were initially formulated to exhibit nearly identical rheological parameters and bleeding-segregation characteristics, with w/c = 0.50 for the limestone and 0.55 for the cement. The former was examined at equilibrium pH {approx} 10 and at pH 12.5 following addition of Ca(OH){sub 2} to allow distinction of effects related to high pH and Ca{sup +2} from those related to cement hydration reactions. Both polynaphthalene- (PNS) and polyacrylate-type (PC) superplasticizers were investigated, adjusting the dosages to cover the same range of paste fluidity. Superplasticizer-particle interactions were monitored through binding isotherms and zeta potential measurements. The rheology of the pastes was evaluated through the mini-slump test and dynamic viscosity measurements which yielded key rheological parameters: yield stress, elastic and loss moduli (G' and G'') and zero-shear viscosity ({eta}{sub 0}). The paste stability was monitored as function of time, i.e. migration of solids and liquid phase measured in-situ and in 'real time', through surface bleeding measurements and from a multipoint conductivity method. The results provide new insight on the relative modes of action of PNS- and PC-type superplasticizers as dispersants. Also, the combined rheology and stability data allow an improved description of the processes responsible for bleeding and segregation in cementitious and reference systems.

  8. Fitting mathematical models to describe the rheological behaviour of chocolate pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Carla; Diogo, Filipa; Alves, M. Rui

    2016-06-01

    The flow behavior is of utmost importance for the chocolate industry. The objective of this work was to study two mathematical models, Casson and Windhab models that can be used to fit chocolate rheological data and evaluate which better infers or previews the rheological behaviour of different chocolate pastes. Rheological properties (viscosity, shear stress and shear rates) were obtained with a rotational viscometer equipped with a concentric cylinder. The chocolate samples were white chocolate and chocolate with varying percentages in cacao (55%, 70% and 83%). The results showed that the Windhab model was the best to describe the flow behaviour of all the studied samples with higher determination coefficients (r2 > 0.9).

  9. Effect of various superplasticizers on rheological properties of cement paste and mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, I.; Agarwal, S.K. )

    1994-01-01

    The effect of eight commercial superplasticizers including one developed from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL) at CBRI on the rheological properties viz. viscosity and flow of cement paste and mortars have been investigated. The viscosity measurements have been made at various shear rates (5--100 rpm). It is found that at higher rates (100 rpm) even with the low concentration of superplasticizers (0.1), the viscosity of the cement paste is more or less the same as that obtained with 0.6 % dosages of SPs at lesser shear rates. The effect of split addition (delayed addition) of superplasticizers on viscosity of cement paste and 1:3 cement sand mortar have also been studied. A decrease in viscosity due to split addition has been observed in the cement paste and there is an increase of 15--20 % in flow of mortars.

  10. Influence of time addition of superplasticizers on the rheological properties of fresh cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Aiad, Ismail

    2003-08-01

    It is well known that the fluidity and the fluidity loss of fresh cement pastes are affected by the kind and the time of addition of organic admixtures. The influence of the time addition of two chemical admixtures, namely, melamine formaldehyde sulfonate (MFS) and naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonate (NFS), on the rheological properties of ordinary Portland and sulfate-resisting cement pastes through the first 120 min of hydration was investigated. The admixture addition was delayed by 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min. Shear stress and apparent viscosity of the cement pastes were determined at different shear rates (3-146 s{sup -1}) and hydration times of 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. The concentration of Ca{sup 2+} and the combined water content of the cement pastes were determined after 120 min. Yield stress and plastic viscosity values were also determined by using the Bingham model. The results show that an increase in the addition time of the admixture reduces the shear stress, the yield stress, and the plastic viscosity of the cement pastes at the early ages (15 min) as well as at later early ages (120 min). The optimum delaying time of admixture addition is found to be 10-15 min. This time does not depend on the cement and superplasticizer type.

  11. Enabling Surgical Placement of Hydrogels through Achieving Paste-Like Rheological Behavior in Hydrogel Precursor Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Emily C.; Lohman, Brooke L.; Tabakh, Daniel B.; Kieweg, Sarah L.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Berkland, Cory J.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are a promising class of materials for tissue regeneration, but they lack the ability to be molded into a defect site by a surgeon because hydrogel precursors are liquid solutions that are prone to leaking during placement. Therefore, although the main focus of hydrogel technology and developments are on hydrogels in their crosslinked form, our primary focus is on improving the fluid behavior of hydrogel precursor solutions. In this work, we introduce a method to achieve paste-like hydrogel precursor solutions by combining hyaluronic acid nanoparticles with traditional crosslinked hyaluronic acid hydrogels. Prior to crosslinking, the samples underwent rheological testing to assess yield stress and recovery using linear hyaluronic acid as a control. The experimental groups containing nanoparticles were the only solutions that exhibited a yield stress, demonstrating that the nanoparticulate rather than the linear form of hyaluronic acid was necessary to achieve paste-like behavior. The gels were also photocrosslinked and further characterized as solids, where it was demonstrated that the inclusion of nanoparticles did not adversely affect the compressive modulus and that encapsulated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable. Overall, this nanoparticle-based approach provides a platform hydrogel system that exhibits a yield stress prior to crosslinking, and can then be crosslinked into a hydrogel that is capable of encapsulating cells that remain viable. This behavior may hold significant impact for hydrogel applications where a paste-like behavior is desired in the hydrogel precursor solution. PMID:25691398

  12. Physicochemical, pasting, rheological, thermal and morphological properties of horse chestnut starch.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Syed Insha; Jan, Kulsum; Singh, Sukhcharn; Saxena, D C

    2015-09-01

    Indian Horse chestnuts contain high content of starch which can be explored to be used in various applications in food industry as encapsulating agent, stabilizer, binder, thickener, gelling agents and many more. Horse chest nut is locally available and can be a boon for food industry if the inherent properties are explored. Hence, horse chest nut starch can be a better option for the replacement of conventional starches to meet the industrial demand of starch. Physicochemical, pasting, rheological, thermal and morphological properties of starch isolated from Indian Horse chestnut (HCN) were determined. Amylose content was found to be 26.10 %. Peak viscosity obtained from RVA profile was 4110 cP. Hardness, cohesiveness, adhesiveness and gumminess were determined by Texture Profile Analyser. Particle size analysis showed a typical Uni modal size distribution profile with particle distribution ranging from 7.52 to 27.44 μm. The shape of starch granules varied from round, irregular, oval, and elliptical with smooth surface. X- ray diffraction revealed that HCN starch showed a typical C-type pattern with characteristic peaks at 5.7, 15.0, 17.3 and 22.3°. The transition temperatures (To, Tp, and Tc) and enthalpy of gelatinization (ΔH) values were 53.35, 58.81, 63.57 °C and 8.76 J/g, respectively. The rheological properties were determined in terms of variation of storage modulus (G (/)), loss modulus (G (//)) and loss factor (tan δ) at different temperatures. Peak G (/), peak G (//) and peak tan δ values were observed as 10,400 Pa, 1,710 Pa, and 0.164, respectively. PMID:26344978

  13. Rheological effects in the 3D creeping flow past a sedimenting sphere subject to orthogonal shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas D.; Tanner, Roger I.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the rheological parameters of nonlinear differential constitutive models in the isothermal, steady, creeping, flow past a sedimenting sphere, in an incompressible viscoelastic matrix fluid, subject to simple shear in a plane perpendicular to the direction of sedimentation are studied analytically. The viscoelasticity of the ambient fluid is modeled using the Upper Convected Maxwell, Oldroyd-B, exponential Phan-Thien-Tanner, Giesekus, and FENE-P constitutive equations. The solution of the governing equations is expanded as a regular perturbation series for small values of the Deborah number, and the resulting sequence of three-dimensional partial differential equations is solved analytically up to fourth order. Approximate analytical expressions for the angular velocity of the rigid sphere, as well as for the drag force on the sphere, are derived and discussed. The solutions reveal both the increase of the drag in case of Boger-type fluids (modeled with the FENE-P model) and the decrease of the drag in case of elastic fluids (modeled with the Giesekus model).

  14. Impact of high pressure treatment on functional, rheological, pasting, and structural properties of lentil starch dispersions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim; Thomas, Linu; Taher, Ayoub; Joseph, Antony

    2016-11-01

    Lentil starch (LS) dispersions (flour to water 1:4w/w) were subjected to high pressure (HP) treatment at 0.1, 400, 500 and 600MPa for 10min, followed by evaluation on the functional, particle size, rheological, pasting, and structural properties of post-process samples. Water holding capacity of pressurized starch increased with the pressure intensity due to increase in damaged starch. The amount of resistant starch increased from 5 to 6.8% after pressure treatment at 600MPa. An increase in starch granule particle size (196-207μm) was obvious after HP treatment. The lentil starch was completely gelatinized after pressure treatment at 600MPa for 10min as evidenced from differential scanning calorimetry, rheometry, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy observation. The elastic modulus, G' of lentil starch gel was less frequency dependent, and higher in magnitude at high pressure (>500MPa) than at lower pressure range (≤400MPa). XRD analysis revealed the disappearance of two diffraction peak intensities at 14.86° and 22.82° at 600MPa for 10min, which confirms the transformation of crystalline to amorphous region of lentil starch. Pasting properties were significantly influenced by the pressure treatment especially at 600MPa, resulting in a considerable decrease in peak viscosity, breakdown and final viscosity, and an increase in peak time. It can be inferred that the functional properties of pressure-treated LS are mainly based on the structural destruction of granules. PMID:27516314

  15. Influence of rheology on deposition behavior of ceramic pastes in direct fabrication systems

    SciTech Connect

    King, B.H.; Morissette, S.L.; Denham, H.; Cesarano, J. III; Dimos, D.

    1998-12-01

    Rheology and deposition behavior of four commercially available thick-film inks and an aqueous alumina slurry were investigated using two different slurry-based deposition systems. The first of these deposition systems, a Micropen, is a commercially available system designed for the deposition of electronic thick film circuits. The second system, referred to as a Robocaster, is a developmental system designed to build thick or structural parts. Slurry rheology was seen to have a minor effect on deposition behavior and the bead shape when deposited using the Micropen. The deposition behavior was instead dominated by drying rate; too rapid of a drying rate led to excessive clogging of the tip. Slurry rheology had a greater impact on the shape of beads deposited using the Robocaster. Highly viscous slurries yielded initially well-defined beads, whereas beads deposited using fluid slurries spread quickly. In both cases, significant spreading occurred with time. These observations only held for slurries with slow drying rates. It was observed that very fluid slurries produced well-defined beads when the drying rate was suitably high.

  16. Fly and bottom ashes from biomass combustion as cement replacing components in mortars production: rheological behaviour of the pastes and materials compression strength.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Stefano; Tonello, Gabriele; Piani, Luciano; Furlani, Erika

    2011-10-01

    In the present research mortar pastes obtained by replacing a commercial cement with the equivalent mass of 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of fly ash or bottom ash from fir chips combustion, were prepared and rheologically characterized. It was observed that the presence of ash modifies their rheological behaviour with respect to the reference blend due to the presence, in the ashes, of KCl and K2SO4 which cause precipitation of gypsum and portlandite during the first hydration stages of the pastes. Hydrated materials containing 5 wt.% of ash display compression strength and absorption at 28 d of same magnitude as the reference composition; conversely, progressive increase of ash cause a continuous decline of materials performances. Conversely, samples tested after 180 d display a marked decline of compression strength, as a consequence of potassium elution and consequent alkali-silica reaction against materials under curing. PMID:21762950

  17. Fly and bottom ashes from biomass combustion as cement replacing components in mortars production: rheological behaviour of the pastes and materials compression strength.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Stefano; Tonello, Gabriele; Piani, Luciano; Furlani, Erika

    2011-10-01

    In the present research mortar pastes obtained by replacing a commercial cement with the equivalent mass of 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of fly ash or bottom ash from fir chips combustion, were prepared and rheologically characterized. It was observed that the presence of ash modifies their rheological behaviour with respect to the reference blend due to the presence, in the ashes, of KCl and K2SO4 which cause precipitation of gypsum and portlandite during the first hydration stages of the pastes. Hydrated materials containing 5 wt.% of ash display compression strength and absorption at 28 d of same magnitude as the reference composition; conversely, progressive increase of ash cause a continuous decline of materials performances. Conversely, samples tested after 180 d display a marked decline of compression strength, as a consequence of potassium elution and consequent alkali-silica reaction against materials under curing.

  18. On the rheology of pendular gels and morphological developments in paste-like ternary systems based on capillary attraction.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Trystan; Velankar, Sachin S

    2015-02-28

    We investigate capillary bridging-induced gelation phenomena in silica particle suspensions and pastes, where a particle-wetting fluid is added as the third component. Increasing the wetting fluid loading in the ternary system induces a morphological transition from a pendular network to compact capillary aggregates network, with an intermediate funicular state. To our knowledge, the formation of percolated structures from compact capillary aggregates when the volume fraction of a wetting fluid approaches that of the particles is unprecedented. Such structures appear to result from the arrested coalescence of compact capillary aggregates due to the balance between the Laplace pressure and solid-like properties (yield stress, elasticity) of the aggregates. Shear-induced yielding of the ternary systems, linked to their percolating nature, is strongly influenced by the amount of wetting fluid phase. A non-monotonic dependence of the yield stress on the amount of wetting fluid is found, with the maximum yield stress obtained for a wetting fluid-to-particle volume fraction ratio of 0.2-0.3. For pendular systems, linear viscoelastic properties display a soft glassy rheological behavior above the percolation threshold (around 4 vol% particles), and complex viscosity data can be scaled using the high frequency plateau value, as well as a single characteristic relaxation time, which decreases when the particle concentration is increased. In addition, the particle concentration dependence of the yielding transition in the pendular regime appears to be efficiently described by two parameters extracted from the steady state flow curves: the yield stress and the limiting viscosity at a high shear rate. Although these non-colloidal networks result from flow-driven assembly, the scaling laws for our pendular gels are reminiscent of colloidal gels with a fractal geometry. Our studies pinpoint new pathways to create physical gels where the interparticle attraction strength is

  19. Emptying Time of a Tank Filled up with Explosive Paste. Comparison between Experimental Measurements and Predictions Based on Rheological Characterization of the Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemin, J. P.; Bonnefoy, O.; Thomas, G.; Brunet, L.; Forichon-Chaumet, N.

    2008-07-01

    One industrial process used by Nexter Munitions to manufacture pyrotechnical materials consists in preparing an emulsion of wax in TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and adding Aluminium and ONTA (3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole-5-one) particles. When the suspension is homogeneous, it is allowed to flow by gravity through a pipe located at the bottom of the tank and to fill up a shell body. The suspension is characterized by a solid volume fraction of 53.4%, which leads to high viscosities. In some circumstances, the emptying time is prohibitively long and the economic profitability is reduced. This study has been performed to make the emptying time lower with the constraint of unchanged volume fractions and grains mean diameter. So, we investigated the influence of the grain size distribution on the suspension viscosity. Different samples of Aluminium and ONTA have been used, with rather small differences in grain size distributions. The suspensions have been prepared in the industrial tank and the flow cast times measured. It has been observed that they differ by one order of magnitude. To avoid situations with too high emptying times, a procedure has been implemented to make prior characterization of the suspension rheology. Because of particles sedimentation and emulsion destabilisation, the classical Couette rheometer is not adapted. So, we designed and built a small size tank (113 cm3), where the suspension is continuously stirred and kept homogeneous. The measurement of the torque and rotational speed together with the use of the Couette analogy allowed us to observe an Ostwald fluid behaviour (flow consistency index k, flow behaviour index n). For a better prediction, we established a correlation between the measured (k, n) values and the grain size distributions. We characterized each suspension by the ratio of φ to φm, where φ is the solid volume fraction (imposed by the commercial specifications) and φm is the maximum packing fraction. Because of the strong analogy

  20. Effect of an organic additive on the rheology of an aluminous cement paste and consequences on the densification of the hardened material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hafiane, Y.; Smith, A.; Bonnet, J. P.; Tanouti, B.

    2005-03-01

    The material used in the present work is Secar 71 (Lafarge) mixed with water containing an organic additive (acetic acid noted HOAc). The rheological behavior of these pastes is studied. The best dispersion is obtained when the mass content of the additive with respect to the cement is equal to 0.5%. The microstructural characterizations of samples aged 4 days at 20° C and 95 % relative humidity reveal a significant increase in the density and a reduction in porosity for very small percentages of additive. The remarkable effect of the acetic acid on the microstructure of hardened material is correlated with its good dispersing action.

  1. The influence of polymeric component of bioactive glass-based nanocomposite paste on its rheological behaviors and in vitro responses: hyaluronic acid versus sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Mehri; Hesaraki, Saeed; Kazemzadeh, Asghar

    2014-04-01

    Different biocomposite pastes were prepared from a solid phase that was nanoparticles of sol-gel-derived bioactive glass and different liquid phases including 3% hyaluronic acid solution, sodium alginate solutions (3% and 10 %) or mixtures of hyaluronic acid and sodium alginate (3% or 10 %) solutions in 50:50 volume ratio. Rheological properties of the pastes were measured in both rotatory and oscillatory modes. The washout behavior and in vitro apatite formation of the pastes were determined by soaking them in simulated body fluid under dynamic situation for 14 days. The proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of MG-63 osteoblastic cells were also determined using extracts of the pastes. All pastes could be easily injected from the standard syringes with different tip diameters. All pastes exhibited visco-elastic character, but a nonthixotropic paste was obtained using hyaluronic acid in which the loss modulus was higher than the storage modulus. The thixotropy and storage modulus were increasingly improved by adding/using sodium alginate as mixing liquid. Moreover, the pastes in which the liquid phase was sodium alginate or mixture of hyaluronic acid and 10% sodium alginate solution revealed better apatite formation ability and washout resistance than that made of hyaluronic acid alone. No cytotoxicity effects were observed by extracts of the pastes on osteoblasts but better alkaline phosphatase activity was found for the pastes containing hyaluronic acid. Overall, injectable biocomposites can be produced by mixing bioactive glass nanoparticles and sodium alginate/hyaluronic acid polymers. They are potentially useful for hard and even soft tissues treatments. PMID:24123918

  2. Effect of S. macrosiphon and L. perfoliatum seed gums on rheological characterization of bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.) and pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) paste blends.

    PubMed

    Asnaashari, Maryam; Motamedzadegan, Ali; Farahmandfar, Reza; Rad, Tandis Khosravi

    2016-02-01

    The steady shear flow properties of bitter orange and pomegranate pastes and blend of two pastes including 0.5% Salvia macrosiphon (SMG) and L. perfoliatum (LPG) seed gums, two traditional Iranian hydrocolloids, were determined. All treatments exhibited shear-thinning behaviour. LPG added sample showed stronger shear thinning behaviour than the other due to its high molecular weight and intermolecular through hydrogen bonds and polymer entanglement. Ostwald model was found the best model to describe steady shear flow behaviour among different time-independent rheological model applied. Treatments including 0.5% these two seed gums indicated a flow behaviour index less than 0.6 and consistency coefficient raised by increasing concentration from 60 °Bx to 76 °Bx in bitter orange paste (from 0.55 Pa s(n) to 32.58 Pa s(n)), pomegranate paste (from 0.55 Pa s(n) to 84.87 Pa s(n)) and mix of these two pastes (from 0.64 Pa s(n) to 56.9 Pa s(n)). Oscillatory shear data showed weak gel-like behaviour of bitter orange and pomegranate pastes treatments including seed gums with the elastic modulus predominating over the viscous one at lower frequency. However, after weak gel formation, G″ was higher than G' in the frequency range of 0.01 to 10 Hz. An Ostwald model was used to describe the changes of viscose modulus with frequency. The results indicate that the elastic properties of bitter orange/ pomegranate paste and bitter orange paste may be increased by the presence of LPG and SMG due to associations of ordered chain segments of these gums, resulting in a weak three-dimensional network. PMID:27162409

  3. Empirical rheology and pasting properties of soft-textured durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) and hard-textured common wheat (T. aestivum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Puroindoline (PIN) proteins are the molecular basis for wheat kernel texture classification and affect flour milling performance. This study aimed at investigating the effect of PINs on kernel physical characteristics and dough rheological properties of common wheat (Alpowa cv, soft wheat) and durum...

  4. Effect of enzymatic hydrolysis of starch on pasting, rheological and viscoelastic properties of milk-barnyard millet (Echinochloa frumentacea) blends meant for spray drying.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Arun; Pushpadass, Heartwin A; Franklin, Magdaline Eljeeva Emerald; Simha, H V Vikram; Nath, B Surendra

    2016-10-01

    The influence of enzymatic hydrolysis of starch on the pasting properties of barnyard millet was studied using a rheometer. The effects of blending hydrolyzed barnyard millet wort with milk at different ratios (0:1, 1:1, 1:1.5 and 1:2) on flow and viscoelastic behavior were investigated. From the pasting curves, it was evident that enzymatically-hydrolyzed starch did not exhibit typical pasting characteristics expected of normal starch. The Herschel-Bulkley model fitted well to the flow behaviour data, with coefficient of determination (R(2)) ranging from 0.942 to 0.988. All milk-wort blends demonstrated varying degree of shear thinning with flow behavior index (n) ranging from 0.252 to 0.647. Stress-strain data revealed that 1:1 blend of milk to wort had the highest storage modulus (7.09-20.06Pa) and an elastically-dominant behavior (phase angle <45°) over the tested frequency range. The crossover point of G' and G" shifted to higher frequencies with increasing wort content. From the flow and viscoelastic behavior, it was concluded that the 1:1 blend of milk to wort would have least phase separation and better flowability during spray drying.

  5. Rheology and aging: A simple approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derec, C.; Ajdari, A.; Lequeux, F.

    2001-03-01

    We introduce a rheological model to describe the low-frequency mechanical properties of systems near a fluid/paste transition. We propose a Landau-like expansion for the vicinity of this transition, treating the stress relaxation rate as an order parameter. This leads to a formally simple model that allows us to describe the interplay between aging and non-linearities in the mechanical response of the system. We focus here on systems prepared by fluidification under a strong shear, on which mechanical measurments are performed (oscillatory rheology, stress relaxation, response to a steady shear rate), after a waiting time during which the system evolves on its own.

  6. Rheology of hyaluronate.

    PubMed

    Bothner, H; Wik, O

    1987-01-01

    Solutions containing high molecular weight hyaluronate at concentrations around 10 mg/ml exhibit interesting rheological properties due to formation of a highly entangled network of flexible polysaccharide molecules. We have performed an extensive study of the rheological properties of hyaluronate solutions as a function of concentration and molecular weight. In this paper we review some basic rheological concepts, and discuss the rheological properties of hyaluronate solutions at high concentrations and medium to high molecular weights (1-5 million). The bulk viscosity (zero shear viscosity) of hyaluronate solutions is strongly dependent both on concentration and molecular weight. A 2-fold increase in concentration or molecular weight results in a 10-fold increase in bulk viscosity. For application in body compartments, the concentration of hyaluronate cannot be increased much above 10 mg/ml due to the highly non-ideal colloid osmotic behaviour of hyaluronate. High viscosity hyaluronate solutions must therefore be based on high molecular weight material. PMID:3481162

  7. Rheology of planetary ices

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    1996-04-24

    The brittle and ductile rheology of ices of water, ammonia, methane, and other volatiles, in combination with rock particles and each other, have a primary influence of the evolution and ongoing tectonics of icy moons of the outer solar system. Laboratory experiments help constrain the rheology of solar system ices. Standard experimental techniques can be used because the physical conditions under which most solar system ices exist are within reach of conventional rock mechanics testing machines, adapted to the low subsolidus temperatures of the materials in question. The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of a decade-long experimental deformation program and to provide some background in deformation physics in order to lend some appreciation to the application of these measurements to the planetary setting.

  8. Rheology of aqueous foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollet, Benjamin; Raufaste, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Aqueous foams are suspensions of bubbles inside aqueous phases. Their multiphasic composition leads to a complex rheological behavior that is useful in numerous applications, from oil recovery to food/cosmetic processing. Their structure is very similar to the one of emulsions, so that both materials share common mechanical properties. In particular, the presence of surfactants at the gas-liquid interfaces leads to peculiar interfacial and dissipative properties. Foam rheology has been an active research topics and is already reported in several reviews, most of them covering rheometry measurements at the scale of the foam, coupled with interpretations at the local scale of bubbles or interfaces. In this review, we start following this approach, then we try to cover the multiscale features of aqueous foam flows, emphasizing regimes where intermediate length scales need to be taken into account or regimes fast enough regarding internal time scales so that the flow goes beyond the quasi-static limit. xml:lang="fr"

  9. Rheology of giant micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, M. E.; Fielding, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Giant micelles are elongated, polymer-like objects created by the self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules (such as detergents) in solution. Giant micelles are typically flexible, and can become highly entangled even at modest concentrations. The resulting viscoelastic solutions show fascinating flow behaviour (rheology) which we address theoretically in this article at two levels. First, we summarize advances in understanding linear viscoelastic spectra and steady-state nonlinear flows, based on microscopic constitutive models that combine the physics of polymer entanglement with the reversible kinetics of self-assembly. Such models were first introduced two decades ago, and since then have been shown to explain robustly several distinctive features of the rheology in the strongly entangled regime, including extreme shear thinning. We then turn to more complex rheological phenomena, particularly involving spatial heterogeneity, spontaneous oscillation, instability and chaos. Recent understanding of these complex flows is based largely on grossly simplified models which capture in outline just a few pertinent microscopic features, such as coupling between stresses and other order parameters such as concentration. The role of ‘structural memory’ (the dependence of structural parameters such as the micellar length distribution on the flow history) in explaining these highly nonlinear phenomena is addressed. Structural memory also plays an intriguing role in the little-understood shear thickening regime, which occurs in a concentration regime close to but below the onset of strong entanglement, and which is marked by a shear-induced transformation from an inviscid to a gelatinous state.

  10. Thermal and rheological properties of breadfruit starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyu; Chen, Ling; Li, Xiaoxi; Xie, Fengwei; Liu, Hongshen; Yu, Long

    2011-01-01

    The thermal and rheological properties of breadfruit starch were studied using DSC and 2 different rheometers. It was found that the gelatinization temperature of starch with excess moisture content (>70%) was at approximately 75 °C. A new endotherm was detected at about 173 °C when the moisture content was lower than required for full gelatinization of the starch. A detailed examination revealed that this endotherm represented the melting of amylose-lipid complexes. Breadfruit starch paste exhibited shear-thinning fluid characteristics, and good thermal and pH stability. The setback viscosity of the breadfruit starch was lower than that of potato and corn starches. The rheological properties of the breadfruit starch paste was well described by the Herschel-Bulkley model at a shear rate of 0 to 100 s(-1), where R(2) is greater than 0.95, and it behaved like a yield-pseudoplastic fluid. Both the storage modulus and loss modulus of the paste initially increased sharply, then dropped after reaching the gelatinization peak. Breadfruit starch gel showed both flexibility and viscosity. Suspension with 6% starch content exhibited very weak gel rigidity; however, this increased significantly at starch contents above 20%.

  11. Stochastic optical active rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Shin, Yongdae; Kim, Sun Taek; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a stochastic based method for performing active rheology using optical tweezers. By monitoring the displacement of an embedded particle in response to stochastic optical forces, a rapid estimate of the frequency dependent shear moduli of a sample is achieved in the range of 10-1-103 Hz. We utilize the method to probe linear viscoelastic properties of hydrogels at varied cross-linker concentrations. Combined with fluorescence imaging, our method demonstrates non-linear changes of bond strength between T cell receptors and an antigenic peptide due to force-induced cell activation.

  12. Rheological structure in Mars and its time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, S.; Katayama, I.

    2014-12-01

    Mars is one of the terrestrial planets which are composed of rock and metal such as the Earth. There is no water, no life, and no plate tectonics on Mars, suggesting that Mars and Earth followed different evolutionary paths. Rheological structure, which indicates the deformation behavior and the strength of planetary interior, plays an important role in the evolution of planets. The rheological behavior of planetary interiors is strongly sensitive to temperature, which may produce strong rheological layering. Rheological structure of Mars in past must be different from the current rheological structure. First, the evolutions of temperature profiles in Mars are inferred from the surface heat flow and the heat conduction equation. The surface heat flow of Mars every 1 billion years was calculated from present abundances of the radioactive isotopes (235U, 235U, 232Th, and 40K) and their half-lives (Hahn et al 2011). Based on the temperature profile, we calculate the rheological structure of Mars every 1 billion years using flow-law of plagioclase and olivine. Calculated rheological structure shows that the brittle-ductile transition of present Mars, which is transition of deformation behavior from brittle failure to viscous flow, is deeper as compared with that of past Mars, suggesting that current elastic thickness also becomes thicker than that of past Mars. Under water-saturated conditions, the rheological structure which simulates the northern lowlands shows the strength contrast between the crust and mantle, indicating that the decoupling might occur at the Moho from 4 Ga to present day. Under dry conditions, lithosphere of northern lowlands has no strength contrast at the Moho, implying that crust and mantle might be coupled from 3 Ga to present day. Viscosity contrast between the surface and planetary interior is key for the mantle convection style (Moresi and Solomatov 1995), and the calculated viscosity contrast at present Mars is ~10-5 (Pa), suggesting that

  13. Review Of Rheology Modifiers For Hanford Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J. M.

    2013-09-30

    As part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)'s strategic development scope for the Department of Energy - Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste feed acceptance and product qualification scope, the SRNL has been requested to recommend candidate rheology modifiers to be evaluated to adjust slurry properties in the Hanford Tank Farm. SRNL has performed extensive testing of rheology modifiers for use with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulated melter feed - a high undissolved solids (UDS) mixture of simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm sludge, nitric and formic acids, and glass frit. A much smaller set of evaluations with Hanford simulated waste have also been completed. This report summarizes past work and recommends modifiers for further evaluation with Hanford simulated wastes followed by verification with actual waste samples. Based on the review of available data, a few compounds/systems appear to hold the most promise. For all types of evaluated simulated wastes (caustic Handford tank waste and DWPF processing samples with pH ranging from slightly acidic to slightly caustic), polyacrylic acid had positive impacts on rheology. Citric acid also showed improvement in yield stress on a wide variety of samples. It is recommended that both polyacrylic acid and citric acid be further evaluated as rheology modifiers for Hanford waste. These materials are weak organic acids with the following potential issues: The acidic nature of the modifiers may impact waste pH, if added in very large doses. If pH is significantly reduced by the modifier addition, dissolution of UDS and increased corrosion of tanks, piping, pumps, and other process equipment could occur. Smaller shifts in pH could reduce aluminum solubility, which would be expected to increase the yield stress of the sludge. Therefore, it is expected that use of an acidic modifier would be limited to concentrations that do not

  14. Modelling the rheological behavior of high solids CWM systems using a new rheological equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hafaiedh, A.; Dinger, D.R.; Funk, J.E.

    1986-05-01

    The understanding of the rheology of concentrated suspensions is an important part of the control and preparation of ceramic slips and pastes and coal water slurries. Many studies have been conducted on concentrated suspensions; many attempts have been made to formulate equations which describe their behavior; and many attempts have been made to use these equations to predict the behavior of slurries and slips. This paper describes a modification to one of the more commonly used rheological equations, the Bingham equation (E.C. Bingham, ''An Investigation of the Laws of Plastic Flow'', Bulletin of the Bureau of Standards'', Volume 13, pp. 309-353 (1916-1917)), and the initial attempts to use it to understand and model the rheological behavior of high solids CWM. The paper will include the description of the new equation, its derivation, and examples of the various forms of the resulting rheograms. Then in the second part of the paper, the equation will be used to analyze the behavior of some typical CWM systems made from Cedar Grove and Moss seam coals. 8 refs., 18 figs.

  15. Rheology of biological macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila Dinesh

    Proteins have interesting mechanical properties in addition to the remarkable functionality. For example, Guanylate kinase is an enzyme that catalyzes Guano- sine monophosphate (GMP) to Guanosine diphosphate (GDP) conversion and this enzyme is approximately 5 nm in size. A gold nano particle of similar size shows linear elasticity for strains up to ˜ 0.1% and shows plastic deformation beyond that, whereas the enzyme Guanylate kinase can have strains up to 1 % with reversible deformation. Our experiments show many different regimes of the mechanical response before the plastic deformation of these proteins. In this dissertation, I study the materials properties of two classes of proteins, an ion channel protein and a transferase, which is a globular protein. The experimental techniques to study the materials properties of these proteins were uniquely developed at the Zocchi lab. Therefore, we were able to observe previously unknown characteristics of these folded proteins. The mechanical properties of the voltage gated potassium channel KvAP was studied by applying AC depolarizing voltages. This technique gave new information about the system that was not seen in the previous studies. These previous experiments were based on applying DC depolarizing voltage steps across the membrane to study the ionic current. By monitoring the ionic current at different depolarizing voltage steps, the DC gating process of the channel could be under- stood. We probed the channel using AC depolarizing signals instead of DC pulses and the ionic current revealed new behaviors, which cannot be predicted with the DC response. We found that the conformational motion of the voltage sensing domain of the ion channel shows internal dissipation. Further, a new non linearity in the dissipation parameter was found in which the dissipation parameter increased with the shear rate of the applied force. Previous studies at the Zocchi lab used a nano rheology experiment on the protein Guanylate

  16. Aging and nonlinear rheology in suspensions of polyethylene oxide-protected silica particles.

    PubMed

    Derec, Caroline; Ducouret, Guylaine; Ajdari, Armand; Lequeux, François

    2003-06-01

    In an attempt to establish connections between classical rheology and aging in paste colloidal suspensions, we report in this paper a large set of experimental results on a given system. We have studied suspensions of polyethylene oxide-protected silica particles and performed classical rheology experiments that exhibit a very nonlinear behavior. We have then evidenced aging through stress relaxation as observed in various glassy systems, and finally show other manifestations of aging through various rheological experiments. Qualitative agreement between these experimental results and the predictions of a simple model suggests that the behavior observed experimentally is governed by the competition between aging and mechanically induced rejuvenation.

  17. Pasting and rheological properties of chia composites containing barley flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chia containing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs) was composited with barley flour having high ß-glucan content. Both omega-3 PUFAs and ß-glucan are well known for lowering blood cholesterol and preventing coronary heart disease. Barley flour was dry blended with ground chia ...

  18. Quantitative Rheological Model Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan; Ewoldt, Randy

    2014-11-01

    The more parameters in a rheological the better it will reproduce available data, though this does not mean that it is necessarily a better justified model. Good fits are only part of model selection. We employ a Bayesian inference approach that quantifies model suitability by balancing closeness to data against both the number of model parameters and their a priori uncertainty. The penalty depends upon prior-to-calibration expectation of the viable range of values that model parameters might take, which we discuss as an essential aspect of the selection criterion. Models that are physically grounded are usually accompanied by tighter physical constraints on their respective parameters. The analysis reflects a basic principle: models grounded in physics can be expected to enjoy greater generality and perform better away from where they are calibrated. In contrast, purely empirical models can provide comparable fits, but the model selection framework penalizes their a priori uncertainty. We demonstrate the approach by selecting the best-justified number of modes in a Multi-mode Maxwell description of PVA-Borax. We also quantify relative merits of the Maxwell model relative to powerlaw fits and purely empirical fits for PVA-Borax, a viscoelastic liquid, and gluten.

  19. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk

  20. Rheological behavior of oxide nanopowder suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinar, Simge

    Ceramic nanopowders offer great potential in advanced ceramic materials and many other technologically important applications. Because a material's rheological properties are crucial for most processing routes, control of the rheological behavior has drawn significant attention in the recent past. The control of rheological behavior relies on an understanding of how different parameters affect the suspension viscosities. Even though the suspension stabilization mechanisms are relatively well understood for sub-micron and micron size particle systems, this knowledge cannot be directly transferred to nanopowder suspensions. Nanopowder suspensions exhibit unexpectedly high viscosities that cannot be explained with conventional mechanisms and are still a topic of investigation. This dissertation aims to establish the critical parameters governing the rheological behavior of concentrated oxide nanopowder suspensions, and to elucidate the mechanisms by which these parameters control the rheology of these suspensions. Aqueous alumina nanopowders were chosen as a model system, and the findings were extrapolated to other oxide nanopowder systems such as zirconia, yttria stabilized zirconia, and titania. Processing additives such as fructose, NaCl, HCl, NaOH, and ascorbic acid were used in this study. The effect of solids content and addition of fructose on the viscosity of alumina nanopowder suspensions was investigated by low temperature differential scanning calorimetry (LT-DSC), rheological, and zeta potential measurements. The analysis of bound water events observed in LT-DSC revealed useful information regarding the rheological behavior of nanopowder suspensions. Because of the significance of interparticle interactions in nanopowder suspensions, the electrostatic stabilization was investigated using indifferent and potential determining ions. Different mechanisms, e.g., the effect of the change in effective volume fraction caused by fructose addition and electrostatic

  1. Local Oscillatory Rheology from Echography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Michel, Brice; Gibaud, Thomas; Leocmach, Mathieu; Manneville, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Local oscillatory rheology from echography consists of a traditional rheology experiment synchronized with high-frequency ultrasonic imaging which gives access to the local material response to oscillatory shear. Besides classical global rheological quantities, this method provides quantitative time-resolved information on the local displacement across the entire gap of the rheometer. From the local displacement response, we compute and decompose the local strain in its Fourier components and measure the spatially resolved viscoelastic moduli. After benchmarking our method on homogeneous Newtonian fluids and soft solids, we demonstrate that this technique is well suited to characterize spatially heterogeneous samples, wall slip, and the emergence of nonlinearity under large-amplitude oscillatory stress in soft materials.

  2. Rheology of Model Dough Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Kiran; Lele, Smita; Lele, Ashish

    2008-07-01

    Dough is generally considered a viscoelastic material, and its elasticity is attributed to the hydrated gluten matrix. Since starch is a major constituent of flour (˜70 wt% on dry basis) we may expect it to contribute to dough rheology in a non-trivial manner. Considering dough to belong to the generic class of soft solid materials, we use the Strain-Rate Frequency Superposition (SRFS) technique to study rheology of various model dough compositions in which the starch/gluten ratio is systematically varied from 100/0 to 0/100. We find that for compositions containing 0-25% gluten the SRFS superposition principle works well, while for compositions containing greater than 25% gluten the quality of SRFS mastercurves deteriorates gradually. Thus we propose that starch particles contribute substantially to the rheology of dough containing up to 25% gluten.

  3. Microgravity foam structure and rheology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Gopal, Anthony D.

    1994-01-01

    Our long-range objective is to establish the fundamental interrelationship between the microscopic structure and dynamics of foams and their macroscopic stability and rheology. Foam structure and dynamics are to be measured directly and noninvasively through the use and development of novel multiple light scattering techniques such as diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). Foam rheology is to be measured in a custom rheometer which allows simultaneous optical access for multiple light drainage of liquid from in between gas bubbles as the liquid:gas volume fraction in increased towards the rigidity-loss transition.

  4. Simple rheology of mixed proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixing different proteins to form strong gel networks for food applications may create synergistic increases in viscoelasticity that cannot be achieved with a single protein. In this study, small amplitude oscillatory shear analyses were used to investigate the rheology of calcium caseinate (CC), e...

  5. SUMMARY OF 2009 RHEOLOGY MODIFIER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.

    2009-12-08

    The overall objective of the EM-31 Rheological Modifiers and Wetting Agents program is to utilize commercially available rheology modifiers to increase the solids fraction of radioactive sludge based waste streams, resulting in an increase in throughput and decreasing the overall processing time. The program first investigates the impact of rheology modifiers on slurry simulants and then utilizes the most effective rheology modifiers on radioactive slurries. The work presented in this document covers the initial investigation of rheology modifier testing with simulants. This task is supported by both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The SRNL EM-31 task, for this year, was to investigate the use of rheology modifiers on simulant Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feeds. The task is to determine, based on the impact of the rheology modifier, if there are rheology modifiers that could reduce the water content of the slurry going to the DWPF melter, hence increasing the melt rate by decreasing the water loading. The rheology modifier in essence would allow a higher solids content slurry to have the same type of rheology or pumpability of a lower solids slurry. The modifiers selected in this report were determined based on previous modifiers used in high level waste melter feed simulants, on-going testing performed by counterparts at PNNL, and experiences gain through use of modifiers in other Department of Energy (DOE) processes such as grout processing. There were 12 rheology modifiers selected for testing, covering both organic and inorganic types and they were tested at four different concentrations for a given melter feed. Five different DWPF melter feeds were available and there was adequate material in one of the melter feeds to increase the solids concentration, resulting in a total of six simulants for testing. The mass of melter feed available in each simulant was not adequate for

  6. Rheology of model aerosol suspensions.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, B K; Washington, C; Davis, S S; Purewal, T S

    1993-07-01

    The rheological properties of model aerosol suspensions at phase fractions of less than 5% w/v (phase ratio of 0.05) were investigated. The rheological profiles of lactose in chloroform, lactose in trichlorofluoromethane (Propellent 11, P11), and salbutamol sulphate in P11 have been investigated in the presence and absence of lecithin, a phospholipid surface-active agent. The relative viscosities of these disperse systems correlated with the increasing disperse phase fractions and the addition of surfactant was found to reduce these viscosities to a relative viscosity of approximately 1.0. The results suggest that the relative viscosity is a useful indicator of flocculation in these systems, and may be valuable in formulation development. PMID:8105051

  7. Modification of rheological, thermal and functional properties of tapioca starch using gum arabic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of gum arabic (GA) to native tapioca starch (TS) to modify the functionality of TS was investigated. GA is well known for its stabilizing, emulsifying, and thickening properties. The effects of adding GA (0.1-1.0%) on pasting, rheological and solubility properties of TS (5%) were analy...

  8. Anesthetics and red blood cell rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Burcu; Aydogan, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There are many conditions where it is useful for anesthetists to have a knowledge of blood rheology. Blood rheology plays an important role in numerous clinical situations. Hemorheologic changes may significantly affect the induction and recovery times with anesthetic agents. But also, hemorheologic factors are directly or indirectly affected by many anesthetic agents or their metabolites. In this review, the blood rheology with special emphasis on its application in anesthesiology, the importance hemorheological parameters in anesthesiology and also the effect of some anesthetic substances on red blood cell rheology were presented.

  9. [Rheological behavior of tomato concentrates: effect of temperature and concentration].

    PubMed

    Barreiro, J A; Sandoval, A J; Guédez, A; Luciani, Y

    1996-09-01

    The rheological properties of various brands of double concentrated tomato paste manufactured in Venezuela were studied. The effect of temperature (30, 40, 50, 60 degrees C) and concentration (15, 20, 25 and 30% total solids) was determined. A concentric cylinders viscometer Haake Rotovisco RV-2 was used for this purpose. A psudoplastic behaviour that followed the power law was found. The rheological parameters (consistency and behavior indexes) that characterize each paste were determined for the conditions of the study. According to the statistical analyses done the consistency index (K) diminished with an increase in temperature and increased as the concentration increased. An equation to determine the consistency index as a function of temperature and concentration was obtained. Likewise, it was found that temperature did not have a significant effect on the behavior index (n) in the range from 30 to 50 degrees C, however this effect was significant for some of the pastes at 60 degrees C. On the other hand, concentration levels above 20% total solids did not have a significant effect on the behavior index, but a significant effect was determined for 15% total solids.

  10. Chemical and rheological evaluation of polymides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximovich, M.; Wereta, A.; Galeos, R.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical and rheological evaluation techniques were developed for polyimide composite matrix resins. LARC 160 (AP-22), LARC 160 (Curithane 103), PMR 15 and PISO2 resins were investigated. Liquid and solid state rheological techniques were used to develop processing parameters and woven graphite reinforced laminates were successfully fabricated, using these processing parameters.

  11. Blood Rheology in Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Castellini, Michael A.; Baskurt, Oguz; Castellini, Judith M.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    The field of blood oxygen transport and delivery to tissues has been studied by comparative physiologists for many decades. Within this general area, the particular differences in oxygen delivery between marine and terrestrial mammals has focused mainly on oxygen supply differences and delivery to the tissues under low blood flow diving conditions. Yet, the study of the inherent flow properties of the blood itself (hemorheology) is rarely discussed when addressing diving. However, hemorheology is important to the study of marine mammals because of the critical nature of the oxygen stores that are carried in the blood during diving periods. This review focuses on the essential elements of hemorheology, how they are defined and on fundamental rheological applications to marine mammals. While the comparative rationale used throughout the review is much broader than the particular problems associated with diving, the basic concepts focus on how changes in the flow properties of whole blood would be critical to oxygen delivery during diving. This review introduces the reader to most of the major rheological concepts that are relevant to the unique and unusual aspects of the diving physiology of marine mammals. PMID:21423386

  12. Buckwheat and Millet Affect Thermal, Rheological, and Gelling Properties of Wheat Flour.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kao; Gan, Renyou; Dai, Shuhong; Cai, Yi-Zhong; Corke, Harold; Zhu, Fan

    2016-03-01

    Buckwheat (BF) and millet (MF) are recommended as healthy foods due to their unique chemical composition and health benefits. This study investigated the thermal and rheological properties of BF-WF (wheat flour) and MF-WF flour blends at various ratios (0:100 to 100:0). Increasing BF or MF concentration led to higher cold paste viscosity and setback viscosity of pasting properties gel adhesiveness, storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″) of dynamic oscillatory rheology, and yield stress (σ0 ) of flow curve of WF. BF and MF addition decreased peak viscosity and breakdown of pasting, gel hardness, swelling volume, and consistency coefficient (K) of flow curve of WF. Thermal properties of the blends appeared additive of that of individual flour. Nonadditive effects were observed for some property changes in the mixtures, and indicated interactions between flour components. This may provide a physicochemical basis for using BF and MF in formulating novel healthy products.

  13. Rheologically interesting polysaccharides from yeasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Nelson, G. A.; Cathey, C. A.; Fuller, G. G.

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary structures of polysaccharides exhibiting the rheological property of friction (drag) reduction in turbulent flows. We found an example of an exopolysaccharide from the yeast Cryptococcus laurentii that possessed high molecular weight but exhibited lower than expected drag reducing activity. Earlier correlations by Hoyt showing that beta 1 --> 3, beta 2 --> 4, and alpha 1 --> 3 linkages in polysaccharides favored drag reduction were expanded to include correlations to secondary structure. The effect of sidechains in a series of gellan gums was shown to be related to sidechain length and position. Disruption of secondary structure in drag reducing polysaccharides reduced drag reducing activity for some but not all exopolysaccharides. The polymer from C. laurentii was shown to be more stable than xanthan gum and other exopolysaccharides under the most vigorous of denaturing conditions. We also showed a direct relationship between extensional viscosity measurements and the drag reducing coefficient for four exopolysaccharides.

  14. Rheology of hydrate forming emulsions.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Jorge; Karanjkar, Prasad U; Lee, Jae W; Morris, Jeffrey F

    2010-07-20

    Results are reported on an experimental study of the rheology of hydrate-forming water-in-oil emulsions. Density-matched concentrated emulsions were quenched by reducing the temperature and an irreversible transition was observed where the viscosity increased dramatically. The hydrate-forming emulsions have characteristic times for abrupt viscosity change dependent only on the temperature, reflecting the importance of the effect of subcooling. Mechanical transition of hydrate-free water-in-oil emulsions may require longer times and depends on the shear rate, occurring more rapidly at higher rates but with significant scatter which is characterized through a probabilistic analysis. This rate dependence together with dependence on subcooling reflects the importance of hydrodynamic forces to bring drops or particles together.

  15. The Rheology of Concentrated Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas Acrivos

    2004-09-07

    Research program on the rheological properties of flowing suspensions. The primary purpose of the research supported by this grant was to study the flow characteristics of concentrated suspensions of non-colloidal solid particles and thereby construct a comprehensive and robust theoretical framework for modeling such systems quantitatively. At first glance, this seemed like a modest goal, not difficult to achieve, given that such suspensions were viewed simply as Newtonian fluids with an effective viscosity equal to the product of the viscosity of the suspending fluid times a function of the particle volume fraction. But thanks to the research findings of the Principal Investigator and of his Associates, made possible by the steady and continuous support which the PI received from the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the subject is now seen to be more complicated and therefore much more interesting in that concentrated suspensions have been shown to exhibit fascinating and unique rheological properties of their own that have no counterpart in flowing Newtonian or even non-Newtonian (polymeric) fluids. In fact, it is generally acknowledged that, as the result of these investigations for which the PI received the 2001 National Medal of Science, our understanding of how suspensions behave under flow is far more detailed and comprehensive than was the case even as recently as a decade ago. Thus, given that the flow of suspensions plays a crucial role in many diverse physical processes, our work has had a major and lasting impact in a subject having both fundamental as well as practical importance.

  16. Thixotropic properties of waxy potato starch depending on the degree of the granules pasting.

    PubMed

    Krystyjan, Magdalena; Sikora, Marek; Adamczyk, Greta; Dobosz, Anna; Tomasik, Piotr; Berski, Wiktor; Łukasiewicz, Marcin; Izak, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the rheological instability (thixotropy/antithixotropy) of waxy potato starch (WPS) pastes depending on their concentration (1-5% w/w) and pasting temperature (80, 95 and autoclaved: 121°C, at 0.1MPa). The hysteresis loop, apparent viscosity at constant shear rate as well as the in-shear structural recovery tests with and without pre-shearing were applied. The pastes were also characterized by the granularity profile, molecular weight, polydispersity and optical transmittance. Differences in rheological properties of the pastes prepared at 80 and 95°C as well as autoclaved resulted from degree of granules pasting. At 121 °C dissolution of the granules occurred, while at the lower temperatures only the partial pasting of the granules took place. Pasting temperature of WPS significantly influenced rheological parameters of the resulted pastes which had thixotropic, antithixotropic or mixed thixotropic/antithixotropic behavior. Autoclaved pastes, regardless their concentration were antithixotropic as demonstrated by the areas of hysteresis loops derived from the flow curves signalized by the degree of structure recovery (DSR) which exceeded unity. The apparent viscosity of WPS pasted at 121°C strongly decreased as compared to the samples pasted at lower temperatures. Samples pasted at 80 and 95°C showed both thixotropic and antithixotropic behavior, with a predominance of the latter. The starch concentration played an important role in the formation of the rheological properties of the resulted pastes. Its influence was strongly connected with the degree of the granules pasting, therefore with the temperature of pastes preparation. For the pastes prepared at 80 and 95°C the values of thixotropy and apparent viscosity increased, while the values of DSR decreased with an increase of concentration. In the autoclaved pastes the antithixotropy, DSR and apparent viscosity increased with increasing starch concentration. It was also found that apart

  17. Investigation of interfacial rheology & foam stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn M.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-05-01

    The rheology at gas-liquid interfaces strongly influences the stability and dynamics of foams and emulsions. Several experimental techniques are employed to characterize the rheology at liquid-gas interfaces with an emphasis on the non-Newtonian behavior of surfactant-laden interfaces. The focus is to relate the interfacial rheology to the foamability and foam stability of various aqueous systems. An interfacial stress rheometer (ISR) is used to measure the steady and dynamic rheology by applying an external magnetic field to actuate a magnetic needle suspended at the interface. Results are compared with those from a double wall ring attachment to a rotational rheometer (TA Instruments AR-G2). Micro-interfacial rheology (MIR) is also performed using optical tweezers to manipulate suspended microparticle probes at the interface to investigate the steady and dynamic rheology. Additionally, a surface dilatational rheometer (SDR) is used to periodically oscillate the volume of a pendant drop or buoyant bubble. Applying the Young-Laplace equation to the drop shape, a time-dependent surface tension can be calculated and used to determine the effective dilatational viscosity of an interface. Using the ISR, double wall ring, SDR, and MIR, a wide range of sensitivity in surface forces (fN to nN) can be explored as each experimental method has different sensitivities. Measurements will be compared to foam stability.

  18. Rheology of Diabase: Implications for Tectonics on Venus and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlstedt, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Two important goals of our experimental investigation of the rheological behavior of diabase rocks were: (1) to determine flow laws describing their creep behavior over wide ranges of temperature, stress and strain rate and (2) to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms by which these rocks flow under laboratory conditions. With this basis, a primary objective then was to construct constitutive equations that can be used to extrapolate from laboratory to planetary conditions. We specifically studied the rheological properties of both natural rock samples and synthetic aggregates. The former provided constraints for geologic systems, while the latter defined the relative contributions of the constituent mineral phases and avoided the influence of glass/melt found in natural samples. In addition, partially molten samples of crustal rock composition were deformed in shear to large strains (greater than 200%) important in crustal environments. The results of this research yielded essential rheological properties essential for models of crustal deformation on terrestrial planets, specifically Venus and Mars, as well as on the geodynamical evolution of these planets. Over the past three years, we also completed our investigation of the creep behavior of water ice with applications to the glaciers, ice sheets and icy satellites. Constitutive equations were determined that describe flow over a wide ranged of stress, strain rate, grain size and temperature. In the case of ice, three creep regimes were delineate. Extrapolation demonstrates that dislocation glide and grain boundary sliding processes dominate flow in ice I under planetary conditions and that diffusion creep is not an important deformation mechanism either in the laboratory or on icy satellites. These results have already been incorporated by other investigators into models describing, for example, the thickness and stability of the ice shell on Europa and to unravel long-standing discrepancies

  19. The rheology of structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning

    2000-10-01

    In this work, the rheological properties of structured materials are studied via both theoretical (continuum mechanics and molecular theory) and experimental approaches. Through continuum mechanics, a structural model, involving shear-induced structural breakdown and buildup, is extended to model biofluids. In particular, we study the cases of steady shear flow, hysteresis, yield stress, small amplitude oscillatory flow as well as non-linear viscoelasticity. Model predictions are successfully compared with experimental data on complex materials such as blood and a penicillin suspension. Next, modifications are introduced into the network model. A new formulation involving non-affine motion is proposed and its applications are presented. The major improvement is that a finite elongational viscosity is predicted for finite elongational rate, contrary to infinite elongational viscosities existing at some elongational rates predicted by most previous network models. Comparisons with experimental data on shear viscosity, primary normal stress coefficient and elongational viscosity are given, in terms of the same set of model parameters. Model predictions for the stress growth are also shown. The model is successfully tested with data on a polyisobutylene solution (S1), on a polystyrene solution and on a poly-alpha-methylstyrene solution. A further extension of the network model is related to the prediction of the stress jump phenomenon which is defined as the instantaneous gain or loss of stress on startup or cessation of a deformation. It is not predicted by most existing models. In this work, the internal viscosity idea used in the dumbbell model is incorporated into the transient network model. Via appropriate approximations, a closed form constitutive equation, which predicts a stress jump, is obtained. Successful comparisons with the available stress jump measurements are given. In addition, the model yields good quantitative predictions of the standard steady

  20. Lubricant Rheology in Concentrated Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.

    1984-01-01

    Lubricant behavior in highly stressed situtations shows that a Newtonian model for lubricant rheology is insufficient for explanation of traction behavior. The oil film build up is predicted by using a Newtonian lubricant model except at high slide to roll ratios and at very high loads, where the nonNewtonian behavior starts to be important already outside the Hertzian contact area. Static and dynamic experiments are reported. In static experiments the pressure is applied to the lubricant more than a million times longer than in an EHD contact. Depending on the pressure-temperature history of the experiment the lubricant will become a crystallized or amorphous solid at high pressures. In dynamic experiments, the oil is in an amorphous solid state. Depending on the viscosity, time scale, elasticity of the oil and the bearing surfaces, the oil film pressure, shear strain rate and the type of lubricant, different properties of the oil are important for prediction of shear stresses in the oil. The different proposed models for the lubricant, which describe it to a Newtonian liquid, an elastic liquid, a plastic liquid and an elastic-plastic solid.

  1. The effect of water to mantle rheology and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brändli, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Water has a significant influence to mantle rheology and therefore also to the convection of the mantle and the plate tectonics. The viscosity of the mantle can be decreased by up to two orders of magnitude when water is present. Another effect of the water is the change in the solidus of the mantle and therefore the melting regime. These two effects of water in the mantle have a significant influence on mantle convection and plate tectonics. The influx of water to the mantle is driven by plate tectonics as wet oceanic lithosphere is subducted into the mantle, then water is brought back to the lithosphere and the surface by MOR-, arc- and hotspot volcanism. Studies show that the amount of water in the mantle is about three times bigger than the water in the oceans. To model this water cycle multiple additions to our simulation code StagYY are necessary. A water diffusion to complement the water transport due to advection, and water dependent viscosity law are implemented. This additions to StagYY will be followed by implementations of a pressure-temperature law for maximum water content, additional transport mechanisms for water, water dependent solidus functions and the implementation of recent values for plate velocities and water capacities in subducting slabs. This will allow us to research the influence of water to the mantle convection and rheology over the past 200Ma.

  2. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  3. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  4. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  5. Synthesis, rheology and forming of Y-Ba-Cu-O ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, T.M.

    1993-07-01

    A chemical synthesis route is discussed which results in a low- temperature precursor to Y-Ba-Cu-O ceramics; it is based on use of molten Ba(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}8H{sub 2}O flux. Two different chemical systems have been examined; the first one, based on nitrate salts, has been demonstrated to be a viable precursor material for tape casting and extrusion; the second, made from acetate salts, has been used for powder synthesis and extrusion. Rheology of pastes shows that their flow may be fit to either Bingham Plastic or Hershel- Bulkley models. Yield stress is controlled in both pastes by volume fraction solids. Viscosity also follows solids loading in the paste. Shear thinning is controlled by colloidal nature of precursor. The paste has colloidal microstructure. Comparison of concentric cylinder rheometry and piston extrusion rheometry shows order of magnitude differences in yield stress, resulting from the test method and paste dilation.

  6. Introduction to Rheology and Application to Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, C.

    This chapter gives an overview of the major current issues in rheology through a series of different problems of particular relevance to geophysics. For each topic considered here, we will outline the key elements and point the reader to ward the most helpful references and authoritative works. The reader is also referred to available books introducing rheology [1, 2] for a more complete presentation and to the tutorial written by Middleton and Wilcock on mechanical and rheological app lications in geophysics [3]. This chapter will focus on materials encountered by geophysicists (mud, snow, magma, etc.), although in most cases we will consider only suspensions of particles within an interstitial fluid without loss of generality. Other complex fluids such as polymeric liquids are rarely encountered in geophysics.

  7. The debris-flow rheology myth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Models that employ a fixed rheology cannot yield accurate interpretations or predictions of debris-flow motion, because the evolving behavior of debris flows is too complex to be represented by any rheological equation that uniquely relates stress and strain rate. Field observations and experimental data indicate that debris behavior can vary from nearly rigid to highly fluid as a consequence of temporal and spatial variations in pore-fluid pressure and mixture agitation. Moreover, behavior can vary if debris composition changes as a result of grain-size segregation and gain or loss of solid and fluid constituents in transit. An alternative to fixed-rheology models is provided by a Coulomb mixture theory model, which can represent variable interactions of solid and fluid constituents in heterogeneous debris-flow surges with high-friction, coarse-grained heads and low-friction, liquefied tails. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  8. Thixotropic properties of normal potato starch depending on the degree of the granules pasting.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Marek; Adamczyk, Greta; Krystyjan, Magdalena; Dobosz, Anna; Tomasik, Piotr; Berski, Wiktor; Lukasiewicz, Marcin; Izak, Piotr

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper was the study of the rheological instability (thixotropy and/or antithixotropy) of normal potato starch (NPS) pastes depending on their concentration (2-5%) and degree of pasting. Flow curves with hysteresis loops, apparent viscosity at constant shear rate and in-shear structural recovery tests were carried out. Granule size profiles, the pasting characteristic of corresponding starch suspensions and the transmittance of the pastes, the molecular weights and polydispersity of granular starch and its pastes prepared at 80, 95 and 121°C were also studied. The degree of pasting was dependent on the temperature and the concentration and influenced strongly the rheological behavior of the pastes. All pastes belonged to the non-Newtonian liquids thinned by shear and were rheologically unstable to the various extent. Thixotropic properties were connected to the size and the number of the starch granules in the pastes as well as depended on the measuring method used. In the 2 and 3% samples pasted at 80°C the swelling of the granules prevailed their destruction (thixotropy was observed). In the other samples the destruction predominated the swelling (antithixotropy observed). PMID:25659697

  9. Characterizing the rheology of fluidized granular matter.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Kenneth W; Villa, Umberto; Newey, Mike; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    In this study we characterize the rheology of fluidized granular matter subject to secondary forcing. Our approach consists of first fluidizing granular matter in a drum half filled with grains via simple rotation and then superimposing oscillatory shear perpendicular to the downhill flow direction. The response of the system is mostly linear, with a phase lag between the grain motion and the oscillatory forcing. The rheology of the system can be well characterized by the GDR MiDi model if the system is forced with slow oscillations. The model breaks down when the forcing time scale becomes comparable to the characteristic time for energy dissipation in the flow. PMID:24125256

  10. Rheology of interfacial protein-polysaccharide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.

    2013-05-01

    The morphology and mechanical properties of protein adsorption layers can significantly be altered by the presence of surfactants, lipids, particles, other proteins, and polysaccharides. In food emulsions, polysaccharides are primarily considered as bulk thickener but can under appropriate environmental conditions stabilize or destabilize the protein adsorption layer and, thus, the entire emulsion system. Despite their ubiquitous usage as stabilization agent, relatively few investigations focus on the interfacial rheology of composite protein/polysaccharide adsorption layers. The manuscript provides a brief review on both main stabilization mechanisms, thermodynamic phase separation and electrostatic interaction and discusses the rheological response in light of the environmental conditions such as ionic strength and pH.

  11. Characterizing the rheology of fluidized granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmond, Kenneth W.; Villa, Umberto; Newey, Mike; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    In this study we characterize the rheology of fluidized granular matter subject to secondary forcing. Our approach consists of first fluidizing granular matter in a drum half filled with grains via simple rotation and then superimposing oscillatory shear perpendicular to the downhill flow direction. The response of the system is mostly linear, with a phase lag between the grain motion and the oscillatory forcing. The rheology of the system can be well characterized by the GDR MiDi model if the system is forced with slow oscillations. The model breaks down when the forcing time scale becomes comparable to the characteristic time for energy dissipation in the flow.

  12. From Reactor to Rheology in LDPE Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Daniel J.; Das, Chinmay; Auhl, Dietmar; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Kapnistos, Michael; Doelder, Jaap den; Vittorias, Iakovos

    2008-07-07

    In recent years the association between molecular structure and linear rheology has been established and well-understood through the tube concept and its extensions for well-characterized materials (e.g. McLeish, Adv. Phys. 2002). However, for industrial branched polymeric material at processing conditions this piece of information is missing. A large number of phenomenological models have been developed to describe the nonlinear response of polymers. But none of these models takes into account the underlying molecular structure, leading to a fitting procedure with arbitrary fitting parameters. The goal of applied molecular rheology is a predictive scheme that runs in its entirety from the molecular structure from the reactor to the non-linear rheology of the resin. In our approach, we use a model for the industrial reactor to explicitly generate the molecular structure ensemble of LDPE's, (Tobita, J. Polym. Sci. B 2001), which are consistent with the analytical information. We calculate the linear rheology of the LDPE ensemble with the use of a tube model for branched polymers (Das et al., J. Rheol. 2006). We then, separate the contribution of the stress decay to a large number of pompom modes (McLeish et al., J. Rheol. 1998 and Inkson et al., J. Rheol. 1999) with the stretch time and the priority variables corresponding to the actual ensemble of molecules involved. This multimode pompom model allows us to predict the nonlinear properties without any fitting parameter. We present and analyze our results in comparison with experimental data on industrial materials.

  13. Rheological Modifier Testing with DWPF Process Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL, STONE

    2004-02-01

    Rheological modification agents were tested on simulated SRAT and SME products to determine if a suitable agent could be found for the DWPF process slurries. The agents tested were dispersants that lower the rheological properties of slurries by preventing agglomerization. Dolapix CE64, an ethylene glycol, and Disperse-Ayd W28, a polyacrylate, were the most effective dispersants tested. Further evaluation and testing should be performed on Dolapix CE64 and Disperse-Ayd W28 to determine if implementation is possible in DWPF. The initial phase of future work will include optimization of the rheology modifier by the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) and development of a maximum concentration limit for the rheology modifiers. IIT has been commissioned to evaluate the properties of these chemicals to determine if the chemical makeup can be optimized to enhance the properties of these modifiers. An initial concentration limit based upon the DWPF flammability limit and other constraints should be calculated to determine the potential downstream impacts.

  14. Impact of Rheology on Meltblown Polymer Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Dawud H.; Ellison, Christopher J.; Bates, Frank S.; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2008-07-01

    Melt blowing, a commercialized polymer processing technique, is used to produce a majority of nonwoven fiber products. It utilizes a stream of hot air to attenuate an extruded polymer strand into a fiber that is typically larger than 1 μm in diameter. Recently, our group has demonstrated the capability of melt blowing various polymers into defect-free fibers with an average diameter of several hundred nanometers by using a lab scale melt blowing device designed after a typical commercial instrument. However, surface tension-driven instabilities are observed when the smallest fibers are generated, resulting in droplets dispersed in the fiber mat. We hypothesize that altering the rheological properties of polymer may either delay or suppress these instabilities. In this study, the rheology has been studied systematically by melt blowing bidisperse polymeric blends obtained by mixing low and high molecular weight polymer. The associated changes in the rheological properties and the effect of rheology on the average and the width of the fiber diameter distribution will be highlighted.

  15. RHEOLOGY OF CONCENTRATED SOLUTIONS OF HYPERBRANCHED POLYESTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solution rheology of different generations of hyperbranched polyesters in N-methyl-2- pyrrolidinone (NMP) solvent was examined in this study. The solutions exhibited Newtonian behavior over a wide range of polyester concentrations. Also, the relative viscosities of poly(amido...

  16. Rheological properties of defense waste slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this two-year project has been to obtain refined and reliable experimental data about the rheological properties of melter feeds. The research has involved both experimental studies and model development. Two experimental facilities have been set up to measure viscosity and pressure drop. Mathematical models have been developed as a result of experimental observation and fundamental rheological theory. The model has the capability to predict the viscosity of melter slurries in a range of experimental conditions. The final results of the investigation could be used to enhance the current design base for slurry transportation systems and improve the performance of the slurry mixing process. If successful, the cost of this waste treatment will be reduced, and disposal safety will be increased. The specific objectives for this project included: (1) the design, implementation, and validation of the experimental facility in both batch and continuous operating modes; (2) the identification and preparation of melter feed samples of both the SRS and Hanford waste slurries at multiple solids concentration levels; (3) the measurement and analysis of the melter feeds to determine the effects of the solids concentration, pH value, and other factors on the rheological properties of the slurries; (4) the correlation of the rheological properties as a function of the measured physical and chemical parameters; and (5) transmission of the experimental data and resulting correlation to the DOE site user to guide melter feed preparation and transport equipment design.

  17. Basic program analyzes fluid rheology to determine pump rates

    SciTech Connect

    Moftah, K.R. )

    1994-05-09

    The use of statistical methods can improve the selection of a rheological model and the subsequent calculations for critical pump rate and pressure drop for cementing operations. The accompanying interactive Basic computer program allows the user to analyze fluid rheology to help determine the best data for use in predicting cementing pump rates. An accurate critical pump rate and pressure drop can then be calculated based on the correctly calculated rheological parameters. For cementing operations, the important methods of calculating the critical pump rate are the Hedstrom analysis, based on the Bingham plastic rheological model, and the Metzner and Reed analysis, based on the power law rheological model.

  18. Shear rheology of molten crumb chocolate.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J E; Van Damme, I; Johns, M L; Routh, A F; Wilson, D I

    2009-03-01

    The shear rheology of fresh molten chocolate produced from crumb was studied over 5 decades of shear rate using controlled stress devices. The Carreau model was found to be a more accurate description than the traditional Casson model, especially at shear rates between 0.1 and 1 s(-1). At shear rates around 0.1 s(-1) (shear stress approximately 7 Pa) the material exhibited a transition to a solid regime, similar to the behavior reported by Coussot (2005) for other granular suspensions. The nature of the suspension was explored by investigating the effect of solids concentration (0.20 < phi < 0.75) and the nature of the particles. The rheology of the chocolate was then compared with the rheology of (1) a synthetic chocolate, which contained sunflower oil in place of cocoa butter, and (2) a suspension of sugar of a similar size distribution (volume mean 15 mum) in cocoa butter and emulsifier. The chocolate and synthetic chocolate showed very similar rheological profiles under both steady shear and oscillatory shear. The chocolate and the sugar suspension showed similar Krieger-Dougherty dependency on volume fraction, and a noticeable transition to a stiff state at solids volume fractions above approximately 0.5. Similar behavior has been reported by Citerne and others (2001) for a smooth peanut butter, which had a similar particle size distribution and solids loading to chocolate. The results indicate that the melt rheology of the chocolate is dominated by hydrodynamic interactions, although at high solids volume fractions the emulsifier may contribute to the departure of the apparent viscosity from the predicted trend.

  19. Measurements and models of cytoskeletal rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamm, Roger

    2006-11-01

    Much attention has recently focused on understanding the rheology of living cells and reconstituted actin gels using a variety of experimental methods (e.g., single- and multi-particle tracking, magnetic twisting cytometry, AFM indentation) and several different models or descriptors (e.g., biopolymer models, tensegrity, cellular solids, power-law rheology), but the debate continues regarding the fundamental basis for the experimental observations. Our recent studies examine the time-dependent behavior of neutrophils as they deform to enter a narrow channel with capillary-scale dimensions. A sudden drop in the shear modulus is observed, followed by recovery to pre-deformation values in < 1 minute. These rheological changes coincide with a reduction in f-actin content and a transient increase in calcium ion concentration [Ca^++], and the change in storage modulus can be prevented by calcium chelation, suggesting that these observations are causally linked. Cells lacking the ability to increase [Ca^++] also become activated more rapidly following deformation, and the time to activation is independent of intracellular strain rates, contrary to experiments lacking the chelating agent. To better understand these processes and the nature of cytoskeletal rheology in general, we have developed a Brownian dynamics model for cytoskeletal self-assembly and subsequent rheological measurement by single particle tracking. Cross-linking proteins are included possessing a range of properties that lead to a variety of cytoskeletal structures from a fine, homogeneous mesh to a structure containing large stress fibers of varying thickness. These results are described in a multi-dimensional phase space that takes into account the geometry, dimensions and stiffness of the cross-linkers.

  20. Role of Yield Stress in Magma Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, A.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Davaille, A.; Kurita, K.

    2012-04-01

    Magmas are essentially multiphase material composed of solid crystals, gaseous bubbles and silicate liquids. They exhibit various types of drastic change in rheology with variation of mutual volumetric fractions of the components. The nature of this variable rheology is a key factor in controlling dynamics of flowing magma through a conduit. Particularly the existence of yield stress in flowing magma is expected to control the wall friction and formation of density waves. As the volumetric fraction of solid phase increases yield stress emerges above the critical fraction. Several previous studies have been conducted to clarify this critical value of magmatic fluid both in numerical simulations and laboratory experiments ([Lejeune and Pascal, 1995], [Saar and Manga 2001], [Ishibashi and Sato 2010]). The obtained values range from 13.3 to 40 vol%, which display wide variation and associated change in rheology has not been clarified well. In this presentation we report physical mechanism of emergence of yield stress in suspension as well as the associated change in the rheology based on laboratory experiments using analog material. We utilized thermogel aqueous suspension as an analog material of multiphase magma. Thermogel, which is a commercial name for poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) undergoes volumetric phase change at the temperature around 35C:below this temperature the gel phase absorbs water and swells while below this it expels water and its volume shrinks. Because of this the volumetric fraction of gel phase systematically changes with temperature and the concentration of gel powder. The viscosity measured at lower stress drastically decreases across this phase change with increasing temperature while the viscosity at higher stress does not exhibit large change across the transition. We have performed a series of rheological measurements focusing on the emergence of yield stress on this aqueous suspension. Since the definition of yield stress is not

  1. Colony Rheology: Active Arthropods Generate Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Mann, Michael; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Hydrodynamic-like flows are observed in biological systems as varied as bacteria, insects, birds, fish, and mammals. Both the phenomenology (e.g. front instabilities, milling motions) and the interaction types (hydrodynamic, direct contact, psychological, excluded-volume) strongly vary between systems, but a question common to all of them is to understand the role of particle-scale fluctuations in controlling large-scale rheological behaviors. We will address these questions through experiments on a new system, Tyrolichus casei (cheese mites), which live in dense, self-mixing colonies composed of a mixture of living mites and inert flour/detritus. In experiments performed in a Hele-Shaw geometry, we observe that the rheology of a colony is strongly dependent on the relative concentration of active and inactive particles. In addition to spreading flows, we also observe that the system can generate convective circulation and auto-compaction.

  2. Nonlinear and nonlocal rheology of jammed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Brian

    Emulsions, foams, and grains all jam into a weakly elastic state when confined by pressure. By now the mechanics of jammed matter is well understood in the case of slow, weak, and homogeneous forcing - but in reality, it is rare for all three of these assumptions to hold. Here we demonstrate the complex rheology that results when jammed materials are forced at finite rate, finite amplitude, and finite wavelength. Using computer simulations, we subject dense soft sphere packings to a host of rheological tests, including stress relaxation, flow start-up, oscillatory shear, and standing wave forcing. These allow us to tease apart the influence of viscous, nonlinear, and nonlocal effects, and also to probe the link between particle dynamics and bulk response. We identify strain, time, and length scales that depend critically on the distance to the jamming transition, and which govern the onset of shear thinning, strain softening, and gradient elasticity.

  3. Introduction to Rheology for Ultrasonic Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takanobu

    2008-05-01

    Here, I introduce the fundamental concept and methodology of rheology measurement especially to researchers in the field of ultrasonic engineering. Althogh we consider the material as fluid and characterize it in terms of viscosity accompanied by its complex part representing elasticity, ultrasonic spectroscopy regards the material as solid with elasticity, which determines ultrasonic velocity. Although these two research fields have contrary viewpoints, they share the purpose of the study, that is, to characterize the mechanical properties of the material as a function of frequency or shear rate and to reveal its mechanism and structure at the molecular level. In this paper, I show the basic methods of rheology measurement and analysis in relation to ultrasonic technology.

  4. Rheological Properties of Iron Oxide Based Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, M.; Mohanta, D.

    2009-06-01

    In the present work, we report synthesis and magneto-viscous properties of cationic and anionic surfactant coated, iron oxide nanoparticles based ferrofluids. Structural and morphological aspects are revealed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. We compare the rheological/magneto-viscous properties of different ferrofluids for various shear rates (2-450 sec-1) and applied magnetic fields (0-100 gauss). In the absence of a magnetic field, and under no shear case, the ferrofluid prepared with TMAH coated particle is found to be 12% more viscous compared to its counterpart. The rheological properties are governed by non-Newtonian features, and for a definite shear rate, viscosity of a given ferrofluid is found to be strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field as well as nature of the surfactant.

  5. Rheological Characterization of Oil Cement Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrahmane, Mellak; Moh-Amokrane, Aitouche

    2015-04-01

    This study is a contribution to the study of the rheological behavior of cement suspensions. An oil well is drilled, cased, cemented and set completion. The well drilling is done in several phases then at various diameters to isolate the following problems like land fragile subsidence and poorly consolidated aquifer formations, loss of the movement in the porous and permeable formations. Therefore, it would go down a casing and cementing to work safely. The materials studied were chosen to satisfy the requirements and the problems encountered in real applications in the oil field (casing cementing wells). So it was used an oil hydraulic binder "G". This systematic study of rheological properties of cement Class "G" standardized API (American Petroleum Institute) deal with a formulation which is compatible with the surrounding environment taking account an optimal efficiency.

  6. Rheological Behavior of Titanium Dioxide Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua-Gui; Li, Chun-Zhong; Gu, Hong-Chen; Fang, Tu-Nan

    2001-04-01

    The rheological properties of titanium dioxide dispersed in water are measured over a wide range of powder concentrations, temperatures, and pH values. The value of intrinsic viscosity of titanium dioxide measured with an Ubbelohde capillary viscometer is 3.55, which is useful for determining the shape and aggregation property of the particles. The yield stress and steady shear viscosity of titanium dioxide with broad and narrow particle size distributions were measured over a wide range of solid volume fractions on a Brabender rheometer. It is observed that the rheological properties of the suspensions are quite different due to the difference in particle size distributions. Quemada, Casson, and Zhou's models were used to fit the experimental data and useful parameters were obtained. Calculated data are also in good agreement with the experimental data. As expected, the shear viscosity and yield stress decrease with increasing temperature. But when the temperature is around 50 degrees C, yield stress increases with increasing temperature while shear viscosity exhibits a complex behavior. The phenomena are very interesting and special. The Peclet number was used to analyze the shear thickening behavior. Models were also used to describe the shear viscosity under different temperatures and the master plots of the reduced variables eta/eta(infinity) vs t(c)gamma; at different temperatures are superimposed, which means the agreement is fair and the models are suitable to describe the rheological properties of titanium dioxide suspensions. pH effects were investigated on a Rheometrics RFS-II rheometer and it was found that pH can change the surface charge of the particles, which also affects the rheological behavior. The pH at which maximum shear viscosity and yield stress occur is in concordance with the isoelectric point. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. Rheological evaluation of pretreated cladding removal waste

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, D.; Chan, M.K.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    Cladding removal waste (CRW) contains concentrations of transuranic (TRU) elements in the 80 to 350 nCi/g range. This waste will require pretreatment before it can be disposed of as glass or grout at Hanford. The CRW will be pretreated with a rare earth strike and solids removal by centrifugation to segregate the TRU fraction from the non-TRU fraction of the waste. The centrifuge centrate will be neutralized with sodium hydroxide. This neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) is expected to be suitable for grouting. The TRU solids removed by centrifugation will be vitrified. The goal of the Rheological Evaluation of Pretreated Cladding Removal Waste Program was to evaluate those rheological and transport properties critical to assuring successful handling of the NCRW and TRU solids streams and to demonstrate transfers in a semi-prototypic pumping environment. This goal was achieved by a combination of laboratory and pilot-scale evaluations. The results obtained during these evaluations were correlated with classical rheological models and scaled-up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The Program used simulated NCRW and TRU solid slurries. Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) provided 150 gallons of simulated CRW and 5 gallons of simulated TRU solid slurry. The simulated CRW was neutralized by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The physical and rheological properties of the NCRW and TRU solid slurries were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCRW allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic or yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The TRU solids slurry contained very few solids. This slurry exhibited the properties associated with a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid.

  8. Rheology of a Polymeric Bicontinuous Microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Kasiraman; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the rheological properties of a model polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion. The microemulsion consists of a ternary blend of poly(ethyl ethylene) (PEE), poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) and the diblock copolymer PEE-PDMS. Steady shear measurements reveal four regimes as a function of shear rate. Newtonian behavior is observed at low shear rates (regime I), whereas shear thinning occurs in regime II. The striking feature is a stress plateau in regime III, independent of shear rate; the stress increases with shear rate again in regime IV. The morphologies in different regimes were characterized by neutron scattering, x-ray scattering, light scattering and microscopy, and these provide evidence for the occurrence of flow-induced phase separation. Transient rheological measurements reveal a behavior similar to worm-like micelles. Transient measurements for step changes in shear rate between different regimes confirm the proposed morphologies. Equilibrium rheological measurements show similarities with diblock copolymer lamellar phases just above the order-disorder transition.

  9. Rheological and boundary effects on microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas; Loghin, Daniel; Smith, David

    2013-11-01

    Two important environmental factors impacting cell motility are the rheological properties of the surrounding fluid and the presence of boundaries. In this talk we will present simulations that explore the relationship between microswimmer, fluid rheology and boundary features, with a particular emphasis on the example of human sperm. Human sperm must navigate the labyrinthine structure of human fallopian tubes, actively bending their flagella in order to propel themselves through physiological mucus. Sperm trajectories are greatly affected by boundaries, scattering over features such as steps and ripples. We present simulations of scattering sperm-like swimmers in confined geometries, comparing these results to experiments of swimmers in microchannels. The rheological properties of mucus also affect sperms' ability to penetrate. Using the method of femlets, a new finite element technique entailing an immersed force representation of the swimmer with a body-fitted mesh, we present novel physical mechanisms through which shear-thinning, an important property of physiological mucus affects microscopic swimmers. In particular, we show that these effects are sensitive to the swimming stroke employed, and present example reciprocal swimmers that violate Purcell's Scallop Theorem.

  10. Time domain analysis of the weighted distributed order rheological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lili; Pu, Hai; Li, Yan; Li, Ming

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the fundamental solution and relevant properties of the weighted distributed order rheological model in the time domain. Based on the construction of distributed order damper and the idea of distributed order element networks, this paper studies the weighted distributed order operator of the rheological model, a generalization of distributed order linear rheological model. The inverse Laplace transform on weighted distributed order operators of rheological model has been obtained by cutting the complex plane and computing the complex path integral along the Hankel path, which leads to the asymptotic property and boundary discussions. The relaxation response to weighted distributed order rheological model is analyzed, and it is closely related to many physical phenomena. A number of novel characteristics of weighted distributed order rheological model, such as power-law decay and intermediate phenomenon, have been discovered as well. And meanwhile several illustrated examples play important role in validating these results.

  11. Crust rheology, slab detachment and topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    The collision between continents following the closure of an ocean can lead to the subduction of continental crust. The introduction of buoyant crust within subduction zones triggers the development of extensional stresses in slabs which eventually result in their detachment. The dynamic consequences of slab detachment affects the development of topography, the exhumation of high-pressure rocks and the geodynamic evolution of collision zones. We employ two-dimensional thermo-mechanical modelling in order to study the importance of crustal rheology on the evolution of spontaneous subduction-collision systems and the occurrence of slab detachment. The modelling results indicate that varying the rheological structure of the crust can results in a broad range of collisional evolutions involving slab detachment, delamination (associated to slab rollback), or the combination of both mechanisms. By enhancing mechanical coupling at the Moho, a strong crust leads to the deep subduction of the crust (180 km). These collisions are subjected to slab detachment and subsequent coherent exhumation of the crust accommodated by eduction (inversion of subduction sense) and thrusting. In these conditions, slab detachment promotes the development of a high (> 4.5 km) and narrow (< 200 km) topographic plateau located in the vicinity of the suture. A contrasting style of collision is obtained by employing a weak crustal rheology. The weak mechanical coupling at the Moho promotes the widespread delamination of the lithosphere, preventing slab detachment to occur. Further shortening leads to buckling and thickening of the crust resulting in the development of topographic bulging on the lower plate. Collisions involving rheologically layered crust are characterised by a decoupling level at mid-crustal depths. These initial condition favours the delamination of the upper crust as well as the deep subduction of the lower crust. These collisions are thus successively affected by delamination

  12. Rheological studies of tautomerization kinetics in supercooled glibenclamide drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Wang, Y.; Sokolov, A. P.; Paluch, M.

    2012-12-01

    Rheological measurements have been applied to study the tautomerization of the pharmaceutically active compound glibenclamide. The rate constant and activation energy of the imidic-acid-amide transformation have been successfully determined by monitoring the evolution of shear viscosity. The kinetic parameters from rheological measurements agree reasonably well with the data previously obtained from dielectric spectroscopy. The present Brief Report demonstrates that rheology can provide a fast and precise way to characterize the reaction kinetics of tautomerization.

  13. Another word on the rheology of silicone putty: Bingham

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, John M.; Summers, John M.

    Silicone putty, a material commonly used as a rock-analog in tectonic scale-model studies, exhibits rheological behavior that is similar to the Bingham rheological model over a wide range of strain rate. Nevertheless, at low strain rates a power law is a useful approximation. Similarly, at high strain rates a linear viscous model can be applied. Thus, the choice of rheologic expression can be based on knowledge of the range of stress levels that are achieved in a given model. Conversely, models can be designed to develop appropriate stress levels so that the rheological formulation appropriate to the relevant prototype material will be applicable.

  14. Measurement of the Rheological Properties of High Performance Concrete: State of the Art Report

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Chiara F.

    1999-01-01

    The rheological or flow properties of concrete in general and of high performance concrete (HPC) in particular, are important because many factors such as ease of placement, consolidation, durability, and strength depend on the flow properties. Concrete that is not properly consolidated may have defects, such as honeycombs, air voids, and aggregate segregation. Such an important performance attribute has triggered the design of numerous test methods. Generally, the flow behavior of concrete approximates that of a Bingham fluid. Therefore, at least two parameters, yield stress and viscosity, are necessary to characterize the flow. Nevertheless, most methods measure only one parameter. Predictions of the flow properties of concrete from its composition or from the properties of its components are not easy. No general model exists, although some attempts have been made. This paper gives an overview of the flow properties of a fluid or a suspension, followed by a critical review of the most commonly used concrete rheology tests. Particular attention is given to tests that could be used for HPC. Tentative definitions of terms such as workability, consistency, and rheological parameters are provided. An overview of the most promising tests and models for cement paste is given.

  15. Rheological properties of typical chernozems (Kursk oblast) under different land uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaidapova, D. D.; Chestnova, V. V.; Shein, E. V.; Milanovskii, E. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    Rheological parameters of humus horizons from typical chernozems under different land use—on a virgin land (unmown steppe) and under an oak forest, long-term black fallow, and agricultural use—have been studied by the amplitude sweep method with an MCR-302 modular rheometer at water contents corresponding to swelling limit and liquid limit. From the curves of elastic and viscous moduli, the ranges of elastic and viscoelastic (plastic) behavior of soil pastes—as well as that of transition from viscoelastic to viscous behavior—have been determined. It has been shown that the rheological behavior is largely determined by the content of organic matter, which can act as a binding agent structuring the interparticle bonds and as a lubricant in the viscous-flow (plastic) state of soil pastes. Soil samples enriched with organic matter (virgin land, oak forest, forest belt) have a more plastic behavior and a higher resistance to loads. Soil samples with the lower content of organic matter (long-term fallow, plowland) are characterized by a more rigid cohesion of particles and a narrower range of load resistance. Soil pastes at the water content of liquid limit have a stronger interparticle cohesion and a more brittle behavior than at the water content of swelling limit. Methodological aspects of testing soil pastes at the constant sample thickness and the controlled normal load have been considered. For swelling soil samples, tests under controlled normal load are preferred.

  16. Adsorption of superplasticizer admixtures on alkali-activated slag pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, M. Houst, Y.F.; Bowen, P.; Puertas, F.

    2009-08-15

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) binders are obtained by a manufacturing process less energy-intensive than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and involves lower greenhouse gasses emission. These alkaline cements allow the production of high mechanical strength and durable concretes. In the present work, the adsorption of different superplasticizer admixtures (naphthalene-based, melamine-based and a vinyl copolymer) on the slag particles in AAS pastes using alkaline solutions with different pH values have been studied in detail. The effect of the superplasticizers on the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the AAS and OPC pastes have been also evaluated. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the adsorption of the superplasticizers on AAS pastes is independent of the pH of the alkaline solutions used and lower than on OPC pastes. However, the effect of the admixtures on the rheological parameters depends directly on the type and dosage of the superplasticizer as well as of the binder used and, in the case of the AAS, on the pH of the alkaline activator solution. In 11.7-pH NaOH-AAS pastes the dosages of the superplasticizers required to attain similar reduction in the yield stress are ten-fold lower than for Portland cement. In this case the superplasticizers studied show a fluidizing effect considerably higher in 11.7-pH NaOH-AAS pastes than in OPC pastes. In 13.6-pH NaOH-AAS pastes, the only admixture observed to affect the rheological parameters is the naphthalene-based admixture due to its higher chemical stability in such extremely alkaline media.

  17. Glacial isostatic adjustment model with composite 3-D Earth rheology for Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Barnhoorn, Auke; Stocchi, Paolo; Gradmann, Sofie; Wu, Patrick; Drury, Martyn; Vermeersen, Bert

    2013-07-01

    Models for glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) can provide constraints on rheology of the mantle if past ice thickness variations are assumed to be known. The Pleistocene ice loading histories that are used to obtain such constraints are based on an a priori 1-D mantle viscosity profile that assumes a single deformation mechanism for mantle rocks. Such a simplified viscosity profile makes it hard to compare the inferred mantle rheology to inferences from seismology and laboratory experiments. It is unknown what constraints GIA observations can provide on more realistic mantle rheology with an ice history that is not based on an a priori mantle viscosity profile. This paper investigates a model for GIA with a new ice history for Fennoscandia that is constrained by palaeoclimate proxies and glacial sediments. Diffusion and dislocation creep flow law data are taken from a compilation of laboratory measurements on olivine. Upper-mantle temperature data sets down to 400 km depth are derived from surface heatflow measurements, a petrochemical model for Fennoscandia and seismic velocity anomalies. Creep parameters below 400 km are taken from an earlier study and are only varying with depth. The olivine grain size and water content (a wet state, or a dry state) are used as free parameters. The solid Earth response is computed with a global spherical 3-D finite-element model for an incompressible, self-gravitating Earth. We compare predictions to sea level data and GPS uplift rates in Fennoscandia. The objective is to see if the mantle rheology and the ice model is consistent with GIA observations. We also test if the inclusion of dislocation creep gives any improvements over predictions with diffusion creep only, and whether the laterally varying temperatures result in an improved fit compared to a widely used 1-D viscosity profile (VM2). We find that sea level data can be explained with our ice model and with information on mantle rheology from laboratory experiments

  18. Rheological Properties of Aqueous Nanometric Alumina Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanping

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal processing is an effective and reliable approach in the fabrication of the advanced ceramic products. Successful colloidal processing of fine ceramic powders requires accurate control of the rheological properties. The accurate control relies on the understanding the influences of various colloidal parameters on the rheological properties. Almost all research done on the rheology paid less attention to the interactions of particle and solvent. However, the interactions of the particles are usually built up through the media in which the particles are suspended. Therefore, interactions of the particle with the media, the adsorbed layers on the particle surface, and chemical and physical properties of media themselves must influence the rheology of the suspension, especially for the dense suspensions containing nanosized particles. Relatively little research work has been reported in this area. This thesis addresses the rheological properties of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions, and paying more attention to the interactions between particle and solvent, which in turn influence the particle-particle interactions. Dense nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions with low viscosity were achieved by environmentally-benign fructose additives. The rheology of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions and its variation with the particle volume fraction and concentration of fructose were explored by rheometry. The adsorptions of solute (fructose) and solvent (water) on the nanometric alumina particle surfaces were measured and analyzed by TG/DSC, TOC, and NMR techniques. The mobility of water molecules in the suspensions and its variation with particle volume fractions and fructose additive were determined by the 17O NMR relaxation method. The interactions between the nanometric alumina particles in water and fructose solutions were investigated by AFM. The results indicated that a large number of water layers were physically bound on the particles

  19. Flexure and rheology of Pacific oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Johnny; Watts, Tony

    2016-04-01

    The idea of a rigid lithosphere that supports loads through flexural isostasy was first postulated in the late 19th century. Since then, there has been much effort to investigate the spatial and temporal variation of the lithosphere's flexural rigidity, and to understand how these variations are linked to its rheology. We have used flexural modelling to first re-assess the variation in the rigidity of oceanic lithosphere with its age at the time of loading, and then to constrain mantle rheology by testing the predictions of laboratory-derived flow laws. A broken elastic plate model was used to model trench-normal, ensemble-averaged profiles of satellite-derived gravity at the trench-outer rise system of circum-Pacific subduction zones, where an inverse procedure was used to find the best-fit Te and loading conditions. The results show a first-order increase in Te with plate age, which is best fit by the depth to the 400 ± 35°C plate-cooling isotherm. Fits to the observed gravity are significantly improved by an elastic plate that weakens landward of the outer rise, which suggests that bending-induced plate weakening is a ubiquitous feature of circum-Pacific subduction zones. Two methods were used to constrain mantle rheology. In the first, the Te derived by modelling flexural observations was compared to the Te predicted by laboratory-derived yield strength envelopes. In the second, flexural observations were modelled using elastic-plastic plates with laboratory-derived, depth-dependent yield strength. The results show that flow laws for low-temperature plasticity of dry olivine provide a good fit to the observations at circum-Pacific subduction zones, but are much too strong to fit observations of flexure in the Hawaiian Islands region. We suggest that this discrepancy can be explained by differences in the timescale of loading combined with moderate thermal rejuvenation of the Hawaiian lithosphere.

  20. Rheological properties of a vesicle suspension.

    PubMed

    Guedda, M; Benlahsen, M; Misbah, C

    2014-11-01

    The rheological behavior of a dilute suspension of vesicles in linear shear flow at a finite concentration is analytically examined. In the quasispherical limit, two coupled nonlinear equations that describe the vesicle orientation in the flow and its shape evolution were derived [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 028104 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.028104] and serve here as a starting point. Of special interest is to provide, for the first time, an exact analytical prediction of the time-dependent effective viscosity η_{eff} and normal stress differences N_{1} and N_{2}. Our results shed light on the effect of the viscosity ratio λ (defined as the inner over the outer fluid viscosities) as the main controlling parameter. It is shown that η_{eff},N_{1}, and N_{2} either tend to a steady state or describe a periodic time-dependent rheological response, previously reported numerically and experimentally. In particular, the shear viscosity minimum and the cusp singularities of η_{eff},N_{1}, and N_{2} at the tumbling threshold are brought to light. We also report on rheology properties for an arbitrary linear flow. We were able to obtain a constitutive law in a closed form relating the stress tensor to the strain rate tensor. It is found that the resulting constitutive markedly contrasts with classical laws known for other complex fluids, such as emulsions, capsule suspensions, and dilute polymer solutions (Oldroyd B model). We highlight the main differences between our law and classical laws. PMID:25493791

  1. Influence of interfacial rheology on stabilization of the tear film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamla, M. Saad; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2014-11-01

    The tear film that protecting the ocular surface is a complex, thin film comprised of a collection of proteins and lipids that come together to provide a number of important functions. Of particular interest in this presentation is meibum, an insoluble layer that is spread from glands lining our eyelids. Past work has focussed on the role of this layer in reducing evaporation, although conflicting evidence on its ability to reduce evaporative loss has been published. We present here the beneficial effects that are derived through the interfacial viscoelasticity of the meibomian lipid film. This is a duplex film is comprised of a rich mixture of phospholipids, long chain fatty esters, and cholesterol esters. Using interfacial rheology measurements, meibum has been shown to be highly viscoelastic. By measuring the drainage and dewetting dynamics of thin aqueous films from hemispherical surfaces where those films are laden with insoluble layers of lipids at controlled surface pressure, we offer evidence that these layers strongly stabilize the films because of their ability to support surface shearing stresses. This alternative view of the role of meibum can help explain the origin of meibomian gland dysfunction, or dry eye disease, where improper compositions of this lipid mixture do not offer the proper mechanical resistance to breakage and dewetting of the tear film.

  2. Rheology and geodynamic modelling: the next step forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, M.; Braun, J.; Brown, M.; Kukowski, N.; Paterson, M.; Schmid, S.; Stöckhert, B.; Stüwe, K.; Thompson, A.; Wosnitza, E.

    2001-05-01

    The application of continuum mechanics and microstructural analysis to geological studies over the past 30 years has spurred earth scientists to reassess fundamental tectonic processes such as subduction, collision and rifting in terms of dynamics. Armed with new analytical methods, geologists have returned to the field to look at rock structures with more mechanistic eyes. The advent of sophisticated computers, programs, and laboratory deformation equipment has facilitated the simulation of geodynamic processes that range in scale from the grain to the lithosphere. The result has been specialization, with the concomitant opening of communication gaps between geodynamicists, field geologists and rock mechanicists. Partly, these gaps reflect differences of perception and approach. In order to bridge these gaps, a workshop was organized after the DRM conference to debate how field and laboratory studies of deformed rocks can improve our understanding of lithospheric rheology, and in turn, how this understanding can be used to refine dynamic models of orogenesis. The workshop hosted participants with backgrounds in structural geology, experimental rock mechanics, metamorphic petrology and both numerical and analogue modelling. This paper summarizes the main controversies and conclusions reached during the workshop. For the sake of brevity, referencing in this summary is restricted to literature referred to during the oral presentations and to comments made by speakers themselves (names italicized).

  3. Rheological and biochemical properties of Solanum lycocarpum starch.

    PubMed

    Di-Medeiros, Maria Carolina B; Pascoal, Aline M; Batista, Karla A; Bassinello, Priscila Z; Lião, Luciano M; Leles, Maria Inês G; Fernandes, Kátia F

    2014-04-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the rheological and physicochemical properties of Solanum lycocarpum starch. The thermogravimetric analysis of S. lycocarpum starch showed a typical three-step weight loss pattern. Microscopy revealed significant changes in the granule morphology after hydrothermal treatment. Samples hydrothermally treated at 50°C for 10 min lost 52% of their crystallinity, which was recovered after storage for 7 days at 4°C. However, samples hydrothermally treated at 65°C were totally amorphous. This treatment was sufficient to completely disrupt the starch granule, as evidenced by the absence of an endothermic peak in the DSC thermogram. The RVA of S. lycocarpum starch revealed 4440.7cP peak viscosity, 2660.5cP breakdown viscosity, 2414.1cP final viscosity, 834.3cP setback viscosity, and a pasting temperature of 49.6°C. The low content of resistant starch (10.25%) and high content of digestible starch (89.78%) in S. lycocarpum suggest that this starch may be a good source for the production of hydrolysates, such as glucose syrup and its derivatives.

  4. Rheological behavior of Slide Ring Gels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vivek; Park, Jong Seung; Park, Jung O.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2006-03-01

    Slide ring gels were synthesized by chemically crosslinking, sparsely populated α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) present on the polyrotaxanes consisting of α-CD and polyethylene glycol (PEG). [1] Unlike physically or chemically crosslinked gels, slide ring gels are topological gels where crosslinks can slide along the chain. [2] We investigate the rheological behavior of these gels swollen in water and compare their viscoelastic properties to those of physical and chemical gels. We also study the equilibrium swelling behavior of these gels. [1] Okumura and Ito, Adv. Mater. 2001, 13, 485 [2] C. Zhao et al, J. Phys. Cond. Mat. 2005, 17, S2841

  5. Rheology and dynamics of repulsive clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroshenko, V. A.; Lazarev, Yu. F.

    2012-01-01

    The physical and thermodynamic properties of a repulsive clathrate used as a working body for the dissipation, storage, and conversion of energy in thermomechanical systems are studied. In repulsive clathrates, use is made for the first time of the molecular repulsive forces acting in large interfacial areas in a system consisting of a fluid and a capillary-porous matrix not wetted by this fluid. Based on experimental studies of a car damper with a repulsive clathrate, a rheological model of energy dissipation was developed which can be used to design compact high-performance dampers for different purposes and anti-seismic systems of new generation.

  6. The rheological behavior of HDPE/coal blends

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Anning; Ge Lingmei; Guo Shucai

    1997-12-31

    The antistatic functional material of HDPE/coal [high density polyethylene mixed with coal fines] has a higher tensile strength, higher resistance and stability. The rheological properties of the blends are important for their processing and practical use. It was necessary to study the rheological behavior of the blends. P. Ujas et al (1994) had studied the rheology of HDPE/nylon-11 blends and the effect of nylon-11 on the rheological behavior of HDPE. If Shenfu coal is used as a special polymer, it has necessarily an important affect on the rheological behavior of HDPE. In this paper, the rheological behavior of HDPE/coal blends were investigated to study the effect of the coal polymer on the rheology of HDPE. The rheological behavior of the blends were found to be very different from that of HDPE. The curves of shear viscosity for the blends at different temperatures (478, 488, and 498K) reveal that HDPE and the blends are characteristic of pseudoplastic fluid, that is, there is a decrease of shear viscosity with an increase of shearing rate.

  7. Western Canadian coking coals -- Thermal rheology and coking quality

    SciTech Connect

    Leeder, W.R.; Price, J.T.; Gransden, J.F.

    1997-12-31

    Methods of predicting coke strength developed from the thermal rheological properties of Carboniferous coals frequently indicate that Cretaceous coals would not make high quality coke -- yet both types of coals produce coke suitable for the iron blast furnace. This paper will discuss the reasons why Western Canadian coals exhibit lower rheological values and how to predict the strength of coke produced from them.

  8. Rheological properties of heavy oils and heavy oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    In this study, the author investigated the effects of a number of process variables such as shear rate, measurement temperature, pressure, the influence of pretreatment, and the role of various amounts of added water on the rheology of the resulting heavy oil or the emulsion. Rheological properties of heavy oils and the corresponding emulsions are important from transportation and processing standpoints.

  9. Sharing the World's Advanced Rheology Knowledge through Rheo-Hub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, H. Henning

    2008-07-01

    Recent advances in rheometer design and rheology theory have led to an abundance of rheological information, both experimental and theoretical. In response to this wonderful opportunity, many of the world's leading rheologists began to share their expert software codes with the wider community of materials researchers and practitioners. This became possible through "Rheo-Hub", a central computer platform from which the user interrogates rheological expert codes ("engines") and rheological data by comparing, merging, and funneling these into further interrogations and explorations. In this virtual environment, results are returned to the computer screen as visuals so that the visual intelligence of the user gets involved in the cognition process. Rheological explorations may be repeated in different ways (using different expert codes for answering the same research question) and viewed from different graphical viewpoints. This creates the multi-scale and multi-expertise workspace that is needed to support quantitative rheological explorations and to prepare for discovery. The virtual environment technology will be presented and examples will be shown. Rheo-Hub's strengths are data analysis, integration of experimental results with theoretically predicted rheology, visuals for communicating results, and introduction of a rheological data standard.

  10. Magneto-rheological defects and failures: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, SA; Ismail, I.; Aid, S.; Rahim, MSA

    2016-02-01

    Magneto-rheological fluid is the colloidal suspension of micron sized magnetic particles in a carrier fluid where defects and failures occur at many circumstances. This paper presents a review on defects and failures of magneto-rheological fluid in engineering applications. The most significant defect is hard cake which developed due to re-dispersion difficulties of remnant particles magnetization, leaving the magneto-rheological fluid ineffective. Clumping effect on the other hand is a separation of carrier fluid from the magnetic particles when magneto-rheological fluid is being exposed to higher magnetic field for an extended period of time. As clumping occurred, it leads to Fluid Particle Separation (FPS) which is believed altering the strength distribution of magneto-rheological fluid and therefore reducing the squeezing force. Another significant failure is magnetic particles oxidation of the magneto-rheological fluid. This paper also will discuss on stability problems which is the most challenged issue in magneto-rheological fluid technology. With the comprehensive review in this paper, researcher can design materials of magneto-rheological fluid for better properties.

  11. Physicochemical, thermal and rheological properties of starches isolated from malting barley varieties.

    PubMed

    Pycia, Karolina; Gałkowska, Dorota; Juszczak, Lesław; Fortuna, Teresa; Witczak, Teresa

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize physicochemical, thermal and rheological properties of starches isolated from malting barley varieties. The analyzed starches contained 19.6-25.2 g of amylose, 42.47-70.67 mg of phosphorus, 0.50-1.26 g of protein and 0.10-0.61 g of fat per 100 g of starch dry mass. The clarity of the 1 % (w/w) starch pastes ranged from 5.4 to 9.8 %. Values of the characteristic gelatinization temperatures were in the ranges of 56.5-58.5 °C, 61.2-63.0 °C and 66.7-68.7 °C, respectively for TO, TP and TE, whereas values of gelatinization enthalpy were from 6.49 to 9.61 J/g. The barley starches showed various tendency to retrogradation, from 24.52 to 44.22 %, measured as R = ∆HR/∆HG value. The pasting curves showed differences in pasting characteristics of the barley starches, where values of peak (PV) and final (FV) viscosities were 133-230 mPa·s and 224-411 mPa·s, respectively. The barley starch pastes exhibited non-Newtonian, shear thinning flow behaviour and thixotropy phenomenon. After cooling the starch gels showed different viscoelastic properties, however, most of them behaved like weak gels (tan δ = G″/G' > 0.1). Significant linear correlations between the parameters of pasting characteristic and some rheological parameters were found.

  12. Ultrasound image velocimetry for rheological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurung, A.; Haverkort, J. W.; Drost, S.; Norder, B.; Westerweel, J.; Poelma, C.

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound image velocimetry (UIV) allows for the non-intrusive measurement of a wide range of flows without the need for optical transparency. In this study, we used UIV to measure the local velocity field of a model drilling fluid that exhibits yield stress flow behavior. The radial velocity profile was used to determine the yield stress and the Herschel-Bulkley model flow index n and the consistency index k. Reference data were obtained using the conventional offline Couette rheometry. A comparison showed reasonable agreement between the two methods. The discrepancy in model parameters could be attributed to inherent differences between the methods, which cannot be captured by the three-parameter model used. Overall, with a whole flow field measurement technique such as UIV, we were able to quantify the complex rheology of a model drilling fluid. These preliminary results show that UIV can be used as a non-intrusive diagnostic for in situ, real-time measurement of complex opaque flow rheology.

  13. Ultrasound image velocimetry for rheological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurung, A.; Haverkort, J. W.; Drost, S.; Norder, B.; Westerweel, J.; Poelma, C.

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound image velocimetry (UIV) allows for the non-intrusive measurement of a wide range of flows without the need for optical transparency. In this study, we used UIV to measure the local velocity field of a model drilling fluid that exhibits yield stress flow behavior. The radial velocity profile was used to determine the yield stress and the Herschel–Bulkley model flow index n and the consistency index k. Reference data were obtained using the conventional offline Couette rheometry. A comparison showed reasonable agreement between the two methods. The discrepancy in model parameters could be attributed to inherent differences between the methods, which cannot be captured by the three-parameter model used. Overall, with a whole flow field measurement technique such as UIV, we were able to quantify the complex rheology of a model drilling fluid. These preliminary results show that UIV can be used as a non-intrusive diagnostic for in situ, real-time measurement of complex opaque flow rheology.

  14. Rheology of rock glaciers: a preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Giardino, J.R.; Vitek, J.D.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    Movement of rock debris under the influence of gravity, i.e., mass movement, generates a range of phenomena from soil creep, through solifluction,debris flows and rock glaciers to rock falls. Whereas the resultant forms of these phenomena are different, common elements in the mechanics of movement are utilized in the basic interpretation of the processes of formation. Measurements of morphologic variables provide data for deductive analyses of processes that operate too slowly to observe or for processes that generated relict phenomena. External and internal characteristics or rock glacier morphometry and measured rates of motion serve as the basis for the development of a rheological model to explain phenomena classified as rock glaciers. A rock glacier in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado, which exhibits a large number of ridges and furrows and lichen bare fronts of lobes, suggests present day movement. A strain-net established on the surface provides evidence of movement characteristics. These data plus morphologic and fabric data suggest two rheological models to explain the flow of this rock glacier. Model one is based upon perfect plastic flow and model two is based upon stratified fluid movement with viscosity changing with depth. These models permit a better understanding of the movement mechanics and demonstrate that catastrophic events and slow creep contribute to the morphologic characteristics of this rock glacier.

  15. Rheological changes in irradiated chicken eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Lúcia F. S.; Del Mastro, Nélida L.

    1998-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria may cause foodborne illnesses. Humans may introduce pathogens into foods during production, processing, distribution and or preparation. Some of these microorganisms are able to survive conventional preservation treatments. Heat pasteurization, which is a well established and satisfactory means of decontamination/disinfection of liquid foods, cannot efficiently achieve a similar objective for solid foods. Extensive work carried out worldwide has shown that irradiation is efficient in eradicating foodborne pathogens like Salmonella spp. that can contaminate poultry products. In this work Co-60 gamma irradiation was applied to samples of industrial powder white, yolk and whole egg at doses between 0 and 25 kGy. Samples were rehydrated and the viscosity measured in a Brookfield viscosimeter, model DV III at 5, 15 and 25°C. The rheological behaviour among the various kinds of samples were markedly different. Irradiation with doses up to 5 kGy, known to reduced bacterial contamination to non-detectable levels, showed almost no variation of viscosity of irradiated egg white samples. On the other hand, whole or yolk egg samples showed some changes in rheological properties depending on the dose level, showing the predominance of whether polimerization or degradation as a result of the irradiation. Additionally, irradiation of yolk egg powder reduced yolk color as a function of the irradiation exposure implemented. The importance of these results are discussed in terms of possible industrial applications.

  16. Structural rheology of a model ointment.

    PubMed

    Pena, L E; Lee, B L; Stearns, J F

    1994-06-01

    A model ointment consisting of white petrolatum, mineral oil and microcrystalline wax was studied using rheology, microscopy and thermal techniques. Rheograms studied over a temperature range of 25-40 degrees C indicated that the overall rheogram shape changed little as the temperature increased. However, two inflections gradually disappeared as the temperature increased. Thermal optical analysis showed that the temperature range over which these inflection disappeared correlated with the melting transition of the components forming the secondary structure. Another series of rheograms obtained from ointments with different combinations of the raw materials showed the rheology of the ointment is primarily controlled by the white petrolatum and mineral oil and that the microcrystalline wax acts to build-up the structure by incorporating itself into the existing white petrolatum structure. Thermal optical analysis of comelts of the raw materials proved that the ointment network structure is essentially a recombination of the naturally occurring components in differing ratios. The knowledge obtained from these studies is applied to a discussion of the thermal and mechanical stresses encountered in the filling operation.

  17. Impact of rheological layering on rift asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Duretz, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous models of rift formation have been proposed, what triggers asymmetry of rifted margins remains unclear. Parametrized material softening is often employed to induce asymmetric fault patterns in numerical models. Here, we use thermo-mechanical finite element models that allow softening via thermal weakening. We investigate the importance of lithosphere rheology and mechanical layering on rift morphology. The numerical code is based on the MILAMIN solver and uses the Triangle mesh generator. Our model configuration consists of a visco-elasto-platic layered lithosphere comprising either (1) only one brittle-ductile transition (in the mantle) or (2) three brittle-ductile transitions (one in the upper crust, one in the lower crust and one in the mantle). We perform then two sets of simulations characterized by low and high extensional strain rates (5*10-15 s-1, 2*10-14 s-1). The results show that the extension of a lithosphere comprising only one brittle-ductile transition produces a symmetric 'neck' type rift. The upper and lower crusts are thinned until the lithospheric mantle is exhumed to the seafloor. A lithosphere containing three brittle-ductile transitions favors strain localization. Shear zones at different horizontal locations and generated in the brittle levels of the lithosphere get connected by the weak ductile layers. The results suggest that rheological layering of the lithosphere can be a reason for the generation of asymmetric rifting and subsequent rift morphology.

  18. Improving feed slurry rheology by colloidal techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, W.O.; Ternes, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PSN) has investigated three colloidal techniques in the laboratory to improve the sedimentation and flowability of Hanford simulated (nonradioactive) current acid waste (CAW) melter feed slurry: polymer-induced bridging flocculation; manipulating glass former (raw SiO/sub 2/ or frit) particle size; and alteration of nitric acid content. All three methods proved successful in improving the rheology of the simulated CAW feed. This initially had exhibited nearly worst-case flow and clogging properties, but was transformed into a flowable, resuspendable (nonclogging) feed. While each has advantages and disadvantages, the following three specific alternatives proved successful: addition of a polyelectrolyte in 2000 ppM concentration to feed slurry; substitution of a 49 wt % SiO/sub 2/ colloidal suspension (approx. 10-micron particle size) for the -325 mesh (less than or equal to 44-micron particle size) raw-chemical SiO/sub 2/; and increase of nitric acid content from the reference 1.06 M to optimum 1.35 M. The first method, polymer-induced bridging flocculation, results in a high sediment volume, nonclogging CAW feed. The second method, involving the use of colloidal silica particles results in a nonsedimenting feed that when left unagitated forms a gel. The third method, increase in feed acidity, results in a highly resuspendable (nonclogging) melter feed. Further research is therefore required to determine which of the three alternatives is the preferred method of achieving rheological control of CAW melter feeds.

  19. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    PubMed

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p < 0.001) and cell morphology was governed by hyphal structures and rounded cells. Using the in situ growth method introduced here, yeast biofilms were determined to be viscoelastic materials with a predominantly solid-like behavior, and neither this nor the G'0 values were significantly affected by the flow conditions or the growth time, and at large deformations their weak structure collapsed beyond a critical strain of about 1.5-5%. The present work could represent a starting point for developing in situ measurements of yeast rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation. PMID:25428768

  20. Development of Alternative Rheological Measurements for DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. c.

    2005-09-01

    Rheological measurements are used to evaluate the fluid dynamic behavior of Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, slurry samples. Measurements are currently made on non-radioactive simulant slurries using two state-of-the-art rheometers located at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory, ACTL. Measurements are made on plant samples using a rheometer in the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, Shielded Cells facility. Low activity simulants or plant samples can be analyzed using a rheometer located in a radioactive hood in SRNL. Variations in the rheology of SB2 simulants impacted the interpretation of results obtained in a number of related studies. A separate rheological study was initiated with the following four goals: (1) Document the variations seen in the simulant slurries, both by a review of recent data, and by a search for similar samples for further study. (2) Attempt to explain the variations in rheological behavior, or, failing that, reduce the number of possible causes. In particular, to empirically check for rheometer-related variations. (3) Exploit the additional capabilities of the rheometers by developing new measurement methods to study the simulant rheological properties in new ways. (4) Formalize the rheological measurement process for DWPF-related samples into a series of protocols. This report focuses on the third and fourth goals. The emphasis of this report is on the development and formalization of rheological measurement methods used to characterize DWPF slurry samples. The organization is by rheological measurement method. Progress on the first two goals was documented in a concurrent technical report, Koopman (2005). That report focused on the types and possible causes of unusual rheological behavior in simulant slurry samples. It was organized by the sample being studied. The experimental portion of this study was performed in the period of March to April 2004. A general rheology protocol for routine DWPF slurry samples, Koopman

  1. The role of rheology in extensional basin formation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez, M.; Ranalli, G.

    1997-12-01

    The rheology of the lithosphere determines its deformation under given initial and boundary conditions. This paper presents a critical discussion on how rheological properties are taken into account in extensional basin modelling. Since strength envelopes are often used in models, we review the uncertainties (in temperature and rheological parameters) and assumptions (in type of rheology and mode of deformation) involved in their construction. Models of extensional basins are classified into three groups: kinematic, kinematic with rheological constraints, and dynamic. Rheology enters kinematic models only implicitly, in the assumption of an isostatic compensation mechanism. We show that there is a critical level of necking that reconciles local isostasy with the finite strength of the lithosphere, which requires a flexural response. Kinematic models with rheological constraints make use of strength envelopes to assess the initial lateral variations of lithospheric strength and its evolution with time at the site of extension. Dynamic models are the only ones to explicitly introduce rheological constitutive equations (usually in plane strain or plane stress). They usually, however, require the presence of an initial perturbation (thickness variations, pre-existing faults, thermal inhomogeneities, rheological inhomogeneities). The mechanical boundary conditions (kinematic and dynamic) and the thermal boundary conditions (constant temperature or constant heat flux at the lower boundary of the lithosphere) may result in negative/positive feedbacks leading to cessation/acceleration of extension. We conclude that, while kinematic models (with rheological constraints if possible) are very successful in accounting for the observed characteristics of sedimentary basins, dynamic models are necessary to gain insight into the physical processes underlying basin formation and evolution.

  2. Rheology of Volatile-rich Crystal Mush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, M.; Caricchi, L.; Ulmer, P.; Reusser, E.; Mancktelow, N.; Burlini, L.

    2012-04-01

    Magma batholiths are commonly highly crystalline (> 50 vol%; crystal mush, Bachmann and Bergantz, 2008a) and possible modes of mobilization and emplacement have been intensively discussed in the last decades. Recently, it has been proposed that a stiff mushy batholith must be reheated to mobilize; this produces a reduction in crystallinity that leads to an increase of the magma buoyancy (Burgisser and Bergantz, 2011). Another way of batholith mobilization in the crust can be caused by addition of volatiles (mainly H2O and CO2) released by ascending hydrous mafic magmas coming from the mantle (Bachmann and Bergantz, 2008b). The enrichment in volatiles induces a drastic decrease in the bulk viscosity of the granitic body and, thus, an evident change in the rheological properties of the batholith. The rheology of such very crystal-rich highly viscous systems is still a matter of debate. To provide some additional experimental constraints relevant to this discussion, we deformed hydrous (2.52 wt% H2O) haplogranitic magmas containing variable amounts of quartz crystals (from 55 to 65 vol%), and fixed volume of gas-pressurized CO2-bubbles (9-10 vol%), in simple shear using a HT-HP Paterson-type rock deformation apparatus. Strain rates ranging between 1•10-5 s-1 and 4•10-3 s-1 were applied at temperatures between 823 and 1023 K and constant confining pressure of 200-250 MPa (8-9 km depth). The results suggest that three-phase suspensions are characterized by strain rate-dependent rheology (non-Newtonian behavior). Two non-Newtonian regimes were observed: shear thinning (decrease of viscosity with increasing strain rate) and shear thickening (increase of viscosity with increasing strain rate). The first effect dominantly occurs because of crystal size reduction and shear localization, enhanced by the presence of gas bubbles in the weak shear bands. However, when the solid crystal framework induces an internal flow blockage due to crystal interlock, the second effect

  3. Rheological evaluations and in vitro studies of injectable bioactive glass-polycaprolactone-sodium alginate composites.

    PubMed

    Borhan, Shokoufeh; Hesaraki, Saeed; Behnamghader, Ali-Asghar; Ghasemi, Ebrahim

    2016-09-01

    Composite pastes composed of various amounts of melt-derived bioactive glass 52S4 (MG5) and polycaprolactone (PCL) microspheres in sodium alginate solution were prepared. Rheological properties in both rotatory and oscillatory modes were evaluated. Injectability was measured as injection force versus piston displacement. In vitro calcium phosphate precipitation was also studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) and tracked using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and FTIR analyses. All composite pastes were thixotropic in nature and exhibited shear thinning behavior. The magnitude of thixotropy decreased by adding 10-30 wt% PCL, while further amounts of PCL increased it again. Moreover, the composites were viscoelastic materials in which the elastic modulus was higher than viscous term. The pastes which were just made of MG5 or PCL had poor injectability, whereas the composites containing both of these constituents exhibited reasonable injectability. All pastes revealed adequate structural stability in contact with SBF solution. In vitro calcium phosphate precipitation was well observed on the paste made of MG5 and somewhat on the pastes with 10-40 wt% PCL, however the precipitated layer was amorphous in nature. Overall, the produced composites may be appropriate as injectable biomaterials for non-invasive surgeries but more biological evaluations are essential. PMID:27432416

  4. Pasting and rheological properties of oat products dry-blended with ground chia seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oat products containing ß-glucan are documented for lowering blood cholesterol that could be beneficial for preventing coronary heart disease. Oat products (oat flour, oat bran concentrate, and Nutrim) were dry-blended with ground chia (Salvia hispanica L.) that contains omega-3 polyunsaturated fatt...

  5. Effect of corn bran particle size on rheology and pasting characteristics of flour gels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fiber in corn bran is known for its beneficial effects on human health and nutrition. Corn bran substitution has shown to affect batter viscosity, and volume, crumb grain, color, and texture of cakes. Purified food-grade corn bran was milled to pass through 80, 100 and 120 mesh sieve, resu...

  6. Relating Single Crystal Rheology to Polyphase Aggregate Rheology - the Importance of Stress Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnley, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    Percolation theory is used to describe the behavior of a large number of disordered systems including the passage of fluid through porous materials, the spread of forest fires, and the mechanical behavior of granular materials. By virtue of both variations in elastic and plastic properties between different rock forming minerals as well as the plastic and elastic anisotropy of individual mineral grains, polycrystalline rocks are elastically and plastically disordered systems. Using 2D finite element models I have shown that stress transmission in rocks can also be described as a percolation problem and that the modulation of stress states within a rock can in some cases, reach levels comparable to the differential load on the rock. The presence of such modulations in the internal stress state of a rock has many implications for understanding how the rock's rheology arises from the rheology of its constituent crystals. A first order result of stress percolation is the formation of shear localization. Depending on the degree of mechanical heterogeneity of the rock's mechanical components (including grain interiors and grain boundaries), the nature of the shear localization may be highly concentrated - and therefore observable or widely distributed and "cryptic" in nature. The modulations in stress states created by stress percolation create small regions (yield nuclei) distributed throughout the rock that yield well before the bulk of the rock has reached the yield criterion. Local yielding leads to percolation of yielded regions and shear localization. Whether the shear localization remains cryptic or is observable by virtue of the development of large offsets, is a function of the density and distribution of yield nuclei. The spatial distribution of yield nuclei is a function of the nature of the stress percolation pattern, the variation in yield strength of the mechanical components and their spatial distribution. The presence of shear localization changes the

  7. Effect of heat-moisture treatment on the structural, physicochemical, and rheological characteristics of arrowroot starch.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Larissa S; Moraes, Jaqueline; Albano, Kivia M; Telis, Vânia R N; Franco, Célia M L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of heat-moisture treatment on structural, physicochemical, and rheological characteristics of arrowroot starch was investigated. Heat-moisture treatment was performed with starch samples conditioned to 28% moisture at 100 ℃ for 2, 4, 8, and 16 h. Structural and physicochemical characterization of native and modified starches, as well as rheological assays with gels of native and 4 h modified starches subjected to acid and sterilization stresses were performed. Arrowroot starch had 23.1% of amylose and a CA-type crystalline pattern that changed over the treatment time to A-type. Modified starches had higher pasting temperature and lower peak viscosity while breakdown viscosity practically disappeared, independently of the treatment time. Gelatinization temperature and crystallinity increased, while enthalpy, swelling power, and solubility decreased with the treatment. Gels from modified starches, independently of the stress conditions, were found to have more stable apparent viscosities and higher G' and G″ than gels from native starch. Heat-moisture treatment caused a reorganization of starch chains that increased molecular interactions. This increase resulted in higher paste stability and strengthened gels that showed higher resistance to shearing and heat, even after acid or sterilization conditions. A treatment time of 4 h was enough to deeply changing the physicochemical properties of starch. PMID:26163566

  8. Effect of heat-moisture treatment on the structural, physicochemical, and rheological characteristics of arrowroot starch.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Larissa S; Moraes, Jaqueline; Albano, Kivia M; Telis, Vânia R N; Franco, Célia M L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of heat-moisture treatment on structural, physicochemical, and rheological characteristics of arrowroot starch was investigated. Heat-moisture treatment was performed with starch samples conditioned to 28% moisture at 100 ℃ for 2, 4, 8, and 16 h. Structural and physicochemical characterization of native and modified starches, as well as rheological assays with gels of native and 4 h modified starches subjected to acid and sterilization stresses were performed. Arrowroot starch had 23.1% of amylose and a CA-type crystalline pattern that changed over the treatment time to A-type. Modified starches had higher pasting temperature and lower peak viscosity while breakdown viscosity practically disappeared, independently of the treatment time. Gelatinization temperature and crystallinity increased, while enthalpy, swelling power, and solubility decreased with the treatment. Gels from modified starches, independently of the stress conditions, were found to have more stable apparent viscosities and higher G' and G″ than gels from native starch. Heat-moisture treatment caused a reorganization of starch chains that increased molecular interactions. This increase resulted in higher paste stability and strengthened gels that showed higher resistance to shearing and heat, even after acid or sterilization conditions. A treatment time of 4 h was enough to deeply changing the physicochemical properties of starch.

  9. Influence of organic acids on rheological and bread-making characteristics of fortified wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sheetal; Shimray, Crassina A; Venkateswara Rao, G

    2012-06-01

    Flour was fortified with premix containing ferrous fumarate and folic acid. Organic acids such as citric acid, malic acid and tartaric acid, which are promoters of iron bioavailability, were added at three levels and their influence on rheological and bread-making characteristics was studied. Farinograph water absorption increased with fortificants, but with addition of organic acids there was a decrease. Maximum pressure was 77 mm in control, which increased to 78-88 mm with the addition of different acids to the fortified flour. Addition of organic acids to fortified flour brought about a decrease in peak viscosity, hot paste viscosity, cold paste viscosity and setback values. The L, a and b values of fortified breads were similar to that of control. Sensory analysis revealed marginal differences in the overall quality of breads prepared with fortified flour with the addition of organic acids.

  10. Ice rheology in the planetary context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, W. B.; McDaniel, S.; Stern, L. A.; Kirby, S. H.

    2003-04-01

    The rheological properties of water are a basis for modeling dynamic processes on and within low-density planetary satellites and on the surfaces of Earth and Mars. The model changes quickly, however, if one includes natural complexities that affect the texture and composition of the ice. The study of the effects of these complexities on the rheology of ice and icy compounds is not far advanced, but there already have been a number of interesting findings. Among these are (1) the presence of NH3 in water ice significantly weakens the ice and increases the possibility of a melt phase being present; (2) dispersed hard particulates strengthen ice slightly in most cases, but significant strengthening requires very high particulate concentrations; and (3) in multi-phase mixtures, minor concentrations of a weak phase can have a disproportionate softening effect on the aggregate. In this talk we focus on two additional behaviors with important planetary applications: the very high strength of gas hydrates and sulfate hydrates, and the role of grain size in the creep of ice I. Hydrated sulfate salts and gas hydrates, candidate planetary building materials, are orders of magnitude more viscous than water ice. Methane hydrate is sufficiently strong and potentially present in sufficient volume to radically alter icy models of certain moons (Titan). CO2 hydrate, weaker than methane hydrate but still much stronger than water ice, may be stable in the interior of the Mars south polar cap. Hydrated sulfate salts in turn are much stronger than even methane hydrate, and where they exist in the Europan crust, must be considered essentially undeformable. Laboratory experiments have clearly shown that at finer grain sizes the rheology of ice is strongly dependent on grain size (referred to as grain-size-sensitive (GSS ) creep) and that at larger grain sizes, the deformation mechanism is predominantly grain size insensitive dislocation creep. The two regimes have contrasting flow laws

  11. Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment II (SHERE II) Microgravity Rheology with Non-Newtonian Polymeric Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaishankar, Aditya; Haward, Simon; Hall, Nancy Rabel; Magee, Kevin; McKinley, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of SHERE II is to study the effect of torsional preshear on the subsequent extensional behavior of filled viscoelastic suspensions. Microgravity environment eliminates gravitational sagging that makes Earth-based experiments of extensional rheology challenging. Experiments may serve as an idealized model system to study the properties of lunar regolith-polymeric binder based construction materials. Filled polymeric suspensions are ubiquitous in foods, cosmetics, detergents, biomedical materials, etc.

  12. Past Tense Route Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Shikora, Emily R.; Balota, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research examined whether lexical (whole word) or more rule-based (morphological constituent) processes can be locally biased by experimental list context in past tense verb inflection. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults completed a past tense inflection task in which list context was manipulated across blocks containing regular…

  13. Past Is Prologue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Behavior-based interviewing (BBI) has been used in the business world for decades as a way to select new hires whose past behaviors indicate future success. Behavior-based interviews are based on the premise that past behavior is the best predictor of future performance and that interview questions should evaluate the knowledge, skills, and…

  14. Essence of disposing the excess sludge and optimizing the operation of wastewater treatment: rheological behavior and microbial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Zhang, Zi

    2014-06-01

    Proper disposal of excess sludge and steady maintenance of the high bioactivity of activated sludge in bioreactors are essential for the successful operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Since sludge is a non-Newtonian fluid, the rheological behavior of sludge can therefore have a significant impact on various processes in a WWTP, such as fluid transportation, mixing, oxygen diffusion, mass transfer, anaerobic digestion, chemical conditioning and mechanical dewatering. These are key factors affecting the operation efficiency and the energy consumption of the entire process. In the past decade-due to the production of large quantities of excess sludge associated with the extensive construction of WWTPs and the emergence of some newly-developed techniques for wastewater purification characterized by high biomass concentrations-investigations into the rheology of sludge are increasingly important and this topic has aroused considerable interests. We reviewed a number of investigations into the rheology of sludge, with the purpose of providing systematic and detailed analyses on the related aspects of the rheological behavior of sludge. It is clear that, even though considerable research has focused on the rheology of sludge over a long time period, there is still a need for further thorough investigation into this field. Due to the complex process of bio-treatment in all WWTPs, biological factors have a major influence on the properties of sludge. These influences are however still poorly understood, particularly with respect to the mechanisms involved and magnitude of such impacts. When taking note of the conspicuous biological characteristics of sludge, it becomes important that biological factors, such as the species composition and relative abundance of various microorganisms, as well as the microbial community characteristics that affect relevant operating processes, should be considered. PMID:24462086

  15. Influence of Plasticizer Amount on Rheological and Hydration Properties of CEM II Type Portland Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šeputytė-Juciké, J.; Pundienė, I.; Kičaitė, A.; Pranckevičienė, J.

    2015-11-01

    The article analyzes the effect of plasticizer (based on polycarboxilates) amount (0.3 - 1.2% wt. of cement) on the rheological and hydration properties of two Portland cements pastes: CEM II/A-S 42.5N and CEM II/A-LL 42.5N. Increase of plasticizer amount reduces viscosity of CEM II/A-LL 42.5N cement paste from 3 to 12 times, where viscosity of CEM II/A-S 42.5N cement paste reduces from 5 to 20 times. The optimum plasticizer dose (0.3%) in case of CEM II/A-S 42.5N and (1.2%) in case of CEM II/A-LL 42.5N was established. Calorimetry studies have shown that plasticizer reduces the wetting heat release rate in CEM II/A-LL 42.5N cement twice and in CEM II/A-S 42.5N cement - by 25%. Plasticizer prolongs the maximum heat release rate time by 16 h in CEM II/A-LL 42.5N samples and reduces heat release rate by 19%. In CEM II/A-S 42.5N cement samples plasticizer prolongs maximum heat release rate time by 14.5 h and increases heat release rate by 15%. The goal of this study is to analyze the effect of the dosage of the most widely used plasticizer on solubility characteristics, rheological and hydration properties of two cements CEM II/A-S 42.5N and CEM II/A-LL 42.5N to establish the optimum dose of plasticizer in cements pastes.

  16. Rheological effects on friction in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachman, E. G.; Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation is presented of the friction in a rolling and sliding elastohydrodynamic lubricated contact. The rheological behavior of the lubricant is described in terms of two viscoelastic models. These models represent the separate effects of non-Newtonian behavior and the transient response of the fluid. A unified description of the non-Newtonian shear rate dependence of the viscosity is presented as a new hyperbolic liquid model. The transient response of viscosity, following the rapid pressure rise encountered in the contact, is described by a compressional viscoelastic model of the volume response of a liquid to an applied pressure step. The resulting momentum and energy equations are solved by an iterative numerical technique, and a friction coefficient is calculated. The experimental study was performed, with two synthetic paraffinic lubricants, to verify the friction predictions of the analysis. The values of friction coefficient from theory and experiment are in close agreement.

  17. Nanoparticles in Polymers: Assembly, Rheology and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yuanqiao

    Inorganic nanoparticles have the potential of providing functionalities that are difficult to realize using organic materials; and nanocomposites is an effective mean to impart processibility and construct bulk materials with breakthrough properties. The dispersion and assembly of nanoparticles are critical to both processibility and properties of the resulting product. In this talk, we will discuss several methods to control the hierarchical structure of nanoparticles in polymers and resulting rheological, mechanical and optical properties. In one example, polymer-particle interaction and secondary microstructure were designed to provide a low viscosity composition comprising exfoliated high aspect ratio clay nanoparticles; in another example, the microstructure control through templates was shown to enable unique thermal mechanical and optical properties. Jeff Munro, Stephanie Potisek, Phillip Hustad; all of the Dow Chemical Company are co-authors.

  18. Rheology of Vimentin Intermediate Filament Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huayin

    2012-02-01

    A cell's ability to function is highly dependent on its structure and material properties - its capacity to withstand and respond to forces in its environment. The cytoskeleton, which largely determines the cellular mechanical properties, is comprised of biopolymer networks, including filamentous actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments (IF). Intermediate filaments are much less studied than actin and microtubules. They are much more varied and specialized as well, and have been suggested as being an important platform in mechanotransduction processes in cells. It is thought that they can withstand very high strains and exhibit strain stiffening behavior. We are characterizing vimentin, a type III IF that is found in all vertebrate cells, using rheological techniques. Vimentin elasticity increases upon addition of multivalent cations, which act like molecular crosslinkers. By varying the concentration of cations, we can extract valuable information about how the networks assemble and function.

  19. Rheological properties of dairy cattle manure.

    PubMed

    El-Mashad, Hamed M; van Loon, Wilko K P; Zeeman, Grietje; Bot, Gerard P A

    2005-03-01

    Rheological properties are important for the design and modelling of handling and treating fluids. In the present study, the viscosity of liquid manure (about 10% total solids) was measured at different shear rates (2.38-238 s(-1)). The effect of temperature on the viscosity at different shear rates was also studied. The results showed that manure has non-Newtonian flow properties, because the viscosity strongly depended on the applied shear rate. The results showed also that manure behaves like real plastic materials. The power-law model of the shear stress and the rate of shear showed that the magnitude of the consistency coefficient decreased while increasing the temperature, with high values of the determination coefficient. Moreover, the results showed that the Arrhenius-type model fitted the temperature effect on manure viscosity very well (R2 at least 0.95) with calculated activation energy of 17.0+/-0.3 kJ mol(-1).

  20. Impact of Helicobacter Pylori on Mucus Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan; Keates, Sarah; Kelly, Ciaran; Turner, Bradley; Bansil, Rama; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that the viscoelastic properties of gastric mucin are crucial to the protection of the lining of the stomach against its own acidic secretions and other agents. Helicobacter Pylori, a rod shaped, gram-negative bacteria that dwells in the mucus layer of approximately 50% of the world's population is a class I carcinogen and is associated with gastric ulcers and severe gastritis. The structural damage to the mucus layer caused by H. Pylori is an important aspect of infection with this bacteria. We are examining the impact of H. Pylori on mucin and mucus rheology quantitatively using a combination of dynamic light scattering and multiple particle tracking experiments. Video microscopy data will also be presented on the motility of this bacteria in mucin at different pH and in other viscoelastic gels.

  1. New applications for cellulose nanofibers: Rheological challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari-Nasrabad, Behzad

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) are an exciting new renewable material produced from wood fibers. Even at low solids content, CNF-water suspensions have a complex rheology that includes extreme shear-thinning as well as viscoelastic properties and a yield stress. In the rheology of CNF suspensions, the measurement method may influence the results due to wall-slippage, but it is unclear how the behavior near walls influences the measurement method and what process equipment can manipulate this material. Parallel-plate and vane geometries were utilized to compare yielding and flow of CNF suspensions obtained by steady-state shear and oscillatory rheological measurements. Four different methods were compared as techniques to obtain a yield stress. The results are compared to pressure driven flow in a tube. Cone and plate geometries were found to lead to sample ejection at low shear rates: floc-floc interactions can explain this ejection. The suspensions violated the Cox-Merz rule in a significant manner as a sign of containing weak gel structures and the formation of a water-rich layer near the solid boundaries. For suspensions lower than 3% solids, the yield stress measured with different procedures were within 20% of each other, but for high solids suspensions, differences among the methods could be as large as 100%; the water-rich layer formation likely is the cause of these results. Oscillatory methods are suggested as a technique to obtain yield stress values. The pressure driven flow results were consistent with the power-law line fitted to the parallel-plate geometry data from steady shear. The capability of the extrusion process was investigated for pumping CNF suspensions through different dies. The extrusion process resulted in acceptable pumping rates which was in good agreement with the mathematical model. However, attributable to the extreme shear-thinning behavior of CNF, the pressure counter-flow dominates the drag flow along the screw channel and does not

  2. [Rheology and hyaluronic acid in inflammatory joint effusions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Zeidler, H; Altmann, S

    1977-11-11

    The Weissenberg rheogoniometer was used to measure viscosity, normal force and the number of molecular entanglements, calculated from a shear modulus obtained by prestationary experiments, in inflammatory and non-inflammatory synovial fluid effusions. The rheological properties show greater pathological change in the inflammatory synovial fluid samples than in the non-inflammatory. Variation in the hyaluronic acid concentration is only partly responsible for the pathological rheology. Initial experiments with a normalization method for the viscosity flow curves suggest the possibility of determining changes in polymerization or structure of the hyaluronic acid by rheological measurements.

  3. Lava thicknesses: Implications for rheological and crustal development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilburn, C. R. J.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    1988-01-01

    The morphology of a lava flow is strongly influenced by its rheological structure. The rheological structure is, in turn, dependent on numerous factors including: (1) bulk composition, (2) crystallingity, (3) vesicularity, and (4) crustal development. Identifying which of the latter factors are most significant, and hence most readily investigated by remote-sensing techniques, is necessary to clarify short-term objectives and expectations from the study of Martian lava flows. Insights into the rheological controls on flow morphology are provided by variations in thickness of undrained lava streams on Etna and Vesuvius, Southern Italy. Both pahoehoe and aa lavas were studied.

  4. Development of a model colloidal system for rheology simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Tallant, David Robert; Piech, Martin; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile

    2008-10-01

    The objective of the experimental effort is to provide a model particle system that will enable modeling of the macroscopic rheology from the interfacial and environmental structure of the particles and solvent or melt as functions of applied shear and volume fraction of the solid particles. This chapter describes the choice of the model particle system, methods for synthesis and characterization, and results from characterization of colloidal dispersion, particle film formation, and the shear and oscillatory rheology in the system. Surface characterization of the grafted PDMS interface, dispersion characterization of the colloids, and rheological characterization of the dispersions as a function of volume fraction were conducted.

  5. Rheology of coal slurries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbrecht, J.J.; Ryan, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental investigations of suspensions of three size distributions of glass spheres in a solution of tetralin and tetrabromoethane were made using a Haake viscometer. The values of viscosity were determined over a range of shear rates from 1 to 1000 sec/sup -1/. The suspending medium is Newtonian with a viscosity of about 9.66 centipoise at 25 +- 1/sup 0/C. At phi less than or equal to 20%, the suspension exhibited Newtonian behavior but at phi greater than or equal to 30%, the suspension exhibited pronounced non-Newtonian behavior. Experimental studies of these three size distributions were also conducted in aqueous solutions of polyvinylpyrrolidone using a pipe loop apparatus. Viscosity was measured over the shear rate range from 600 to 6000 sec./sup -1/. These suspensions having non-Newtonian suspending media, exhibit non-Newtonian behavior at all concentration levels of the solid particles. In the limit of very high shear rates, the suspension viscosity was found to be independent of tube diameter over the range of shear rates and concentrations studied. The rheological behavior of slurries of irregularly-shaped anthracite coal particles was also systematically investigated. The suspending medium consisted of a mixture of anthracene oil and tetrabromoethane. The shear rate was varied from 0.01 to 1000 sec./sup -1/. Volume concentrations range from 0 to 34%. At volume concentrations greater than 29% the slurries exhibited a yield stress and pronounced thixotropic behavior. The relative viscosities of both the model and the coal slurries were found to be dependent on both the shear rate and the particle size. In the case of the coal slurries caution must be exercised with regard to the proper interpretation of the rheological data due to the influences of the measured apparent density of the coal particles, viscometric flow geometry, and time dependent effects.

  6. Rheological Characterization of Ethanolamine Gel Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. S Jyoti, Botchu; Baek, Seung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Ethanolamine is considered to be an environmentally friendly propellant system because it has low toxicity and is noncarcinogenic in nature. In this article, efforts are made to formulate and prepare ethanolamine gel systems, using pure agarose and hybrids of paired gelling agents (agarose + polyvinylpyrrolidine (PVP), agarose + SiO2, and PVP + SiO2), that exhibit a measurable yield stress, thixotropic behavior under shear rate ranges of 1-1,000 s-1 and a viscoelastic nature. To achieve these goals, multiple rheological experiments (including flow and dynamic studies) are performed. In this article, results are presented from experiments measuring the apparent viscosity, yield stress, thixotropy, dynamic strain, frequency sweep, and tan δ behaviors, as well as the effects of the test temperature, in the gel systems. The results show that the formulated ethanolamine gels are thixotropic in nature with yield stress between 30 and 60 Pa. The apparent viscosity of the gel decreases as the test temperature increases, and the apparent activation energy is the lowest for the ethanolamine-(PVP + SiO2) gel system. The dynamic rheology study shows that the type of gellant, choice of hybrid gelling materials and their concentration, applied frequencies, and strain all vitally affect the viscoelastic properties of the ethanolamine gel systems. In the frequency sweep experiment, the ethanolamine gels to which agarose, agarose + PVP, and agarose + SiO2 were added behave like linear frequency-dependent viscoelastic liquids, whereas the ethanolamine gel to which PVP + SiO2 was added behaves like a nearly frequency-independent viscoelastic solid. The variation in the tan δ of these gelled propellants as a function of frequency is also discussed.

  7. Rheological Behavior, Granule Size Distribution and Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Cross-Linked Banana (Musa paradisiaca) Starch.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-Santiago, María C.; Maristany-Cáceres, Amira J.; Suárez, Francisco J. García; Bello-Pérez, Arturo

    2008-07-01

    Rheological behavior at 60 °C, granule size distribution and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) tests were employed to study the effect of diverse reaction conditions: adipic acid concentration, pH and temperature during cross-linking of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch. These properties were determined in native banana starch pastes for the purpose of comparison. Rheological behavior from pastes of cross-linked starch at 60 °C did not show hysteresis, probably due the cross-linkage of starch that avoided disruption of granules, elsewhere, native starch showed hysteresis in a thixotropic loop. All pastes exhibited non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior. In all cases, size distribution showed a decrease in the median diameter in cross-linked starches. This condition produces a decrease in swelling capacity of cross-linked starch. The median diameter decreased with an increase of acid adipic concentration; however, an increase of pH and Temperature produced an increase in this variable. Finally, an increase in gelatinization temperature and entalphy (ΔH) were observed as an effect of cross-linkage. An increase in acid adipic concentration produced an increase in Tonset and a decrease in ΔH. pH and temperature. The cross-linked of banana starch produced granules more resistant during the pasting procedure.

  8. On the Rheological Behavior of Impurity-Laden Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsby, D. L.; Qi, C.

    2016-09-01

    The rheological behavior of ice can be strongly influenced by the presence of second-phase particles, depending on the size, volume fraction, and distribution of particles. The influence of graphite particles on ice flow behavior will be discussed.

  9. Dynamic and rheological properties of soft biological cell suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, Xuejin

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying dynamic and rheological properties of suspensions of soft biological particles such as vesicles, capsules, and red blood cells (RBCs) is fundamentally important in computational biology and biomedical engineering. In this review, recent studies on dynamic and rheological behavior of soft biological cell suspensions by computer simulations are presented, considering both unbounded and confined shear flow. Furthermore, the hemodynamic and hemorheological characteristics of RBCs in diseases such as malaria and sickle cell anemia are highlighted. PMID:27540271

  10. Dense granular flow rheology in turbulent bedload transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, Raphael; Chauchat, Julien; Frey, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    The local granular rheology is investigated numerically in turbulent bedload transport. Considering spherical particles, steady uniform configurations are simulated using a coupled fluid-discrete element model. The stress tensor is computed as a function of the depth for a series of simulations varying the Shields number, the specific density and the particle diameter. The results are analyzed in the framework of the $\\mu(I)$ rheology and exhibit a collapse of both the shear to normal stress ratio and the solid volume fraction over a wide range of inertial numbers. Contrary to expected, the effect of the interstitial fluid on the granular rheology is shown to be negligible, supporting recent work suggesting the absence of a clear transition between the free-fall and the turbulent regime. In addition, the data collapse is observed up to unexpectedly high inertial numbers $I\\sim2$, challenging the existing conceptions and parametrization of the $\\mu(I)$ rheology. Focusing upon bedload transport modelling, the results are pragmatically analyzed in the $\\mu(I)$ framework in order to propose a granular rheology for bedload transport. The proposed rheology is tested using a 1D volume-averaged two-phase continuous model, and is shown to accurately reproduce the dense granular flow profiles and the sediment transport rate over a wide range of Shields number. The present contribution represents a step in the upscaling process from particle-scale simulations toward large scale applications involving complex flow geometry.

  11. Using Ultrasound to Measure Mud Rheological Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maa, P. Y. P. Y.; Kwon, J. I.; Park, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to predict the dynamic responses of newly consolidated cohesive sediment beds, a better understanding of the material rheological properties (bulk density, ρ, kinematic viscosity, ν, and shear modulus, G, assuming mud is a simple Voigt viscoelastic model) of these sediment beds is needed. An acoustic approach that uses a commercially available 250 kHz shear wave transducer and tone-burst waves has been developed to measure those properties. This approach uses a 86.3 mm long delay-line (DL) to separate the generated pressure and shear waves, and measures the reflected shear waves as well as the reflected pressure waves caused at the interface between the delay line and the mud to interpret these properties. By using materials (i.e., air, water, olive oil, and honey) with available rheological properties to establish a calibration relationship between the information carried by the measured reflected waves and those given material properties, the mud properties as well as thνe change of these properties during consolidation can be interpreted. Using jelly pudding as a check, a value of G ≈ 12310 N/m2 and ν ≈ 5 x 10-5 m2/s were estimated. For the consolidating kaolinite bed (with zero salinity and initial suspended sediment concentration about 420 g/cm3), the measurements show that the shear modulus developed after about 40 hours and approached a value on the order of 15000 N/m2 after about 100 hours. The initial kinematic viscosity was about 5 x 10-4 m2/s, and it decreased slowly with time and approached a low plateau between 10-6 and 10-7 m2/s after 300 hours. The measured bulk density showed a small increasing rate during the entire consolidation period, except at a short period between 80 and 90 hours after consolidation. Results from this study suggest a promising approach for developing an in-situ instrument to measure mud properties, as well as many other materials in other industries.

  12. Rheological Characterization of Foamy Oils under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abivin, Patrice; Henaut, Isabelle; Moan, Michel; Argillier, Jean-Francois

    2008-07-01

    Heavy oils are a strategic source of hydrocarbons due to the large amount of reserves located mainly in Venezuela and Canada. They distinguish from conventional oils by their higher density and viscosity. When a reservoir is depleted, the lightest components (methane, ethane, etc.) can exsolve from the crude oil and create a gaseous phase. In conventional oils, bubbles grow and coalesce quickly. On the contrary, in heavy oils, bubbles are small and remain dispersed within the oil for a long time. This "foamy oil" phenomenon changes drastically the flow properties of the crude oil. This article is devoted to the characterization of the heavy oil foamy behavior through a rheological study. Our objectives are to study the kinetics of bubble evolution in heavy oil and to measure their influence on viscosity. A new experimental method was developed, based upon rheological measurements under pressure. Several heavy oils containing dissolved gas have been depleted inside the pressure cells of controlled stress rheometers to create foamy oils. Viscoelastic properties have been continuously measured using both oscillatory and continuous tests from the nucleation up to the total disengagement of bubbles from oil. The occurrence of bubbles was visualized using X-ray scanning experiments. Results demonstrate that foamy oil kinetics is mostly related to the oil viscosity. They also reveal that under low shear rates, the presence of bubbles leads to an increase in heavy oil viscosity, as predicted by the Hard Sphere Model or by Taylor's one. A theoretical model describing the viscosity of foamy oil was then established. It takes into account both first-order kinetics of appearance and release of bubbles in oil and a basic suspension model. Good agreement was obtained between experimental data and model predictions. Finally, several tests reveal the strong influence of the shear rate on the foamy oil behavior and point out the major role of bubble deformation on the viscosity of

  13. Integrative Analysis of Mantle Lithosphere Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, G.; Collins, J. A.; Molnar, P. H.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    We will present an analysis of the rheology of mantle lithosphere based on extrapolation of lab-based flow laws, microstructural characterization of mantle shear zones and xenoliths, and the spatial distribution of mantle earthquakes and seismic anisotropy. As a starting point, we illustrate the similarity in the evolution of olivine lattice preferred orientation (LPO) for cm-scale lab samples (e.g., Zhang et al., 2000) and 100 meter-scale shear zones (e.g., Warren et al., 2008; Skemer et al., 2010). This correlation provides strong support for the extrapolation of lab data in both time and scale. The extrapolation of these results to plate-scale processes is supported by the analysis of shear wave splitting across the Alpine Fault on the South Island of New Zealand and its surrounding ocean basins (Zietlow et al., 2014). For the same region, the similarity in the fast Pn azimuth with the fast shear wave polarization directions indicates high strain deformation of relatively cold (~500-700oC) mantle lithosphere across a region 100-200 km wide (Collins and Molnar, 2014). This latter observation suggests that the lithosphere is significantly weaker than predicted by the extrapolation of dislocation creep or Peierls creep flow laws. Weakening via promotion of grain size sensitive creep mechanisms (diffusion creep and DisGBS) is likely at these conditions; however, studies of exhumed mantle shear zones generally indicate that the activation of these processes leads to strain localization at scales <<200 km. These observations motivate us to consider rheological constraints derived from geodetic studies and earthquake depths in regions where deformation of the lithosphere occurs at similar conditions. At face value, these data provide additional support for the extrapolation of lab data; the depth extent of earthquakes is consistent with estimates for the conditions where a transition from stable to unstable frictional sliding occurs (e.g., Boettcher et al., 2007) - and

  14. Past Tense Route Priming

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Shikora, Emily R.; Balota, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research examined whether lexical (whole word) or more rule-based (morphological constituent) processes can be locally biased by experimental list context in past tense verb inflection. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults completed a past tense inflection task in which list context was manipulated across blocks containing regular past tense verbs (e.g. REACH-REACHED) or irregular past tense verbs (TEACH-TAUGHT). Critical targets, consisting of half regular and half irregular verbs, were embedded within blocks and participants' inflection response latency and accuracy were assessed. The results yielded a cross-over interaction in response latencies. In the regular context there was a robust regularity effect: regular target verbs were conjugated faster than irregular target verbs. In contrast, in the irregular context, irregular target verbs were conjugated faster than regular target verbs. Experiment 2 used the same targets but in the context of either standard nonwords or nonwords ending in “-ED” to test the possibility of a phonological basis for the effect. The effect of context was eliminated. The results support the notion that distinct processes in past tense verb production can be locally biased by list context and, as shown in Experiment 2, this route priming effect was not due to phonological priming. PMID:23291293

  15. Influence of Fat Content on Chocolate Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, D.; Migliori, M.; Baldino, N.; de Cindio, B.

    2008-07-01

    Molten chocolate is a suspension having properties strongly affected by particle characteristics including not only the dispersed particles but also the fat crystals formed during chocolate cooling and solidification. Even though chocolate rheology is extensively studied, mainly viscosity at high temperature was determined and no information on amount and type of fat crystals can be detected in these conditions. However chocolate texture and stability is strongly affected by the presence of specific crystals. In this work a different approach, based on creep test, was proposed to characterize chocolate samples at typical process temperatures (approximately 30 °C). The analysis of compliance, as time function, at short times enable to evaluate a material "elasticity" related to the solid-like behavior of the material and given by the differential area between the Newtonian and the experimental compliance. Moreover a specific time dependent elasticity was defined as the ratio between the differential area, in a time range, and total area. Chocolate samples having a different fat content were prepared and they were conditioned directly on rheometer plate by applying two different controlled cooling rate; therefore creep were performed by applying a low stress to ensure material linear behavior. Experimental data were analyzed by the proposed method and specific elasticity was related to single crystal properties. It was found that fat crystal amount and properties depend in different way on fat content and cooling rate; moreover creep proved to be able to detect even small differences among tested samples.

  16. Rheological Characterization of Bioinspired Mineralization in Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regitsky, Abigail; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    With increasing amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere linked to potentially catastrophic climate change, it is critical that we find methods to permanently sequester and store CO2. Inspired by the natural biomineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), one future goal of this project is to understand the mechanisms of CaCO3 mineralization in order to ultimately optimize a bioinspired hydrogel system, which produces high value industrial powders that consume CO2 as a feedstock. Along the way, we are developing a rheological technique to study mineral nucleation and growth events by measuring the modulations in mechanical properties of a hydrogel system during mineralization. Our initial system consists of a gelatin hydrogel matrix, which is preloaded with calcium ions, and an aqueous solution of carbonate ions, which are allowed to diffuse through the gel to initiate the mineralization process. In order to monitor how the growth of minerals affects the mechanical properties of the gel network, we measure the storage (G') and loss (G'') moduli of the system in situ. Future work will focus on modifying the properties of the minerals formed by changing the polymer used in the hydrogel network and adding other organic molecules into the system.

  17. Biodegradable compounds: Rheological, mechanical and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Lucia, G.; Santella, M.; Malinconico, M.; Cerruti, P.; Pantani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recently great attention from industry has been focused on biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources. In particular, PLA has attracted great interest due to its high strength and high modulus and a good biocompatibility, however its brittleness and low heat distortion temperature (HDT) restrict its wide application. On the other hand, Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) is a biodegradable polymer with a low tensile modulus but characterized by a high flexibility, excellent impact strength, good thermal and chemical resistance. In this work the two aliphatic biodegradable polyesters PBS and PLA were selected with the aim to obtain a biodegradable material for the industry of plastic cups and plates. PBS was also blended with a thermoplastic starch. Talc was also added to the compounds because of its low cost and its effectiveness in increasing the modulus and the HDT of polymers. The compounds were obtained by melt compounding in a single screw extruder and the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The properties of the two compounds were compared and it was found that the values of the tensile modulus and elongation at break measured for the PBS/PLA/Talc compound make it interesting for the production of disposable plates and cups. In terms of thermal resistance the compounds have HDTs high enough to contain hot food or beverages. The PLA/PBS/Talc compound can be, then, considered as biodegradable substitute for polystyrene for the production of disposable plates and cups for hot food and beverages.

  18. Ex vivo rheology of spider silk.

    PubMed

    Kojić, N; Bico, J; Clasen, C; McKinley, G H

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the rheological properties of microliter quantities of the spinning material extracted ex vivo from the major ampullate gland of a Nephila clavipes spider using two new micro-rheometric devices. A sliding plate micro-rheometer is employed to measure the steady-state shear viscosity of approximately 1 microl samples of silk dope from individual biological specimens. The steady shear viscosity of the spinning solution is found to be highly shear-thinning, with a power-law index consistent with values expected for liquid crystalline solutions. Calculations show that the viscosity of the fluid decreases 10-fold as it flows through the narrow spinning canals of the spider. By contrast, measurements in a microcapillary extensional rheometer show that the transient extensional viscosity (i.e. the viscoelastic resistance to stretching) of the spinning fluid increases more than 100-fold during the spinning process. Quantifying the properties of native spinning solutions provides new guidance for adjusting the spinning processes of synthetic or genetically engineered silks to match those of the spider. PMID:17050850

  19. Mesophase behavior and rheology of polyhedral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Umang; Escobedo, Fernando

    2011-03-01

    Translational and orientational excluded volume fields can guide assembly of particles with anisotropic shape to diverse morphologies. A roadmap elucidating correlations between phase behavior and particle shape may help devising efficient strategies for self-assembly of desired nanocrystal superlattices. To explore these complex correlations we performed detailed Monte Carlo simulations of six convex multi-faceted shapes belonging to the diverse class of space-filling polyhedrons. Simulations predict formation of various novel liquid-crystalline and plastic-crystalline phases at intermediate volume fractions. By correlating these findings with particle anisotropy and order of rotational symmetry, simple guidelines for predicting phase behavior of polyhedral particles are proposed. Moreover, detailed analysis of the structures of mesophases reveals importance of dynamical order in defining these phases and preliminary information about kinetics of these transitions is also obtained. Finally, to elucidate the effect of particle shape anisotropy on rheology, preliminary results will be reported from non equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the isotropic and cubatic(LC) phase of cuboidal particles. This work was supported by a Department of Energy Basic Energy Science Grant ER46517.

  20. Mudflow rheology in a vertically rotating flume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Westphal, Jerome A.; Jobson, Harvey E.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Joint research by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Missouri-Rolla currently (1990) is being conducted on a 3.05 meters in diameter vertically rotating flume used to simulate mudflows under steady-state conditions. Observed mudflow simulations indicate flow patterns in the flume are similar to those occurring in natural mudflows. Variables such as mean and surface velocity, depth, and average boundary shear stress can be measured in this flume more easily than in the field or in a traditional tilting flume. Sensitive variables such as sediment concentration, grain-size distribution, and Atterberg limits also can be precisely and easily controlled. A known Newtonian fluid, SAE 30 motor oil, was tested in the flume and the computed value for viscosity was within 12.5 percent of the stated viscosity. This provided support that the data from the flume can be used to determine the rheological properties of fluids such as mud. Measurements on mud slurries indicate that flows with sediment concentrations ranging from 81 to 87 percent sediment by weight can be approximated as Bingham plastic for strain rates greater than 1 per second. In this approximation, the yield stress and Bingham viscosity were extremely sensitive to sediment concentration. Generally, the magnitude of the yield stress was large relative to the change in shear stress with increasing mudflow velocity.

  1. Rheological properties of asphalts with particulate additives

    SciTech Connect

    Shashidhar, N.; Chollar, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    The Superpave asphalt binder specifications are performance-based specifications for purchasing asphalt binders for the construction of roads. This means that the asphalt is characterized by fundamental material (rheological) properties that relate to the distress modes of the pavements. The distress modes addressed are primarily rutting, fatigue cracking and low temperature cracking. For example, G*/sin({delta}) is designed to predict the rutting potential of pavements, where G* is the magnitude of the complex shear modulus and 6 is the phase angle. The binder for a road that is situated in a certain climatic zone requires the binder to have a minimum G*/sin({delta}) of 2200 Pa at the highest consecutive 7-day average pavement temperature the road had experienced. Implicit in such a performance based specification is that the fundamental property, G*/sin({delta}), of the binder correlates with rutting potential of the pavement regardless of the nature of the binder. In other words, the specification is transparent to the fact that the binder can simply be an asphalt, or an asphalt modified by polymers, particulates and other materials that can form a two-phase mixture. This paper discusses the asphalt-particulate system.

  2. Rheological and fractal hydrodynamics of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Tijani, H I; Abdullah, N; Yuzir, A; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-06-01

    The structural and hydrodynamic features for granules were characterized using settling experiments, predefined mathematical simulations and ImageJ-particle analyses. This study describes the rheological characterization of these biologically immobilized aggregates under non-Newtonian flows. The second order dimensional analysis defined as D2=1.795 for native clusters and D2=1.099 for dewatered clusters and a characteristic three-dimensional fractal dimension of 2.46 depicts that these relatively porous and differentially permeable fractals had a structural configuration in close proximity with that described for a compact sphere formed via cluster-cluster aggregation. The three-dimensional fractal dimension calculated via settling-fractal correlation, U∝l(D) to characterize immobilized granules validates the quantitative measurements used for describing its structural integrity and aggregate complexity. These results suggest that scaling relationships based on fractal geometry are vital for quantifying the effects of different laminar conditions on the aggregates' morphology and characteristics such as density, porosity, and projected surface area.

  3. Extensional Rheology of Fire Ant Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Scott; Kern, Matthew; Phonekeo, Sulisay; Hu, David

    We explore the extensional rheology and self-healing of fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) aggregations, mechanically entangled ensembles used to form rafts, bivouacs or bridges. Macroscopic experiments create quasi-two dimensional piles and measure the force required to impose a constant end-velocity. This force fluctuates, reminiscent of similar experiments on geometrically cohesive granular materials. Heterogeneous chains develop, with isolated ants often the sole link between top and bottom. Finally, the maximum pile strength scales sub-linearly with the number of ants, with the maximum force per ant decreasing as the pile grows. We reproduce these behaviors with a simple model that represents ants feet as discs connected by a spring (the ''leg''). Discs move randomly, and stick to one another when in contact. Discs in contact un-stick at random with a probability that decreases as the spring (leg) is stretched, modeling an ant's tendency to hold on longer when stretched. Simulations qualitatively reproduces the fluctuating force, chain formation and sublinear scaling of maximum force with particle number and give insight into underlying mechanisms that govern the ants' behaviors. Funded in part by NSF DMR #1133722.

  4. Rheological behaviors of the fresh SFRCC extrudate: Experimental, theoretical and numerical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangming

    Short fiber reinforced cementitious composites (SFRCC) manufactured by the extrusion technique exhibit significant improvements in physical, mechanical and durable properties as compared with the fiber-reinforced cementitious composites made by traditional manufacturing techniques. In the present study, first, various promising rheology and plasticity methods, including ram extrusion, orifice extrusion, capillary extrusion and upsetting, have been examined to investigate constitutive characteristics of the fresh SFRCC pastes for extrusion. In these experimental works, the traditional ram extrusion and orifice extrusion theories have been further developed and the capillary extrusion theory has been modified by taking the rate and the slip effects. The upsetting theory has been corrected to include the effects of boundary friction and strain rate. It has been found that the fresh SFRCC pastes show pseudo-plasticity and significant strain rate hardening behavior. Only by combing rheology and plasticity methods could it give a full description of the constitutive behavior of such pastes. Second, based on experimental and theoretical investigations, an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model has been proposed for the fresh SFRCC paste, which considers the von Mises yield criterion, the associated flow rule and nonlinear isotropic strain rate-hardening. The model is formulated by introducing a strain rate-dependent yield function. The associated material parameters in the proposed constitutive model could be identified from material tests without the help of numerical methods. These parameters have been determined for the fresh SFRCC paste for extrusion in this study. Third, the proposed elasto-viscoplasticy constitutive model has been formulated in a computational form and implemented into the explicit finite element code ANSYS/LS-DYNA for simulation purposes. Various forming processes of the fresh SFRCC pastes, including upsetting and ram extrusion, have been simulated

  5. Determination of the mineral fraction and rheological properties of microwave modified starch from Canna edulis.

    PubMed

    Lares, Mary; Pérez, Elevina

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of the physical modification by microwave irradiation on the mineral fraction and rheological properties of starch isolated from Canna edulis rhizomes. Phosphorus, sodium, potassium, magnesium, iron, calcium and zinc were evaluated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Rheological properties were determined using both the Brabender amylograph and Brookfield viscosimeter. Except for the calcium concentration, mineral contents decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after microwave treatment. The amylographic profile was also modified, showing increased pasting temperature range and breakdown index, whereas the viscosity peak, viscosity at holding (95 degrees C) and cooling periods (50 degrees C), setback and consistency decreased as compared to the native starch counterpart. Although viscosity decreased in the microwaved sample, presumably due to starch changes at molecular level, it retained the general pseudo plastic behavior of native starch. It is concluded that canna starch may be modified by microwave irradiation in order to change its functional properties. This information should be considered when using microwave irradiation for food processing. Furthermore, the altered functional attributes of canna modified starch could be advantageous in new product development.

  6. Influence of micronutrients on rheological characteristics and bread-making quality of flour.

    PubMed

    Sudha, M L; Leelavathi, K

    2008-03-01

    Studies were carried out to see the influence of different iron and calcium salts along with some vitamins on the rheological characteristics and bread-making quality of wheat flour. Fortification with iron (30-90 ppm) from different sources showed a marginal increase in water absorption (2%). Calcium ranging between 800 and 1,600 ppm did not show any influence on the mixing properties of the dough. Except for ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and calcium lactate, all other salts did not have any influence on the alveograph characteristics. The gelatinization temperature slightly increased by about 2-3 degrees C and the cold paste viscosity increased from 468 to 524 BU. Addition of micronutrient premix containing ferrous sulphate, calcium carbonate and vitamins such as thiamine (thiamine hydrochloride), riboflavin, niacin (nicotinic acid) and folic acid at different levels showed a marginal effect on the rheological parameters. There was no significant influence of micronutrient premix on the objective and subjective evaluation of the breads, except for the crumb colour. Fortification with the vitamin-mineral premix did not affect the theological parameters and bread-making quality of flour, even after storage. PMID:17852480

  7. Linear and Nonlinear Rheological Characterization of Temporary Networks of Telechelic Polybutadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Florian J.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Bailly, Christian

    2008-07-01

    Apolar polymers with hydrogen-bonding or ionic end-groups have a natural tendency to form temporary networks and are as such interesting systems to study the interplay between topological interactions, i.e. entanglements, and reversible supramolecular linkages. While some rheological and structural characterization of such systems has been published in the past, no systematic study on the respective influences of topological vs. supramolecular interactions has been reported. In this work, we focus on the linear and non linear rheological characterization of telechelic polybutadienes (PBd) with carboxylic end groups neutralized with various inorganic and organic bases. A difunctional carboxylic acid terminated PBd shows only very weak associative behavior with a slightly increased temperature dependence by comparison with the neat polymer. The neutralization of the acid end-groups, however, leads to the formation of a reversible network, whose bonding strength and characteristic relaxation time depend very much on the nature of the ion, and to a much higher temperature dependence. An increase of the relaxation time by several orders of magnitude is observed together with a dramatic change of the plateau modulus by comparison with the reference polymer.

  8. Rheological, thermo-mechanical, and baking properties of wheat-millet flour blends.

    PubMed

    Aprodu, Iuliana; Banu, Iuliana

    2015-07-01

    Millet has long been known as a good source of fiber and antioxidants, but only lately started to be exploited by food scientists and food industry as a consequence of increased consumer awareness. In this study, doughs and breads were produced using millet flour in different ratios (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50%) to white, dark, and whole wheat flour. The flour blends were evaluated in terms of rheological and thermo-mechanical properties. Fundamental rheological measurements revealed that the viscosity of the flour formulations increases with wheat flour-extraction rate and decreases with the addition of millet flour. Doughs behavior during mixing, overmixing, pasting, and gelling was established using the Mixolab device. The results of this bread-making process simulation indicate that dough properties become critical for the flour blends with millet levels higher than 30%. The breads were evaluated for volume, texture, and crumb-grain characteristics. The baking test and sensory evaluation results indicated that substitution levels of up to 30% millet flour could be used in composite bread flour. High levels of millet flour (40 and 50%) negatively influenced the loaf volume, crumb texture, and taste.

  9. Rheology of Film-Forming Solutions Prepared with Modified Banana Starch and Plasticizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Gómez, Yaritza; Sánchez-Rivera, Mirna; Romero-Bastida, Claudia; González-Soto, Rosalía; Bello-Pérez, Arturo; Solorza-Feria, Javier

    2008-07-01

    The physical properties of edible films depend to a great extent on those of their components; the biopolymer and the plasticizer, which define its physical changes during heat processing and handling. The aim of this work was to determine the rheological profile of film forming solutions (FFS) composed of native and modified (oxidized) banana starch and the plasticizer glycerol. Samples of FFS, composed by 4%(w/w) of native and oxidized banana starch and glycerol (4%(w/w) were prepared. Two types of rheological tests were undertaken using a strain controlled Rheometer TA Instruments, model AR1000, with a cone and plate system, 60 mm of diameter and angle of 2°: a) isothermal oscillatory (amplitude and frequency) tests at 25 °C, 90 °C and once cooled down, at 25 °C. b) temperature sweeps, run as the samples were heated up from 25 °C to 90 °C and also when cooled down to 25 °C. The isothermal tests showed that all pastes produced, behaved as weak viscoelastic gel-like materials, with the elastic modulus (G')> the viscous modulus (G″) over the entire frequency range. The temperature sweeps also showed that all viscoelastic FFS, behaved as mainly elastic materials over the temperature range. Overall, FFS from native starch yielded gels with higher moduli values than those of the oxidized ones.

  10. The rheology, degradation, processing, and characterization of renewable resource polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jason David

    Renewable resource polymers have become an increasingly popular alternative to conventional fossil fuel based polymers over the past couple decades. The push by the government as well as both industrial and consumer markets to go "green" has provided the drive for companies to research and develop new materials that are more environmentally friendly and which are derived from renewable materials. Two polymers that are currently being produced commercially are poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolymers, both of which can be derived from renewable feedstocks and have shown to exhibit similar properties to conventional materials such as polypropylene, polyethylene, polystyrene, and PET. PLA and PHA are being used in many applications including food packaging, disposable cups, grocery bags, and biomedical applications. In this work, we report on the rheological properties of blends of PLA and PHA copolymers. The specific materials used in the study include Natureworks RTM 7000D grade PLA and PHA copolymers of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate). Blends ranging from 10 to 50 percent PHA by weight are also examined. Shear and extensional experiments are performed to characterize the flow behavior of the materials in different flow fields. Transient experiments are performed to study the shear rheology over time in order to determine how the viscoelastic properties change under typical processing conditions and understand the thermal degradation behavior of the materials. For the blends, it is determined that increasing the PHA concentration in the blend results in a decrease in viscosity and increase in degradation. Models are fit to the viscosity of the blends using the pure material viscosities in order to be able to predict the behavior at a given blend composition. We also investigate the processability of these materials into films and examine the resultant properties of the cast films. The mechanical and thermal properties of the

  11. Rheological properties of polyvinylsiloxane impression materials before mixing and during setting related to handling characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyang-Ok; Lee, In-Bog

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine and compare the handling and rheological properties of polyvinylsiloxane impression pastes before mixing and during setting, and to investigate the effect of its constituents on the properties of the materials. Five polyvinylsiloxane impression materials (Examixfine, Extrude, Honigum, Imprint II, and Express) were used. A flow test and a drip test were performed to determine the handling characteristics. The rheological properties of each impression material prior to mixing (shear stress, viscosity) and during setting (storage modulus G'), loss modulus G″), loss tangent tanδ) were measured with a stress-controlled rheometer at 25°C and 32°C, respectively. Inorganic filler content of each impression material was measured and observed with a SEM. The molecular weight distribution of polymer matrix was determined with a gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Express and Honigum display lower flow compared to the other materials, due to their high yield-stress values. Examixfine exhibits the greatest flow. All materials display pseudoplastic behavior, excluding the Examixfine catalyst. The viscosities at low shear rate are greatest for Express and Honigum; however, under high shear conditions, the viscosities of Extrude and Honigum are the lowest. Following mixing, each material show an increase in G', finally reaching a plateau, and the tanδ rapidly decreases with time. Imprint II shows the highest final G' as well as the most rapid decrease in tanδ. Express and Imprint II present the highest filler content and rough filler surface, while Honigum shows the lowest filler content and small filler particles. Most products are composed of polymers over 30 kDa and oligomers less than 1 kDa. Each impression material possesses different rheological properties, which significantly affect the handling characteristics. The yield stress of the impression material minimizes unnecessary flow prior to and after seating. Viscoelastic

  12. Is the Past Irrelevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banowsky, William S.

    1972-01-01

    Author sees a cultish emphasis on the new and the now" sweeping this country and believes we must avoid the cut-flower syndrome of being beautiful but rootless by not severing ties with the past. History is germane and so are many areas of the high school curriculum now under attack for their irrelevance. (Editor/RB)

  13. Tackiness and cohesive failure of granular pastes: mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Abdelhaye, Y O Mohamed; Chaouche, M; Chapuis, J; Charlaix, E; Hinch, J; Roux, S; Van Damme, H

    2012-06-01

    Granular pastes are dense dispersions of non-colloidal grains in a simple or a complex fluid. Typical examples are the coating, gluing or sealing mortars used in building applications. We study the rupture of a thick layer of mortar paste in a simple pulling test where the paste is confined between two flat surfaces. It is shown that, depending on the rheological properties of the paste and the plate separation velocity, two main failure modes are obtained. The first mode is the inwards shear flow of the paste with viscous fingering instabilities, similarly to what has been observed with Newtonian fluids and with non-Newtonian colloidal suspensions or polymer solutions. The second failure mode is stemming from the expansion of bubbles, similarly to what has been observed in soft adhesive polymer layers and, more recently, in highly viscous fluids. It is shown that the crossover between the two failure modes is determined by the conditions required to generate a pressure drop able to trigger the growth of pre-existing micro-bubbles smaller than the inter-granular distance. PMID:22692685

  14. Tackiness and cohesive failure of granular pastes: mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Abdelhaye, Y O Mohamed; Chaouche, M; Chapuis, J; Charlaix, E; Hinch, J; Roux, S; Van Damme, H

    2012-06-01

    Granular pastes are dense dispersions of non-colloidal grains in a simple or a complex fluid. Typical examples are the coating, gluing or sealing mortars used in building applications. We study the rupture of a thick layer of mortar paste in a simple pulling test where the paste is confined between two flat surfaces. It is shown that, depending on the rheological properties of the paste and the plate separation velocity, two main failure modes are obtained. The first mode is the inwards shear flow of the paste with viscous fingering instabilities, similarly to what has been observed with Newtonian fluids and with non-Newtonian colloidal suspensions or polymer solutions. The second failure mode is stemming from the expansion of bubbles, similarly to what has been observed in soft adhesive polymer layers and, more recently, in highly viscous fluids. It is shown that the crossover between the two failure modes is determined by the conditions required to generate a pressure drop able to trigger the growth of pre-existing micro-bubbles smaller than the inter-granular distance.

  15. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabloff, J A

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  16. The non-isothermal rheology of low viscosity magmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, Stephan; Giordano, Daniele; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate prediction of the run-out distance of lava flows, as well as the understanding of magma migration in shallow dyke systems is hampered by an incomplete understanding of the transient, sub-liquidus rheology of crystallizing melts. This sets significant limits to physical property based modelling of lava flow (especially flow width, length and advancement rate) and magma migration behaviour and the resulting accuracy of volcanic hazard assessment The importance of the dynamic rheology of a lava / magma on its emplacement style becomes especially apparent in towards later stages of flow and dyke emplacement, where the melt builds increasing resistance to flow, entering rheologic regimes that determine the halting of lava flows and sealing of dykes. Thermal gradients between the interior of a melt body and the contact with air or the substratum govern these rheologic transitions that give origin to flow directing or impeding features like levees, tubes and chilled margins. Besides the critical importance of non-isothermal and sub-liquidus processes for the understanding of natural systems, accurate rheologic data at these conditions are scarce and studies capturing the transient rheological evolution of lavas at conditions encountered during emplacement virtually absent. We describe the rheologic evolution of a series of natural, re-melted lava samples during transient and non-equilibrium crystallization conditions characteristic of lava flows and shallow magmatic systems in nature. The sample suite spans from foidites to basalts; the dominant compositions producing low viscosity lava flows. Our data show that all melts undergo one or more change zones in effective viscosity when subjected to sub liquidus temperatures. The apparent viscosity of the liquid-crystal suspension increases drastically from the theoretical temperature-viscosity relationship of a pure liquid once cooled below the liquidus temperature. We find that: 1) Both cooling rate and shear rate

  17. Impact of Rheological Modifiers on Various Slurries Supporting DOE Waste Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Bredt, Paul R.; Hansen, Erich; Bhosale, Prasad S.; Berg, John C.

    2010-03-11

    Controlling the stability and subsequent rheological properties of slurries has been an important but challenging issue in nuclear waste treatment, one that previous research has yet to sufficiently address. At the Hanford and Savannah River sites, operation of the waste treatment facilities at increased solids loading reduces the evaporative load on the melter systems and thereby increases waste processing rates. However, at these higher solids loadings, increased slurry rheology becomes a significant processing issue. The current study evaluates the use of several rheological modifiers to alleviate increased slurry rheology at high waste solids concentrations. Rheological modifiers change particle interactions in slurry. For colloidal slurries, modifiers mainly alter the electrostatic and steric interactions between particles, leading to a change in slurry rheology. Weak organic acid type rheological modifiers strengthen electrostatic repulsion whereas nonionic/polymer surfactant type rheological modifiers introduce a steric repulsion. We investigated various rheological modifiers using high level waste (HLW) nuclear waste simulants characterized typically by high ionic strength and a wide range of pH from 4 to 13. Using rheological analysis, it was found that citric acid and polyacrylic acid would be good rheological modifiers for the HLW simulants tested, effectively reducing slurry rheology by 40% or more. Physical insights into the mechanisms driving stabilization by these rheological modifiers will be discussed.

  18. Factors That Influence the Extensional Rheological Property of Saliva.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Amrita; Inui, Taichi; Dodds, Michael; Proctor, Gordon; Carpenter, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The spinnbarkeit of saliva reflects the ability of saliva to adhere to surfaces within the mouth, thereby serving as a protective role and aiding in lubrication. Therefore, alterations in the extensional rheology of saliva may result in the loss in adhesiveness or the ability to bind onto surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins and their structures are known to be important factors for the extensional rheological properties of saliva. The conformation of mucin depends on factors such as pH and ionic strength. Chewing is one of the main stimuli for salivary secretion but creates significant sheer stress on the salivary film which could influence mouthfeel perceptions. The current study investigates the possible factors which affect the extensional rheological properties of saliva by comparing submandibular/sublingual saliva with different oral stimuli within the same group of subjects. Unstimulated and stimulated saliva (chew, smell and taste) salivas were collected primarily from submandibular/sublingual glands. The saliva samples were measured for Spinnbarkeit followed by the measuring mucin, total protein, total calcium and bicarbonate concentrations. The results indicated correlations between rheological properties and mucin/ion concentrations. However, chewing stimulated submandibular/sublingual saliva is shown to have significantly lower Spinnbarkeit, but factors such as mucin, protein and calcium concentrations did not account for this variation. Analysis of the concentration of bicarbonate and pH appears to suggest that it has a prominent effect on extensional rheology of saliva. PMID:26305698

  19. Factors That Influence the Extensional Rheological Property of Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Amrita; Inui, Taichi; Dodds, Michael; Proctor, Gordon; Carpenter, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The spinnbarkeit of saliva reflects the ability of saliva to adhere to surfaces within the mouth, thereby serving as a protective role and aiding in lubrication. Therefore, alterations in the extensional rheology of saliva may result in the loss in adhesiveness or the ability to bind onto surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins and their structures are known to be important factors for the extensional rheological properties of saliva. The conformation of mucin depends on factors such as pH and ionic strength. Chewing is one of the main stimuli for salivary secretion but creates significant sheer stress on the salivary film which could influence mouthfeel perceptions. The current study investigates the possible factors which affect the extensional rheological properties of saliva by comparing submandibular/sublingual saliva with different oral stimuli within the same group of subjects. Unstimulated and stimulated saliva (chew, smell and taste) salivas were collected primarily from submandibular/sublingual glands. The saliva samples were measured for Spinnbarkeit followed by the measuring mucin, total protein, total calcium and bicarbonate concentrations. The results indicated correlations between rheological properties and mucin/ion concentrations. However, chewing stimulated submandibular/sublingual saliva is shown to have significantly lower Spinnbarkeit, but factors such as mucin, protein and calcium concentrations did not account for this variation. Analysis of the concentration of bicarbonate and pH appears to suggest that it has a prominent effect on extensional rheology of saliva. PMID:26305698

  20. Factors That Influence the Extensional Rheological Property of Saliva.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Amrita; Inui, Taichi; Dodds, Michael; Proctor, Gordon; Carpenter, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The spinnbarkeit of saliva reflects the ability of saliva to adhere to surfaces within the mouth, thereby serving as a protective role and aiding in lubrication. Therefore, alterations in the extensional rheology of saliva may result in the loss in adhesiveness or the ability to bind onto surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins and their structures are known to be important factors for the extensional rheological properties of saliva. The conformation of mucin depends on factors such as pH and ionic strength. Chewing is one of the main stimuli for salivary secretion but creates significant sheer stress on the salivary film which could influence mouthfeel perceptions. The current study investigates the possible factors which affect the extensional rheological properties of saliva by comparing submandibular/sublingual saliva with different oral stimuli within the same group of subjects. Unstimulated and stimulated saliva (chew, smell and taste) salivas were collected primarily from submandibular/sublingual glands. The saliva samples were measured for Spinnbarkeit followed by the measuring mucin, total protein, total calcium and bicarbonate concentrations. The results indicated correlations between rheological properties and mucin/ion concentrations. However, chewing stimulated submandibular/sublingual saliva is shown to have significantly lower Spinnbarkeit, but factors such as mucin, protein and calcium concentrations did not account for this variation. Analysis of the concentration of bicarbonate and pH appears to suggest that it has a prominent effect on extensional rheology of saliva.

  1. Model of ciliary clearance and the role of mucus rheology.

    PubMed

    Norton, Michael M; Robinson, Risa J; Weinstein, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the transportability of mucus by cilial mats is dependent on the rheological properties of the mucus. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid that exhibits a plethora of phenomena such as stress relaxation, tensile stresses, shear thinning, and yielding behavior. These observations motivate the analysis in this paper that considers the first two attributes in order to construct a transport model. The model developed here assumes that the mucus is transported as a rigid body, the metachronal wave exhibits symplectic behavior, that the mucus is thin compared to the metachronal wavelength, and that the effects of individual cilia can be lumped together to impart an average strain to the mucus during contact. This strain invokes a stress in the mucus, whose non-Newtonian rheology creates tensile forces that persist into unsheared regions and allow the unsupported mucus to move as a rigid body whereas a Newtonian fluid would retrograde. This work focuses primarily on the Doi-Edwards model but results are generalized to the Jeffrey's and Maxwell fluids as well. The model predicts that there exists an optimal mucus rheology that maximizes the shear stress imparted to the mucus by the cilia for a given cilia motion. We propose that this is the rheology that the body strives for in order to minimize energy consumption. Predicted optimal rheologies are consistent with results from previous experimental studies when reasonable model parameters are chosen.

  2. Model of ciliary clearance and the role of mucus rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Michael M.; Robinson, Risa J.; Weinstein, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the transportability of mucus by cilial mats is dependent on the rheological properties of the mucus. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid that exhibits a plethora of phenomena such as stress relaxation, tensile stresses, shear thinning, and yielding behavior. These observations motivate the analysis in this paper that considers the first two attributes in order to construct a transport model. The model developed here assumes that the mucus is transported as a rigid body, the metachronal wave exhibits symplectic behavior, that the mucus is thin compared to the metachronal wavelength, and that the effects of individual cilia can be lumped together to impart an average strain to the mucus during contact. This strain invokes a stress in the mucus, whose non-Newtonian rheology creates tensile forces that persist into unsheared regions and allow the unsupported mucus to move as a rigid body whereas a Newtonian fluid would retrograde. This work focuses primarily on the Doi-Edwards model but results are generalized to the Jeffrey's fluid as well. The model predicts that there exists an optimal mucus rheology that maximizes the shear stress imparted to the mucus by the cilia for a given cilia motion. We propose that this is the rheology that the body strives for in order to minimize energy consumption. Predicted optimal rheologies are consistent with results from previous experimental studies when reasonable model parameters are chosen.

  3. Complex rheological behaviors of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) skin mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang Su, Heng Lv, Weiyang Du, Miao Song, Yihu Zheng, Qiang

    2015-01-15

    The functions and structures of biological mucus are closely linked to rheology. In this article, the skin mucus of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) was proved to be a weak hydrogel susceptible to shear rate, time, and history, exhibiting: (i) Two-region breakdown of its gel structure during oscillatory strain sweep; (ii) rate-dependent thickening followed by three-region thinning with increased shear rate, and straight thinning with decreased shear rate; and (iii) time-dependent rheopexy at low shear rates, and thixotropy at high shear rates. An interesting correlation between the shear rate- and time-dependent rheological behaviors was also revealed, i.e., the rheopexy-thixotropy transition coincided with the first-second shear thinning region transition. Apart from rheology, a structure of colloidal network was observed in loach skin mucus using transmission electron microscopy. The complex rheology was speculated to result from inter- and intracolloid structural alterations. The unique rheology associated with the colloidal network structure, which has never been previously reported in vertebrate mucus, may play a key role in the functions (e.g., flow, reannealing, lubrication, and barrier) of the mucus.

  4. Antigorite rheology? Experimental challenges and complicating observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, B.; Hirth, G.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing the rheology of antigorite remains a challenge due to its strongly anisotropic structure and relatively low dehydration temperature. The efficacy of trading off temperature for strain-rate is limited and to date it remains unclear if antigorite can deform by fully plastic flow and, if so, by what rate-limiting mechanism(s). We present results from general shear experiments on antigorite gouge conducted in a Griggs-rig at 1-2 GPa confining pressure, 300-500 °C and strain-rates from 10^-5/s to 10^-7/s. We observe a peculiar behavior in which strain becomes increasingly localized at higher temperatures. At 300 °C gouge samples are macroscopically ductile with strain accommodated by a dense network of small fractures. At 500 °C strain is fully localized to a single ~10 μm wide fracture. Fractures contained finer-grained foliated antigorite. Increasing pressure from 1-2 GPa had no effect on localization. The apparent friction associated with slip along the fractures decreased from 0.23 to 0.07 at 300 °C and 500 °C respectively. The rate-dependence was relatively low (with an effective stress exponent of ~36) and decreased with increasing temperature. These findings are consistent with previous observations on talc (Escartin et al., 2008) and further complicate to the proposed Peierls creep and power law creep flow laws for antigorite (e.g., Amiguet et al., 2012). The 'thermal' embrittlement observed in our experiments may explain some occurrences of seismicity in serpentinized rock at temperatures too cold for dehydration.

  5. Linking enclave formation to magma rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, K. F.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2012-10-01

    Magmatic enclaves record the history of deformation and disaggregation (i.e., fragmentation) of relatively hot, compositionally more mafic magmas injected into actively convecting silicic magma chambers through dikes. Enclave size distributions may provide crucial clues for understanding the nature of this mechanical mixing process. Accordingly, we conduct a comprehensive field study to measure enclave size distributions in six Cascade lava flows. Using results from recent fluid dynamics experiments along with thermodynamic and modeling constraints on key physical properties of the injected and host magmas (i.e., temperature, density and effective viscosity), we use the size distributions of enclaves to characterize the magmatic flow regime governing enclave formation. Scaling arguments suggest that the viscous stresses related to magma chamber flow acting against the yield strength of a crystallizing injected magma control the breakup of 1 m-wide mafic dikes into millimeter- to centimeter-scale enclaves. Our data analysis identifies a characteristic length scale of breakup that constrains the yield strength of the injected magmas in a more restrictive way than existing empirical models for yield strength based on crystal content. In all six lava flows, we show that the progressive fragmentation of the injected magma is self-similar and characterized by a fractal dimensionDf ˜ 2, which is comparable to previous studies on enclaves. We also find a small but statistically significant dependence of Df on the effective viscosity ratio between host and enclave magmas, such that large variations in effective viscosity enhance breakup. This work demonstrates that field observations of enclave size distributions can reliably constrain the rheological and flow conditions in which enclaves form.

  6. Ice rheology and tidal heating of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, D.; Hussmann, H.; Kurita, K.; Sohl, F.

    2013-09-01

    For the saturnian satellite Enceladus, the possible existence of a global ocean is a major issue. For the stability of an internal ocean, tidal heating is suggested as an effective heat source. However, assuming Maxwell rheology ice, it has been shown that a global scale ocean on Enceladus cannot be maintained (Roberts, J.F., Nimmo, F. [2008]. Icarus 194, 675-689). Here, we analyze tidal heating and the stability of a global ocean from the aspect of anelastic behavior. The Maxwell model is the most typical and widely used viscoelastic model. However, in the tidal frequency domain, energy is also dissipated by the anelastic response involving time-dependent or transient creep mechanisms, which is different from the viscoelastic response caused by steady-state creep. The Maxwell model cannot adequately address anelasticity, which has a large effect in the high viscosity range. Burgers and Andrade models are suggested as suitable models for the creep behavior of ice in the frequency domain. We calculate tidal heating in the ice layer and compare it with the radiated heat assuming both convection and conduction of the ice layer. Though anelastic behavior increases the heating rate, it is insufficient to maintain a global subsurface ocean if the ice layer is convecting, even though a wide parameter range is taken into account. One possibility to maintain a global ocean is that Enceladus’ ice shell is conductive and its tidal response is similar to that of the Burgers body with comparatively small transient shear modulus and viscosity. If the surface ice with large viscosity is dissipative by anelastic response, the heat produced in the ice layer would supersede the cooling rate and a subsurface ocean could be maintained without freezing.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular polymer rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Djohari, Hadrian; Dormidontova, Elena E.

    2010-11-01

    Using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we studied the equilibrium and rheological properties of dilute and semidilute solutions of head-to-tail associating polymers. In our simulation model, a spontaneous complementary reversible association between the donor and the acceptor groups at the ends of oligomers was achieved by introducing a combination of truncated pseudo-Coulombic attractive potential and Lennard Jones repulsive potential between donor, acceptor, and neighboring groups. We have calculated the equilibrium properties of supramolecular polymers, such as the ring/chain equilibrium, average molecular weight, and molecular weight distribution of self-assembled chains and rings, which all agree well with previous analytical and computer modeling results. We have investigated shear thinning of solutions of 8- and 20-bead associating oligomers with different association energies at different temperatures and oligomer volume fractions. All reduced viscosity data for a given oligomer length can be collapsed into one master curve, exhibiting two power-law regions of shear-thinning behavior with an exponent of -0.55 at intermediate ranges of the reduced shear rate β and -0.8 (or -0.9) at larger shear rates. The equilibrium viscosity of supramolecular solutions with different oligomer lengths and associating energies is found to obey a power-law scaling dependence on oligomer volume fraction with an exponent of 1.5, in agreement with the experimental observations for several dilute or semidilute solutions of supramolecular polymers. This implies that dilute and semidilute supramolecular polymer solutions exhibit high polydispersity but may not be sufficiently entangled to follow the reptation mechanism of relaxation.

  8. 2012 SRNL-EM VANE RHEOLOGY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.; Marzolf, A.; Hera, K.

    2012-08-31

    The vane method has been shown to be an effective tool in measuring the yield stress of both settled and mixed slurries in laboratory bench scale conditions in supporting assessments of both actual and simulant waste slurries. The vane has also been used to characterize dry powders and granular solids, the effect of non-cohesive solids with interstitial fluids and used as a guide to determine if slip is present in the geometries typically used to perform rheological flow curve measurements. The vane has been extensively characterized for measuring the shear strength in soils in both field and laboratory studies. The objectives for this task are: Fabricate vane instrument; Bench top testing to further characterize the effect of cohesive, non-cohesive, and blends of cohesive/non-cohesive simple simulants; Data from measurement of homogenized and settled bed of Kaolin sludge and assessment of the technology. In this document, the assessment using bench scale measurements of non-cohesive materials (beads) and cohesive materials (kaolin) is discussed. The non-cohesive materials include various size beads and the vane was assessed for depth and deaeration (or packing) via tapping measurements. For the cohesive (or non-Newtonian) materials, flow curves and yield stress measurements are performed using the vane and this data is compared to the traditional concentric cylinder flow curve measurement. Finally, a large scale vane was designed, fabricated, and tested with the cohesive (or non-Newtonian) materials to determine how a larger vane performs in measuring the yield stress and flow curve of settled cohesive solids.

  9. Effect of inulin on rheological and thermal properties of gluten-free dough.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Lesław; Witczak, Teresa; Ziobro, Rafał; Korus, Jarosław; Cieślik, Ewa; Witczak, Mariusz

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of inulins with varying degree of polymerization on rheological and thermal properties of gluten-free starch-based dough. The share of inulin reduced the values of consistency coefficient, as well as storage and loss moduli, and increased creep compliance. Inulin preparation with the highest average degree of polymerization had the strongest impact on viscoelastic properties of the obtained dough. The presence of inulin also caused a significant decrease of viscosity upon pasting, and an increase of gelatinization temperatures TOg, TP1g, TP2g, and TEg. Addition of inulin had no effect on gelatinization enthalpy (ΔHg), while it strongly reduced the enthalpies of retrograded amylopectin after storage. Water binding properties of inulin seem to be the key factor, responsible for modification of dough properties, because they influence solvent availability for other constituents of such system. PMID:24751052

  10. Numerical Simulation of Rheology Character of Polymer Extrusion Flow in the Micro Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Huang, Xing-Yuan; Liu, He-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, to study the rheology characteristic of polymer melt in the micro-channel, the apparent viscosity, entrance pressure and shear stress under the same shear rate were analyzed by mean of CFD numerical simulation method. The Phan-Thien and Tanner (PTT) viscoelastic model was used as the constructive equation of polymer melt. To verify the change situation of apparent viscosity and entrance pressure in the flow of channel, two sets of channels with different diameters and ratios of length-to-diameter were compared with each other. The research results verified that the entrance pressure increase and apparent viscosity decrease with decreasing of diameter of channel, which is in good agreement with the results of past reported.

  11. Effect of whey and casein protein hydrolysates on rheological, textural and sensory properties of cookies.

    PubMed

    Gani, Adil; Broadway, A A; Ahmad, Mudasir; Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Wani, Ali Abas; Wani, Sajad Mohd; Masoodi, F A; Khatkar, Bupinder Singh

    2015-09-01

    Milk proteins were hydrolyzed by papain and their effect on the rheological, textural and sensory properties of cookies were investigated. Water absorption (%) decreased significantly as the amount of milk protein concentrates and hydrolysates increased up to a level of 15 % in the wheat flour. Dough extensibility decreased with inrease in parental proteins and their hydrolysates in wheat flour, significantly. Similarly, the pasting properties also varied significantly in direct proportion to the quantity added in the wheat flour. The colour difference (ΔE) of cookies supplemented with milk protein concentrates and hydrolysates were significantly higher than cookies prepared from control. Physical and sensory characteristics of cookies at 5 % level of supplementation were found to be acceptable. Also the scores assigned by the judges for texture and colour were in good agreement with the measurements derived from the physical tests.

  12. Influence of processed sugarcane bagasse on the microbial, nutritional, rheological and quality characteristics of biscuits.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, A V; Mahadevamma, S; Begum, Khyrunnisa; Sudha, M L

    2011-08-01

    Sugarcane bagasse, a dietary fiber-rich by-product of the sugar industry (70-75%) and having negligible protein and fat content, was treated with acid, alkali and steaming to reduce the microbial load. Steaming was effective in making the bagasse microbiologically safe. The processed bagasse (5-15%) was used in the rheological studies and in the preparation of soft dough biscuits. Glucose (hexose), arabinose and xylose (pentose) were present, whereas rhamnose, mannose and galctose were not traced in all of the bagasse samples. Farinograph characteristics of wheat flour-bagasse blends showed that the mixing profile weakened with addition of bagasse. Processed bagasse also affected the pasting characteristics indicating starch dilution on incorporation of bagasse, as indicated by sensory characteristics. Biscuits prepared from steamed bagasse (10%) along with additives were highly acceptable. Results indicated that high-fiber biscuits can be prepared by replacing wheat flour with steamed bagasse at a 10% level.

  13. Angiocardiography - Past and present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, H.

    1976-01-01

    Angiocardiography is defined as an X-ray procedure which uses an intravascularly injected contrast material for visualization of the internal anatomy of the heart and great vessels. Past and present efforts in angiocardiography technology and methodology are reviewed, with special emphasis on qualitative and quantitative measurements of heart and vessel geometry. One of the more recent applications of angiographic image analysis has been for pattern recognition of margin motions over a cardiac cycle, termed contourography. Angiocardiography will continue to serve, as it has served in the past, as the principal standard of reference for calibration and/or comparison of newer methods for determining volume or dimensional change, depending on further technologic advances in X-ray equipment and means for displaying computer-processed information.

  14. Study of effect of excipient source variation on rheological behavior of diltiazem HCl-HPMC wet masses using a mixer torque rheometer.

    PubMed

    Chatlapalli, Ramarao; Rohera, Bhagwan D

    2002-05-15

    In the wet massing of powders and powder blends, the rheological behavior of the wet powder masses not only plays a critical role in the unit process but also influences the attributes of the product. The physical properties of the powder excipients, such as particle size and size distribution, shape, surface area, bulk and tapped density and surface morphology, are a major source of variability in the rheological behavior of wet powder masses and the quality attributes of the final product. The objective of the present investigations was to study the rheological behavior of wet masses containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) obtained from two sources (Methocel from Dow and Pharmacoat from Shin-Etsu) using a mixer torque rheometer. In order to simulate a real formulation, diltiazem HCl (DTZ) (40% loading) was used as part of the substrate powder mass. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) was used as the binder. Since HPMC is water-soluble, isopropyl alcohol (IPA) was used as the wet massing liquid. The rheological behavior of the wet powder masses was studied as a function of mixing time and amount of wet massing liquid (IPA). The rheological profiles obtained for DTZ-Methocel and DTZ-Pharmacoat exhibited same magnitude for mean torque, however, for DTZ-Pharmacoat the peak was more extended than that for DTZ-Methocel. The extended peak for DTZ-Pharmacoat indicated that the wet mass will stay suitable during the process for larger quantities of the wet massing liquid before turning into paste and becoming unsuitable for the process as compared with the DTZ-Methocel system. The mixing kinetics of the two powder systems appeared to be quite different. These differences in the rheological behavior of the wet masses may be attributed to the difference in the particulate and surface properties of the two HPMCs. Some of the properties of the two HPMCs, such as particle size and size distribution, surface area, surface morphology and DSC thermograms, explain the difference

  15. Rheological Characterization of Unusual DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2005-09-01

    A study was undertaken to identify and clarify examples of unusual rheological behavior in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulant slurry samples. Identification was accomplished by reviewing sludge, Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product simulant rheological results from the prior year. Clarification of unusual rheological behavior was achieved by developing and implementing new measurement techniques. Development of these new methods is covered in a separate report, WSRC-TR-2004-00334. This report includes a review of recent literature on unusual rheological behavior, followed by a summary of the rheological measurement results obtained on a set of unusual simulant samples. Shifts in rheological behavior of slurries as the wt. % total solids changed have been observed in numerous systems. The main finding of the experimental work was that the various unusual DWPF simulant slurry samples exhibit some degree of time dependent behavior. When a given shear rate is applied to a sample, the apparent viscosity of the slurry changes with time rather than remaining constant. These unusual simulant samples are more rheologically complex than Newtonian liquids or more simple slurries, neither of which shows significant time dependence. The study concludes that the unusual rheological behavior that has been observed is being caused by time dependent rheological properties in the slurries being measured. Most of the changes are due to the effect of time under shear, but SB3 SME products were also changing properties while stored in sample bottles. The most likely source of this shear-related time dependence for sludge is in the simulant preparation. More than a single source of time dependence was inferred for the simulant SME product slurries based on the range of phenomena observed. Rheological property changes were observed on the time-scale of a single measurement (minutes) as well as on a time scale of hours

  16. Rheological behaviors of doughs reconstituted from wheat gluten and starch.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanyan; Song, Yihu; Zheng, Qiang

    2011-08-01

    Hydrated starch-gluten reconstituted doughs were prepared and dynamic rheological tests of the reconstituted doughs were performed using dynamic strain and dynamic frequency sweep modes. Influence of starch/gluten ratio on rheological behaviors of the reconstituted doughs was investigated. The results showed that the reconstituted doughs exhibited nonlinear rheological behavior with increasing strain. The mechanical spectra revealed predominantly elastic characteristics in frequency range from 10(-1) rad s(-1) to 10(2) rad s(-1). Cole-Cole functions were applied to fit the mechanical spectra to reveal the influence of starch/gluten ratio on Plateau modulus and longest relaxation time of the dough network. The time-temperature superposition principle was applicable to a narrow temperature range of 25°C ~40°C while it failed at 50°C due to swelling and gelatinization of the starch.

  17. High-throughput rheology in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Eric; Schultz, Kelly; Han, Hyejin; Kim, Chongyoup

    2011-11-01

    High-throughput rheological measurements in a microfluidic device are demonstrated. A series of microrheology samples is generated as droplets in an immiscible spacer fluid using a microfluidic T-junction. The compositions of the sample droplets are continuously varied over a wide range. Rheology measurements are made in each droplet using multiple particle tracking microrheology. We review critical design and operating parameters, including the droplet size, flow rates and rapid fabrication methods. Validation experiments are performed by measuring the solution viscosity of glycerine and the biopolymer heparin as a function of concentration. Finally, an analysis of droplet mixing is performed in order to optimize the device performance. Overall, the combination of microrheology with microfluidics maximizes the number of rheological measurements while simultaneously minimizing the sample preparation time and amount of material, and should be particularly suited to the characterization of scarce or expensive materials. We acknowledge financial support from the NSF (CBET-0730292).

  18. Rheological Properties of Viscoelastic Drops on Superamphiphobic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Victoria C; Paven, Maxime; Vollmer, Doris; Sharp, James S

    2016-04-26

    The rheological properties of microliter sized drops of polymer solutions were investigated using measurements of their mechanical vibrational response. Drops were suspended on superamphiphobic substrates and vibrated by the application of a short mechanical impulse. Surface vibrations were monitored by refracting laser light through the drops and focusing the refracted light onto the surface of a photodiode. Time dependent variations in the photodiode output were Fourier transformed to obtain the frequency and spectral width of the mechanical resonances of the drops. These quantities were related to the frequency dependent shear storage and loss moduli (G' and G″, respectively) using a simple theoretical model. The resulting rheological properties were found to be in agreement with microrheology measurements of the same solutions. Drop vibration therefore provides a fast and accurate method of quantifying the rheological properties of single drops.

  19. Rheological behavior of magnetic powder mixtures for magnetic PIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Kim, See Jo; Park, Seong Jin; Mun, Jun Ho; Kang, Tae Gon; Park, Jang Min

    2012-06-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) is a promising manufacturing technology for the net-shape production of small, complex, and precise metal or ceramic components. In order to manufacture high quality magnets using PIM, the magneto-rheological (MR) properties of the PIM feedstock, i.e. magnetic powder-binder mixture, should be investigated experimentally and theoretically. The current research aims at comprehensive understanding of the rheological characteristics of the PIM feedstock. The feedstock used in the experiment consists of strontium ferrite powder and paraffin wax. Steady and oscillatory shear tests have been carried out using a plate-and-plate rheometer, under the influence of a uniform magnetic field applied externally. Rheological properties of the PIM feedstock have been measured and characterized for various conditions by changing the temperature, the powder fraction and the magnetic flux density.

  20. Gap Dependent Rheology in Type I Collagen Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, Richard; Urbach, Jeffrey; Blair, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Branched type I collagen fiber networks provide extracellular support in mammalian tissues. The intricate network structure can succumb to partial or complete tearing under sufficient applied strain. Under small shear strains, in vitro collagen gels exhibit strain-stiffening while maintaining overall network integrity. Higher shear strains lead to network failure through discrete yielding events. We perform rheology and confocal-rheology experiments to fully elucidate the strain-stiffening and yielding behavior in these highly nonlinear materials. We apply continuous shear strains to collagen gels confined within the rheometer at fixed gaps. We observe that sheared collagen in the strain-stiffening and yielding regime has an apparent modulus that is strongly dependent on the collagen thickness. Moreover, we demonstrate that network yielding is universally controlled by the ratio of the collagen thickness to the mesh size. These results have broad implications for the interpretation of rheological data of extracellular matrix proteins and for the design of biomimetic scaffolds.

  1. Weakly sheared active suspensions: hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: the apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration. PMID:21517529

  2. Weakly sheared active suspensions: Hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: The apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration.

  3. Rheological properties of simulated debris flows in the laboratory environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Chen, Cheng-lung; Jan, Chyan-Deng; ,

    1990-01-01

    Steady debris flows with or without a snout are simulated in a 'conveyor-belt' flume using dry glass spheres of a uniform size, 5 or 14 mm in diameter, and their rheological properties described quantitatively in constants in a generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model. Close agreement of the measured velocity profiles with the theoretical ones obtained from the GVF model strongly supports the validity of a GVF model based on the continuum-mechanics approach. Further comparisons of the measured and theoretical velocity profiles along with empirical relations among the shear stress, the normal stress, and the shear rate developed from the 'ring-shear' apparatus determine the values of the rheological parameters in the GVF model, namely the flow-behavior index, the consistency index, and the cross-consistency index. Critical issues in the evaluation of such rheological parameters using the conveyor-belt flume and the ring-shear apparatus are thus addressed in this study.

  4. Tidal dissipation in heterogeneous bodies: Maxwell vs Andrade rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, M.; Cadek, O.

    2014-04-01

    The tremendous volcanism on Jupiter's moon Io as well as the huge activity at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus show that tidal dissipation is a very strong source of energy for some bodies in the Solar System. Outside the Solar System, tidal heating in short-period exoplanets may cause Io-like volcanism, large-scale melting and even thermal runaways [1-4]. Here we further develop the method to compute tidal heating in heterogeneous bodies [5]. Especially, we concentrate on the Andrade rheology implementation. We study the impact of the improved model on bodies with large lateral viscosity variation such as Enceladus and tidally locked exoEarth with a large surface temperature contrast due to uneven insolation [6]. We discuss the influence of empirical parameters describing the Andrade rheology and compare the tidal heating and tidal stress obtained for the Andrade rheology with frequently used Maxwell models for different forcing frequencies.

  5. Dielectric Relaxation and Rheological Behavior of Supramolecular Polymeric Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Nan; Wang, Yangyang; Li, Xiaopeng; Li, Haixia; Wang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    A model self-complementary supramolecular polymer based on thymine and diamidopyridine triple hydrogen-bonding motifs has been synthesized, and its dielectric and rheological behavior has been investigated. The formation of supramolecular polymers has been unequivocally demonstrated by nuclear magnetic resonance, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with traveling wave ion mobility separation, dielectric spectroscopy, and rheology. The dynamical behaviors of this associating polymer generally conform to those of type-A polymers, with a low-frequency chain relaxation and a high-frequency relaxation visible in both rheological and dielectric measurements. The dielectric chain relaxation shows the ideal symmetric Debye-like shape, resembling the peculiar features of hydrogen-bonding monoalcohols. Detailed analysis shows that there exists a weak decoupling between the mechanical terminal relaxation and dielectric Debye-like relaxation. The origin of the Debye-like dielectric relaxation is further discussed in the light of monoalcohols.

  6. Molecular model for the rheology of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, Catalin; Sarvestani, Alireza

    2006-03-01

    In this work we develop a molecular model for the rheology of entangled monodisperse homopolymers filled with nanoparticles at low filling volume fraction. This research is the continuation of our ongoing effort towards establishing a connection between the macroscopic time-dependent behavior of polymer nanocomposites and their molecular structure. The model is developed based on insight gained from molecular simulations, regarding the structure and dynamics of polymeric chains confined between nanoparticles. These simulations provide physically relevant parameters for the rheological model. The model accounts for reptation, chain stretch and contour length fluctuations. It also accounts for the short-range energetic interactions between polymers and fillers. Its predictions are compared with experimental data. The rheological model is implemented in a FEM package to simulate nanocomposite processing.

  7. Native Silk Feedstock as a Model Biopolymer: A Rheological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Laity, Peter R; Holland, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Variability in silk's rheology is often regarded as an impediment to understanding or successfully copying the natural spinning process. We have previously reported such variability in unspun native silk extracted straight from the gland of the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori and discounted classical explanations such as differences in molecular weight and concentration. We now report that variability in oscillatory measurements can be reduced onto a simple master-curve through normalizing with respect to the crossover. This remarkable result suggests that differences between silk feedstocks are rheologically simple and not as complex as originally thought. By comparison, solutions of poly(ethylene-oxide) and hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose showed similar normalization behavior; however, the resulting curves were broader than for silk, suggesting greater polydispersity in the (semi)synthetic materials. Thus, we conclude Nature may in fact produce polymer feedstocks that are more consistent than typical man-made counterparts as a model for future rheological investigations. PMID:27315508

  8. A dynamic rheological model for thin-film lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Jun; Huang, Ying; Guo, Yan-Bao; Tian, Yu; Meng, Yong-Gang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the non-Newtonian rheological properties of the lubricant in a thin-film lubrication regime between smooth surfaces were investigated. The thin-film lubrication regime typically appears in Stribeck curves with a clearly observable minimum coefficient of friction (COF) and a low-COF region, which is desired for its lower energy dissipation. A dynamic rheology of the lubricant from the hydrodynamic lubrication regime to the thin-film lubrication regime was proposed based on the convected Maxwell constitutive equation. This rheology model includes the increased relaxation time and the yield stress of the confined lubricant thin film, as well as their dependences on the lubricant film thickness. The Deborah number (De number) was adopted to describe the liquid-solid transition of the confined lubricant thin film under shearing. Then a series of Stribeck curves were calculated based on Tichy's extended lubrication equations with a perturbation of the De number. The results show that the minimum COF points in the Stribeck curve correspond to a critical De number of 1.0, indicating a liquid-to-solid transition of the confined lubricant film. Furthermore, the two proposed parameters in the dynamic rheological model, namely negative slipping length b (indicating the lubricant interfacial effect) and the characteristic relaxation time λ0, were found to determine the minimum COF and the width of the low-COF region, both of which were required to optimize the shape of the Stribeck curve. The developed dynamic rheological model interprets the correlation between the rheological and interfacial properties of lubricant and its lubrication behavior in the thin-film regime.

  9. Mantle Rheology and Plate Tectonics: Damage and Inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Y. R.; Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G.

    2014-12-01

    The specific rheology of the lithosphere that allows the existence of plate tectonics on Earth is poorly understood. This rheology must explain why plate tectonics initiated on Earth but not on Venus, which has very similar size and gravity, but also how changes in plate motion can occur on time scales more rapid than that of the deeper convection (~100 myrs). We suggest that a key ingredient of this rheology is the coupling of the grain size evolution of the polycrystalline rocks that constitute the mantle, with the flow. We demonstrate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism (Bercovici and Ricard, 2012) with a composite rheology, which are compatible with field and laboratory observations. Our model predicts that the grain size is controlled by an dynamic equilibrium where deformation tends to reduce the grain sizes which otherwise would spontaneously increase. The presence of secondary phases is crucial as it eases the grain size reduction and inhibits their too fast recoveries. The resulting time-dependent rheology is non-linear, leads to localisation on time scales much shorter than those of the typical transit time of mantle convection but has also a long healing time. These characteristics of fast damage and long term memory is shown in simple models to spontaneously generate plates on a planet with Earth's parameters. For Venus hotter surface conditions, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread. This rheology also explains how subducting slabs can be rapidly detached when a buoyant crust is drawn into subduction and therefore how rapid plate changes can occur.

  10. Stabilizers: indispensable substances in dairy products of high rheology.

    PubMed

    Tasneem, Madiha; Siddique, Farzana; Ahmad, Asif; Farooq, Umar

    2014-01-01

    The functionality of stabilizers is apparent in many food applications including dairy products. The role of stabilizers like gelatin, pectins, alginates, carboxymethylcellulose, gums, ispghol, sago starch, and chitosan in the development of dairy products of high rheology, like yoghurt, ice cream, and flavored milk, is discussed in this review. Attention is also paid to comprehend on interactions among milk proteins, minerals, and other milk constituents with the reactive sites of stabilizers to get the desirable properties such as appearance, body and texture, mouthfeel, consistency. The role played by stabilizers in the control of syneresis and overrun problems in the high-rheology dairy products is also the topic of discussion.

  11. Rheological Study of Dextran-Modified Magnetite Nanoparticle Water Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefczak, A.; Hornowski, T.; Rozynek, Z.; Skumiel, A.; Fossum, J. O.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of surface modification of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (sterically stabilized by sodium oleate) by the dextran biocompatible layer on the rheological behavior of water-based magnetic fluids. The flow curves were measured as a function of the magnetic field strength by means of rheometry. The measured viscosity is generally dependent on both the particle concentration and the geometrical factors such as the particle shape and thickness of the adsorbed layers. The rheological properties of the magnetic fluids studied show the effect of the magnetic field strength and the presence of the surfactant second layer (dextran) on their viscosity.

  12. The rheology and composition of cryovolcanic flows on icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey S.

    1993-01-01

    The rheologic properties of terrestrial lavas have been related to morphologic features of their flows, such as levees, banked surfaces, multilobate structures, and compressible folds. These features also have been used to determine rheologies and constrain the compositions of extraterrestrial flows. However, with rare exceptions, such features are not resolvable in Voyager images of the satellites of outer planets. Often only flow length and edge thickness of cryovolcanic flows can be measured reasonably accurately from Voyager images. The semiempirical lava-flow model presented here is a renewed effort to extract useful information from such measurements.

  13. Rheological Models of Blood: Sensitivity Analysis and Benchmark Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeliga, Danuta; Macioł, Piotr; Banas, Krzysztof; Kopernik, Magdalena; Pietrzyk, Maciej

    2010-06-01

    Modeling of blood flow with respect to rheological parameters of the blood is the objective of this paper. Casson type equation was selected as a blood model and the blood flow was analyzed based on Backward Facing Step benchmark. The simulations were performed using ADINA-CFD finite element code. Three output parameters were selected, which characterize the accuracy of flow simulation. Sensitivity analysis of the results with Morris Design method was performed to identify rheological parameters and the model output, which control the blood flow to significant extent. The paper is the part of the work on identification of parameters controlling process of clotting.

  14. Microscale rheology of a soft glassy material close to yielding.

    PubMed

    Jop, Pierre; Mansard, Vincent; Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Bocquet, Lydéric; Colin, Annie

    2012-04-01

    Using confocal microscopy, we study the flow of a model soft glassy material: a concentrated emulsion. We demonstrate the micro-macro link between in situ measured movements of droplets during the flow and the macroscopic rheological response of a concentrated emulsion, in the form of scaling relationships connecting the rheological "fluidity" with local standard deviation of the strain-rate tensor. Furthermore, we measure correlations between these local fluctuations, thereby extracting a correlation length which increases while approaching the yielding transition, in accordance with recent theoretical predictions.

  15. Rheology of composite solid propellants during motor casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klager, K.; Rogers, C. J.; Smith, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of casting studies are reviewed so as to define the viscosity criteria insuring the fabrication of defect-free grains. The rheology of uncured propellants is analyzed showing that a realistic assessment of a propellant's flow properties must include measurement of viscosity as a function of shear stress and time after curing agent. Methods for measuring propellant viscosity are discussed, with particular attention given to the Haake-Rotovisko rotational viscometer. The effects of propellant compositional and processing variables on apparent viscosity are examined, as are results relating rheological behavior to grain defect formation during casting.

  16. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of lubricant shear rheological behavior in the amorphous solid region and near the liquid-solid transition are reported. Elastic, plastic and viscous behavior was observed. A shear rheological model based on primary laboratory data is proposed for concentrated contact lubrication. The model is a Maxwell model modified with a limiting shear stress. Three material properties are required: low shear stress viscosity, limiting elastic shear modulus, and the limiting shear stress the material can withstand. All three are functions of temperature and pressure. In applying the model to EHD contacts the predicted response possesses the characteristics expected from several experiments reported in the literature.

  17. Rheology of Savannah River site tank 42 HLW radioactive sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, B.C.

    1997-11-05

    Knowledge of the rheology of the radioactive sludge slurries at the Savannah River Site is necessary in order to ensure that they can be retrieved from waste tanks and processed for final disposal. At Savannah River Site, Tank 42 sludge represents on of the first HLW radioactive sludges to be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The rheological properties of unwashed Tank 42 sludge slurries at various solids concentrations were measured remotely in the Shielded Cells at the Savannah River Technology Center using a modified Haake Rotovisco viscometer.

  18. Rheological Study of Mutarotation of Fructose in Anhydrous State

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yangyang; Wlodarczyk, Patryk; Sokolov, Alexei P; Paluch, Marian W

    2013-01-01

    Rheological measurement was employed to study the mutarotation of D-fructose in anhydrous state. By monitoring the evolution of shear viscosity with time, rate constants for mutarotation were estimated, and two different stages of this reaction were identified. One of the mutarotation stages is rapid and has a low activation energy, whereas the other is much slower and has a much higher activation energy. Possible conversions corresponding to these two phases are discussed. This work demonstrates that, in addition to the routine techniques such polarimetry and gas liquid chromatography, rheological measurement can be used as an alternative method to continuously monitor the mutarotation of sugars.

  19. Longevity and rheology of cratons: key constraints from surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, T.; Burov, E. B.; Meyer, B.; Agard, P.

    2011-12-01

    Archean cratons are stable remnants of Earth's early continental lithosphere. Their structure, composition and survival over geological time spans make them ones of the most unique and enigmatic features of the Earth's surface. It has become evident from both geophysical and petrological studies that cratons exhibit deep lithospheric roots, which remained stable ever since their formation in the early Archean. The question of how some of the cratons survived destruction over timescales of billions of years remains a subject of vigorous debate. In order to understand what controls the long-term stability of the cratons, we investigated the impact of the thermo-rheological structure of the lithosphere on the evolution of both surface topography and cratonic roots using fully coupled thermo-mechanical numerical models (600*3000 km, free upper surface topography, layered lithospheric structure). Our model has a particular focus on the Canadian Shield, where considerable structural and thermal data are available from both geological and geophysical studies. In particular, we compare the implications of the "Cratonic" "Jelly-Sandwich" rheology (JS; strong dry olivine mantle, strong crust, cold geotherm with Moho temperature of 400°C, thermal lithosphere thickness of 250 km) with those of the "Crème Brûlée" rheology (CB; strong crust, weak wet olivine mantle, Moho temperature of 600°C, thermal lithosphere thickness of 150 km) (Figure 1). Our experiments show that, in the case of a laterally homogeneous lithosphere and in the absence of tectonic shortening or extension (blocked borders), both JS and CB rheologies may account for the stability of the shield and its surface topography. In this case continental lithosphere remains stable over large time spans, even for the weakest wet olivine mantle (but for "cold" thermal gradients). Nevertheless, for a laterally heterogeneous crust, as is the case for the Canadian Shield and most cratons, dry olivine mantle JS rheology

  20. Critical scaling in the rheology of damped random spring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Brian

    2011-11-01

    Physical, biological, and engineered materials ranging from foams and emulsions to bioppolymer and bar-joint networks can be modelled as random networks of springs. We study the oscillatory rheology of random networks immersed in a viscous background fluid, and show how their response is intimately tied to the presence or absence of floppy modes in the zero frequency limit. The rheology displays dynamic critical scaling with three different regimes: viscous fluid, elastic solid, and shear thinning power law fluid. We give scaling arguments to explain all of the critical exponents and confirm our predictions with numerics. Supported by the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  1. REAL WASTE TESTING OF SLUDGE BATCH 5 MELTER FEED RHEOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S.; Stone, M.

    2010-03-17

    Clogging of the melter feed loop at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has reduced the throughput of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing. After completing a data review, DWPF attributed the clogging to the rheological properties of the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) project. The yield stress of the SB5 melter feed material was expected to be high, based on the relatively high pH of the SME product and the rheological results of a previous Chemical Process Cell (CPC) demonstration performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  2. Stabilizers: indispensable substances in dairy products of high rheology.

    PubMed

    Tasneem, Madiha; Siddique, Farzana; Ahmad, Asif; Farooq, Umar

    2014-01-01

    The functionality of stabilizers is apparent in many food applications including dairy products. The role of stabilizers like gelatin, pectins, alginates, carboxymethylcellulose, gums, ispghol, sago starch, and chitosan in the development of dairy products of high rheology, like yoghurt, ice cream, and flavored milk, is discussed in this review. Attention is also paid to comprehend on interactions among milk proteins, minerals, and other milk constituents with the reactive sites of stabilizers to get the desirable properties such as appearance, body and texture, mouthfeel, consistency. The role played by stabilizers in the control of syneresis and overrun problems in the high-rheology dairy products is also the topic of discussion. PMID:24499066

  3. Rheological Properties of Enzymatically Isolated Tomato Fruit Cuticle.

    PubMed Central

    Petracek, P. D.; Bukovac, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Rheological properties were determined for cuticular membranes (CMs) enzymatically isolated from mature tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Pik Red) fruit. The cuticle responded as a viscoelastic polymer in stress-strain studies. Both CM and dewaxed CM expanded and became more elastic and susceptible to fracture when hydrated, suggesting that water plasticized the cuticle. Dewaxing of the CM caused similar changes in elasticity and fracturing, indicating that wax may serve as a supporting filler in the cutin matrix. Exposure of the cuticle to the surfactant Triton X-100 did not significantly affect its rheological properties. PMID:12228622

  4. Introducing Students to Rheological Classification of Foods, Cosmetics, and Pharmaceutical Excipients Using Common Viscous Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faustino, Ce´lia; Bettencourt, Ana F.; Alfaia, Anto´nio; Pinheiro, Lídia

    2015-01-01

    Rheological measurements are very important tools for the characterization of the flow and deformation of a material, as well as for optimization of the rheological parameters. The application and acceptance of pharmaceutical formulations, cosmetics, and foodstuffs depends upon their rheological characteristics, such as texture, consistency, or…

  5. Gas slug ascent through rheologically stratified conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Antonio; James, Mike R.; Lane, Steve J.

    2016-04-01

    Textural and petrological evidence has indicated the presence of viscous, degassed magma layers at the top of the conduit at Stromboli. This layer acts as a plug through which gas slugs burst and it is thought to have a role in controlling the eruptive dynamics. Here, we present the results of laboratory experiments which detail the range of slug flow configurations that can develop in a rheologically stratified conduit. A gas slug can burst (1) after being fully accommodated within the plug volume, (2) whilst its base is still in the underlying low-viscosity liquid or (3) within a low-viscosity layer dynamically emplaced above the plug during the slug ascent. We illustrate the relevance of the same flow configurations at volcanic-scale through a new experimentally-validated 1D model and 3D computational fluid dynamic simulations. Applied to Stromboli, our results show that gas volume, plug thickness, plug viscosity and conduit radius control the transition between each configuration; in contrast, the configuration distribution seems insensitive to the viscosity of magma beneath the plug, which acts mainly to deliver the slug into the plug. Each identified flow configuration encompasses a variety of processes including dynamic narrowing and widening of the conduit, generation of instabilities along the falling liquid film, transient blockages of the slug path and slug break-up. All these complexities, in turn, lead to variations in the slug overpressure, mirrored by changes in infrasonic signatures which are also associated to different eruptive styles. Acoustic amplitudes are strongly dependent on the flow configuration in which the slugs burst, with both acoustic peak amplitudes and waveform shapes reflecting different burst dynamics. When compared to infrasonic signals from Stromboli, the similarity between real signals and laboratory waveforms suggests that the burst of a slug through a plug may represent a viable first-order mechanism for the generation of

  6. Treating inertia in passive microbead rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indei, Tsutomu; Schieber, Jay D.; Córdoba, Andrés; Pilyugina, Ekaterina

    2012-02-01

    The dynamic modulus G* of a viscoelastic medium is often measured by following the trajectory of a small bead subject to Brownian motion in a method called “passive microbead rheology.” This equivalence between the positional autocorrelation function of the tracer bead and G* is assumed via the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (GSER). However, inertia of both bead and medium are neglected in the GSER so that the analysis based on the GSER is not valid at high frequency where inertia is important. In this paper we show how to treat both contributions to inertia properly in one-bead passive microrheological analysis. A Maxwell fluid is studied as the simplest example of a viscoelastic fluid to resolve some apparent paradoxes of eliminating inertia. In the original GSER, the mean-square displacement (MSD) of the tracer bead does not satisfy the correct initial condition. If bead inertia is considered, the proper initial condition is realized, thereby indicating an importance of including inertia, but the MSD oscillates at a time regime smaller than the relaxation time of the fluid. This behavior is rather different from the original result of the GSER and what is observed. What is more, the discrepancy from the GSER result becomes worse with decreasing bead mass, and there is an anomalous gap between the MSD derived by naïvely taking the zero-mass limit in the equation of motion and the MSD for finite bead mass as indicated by McKinley [J. Rheol.JORHD20148-605510.1122/1.3238546 53, 1487 (2009)]. In this paper we show what is necessary to take the zero-mass limit of the bead safely and correctly without causing either the inertial oscillation or the anomalous gap, while obtaining the proper initial condition. The presence of a very small purely viscous element can be used to eliminate bead inertia safely once included in the GSER. We also show that if the medium contains relaxation times outside the window where the single-mode Maxwell behavior is observed

  7. Rheology and microstructure of filled polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin John

    The states of particle dispersion in polymer nanocomposite melts are studied through rheological characterization of nanocomposite melt mechanical properties and small angle X-ray scattering measurement of the particle microstructure. The particle microstructure probed with scattering is related to bulk flow mechanics to determine the origin of slow dynamics in these complex dispersions: whether a gel or glass transition or a slowing down of dispersing phase dynamics. These studies were conducted to understand polymer mediated particle-particle interactions and potential particle-polymer phase separation. The phase behavior of the dispersion will be governed by enthalpic and entropic contributions. A variety of phases are expected: homogeneous fluid, phase separated, or non-equilibrium gel. The effects of dispersion control parameters, namely particle volume fraction, polymer molecular weight, and polymer-particle surface affinity, on the phase behavior of 44 nm silica dispersions are studied in low molecular weight polyethylene oxide (PEO), polyethylene oxide dimethylether (PEODME), and polytetrahydrofuran (PTHF). Scattering measurements of the particle second virial coefficient in PEO melts indicates repulsive particles by a value slightly greater than unity. In PEO nanocomposites, dispersion dynamics slow down witnessed by a plateau in the elastic modulus as the particle separation approaches the length scale of the polymer radius of gyration. As the polymer molecular weight is increased, the transition shifts to lower particle volume fractions. Below polymer entanglement, the slow dynamics mimics that of a colloidal glass by the appearance of two relaxation times in the viscous modulus that display power law scaling with volume fraction. Above entanglement, the slow dynamics is qualitatively different resembling the behavior of a gelled suspension yet lacking any sign of scattering from particle agglomerates. As polymer molecular weight is increased at a fixed

  8. Flow Birefringence in Polymer Melt Rheology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Ramesh Mani

    Optical techniques that are sensitive to structural changes induced by a flow field applied to polymers during processing have been used to study the fundamental relationships between applied deformation, mechanical stresses, and flow -induced molecular orientation. But most of the work done so far has used opto-mechanical techniques (i.e. mechanical measurement of stress and deformation, and optical measurement of flow-induced molecular orientation). This thesis reports the development and application of non-intrusive, opto-electronic techniques for rheo-optical studies on a 300 Pa.s polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) melt flowing through a 5.00 cm wide converging wedge cell at room temperature. The two techniques used as tools of rheological characterization in the present study are laser doppler anemometry (LDA) to compute strain rate from local velocity measurements, and flow birefringence (double refraction) for measurement of the anisotropic refractive index tensor which, for flexible polymer solutions and melts, provides information the state of stress in the material via the stress-optical law. Birefringence measurements in extensional flow up to a pressure drop of 689 kPa across the converging wedge cell indicated that stress tensor and polarizability or anisotropic refractive index tensor were linearly related for the polymer over a range of strain rate that extended well into the non-Newtonian region. Along the cell centerline, the extensional flow behaviour of the polymer was studied via birefringence measurements in the linear stress-optical region, and it was found to be extension-thinning in nature. Assuming no boundary layer error, the optical techniques used in the present study provide a valuable test for constitutive relations between stress and deformation in the polymer by comparing predicted orientation angles with experimental measurements in combined shear and extension flows. The two constitutive equations tested were the Power-law model and the

  9. Triamcinolone Acetonide Oromucoadhesive Paste for Treatment of Aphthous Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hamishehkar, Hamed; Nokhodchi, Ali; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Kouhsoltani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to prepare the optimized oral paste formulation of Triamcinolone acetonide intended to be used in aphtous stomatitis. Methods: Plastibases were prepared using mineral oil and polyethylene (95:5). Oral paste formulations were prepared with different mixtures of three hydrocolloids solids, including gelatin, pectin and sodium carboxymethylcellulose, with different ratios, as well as Plastibase. Long-term and short-term stability of prepared formulations were studied in the case of color and consistency of pastes. Franz diffusion cell and dialysis membrane were employed for release study. Release data were fitted in the kinetic models to find out the mechanism of drug release. Results: Formulation containing 60% plastibase, 3.3% pectin, 6.6% gelatin and 30% carboxymethylcellulose showed desired durability of adhesion, spreadability and rheology property in healthy volunteers and was compared with reference formulation (Adcortyl®) in the case of release profile. Although, optimized formulation and Adcortyl followed the Higuchi and first order release kinetics respectively, optimized formulation showed similar release profile to reference formulation. Conclusion: Optimized oral paste formulation of Triamcinolone Acetonide showed similar characteristics with reference formulation and could be used as an effective drug delivery system for the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. PMID:26236668

  10. Rheology and structure of surface crosslinked surfactant-activated microgels.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongcui; Hsu, Raymond; Figura, Brian; Jacobs, Robert; Li, Sinan; Horvath, Steve; Clifford, Ted; Chari, Krishnan

    2016-09-14

    Nonionic surfactant-activated microgels (SAMs), composed of hydrophobic alkyl acrylates and hydrophilic hydroxyalkyl esters that utilize the effects of surfactant mediated swelling and interaction to provide pH-independent rheological properties, were previously reported as a new pathway to the rheology modification of surfactant solutions. Crosslinking was shown to play an important role in the properties of these soft microgel systems. To understand the impact of crosslinking chemistry on SAM polymers, we have compared two types of SAM polymers: a conventionally crosslinked SAM polymer via allyl pentaerythritol and a novel SAM polymer, where the surface is self-crosslinked via a reactive surfactant. We have systematically characterized the polymer's swelling, rheology and microstructure in a model system containing the polymer, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and water. Surface self-crosslinking is demonstrated to be a more effective crosslinking approach to create surfactant-mediated interactions between the microgel particles, resulting in more effective rheology modification. Internal crosslinking hinders both the full swelling of the SAM polymer as well as inter-particle bridging interactions, and is therefore less effective. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on creating a novel surface self-crosslinked microgel via a dual-functional reactive surfactant that interacts with a non-reactive surfactant to create a yield stress fluid.

  11. Relationships among rheological and sensorial properties of young cheeses.

    PubMed

    Brown, J A; Foegeding, E A; Daubert, C R; Drake, M A; Gumpertz, M

    2003-10-01

    This study investigated the sensory and rheological properties of young cheeses in order to better understand perceived cheese texture. Mozzarella and Monterey Jacks were tested at 4, 10, 17, and 38 d of age; process cheese was tested at 4 d. Rheological methods were used to determine the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic and fracture properties. A trained sensory panel developed a descriptive language and reference scales to evaluate cheese texture. All methods differentiated the cheeses by variety. Principal component analysis of sensory texture revealed that three principal components explained 96.1% of the total variation in the cheeses. The perception of firmness decreased as the cheeses aged, whereas the perception of springiness increased. Principal component analysis of the rheological parameters (three principal components: 87.9% of the variance) showed that the cheeses' solid-like response (storage modulus and fracture modulus) decreased during aging, while phase angle, maximum compliance, and retardation time increased. Analysis of the instrumental and sensory parameters (three principal components: 82.1% of the variance) revealed groupings of parameters according to cheese rigidity, resiliency, and chewdown texture. Rheological properties were highly associated with rigidity and resiliency, but less so with chewdown texture.

  12. Microwave heating effect on rheology and microstructure of white sauces.

    PubMed

    Guardeño, Luis M; Sanz, Teresa; Fiszman, Susana M; Quiles, Amparo; Hernando, Isabel

    2011-10-01

    The microstructure and rheological properties of white sauces formulated with different starches were analyzed after being microwave-heated for different times. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in rheological parameters analyzed-storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″), and loss tangent (tanδ)-were obtained for sauces made with different starches. Microwave reheating did not affect G' and G″ values until water evaporation became significant. In addition, tanδ values did not change significantly (P < 0.05) even during long reheating times showing that sauce viscoelastic properties did not change after microwave irradiation. However, microstructure assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed changes in fat globule and protein. These microstructural changes did not seem to have a significant effect on rheological measurements since starch and ι-carrageenan are mainly responsible for the viscoelastic behavior of the sauces. Practical Application:  The development of products appropriate to microwave heating is constantly rising in food industry. It is necessary to understand the behavior of the ingredients and the final product to microwave heating in order to choose those ingredients which will develop the best performance. Starches are common ingredients in industrial sauces, and rheological and microstructural techniques have shown their usefulness in characterization of starch-based systems. PMID:21913921

  13. Using Modeling to Design new Rheology Modifiers for Paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Valeriy

    2013-03-01

    Since their invention in 1970-s, hydrophobically ethoxylated urethanes (HEUR) have been actively used as rheology modifiers for paints. Thermodynamic and rheological behavior of HEUR molecules in aqueous solutions is now very well understood and is based on the concept of transient network (TN), where the association of hydrophobic groups into networks of flower micelles causes viscosity to increase dramatically as function of polymer concentration. The behavior of complex mixtures containing water, HEUR, and latex (``binder'') particles, however, is understood less well, even though it has utmost importance in the paint formulation design. In this talk, we discuss how the adsorption of HEUR chains onto latex particles results in formation of complex viscoelastic networks with temporary bridges between particles. We then utilize Self-Consistent Field Theory (SCFT) model to compute effective adsorption isotherms (thickener-on-latex) and develop a rheological theory describing steady-shear viscosity of such mixtures. The model is able to qualitatively describe many important features of the water/latex/HEUR mixtures, such as strong shear thinning. The proposed approach could potentially lead to the design of new HEUR structures with improved rheological performance. This work was supported by Dow Chemical Company

  14. Flow and Thixotropic Parameters for Rheological Characterization of Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ghica, Mihaela Violeta; Hîrjău, Mircea; Lupuleasa, Dumitru; Dinu-Pîrvu, Cristina-Elena

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to design several sodium carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels containing a BCS class II model drug and to evaluate their flow and thixotropic properties. The rheological measurements were performed at two temperatures (23 °C and 37 °C), using a rotational viscometer. The hydrogels were stirred at different time intervals (10 s, 2, 5, 10 and 20 min at 23 °C, and 10 s, 2 and 5 min at 37 °C), with a maximum rotational speed of 60 rpm, and the corresponding forward and backward rheograms were recorded as shear stress vs. shear rate. For all hydrogels, the rheological data obtained at both temperatures showed a decrease of viscosity with the increase of the shear rate, highlighting a pseudoplastic behaviour. The flow profiles viscosity vs. shear rate were quantified through power law model, meanwhile the flow curves shear stress vs. shear rate were assessed by applying the Herschel-Bulkley model. The thixotropic character was evaluated through different descriptors: thixotropic area, thixotropic index, thixotropic constant and destructuration thixotropic coefficient. The gel-forming polymer concentration and the rheological experiments temperature significantly influence the flow and thixotropic parameters values of the designed hydrogels. The rheological characteristics described have an impact on the drug release microenvironment and determine the stasis time at the application site. PMID:27322222

  15. Rheology of the Active Cell Cortex in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Toyoda, Yusuke; Cattin, Cedric J; Müller, Daniel J; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-08-01

    The cell cortex is a key structure for the regulation of cell shape and tissue organization. To reach a better understanding of the mechanics and dynamics of the cortex, we study here HeLa cells in mitosis as a simple model system. In our assay, single rounded cells are dynamically compressed between two parallel plates. Our measurements indicate that the cortical layer is the dominant mechanical element in mitosis as opposed to the cytoplasmic interior. To characterize the time-dependent rheological response, we extract a complex elastic modulus that characterizes the resistance of the cortex against area dilation. In this way, we present a rheological characterization of the cortical actomyosin network in the linear regime. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of actin cross linkers and the impact of active prestress on rheological behavior. Notably, we find that cell mechanics values in mitosis are captured by a simple rheological model characterized by a single timescale on the order of 10 s, which marks the onset of fluidity in the system. PMID:27508442

  16. Rheological Properties of Liquid and Particle Stabilized Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özarmut, A. Ö.; Steeb, H.

    2015-04-01

    In Earth-Pressure-Balance (EPB) tunnelling the excavated ground is used as face support medium to prevent surface settlements. In general, the excavated ground (e.g. for cohesionless soils) does not exhibit suitable conditions to support the tunnelling face. This technical challenge can be solved by adding conditioning agents that are mainly foams. In order to physically understand the rheological properties of the (added) liquid foam and the foam-soil (foam-particle) mixture and to comprehend its influence on the soil, advanced rheological investigations are necessary. Therefore, rheological experiments such as flow curve tests have been performed to determine the effective yield stress. Since the morphology, i.e. the microstructure of the foam accounts for effective rheological properties, size, shape and distribution of the cells of the foam and particle-laden foam were characterized in detail applying imaging techniques. In order to perform the above mentioned experiments, polymer- stabilised shaving foam seems to be a good replacement of tunnelling foam and suitable for laboratory tests due to its time stability, characteristic length scales of the microstructure and accessibility. Glass beads (of different diameter and volume fractions, i.e. specific surface areas) are used to investigate the effective material behaviour of foam-particle mixtures. The experimental results are compared with yield stress models of modified Herschel-Bulkley- Papanastasiou type.

  17. Continuum-mechanics-based rheological formulation for debris flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung; Ling, Chi-Hai; ,

    1993-01-01

    This paper aims to assess the validity of the generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in the light of both the classical relative-viscosity versus concentration relation and the dimensionless stress versus shear-rate squared relations based on kinetic theory, thereby addressing how to evaluate the rheological parameters of the GVF model using Bagnold's data.

  18. Analysis improves selection of rheological model for slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Moftah, K. )

    1993-10-25

    The use of a statistical index of determination can help select a fluid model to describe the rheology of oil well cement slurries. The closer the index is to unity, the better the particular model will describe the actual fluid behavior. Table 1 lists a computer program written in Quick Basic to calculate rheological parameters and an index of determination for the Bingham plastic and power law models. The points used for the calculation of the rheological parameters can be selected from the data set. The skipped points can then be introduced and the calculations continued, not restarted, to obtain the parameters for the full set of data. The two sets of results are then compared for the decision to include or exclude the added points in the regression. The program also calculates the apparent viscosity to help determine where turbulence or high gross error occurred. In addition, the program calculates the confidence interval of the rheological parameters for a 90% level of confidence.

  19. Continuum Modeling of Secondary Rheology in Dense Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henann, David L.; Kamrin, Ken

    2014-10-01

    Recent dense granular flow experiments have shown that shear deformation in one region of a granular medium fluidizes its entirety, including regions far from the sheared zone, effectively erasing the yield condition everywhere. This enables slow creep deformation to occur when an external force is applied to a probe in the nominally static regions of the material. The apparent change in rheology induced by far-away motion is termed the "secondary rheology," and a theoretical rationalization of this phenomenon is needed. Recently, a new nonlocal granular rheology was successfully used to predict steady granular flow fields, including grain-size-dependent shear-band widths in a wide variety of flow configurations. We show that the nonlocal fluidity model is also capable of capturing secondary rheology. Specifically, we explore creep of a circular intruder in a two-dimensional annular Couette cell and show that the model captures all salient features observed in experiments, including both the rate-independent nature of creep for sufficiently slow driving rates and the faster-than-linear increase in the creep speed with the force applied to the intruder.

  20. Dynamic hysteresis in the rheology of complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Puisto, Antti; Mohtaschemi, Mikael; Alava, Mikko J; Illa, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Recently, rheological hysteresis has been studied systematically in a wide range of complex fluids combining global rheology and time-resolved velocimetry. In this paper we present an analysis of the roles of the three most fundamental mechanisms in simple-yield-stress fluids: structure dynamics, viscoelastic response, and spatial flow heterogeneities, i.e., time-dependent shear bands. Dynamical hysteresis simulations are done analogously to rheological ramp-up and -down experiments on a coupled model which incorporates viscoelasticity and time-dependent structure evolution. Based on experimental data, a coupling between hysteresis measured from the local velocity profiles and that measured from the global flow curve has been suggested. According to the present model, even if transient shear banding appears during the shear ramps, in typical narrow-gap devices, only a small part of the hysteretic response can be attributed to heterogeneous flow. This results in decoupling of the hysteresis measured from the local velocity profiles and the global flow curve, demonstrating that for an arbitrary time-dependent rheological response this proposed coupling can be very weak.

  1. Constraints on the rheological structure of the mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnell, R. J.; Hager, B. H.

    1985-01-01

    Rheological models of the mantle are at present limited to radial symmetry, usually with homogeneous linearly viscous or viscoelastic incompressible layers. While such models are probably overly simple, they readily allow calculation of geophysical effects, such as post glacial rebound and related changes in the Earth's shape. They are also directly applicable to problems of global mantle flow and plate motions.

  2. Historical evolution of oil painting media: A rheological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Viguerie, Laurence; Ducouret, Guylaine; Lequeux, François; Moutard-Martin, Thierry; Walter, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Rheology is the science of flow, which is a phenomenon found in every painting operation, such as decorative paintings or protective coatings. In this article, the principles of rheology as applied to paintings and coatings are recalled in a first part and the rheological criteria required in the paint industry presented. Indeed, different flow behaviours leads to different finishes. The same procedure and techniques as in industry can be employed to explain some evolutions in oil painting aspects over the centuries. The first recipes for oil painting indicate the use of treated oil, resins and spirits. This article deals with the evolution of the composition of these systems as media for oil painting, according to rheological clues. During the Renaissance period, the media used were Newtonian or slightly shear thinning and allowed one a perfect levelling. Then techniques changed, paints became more opaque with less addition of oil/resin media, and brushstrokes appeared visible. Some preparations containing lead, oil and mastic resin, whose flow behaviour is closed to those required in industry, may have appeared during the 17th century and are still used and sold today. To cite this article: L. de Viguerie et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  3. Rheology and structure of surface crosslinked surfactant-activated microgels.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongcui; Hsu, Raymond; Figura, Brian; Jacobs, Robert; Li, Sinan; Horvath, Steve; Clifford, Ted; Chari, Krishnan

    2016-09-14

    Nonionic surfactant-activated microgels (SAMs), composed of hydrophobic alkyl acrylates and hydrophilic hydroxyalkyl esters that utilize the effects of surfactant mediated swelling and interaction to provide pH-independent rheological properties, were previously reported as a new pathway to the rheology modification of surfactant solutions. Crosslinking was shown to play an important role in the properties of these soft microgel systems. To understand the impact of crosslinking chemistry on SAM polymers, we have compared two types of SAM polymers: a conventionally crosslinked SAM polymer via allyl pentaerythritol and a novel SAM polymer, where the surface is self-crosslinked via a reactive surfactant. We have systematically characterized the polymer's swelling, rheology and microstructure in a model system containing the polymer, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and water. Surface self-crosslinking is demonstrated to be a more effective crosslinking approach to create surfactant-mediated interactions between the microgel particles, resulting in more effective rheology modification. Internal crosslinking hinders both the full swelling of the SAM polymer as well as inter-particle bridging interactions, and is therefore less effective. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on creating a novel surface self-crosslinked microgel via a dual-functional reactive surfactant that interacts with a non-reactive surfactant to create a yield stress fluid. PMID:27470971

  4. Microwave heating effect on rheology and microstructure of white sauces.

    PubMed

    Guardeño, Luis M; Sanz, Teresa; Fiszman, Susana M; Quiles, Amparo; Hernando, Isabel

    2011-10-01

    The microstructure and rheological properties of white sauces formulated with different starches were analyzed after being microwave-heated for different times. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in rheological parameters analyzed-storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″), and loss tangent (tanδ)-were obtained for sauces made with different starches. Microwave reheating did not affect G' and G″ values until water evaporation became significant. In addition, tanδ values did not change significantly (P < 0.05) even during long reheating times showing that sauce viscoelastic properties did not change after microwave irradiation. However, microstructure assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed changes in fat globule and protein. These microstructural changes did not seem to have a significant effect on rheological measurements since starch and ι-carrageenan are mainly responsible for the viscoelastic behavior of the sauces. Practical Application:  The development of products appropriate to microwave heating is constantly rising in food industry. It is necessary to understand the behavior of the ingredients and the final product to microwave heating in order to choose those ingredients which will develop the best performance. Starches are common ingredients in industrial sauces, and rheological and microstructural techniques have shown their usefulness in characterization of starch-based systems.

  5. Rheology of crumb-rubber modified asphalt binders and mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Vikas Rameshchandra

    Laboratory test procedures are presented to determine the rheological properties of crumb rubber modified asphalt (CRMA) binders and mixes. These tests provide simple, fast, and cost-effective alternatives to evaluate the performance (rutting and cracking potential) of binders and mixes used for pavement construction. Viscoelastic properties of CRMA binders are measured using dynamic shear analysis. Master curves were generated using the principle of time-temperature superposition to evaluate the effects of aging, rubber concentration, and curing conditions on the rheology of the modified binder. Results indicate that the rheology of CRMA binders can be divided into three regions of viscoelasticity: glassy region at high frequencies, transition/viscoelastic region at intermediate frequencies, and viscous region at low frequencies. Modification of the asphalt by addition of rubber leads to an improvement in both the high and low temperature properties, as reflected by changes in Gsp' and Gsp{''}, which causes the binder to have a greater resistance to specific pavement failure mechanisms. Both transient and dynamic properties of CRMA mixes were measured in the laboratory using the creep and recovery, direct tension, and frequency sweep tests. Rheological properties of the mix generated from the test data were compared to those of the binder to evaluate the effect of aging, rubber concentration, and curing conditions on mix performance. Several rheological parameters have been identified to characterize the rutting and cracking potential of mixes. A power law equation was found to give good correlations between several mix rheological parameters. Analysis of binder and mix failure energies show that work of cohesion of the binder is negligible compared to the failure energies. A unique relationship between Paris law material parameters has been confirmed. It is also shown that mix failure properties bear a one-to-one correlation with binder failure properties. Based

  6. Viscoelastic silicone oils in analog modeling - a rheological benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Michael; Boutelier, David; Rosenau, Matthias; Schreurs, Guido; Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    Tectonic analog models frequently use silicone oils to simulate viscous flow in the lower crust and mantle. Precise knowledge of the model rheology is required to ensure dynamic similarity with the prototype. We assessed the rheological properties of various silicone oils using rotational and oscillatory tests. Resulting viscosities are in the range of 2 - 3 ×104 Pa s with a transition from Newtonian viscous to power-law, shear-thinning, around shear rates of 10‑2 to 10‑1 s‑1. Maxwell relaxation times are in the range of 10‑1 s. Comparing the rheological properties of chemically similar silicone oils from different laboratories shows that they differ from laboratory to laboratory. Furthermore, we characterized the temperature dependency of viscosity and aging effects. The samples show a reduction in zero-shear viscosity over time. This stabilizes at a certain value over several months. The dynamic moduli decrease as well, but other viscoelastic constants, such as the Maxwell relaxation time, are not affected by aging. We conclude that the aging is mainly controlled by the storage conditions and that a silicone shows no further aging when it has equilibrated with the ambient laboratory conditions. We consider all these differences as minor compared to the much larger uncertainties for estimating the lithosphere rheology. Nevertheless, it is important that the rheological properties of the experimental materials are monitored during an experimental series that spans over several weeks to months. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties may be scaled using dimensionless parameters (Deborah number) and show a dynamically similar change from Newtonian to power-law flow, like the natural prototype. In consequence, the viscoelasticity of these silicone oils is able to mimic the change in deformation mechanism from diffusion to dislocation creep.

  7. Viscoelastic silicone oils in analog modeling - a rheological benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Michael; Boutelier, David; Rosenau, Matthias; Schreurs, Guido; Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    Tectonic analog models frequently use silicone oils to simulate viscous flow in the lower crust and mantle. Precise knowledge of the model rheology is required to ensure dynamic similarity with the prototype. We assessed the rheological properties of various silicone oils using rotational and oscillatory tests. Resulting viscosities are in the range of 2 - 3 ×104 Pa s with a transition from Newtonian viscous to power-law, shear-thinning, around shear rates of 10-2 to 10-1 s-1. Maxwell relaxation times are in the range of 10-1 s. Comparing the rheological properties of chemically similar silicone oils from different laboratories shows that they differ from laboratory to laboratory. Furthermore, we characterized the temperature dependency of viscosity and aging effects. The samples show a reduction in zero-shear viscosity over time. This stabilizes at a certain value over several months. The dynamic moduli decrease as well, but other viscoelastic constants, such as the Maxwell relaxation time, are not affected by aging. We conclude that the aging is mainly controlled by the storage conditions and that a silicone shows no further aging when it has equilibrated with the ambient laboratory conditions. We consider all these differences as minor compared to the much larger uncertainties for estimating the lithosphere rheology. Nevertheless, it is important that the rheological properties of the experimental materials are monitored during an experimental series that spans over several weeks to months. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties may be scaled using dimensionless parameters (Deborah number) and show a dynamically similar change from Newtonian to power-law flow, like the natural prototype. In consequence, the viscoelasticity of these silicone oils is able to mimic the change in deformation mechanism from diffusion to dislocation creep.

  8. Periodontology: past, present, perspectives.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that affects the tooth-supporting tissues and exhibits a wide range of clinical, microbiological and immunological manifestations. The disease is associated with and is probably caused by a multifaceted dynamic interaction of specific infectious agents, host immune responses, harmful environmental exposure and genetic susceptibility factors. This volume of Periodontology 2000 covers key subdisciplines of periodontology, ranging from etiopathogeny to therapy, with emphasis on diagnosis, classification, epidemiology, risk factors, microbiology, immunology, systemic complications, anti-infective therapy, reparative treatment, self-care and affordability issues. Learned and unlearned concepts of periodontitis over the past 50 years have shaped our current understanding of the etiology of the disease and of clinical practice.

  9. Water Past and Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of sulfate and water ice deposits in the Olympia Undae region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 2213 UTC on October 2, 2006 (6:13 p.m. EDT) near 81.6 degrees north latitude, 188.9 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across.

    Olympia Undae is a large dune field that stretches some 1,100 kilometers (684 miles) across the northern polar region of Mars, just south of the ice cap. The region holds a vast expanse of complex, shifting dunes and is best described as a sand sea or erg similar to the Sahara.

    The two images above provide interesting clues into Mars' history by revealing the planet's wet past and frozen present. The left image is an infrared, false-color image that reveals dark-colored dunes overlying a lighter substrate. Spectral data from CRISM and its sister instrument OMEGA suggest similar compositions of these dunes and the dark basal, or lowermost, unit of the north polar layered deposits. HIRISE images revealed cross-bedding (crossed layers that are oriented at a different angle to the main layer) in this dark unit. On Earth, cross-bedded sediments can form in both windy and watery environments. The dark polar basal unit on Mars is interpreted as a sand sheet underlying and pre-dating the ice, and now being eroded to dunes by the Martian winds.

    The mineralogy of the Olympia Undae region holds a record of past water. CRISM spectral data (right image) shows that the darker dunes are rich in polyhydrated sulfate (sulfates with more than one water molecule incorporated into each molecule of the mineral). The mineral gypsum is a polyhydrated sulfate, and the most likely constituent in these dunes. The gypsum probably formed by evaporation of ancient, saline water or by aqueous alteration of the silicate portion of the dune material. Areas shaded in red are cover by

  10. Weird past tense forms.

    PubMed

    Xu, F; Pinker, S

    1995-10-01

    It is often assumed that children go through a stage in which they systematically overapply irregular past tense patterns to inappropriate verbs, as in wipe-wope, bring-brang, trick-truck, walk-has walken. Such errors have been interpreted both as reflecting over-use of minor grammatical rules (e.g. 'change i to a'), and as reflecting the operation of a connectionist pattern associator network that superimposes and blends patterns of various degrees of generality. But the actual rate, time course, and nature of these errors have never been documented. We analysed 20,000 past tense and participle usages from nine children in the CHILDES database, looking for overapplications of irregular vowel-change patterns, as in brang, blends, as in branged, productive suffixations of -en, as in walken, gross distortions, as in mail-membled, and double-suffixation, as in walkeded. These errors were collectively quite rare; children made them in about two tenths of one per cent of the opportunities, and with few stable patterns: the errors were not predominantly word-substitutions, did not occur predominantly with irregular stems, showed no consistency across verbs or ages, and showed no clear age trend. Most (though not all) of the errors were based closely on existing irregular verbs; gross distortions never occurred. We suggest that both rule-theories and connectionist theories have tended to overestimate the predominance of such errors. Children master irregular forms quite accurately, presumably because irregular forms are just a special case of the arbitrary sound-meaning pairings that define words, and because children are good at learning words.

  11. An Introduction to Rheology with an Emphasis on Application to Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyka, Andrea L.

    1996-04-01

    Rheology is the study of the flow and deformation of matter. This interdisciplinary field encompasses many different types of materials and applications, both in academia and industry. One of the most challenging and practical areas in which technical strides have been made is dispersion chemistry. Rheology can be used to characterize not only flow properties of a material, but also structural features. This introduction is intended to help newcomers to the field to comprehend, relatively quickly, the practical nature of rheological information and to recognize the impact of the type of internal structure on rheological properties. This article describes dispersions well-suited to rheological study and the types of interparticle forces responsible for their internal structure. The fundamental terms and concepts of rheology are explained using practical examples to illustrate how rheological techniques distinguish dispersions in terms of both flow properties and structural features.

  12. Review Of Rheology Models For Hanford Waste Blending

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-26

    The area of rheological property prediction was identified as a technology need in the Hanford Tank Waste - waste feed acceptance initiative area during a series of technical meetings among the national laboratories, Department of Energy-Office of River Protection, and Hanford site contractors. Meacham et al. delivered a technical report in June 2012, RPP-RPT-51652 ''One System Evaluation of Waste Transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant'' that included estimating of single shell tank waste Bingham plastic rheological model constants along with a discussion of the issues inherent in predicting the rheological properties of blended wastes. This report was selected as the basis for moving forward during the technical meetings. The report does not provide an equation for predicting rheological properties of blended waste slurries. The attached technical report gives an independent review of the provided Hanford rheological data, Hanford rheological models for single tank wastes, and Hanford rheology after blending provided in the Meacham report. The attached report also compares Hanford to SRS waste rheology and discusses some SRS rheological model equations for single tank wastes, as well as discussing SRS experience with the blending of waste sludges with aqueous material, other waste sludges, and frit slurries. Some observations of note: Savannah River Site (SRS) waste samples from slurried tanks typically have yield stress >1 Pa at 10 wt.% undissolved solids (UDS), while core samples largely have little or no yield stress at 10 wt.% UDS. This could be due to how the waste has been processed, stored, retrieved, and sampled or simply in the differences in the speciation of the wastes. The equations described in Meacham's report are not recommended for extrapolation to wt.% UDS beyond the available data for several reasons; weak technical basis, insufficient data, and large data scatter. When limited data are available, for example two to three points, the equations

  13. Extensional Rheology Experiment Developed to Investigate the Rheology of Dilute Polymer Solutions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, Kirk A.

    2001-01-01

    A fundamental characteristic of fluid is viscosity; that is, the fluid resists forces that cause it to flow. This characteristic, or parameter, is used by manufacturers and end-users to describe the physical properties of a specific material so that they know what to expect when a material, such as a polymer, is processed through an extruder, a film blower, or a fiber-spinning apparatus. Normally, researchers will report a shear viscosity that depends on the rate of an imposed shearing flow. Although this type of characterization is sufficient for some processes, simple shearing experiments do not provide a complete picture of what a processor may expect for all materials. Extensional stretching flows are common in many polymer-processing operations such as extrusion, blow molding, and fiber spinning. Therefore, knowledge of the complete rheological (ability to flow and be deformed) properties of the polymeric fluid being processed is required to accurately predict and account for the flow behavior. In addition, if numerical simulations are ever able to serve as a priori design tools for optimizing polymer processing operations such as those described above, an accurate knowledge of the extensional viscosity of a polymer system and its variation with temperature, concentration, molecular weight, and strain rate is critical.

  14. PAA/PEO comb polymer effects on the rheological property evolution in concentrated cement suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Glen Harold

    We have studied the behavior of polyelectrolyte-based comb polymers in dilute solution and on the rheological property evolution of concentrated Portland cement suspensions. These species consisted of charge-neutral, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) "teeth" grafted onto a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) "backbone" that contains one ionizable carboxylic acid group (COOH) per monomer unit. As a benchmark, our observations were compared to those obtained for pure cement pastes and systems containing pure polyelectrolyte species, i.e., sulfonated naphthalene formaldehyde (SNF) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The behavior of PAA/PEO comb polymers, SNF, and PAA in dilute solution was studied as a function of pH in the absence and presence of mono-, di-, and trivalent counterions. Light scattering and turbidity measurements were carried out to assess their hydrodynamic radius and stability in aqueous solution, respectively. PAA experienced large conformational changes as a function of solution pH and ionic strength. Moreover, dilute solutions of ionized SNF and PAA species became unstable in the presence of multivalent counterions due to ion-bridging interactions. PAA/PEO solutions exhibited enhanced stability relative to pure polyelectrolytes under analogous conditions. The charge neutral PEO teeth shielded the underlying PAA backbone from ion-bridging interactions. In addition, such species hindered conformational changes in solution due to steric interactions between adjacent teeth. A new oscillatory shear technique was developed to probe the rheological property evolution of concentrated cement systems. The rheological property evolution of ordinary and white Portland cement systems were studied in the absence and presence of pure polyelectrolytes and PAA/PEO comb polymers with a wide range of PAA backbone molecular weight, PEO teeth molecular weight, and acid:imide ratio. Cement-PAA suspensions experienced rapid irreversible stiffening and set at 6 min due to ion

  15. People: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that literature about people from the past allows readers to experience vicariously another time and place. Proposes that readers might discover that the actions of people in the past or present may influence the future. Presents annotations of 30 children's books which deal with special characters of the past or present in the categories of…

  16. Valuing (and Teaching) the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peart, Sandra J.; Levy, David M.

    2005-01-01

    There is a difference between the private and social cost of preserving the past. Although it may be privately rational to forget the past, the social cost is significant: We fail to see that classical political economy is analytically egalitarian. The past is a rich source of surprises and debates, and resources on the Web are uniquely suited to…

  17. Textural, Rheological and Sensory Properties and Oxidative Stability of Nut Spreads—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shakerardekani, Ahmad; Karim, Roselina; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Chin, Nyuk Ling

    2013-01-01

    Tree nuts are rich in macro and micronutrients, phytochemicals, tocopherols and phenolic compounds. The development of nut spreads would potentially increase the food uses of nuts and introduce consumers with a healthier, non-animal breakfast snack food. Nut spreads are spreadable products made from nuts that are ground into paste. Roasting and milling (particle size reduction) are two important stages for the production of nut spreads that affected the textural, rheological characteristic and overall quality of the nut spread. Textural, color, and flavor properties of nut spreads play a major role in consumer appeal, buying decisions and eventual consumption. Stability of nut spreads is influenced by its particle size. Proper combination of ingredients (nut paste, sweetener, vegetable oil and protein sources) is also required to ensure a stable nut spread product is produced. Most of the nut spreads behaved like a non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic fluid under yield stress which help the producers how to start pumping and stirring of the nut spreads. Similar to other high oil content products, nut spreads are susceptible to autoxidation. Their oxidation can be controlled by application of antioxidants, using processing techniques that minimize tocopherol and other natural antioxidant losses. PMID:23429239

  18. Rheology of lava flows on Mercury: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehlke, A.; Whittington, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The morphology of lava flows is controlled by the physical properties of the lava and its effusion rates, as well as environmental influences such as surface medium, slope and ambient temperature and pressure conditions. The important rheological properties of lavas include viscosity (η) and yield strength (σy), strongly dependent on temperature (T), composition (X), crystal fraction (φc) and vesicularity (φb). The crystal fraction typically increases as temperature decreases, and also influences the residual liquid composition. The rheological behavior of multi-phase lava flows is expressed as different flow morphologies, for example basalt flows transition from smooth pahoehoe to blocky `a`a at higher viscosities and/or strain rates. We have previously quantified the rheological conditions of this transition for Hawaiian basalts, but lavas on Mercury are very different in composition and expected crystallization history. Here we determine experimentally the temperature and rheological conditions of the pahoehoe-`a`a transition for two likely Mercury lava compositions using concentric cylinder viscometry. We detect first crystals at 1302 ºC for an enstatite basalt and 1317 ºC for a basaltic komatiite composition representative of the northern volcanic plains (NVP). In both cases, we observe a transition from Newtonian to pseudo-plastic response at crystal fractions > 10 vol%. Between 30 to 40 vol%, a yield strength (τ0) around 26±6 and 110±6 Pa develops, classifying the two-phase suspensions as Herschel-Bulkley fluids. The measured increase in apparent viscosity (ηapp) ranges from 10 Pa s to 104 Pa s. This change in rheological properties occurs only in a temperature range up to 100 ºC below the liquidus. By analogy with the rheological conditions of the pahoehoe-`a`a transition for Hawaiian basalts, we can relate the data for Mercury to lava flow surface morphology as shown in Figure 1, where the onset of the transition threshold zone (TTZ) for the

  19. Spectrophotometry: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    2009-01-01

    I describe the rise of optical region spectrophotometry in the 1960's and 1970's when it achieved a status as a major tool in stellar research through its decline and near demise at present. With absolutely calibrated fluxes and Balmer profiles usually of H-gamma, astronomers used model atmospheres predictions to find both the effective temperatures and surface gravities of many stars. Spectrophotometry as I knew it was photometrically calibrated low dispersion spectroscopy with a typical resolution of order 25 A. A typical data set consists of 10 to 15 values covering most of the optical spectral region. The strengths and shortcomings of the rotating grating scanners are discussed. The accomplishments achieved using spectrophotometric data, which were obtained with instruments using photomultipliers, are reviewed. Extensions to other spectral regions are noted and attempts to use observations from space to calibrate the optical region will be discussed. There are two steps to fully calibrate flux data. The first requires the calibration of the fluxes of one or more standard stars against sources calibrated absolutely in a laboratory. The use of Vega as the primary standard has been both a blessing as it is so bright and a curse especially as modeling it correctly requires treating it as a fast rotating star seen nearly pole-on. At best its calibration has errors of about 1%. The other step is to apply extinction corrections for the Earth's atmosphere and then calibrate the fluxes using the fluxes of standard stars. Now the ASTRA Spectrophotometer promises a revitalization of the use and availability of optical flux data. Its design specifications included solutions to the problems of past optical spectrophotometric instruments.

  20. High-temperature rheological study of foam fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, P.C.; Reidenbach, V.G.

    1984-09-01

    Nitrogen foam properties were measured up to 300/sup 0/F in a high temperature and pressure recirculating loop viscometer. Foam fluids did not thin as rapidly as gel fluids under similar conditions. Therefore, foams offer inherent advantages for high temperature stimulation work. Higher gelling agent concentrations do not improve dynamic foam stability. Rather, high temperature dynamic stability is dependent upon surfactant type and concentration. Mathematical equations have been developed to describe foam rheological behavior from 75 to 300/sup 0/F, 0 to 80 quality, containing 0 to 80 lb HPG/Mgal in the aqueous phase. Basic physical properties were previously outlined which determined foam rheological behavior at 75/sup 0/F. Foams were classified as yield pseudoplastic type fluids. This paper extends the previous work from 75 to 300/sup 0/F, and covers a broader range of external liquid phase compositions applicable to foam stimulation work.

  1. The Rheological Properties of the Biopolymers in Synovial Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Wetsch, Julie; Oates, Katherine M. N.; Colby, Ralph H.

    2005-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid and the synovial fluid model indicate that the fluids are highly viscoeleastic and rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  2. Rheology and TIC/TOC results of ORNL tank samples

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J. M.; Hansen, E. K.

    2013-04-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)) was requested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), and rheological measurements for several Oak Ridge tank samples. As received slurry samples were diluted and submitted to SRNL-Analytical for TIC and TOC analyses. Settled solids yield stress (also known as settled shear strength) of the as received settled sludge samples were determined using the vane method and these measurements were obtained 24 hours after the samples were allowed to settled undisturbed. Rheological or flow properties (Bingham Plastic viscosity and Bingham Plastic yield stress) were determined from flow curves of the homogenized or well mixed samples. Other targeted total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations samples were also analyzed for flow properties and these samples were obtained by diluting the as-received sample with de-ionized (DI) water.

  3. Rheology evolution of sludge through high-solid anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaohu; Gai, Xin; Dong, Bin

    2014-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the rheology evolution of sludge through high-solid anaerobic digestion (AD) and its dependency on sludge retention time (SRT) and temperature of AD reactor. The operation performance of high-solid AD reactors were also studied. The results showed that sludge became much more flowable after high-solid AD. It was found that the sludge from reactors with long SRT exhibited low levels of shear stress, viscosity, yield stress, consistency index, and high value of flow behaviour index. While the flowability of sludge from thermophilic AD reactors were better than that of sludge from mesophilic AD reactors though the solid content of the formers were higher than that of the latters, which could be attributed to the fact that the formers had more amount of free and interstitial moisture. It might be feasible to use sludge rheology as an AD process controlling parameter.

  4. Rheological properties of polyolefin composites highly filled with calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Jakubowska, Paulina; Sterzynski, Tomasz

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the rheological properties of highly filled polyolefin composites (HFPCs) have been investigated. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3), with stearic acid modified surface, was used as filler. Ternary compounds have been obtained by the inclusion of a CaCO3/polypropylene master batch into the high density polyethylene matrix. The highly filled polyolefin composites with CaCO3 content in the range between 40 and 64 wt% have been prepared in the molten state using a single-screw extruder, the temperature of the extrusion die was set at 230°C. The melt rheological properties of the HFPCs have been extensively investigated both in oscillatory and steady shear flow.

  5. Estimate of Hanford Waste Rheology and Settling Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Poloski, Adam P.; Wells, Beric E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Hall, Mark N.; Thomson, Scott L.; Smith, Gary Lynn; Johnson, Michael E.; Meacham, Joseph E.; Knight, Mark A.; Thien, Michael G.; Davis, Jim J.; Onishi, Yasuo

    2007-10-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. Piping, pumps, and mixing vessels have been selected to transport, store, and mix the high-level waste slurries in the WTP. This report addresses the analyses performed by the Rheology Working Group (RWG) and Risk Assessment Working Group composed of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Bechtel National Inc. (BNI), CH2M HILL, DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and Yasuo Onishi Consulting, LLC staff on data obtained from documented Hanford waste analyses to determine a best-estimate of the rheology of the Hanford tank wastes and their settling behavior. The actual testing activities were performed and reported separately in referenced documentation. Because of this, many of the required topics below do not apply and are so noted.

  6. Rheological characterization of petrolatum using a controlled stress rheometer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Ewing, Gary D

    2008-02-01

    The current study focuses on characterizing the rheological characteristics of different petrolatum grades using a controlled stress rheometer. Both steady-state flow and dynamic oscillatory tests were conducted on the petrolatums. The thermorheological scans were found to be the most informative and reproducible for this study. Significant differences in the structure were observed between the petrolatum grades. The structural differences were found to be most significant in the temperature range 25-35 degrees C. The findings from this study will help in identifying the critical parameters (for e.g., temperature, mixing) during the processing and handling of such materials, which can have a direct impact on the product rheology and performance.

  7. Novel Rheology in a Structured Food Product—Marmite™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, David E.; Moggridge, Geoff D.; Wilson, D. Ian

    2008-07-01

    The rheology of Marmite™, a yeast extract spread containing ˜70-75 wt% colloidal protein and NaCl solids in water, was studied using a number of shear rheology techniques. The material was found to be thixotropic in steady shear with no wall-slip. Creep data and the occurrence of jamming in controlled-stress mode further illustrate the presence of a structure and both solid and liquid flow regimes. Steady-state data acquired at low shear rates suggest a zero-shear plateau at shear stresses that are of the same order of magnitude as those found for the transition between flow regimes observed in the creep data. This transition has been the subject of recent discussion, e.g. [1],[2].

  8. Rheological and thermal properties of PP-based WPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, V.; Mollica, F.; El Kissi, N.

    2014-05-01

    Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) has attracted great interest in outdoor building products for the reduced cost and the possibility of using recycled materials. Nevertheless the material shows two problems: the large viscosity due to the presence of high concentrations of filler and the degradation of cellulose during processing The aim of this work was to investigate the rheological and thermal properties of WPC. The material used for the experiments was a commercial PP-based WPC compound, with different concentrations of natural fibers (30, 50, 70% wt.). The thermal properties were studied to check for degradation of natural fibers during the subsequent rheological tests. Analyzing the storage and loss moduli and the complex viscosity curves obtained using a parallel plate rheometer it was possible to observe some features related to the viscoelastic nature of the composite.

  9. Applications and limitations of a rheology for granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawthorn, Chris; Hinch, John; Huppert, Herbert

    2007-11-01

    In order to assess the validity of the rheological law for granular flows proposed by Jop, Pouliquen and Forterre [Nature, vol. 441, pp.727-730], we present its application to a number of different problems. Whilst it works well for steady flow on a confined sandpile, or in an inclined channel, we will show that the law fails to qualitatively predict flow some simple geometries, such as annular Couette flow and vertical chute flow. In addition, we consider perturbations to 2D flow on an inclined plane and 3D flow in an inclined channel, where the effect of the confining vertical walls becomes important. Implications for the use of Jop's rheology for more complicated problems, particularly those involving dam-break or column collapse will also be addressed.

  10. Rheological study of reinforcement of agarose hydrogels by cellulose nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Kevin J; Gaillard, Cedric; Helbert, William; Garnier, Catherine; Aubry, Thierry

    2015-02-13

    The influence of the addition of tunicate cellulose nanowhiskers on the structural and rheological properties of an agarose hydrogel matrix has been studied, with the objective to design innovative green material, with good mechanical properties. The cellulose nanowhiskers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, and their charge surface density was determined by a titration method. Oscillatory shear and stress relaxation tests were performed in order to characterize the rheological properties of the agarose matrix, and of the agarose hydrogels filled by nanowhiskers at volume fractions below 0.2%. The results show a significant reinforcement effect due to the addition of nanowhiskers, and suggest changes in the matrix network structure induced by the cellulose nanoparticles. PMID:25458280

  11. Rheology of Foam Near the Order-Disorder Phase Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; McDaniel, J. Gregory

    1999-01-01

    Foams are extremely important in a variety of industrial applications. Foams are widely used in fire-fighting applications, and are especially effective in fighting flammable liquid fires. In fact the Fire Suppression System aboard the Space Shuttle utilizes cylinders of Halon foam, which, when fired, force a rapidly expanding foam into the convoluted spaces behind instrument panels. Foams are critical in the process of enhanced oil recovery, due to their surface-active and highly viscous nature. They are also used as drilling fluids in underpressurized geologic formations. They are used as transport agents, and as trapping agents. They are also used as separation agents, where ore refinement is accomplished by froth flotation of the typically lighter and hydrophobic contaminants. The goal of the proposed investigation is the determination of the mechanical and rheological properties of foams, utilizing the microgravity environment to explore foam rheology for foams which cannot exist, or only exist for a short time, in 1g.

  12. Microstructure and rheology of microfibril-polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Veen, Sandra J; Versluis, Peter; Kuijk, Anke; Velikov, Krassimir P

    2015-12-14

    By using an adsorbing polymer in combination with mechanical de-agglomeration, the microstructure and rheological properties of networks of microfibrils could be controlled. By the addition of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose during de-agglomeration of networks of bacterial cellulose, the microstructure could be changed from an inhomogeneous network with bundles of microfibrils and voids to a more homogeneous spread and alignment of the particles. As a result the macroscopic rheological properties were altered. Although still elastic and gel-like in nature, the elasticity and viscous behavior of the network as a function of microfibril concentration is altered. The microstructure is thus changed by changing the surface properties of the building blocks leading to a direct influence on the materials macroscopic behavior. PMID:26434637

  13. Time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Kuśmierczyk, Piotr; Liu, Changqing; Yang, Guang; Sevostianov, Igor; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel. Due to its ideal biocompatibility, BC hydrogel could be employed in biomedical applications. Considering the complexity of loading conditions in human body environment, time-dependent behaviour under relevant conditions should be understood. BC specimens are produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 at static-culture conditions. Time-dependent behaviour of specimens at several stress levels is experimentally determined by uniaxial tensile creep tests. We use fraction-exponential operators to model the rheological behaviour. Such a representation allows combination of good accuracy in analytical description of viscoelastic behaviour of real materials and simplicity in solving boundary value problems. The obtained material parameters allow us to identify time-dependent behaviour of BC hydrogel at high stress level with sufficient accuracy. PMID:26478298

  14. Microstructure and rheology of microfibril-polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Veen, Sandra J; Versluis, Peter; Kuijk, Anke; Velikov, Krassimir P

    2015-12-14

    By using an adsorbing polymer in combination with mechanical de-agglomeration, the microstructure and rheological properties of networks of microfibrils could be controlled. By the addition of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose during de-agglomeration of networks of bacterial cellulose, the microstructure could be changed from an inhomogeneous network with bundles of microfibrils and voids to a more homogeneous spread and alignment of the particles. As a result the macroscopic rheological properties were altered. Although still elastic and gel-like in nature, the elasticity and viscous behavior of the network as a function of microfibril concentration is altered. The microstructure is thus changed by changing the surface properties of the building blocks leading to a direct influence on the materials macroscopic behavior.

  15. Rheology of fluids measured by correlation force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiom, Milad; Robbins, Brian; Honig, Christopher D. F.; Walz, John Y.; Paul, Mark R.; Ducker, William A.

    2012-04-01

    We describe a method, correlation force spectrometry (CFS), which characterizes fluids through measurement of the correlations between the thermally stimulated vibrations of two closely spaced micrometer-scale cantilevers in fluid. We discuss a major application: measurement of the rheological properties of fluids at high frequency and high spatial resolution. Use of CFS as a rheometer is validated by comparison between experimental data and finite element modeling of the deterministic ring-down of cantilevers using the known viscosity of fluids. The data can also be accurately fitted using a harmonic oscillator model, which can be used for rapid rheometric measurements after calibration. The method is non-invasive, uses a very small amount of fluid, and has no actively moving parts. It can also be used to analyze the rheology of complex fluids. We use CFS to show that (non-Newtonian) aqueous polyethylene oxide solution can be modeled approximately by incorporating an elastic spring between the cantilevers.

  16. Empirical rheological model for rough or grooved bonded interfaces.

    PubMed

    Belloncle, Valentina Vlasie; Rousseau, Martine

    2007-12-01

    In the industrial sector, it is common to use metal/adhesive/metal structural bonds. The cohesion of such structures can be improved by preliminary chemical treatments (degreasing with solvents, alkaline, or acid pickling), electrochemical treatments (anodising), or mechanical treatments (abrasion, sandblasting, grooving) of the metallic plates. All these pretreatments create some asperities, ranging from roughnesses to grooves. On the other hand, in damage solid mechanics and in non-destructive testing, rheological models are used to measure the strength of bonded interfaces. However, these models do not take into account the interlocking of the adhesive in the porosities. Here, an empirical rheological model taking into account the interlocking effects is developed. This model depends on a characteristic parameter representing the average porosity along the interface, which considerably simplifies the corresponding stress and displacement jump conditions. The paper deals with the influence of this interface model on the ultrasonic guided modes of the structure. PMID:17659313

  17. Constant Stress and Pressure Rheology of Colloidal Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mu; Brady, John F

    2015-10-01

    We study the constant stress and pressure rheology of dense hard-sphere colloidal suspensions using Brownian dynamics simulation. Expressing the flow behavior in terms of the friction coefficient-the ratio of shear to normal stress-reveals a shear arrest point from the collapse of the rheological data in the non-Brownian limit. The flow curves agree quantitatively (when scaled) with the experiments of Boyer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 188301 (2011)]. Near suspension arrest, both the shear and the incremental normal viscosities display a universal power law divergence. This work shows the important role of jamming on the arrest of colloidal suspensions and illustrates the care needed when conducting and analyzing experiments and simulations near the flow-arrest transition. PMID:26550755

  18. Time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Kuśmierczyk, Piotr; Liu, Changqing; Yang, Guang; Sevostianov, Igor; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel. Due to its ideal biocompatibility, BC hydrogel could be employed in biomedical applications. Considering the complexity of loading conditions in human body environment, time-dependent behaviour under relevant conditions should be understood. BC specimens are produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 at static-culture conditions. Time-dependent behaviour of specimens at several stress levels is experimentally determined by uniaxial tensile creep tests. We use fraction-exponential operators to model the rheological behaviour. Such a representation allows combination of good accuracy in analytical description of viscoelastic behaviour of real materials and simplicity in solving boundary value problems. The obtained material parameters allow us to identify time-dependent behaviour of BC hydrogel at high stress level with sufficient accuracy.

  19. Rheological study of clay-kaolin aqueous suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapasin, R.; Lucchini, F.

    1984-01-01

    Rheological characteristics of clay-kaolin aqueous suspensions were studied by a rotational viscometer to correlate their behavior with the properties of ceramic slips for casting containing quartz, feldspars, and other nonplastic materials. In particular, the effects of the different amounts of dry materials and deflocculant (mixture 1:1 of Na2CO3 and Na2SiO3) and of temperatures on the shear-time-dependent properties of suspensions were examined.

  20. Interfacial shear rheology of DPPC under physiologically relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Vermant, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Lipids, and phosphatidylcholines in particular, are major components in cell membranes and in human lung surfactant. Their ability to encapsulate or form stable layers suggests a significant role of the interfacial rheological properties. In the present work we focus on the surface rheological properties of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Literature results are confusing and even contradictory; viscosity values have been reported differ by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, even both purely viscous and gel-like behaviours have been described. Assessing the literature critically, a limited experimental window has been explored correctly, which however does not yet include conditions relevant for the physiological state of DPPC in vivo. A complete temperature and surface pressure analysis of the interfacial shear rheology of DPPC is performed, showing that the monolayer behaves as a viscoelastic liquid with a domain structure. At low frequencies and for a thermally structured monolayer, the interaction of the molecules within the domains can be probed. The low frequency limit of the complex viscosity is measured over a wide range of temperatures and surface pressures. The effects of temperature and surface pressure on the low frequency viscosity can be analysed in terms of the effects of free molecular area. However, at higher frequencies or following a preshear at high shear rates, elasticity becomes important; most probably elasticity due to defects at the edge of the domains in the layer is probed. Preshearing refines the structure and induces more defects. As a result, disagreeing interfacial rheology results in various publications might be due to different pre-treatments of the interface. The obtained dataset and scaling laws enable us to describe the surface viscosity, and its dependence under physiological conditions of DPPC. The implications on functioning of lung surfactants and lung surfactant replacements will be discussed. PMID:24651838

  1. Rheology and Wetting Properties of Fluxes for Flip Chip Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinlin

    2008-07-01

    The rheological properties, wettability, and fluxability of fluxes for flip chip packages were studied. The flux viscosity showed significant decrease from room temperature to the peak reflow temperature. The viscosity of fluxes decreased after kneading process. One of the reasons of the viscosity decrease for some fluxes during the kneading is the moisture uptake. The tackiness of the fluxes increased with both applied load and retraction speed.

  2. Plate Interface Rheology, Mechanical Coupling and Accretion during Subduction Infancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Yamato, P.; Mathieu, S.; Prigent, C.; Guillot, S.; Plunder, A.; Dubacq, B.; Monie, P.; Chauvet, A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding subduction rheology in both space and time has been a challenge since the advent of plate tectonics. We herein focus on "subduction infancy", that is the first ~1-5 My immediately following subduction nucleation, when a newly born slab penetrates into the upper plate mantle and heats up. The only remnants of this critical yet elusive geodynamic step are thin metamorphic soles, commonly found beneath pristine, 100-1000 km long portions of oceanic lithosphere emplaced on continents (i.e., ophiolites). Through the (i) worldwide compilation of pressure-temperature conditions of metamorphic sole formation augmented by pseudosection thermodynamic modeling, (ii) calculations of the viscosity of materials along the plate interface and (iii) generic numerical thermal models, we provide a conceptual model of dynamic plate interface processes during subduction infancy (and initiation s.l.). We show in particular how major rheological switches across the subduction interface control slab penetration, and the formation of metamorphic soles. Due to the downward progression of hydration and weakening of the mantle wedge with cooling, the lower plate (basalt, sediment) and the upper plate (mantle wedge) rheologies equalize and switch over a restricted temperature-time-depth interval (e.g., at ~800°C and ~1 GPa, during 0.1-2 My, for high-temperature metamorphic sole formation). These switches result in episodes of maximum interplate mechanical coupling, thereby slicing the top of the slab and welding pieces (basalt, sediment) to the base of the mantle wedge. Similar mechanical processes likely apply for the later, deeper accretion and exhumation of high-temperature oceanic eclogites in serpentinite mélanges, or for the accretion of larger tectonic slices. This model provides constraints on the effective rheologies of the crust and mantle and general understanding, at both rock and plate scale, for accretion processes and early slab dynamics.

  3. Rapid rheological screening to identify conditions of biomaterial hydrogelation

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Kelly M.; Baldwin, Aaron D.; Kiick, Kristi L.; Furst, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogels engineered for biomedical applications consist of numerous components, each of which can affect the material assembly and final mechanical properties. We present methods that rapidly generate rheological libraries to identify regimes of hydrogel assembly in a large composition parameter space. This method conserves both material and time, and leads to critical insight into assembly mechanisms and mechanics, which can then be used for further materials development and optimization. PMID:20046915

  4. Rheological evaluation of simulated neutralized current acid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Fow, C.L.; McCarthy, D.; Thornton, G.T.

    1986-06-01

    A byproduct of the Purex process is an aqueous waste stream that contains fission products. This waste stream, called current acid waste, is chemically neutralized and stored in double shell tanks on the Hanford Site. This neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) will be transported by pipe to B-Plant, a processing plant on the Hanford Site. Rheological and transport properties of NCAW slurry were evaluated. First, researchers conducted lab rheological evaluations of simulated NCAW. The results of these evaluations were then correlated with classical rheological models and scaled up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The NCAW in the tank will either be retrieved as is, i.e., no change in the concentration presently in the tank, or will be slightly concentrated before retrieval. Sluicing may be required to retrieve the solids. Three concentrations of simulated NCAW were evaluated that would simulate the different retrieval options: NCAW in the concentration that is presently in the tank; a slightly concentrated NCAW, called NCAW5.5; and equal parts of NCAW settled solids and water (simulating the sluicing stage), called NCAW1:1. The physical and rheological properties of three samples of each concentration at 25 and 100/sup 0/C were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCAW and NCAW5.5 at 25 and 100/sup 0/C allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. NCAW1:1 at 25 and 100/sup 0/C displayed properties of a yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The classical non-Newtonian models for pseudoplastic and yield-pseudoplastic fluids were used with the laboratory data to predict the full-scale pump-pipe network parameters.

  5. Shape Oscillations of Gas Bubbles With Newtonian Interfacial Rheological Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadim, Ali

    1996-01-01

    The oscillation frequency and damping rate for small-amplitude axisymmetric shape modes of a gas bubble in an ideal liquid are obtained, in the limit when the bubble interface possesses Newtonian interfacial rheology with constant surface shear and dilatational viscosities. Such results permit the latter surface properties to be measured by analyzing experimental data on frequency shift and damping rate of specific shape modes of suspended bubbles in the presence of surfactants.

  6. Olivine Slip-system Activity at High Pressure: Implications for Upper-Mantle Rheology and Seismic Anisotropy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raterron, P.; Castelnau, O.; Geenen, T.; Merkel, S.

    2013-12-01

    The past decade abounded in technical developments allowing the investigation of materials rheology at high pressure (P > 3 GPa) [1]. This had a significant impact on our understanding of olivine rheology in the Earth asthenosphere, where P is in the range 3 - 13 GPa. A dislocation slip-system transition induced by pressure has been documented in dry Fe-bearing olivine [2]; it induces changes in olivine aggregate lattice preferred orientation (LPO) [3,4], which may explain the seismic velocity anisotropy attenuation observed at depths > 200 km in the upper mantle [5]. Deformation experiments carried out on olivine single crystals at high pressure allowed quantifying the effect of P on individual slip system activities [6]. Integration of these data, together with data on lattice friction arising from computational models (e.g., [7]), into analytical or mean-field numerical models for aggregate plasticity gave insight on the viscosity and LPO of olivine aggregates deformed at geological conditions in the dislocation creep regime [8,9]. We will review these recent findings and their implications for upper mantle rheology and seismic anisotropy. [1] Raterron & Merkel, 2009, J. Sync. Rad., 16, 748 ; [2] Raterron et al., 2009, PEPI, 172, 74 ; [3] Jung et al., 2009, Nature Geoscience, 2, 73 ; [4] Ohuchi et al., 2011, EPSL, 304, 55 ; [5] Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731 ; [6] Raterron et al., 2012, PEPI, 200-201, 105 ; [7] Durinck et al., 2007, EJM, 19, 631 ; [8] Castelnau et al., 2010, C.R. Physique, 11, 304 ; [9] Raterron et al., 2011, PEPI, 188, 26

  7. The Role of History-Dependent Rheology in Plate Boundary Lubrication for Generating One-Sided Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Michio; Nakakuki, Tomoeki; Kameyama, Masanori; Tajima, Fumiko

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional dynamical model of asymmetric subduction integrated into the mantle convection without imposed plate velocities. In this model we consider that weak oceanic crust behaves as a lubricator on the thrust fault at the plate boundary. We introduce a rheological layer that depends on the history of the past fracture to simulate the effect of the oceanic crust. The thickness of this layer is set to be as thin as the Earth's oceanic crust. To treat 1-kilometer scale structure at the plate boundary in the 1000-kilometer scale mantle convection calculation, we introduce a new numerical method to solve the hydrodynamic equations using a couple of uniform and nonuniform grids of control volumes. Using our developed models, we have systematically investigated effects of basic rheological parameters that determine the deformation strength of the lithosphere and the oceanic crust on the development of the subducted slab, with a focus on the plate motion controlling mechanism. In our model the plate subduction is produced when the friction coefficient (0.004 0.008) of the modeled oceanic crust and the maximum strength (400 MPa) of the lithosphere are in plausible range inferred from the observations on the plate driving forces and the plate deformation, and the rheology experiments. In this range of the plate strength, yielding induces the plate bending. In this case the speed of plate motion is controlled more by viscosity layering of the underlying mantle than by the plate strength. To examine the setting of the overriding plate, we also consider the two end-member cases in which the overriding plate is fixed or freely-movable. In the case of the freely-movable overriding plate, the trench motion considerably changes the dip angle of the deep slab. Especially in the case with a shallow-angle plate boundary, retrograde slab motion occurs to generate a shallow-angle deep slab.

  8. Super-strong magneto-rheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.

    2001-03-01

    A typical MR fluid is a suspension of magnetic particles of micrometer size in a liquid. Upon application of a strong magnetic field, the fluid turns into a solid. This process is reversible and the response time is of milliseconds. MR fluids presently have a yield shear stress around 80 kPa, which is adequate for applications in shock absorbers and vibration dampers, but is inadequate for automobile clutch etc. Efforts in searching for new materials in the past decades came with limited results. Thus we have developed a new approach to change the microstructure of MR fluids and make them super-strong. It is well known that under a strong magnetic field, the ideal structure of MR fluids is a body-centered tetragonal (bct) lattice. The mechanical strength of MR fluids strongly depends on the microstructure. A bct-lattice based thick column has a much higher yield stress than a single-chain structure. When a magnetic field is applied to a MR fluid, the particles first form chains. With time, the chains may aggregate into columns. However, the unassisted aggregation is not very useful, as it is slow and produces columns with a limited thickness. Our method is based on assisted aggregations. Immediately after a magnetic field is applied, we compress the MR fluid in the field direction before a shear force is applied. The compression pushes the induced chains together to form thick columns. This microstructure change greatly enhances the yield stress. The experiment on an iron-based MR fluid finds 800 kPa for the yield stress, ten times stronger than that without the compression. When the magnetic field is removed, the MR fluid still returns to the liquid state quickly. The upper limit of this structure-enhanced yield stress seems well above 800 kPa. The super-strong MR fluids are suitable for many industrial applications. *Supported by NSF Grant 0196022

  9. Thermal and rheological properties of nixtamalized maize starch.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Montealvo, G; Sánchez-Rivera, M M; Paredes-López, O; Bello-Pérez, L A

    2006-12-15

    The effect of nixtamalization process on thermal and rheological characteristics of corn starch was studied. Starch of raw sample had higher gelatinization temperature than its raw counterpart, because, the Ca(2+) ions stabilize starch structure of nixtamalized sample; however, the enthalpy values were not different in both samples. The temperature of the phase transition of the retrograded starches (raw and nixtamalized) were not different at the storage times assessed, but the enthalpy values of the above mentioned transition was different, indicating a lower reorganization of the starch structure in the nixtamalized sample. The viscoamylographic profile showed differences between both starches, since raw starch had higher peak viscosity than the nixtamalized sample due to partial gelatinization of some granules during this heat treatment. Rheological test showed that at low temperature (25 degrees C) the raw and nixtamalized starches presented different behaviour; however, the elastic characteristic was more important in the starch gel structure. The nixtamalization process produced changes in thermal and rheological characteristics becoming important in those products elaborated from nixtamalized maize.

  10. Application of Flow Laws to the Rheology of Shear Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg

    2015-04-01

    A limitation in the application of experimental flow laws is that lab data are often obtained from single phase aggregates, rather than rocks. Using a combination of microstructural observations, thermobarometry, metamorphic petrology and thermochronology (where possible), we have identified several scenarios where shear zone rheology appears to operate at conditions where the nominally stronger multi-phase rock deforms by diffusion creep and the single-phase regions of the same rocks deform by dislocation creep of the weak phase. Examples include mafic rocks from the oceanic crust (Mehl and Hirth, 2008), hydrated mafic rocks from lower continental crust (Getsinger et al., 2013) and ophiolites (Homburg et al., 2010), and peridotites from both oceanic transform (Warren and Hirth, 2006) and ophiolites (Skemer et al., 2010). In each case, the extrapolation of experimental data provide evidence that the texture of the poly-phase rock evolves such that the effective viscosity of poly-phase regions deforming by diffusion creep is comparable to that of the single-phase regions deforming by dislocation creep. As such, these scenarios suggest that in many situations using flow laws for single phase aggregates actually provides a reasonable approximation for shear zone rheology. In this presentation, I will provide examples of these scenarios, discuss mechanisms for the grain size evolution of the poly-phase rocks that facilitate the production of the "uniform viscosity layers" in shear zones, and the implications of these observations for the rheology of shear zones and the interpretation of post-seismic geodetic data.

  11. Rheology of Savannah River Site Tank 51 HLW radioactive sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, B.C.

    1993-01-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 51 HLW radioactive sludge represents a major portion of the first batch of sludge to be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The rheological properties of Tank 51 sludge will determine if the waste sludge can be pumped by the current DWPF process cell pump design and the homogeneity of melter feed slurries. The rheological properties of Tank 51 sludge and sludge/frit slurries at various solids concentrations were measured remotely in the Shielded Cells Operations (SCO) at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) using a modified Haake Rotovisco viscometer system. Rheological properties of Tank 51 radioactive sludge/Frit 202 slurries increased drastically when the solids content was above 41 wt %. The yield stresses of Tank 51 sludge and sludge/frit slurries fall within the limits of the DWPF equipment design basis. The apparent viscosities also fall within the DWPF design basis for sludge consistency. All the results indicate that Tank 51 waste sludge and sludge/frit slurries are pumpable throughout the DWPF processes based on the current process cell pump design, and should produce homogeneous melter feed slurries.

  12. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-01

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment. PMID:26855752

  13. The effect of temperature on rheological properties of endodontic sealers

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Roshni U.; Singbal, Kiran P.; Parekh, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate temperature-dependent rheological properties of three endodontic sealers MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Brazil), AH Plus (Dentsply, Germany), and EndoREZ (Ultradent, USA). Materials and Methods: Five samples of each group of endodontic sealers (n = 30) were freshly mixed and placed on the plate of a rheometer (MCR 301, AntonPaar, Physica) and examined at 25°C and 37°C temperature, respectively. Rheological properties of the sealers were calculated according to the loss modulus (G″), storage modulus (G′), loss factor (Tan δ), and complex viscosity (η*) using dynamic oscillatory shear tests. Results: Statistical analysis (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) demonstrated that MTA Fillapex exhibited higher loss modulus (G″ > G′) and a crossover region. AH Plus and EndoREZ had a higher storage modulus (G′ > G″) at both temperatures. Loss factor (Tan δ) of MTA Fillapex was the highest compared to AH Plus, followed by EndoREZ. With a temperature change from 25°C to 37°C, MTA Fillapex exhibited a decrease while AH Plus exhibited an increase and, EndoREZ exhibited the least change, in complex viscosity (η*). Conclusions: EndoREZ exhibited better rheological properties compared to the other two test sealers. PMID:27099414

  14. Rheological assessment of nanofluids at high pressure high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) fluids are commonly encountered in industry, for example in cooling and/or lubrications applications. Nanofluids, engineered suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a base fluid, have shown prospective as industrial cooling fluids due to their enhanced rheological and heat transfer properties. Nanofluids can be potentially utilized in oil industry for drilling fluids and for high pressure water jet cooling/lubrication in machining. In present work rheological characteristics of oil based nanofluids are investigated at HPHT condition. Nanofluids used in this study are prepared by dispersing commercially available SiO2 nanoparticles (~20 nm) in a mineral oil. The basefluid and nanofluids with two concentrations, namely 1%, and 2%, by volume, are considered in this investigation. The rheological characteristics of base fluid and the nanofluids are measured using an industrial HPHT viscometer. Viscosity values of the nanofluids are measured at pressures of 100 kPa to 42 MPa and temperatures ranging from 25°C to 140°C. The viscosity values of both nanofluids as well as basefluid are observed to have increased with the increase in pressure. Funded by Qatar National Research Fund (NPRP 08-574-2-239).

  15. Identification of rheological properties of human body surface tissue.

    PubMed

    Benevicius, Vincas; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Marozas, Vaidotas

    2014-04-11

    According to World Health Organization obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century. It has tripled since the 1980s and the numbers of those affected continue to rise at an alarming rate, especially among children. There are number of devices that act as a prevention measure to boost person's motivation for physical activity and its levels. The placement of these devices is not restricted thus the measurement errors that appear because of the body rheology, clothes, etc. cannot be eliminated. The main objective of this work is to introduce a tool that can be applied directly to process measured accelerations so human body surface tissue induced errors can be reduced. Both the modeling and experimental techniques are proposed to identify body tissue rheological properties and prelate them to body mass index. Multi-level computational model composed from measurement device model and human body surface tissue rheological model is developed. Human body surface tissue induced inaccuracies can increase the magnitude of measured accelerations up to 34% when accelerations of the magnitude of up to 27 m/s(2) are measured. Although the timeframe of those disruptions are short - up to 0.2 s - they still result in increased overall measurement error.

  16. Crosslinked hyaluronic acid dermal fillers: a comparison of rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Samuel J; Berg, Richard A

    2008-10-01

    Temporary dermal fillers composed of crosslinked hyaluronic acid (XLHA) are space filling gels that are readily available in the United States and Europe. Several families of dermal fillers based on XLHA are now available and here we compare the physical and rheological properties of these fillers to the clinical effectiveness. The XLHA fillers are prepared with different crosslinkers, using HA isolated from different sources, have different particle sizes, and differ substantially in rheological properties. For these fillers, the magnitude of the complex viscosity, |eta*|, varies by a factor of 20, the magnitude of the complex rigidity modulus, |G*|, and the magnitude of the complex compliance, |J*| vary by a factor of 10, the percent elasticity varies from 58% to 89.9%, and the tan delta varies from 0.11 to 0.70. The available clinical data cannot be correlated with either the oscillatory dynamic or steady flow rotational rheological properties of the various fillers. However, the clinical data appear to correlate strongly with the total concentration of XLHA in the products and to a lesser extent with percent elasticity. Hence, our data suggest the following correlation: dermal filler persistence = [polymer] x [% elasticity] and the clinical persistence of a dermal filler composed of XLHA is dominated by the mass and elasticity of the material implanted. This work predicts that the development of future XLHA dermal filler formulations should focus on increasing the polymer concentration and elasticity to improve the clinical persistence.

  17. Aging and nonlinear rheology of thermoreversible colloidal gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Gordon, Melissa; Kloxin, Christopher

    Colloidal dispersions are found in a wide variety of consumer products such as paint, food and pharmaceuticals. We investigate gel formation and aging in a thermoreverible gel consisting of octadecyl-coated silica nanoparticles suspended in n-tetradecane. In this system, the octadecyl brush can undergo a phase change allowing the attractions between particles to be tuned by temperature (1,2). By probing the system with steady shear and large amplitude oscillatory shear, we have studied the effect of thermal history and shear history on gel formation and gel mechanical properties during aging. Gels were formed by approaching a common temperature from above and below to determine a reference state from which creep tests were conducted. Creep ringing was observed as expected for the viscoelastic gel. The rheological aging is interpreted in terms of the gel microstructure formed with differing thermal and shear histories to determine how processing affects structure. Recently proposed scaling laws for the rheology and structure under flow are explored within the context of gel aging (3). Through rheological and microstructural measurements, we will further the understanding of gel formation and aging in this model system which may be applied to processing conditions in an industrial setting.

  18. Hanford Waste Physical and Rheological Properties: Data and Gaps - 12078

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.; Wells, B.E.; Huckaby, J.L.; Mahoney, L.A.; Daniel, R.C.; Burns, C.A.; Tingey, J.M.; Cooley, S.K.

    2012-07-01

    The retrieval, transport, treatment and disposal operations associated with Hanford Tank Wastes involve the handling of a wide range of slurries. Knowledge of the physical and rheological properties of the waste is a key component to the success of the design and implementation of the waste processing facilities. Previous efforts to compile and analyze the physical and rheological properties were updated with new results including information on solids composition and density, particle size distributions, slurry rheology, and particle settling behavior. The primary source of additional data is from a recent series of tests sponsored by the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). These tests involved an extensive suite of characterization and bench-scale process testing of 8 waste groups representing approximately 75% of the high-level waste mass expected to be processed through the WTP. Additional information on the morphology of the waste solids was also included. Based on the updated results, a gap analysis to identify gaps in characterization data, analytical methods and data interpretation was completed. (authors)

  19. Hanford Waste Physical and Rheological Properties: Data and Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, Dean E.; Wells, Beric E.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Tingey, Joel M.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-03-01

    The retrieval, transport, treatment and disposal operations associated with Hanford Tank Wastes involve the handling of a wide range of slurries. Knowledge of the physical and rheological properties of the waste is a key component to the success of the design and implementation of the waste processing facilities. Previous efforts to compile and analyze the physical and rheological properties were updated with new results including information on solids composition and density, particle size distributions, slurry rheology, and particle settling behavior. The primary source of additional data is from a recent series of tests sponsored by the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. These tests involved an extensive suite of characterization and bench-scale process testing of 8 waste groups representing approximately 75% of the high-level waste mass expected to be processed through the WTP. Additional information on the morphology of the waste solids was also included. Based on the updated results, a gap analysis to identify gaps in characterization data, analytical methods and data interpretation was completed.

  20. Rheological characterization, crystallization, and gelation behavior of monoglyceride gels.

    PubMed

    Sein, Arjen; Verheij, Jan A; Agterof, Wim G M

    2002-05-15

    Saturated monoglycerides can form firm gels in water. These gels are networks of stiff plate-like beta-crystals of monoglycerides (a "cardhouse"), grown from a space-filling lamellar liquid-crystalline phase. The molecular mechanism of crystallization is discussed in the light of network formation. The concentration dependence of gel development of (shear-cooled) monoglyceride gels has been studied by rheology. A gelation mechanism has been proposed, consisting of two steps: (i) After formation of a nucleus, rapid crystallization in a lateral direction occurs (probably within one bilayer) by which the first space-filling network is formed. (ii) This is followed by reinforcement of the network by which stacks of crystalline bilayers are formed. The plate-like crystals are linked in connective domains or junction zones, probably containing all the material (cosurfactants, diglycerides, etc.) that does not fit in the crystalline array. Small deformation rheology shows that above about 2 wt% monoglyceride a percolating network is formed. The large deformation rheology is typical for a particle gel with a relatively small strain at failure (both in shear deformation and compression). The connective domains or junction zones already fail when relatively small deformations are put on the system. PMID:16290616

  1. The Rheology and Processing of Renewable Resource Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jason D.; Harrison, Graham M.

    2008-07-01

    Bio-based polymers offer an alternative to conventional fossil fuel-based materials, in particular for commodity applications such as single-use products. In this work, we report on the rheology and processing of two bio-based polymers, namely poly-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolymers and poly-lactic acid (PLA), and their blends. These materials are derived from renewable resources, and can degrade under the appropriate conditions. The rheology is investigated in shear, elongation, and transient modes. Of particular importance is the degradation of these materials at typical processing conditions, and the impact of polymer architecture on the extensional properties. Using results from these rheological investigations, appropriate thermal and flow conditions are employed in a DSM Xplore microcompounder, with the cast film attachment, to produce films of PHA copolymers blended with PLA. The resultant films are characterized, as a function of both material composition and processing history, using DSC, WAXD, tensile testing, and SEM, to investigate the effect of varying PHA content on the final properties.

  2. Rheology of water-silicate mixtures at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, William B.

    1992-01-01

    Lab studies of the effects of hard particulates on the rheology of ice have been mainly directed at the evolution of the Galilean satellites, but yield results that may be applicable to the rheology of the Martian polar caps. The experiments have explored the ductile rheology as well as brittle behavior of water + particulate (mainly quartz) mixtures in particulate volume fractions ranging from 0.001 to 0.56, particulate sizes 1 to 150 microns, temperatures 77 to 224 K, and deformation rates 3.5 x 10(exp -7) to 3.5 x 10(exp -4)/s, under confining pressures of 50 to 100 MPa. Particulates act mainly to strengthen the material in the ductile field, although work by others has shown that very close to the melting temperature hard particulates can actually cause softening. So called dispersion hardening by the Orowan mechanism of pinning glide dislocations, often exploited in metallurgy for strengthening materials, appears not to be an issue in ice except at very low temperatures, less than approx. 135 K.

  3. Rheological changes induced by clast fragmentation in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Lizeth; Sarocchi, Damiano; Soto, Enrique; Borselli, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    On the basis of rotating drum analogue experiments, we describe a fragmentation process acting within debris flows during transport and its influence on rheologic behavior. Our hypothesis is based on a detailed textural analysis including granulometry, clast morphology, and rheologic properties of the fluid matrix. Results of the experiments point out that breakage of certain granulometric classes produces fine particles like fine sand and silt. The population growth of fine clasts with time leads to an increase in yield strength and viscosity that progressively modifies the rheologic behavior. From a textural point of view, this is reflected in a bimodal granulometric distribution. Up to now this characteristic has been explained as the effect of bulking and/or sedimentation processes during transport. Our experimental results show that the type of fragmentation depends on particle size and is the consequence of strong clast-clast interaction and clast-fluid interactions. Coarse particles develop small fractures which cause the loss of sharp edges and asperities. Medium-sized particles develop through-going fractures that cause them to break apart. The latter process explains why intermediate granulometric classes progressively diminish with time in debris flows. Analogue experiments enable us to study the efficacy of clast fragmentation in modifying the textural character and flow behavior of debris flows without the influence of external factors such as erosion and sedimentation. The obtained results constitute the base of a new approach for modeling debris flow dynamics.

  4. Mechanically modified xanthan gum: Rheology and polydispersity aspects.

    PubMed

    Eren, Necla Mine; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo

    2015-12-10

    Xanthan gum solutions were treated with high-pressure homogenization (HPH) in order to provide alternative treatments to enzymatic and chemical modification of this carbohydrate. Rheological properties of the treated and control samples were investigated in detail to gain an understanding of functional consequences of physical modification. The molecular structural properties were investigated via Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with Multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and Circular dichroism (CD). Structured network of xanthan gum solutions was lost gradually depending on the severity of the HPH treatment as evidenced by the observed changes in the viscosity and viscoelasticity of the treated solutions. Reduction in molecular weight and a significant increase in polydispersity of the polymer were the expected causes of these rheological changes. Observed increase in hydrodynamic volume upon HPH treatment was not surprising and attributed to the loss of structured networks. Changes in the rheological and structural characteristics of biopolymer were irreversible and significant recovery was not detected over a period of 11 weeks. PMID:26428149

  5. [Clinical and rheological efficacy of troxerutin in obstetric gynecology].

    PubMed

    Marhic, C

    1991-02-25

    The success of treatment aimed at improving manifestations of venous insufficiency appears today to be closely linked to a therapeutic impact on blood viscosity and the macrorheological parameters upon which it depends. This double-blind placebo-controlled trial of troxerutine was designed to evaluate changes during treatment in rheological abnormalities in 60 women with vulval varicosities and venous insufficiency of the lower limbs, half in the context of premenstrual syndrome and half in pregnant women from the 4th month on. Initial examination revealed no significant difference between the treated and control groups from a clinical and rheological standpoint in the gynecological and obstetric categories. Analysis of results showed that a high dose of troxerutine was associated with a very marked improvement in symptomatic parameters by the first month of treatment with a significant correlation between clinical criteria and rheological parameters in pregnant women as well as in those with a premenstrual syndrome. These data were confirmed by excellent acceptability as well as subjective assessment by patients after 4 months' treatment at the dosage of 4 g/d.

  6. Recent Advances in High Pressure and Temperature Rheological Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanbin; Hilairet, Nadege; Dera, Przemyslaw

    2012-01-20

    Rheological studies at high pressure and temperature using in-situ X-ray diffraction and imaging have made significant progresses in recent years, thanks to a combination of recent developments in several areas: (1) advances in synchrotron X-ray techniques, (2) advances in deformation devices and the abilities to control pressure, temperature, stress, strain and strain rates, (3) theoretical and computational advances in stress determination based on powder and single crystal diffraction, (4) theoretical and computational advances in modeling of grain-level micromechanics based on elasto-plastic and visco-plastic self-consistent formulations. In this article, we briefly introduce the experimental techniques and theoretical background for in-situ high pressure, high temperature rheological studies, and then review recent studies of rheological properties of major mantle materials. Some currently encountered issues have prompted developments in single-crystal quasi-Laue diffraction for complete stress tensor determination and textural evolution of poly-phased composites based on X-ray microtomography. Future prospects are discussed.

  7. Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment: A Proposed ISS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Nancy R.; Logsdon, Kirk A.; Magee, Kevin S.

    2007-01-01

    The Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment (SHERE) is a proposed International Space Station (ISS) glovebox experiment designed to study the effect of preshear on the transient evolution of the microstructure and viscoelastic tensile stresses for monodisperse dilute polymer solutions. Collectively referred to as Boger fluids, these polymer solutions have become a popular choice for rheological studies of non-Newtonian fluids and are the non-Newtonian fluid used in this experiment. The SHERE hardware consists of the Rheometer, Camera Arm, Interface Box, Cabling, Keyboard, Tool Box, Fluid Modules, and Stowage Tray. Each component will be described in detail in this paper. In the area of space exploration, the development of in-situ fabrication and repair technology represents a critical element in evolution of autonomous exploration capability. SHERE has the capability to provide data for engineering design tools needed for polymer parts manufacturing systems to ensure their rheological properties have not been impacted in the variable gravity environment and this will be briefly addressed.

  8. Rheological Properties of Quasi-2D Fluids in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Trittel, Torsten; Eremin, Alexey; Harth, Kirsten; Clark, Noel; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Park, Cheol; Hall, Nancy; Tin, Padetha

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research on complex fluids and fluids in restricted geometries has attracted much attention in the scientific community. This can be attributed not only to the development of novel materials based on complex fluids but also to a variety of important physical phenomena which have barely been explored. One example is the behavior of membranes and thin fluid films, which can be described by two-dimensional (2D) rheology behavior that is quite different from 3D fluids. In this study, we have investigated the rheological properties of freely suspended films of a thermotropic liquid crystal in microgravity experiments. This model system mimics isotropic and anisotropic quasi 2D fluids [46]. We use inkjet printing technology to dispense small droplets (inclusions) onto the film surface. The motion of these inclusions provides information on the rheological properties of the films and allows the study of a variety of flow instabilities. Flat films have been investigated on a sub-orbital rocket flight and curved films (bubbles) have been studied in the ISS project OASIS. Microgravity is essential when the films are curved in order to avoid sedimentation. The experiments yield the mobility of the droplets in the films as well as the mutual mobility of pairs of particles. Experimental results will be presented for 2D-isotropic (smectic-A) and 2D-nematic (smectic-C) phases.

  9. Rheological properties of kaolin and chemically simulated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, C.L.

    1981-12-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory is conducting tests to determine the best operating conditions of pumps used to transfer insoluble radioactive sludges from old to new waste tanks. Because it is not feasible to conduct these tests with real or chemically simulated sludges, kaolin clay is being used as a stand-in for the solid waste. The rheology tests described herein were conducted to determine whether the properties of kaolin were sufficiently similar to those of real sludge to permit meaningful pump tests. The rheology study showed that kaolin can be substituted for real waste to accurately determine pump performance. Once adequately sheared, kaolin properties were found to remain constant. Test results determined that kaolin should not be allowed to settle more than two weeks between pump tests. Water or supernate from the waste tanks can be used to dilute sludge on an equal volume basis because they identically affect the rheological properties of sludge. It was further found that the fluid properties of kaolin and waste are insensitive to temperature.

  10. Modeling of rheological properties for entangled polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Nilanjana

    The study of entangled polymer rheology both in the field of medicine and polymer processing has their major importance. Mechanical properties of biomolecules are studied in order to better understand cellular behavior. Similarly, industrial processing of polymers needs thorough understanding of rheology so as to improve process techniques. Work in this dissertation has been organized into three major sections. Firstly, numerical/analytical models are reviewed for describing rheological properties and mechanical behaviors of cytoskeleton. The cytoskeleton models are classified into categories according to the length scales of the phenomena of interest. The main principles and characteristics of each model are summarized and discussed by comparison with each other, thus providing a systematic understanding of biopolymer network modeling. Secondly, a new constitutive "toy" Mead-Banerjee-Park (MBP) model is developed for monodisperse entangled polymer systems, by introducing the idea of a configuration dependent friction coefficient (CDFC) and entanglement dynamics (ED) into the MLD "toy" model. The model is tested against experimental data in steady and transient extensional and shear flows. The model simultaneously captures the monotonic thinning of the extensional flow curve of polystyrene (PS) melts and the extension hardening found in PS solutions. Thirdly, the monodisperse MBP model is accordingly modified into polydisperse MBP "toy" constitutive model to predict the nonlinear viscoelastic material properties of model polydisperse systems. The polydisperse MBP toy model accurately predicts the material properties in the forward direction for transient uniaxial extension and transient shear flow.

  11. Rheology of Anhydrite during deformation in nature: a first look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus Schmalholz, Stefan; Urai, Janos

    2014-05-01

    The rheology of Anhydrite under conditions of natural deformation is largely unconstrained, although it has many important effects in salt tectonics and in long-tem predictions of engineering structures in salt. A review of laboratory triaxial experiments at low temperature indicate brittle, pressure dependent behavior. At temperatures above 400 C experimental deformation shows power law creep, with contributions of dislocation creep and diffusional creep. In naturally deformed Anhydrite rocks microstructures indicate recrystallization, solution - precipitation processes and pressure solution producing stylolites. Analysis of Anhydrite layers embedded in rock salt shows complex behavior. Bedding-parallel stretching leads to boudinage, with variable amounts of pinch-and-swell before rupture and precipitation of Halite in the boudin-neck. Bedding-parallel shortening of single layers embedded in salt leads to folding of the Anhydrite layers, with the fold shapes suggesting an effective viscosity contrast between 10 and 100. This is also in agreement with the absence of extension fracture in the outer arcs of the folds. Although much remains to be done in accurately constraining Anhydrite rheology in nature, and for example its dependence on pore fluid pressure and chemistry, these results provide a first order estimate of Anhydrite rheology in nature, to be used in numerical simulations. A challenging task is to find a unified flow law which describes power law creep and fracturing dependent on effective stress.

  12. Characterization of non-linear rheological behavior of SPI-FG dispersions using LAOS tests and FT rheology.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chong-hao; Li, Dong; Wang, Li-jun; Wang, Yong; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-02-15

    The effect of flaxseed gum (FG) on the rheological and nonlinear stress response behaviors of mixed soy protein isolate (SPI)-flaxseed gum (FG) dispersions were studied. Results showed that the viscosity of the SPI-FG mixed dispersions increased significantly with increase in the FG concentration. Both the shear stress and the apparent viscosity values as a function of shear rate were fitted well using Power law model as expected. The frequency dependence of G', G'' and tanδ of soy protein isolate decreased as the FG concentration increased. The large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) test and Fourier transform (FT) rheology analysis showed that the addition of flaxseed gum strongly affected the structure of the SPI-FG mixed dispersion system as shown by deformation of the nonlinear stress response curve and significantly altered magnitude of higher harmonic curve. The addition of FG increased the instantaneous strain softening effect of the SPI-FG mixed dispersion system.

  13. Structure-morphology-rheology relationships in thermoplastic polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Yeo-O.

    The effect of thermal history on the phase transitions, morphology, and rheological behavior of six thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs) with varying contents of hard segment, each having 4,4'-methylene bis(phenyl isocyanate) and 1,4-butane diol as hard segment and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) diol as soft segment was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and polarizing optical microscopy (POM). Specifically, we conducted dynamic frequency sweep experiments at various temperatures for all six TPUs synthesized, as well as isochronal temperature sweep experiments using the parallel-plate fixture of a cone-and-plate rheometer. In the dynamic frequency sweep experiments, the initial morphology was controlled by heating a specimen to a temperature above the isotropization temperature (Ti) of the hard segment, and then slowly cooled the sample down to a predetermined temperature below the Ti of each TPU specimen. Initial DSC experiments provided information on thermal transition temperatures of each TPU specimen. The rheological measurements are interpreted with the aid of the images from polarized optical microscopy taken under the same thermal histories employed as for the rheological measurements. It was found that thermal history of specimen (L3) had a profound influence on the variations of storage modulus (G ') and loss modulus (G″) with time observed during isothermal annealing, based upon the structural development of spherulitic superstructure of hard segment. The differences in the rheological behavior observed among the different TPUs synthesized in this study are further interpreted with the aid of Fourier transform infrared spectra obtained at various temperatures. It is concluded that hydrogen bonding has a profound influence on the time variations of rheological behavior during measurements. Finally, we have investigated time variations of G ' obtained

  14. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANT ADDITION ON RHEOLOGY USING LASER SCANNING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    White, T

    2007-05-08

    The effectiveness of three dispersants to modify rheology was examined using rheology measurements and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in simulated waste solutions. All of the dispersants lowered the yield stress of the slurries below the baseline samples. The rheology curves were fitted reasonably to a Bingham Plastic model. The three-dimensional LSCM images of simulants showed distinct aggregates were greatly reduced after the addition of dispersants leading to a lowering of the yield stress of the simulated waste slurry solutions.

  15. Rheological and Tribological Properties of Complex Biopolymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klossner, Rebecca Reese

    2011-12-01

    The rheological and tribological properties of an experimental synovial fluid model were investigated in order to determine the solution dynamics of the three most abundant macromolecules present in synovial fluid, the fluid that lubricates freely moving (synovial) joints. These components, hyaluronic acid (HA) and the plasma proteins, albumin and gamma-globulins are combined in a phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) and subjected to steady shear rheology testing, as well as nanoindenter-based scratch testing, which allows for the study of the lubrication properties of the experimental synovial fluid model. Steady shear experiments, where the shear rate was increased from low to high, and then decreased from high to low, showed hysteresis in only protein containing solutions, whereas samples of HA in PBS behaved as a "typical" polyelectrolyte in solution. Subsequent rheological experiments on the synovial fluid model exhibited an increase in viscosity at low shear stresses, indicating that a structure was present at these low shear stresses, which was not found at higher shear stresses. This result is in agreement with studies conducted on the same model which show unusual rheological behavior at low shear rates. Low shear stresses can cause modifications to the external protein surface, resulting in their unfolding and creating many opportunities for the molecules to reorder themselves. As the proteins reorder themselves, the newly exposed hydrophobic patches will have a tendency to aggregate together, creating a network within the fluid, and, in turn causing the observed increased viscosity at low shear stresses. Additionally, an anti-inflammatory drug, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) was added to the solutions. This addition diminishes the protein aggregation process substantially. Finally, the HA component of the synovial fluid model was replaced with a neutral polymer in order to examine the role of HA in synovial fluid. As suspected, the HA appears to have

  16. Using natural laboratories and modeling to decipher lithospheric rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    Rheology is obviously important for geodynamic modeling but at the same time rheological parameters appear to be least constrained. Laboratory experiments give rather large ranges of rheological parameters and their scaling to nature is not entirely clear. Therefore finding rheological proxies in nature is very important. One way to do that is finding appropriate values of rheological parameter by fitting models to the lithospheric structure in the highly deformed regions where lithospheric structure and geologic evolution is well constrained. Here I will present two examples of such studies at plate boundaries. One case is the Dead Sea Transform (DST) that comprises a boundary between African and Arabian plates. During the last 15- 20 Myr more than 100 km of left lateral transform displacement has been accumulated on the DST and about 10 km thick Dead Sea Basin (DSB) was formed in the central part of the DST. Lithospheric structure and geological evolution of DST and DSB is rather well constrained by a number of interdisciplinary projects including DESERT and DESIRE projects leaded by the GFZ Potsdam. Detailed observations reveal apparently contradictory picture. From one hand widespread igneous activity, especially in the last 5 Myr, thin (60-80 km) lithosphere constrained from seismic data and absence of seismicity below the Moho, seem to be quite natural for this tectonically active plate boundary. However, surface heat flow of less than 50-60mW/m2 and deep seismicity in the lower crust ( deeper than 20 km) reported for this region are apparently inconsistent with the tectonic settings specific for an active continental plate boundary and with the crustal structure of the DSB. To address these inconsistencies which comprise what I call the "DST heat-flow paradox", a 3D numerical thermo-mechanical model was developed operating with non-linear elasto-visco-plastic rheology of the lithosphere. Results of the numerical experiments show that the entire set of

  17. Influence of Wheat-Milled Products and Their Additive Blends on Pasta Dough Rheological, Microstructure, and Product Quality Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Dhiraj, B.; Prabhasankar, P.

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to assess the suitability of T. aestivum wheat milled products and its combinations with T. durum semolina with additives such as ascorbic acid, vital gluten and HPMC (Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose) for pasta processing quality characteristics such as pasta dough rheology, microstructure, cooking quality, and sensory evaluation. Rheological studies showed maximum dough stability in Comb1 (T. aestivum wheat flour and semolina). Colour and cooking quality of Comb2 (T. durum semolina and T. aestivum wheat flour) and Comb3 (T. aestivum wheat semolina and T. durum semolina) were comparable with control. Pasting results indicated that T. aestivum semolina gave the lowest onset gelatinization temperature (66.9°C) but the highest peak viscosity (1.053 BU). Starch release was maximum in Comb1 (53.45%) when compared with control (44.9%) as also proved by microstructure studies. Firmness was seen to be slightly high in Comb3 (2.430 N) when compared with control (2.304 N), and sensory evaluations were also in the acceptable range for the same. The present study concludes that Comb3 comprising 50% T. durum semolina and 50% T. aestivum refined wheat flour with additives would be optimal alternate for 100% T. durum semolina for production of financially viable pasta. PMID:26904601

  18. Influence of Wheat-Milled Products and Their Additive Blends on Pasta Dough Rheological, Microstructure, and Product Quality Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dhiraj, B; Prabhasankar, P

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to assess the suitability of T. aestivum wheat milled products and its combinations with T. durum semolina with additives such as ascorbic acid, vital gluten and HPMC (Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose) for pasta processing quality characteristics such as pasta dough rheology, microstructure, cooking quality, and sensory evaluation. Rheological studies showed maximum dough stability in Comb1 (T. aestivum wheat flour and semolina). Colour and cooking quality of Comb2 (T. durum semolina and T. aestivum wheat flour) and Comb3 (T. aestivum wheat semolina and T. durum semolina) were comparable with control. Pasting results indicated that T. aestivum semolina gave the lowest onset gelatinization temperature (66.9°C) but the highest peak viscosity (1.053 BU). Starch release was maximum in Comb1 (53.45%) when compared with control (44.9%) as also proved by microstructure studies. Firmness was seen to be slightly high in Comb3 (2.430 N) when compared with control (2.304 N), and sensory evaluations were also in the acceptable range for the same. The present study concludes that Comb3 comprising 50% T. durum semolina and 50% T. aestivum refined wheat flour with additives would be optimal alternate for 100% T. durum semolina for production of financially viable pasta. PMID:26904601

  19. Biodiversity: past, present, and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Data from the fossil record are used to illustrate biodiversity in the past and estimate modern biodiversity and loss. This data is used to compare current rates of extinction with past extinction events. Paleontologists are encouraged to use this data to understand the course and consequences of current losses and to share this knowledge with researchers interested in conservation and ecology.

  20. Constraints on the mantle and lithosphere dynamics from the observed geoid with the effect of visco-elasto-plastic rheology in the upper 300 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei Tutu, Anthony; Steinberger, Bernhard; Rogozhina, Irina; Sobolev, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades rheological properties of the Earth's mantle and lithosphere have been extensively studied using numerical models calibrated versus a range of surface observations (e.g., free-air-gravity anomaly/geoid, dynamic topography, plate velocity, etc.).The quality of model predictions however strongly depends on the simplifying assumptions, spatial resolution and parameterizations adopted by numerical models. The geoid is largely (Hager & Richards, 1989) determined by both the density anomalies driving the mantle flow and the dynamic topography at the Earth surface and the core-mantle boundary. This is the effect of the convective processes within the Earth's mantle. The remainder is mostly due to strong heterogeneities in the lithospheric mantle and the crust, which also need to be taken into account. The surface topography caused by density anomalies both in the sub-lithospheric mantle and within the lithosphere also depends on the lithosphere rheology. Here we investigate the effects of complex lithosphere rheology on the modelled dynamic topography, geoid and plate motion using a spectral mantle flow code (Hager & O'Connell, 1981) considering radial viscosity distribution and a fully coupled code of the lithosphere and mantle accounting for strong heterogeneities in the upper mantle rheology in the 300 km depths (Popov & Sobolev, 2008). This study is the first step towards linking global mantle dynamics with lithosphere dynamics using the observed geoid as a major constraint. Here we present the results from both codes and compare them with the observed geoid, dynamic topography and plate velocities from GPS measurements. This method allows us to evaluate the effects of plate rheology (e.g., strong plate interiors and weak plate margins) and stiff subducted lithosphere on these observables (i.e. geoid, topography, plate boundary stresses) as well as on plate motion. This effort will also serve as a benchmark of the two existing numerical methods

  1. Rheological and microstructural properties of porcine gastric digesta and diets containing pectin or mango powder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Dhital, Sushil; Williams, Barbara A; Chen, Xiao Dong; Gidley, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Hydrated polysaccharides and their assemblies are known to modulate gastric emptying rate due to their capacity to change the structural and rheological properties of gastric contents (digesta). In the present study, we investigated the rheological and microstructural properties of gastric digesta from pigs fed with diets incorporating mango powder or pectin, and compared results with those from hydrated diets of the same water content, in order to investigate the origins for rheological changes in the pig stomach. All of the hydrated diets and gastric digesta were particle-dominated suspensions, generally showing weak gel or more solid-like behavior with the storage modulus (G') always greater than loss modulus (G") under small deformation oscillatory measurements, and with small deformation viscosity greater than steady shear viscosity (i.e. non-Cox-Merz superposition). Although significant rheological differences were observed between the hydrated diets, rheological parameters for gastric digesta were similar for all diets, indicative of a rheological homeostasis in the pig stomach. Whilst the addition of gastric mucin (20mg/mL) to control and mango diets altered the rheology to match the gastric digesta rheology, the effect of mucin on the pectin-containing diet was negligible. The viscous effect of pectin also hindered the action of alpha amylase as observed from relatively less damaged starch granules in pectin digesta compared to mango and control digesta. Based on the experimental findings that the rheology of gastric digesta differs from hydrated diets of the same water content, the current study revealed composition-dependent complex behavior of gastric digesta in vivo, suggesting that the rheology of food products or ingredients may not necessarily reflect the rheological effect when ingested. PMID:27185134

  2. Foam rheology: A model of viscous effects in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Foams consisting of gas bubbles dispersed in a continuous network of thin liquid films display a remarkable range of rheological characteristics that include a finite shear modulus, yield stress, non-Newtonian viscosity, and slip at the wall. Progress in developing micromechanical theories to describe foam rheology has depended upon two-dimensional models, which in most cases are assumed to have perfectly ordered structure. Princen accounted for surface tension and geometrical effects, and analyzed the nonlinear elastic response of a spatially periodic foam in simple shear. His analysis has been extended to account for more general deformations. Khan and Armstrong and Kraynik and Hansen have proposed ad hoc models for viscous effects in foam rheology. Their models capture numerous qualitative phenomena but incorporate relaxation mechanisms based upon overly simplified assumptions of liquid flow in the thin films. Mysels, Shinoda, and Frankel considered soap films with interfaces that are inextensible due to the presence of surfactants. They analyzed the primary flow that occurs when such films are slowly withdrawn from or recede into essentially static junction regions such as the Plateau borders in a foam. Adopting this mechanism, Schwartz and Princen considered small periodic deformations of a foam and calculated the energy dissipation due to viscous flow in the thin films. In the following, we also adopt the basic interfacial and viscous mechanisms introduced by Mysels et al. and analyze simple shearing deformations of finite amplitude. The configuration and effective stress of the foam are determined. Under these deformation conditions, the foam is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. Results for the uniform expansion of a foam are also presented. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Quartz rheology from field observations and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigull, Susanne; Ellis, Susan M.; Little, Timothy A.; Hill, Matthew P.; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2013-04-01

    The mechanical properties of quartz strongly influence the strength of the continental crust and therefore the depth of the brittle-ductile transition and the nucleation depth of major earthquakes. Despite quartz being one of the most abundant minerals constituting the crust, natural examples to constrain quartz rheology are rare. Here, we present a brittle-ductile fault array in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, and use it as a natural laboratory into the rheology of deformed quartz rocks. The faults formed in the hanging wall of the Alpine Fault during the late Cenozoic at ≥ 21 km depth. They are near-vertical, systematically and closely spaced, extend laterally and vertically over tens of metres, and strike sub-parallel to the Alpine Fault. They consistently express both dextral and NW-up senses of slip. The faults displace quartzofeldspathic meta-greywacke (Alpine Schist) through predominantly brittle processes. Brittle shearing usually ceases where the faults intersect centimetre-thick quartz veins that are hosted by the Alpine Schist and that are discordant to the dominant schist foliation. In these quartz veins shearing is variably ductile to brittle, with ductile shear strains of up to ~15 over shear zone widths of ~3 cm. We use field-observed geometrical scaling relationships related to the sheared quartz veins, such as ductile shear zone width vs. ductile slip, and interactions between brittle faults and ductilely deforming quartz veins that intersect them to produce a set of viable numerical models reflecting the field observations. Quartz rheology is modelled by linear or power law creep, and the material parameters extracted for the quartz veins, together with viscous and brittle strength ratios between vein quartz and schist. The results indicate that under the prevailing deformation conditions, the dominant deformation mechanism in the quartz veins was dislocation creep, resulting in a non-linear viscous quartz flow behaviour.

  4. Rheology and phase behavior of dense casein micelle dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoux, A.; Debbou, B.; Gésan-Guiziou, G.; Famelart, M.-H.; Doublier, J.-L.; Cabane, B.

    2009-10-01

    Casein micelle dispersions have been concentrated through osmotic stress and examined through rheological experiments. In conditions where the casein micelles are separated from each other, i.e., below random-close packing, the dispersions have exactly the flow and dynamic properties of the polydisperse hard-sphere fluid, demonstrating that the micelles interact only through excluded volume effects in this regime. These interactions cause the viscosity and the elastic modulus to increase by three orders of magnitude approaching the concentration of random-close packing estimated at Cmax≈178 g/l. Above Cmax, the dispersions progressively turn into "gels" (i.e., soft solids) as C increases, with elastic moduli G' that are nearly frequency independent. In this second regime, the micelles deform and/or deswell as C increases, and the resistance to deformation results from the formation of bonds between micelles combined with the intrinsic mechanical resistance of the micelles. The variation in G' with C is then very similar to that observed with concentrated emulsions where the resistance to deformation originates from a set of membranes that separate the droplets. As in the case of emulsions, the G' values at high frequency are also nearly identical to the osmotic pressures required to compress the casein dispersions. The rheology of sodium caseinate dispersions in which the caseins are not structured into micelles is also reported. Such dispersions have the behavior of associative polymer solutions at all the concentrations investigated, further confirming the importance of structure in determining the rheological properties of casein micelle systems.

  5. Rheological and thermal properties of polylactide/silicate nanocomposites films.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim; Varshney, Sunil K; Auras, Rafeal

    2010-03-01

    Polylactide (DL)/polyethylene glycol/silicate nanocomposite blended biodegradable films have been prepared by solvent casting method. Rheological and thermal properties were investigated for both neat amorphous polylactide (PLA-DL form) and blend of montmorillonite (clay) and poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG). Melt rheology of the PLA individually and blends (PLA/clay; PLA/PEG; PLA/PEG/clay) were performed by small amplitude oscillation shear (SAOS) measurement. Individually, PLA showed an improvement in the viscoelastic properties in the temperature range from 180 to 190 degrees C. Incorporation of nanoclay (3% to 9% wt) was attributed by significant improvements in the elastic modulus (G') of PLA/clay blend due to intercalation at higher temperature. Both dynamic modulii of PLA/PEG blend were significantly reduced with addition of 10% PEG. Rheometric measurement could not be conducted while PLA/PEG blends containing 25% PEG. A blend of PLA/PEG/clay (68/23/9) showed liquid-like properties with excellent flexibility. Thermal analysis of different clay loading films indicated that the glass transition temperatures (T(g)) remained unaffected irrespective of clay concentration due to immobilization of polymer chain in the clay nanocomposite. PEG incorporation reduced the T(g) of the blend (PLA/PEG and PLA/PEG/clay) significantly. Both rheological and thermal analysis data supported plasticization and flexibility of the blended films. It is also interesting to study competition between PLA and PEG for the intercalation into the interlayer spacing of the clay. This study indicates that PLA/montmorillonite blend could serve as effective nano-composite for packaging and other applications. PMID:20492249

  6. Abnormal rheology of oxygenated blood in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu; Usami, Shunichi; Bertles, John F.

    1970-01-01

    The viscosity of oxygenated blood from patients with sickle cell anemia (Hb SS disease) was found to be abnormally increased, a property which contrasts with the well recognized viscous aberration produced by deoxygenation of Hb SS blood. Experiments designed to explain this finding led to considerations of deformation and aggregation, primary determinants of the rheologic behavior of erythrocytes as they traverse the microcirculation. Deformability of erythrocytes is in turn dependent upon internal viscosity (i.e. the state and concentration of hemoglobin in solution) and membrane flexibility. Definition of the contribution made by each of these properties to the abnormal viscosity of oxygenated Hb SS blood was made possible by analysis of viscosity measurements, made over a wide range of shear rates and cell concentrations, on Hb SS erythrocytes and normal erythrocytes suspended in Ringer's solution (where aggregation does not occur) and in plasma. Similar measurements were made on the two cell types separated by ultracentrifugation of Hb SS erythrocytes: high density erythrocytes composed of 50 to 70% irreversibly “sickled” cells (ISC) and low density erythrocytes composed of over 95% non-ISC. Under all experimental conditions (hematocrit, shear rate, and suspending medium) the viscosity of ISC exceeds that of normal erythrocytes. The viscosity of non-ISC is elevated only in the absence of aggregation and over intermediate ranges of hematocrit. Analyses of the data reveal (a) an elevated internal viscosity of ISC: (b) a reduced membrane flexibility of both ISC and non-ISC, particularly at low shear rates; and (c) a reduced tendency for aggregation displayed by both cell types. The abnormal viscosity of oxygenated Hb SS blood can be attributed to the altered rheology of ISC and, to a lesser extent, of non-ISC. These studies assign a role to the abnormal rheology of Hb SS erythrocytes in the pathogenesis of sickle cell anemia, even under conditions of complete

  7. Evaluation of rheological, bioactives and baking characteristics of mango ginger (curcuma amada) enriched soup sticks.

    PubMed

    Crassina, K; Sudha, M L

    2015-09-01

    Wheat flour was replaced with mango ginger powder (MGP) at 0, 5, 10 and 15 %. Influence of MGP on rheological and baking characteristics was studied. Farinograph was used to study the mixing profile of wheat flour-MGP blend. Pasting profile of the blends namely gelatinization and retrogradation were carried out using micro-visco-amylograph. Test baking was done to obtain the optimum level of replacement and processing conditions. Sensory attributes consisting texture, taste, overall quality and breaking strength were assessed. Nutritional characterization of the soup sticks in terms of protein and starch in vitro digestibility, dietary fiber, minerals, polyphenols and antioxidant activity were determined using standard methods. With the increasing levels of MGP from 0 to 15 %, the farinograph water absorption increased from 60 to 66.7 %. A marginal increase in the gelatinization temperature from 65.4 to 66.2 °C was observed. Retrogradation of gelatinized starch granules decreased with the addition of MGP. The results indicated that the soup stick with 10 % MG had acceptable sensory attributes. The soup stick showed further improvement in terms of texture and breaking strength with the addition of gluten powder, potassium bromate and glycerol monostearate. The total dietary fiber and antioxidant activity of the soup sticks having 10 % MGP increased from 3.31 to 8.64 % and 26.83 to 48.06 % respectively as compared to the control soup sticks. MGP in soup sticks improved the nutritional profile. PMID:26345009

  8. Morphological, Thermal, and Rheological Properties of Starches from Maize Mutants Deficient in Starch Synthase III.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Bertoft, Eric; Li, Guantian

    2016-08-31

    Morphological, thermal, and rheological properties of starches from maize mutants deficient in starch synthase III (SSIII) with a common genetic background (W64A) were studied and compared with the wild type. SSIII deficiency reduced granule size of the starches from 16.7 to ∼11 μm (volume-weighted mean). Thermal analysis showed that SSIII deficiency decreased the enthalpy change of starch during gelatinization. Steady shear analysis showed that SSIII deficiency decreased the consistency coefficient and yield stress during steady shearing, whereas additional deficiency in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) increased these values. Dynamic oscillatory analysis showed that SSIII deficiency decreased G' at 90 °C during heating and increased it when the paste was cooled to 25 °C at 40 Hz during a frequency sweep. Additional GBSS deficiency further decreased the G'. Structural and compositional bases responsible for these changes in physical properties of the starches are discussed. This study highlighted the relationship between SSIII and some physicochemical properties of maize starch. PMID:27523327

  9. Evaluation of rheological, bioactives and baking characteristics of mango ginger (curcuma amada) enriched soup sticks.

    PubMed

    Crassina, K; Sudha, M L

    2015-09-01

    Wheat flour was replaced with mango ginger powder (MGP) at 0, 5, 10 and 15 %. Influence of MGP on rheological and baking characteristics was studied. Farinograph was used to study the mixing profile of wheat flour-MGP blend. Pasting profile of the blends namely gelatinization and retrogradation were carried out using micro-visco-amylograph. Test baking was done to obtain the optimum level of replacement and processing conditions. Sensory attributes consisting texture, taste, overall quality and breaking strength were assessed. Nutritional characterization of the soup sticks in terms of protein and starch in vitro digestibility, dietary fiber, minerals, polyphenols and antioxidant activity were determined using standard methods. With the increasing levels of MGP from 0 to 15 %, the farinograph water absorption increased from 60 to 66.7 %. A marginal increase in the gelatinization temperature from 65.4 to 66.2 °C was observed. Retrogradation of gelatinized starch granules decreased with the addition of MGP. The results indicated that the soup stick with 10 % MG had acceptable sensory attributes. The soup stick showed further improvement in terms of texture and breaking strength with the addition of gluten powder, potassium bromate and glycerol monostearate. The total dietary fiber and antioxidant activity of the soup sticks having 10 % MGP increased from 3.31 to 8.64 % and 26.83 to 48.06 % respectively as compared to the control soup sticks. MGP in soup sticks improved the nutritional profile.

  10. Some physicochemical and rheological properties of starch isolated from avocado seeds.

    PubMed

    Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Barbosa-Martín, Enrique; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; González-Mondragón, Edith; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2016-05-01

    Seeds from avocado (Persea americana Miller) fruit are a waste byproduct of fruit processing. Starch from avocado seed is a potential alternative starch source. Two different extraction solvents were used to isolate starch from avocado seeds, functional and rheological characteristics measured for these starches, and comparisons made to maize starch. Avocado seed powder was suspended in a solution containing 2 mM Tris, 7.5 mM NaCl and 80 mM NaHSO3 (solvent A) or sodium bisulphite solution (1500 ppm SO2, solvent B). Solvent type had no influence (p>0.05) on starch properties. Amylose content was 15-16%. Gelatinization temperature range was 56-74 °C, peak temperature was 65.7 °C, and transition enthalpy was 11.4-11.6J/g. At 90 °C, solubility was 19-20%, swelling power 28-30 g water/g starch, and water absorption capacity was 22-24 g water/g starch. Pasting properties were initial temperature 72 °C; maximum viscosity 380-390 BU; breakdown -2 BU; consistency 200 BU; and setback 198 BU. Avocado seed starch dispersions (5% w/v) were characterized as viscoelastic systems, with G'>G″. Avocado seed starch has potential applications as a thickening and gelling agent in food systems, as a vehicle in pharmaceutical systems and an ingredient in biodegradable polymers for food packaging. PMID:26800900

  11. Some physicochemical and rheological properties of starch isolated from avocado seeds.

    PubMed

    Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Barbosa-Martín, Enrique; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; González-Mondragón, Edith; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2016-05-01

    Seeds from avocado (Persea americana Miller) fruit are a waste byproduct of fruit processing. Starch from avocado seed is a potential alternative starch source. Two different extraction solvents were used to isolate starch from avocado seeds, functional and rheological characteristics measured for these starches, and comparisons made to maize starch. Avocado seed powder was suspended in a solution containing 2 mM Tris, 7.5 mM NaCl and 80 mM NaHSO3 (solvent A) or sodium bisulphite solution (1500 ppm SO2, solvent B). Solvent type had no influence (p>0.05) on starch properties. Amylose content was 15-16%. Gelatinization temperature range was 56-74 °C, peak temperature was 65.7 °C, and transition enthalpy was 11.4-11.6J/g. At 90 °C, solubility was 19-20%, swelling power 28-30 g water/g starch, and water absorption capacity was 22-24 g water/g starch. Pasting properties were initial temperature 72 °C; maximum viscosity 380-390 BU; breakdown -2 BU; consistency 200 BU; and setback 198 BU. Avocado seed starch dispersions (5% w/v) were characterized as viscoelastic systems, with G'>G″. Avocado seed starch has potential applications as a thickening and gelling agent in food systems, as a vehicle in pharmaceutical systems and an ingredient in biodegradable polymers for food packaging.

  12. Preparation of Magnetorheological Fluid and Study on Its Rheological Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolekar, Shreedhar

    2014-04-01

    The present paper focuses on preparation and process of the magnetorheological (MR) fluid whose carrier fluid is silicone-based oil and its additive is the commercial grease with different concentration of iron particles. General properties of MR fluid are discussed and rheological properties like shear rate, shear stress, viscosity of MR fluid can be found by using cone-and-plate sensor system-type rheometer. The result shows that shear stress as a function of magnetic flux density and viscosity does not strictly scale with iron loading.

  13. Microfluidic rheology of soft colloids above and below jamming.

    PubMed

    Nordstrom, K N; Verneuil, E; Arratia, P E; Basu, A; Zhang, Z; Yodh, A G; Gollub, J P; Durian, D J

    2010-10-22

    The rheology near jamming of a suspension of soft colloidal spheres is studied using a custom microfluidic rheometer that provides the stress versus strain rate over many decades. We find non-Newtonian behavior below the jamming concentration and yield-stress behavior above it. The data may be collapsed onto two branches with critical scaling exponents that agree with expectations based on Hertzian contacts and viscous drag. These results support the conclusion that jamming is similar to a critical phase transition, but with interaction-dependent exponents.

  14. Rheological aging and rejuvenation in solid friction contacts.

    PubMed

    Bureau, L; Baumberger, T; Caroli, C

    2002-06-01

    We study the low-velocity (0.1-100 microm s(-1)) frictional properties of interfaces between a rough glassy polymer and smooth silanized glass, a configuration which gives direct access to the rheology of the adhesive joints in which shear localizes. We show that these joints exhibit the full phenomenology expected for confined quasi-2D soft glasses: they strengthen logarithmically when aging at rest, and weaken (rejuvenate) when sliding. Rejuvenation is found to saturate at large velocities. Moreover, aging at rest is shown to be strongly accelerated when waiting under finite stress below the static threshold.

  15. RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES & MOLECULAR WEIGHT DISTRIBUTIONS OF FOUR PERFLUORINATED THERMOPLASTIC POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D M; Shields, A L

    2009-02-24

    Dynamic viscosity measurements and molecular weight estimates have been made on four commercial, amorphous fluoropolymers with glass transitions (Tg) above 100 C: Teflon AF 1600, Hyflon AD 60, Cytop A and Cytop M. These polymers are of interest as binders for the insensitive high explosive 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) because of their high density and Tg above ambient, but within a suitable processing range of TATB. As part of this effort, the rheological properties and molecular weight distributions of these polymers were evaluated.

  16. The role of surface rheology in liquid film formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheid, B.; Delacotte, J.; Dollet, B.; Rio, E.; Restagno, F.; van Nierop, E. A.; Cantat, I.; Langevin, D.; Stone, H. A.

    2010-04-01

    The role of surface rheology in fundamental fluid dynamical systems, such as liquid coating flows and soap film formation, is poorly understood. We investigate the role of surface viscosity in the classical film-coating problem. We propose a theoretical model that predicts film thickening based on a purely surface-viscous theory. The theory is supported by a set of new experimental data that demonstrates slight thickening even at very high surfactant concentrations for which Marangoni effects are irrelevant. The model and experiments represent a new regime that has not been identified before.

  17. Rheology of composite solid propellants during motor casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. J.; Smith, P. L.; Klager, K.

    1978-01-01

    In a study conducted to evaluate flow parameters of uncured solid composite propellants during motor casting, two motors (1.8M-lb grain wt) were cast with a PBAN propellant exhibiting good flow characteristics in a 260-in. dia solid rocket motor. Attention is given to the effects of propellant compositional and processing variables on apparent viscosity as they pertain to rheological behavior and grain defect formation during casting. It is noted that optimized flow behavior is impaired with solid propellant loading. Non-Newtonian pseudoplastic flow is observed, which is dependent upon applied shear stress and the age of the uncured propellant.

  18. The ball bearing as a rheological test device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, E.

    1984-01-01

    An angular-contact ball bearing provides an easily obtainable, precise mechanical system for rheological tests on thin films under high pressure. The test conditions are by definition similar to those found in practice. Accessible independent variables include size, pressure, bulk temperature, roughness, adsorbed surfactant, fluid type, fluid quantity, fluid supply rate, film thickness, entrainment velocity, transit time, and combined strain. Easily measured or inferred variables include slip, changes in film thickness with time (transients), strain rate, lubricant elastic modulus (thin film, high pressure), tractive force, lubricant chemical degradation rate, and lubricant degradation product. Methods for setting and obtaining these quantities in a bearing are discussed, together with experimental limitations on them.

  19. Applying modern measurements of Pleistocene loads to model lithospheric rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, E. P.; Hoggan, J. R.; Lowry, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    The remnant shorelines of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville provide a unique opportunity for building a dataset from which to infer rheological properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Multiple lakeshores developed over a period of around 30 kyr which record the lithosphere's isostatic response to a well-constrained load history. Bills et al. (1994) utilized a shoreline elevation dataset compiled by Currey (1982) in an attempt to model linear (Maxwell) viscosity as a function of depth beneath the basin. They estimated an effective elastic thickness (Te) for the basin of 20-25 km which differs significantly from the 5-15 km estimates derived from models of loading on geologic timescales (e.g., Lowry and Pérez-Gussinyé, 2011). We propose that the discrepancy in Te modeled by these two approaches may be resolved with dynamical modeling of a common rheology, using a more complete shoreline elevation dataset applied to a spherical Earth model. Where Currey's (1982) dataset was compiled largely from observations of depositional shoreline features, we are developing an algorithm for estimating elevation variations in erosional shorelines based on cross-correlation and stacking techniques similar to those used to automate picking of seismic phase arrival times. Application of this method to digital elevation models (DEMs) will increase the size and accuracy of the shoreline elevation dataset, enabling more robust modeling of the rheological properties driving isostatic response to unloading of Lake Bonneville. Our plan is to model these data and invert for a relatively small number of parameters describing depth- and temperature-dependent power-law rheology of the lower crust and upper mantle. These same parameters also will be used to model topographic and Moho response to estimates of regional mass variation on the longer loading timescales to test for inconsistencies. Bills, B.G., D.R. Currey, and G.A. Marshall, 1994, Viscosity estimates for the crust and upper

  20. The rheology of crystal-rich magmas (Kuno Award Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Aldin Faroughi, Salah; Degruyter, Wim

    2016-04-01

    The rheology of magmas controls not only eruption dynamics but also the rate of transport of magmas through the crust and to a large extent the rate of magma differentiation and degassing. Magma bodies stalled in the upper crust are known to spend most of their lifespan above the solidus at a high crystal content (Cooper and Kent, 2014; Huber et al., 2009), where the probability of melt extraction (crystal fractionation) is the greatest (Dufek and Bachmann, 2010). In this study, we explore a new theoretical framework to study the viscosity of crystal bearing magmas. Since the seminal work of A. Einstein and W. Sutherland in the early 20th century, it has been shown theoretically and tested experimentally that a simple self-similar behavior exist between the relative viscosity of dilute (low crystal content) suspensions and the particle volume fraction. The self-similar nature of that relationship is quickly lost as we consider crystal fractions beyond a few volume percent. We propose that the relative viscosity of crystal-bearing magmas can be fully described by two state variables, the intrinsic viscosity and the crowding factor (a measure of the packing threshold in the suspension). These two state variables can be measured experimentally under different conditions, which allows us to develop closure relationships in terms of the applied shear stress and the crystal shape and size distributions. We build these closure equations from the extensive literature on the rheology of synthetic suspensions, where the nature of the particle shape and size distributions is better constrained and apply the newly developed model to published experiments on crystal-bearing magmas. We find that we recover a self-similar behavior (unique rheology curve) up to the packing threshold and show that the commonly reported break in slope between the relative viscosity and crystal volume fraction around the expected packing threshold is most likely caused by a sudden change in the state

  1. Effect of aging on rheology of ball clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonthai, Tienchai

    2002-01-01

    The behaviors of clay-water suspensions such as deflocculation or rheological properties are not constant but change with time. Aging has been recognized for changing the rheological properties of clay suspensions. This work provided information about the effects of the moisture contents in ball clay lumps and clay air exposure time on their processability. Dynamic oscillatory rheometry using a vane-in-cup geometry was used to characterize the rheological behavior of ball clay suspensions in terms of elastic modulus, viscous modulus and yield stress as a function of aging time. A light scattering size analyzer was used to examine the agglomerate size distribution of ball clay suspensions which affected the rheological behavior. Soluble ion release (both cations and anions) in the filtrate of suspensions was measured by ion chromatography. Low and high lignitic ball clay suspensions were dispersed with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) or sodium polyacrylate at specific gravity 1.3 and 1.6 in two dispersion states: fully deflocculated (minimum viscosity) and under deflocculated. Suspensions prepared using freshly mined ball clays required more dispersant than suspensions prepared using dry ball clays to achieve minimum viscosity due to a difference in agglomerate size distribution. The agglomerate size distribution of suspensions prepared using dry clays was broader than that of suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays. In suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays, there were many uniformly small agglomerates having loose water inside, while in suspensions prepared using dry clays, the capillary effect and bonding between clay particles resulting from drying broke clay aggregates apart into agglomerate structures composed of a few to many clay particles. For suspensions prepared using dry clays after one day suspension aging, the elastic modulus and yield stress decreased due to the change in agglomerate size distribution of suspensions but increased for

  2. Rheology of Human Blood, near and at Zero Flow

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, E. W.; Gilliland, E. R.; Cokelet, G.; Shin, H.; Britten, A.; Wells, R. E.

    1963-01-01

    Static normal human blood possesses a distinctive yield stress. When the yield stress is exceeded, the same blood has a stress-shear rate function under creeping flow conditions closely following Casson's model, which implies reversible aggregation of red cells in rouleaux and flow dominated by movement of rouleaux. The yield stress is essentially independent of temperature and its cube root varies linearly with hematocrit value. The dynamic rheological properties in the creeping flow range are such that the relative viscosity of blood to water is almost independent of temperature. Questions raised by these data are discussed, including red cell aggregation promoted by elements in the plasma. PMID:13935042

  3. Rheology of solid methane and nitrogen - Applications of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Stevenson, David J.

    1990-01-01

    The existing information about the rheological properties of solid methane and nitrogen is reviewed. The main limitation is the absence of creep data for solid nitrogen, but estimated properties are derived on the basis of simple scaling arguments for van der Waals bonded materials. On Triton solid methane and most likely nitrogen are too soft to support any topography over billions of years. Topographic support by water ice-rich materials seems almost certain. Nitrogen and methane do not intermix by solid-state diffusion. The weakness (absence?) of the opposition effect on Triton can be explained by annealing of nitrogen grains, provided the latter have sizes characteristic of freshly deposited frost.

  4. Terahertz correlation spectroscopy infers particle velocity and rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Rees, Eric J; Su, Ke; Zeitler, Axel

    2016-07-15

    Correlation spectroscopy is an analytical technique that can identify the residence time of reflective or fluorescent particles in a measurement spot, allowing particle velocity or diffusion to be inferred. We show that the technique can be applied to data measured with a time-domain terahertz sensor. The speed of reflectors such as silica ballotini or bubbles can thus be measured in fluid samples. Time-domain terahertz sensors can therefore be used, for the first time, to measure rheological properties of optically opaque fluids that contain entrained reflectors, such as polyethylene beads. PMID:27420517

  5. Pre-cooked Fiber-enriched Wheat Flour Obtained by Extrusion: Rheological and Functional Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional and rheological properties of different process conditions of extruded wheat flour with 0%, 10%, 20% and 30% fiber levels were studied in the production of cookies and tortillas. Functional and rheological properties were evaluated using Rapid Visco Analyzer and Mixograph equipment. Resul...

  6. Dynamic light scattering for measuring microstructure and rheological properties of food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there has been significant interest in the determination of microstructural and rheological properties of viscoelastic food materials and their formulations. This is because the arrangement (architecture) of the micro­ and nano­components, size distribution, and rheological (mechanic...

  7. Structural analysis of gluten-free doughs by fractional rheological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orczykowska, Magdalena; Dziubiński, Marek; Owczarz, Piotr

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the effects of various components of tested gluten-free doughs, such as corn starch, amaranth flour, pea protein isolate, and cellulose in the form of plantain fibers on rheological properties of such doughs. The rheological properties of gluten-free doughs were assessed by using the rheological fractional standard linear solid model (FSLSM). Parameter analysis of the Maxwell-Wiechert fractional derivative rheological model allows to state that gluten-free doughs present a typical behavior of viscoelastic quasi-solid bodies. We obtained the contribution dependence of each component used in preparations of gluten-free doughs (either hard-gel or soft-gel structure). The complicate analysis of the mechanical structure of gluten-free dough was done by applying the FSLSM to explain quite precisely the effects of individual ingredients of the dough on its rheological properties.

  8. 77 FR 25406 - Consortium on “Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)”: Membership Fee Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Consortium on ``Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME... NIST/Industry Consortium on Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)''. The notice stated that... consortium is to predict the pumpability of a grout/mortar or a concrete from the rheological properties...

  9. High-temperature rheological study of foam fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, P.C.; Reidenbach, V.G.

    1987-05-01

    Two significant observations were made during measurement of N/sub 2/ foam properties at temperatures up to 300/sup 0/F (149/sup 0/C) in a high-temperature, high-pressure recirculating loop viscometer: foam fluids did not thin as rapidly as gel fluids under similar conditions, so foams offer inherent advantages for high-temperature simulation work, and high gelling-agent concentrations do not improve dynamic foam stability; instead, high-temperature dynamic stability depends on surfactant type and concentration. Mathematical equations have been developed from experimental data to describe foam rheological behavior from 75 to 300/sup 0/F (24 to 149/sup 0/C), 0 to 80 quality, containing 0 to 80 lbm hydroxypropyl guar (HPG)/1,000 gal (0 to 9586 g HPG/m/sup 3/) in the aqueous phase. Basic physical properties previously outlined determined foam rheological behavior at 75/sup 0/F (24/sup 0/C). Foams were classified as yield-pseudoplastic-type fluids. This paper extends the previous work from 75 to 300/sup 0/F (24 to 149/sup 0/C) and covers a broader range of external liquid-phase compositions applicable to foam stimulation work.

  10. Rheology of slurries and environmental impacts in the mining industry.

    PubMed

    Boger, David V

    2013-01-01

    The world's resource industries are the largest producers of waste. Much of this waste is produced as a fine particle slurry, which is pumped to a storage area, generally at a low concentration, where it behaves like a Newtonian fluid. Simply removing, reusing, and recycling water from the slurry represents a step toward a more sustainable practice in this industry. As the concentration of such a slurry is increased as a result of dewatering, the materials exhibit non-Newtonian behavior, which is characterized by shear thinning, a yield stress, and in some instances thixotropic behavior. Such high-concentration, nonideal (dirty) suspensions in the resource industries have meant that new rheological methods and techniques have been needed to measure and interpret the basic flow properties. Also, some older empirical techniques have needed to be modified and interpreted in a more fundamental way so that the results could be used in design. This article reviews these techniques and illustrates how the industry itself has motivated their development. Understanding and exploiting this rheology has resulted in dramatic improvement in the waste-disposal strategy for some industries, but many have failed to embrace the available technology. The reasons for this are discussed. The article concludes that a greater positive change in waste-management practice will occur in the future, motivated by several factors, including public perception, tighter regulation, and perhaps even commonsense life cycle accounting.

  11. Surfactant-activated microgels: a new pathway to rheology modification.

    PubMed

    Chari, Krishnan; Hsu, Raymond; Bhargava, Prachur; Figura, Brian; Yang, Wayne; Park, Jung Hyun; Clifford, Ted; Kadir, Murat

    2013-12-17

    Alkali swellable microgels are widely used to control rheology of formulated products containing surfactants. However, formulations based on these pH-responsive polymers show undesirably large changes in yield stress in a range of pH close to the pKa of the acid group. Analysis of the behavior of a cross-linked copolymer of ethyl acrylate and methacrylic acid in the nonionized form (at pH below the pKa of methacrylic acid) in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate shows surfactant-mediated swelling (an increase in particle diameter by over 2.5×) and a peak in zero-shear viscosity versus surfactant concentration indicating surfactant-mediated interaction of the swollen microgels. On the basis of these results, we demonstrate a new class of nonionic microgels composed of hydrophobic alkyl acrylates and hydrophilic hydroxyalkyl esters that utilize the effects of surfactant-mediated swelling and interaction to provide pH-independent rheological properties.

  12. Physicochemical, rheological and structural characteristics of starch in maize tortillas.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Uribe, Juan P; Ramos-López, Gonzalo; Yee-Madeira, Hernani; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2010-06-01

    Fresh and stored maize (white and blue) tortillas were evaluated for physicochemical, rheological and structural characteristics assessed by calorimetry, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, dynamic viscoelastic tests, and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography. Two endotherms were found in studies of fresh and stored tortillas. The low temperature endotherm (50-56 degrees C) was due to reorganized (retrograded) amylopectin, while the high temperature endotherm (105-123 degrees C) was attributed to retrograded amylose. The enthalpy value for the lower temperature transition was minor than that of the high temperature transition. Fresh tortillas showed an amorphous starch arrangement by x-ray diffraction study. Stored samples showed the presence of peaks at 2theta = 17 masculine and 23 masculine, indicating re-crystallization of starch components. FTIR results confirmed the development of higher levels of starch crystals during storage. Differences in the viscoelastic parameters were also observed between fresh and stored samples. At the longest storage times, white tortillas were more rigid than blue tortillas. Molar mass values for starch increased for both white and blue tortillas as storage time progressed, though relatively higher values were obtained for white tortillas. More starch reorganization occurred in white tortillas, in accordance to calorimetric, x-ray diffraction, FTIR and rheological results. These results corroborate that changes occurring in tortillas during storage are related to reorganization of starch components, and the maize variety more than the color plays an important role.

  13. Synthesis, physicochemical, structural and rheological characterizations of carboxymethyl xanthan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yahoum, Madiha M; Moulai-Mostefa, Nadji; Le Cerf, Didier

    2016-12-10

    The aim of this work was to synthesize a carboxymethylated xanthan (CMXG) via an etherification reaction between different ratios (2, 4, and 6) of xanthan gum (XG) and monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) using the Williamson synthesis method. The synthetized products were characterized in terms of their physico-chemical and rheological properties. Both FTIR and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H(1) NMR) analyses confirmed the grafting of carboxymethyl groups on xanthan hydroxyl groups. The obtained results demonstrated that the degree of substitution was proportional to the chloroacetic acid and xanthan gum ratios. The obtained carboxymethyl derivatives presented greater hydrophilicity and lower molecular weights with increasing degrees of substitution than native xanthan gum. The rheological study revealed that the viscosity of the CMXG derivatives decreased with the degree of substitution and with the conservation of the shear-thinning and weak gel behaviours. The flow curves suggested the existence of two different populations of particles consisting of CMXG particles with a smaller average size and a second population formed by the residual fractions of native XG particles. It was also found that the elastic modulus of XG was largely higher than that of the CMXG derivatives and decreased with increasing DS. For the CMXG derivatives, two regions of viscoelastic behaviour were observed, which were separated by a crossover point corresponding to the critical frequency and relaxation time, i.e., the time required for stress relaxation.

  14. Rheology of zirconia suspensions in a nonpolar organic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, V.M.B.; Parris, D.; Edirisinghe, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Three dispersants (stearic acid, oleic acid, and poly-(12-hydroxystearic acid)) are compared for their ability to produce low-viscosity suspensions of zirconia in kerosene. Rheological measurements and sediment packing density measurements show that poly(12-hydroxystearic acid) is a better dispersant than stearic acid or oleic acid; this is explained in terms of the longer tail of the poly-(12-hydroxystearic acid) surfactant molecule. The amount of dispersant can be optimized to reduce viscosity and yield point of the suspension, and to eliminate thixotropic hysteresis. The use of a dispersion medium of lower viscosity than the dispersant makes it easy to detect when complete monolayer coverage has been achieved. The loss of pseudoplasticity, brought about by a higher degree of deflocculation, can be recovered by increasing the volume fraction of solids of a suspension and this is beneficial in the plastic forming of ceramics. Rheological measurements showed that these suspensions reach a critical state above a critical shear stress ({tau}{sub c}). This critical state is described by several parameters, i.e., the Bingham yield stress ({tau}{sub B}), the plastic viscosity ({eta}{sub PL}), and the critical shear rate ({dot {gamma}}{sub c}), which are dependent on the volume fraction of solids.

  15. Modeling the Rheology of Polymer Melts and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, R. G.; Desai, Priyanka S.

    2015-01-01

    We review constitutive modeling of solutions and melts of linear polymers, focusing on changes in rheological behavior in shear and extensional flow as the concentration increases from unentangled dilute, to entangled, to dense melt. The rheological changes are captured by constitutive equations, prototypes of which are the FENE-P model for unentangled solutions and the DEMG model for entangled solutions and melts. From these equations, and supporting experimental data, for dilute solutions, the extensional viscosity increases with the strain rate from the low-strain rate to the high-strain rate asymptote, but in the densely entangled state, the high-strain rate viscosity is lower than the low-shear rate value, especially when orientation-dependent friction is accounted for. In shearing flow, shear thinning increases dramatically as the entanglement density increases, which can eventually lead to a shear-banding inhomogeneity. Recent improvements in constitutive modeling are paving the way for robust and accurate numerical simulations of polymer fluid mechanics and industrial processing of polymers.

  16. Dynamically-Tunable Smart Composites Featuring Electro-Rheological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Mukesh V.; Thompson, Brian S.

    1990-02-01

    A new generation of revolutionary multi-functional, dynamically-tunable, intelligent, ultra-advanced composite materials featuring electro-rheological fluids is proposed herein for the active continuum vibrational-control of structural systems. This paper reports on pioneering proof-of-concept experimental investigations focused on evaluating the elastodynamic transient and also the forced response characteristics of beams fabricated in this new class of materials. The results of these investigations clearly demonstrate the ability to dramatically change the vibrational characteristics of beam-like specimens fabricated in ultra-advanced composite materials by changing the electrical field imposed on the fluid domains. In addition, experimental results are presented which characterize the elastodynamic response of a connecting rod of a slider-crank mechanism fabricated in these ultra-advanced composite materials. Again, the combined forced and parametric responses are controlled by the voltage imposed on the electro-rheological fluid domain in the structure. The capability of these materials to interface with modern solid-state electronics can be exploited by extending the fundamental phenomenological work presented herein through the successful incorporation of intelligent sensor technologies and modern control strategies in order to significantly accelerate the evolution of these novel composite materials for the military and aerospace industries.

  17. Microfluidic viscometers for shear rheology of complex fluids and biofluids.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Siddhartha; Wang, William S; Vanapalli, Siva A

    2016-07-01

    The rich diversity of man-made complex fluids and naturally occurring biofluids is opening up new opportunities for investigating their flow behavior and characterizing their rheological properties. Steady shear viscosity is undoubtedly the most widely characterized material property of these fluids. Although widely adopted, macroscale rheometers are limited by sample volumes, access to high shear rates, hydrodynamic instabilities, and interfacial artifacts. Currently, microfluidic devices are capable of handling low sample volumes, providing precision control of flow and channel geometry, enabling a high degree of multiplexing and automation, and integrating flow visualization and optical techniques. These intrinsic advantages of microfluidics have made it especially suitable for the steady shear rheology of complex fluids. In this paper, we review the use of microfluidics for conducting shear viscometry of complex fluids and biofluids with a focus on viscosity curves as a function of shear rate. We discuss the physical principles underlying different microfluidic viscometers, their unique features and limits of operation. This compilation of technological options will potentially serve in promoting the benefits of microfluidic viscometry along with evincing further interest and research in this area. We intend that this review will aid researchers handling and studying complex fluids in selecting and adopting microfluidic viscometers based on their needs. We conclude with challenges and future directions in microfluidic rheometry of complex fluids and biofluids.

  18. Rheology behaviors of stable electrohydrodynamic direct-write jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Zheng, Gaofeng; Xu, Lei; Wang, Han; Li, Wenwang

    2016-10-01

    Electrohydrodynamic direct-write (EDW) is a novel direct-write technology to fabricate micro/nano-structures from viscoelastic solution, which had displayed great application potential in organic electronic device. Due to the shorter spinneret to substrate distance, the rheology behaviors of EDW charged jet played an important role in defining the line width or diameter of the direct-written micro/nano-structures. High speed camera is utilized to observe the rheology process of EDW charged jet, and solidified jets are measured by SEM that offers a quantitative method to investigate the diameter evolution of jet. The diameter of charged jet and nanofiber injected from solid probe increase with the increasing of polymer solution concentration. Attribute to the larger diameter and higher solvent content, charged jet injected from hollow nozzle displayed greater fluid viscoelasticity, and then stretched into micro structure of flat film under the gravitation on the substrate. The diameter of charged jet and line width of thin film injected from nozzle decrease with the increasing of polymer concentration.

  19. Advanced rheological characterization of soft colloidal model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Kundu, S. K.; Stellbrink, J.; Willner, L.; Allgaier, J.; Richter, D.

    2012-11-01

    The complex flow behavior of polymer-based soft colloidal model systems was investigated using steady and oscillatory shear to prove new concepts for advanced rheological characterization. In the very dilute regime we investigated high molecular weight polybutadiene star polymers to quantify the internal relaxation time arising from the polymeric nature of these ultra-soft colloids. The observed shear-induced brush deformation is interpreted in terms of the internal Zimm time τz. The observed dependence of τz on matrix viscosity can be explained by shrinkage of the star polymer due to an increasing incompatibility with increasing matrix molecular weight. The influence of the polymeric nature on the characteristic structural relaxation time in the concentrated regime was investigated using non-linear rheology following Wyss et al (SRFS) (2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 238303). Here we used star-like block copolymer micelles to systematically tune the ‘softness’ of the colloids by variation of the block ratio. A master curve with proper scaling parameters could be generated independent of the degree of colloidal ‘softness’. However, the obtained strain-rate independent structural relaxation time τ0 was not observed in the linear regime. In addition, a high frequency discrepancy was clearly found in all our experimental data. Both reflect the shortcomings of the SRFS approach.

  20. Effect of Amphiphiles on the Rheology of Triglyceride Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Jyoti

    2014-11-01

    Networks of aggregated crystallites form the structural backbone of many products from the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Such materials are generally formulated by cooling a saturated solution to yield the desired solid fraction. Crystal nucleation and growth followed by aggregation leads to formation of a space percolating fractal-network. It is understood that microstructural hierarchy and particle-particle interactions determine material behavior during processing, storage and use. In this talk, rheology of suspensions of triglycerides (TAG, like tristearin) will be explored. TAGs exhibit a rich assortment of polymorphs and form suspensions that are evidently sensitive to surface modifying additives like surfactants and polymers. Here, a theoretical framework will be presented for suspensions containing TAG crystals interacting via pairwise potentials. The work builds on existing models of fractal aggregates to understand microstructure and its correlation with material rheology. Effect of amphiphilic additives is derived through variation of particle-particle interactions. Theoretical predictions for storage modulus will be compared against experimental observations and data from the literature and micro structural predictions against microscopy. Such a theory may serve as a step towards predicting short and long-term behavior of aggregated suspensions formulated via crystallization.

  1. CFD simulation of anaerobic digester with variable sewage sludge rheology.

    PubMed

    Craig, K J; Nieuwoudt, M N; Niemand, L J

    2013-09-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that evaluates mechanical mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester was developed to investigate the influence of sewage sludge rheology on the steady-state digester performance. Mechanical mixing is provided through an impeller located in a draft tube. Use is made of the Multiple Reference Frame model to incorporate the rotating impeller. The non-Newtonian sludge is modeled using the Hershel-Bulkley law because of the yield stress present in the fluid. Water is also used as modeling fluid to illustrate the significant non-Newtonian effects of sewage sludge on mixing patterns. The variation of the sewage sludge rheology as a result of the digestion process is considered to determine its influence on both the required impeller torque and digester mixing patterns. It was found that when modeling the fluid with the Hershel-Bulkley law, the high slope of the sewage stress-strain curve at high shear rates causes significant viscous torque on the impeller surface. Although the overall fluid shear stress property is reduced during digestion, this slope is increased with sludge age, causing an increase in impeller torque for digested sludge due to the high strain rates caused by the pumping impeller. Consideration should be given to using the Bingham law to deal with high strain rates. The overall mixing flow patterns of the digested sludge do however improve slightly.

  2. Particle size dependent rheological property in magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Pei, Lei; Xuan, Shouhu; Yan, Qifan; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the particle size on the rheological property of magnetic fluid was studied both by the experimental and computer simulation methods. Firstly, the magnetic fluids were prepared by dispersing Fe3O4 nanospheres with size varied from 40 nm to 100 nm and 200 nm in the solution. Then, the rheological properties were investigated and it was found that the relative magnetorheological effects increased with increasing the particle size. Finally, the molecular dynamic simulation was used to analyze the mechanical characteristics of the magnetic fluid and the chain-like model agreed well with the experimental result. The authentic chain-like structure observed by a microscope agreed with the simulation results. The three particles composed of the similar cluster nanostructure, thus they exhibited similar magnetic property. To this end, the unique assembling microstructures was the origination of the mechanical difference. And it was found that the higher MR (magnetorheological) effects of the large particle based magnetic fluid was originated from the stronger assembling microstructure under the applying magnetic field.

  3. Growth Kinetics and Mechanics of Hydrate Films by Interfacial Rheology.

    PubMed

    Leopércio, Bruna C; de Souza Mendes, Paulo R; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-05-01

    A new approach to study and understand the kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrates by interfacial rheology is presented. This is made possible using a "double wall ring" interfacial rheology cell that has been designed to provide the necessary temperature control. Cyclopentane and water are used to form hydrates, and this model system forms these structures at ambient pressures. Different temperature and water/hydrocarbon contact protocols are explored. Of particular interest is the importance of first contacting the hydrocarbon against ice crystals in order to initiate hydrate formation. Indeed, this is found to be the case, even though the hydrates may be created at temperatures above the melting point of ice. Once hydrates completely populate the hydrocarbon/water interface, strain sweeps of the interfacial elastic and viscous moduli are conducted to interrogate the mechanical response and fragility of the hydrate films. The dependence on temperature, Tf, by the kinetics of formation and the mechanical properties is reported, and the cyclopentane hydrate dissociation temperature was found to be between 6 and 7 °C. The formation time (measured from the moment when cyclopentane first contacts ice crystals) as well as the elastic modulus and the yield strain increase as Tf increases. PMID:27076092

  4. Tribological and Rheological Properties of a Synovial Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klossner, Rebecca; Liang, Jing; Krause, Wendy

    2010-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and the plasma proteins, albumin and globulins, are the most abundant macromolecules in synovial fluid, the fluid that lubricates freely moving joints. In previous studies, bovine synovial fluid, a synovial fluid model (SFM) and albumin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were observed to be rheopectic---viscosity increases over time under constant shear. Additionally, steady shear experiments have a strong shear history dependence in protein-containing solutions, whereas samples of HA in PBS behaved as a ``typical'' polyelectrolyte. The observed rheopexy and shear history dependence are indicative of structure building in solution, which is most likely caused by protein aggregation. The tribology of the SFM was also investigated using nanoindenter-based scratch tests. The coefficient of frictions (μ) between the diamond nanoindenter tip and a polyethylene surface was measured in the presence of the SFM and solutions with varied protein and HA concentrations. The lowest μ is observed in the SFM, which most closely mimics a healthy joint. Finally, an anti-inflammatory drug, hydroxychloroquine, was shown to inhibit protein interactions in the SFM in rheological studies, and thus the tribological response was examined. We hypothesize that the rheopectic behavior is important in lubrication regimes and therefore, the rheological and tribological properties of these solutions will be correlated.

  5. Mesoscale Characterization of Supramolecular Transient Networks Using SAXS and Rheology

    PubMed Central

    Pape, A. C. H.; Bastings, Maartje M. C.; Kieltyka, Roxanne E.; Wyss, Hans M.; Voets, Ilja K.; Meijer, E. W.; Dankers, Patricia Y. W.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels and, in particular, supramolecular hydrogels show promising properties for application in regenerative medicine because of their ability to adapt to the natural environment these materials are brought into. However, only few studies focus on the structure-property relationships in supramolecular hydrogels. Here, we study in detail both the structure and the mechanical properties of such a network, composed of poly(ethylene glycol), end-functionalized with ureido-pyrimidinone fourfold hydrogen bonding units. This network is responsive to triggers such as concentration, temperature and pH. To obtain more insight into the sol-gel transition of the system, both rheology and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) are used. We show that the sol-gel transitions based on these three triggers, as measured by rheology, coincide with the appearance of a structural feature in SAXS. We attribute this feature to the presence of hydrophobic domains where cross-links are formed. These results provide more insight into the mechanism of network formation in these materials, which can be exploited for tailoring their behavior for biomedical applications, where one of the triggers discussed might be used. PMID:24441567

  6. Rheological and structural studies of carboxymethyl derivatives of chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Winstead, Cherese; Katagumpola, Pushpika

    2014-05-15

    The degrees of substitution of chitosan derivatives were varied and the viscoelastic behavior of these biopolymer solutions was studied using rheology. Chitosan is a cationic copolymer of glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine obtained by alkaline deacetylation of chitin. Due to its inherent non-toxicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability, chitosan has gained much interest. However, the poor solubility of the biopolymer in water and most common organic solvents limits its applications. Therefore, the focus of this work is the chemical modification of chitosan via carboxymethylation as well as studying the viscoelastic behavior of these polymer solutions. Varying degrees of substitution (DS) of carboxymethyl chitosan derivatives were synthesized by treating chitosan with monochloroacetic acid under alkylated medium varying the reaction time and temperature. The effect of degree of substitution on the rheology of these polymer solutions was studied as a function of concentration. The viscosity of chitosan derivatives sharply increased with increase in degree of substitution. G' and G' dependence on strain and angular frequency were studied and were found to exhibit predominantly viscous behavior. Additional characterization of the derivatized products were further studied using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), {sup 1}H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravimetric analysis as well as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Degree of substitution (DS) was calculated by titrimetric method.

  7. Phase behavior and rheological characterization of silica nanoparticle gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metin, Cigdem O.; Rankin, Kelli M.; Nguyen, Quoc P.

    2014-01-01

    Preferential injection into high permeability thief zones or fractures can result in early breakthrough at production wells and large unswept areas of high oil saturation, which impact the economic life of a well. A variety of conformance control techniques, including polymer and silica gel treatments, have been designed to block flow through the swept zones. Over a certain range of salinities, silica nanoparticle suspensions form a gel in bulk phase behavior tests. These gels have potential for in situ flow diversion, but in situ flow tests are required to determine their applicability. To determine the appropriate scope of the in situ tests, it is necessary to obtain an accurate description of nanoparticle phase behavior and gel rheology. In this paper, the equilibrium phase behavior of silica nanoparticle solutions in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl) is presented with four phase regions classified as a function of salinity and nanoparticle concentration. Once the gelation window was clearly defined, rheology experiments of silica nanoparticle gels were also carried out. Gelation time decreases exponentially as a function of silica concentration, salinity, and temperature. Following a power law behavior, the storage modulus, G', increases with particle concentration. Steady shear measurements show that silica nanoparticle gels exhibit non-Newtonian, shear thinning behavior. This comprehensive study of the silica nanoparticle gels has provided a clear path forward for in situ tests to determine the gel's applicability for conformance control operations.

  8. What exactly is measured by passive microbead rheology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, Jay; Pilyugina, Ekaterina

    2010-03-01

    The dynamic modulus G^* of a viscoelastic medium is often measured by following the trajectory of a small bead subject to Brownian motion in a method called ``passive microbead rheology". In the pioneering manuscript that introduced the idea [T. G. Mason and D. A. Weitz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1250 (1995)], this equivalence between the autocorrelation function and G^* was assumed via the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (GSER). We show here that this expression does not satisfy the correct initial condition. Also, earlier derivations of the GSER use an initial condition that freezes the bead in space until measurements begin, which is not typical for experiments. We use here an analytic solution of the forces on a sphere undergoing arbitrary displacement in an arbitrary viscoelastic medium combined with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to derive what is actually measured in the microbead rheology experiment. We find that a convolution of G^* is indeed measured in bead-displacement statistics, which is similar to GSER but obeys the correct initial conditions. The result includes inertial effects, and allows for the presence of an optical trap, allowing a more general technique to extract the dynamic modulus from microrheology.

  9. Forced unfolding of protein domains determines cytoskeletal rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, John

    2005-03-01

    Cells have recently been shown to have a power-law dynamic shear modulus over wide frequency range; the value of the exponent being non-universal, varying from 0.1-0.25 depending on cell type. This observation has been interpreted as evidence for the Soft Glassy Rheology (SGR) model, a trap-type glass model with an effective granular temperature. We propose a simple, alternative model of cytoskeletal mechanics based on the thermally activated, forced unfolding of domains in proteins cross-linking a stressed semi-flexible polymer gel. It directly relates a cell’s mechanical response to biophysical parameters of the cytoskeleton’s molecular constituents. Simulations indicate that unfolding events in a random network display a collective self-organization, giving rise to an exponential distribution of crosslink stress that can reproduce cell viscoelasticity. The model suggests natural explanations for the observed correlation between cell rheology and intracellular static stress, including those previously explained using the tensegrity concept. Moreover, our model provides insight into potential mechanisms of mechanotransduction as well as cell shape sensing and maintenance.

  10. Structure and rheological properties in alkali aluminosilicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviors. In this mind, it is very important to understand which parameters influence these properties. Up to now, we know for example that viscosity of silicate melts is dependent of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts like haplogranitic rhyolitic alkali magmas. We will first present our viscosity measurements and some modelisation concepts based on the Adam and Gibbs theory. From configurational entropy theory we obtain some macroscopic information's that we can link to the structure of glasses and melts. In this mind, we have investigated them with Raman and NMR spectroscopies. These spectroscopies provide information on speciation and polymerization of glasses and melts. We will present and discuss structural and rheological variations as a function of temperature and chemical change.

  11. The influence of additives on rheological properties of limestone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworska, B.; Bartosik, A.

    2014-08-01

    Limestone slurry appears in the lime production process as the result of rinsing the processed material. It consists of particles with diameter smaller than 2 mm and the water that is a carrier of solid fraction. Slurry is directed to the settling tank, where the solid phase sediments and the excess water through the transfer system is recovered for re-circulation. Collected at the bottom of the tank sludge is deposited in a landfill located on the premises. Rheological properties of limestone slurry hinder its further free transport in the pipeline due to generated flow resistance. To improve this state of affairs, chemical treatment of drilling fluid, could be applied, of which the main task is to give the slurry properties suitable for the conditions encountered in hydrotransport. This treatment consists of applying chemical additives to slurry in sufficient quantity. Such additives are called as deflocculants or thinners or dispersants, and are chemical compounds which added to aqueous solution are intended to push away suspended particles from each other. The paper presents the results of research allowing reduction of shear stress in limestone slurry. Results demonstrate rheological properties of limestone slurry with and without the addition of modified substances which causes decrease of slurry viscosity, and as a consequence slurry shear stress for adopted shear rate. Achieving the desired effects increases the degree of dispersion of the solid phase suspended in the carrier liquid and improving its ability to smooth flow with decreased friction.

  12. Rheology of Supercritical CO2 dispersed Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Horsch, Steven; Subramanium, Ganapathy; Gulari, Esin

    2006-03-01

    Effective dispersion of the fillers in a polymer matrix has been a key challenge in the field of nanocomposites. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) appears , PS/clay, The nanocomposites are characterized using WAXD, SEM, TEM, Rheology and DSC. The high degree of dispersion achieved through sc-CO2 appears to result in an order of magnitude increase in the rheological properties of PS, associated with an increase in the Tg of around 13 C, at 10% clay loading. These moduli improvements are significant better than those obtained with conventional, chemically-modified intercalated clay nanocomposites. The degree of enhancement in the properties appears to be strongly dependant on the polymer-clay interactions, and how it is promoted by the supercritical fluid. In the case of PDMS nanocomposites, where the clay-polymer interactions were weak, the modulus increase at low frequencies (for sc-CO2 processed system) was only a factor of 2. In the case of PVME- I30P clay nanocomposites, the modulus increase was substantial even at moderate loadings and dispersions, perhaps to be hydrogen-bonding interactions. The clay and the polymer orientation and interactions in these nanocomposites are also being probed using rheo-optical FTIR spectroscopy.

  13. Pressure cycle rheology of nanofluids at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza; Yrac, Rommel; Amani, Mahmood

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of particles dispersed in a base fluid (or drilling fluid) are commonly used in oil industry to aid the drilling of oil well into the ground. Nanofluids, the colloidal suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a basefluid, have also shown potentials as cooling and abrasive fluids. Utilizing them along with drilling fluids under cyclic high-pressure loadings have not been investigated so far. In the present work, rheological characteristics of silicon oil based nanofluids (prepared with alumina nanoparticles) under pressures up to 1000 bar are investigated using a high-pressure viscometer. The rheological characteristics of nanofluids are measured and are compared with that of the basefluid under increasing and decreasing pressures. Relative viscosity variations of nanofluids were observed to have influenced by the shear rate. In addition, under cyclic high-pressure loading viscosity values of nanofluids are observed to have reduced. This reduction in viscosity at the second pressure cycle could have been caused by the de-agglomeration of particles in the first cycle while working a high-pressure and high-shear condition.

  14. Rheology near jamming: The influence of lubrication forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Heussinger, Claus

    2014-05-01

    We study, by computer simulations, the roles of different dissipation forces in the rheological properties of highly dense particle-laden flows. In particular, we are interested in the close-packing limit (jamming) and the question of whether "universal" observables can be identified that do not depend on the details of the dissipation model. To this end, we define a simplified lubrication force and systematically vary the range hc of this interaction. For fixed hc a crossover is seen from a Newtonian flow regime at small strain rates to inertia-dominated flow at larger strain rates. The same crossover is observed as a function of the lubrication range hc. At the same time, but only at high densities close to jamming, single-particle velocities as well as local density distributions are unaffected by changes in the lubrication range—they are candidates for universal behavior. At densities away from jamming, this invariance is lost: short-range lubrication forces lead to pronounced particle clustering, while longer-ranged lubrication does not. These findings highlight the importance of "geometric" packing constraints for particle motion—independent of the specific dissipation model. With the free volume vanishing at random close packing, particle motion is more and more constrained by the ever smaller amount of free space. On the other hand, macroscopic rheological observables as well as higher-order correlation functions retain the variability of the underlying dissipation model.

  15. How does interfacial rheology govern soap bubble cluster dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Biance, Anne-Laure; Hohler, Reinhard

    2009-11-01

    Aqueous foams are concentrated dispersions of gas bubbles in a soapy solution. These complex fluids exhibit solid-like or liquid-like mechanical behaviors, depending on the applied shear. When it is increased beyond a yield strain, neighbor switching bubble rearrangements called T1 events are triggered and plastic flow sets in. We study experimentally the dynamics of such strain induced T1s in 3D bubble clusters that we consider as model systems of 3D foams. To determine the hydrodynamics and physico-chemistry that set the duration of T1s, we use foaming solutions of a wide range of well characterized bulk and interfacial rheological properties. At low shear rates, the T1 duration is set by a balance between surface tension and surface viscous forces in qualitative agreement with previous studies of T1s in 2D foams [1] and we present a simple physical model that explains our 3D findings. Moreover, above a characteristic shear rate, rearrangement dynamics are driven by the applied strain. By combining all our results, we link the transition from intermittent to continous flow dynamics in foams to the rheology of the gas-liquid interfaces. [4pt] [1] M. Durand, H. A. Stone, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 2226101 (2006).

  16. Dynamics and rheology of high molar mass polyethylene oxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Abhishek; Solomon, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We report dynamic light scattering (DLS), bulk rheology and turbulent drag reduction (TDR) measurements that investigate the structure and dynamics of high molar mass PEO solutions. Steady shear rheology of high molar mass PEO solutions, when modeled by the FENE-P constitutive equation, was consistent with viscoelastic relaxation times much larger than predicted by single polymer, dilute solution theory. DLS of dilute PEO solutions showed a single relaxation mode in the decay time distribution, which scales as q-3 rather than the q-2 scaling expected of diffusive dynamics. We interpret this result as consistent with the internal dynamics of large multichain domains, clusters or aggregates in the high molar mass PEO solutions. By means of DLS, we also show that the aggregation state of dilute solutions of high molar mass PEO can be manipulated by addition of the chaotropic salt guanidine sulfate or the divalent salt magnesium sulfate. Addition of these salts shifts the power law scaling of the relaxation time from q-3 to q-2. This shift of relaxation time scaling from one indicative of aggregate dynamics (q-3) to one characteristic of polymer center-of-mass diffusion (q-2) shows that these salts are effective de-aggregation agents for PEO. We discuss the results in light of the potential connection between aggregation behavior and polymer TDR of high molar mass PEO.

  17. Synthesis, physicochemical, structural and rheological characterizations of carboxymethyl xanthan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yahoum, Madiha M; Moulai-Mostefa, Nadji; Le Cerf, Didier

    2016-12-10

    The aim of this work was to synthesize a carboxymethylated xanthan (CMXG) via an etherification reaction between different ratios (2, 4, and 6) of xanthan gum (XG) and monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) using the Williamson synthesis method. The synthetized products were characterized in terms of their physico-chemical and rheological properties. Both FTIR and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H(1) NMR) analyses confirmed the grafting of carboxymethyl groups on xanthan hydroxyl groups. The obtained results demonstrated that the degree of substitution was proportional to the chloroacetic acid and xanthan gum ratios. The obtained carboxymethyl derivatives presented greater hydrophilicity and lower molecular weights with increasing degrees of substitution than native xanthan gum. The rheological study revealed that the viscosity of the CMXG derivatives decreased with the degree of substitution and with the conservation of the shear-thinning and weak gel behaviours. The flow curves suggested the existence of two different populations of particles consisting of CMXG particles with a smaller average size and a second population formed by the residual fractions of native XG particles. It was also found that the elastic modulus of XG was largely higher than that of the CMXG derivatives and decreased with increasing DS. For the CMXG derivatives, two regions of viscoelastic behaviour were observed, which were separated by a crossover point corresponding to the critical frequency and relaxation time, i.e., the time required for stress relaxation. PMID:27577918

  18. Processing parameters matching effects upon Rhizobium tropici biopolymers' rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Flávia Duta; Lopes, Léa Maria de Almeida; de França, Francisca Pessôa

    2008-07-01

    The combined effects of the processing parameters upon rheological properties of biopolymers produced by Rhizobium tropici were studied as a function of the Ca(+2) ions' concentration variation, yeast extract concentration added to the medium, aeration, and agitation, maintaining the mannitol concentration in 10 g/L. The experiments were carried out using a fermenter with 20-L capacity as a reactor. All processing parameters were monitored online. The temperature [(30 +/- 1) degrees C] and pH values (7.0) were kept constant throughout the experimental time. As a statistical tool, a complete 2(3) factorial design with central point and response surface was used to investigate the interactions between relevant variables of the fermentation process: calcium carbonate concentration, yeast extract concentration, aeration, and agitation. The processing parameter setup for reaching the maximum response for rheological propriety production was obtained when applying mannitol concentration of 10.0 g/L, calcium carbonate concentration 1.0 g/L, yeast extract concentration 1.0 g/L, aeration 1.30 vvm, and agitation 800 rpm. The viscosimetric investigation of polysaccharide solutions exposed their shear-thinning behavior and polyelectrolytic feature.

  19. A Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology for sea ice modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansereau, Véronique; Weiss, Jérôme; Saramito, Pierre; Lattes, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    A new rheological model is developed that builds on an elasto-brittle (EB) framework used for sea ice and rock mechanics, with the intent of representing both the small elastic deformations associated with fracturing processes and the larger deformations occurring along the faults/leads once the material is highly damaged and fragmented. A viscous-like relaxation term is added to the linear-elastic constitutive law together with an effective viscosity that evolves according to the local level of damage of the material, like its elastic modulus. The coupling between the level of damage and both mechanical parameters is such that within an undamaged ice cover the viscosity is infinitely large and deformations are strictly elastic, while along highly damaged zones the elastic modulus vanishes and most of the stress is dissipated through permanent deformations. A healing mechanism is also introduced, counterbalancing the effects of damaging over large timescales. In this new model, named Maxwell-EB after the Maxwell rheology, the irreversible and reversible deformations are solved for simultaneously; hence drift velocities are defined naturally. First idealized simulations without advection show that the model reproduces the main characteristics of sea ice mechanics and deformation: strain localization, anisotropy, intermittency and associated scaling laws.

  20. Effect of confinement induced structures on suspension rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Meera; Leahy, Brian; Lin, Yen-Chih; Cohen, Itai

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the flow behavior of confined colloidal systems is important in many industrial settings ranging from inkjet printers to pharmaceuticals. Confined colloidal suspensions under shear demonstrate many fascinating responses including vorticity-aligned strings in colloidal liquids and buckled phases in crystals. Despite the extensive studies of these confinement induced structures, the interplay between these exotic structural responses and the suspension rheology remains poorly understood. Here, we use a confocal rheoscope to image the suspension particle configuration while simultaneously measuring its stress responses. The confocal rheoscope has two precisely-aligned parallel plates that can confine the suspension with a variable gap size ranging from 3 to 20 particle diameters, allowing us to measure the response of the system as a function of the gap size. Moreover, we alter the rheological properties of the sample by adding a small amount of dimers. The dimers undergo Jeffery orbits at large strains and deform the confinement induced structures of the spheres, leading to a viscosity change. We discuss the results of these experiments and their implications in the areas of micro and nanofluidics.

  1. Microfluidic viscometers for shear rheology of complex fluids and biofluids.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Siddhartha; Wang, William S; Vanapalli, Siva A

    2016-07-01

    The rich diversity of man-made complex fluids and naturally occurring biofluids is opening up new opportunities for investigating their flow behavior and characterizing their rheological properties. Steady shear viscosity is undoubtedly the most widely characterized material property of these fluids. Although widely adopted, macroscale rheometers are limited by sample volumes, access to high shear rates, hydrodynamic instabilities, and interfacial artifacts. Currently, microfluidic devices are capable of handling low sample volumes, providing precision control of flow and channel geometry, enabling a high degree of multiplexing and automation, and integrating flow visualization and optical techniques. These intrinsic advantages of microfluidics have made it especially suitable for the steady shear rheology of complex fluids. In this paper, we review the use of microfluidics for conducting shear viscometry of complex fluids and biofluids with a focus on viscosity curves as a function of shear rate. We discuss the physical principles underlying different microfluidic viscometers, their unique features and limits of operation. This compilation of technological options will potentially serve in promoting the benefits of microfluidic viscometry along with evincing further interest and research in this area. We intend that this review will aid researchers handling and studying complex fluids in selecting and adopting microfluidic viscometers based on their needs. We conclude with challenges and future directions in microfluidic rheometry of complex fluids and biofluids. PMID:27478521

  2. Effect of water on the rheology of enstatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Mei, S.; Song, M.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of water on the rheological properties of enstatite, the second principal constituent of the upper mantle, was investi­gated by performing high-temperature creep experiments under both hydrous and anhydrous conditions. Samples were fabricated from fine powered Bamble enstatite (Mg0.85Fe0.15SiO3) from Norway. Deformation experiments were carried out using a gas-medium apparatus at a confining pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures between 1123 and 1473 K. For experiments conducted under hydrous conditions, samples were encapsulated with a talc sleeve, which supplied water by the dehydration near 1075 K. Under our experimental conditions, deformation was dominated by diffusion creep as indicated by a stress exponent of ~1 for both anhydrous and hydrous conditions. Furthermore, our data yields activation energies of ~200 and ~400 kJ/mol for hydrous and anhydrous conditions, respectively. These values are smaller than those reported for enstatite deformed in the dislocation creep regime (820 kJ/mol, Mackwell, 1992; 600 kJ/mol, Lawlis, 1997). Importantly, our results demonstrate a strong influence of water on the diffusion creep of enstatite. Samples deformed under hydrous conditions crept ~1.5 order of magnitude faster than those deformed under anhydrous conditions at similar differential stresses and temperatures. This water-weakening effect is more than ten times greater than determined for olivine. Such results provide critical constraints needed for understanding the rheological behavior of Earth's interior.

  3. Processing parameters matching effects upon Rhizobium tropici biopolymers' rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Flávia Duta; Lopes, Léa Maria de Almeida; de França, Francisca Pessôa

    2008-07-01

    The combined effects of the processing parameters upon rheological properties of biopolymers produced by Rhizobium tropici were studied as a function of the Ca(+2) ions' concentration variation, yeast extract concentration added to the medium, aeration, and agitation, maintaining the mannitol concentration in 10 g/L. The experiments were carried out using a fermenter with 20-L capacity as a reactor. All processing parameters were monitored online. The temperature [(30 +/- 1) degrees C] and pH values (7.0) were kept constant throughout the experimental time. As a statistical tool, a complete 2(3) factorial design with central point and response surface was used to investigate the interactions between relevant variables of the fermentation process: calcium carbonate concentration, yeast extract concentration, aeration, and agitation. The processing parameter setup for reaching the maximum response for rheological propriety production was obtained when applying mannitol concentration of 10.0 g/L, calcium carbonate concentration 1.0 g/L, yeast extract concentration 1.0 g/L, aeration 1.30 vvm, and agitation 800 rpm. The viscosimetric investigation of polysaccharide solutions exposed their shear-thinning behavior and polyelectrolytic feature. PMID:18437296

  4. Evolutionary models of the Earth with a grain size-dependent rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozel, Antoine; Golabek, Gregor; Tackley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Thermodynamically consistent models of single phase grain size evolution have been proposed in the past years [Austin and Evans (2007), Ricard and Bercovici (2009), Rozel et al. (2011), Rozel (2012)]. Following the same physical approach, the mechanics of two-phase grain aggregates has been formulated [Bercovici and Ricard (2012a)]. Several non-linear mechanisms such as dynamic recrystallization or Zener pinning are now available in a single non-equilibrium formulation of grain size distributions evolution. The self-consistent generation of localized plate boundaries is predicted in [Bercovici and Ricard (2012b)] using this model, but it has not been tested in a dynamically consistent way. Our preliminary results have shown that out of equilibrium grain size dynamics leads to localization of deformation below the lithosphere rather than subduction initiation. Yet this result was obtained assuming indealized conditions. We study here, for the first time, the evolution of grain size in the mantle and lithosphere in evolutionary models, starting from a just-frozen magma ocean until the present day situation. Following complexities are considered in these models: melting, phase transitions, compressible convection, and different pressure-temperature-dependent composite rheologies in upper and lower mantles. We use a visco-plastic rheology in which the viscous strain rate is obtained by summation of dislocation and diffusion creep. Pressure and velocity fields are solved on a staggered grid using a SIMPLER-like method. Multigrid W-cycles and extra coarse-grid relaxations are employed to enhance the convergence of Stokes and continuity equations. The grain size is stored on a large number of tracers advected through the computational domain (a 2D spherical annulus), which prevent numerical diffusion and allows a high resolution. We also describe the physical formalism itself and derive a set of free parameters for the model. The results show that Normal growth, dynamic

  5. Impact of lithosphere rheology on the dynamic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Evgueni; Gerya, Taras; Koptev, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic topography is a key observable signature of the Earth's and planetary (e.g. Venus) mantle dynamics. In general view, it reflects complex mantle flow patterns, and hence is supposed to correlate at different extent with seismic tomography, SKS fast orientations, geodetic velocity fields and geoid anomalies. However, identification of dynamic topography had no systematic success, specifically in the Earth's continents. Here we argue that lithosphere rheology, in particular, rheological stratification of continents, results in modulation of dynamic topography, converting commonly expected long-wavelength/small amplitude undulations into short-wavelength surface undulations with wide amplitude spectrum, superimposed onto "tectonic" topography. These ideas are explored in 3D using unprecedentedly high resolution numerical experiments (grid step size 2-3 km for 1500x1500x600 km computational area) incorporating realistic rheologically stratified lithosphere. Such high resolution is actually needed to resolve small-scale crustal faulting and inter-layer coupling/uncoupling that shape surface topography. The results reveal strikingly discordant, counterintuitive features of 3D dynamic topography, going far beyond the inferences from previous models. In particular, even weak anisotropic tectonic stress field results both in large-scale small-amplitude dynamic topography and in strongly anisotropic short-wavelength (at least in one direction) dynamic topography with wide amplitude range (from 100 to 2000-3000 m), including basins and ranges and large-scale linear normal and strike-slip faults. Even very slightly pre-stressed strong lithosphere yields and localizes deformation much easier , than un-prestressed one, in response to plume impact and mantle flow. The results shed new light on the importance of lithosphere rheology and active role of lithosphere in mantle-lithosphere interactions as well as on the role of mantle flow and far-field stresses in tectonic

  6. Dynamics of the detachment of subducted tectonic plates: Rheologic controls and ridge-trench interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, Erin Rachel

    The detachment (break-off or tearing) of portions of subducted tectonic lithosphere has attracted increasing recognition in the past decade as a process that may cause a range of seismic, tectonic, and magmatic observations in a number of locations worldwide (e.g., Baja California, central Mexico, Mediterranean-Carpathian region, India-Asia collision zone, and Tonga-Fiji-New Hebrides-New Zealand region). Slab detachment is a transitory process marking the end of subduction that has major implications for rapid changes in plate motions following loss of the slab pull force driving subduction. Although many studies have focused on the dynamics of subduction initiation and self-sustaining subduction, few have explored the dynamics of the end stage of subduction. I present results of two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) numerical models that provide constraints on the rheologic controls on the dynamics of slab detachment, which build upon previous conceptual models, observational studies, and analytic calculations that make up the majority of current slab detachment literature. Results of 2-D models of a stalled subduction scenario demonstrate that (a) the inclusion of a more realistic non-Newtonian upper mantle rheology is necessary for the occurrence of slab detachment, and (b) the timing and depth of detachment depend on slab stiffness (stress supported viscously) as determined by the maximum yield strength and age of the slab. In 2-D models that include a specific possible mechanism for stalled subduction (i.e., ridge-trench collision), slab detachment (a) occurs in all cases before the ridge approaches within ˜100 km of the trench due to the increased buoyancy and reduced strength of young lithosphere between ˜7-12 My in age, and (b) is first order consistent with observations of offshore ridge abandonment, cessation of subduction, and evidence for slab gap volcanism along Baja California. Three-dimensional model results also demonstrate the same

  7. Magma rheology and eruption style at Volcán Fuego, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, A. G.; Magaldi, T.; Calderas, A.; Chigna, G.; Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Lyons, J. J.; Mathias, O.; Robert, G.; Seaman, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Volcán Fuego, Guatemala, is a basaltic andesitic stratovolcano that has been in semi-continuous eruption for more than 500 years. The past decade has been characterized by vulcanian explosions with minor ash emission, punctuated by strombolian episodes with extrusions of lava flows and rare larger eruptions with pyroclastic flows, most recently in September 2012. We have investigated 10 samples (4 lava flows, 2 air-cooled bombs, and 4 blocks transported in pyroclastic flows) erupted or deposited in 2003 and in 2008-9, and all collected from the Barranca Santa Teresa on Fuego's western flank, to see if the type of activity (lava flow vs pyroclastic flow generation) can be correlated with varying physical and chemical properties of the magma. In particular we test the hypothesis that magma rheology controls eruptive style, i.e. blocks and bombs should be more viscous than lava flows. All the samples are highly crystalline, with similar basaltic andesite bulk compositions (52-53 wt.% SiO2) comprising matrix glass of andesitic to dacitic composition (62-67 wt.% SiO2) with abundant plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts together with minor Fe-Ti oxides. One lava flow "2003c" has a rhyolitic matrix glass (74 wt.% SiO2). Phenocryst compositions vary little, and show no systematic variation with eruption style. The matrix (dense-rock) density of the samples also varies little, from 2810-2850 kgm-3), while bulk density varies from 1480 to 2680 kgm-3, due to porosity. Lava flow samples contain 11-16 vol.% vesicles, while the bomb contains 16 vol.% and blocks range from 5 vol.% (dense) to 48 vol.% (vesicular). Water contents of matrix glasses vary from 0.25 wt.% (bomb) to less than 500 ppm (breadcrust block in a pyroclastic flow). The rheology of all samples was measured by uniaxial compression at 1020°C and 1 atm. In all experiments, regardless of porosity, the viscosity increased from 1010 to 1012 Pa.s in a few hours, then increased only slightly for the next 80

  8. Acetylation of banana (Musa paradisiaca L.) and corn (Zea mays L.) starches using a microwave heating procedure and iodine as catalyst: II. Rheological and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rivera, Mirna M; Almanza-Benitez, Sirlen; Bello-Perez, Luis A; Mendez-Montealvo, Guadalupe; Núñez-Santiago, María C; Rodriguez-Ambriz, Sandra L; Gutierrez-Meráz, Felipe

    2013-02-15

    The effect of iodine concentration on the acetylation of starches with low and moderate degree of substitution (DS<0.5) and its impact on the physicochemical feature and structural features was evaluated. The acetylated starches were prepared with 0.03 mol anhydroglucose unit, 0.12 mol of anhydride acetic, and 0.6, 0.9 or 1.4 mM of molecular iodine as catalyst in a sealed Teflon vessel using microwave heating (600 W/2 min). Pasting profile and rheological properties were obtained under steady flow; dynamic oscillatory test was used. Structural features were obtained by HPSEC-RI. In acetylated starches, DS and acetyl groups increased when the iodine concentration increased, corn starch showed higher values than banana starch. The viscosity of acetylated starches decreased relative to unmodified starches while, acetylated corn starch had lower value than acetylated banana starch. In the flow curves, a non-Newtonian pattern (shear-thinning) was shown in the pastes of native and modified starches. Storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G") showed low dependence on frequency (G'αω(0.1); G"αω(0.2)) on frequency sweep test, which is characteristic of a viscoelastic gel. Debranched native banana and corn starches presented trimodal chain-length distribution. The pattern was maintained in the acetylated starches, but with different level of short and long chains. The structural differences in native and acetylated samples explain the rheological characteristics in both starches.

  9. Local rheology of human neutrophils investigated using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong J; Patel, Dipika; Park, Soyeun

    2011-01-01

    During the immune response, neutrophils display localized mechanical events by interacting with their environment through the micro-vascular transit, trans-endothelial, and trans-epithelial migration. Nano-mechanical studies of human neutrophils on localized nano-domains could provide the essential information for understanding their immune responsive functions. Using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)-based micro-rheology, we have investigated rheological properties of the adherent human neutrophils on local nano-domains. We have applied the modified Hertz model to obtain the viscoelastic moduli from the relatively thick body regions of the neutrophils. In addition, by using more advanced models to account for the substrate effects, we have successfully characterized the rheological properties of the thin leading and tail regions as well. We found a regional difference in the mechanical compliances of the adherent neutrophils. The central regions of neutrophils were significantly stiffer (1,548 ± 871 Pa) than the regions closer to the leading edge (686 ± 801 Pa), while the leading edge and the tail (494 ± 537 Pa) regions were mechanically indistinguishable. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli also display a similar regional difference. Over the studied frequency range (100 to 300 Hz), the complex viscoelastic moduli display the partial rubber plateau behavior where the elastic moduli are greater than the viscous moduli for a given frequency. The non-disparaging viscous modulus indicates that the neutrophils display a viscoelastic dynamic behavior rather than a perfect elastic behavior like polymer gels. In addition, we found no regional difference in the structural damping coefficient between the leading edge and the cell body. Thus, we conclude that despite the lower loss and storage moduli, the leading edges of the human neutrophils display partially elastic properties similar to the cell body. These results suggest that the lower elastic moduli

  10. Local rheology of human neutrophils investigated using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong J; Patel, Dipika; Park, Soyeun

    2011-01-01

    During the immune response, neutrophils display localized mechanical events by interacting with their environment through the micro-vascular transit, trans-endothelial, and trans-epithelial migration. Nano-mechanical studies of human neutrophils on localized nano-domains could provide the essential information for understanding their immune responsive functions. Using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)-based micro-rheology, we have investigated rheological properties of the adherent human neutrophils on local nano-domains. We have applied the modified Hertz model to obtain the viscoelastic moduli from the relatively thick body regions of the neutrophils. In addition, by using more advanced models to account for the substrate effects, we have successfully characterized the rheological properties of the thin leading and tail regions as well. We found a regional difference in the mechanical compliances of the adherent neutrophils. The central regions of neutrophils were significantly stiffer (1,548 ± 871 Pa) than the regions closer to the leading edge (686 ± 801 Pa), while the leading edge and the tail (494 ± 537 Pa) regions were mechanically indistinguishable. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli also display a similar regional difference. Over the studied frequency range (100 to 300 Hz), the complex viscoelastic moduli display the partial rubber plateau behavior where the elastic moduli are greater than the viscous moduli for a given frequency. The non-disparaging viscous modulus indicates that the neutrophils display a viscoelastic dynamic behavior rather than a perfect elastic behavior like polymer gels. In addition, we found no regional difference in the structural damping coefficient between the leading edge and the cell body. Thus, we conclude that despite the lower loss and storage moduli, the leading edges of the human neutrophils display partially elastic properties similar to the cell body. These results suggest that the lower elastic moduli

  11. Rheological and morphological properties of graphene-epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the rheological and morphological properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated. Two samples of partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) and carboxylated partially exfoliated graphite (CpEG), differing essentially for the content of carboxylated groups, are used. The percentage of exfoliated graphite is slightly different for the two samples: 56% for pEG and and 60% for CpEG. Exfoliated graphite is prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The epoxy matrix is prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), is added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the pEG and CpEG samples in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behavior; on the contrary the complex viscosity of the nanocomposites clearly shows a shear thinning behavior at 3 wt % of pEG content and at 0.75 wt% of CpEG content. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of pEG and CpEG content is mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus of the nanocomposites. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures are cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage is carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour and, then, a second isothermal stage at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The different morphology shown by the two pEG and CpEG samples is consistent with the difference in the percentage of exfoliation degree and well correlates with the rheological behavior of investigated graphene-epoxy nanocomposites.

  12. Thermo-Rheological Feedbacks in Silicic Lavas and Ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, A. G.; Robert, G.; Andrews, G. D.; Avard, G.; Romine, W. L.; Ye, J.

    2012-12-01

    The rheology of lava is highly dependent on temperature, both directly (via non-Arrhenian temperature dependence of melt viscosity) and indirectly (via increasing crystal content). Rheology feeds back to temperature, because rapidly sheared melts can undergo viscous heating (heat production = viscosity × [strain rate]2), and rapid disequilibrium crystallization can cause heating due to latent heat release (ΔHxt). The heat budget of partially crystalline lava balances these gains with conductive losses controlled by thermal diffusivity (D) and conductivity (k = DρCP, where ρ is density and CP is heat capacity). We measured the apparent viscosity of several crystalline dacitic lavas from Santiaguito, Guatemala and Bezymianny, Kamchatka. At conditions appropriate to lava flows (shear stress ~0.1 to 0.4 MPa, strain rate ~10-8 to 10-5s-1), apparent viscosity is best modeled as a power-law with no yield strength. Viscosity of the flow core, at ~850°C, is estimated ~5×1010 Pa.s. There is no evidence for significant crystallization during flow emplacement at Santiaguito, but viscous heating may be significant ongoing heat source within these flows (~100Wm-3 if most shearing is restricted to a ~1m wide zone), enabling highly viscous lava to travel long distances (~4 km in ~2 yrs for Santiaguito). Extremely high-grade, lava-like welded ignimbrites are deposited by many of the largest explosive eruptions in Earth history with volumes typically ranging between 10 to 1000 km3 and volcanic explosivity indices of 8 to 9. The lava-like and rheomorphic Grey's Landing ignimbrite, Idaho, provides abundant field evidence supporting the upward-migration of a transient, 1 - 2 m thick, sub-horizontal ductile shear zone at the interface between the pyroclastic density current and deposit, through which all of the deposit passed. We test the syn-depositional shear zone model through a combination of rheological experiments and thermo-mechanical modeling. Our results demonstrate that

  13. Rheology as a tool for evaluation of melt processability of innovative dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Aho, Johanna; Boetker, Johan P; Baldursdottir, Stefania; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-10-30

    Future manufacturing of pharmaceuticals will involve innovative use of polymeric excipients. Hot melt extrusion (HME) is an already established manufacturing technique and several products based on HME are on the market. Additionally, processing based on, e.g., HME or three dimensional (3D) printing, will have an increasingly important role when designing products for flexible dosing, since dosage forms based on compacting of a given powder mixture do not enable manufacturing of optimal pharmaceutical products for personalized treatments. The melt processability of polymers and API-polymer mixtures is highly dependent on the rheological properties of these systems, and rheological measurements should be considered as a more central part of the material characterization tool box when selecting suitable candidates for melt processing by, e.g., HME or 3D printing. The polymer processing industry offers established platforms, methods, and models for rheological characterization, and they can often be readily applied in the field of pharmaceutical manufacturing. Thoroughly measured and calculated rheological parameters together with thermal and mechanical material data are needed for the process simulations which are also becoming increasingly important. The authors aim to give an overview to the basics of rheology and summarize examples of the studies where rheology has been utilized in setting up or evaluating extrusion processes. Furthermore, examples of different experimental set-ups available for rheological measurements are presented, discussing each of their typical application area, advantages and limitations.

  14. The influence of selected excipients on the rheological behaviour of chitosan based ocular pharmaceutical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, L.; Szabadi, E.; Hajdú, M.; Budai, M.; Klebovich, I.; Antal, I.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: Chitosan, a modified natural carbohydrate polymer, has received great attention in diverse scientific fields including pharmaceutical and biomedical research areas. Besides its low toxicity, mucoadhesiveness and biodegradability its special favourable rheological feature makes it a unique gelling agent for the design of ocular systems. Chitosan based (2.0 w/v %) ocular systems containing selected excipients were formulated in order to investigate the rheological influence of applied auxiliary materials. Rotational and oscillatory rheological properties of propylene glycol (1.0-20.0 w/v %), glycerin (1.0-5.0 w/v %) and castor oil (1.0-5.0 w/v %) containing chitosan gels were evaluated. The rheological behaviour of formulated ocular gels were compared before and after steam sterilization. Methods: Rotational and oscillatory rheological measurements were carried out with Kinexus Pro Rheometer. Comparison of flow curves and oscillatory frequency sweep measurements in the linear viscoelastic region made possible the evaluation of rheological effect of selected excipients. Results: In the applied concentration range the effect of propylene glycol among the selected excipients presents the most significant impact on rheology of chitosan formulations. Steam sterilization results in reduced viscosity in most of chitosan gels. However, the presence of polyols appears to prevent the degradation of chitosan after steam sterilization.

  15. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-07-05

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  16. Past presidents I have known.

    PubMed Central

    Keys, T E

    1998-01-01

    This paper is an account of the accomplishments of some of the early past presidents of the Medical Library Association known personally to the author in his career as a medical librarian. It demonstrates the qualities that made these librarians leaders of our profession and also indicates their personal attributes that contributed to the advancement of medical librarianship. It is hoped that the historical presentation of some of the giants of our profession will inspire present and future presidents and other medical librarians with an understanding of some of the qualities necessary to the continuing success of our profession. Sir William Osler, who was a great believer in libraries and librarians and himself a past president of MLA, summed up four qualities in his advice to medical students equally applicable to past and present leadership in the library profession--(1) the art of detachment, (2) the virtue of method, (3) the quality of thoroughness, and (4) the grace of humility (Osler, Sir William. Teacher and Student. In his Aequanimitas: with Other Addresses to Medical Students. 3d ed. Philadelphia, Blakiston Company, 1904. p. 27-31). It is thought that our past presidents possessed all of these qualities. Images PMID:9578938

  17. Healing the Past through Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullet, Judy H.; Akerson, Nels M. K.; Turman, Allison

    2013-01-01

    Stories matter, and the stories we tell ourselves matter most. Truth has many layers and narrative helps us makes senses of our multilayered reality. We live a personal narrative that is grounded in our past experience, but embodied in our present. As such, it filters what we see and how we interpret events. Attachment theorists tell us our early…

  18. Past presidents I have known.

    PubMed Central

    Keys, T E

    1975-01-01

    This paper is an account of the accomplishments of some of the early past presidents of the Medical Library Association known personally to the author in his career as a medical librarian. It demonstrates the qualities that made these librarians leaders of our profession and also indicates their personal attributes that contributed to the advancement of medical librarianship. It is hoped that the historical presentation of some of the giants of our profession will inspire present and future presidents and other medical librarians with an understanding of some of the qualities necessary to the continuing success of our profession. Sir William Osler, who was a great believer in libraries and librarians and himself a Past President of MLA, summed up four qualities in his advice to medical students equally applicable to past and present leadership in the library profession-(1) the art of detachment, (2) the virtue of method, (3) the quality of thoroughness, (4) the grace of humility (Osler, Sir William. Teacher and Student. In his Aequanimitas: with Other Addresses to Medical Students. 3d ed. Philadelphia, Blakiston Company, 1904. p. 27-31.). It is thought that our past presidents possessed all of these qualities. Images PMID:1089017

  19. Comparing the rheology of native spider and silkworm spinning dope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, C.; Terry, A. E.; Porter, D.; Vollrath, F.

    2006-11-01

    Silk production has evolved to be energetically efficient and functionally optimized, yielding a material that can outperform most industrial fibres, particularly in toughness. Spider silk has hitherto defied all attempts at reproduction, despite advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its superb mechanical properties. Spun fibres, natural and man-made, rely on the extrusion process to facilitate molecular orientation and bonding. Hence a full understanding of the flow characteristics of native spinning feedstock (dope) will be essential to translate natural spinning to artificial silk production. Here we show remarkable similarity between the rheologies for native spider-dragline and silkworm-cocoon silk, despite their independent evolution and substantial differences in protein structure. Surprisingly, both dopes behave like typical polymer melts. This observation opens the door to using polymer theory to clarify our general understanding of natural silks, despite the many specializations found in different animal species.

  20. Propulsion with a Reciprocal Stroke Enabled by Nonlinear Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, Paulo; Shen, Xiaoning; Keim, Nathan

    2012-11-01

    In a fluid that is entirely viscous, a reciprocal swimming stroke results in no net displacement. However, complex fluids such as mucus or dense suspensions exhibit nonlinear rheology even at low Reynolds number. This nonlinear fluid response can lead to time-reversal symmetry breaking which can enable a reciprocal swimmer to move. Here we demonstrate this principle with a reciprocally-actuated artificial propeller in two viscoelastic fluids: a polymeric fluid with elasticity but negligible shear thinning, and a wormlike micellar fluid that exhibits shear thinning and shear-bands. Propulsion is absent in Newtonian fluid, and is strongest in the shear-thinning micellar fluid. We report on the role of elasticity (Deborah number) in setting the speed of propulsion, and of body shape and boundary conditions in setting its direction. This work is supported by the Army Research Office through award W911NF-11-1-0488.

  1. Rheological properties of ovalbumin hydrogels as affected by surfactants addition.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Messina, Paula V; Dodero, Veronica I; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-04-01

    The gel properties of ovalbumin mixtures with three different surfactants (sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate and sodium dodecanoate) have been studied by rheological techniques. The gel elasticities were determined as a function of surfactant concentration and surfactant type. The fractal dimension of the formed structures was evaluated from plots of storage modulus against surfactant concentration. The role of electrostatic, hydrophobic and disulfide SS interactions in these systems has been demonstrated to be the predominant. The viscosity of these structures tends to increase with surfactant concentration, except for the fluorinated one. Unfolded ovalbumin molecules tend to form fibrillar structures that tend to increase with surfactant concentration, except for the fluorinated one. This fact has been related to the particular nature of this molecule.

  2. Rheology and Relaxation Timescales of ABA Triblock Polymer Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andrew; Lodge, Timothy

    When dissolved in a midblock selective solvent, ABA polymers form gels composed of aggregated end block micelles bridged by the midblocks. While much effort has been devoted to the study of the structure of these systems, the dynamics of these systems has received less attention. We examine the underlying mechanism of shear relaxation of ABA triblock polymer gels, especially as a function of chain length, composition, and concentration. Recent work using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering of polystyrene (PS)-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PEP) in squalane has elucidated many aspects of the dynamics of diblock chain exchange. By using rheology to study bulk relaxation phenomena of the triblock equivalent, PS-PEP-PS, we apply the knowledge gained from the chain exchange studies to bridge the gap between the molecular and macroscopic relaxation phenomena in PS-PEP-PS triblock gels.

  3. Rheological characterization of digested sludge by solid sphere impact.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiankai; Wu, Jing; Poncin, Souhila; Li, Huai Z

    2016-10-01

    An impact method was applied to investigate the rheological characteristics of digested sludge and reveal its transient dynamics. A high-speed camera allowed visualizing the dynamic impact process and observing interaction between impacting sphere and targeted sludge. A damping oscillation was observed after the impact. The crater diameter followed an exponential function, while the crater depth varied as a logarithmic function of both sphere diameter and free fall height. Furthermore, the viscosity and elasticity of digested sludge were evaluated by establishing a simplified impact drag force model. The impact elastic modulus was consistent with the Young's modulus measured by a penetrometer. The impact viscosity was reasonable as the estimated impact shear stress was greater than the yield stress of digested sludge resulting in the formation of crater. The impact method offers an alternative way to reveal the viscoelasticity of digested sludge through a dynamic process.

  4. Rheological investigation of highly filled polymers: Effect of molecular weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatkova, Eva; Hausnerova, Berenika; Hales, Andrew; Jiranek, Lukas; Vera, Juan Miguel Alcon

    2015-04-01

    The paper deals with rheological properties of highly filled polymers used in powder injection molding. Within the experimental framework seven PIM feedstocks based on superalloy Inconel 718 powder were prepared. Each feedstock contains the fixed amount of powder loading and the same composition of binder system consisting of three components: polyethylene glycol (PEG) differing in molecular weight, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and stearic acid (SA). The aim is to investigate the influence of PEG's molecular weight on the flow properties of feedstocks. Non-Newtonian indices, representing the shear rate sensitivity of the feedstocks, are obtained from a polynomial fit, and found to vary within measured shear rates range from 0.2 to 0.8. Temperature effect is considered via activation energies, showing decreasing trend with increasing of molecular weight of PEG (except of feedstock containing 1,500 g.mol-1 PEG).

  5. New insights on the rheological properties of a rocksalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, G.; Vinciguerra, S.; Di Genova, D.; Romano, C.; Vona, A.; Mollo, S.; Iarocci, A.

    2013-12-01

    The importance and economic interest on rocksalt deposits and salt bodies are well known and extensively studied. The physical and mechanical properties of salt have a profound influence on the tectonics as well as they are considered to be vital for applicative purposes such as mining, petroleum and nuclear waste storage. However, previous scientific works have mainly focused on synthetic rocksalt or commercial salt, whereas natural salt facies have been scarcely investigated. In this view, we present new data on the role of natural heterogeneities (i.e., relative abundance of primary salt crystals and impurities) on the rheological parameters of a rocksalt. This rock belongs to the Saline di Volterra formation (Volterra basin, Tuscany, central Italy) that was deposited during the Messinian Salinity Crisis. The 49-metre-thick salt sequence (intersected by the S1113 borehole of the Solvay company) is characterized by a high salt facies variability. In particular, three end-members have been recognized: the first contains abundant primary salt crystals, with minor or no recrystallizazion; the second member is extensively recrystallized, with scarce primary crystal remnants; the third shows a great abundance of clay impurities. Rheological parameters, such as static and dynamic Young's Modulus and coefficient of linear expansion, were measured for the three rocksalt end-members throughout P and S seismic velocities, uniaxial compressive strength and thermal expansion measurements. Seismic velocity has been measured on cubic samples with a side ranging from 4 to 7 cm. A clear effect of the salt facies was found: the average velocity is faster in mostly recrystallized salt samples (4500 m/s), slower in primary salt-rich samples (4300 m/s), and intermediate (4350 m/s) in presence of clay impurities. Dynamic Young's Modulus calculated on velocities (average value ≈ 38 GPa) mirrors this behavior, with lowest values related to primary salt. The anisotropic effect induced

  6. Rheology, tectonics, and the structure of the Venus lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    Given the absence of ground truth information on seismic structure, heat flow, and rock strength, or short wavelength gravity or magnetic data for Venus, information on the thermal, mechanical and compositional nature of the shallow interior must be obtained by indirect methods. Using pre-Magellan data, theoretical models constrained by the depths of impact craters and the length scales of tectonic features yielded estimates on the thickness of Venus' brittle-elastic lithosphere and the allowable range of crustal thickness and surface thermal gradient. The purpose of this study is to revisit the question of the shallow structure of Venus based on Magellan observations of the surface and recent experiments that address Venus' crustal rheology.

  7. Novel formulations of ballistic gelatin. 1. Rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Zecheru, Teodora; Său, Ciprian; Lăzăroaie, Claudiu; Zaharia, Cătălin; Rotariu, Traian; Stănescu, Paul-Octavian

    2016-06-01

    Ballistic gelatin is the simulant of the human body during field tests in forensics and other related fields, due to its physical and mechanical similarities to human trunk and organs. Since the ballistic gelatin used in present has important issues to overcome, an alternative approach is the use of gelatin-polymer composites, where a key factor is the insertion of biocompatible materials, which replicate accurately the human tissues. In order to be able to obtain an improved material in terms of mechanical performances by an easy industrial-scale technology, before the verification of the ballistic parameters by shooting in agreement with military standards, one of the best and cheapest solutions is to perform a thorough check of their rheological properties, in standard conditions. PMID:27139038

  8. Rheological decoupling at the Moho and implication to Venusian tectonics

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Shintaro; Katayama, Ikuo; Nakakuki, Tomoeki

    2014-01-01

    Plate tectonics is largely responsible for material and heat circulation in Earth, but for unknown reasons it does not exist on Venus. The strength of planetary materials is a key control on plate tectonics because physical properties, such as temperature, pressure, stress, and chemical composition, result in strong rheological layering and convection in planetary interiors. Our deformation experiments show that crustal plagioclase is much weaker than mantle olivine at conditions corresponding to the Moho in Venus. Consequently, this strength contrast may produce a mechanical decoupling between the Venusian crust and interior mantle convection. One-dimensional numerical modeling using our experimental data confirms that this large strength contrast at the Moho impedes the surface motion of the Venusian crust and, as such, is an important factor in explaining the absence of plate tectonics on Venus. PMID:24638113

  9. The Rheological Structure of the East Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Jin, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Rheological Structure of the East Tibetan Plateau Xiaodian Jiang1, and Yu Jin2 1. Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China 2. Chevron Exploration & Production, Beijing 100004, China The rheological structure of the lithosphere can be calibrated with seismic activities. We intensively use the seismic focal depths from 2072 events occurring in Longmenshan Fold Belt (LFB) area to identify the transition from brittle failure to ductile with depth in the lithosphere. The earthquakes were monitored by China Earthquake Network Center (CENC) from 01/07/1970 through 31/08/2010 with magnitude larger than 3.5 at 88 earthquake stations with a depth error bar of ±2km. Among the 2072 seismic events, 82 of them have a magnitude larger than 5 and were recorded simultaneously by the NEIC and CENC since January 1, 1990. The parameters of the 82 events recorded by both institutions are in close agreement. Most of the earthquakes in LFB and its vicinity occurred at depths from 2 to 36 km. However, there are 3 extras with focal depth at 39, 44 and 60 km respectively. All these three events occurred in Sichuan Basin where the lithosphere is not decouple between the crust and the upper mantle so that the brittle failure is able to propagate all the way from the crust to the upper mantle lithosphere. Because all of the seismic events in the eastern Tibetan plateau occurred at the depths less than or equal to 36±2 km deep, the 36±2 km should be a good statistical number to define the lower boundary of the elastically strong, brittle upper/middle crust. The Moho depth across LFB calculated by the 3D flexural modeling in space domain constrained by the gridded gravity database and merged our new measurement data varies considerably from about 38 km in Sichuan Basin to about 58 km beneath the eastern plateau. The Moho depths in the eastern plateau are in lower to mid 50 km deep. In the other words, the thermally depending ductile, weak lower crust is rheologically defined the

  10. Rheological profile of boron nitride–ethylene glycol nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Żyła, Gaweł; Witek, Adam; Gizowska, Magdalena

    2015-01-07

    The paper presents the complete rheological profile of boron nitride (BN)–ethylene glycol (EG) nanofluids. Nanofluids have been produced by two-step method on the basis of commercially available powder of plate-like grains of nanometrical thickness. Viscoelastic structure has been determined in oscillatory measurements at a constant frequency and temperature. Viscosity and flow curves for these materials have been measured. Studies have shown that the Carreau model can be used for the modeling of dynamic viscosity curves of the material. The samples were tested for the presence of thixotropy. The dependence of viscosity on temperature was also examined. The effect of temperature on the dynamic viscosity of BN-EG nanofluids can be modelled with the use of Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann expression.

  11. Rheological decoupling at the Moho and implication to Venusian tectonics.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Shintaro; Katayama, Ikuo; Nakakuki, Tomoeki

    2014-01-01

    Plate tectonics is largely responsible for material and heat circulation in Earth, but for unknown reasons it does not exist on Venus. The strength of planetary materials is a key control on plate tectonics because physical properties, such as temperature, pressure, stress, and chemical composition, result in strong rheological layering and convection in planetary interiors. Our deformation experiments show that crustal plagioclase is much weaker than mantle olivine at conditions corresponding to the Moho in Venus. Consequently, this strength contrast may produce a mechanical decoupling between the Venusian crust and interior mantle convection. One-dimensional numerical modeling using our experimental data confirms that this large strength contrast at the Moho impedes the surface motion of the Venusian crust and, as such, is an important factor in explaining the absence of plate tectonics on Venus. PMID:24638113

  12. Rheological measurements in titania gels synthesized from reverse micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, S. D.; Kurlat, D. H.

    2000-06-01

    TiO 2 sol and gel systems have been synthesized by hydrolysis of titanium butoxide in microemulsions W/O. Different systems compositions were prepared at constant Wo=[H 2O]/[AOT] and changing R=[H 2O]/[Ti(BuO) 4]. Experimental measurements show a progressive increase of the viscosity with time, characteristic of a sol-gel transition. The rheology of the transition was studied by following the behavior of viscoelastic parameters ( G', G″ and η*) as a function of time at different frequencies. The possibility to apply standard percolation theory was discussed. The application of two alternative growth models — either `fractal growth model' or `nearly linear growth model' — has been analysed.

  13. Human cervical mucus. V. Oral contraceptives and mucus rheologic properties.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Blasco, L; Khan, M A; Litt, M

    1979-08-01

    Mucus viscoelasticity on individual samples obtained from patients using combination oral contraceptives was quantitated by microrheometry. These results, in conjunction with mucus chemical characterization, indicate that combination oral contraceptive use eliminates the cyclic variations in mucus chemical, physicochemical, and rheologic properties associated with the ovulatory menstrual cycle. A correlation was demonstrated between the mucus elastic modulus and mucus nondialyzable dry weight, and the mucins produced during oral contraceptive therapy were shown to be similar to those recovered from ovulatory donors. Differences in mucus properties were noted when donors using estrogenic contraceptives were contrasted with those using androgenic contraceptives. On the basis of established relationships between sperm penetrability and mucus solids content, it was concluded that the use of contraceptives, as examined in this study, provided a secondary degree of fertility control at the cervical level.

  14. Aggregation kinetics and shear rheology of aqueous silica suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metin, Cigdem O.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Lake, Larry W.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Nguyen, Quoc P.

    2012-12-01

    The kinetics of aggregation of silica nanoparticle solutions as a function of NaCl and silica concentrations is studied experimentally and theoretically. Silica nanoparticles form fractal aggregates due to the collapse of the electrical double layer at high salt concentrations and resulting reduction in stabilizing repulsive force. We propose a convenient model to describe the aggregation of silica nanoparticles and the growth of their aggregate size that depends on particle size and concentration and salt concentration. The model agrees well with experimental data. The aggregation of silica nanoparticles also affects the rheology of the suspension. We propose an equilibrium approach for sediment volume fraction to determine the maximum effective packing fraction. The results for the relative viscosity of silica aggregates agree well with the proposed viscosity model, which also collapses onto a single master curve.

  15. Low temperature rheological studies of hydrocarbon base lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Venerus, D.C.; Klaus, E.E.; Duda, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    This study is designed to evaluate the rheological properties of samples of waxy mineral oil, a wax-free hydrocarbon solvent, wax-free polymer-thickened oils and fully formulated lubricants containing wax and polymer in hydrocarbon solvents. A mechanical spectrometer (cone and plate rotational viscometer) and the mini rotary viscometer were used in these studies. The cooling rate and cold soak times were computer programmed using a mechanical system. A compromise system using a cooling rate of 0.56/sup 0/C/min and a cold soak time of one hour was used in order to produce data in a reasonable time. These values were chosen from the information gained on wax crystal growth and equilibration from the low temperature dewaxing studies conducted at this laboratory.

  16. Rheological characterization of digested sludge by solid sphere impact.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiankai; Wu, Jing; Poncin, Souhila; Li, Huai Z

    2016-10-01

    An impact method was applied to investigate the rheological characteristics of digested sludge and reveal its transient dynamics. A high-speed camera allowed visualizing the dynamic impact process and observing interaction between impacting sphere and targeted sludge. A damping oscillation was observed after the impact. The crater diameter followed an exponential function, while the crater depth varied as a logarithmic function of both sphere diameter and free fall height. Furthermore, the viscosity and elasticity of digested sludge were evaluated by establishing a simplified impact drag force model. The impact elastic modulus was consistent with the Young's modulus measured by a penetrometer. The impact viscosity was reasonable as the estimated impact shear stress was greater than the yield stress of digested sludge resulting in the formation of crater. The impact method offers an alternative way to reveal the viscoelasticity of digested sludge through a dynamic process. PMID:27372010

  17. Rheology of human blood plasma: viscoelastic versus Newtonian behavior.

    PubMed

    Brust, M; Schaefer, C; Doerr, R; Pan, L; Garcia, M; Arratia, P E; Wagner, C

    2013-02-15

    We investigate the rheological characteristics of human blood plasma in shear and elongational flows. While we can confirm a Newtonian behavior in shear flow within experimental resolution, we find a viscoelastic behavior of blood plasma in the pure extensional flow of a capillary breakup rheometer. The influence of the viscoelasticity of blood plasma on capillary blood flow is tested in a microfluidic device with a contraction-expansion geometry. Differential pressure measurements revealed that the plasma has a pronounced flow resistance compared to that of pure water. Supplementary measurements indicate that the viscoelasticity of the plasma might even lead to viscoelastic instabilities under certain conditions. Our findings show that the viscoelastic properties of plasma should not be ignored in future studies on blood flow.

  18. Novel reversible and switchable electrolytes based on magneto-rheology

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Peng, Gangrou; Shu, Kewei; Wang, Caiyun; Tian, Tongfei; Yang, Wenrong; Zhang, Yuanchao; Wallace, Gordon G.; Li, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    Replacing organic liquid electrolytes with solid electrolytes has led to a new perspective on batteries, enabling high-energy battery chemistry with intrinsically safe cell designs. However, most solid/gel electrolytes are easily deformed; under extreme deformation, leakage and/or short-circuiting can occur. Here, we report a novel magneto-rheological electrolyte (MR electrolyte) that responds to changes in an external magnetic field; the electrolyte exhibits low viscosity in the absence of a magnetic field and increased viscosity or a solid-like phase in the presence of a magnetic field. This change from a liquid to solid does not significantly change the conductivity of the MR electrolyte. This work introduces a new class of magnetically sensitive solid electrolytes that can enhance impact resistance and prevent leakage from electronic devices through reversible active switching of their mechanical properties. PMID:26493967

  19. Rheological decoupling at the Moho and implication to Venusian tectonics.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Shintaro; Katayama, Ikuo; Nakakuki, Tomoeki

    2014-03-18

    Plate tectonics is largely responsible for material and heat circulation in Earth, but for unknown reasons it does not exist on Venus. The strength of planetary materials is a key control on plate tectonics because physical properties, such as temperature, pressure, stress, and chemical composition, result in strong rheological layering and convection in planetary interiors. Our deformation experiments show that crustal plagioclase is much weaker than mantle olivine at conditions corresponding to the Moho in Venus. Consequently, this strength contrast may produce a mechanical decoupling between the Venusian crust and interior mantle convection. One-dimensional numerical modeling using our experimental data confirms that this large strength contrast at the Moho impedes the surface motion of the Venusian crust and, as such, is an important factor in explaining the absence of plate tectonics on Venus.

  20. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, R. K.; Nagaraj, H. S.; Sanborn, D. M.; Winer, W. O.

    1975-01-01

    Traction prediction in sliding elastohydrodynamic (EHD) contacts was examined along with an elastohydrodynamic lubrication simulation of the effects of load and speed on temperatures in the EHD contact. An existing shear stress theory and lubricant rheological model were studied and evaluated by applying them to traction prediction. Results obtained using measured film thickness and surface temperature data, were compared with measured traction values. The infrared technique for measuring temperatures in an EHD contact was further developed and ball surface and fluid temperatures are reported for sliding speeds of 0.35 to 5.08 m/s at 0.52 to 2.03 GN/sq m maximum pressure and surface roughnesses of .011 to .381 micrometers c.1.a. The relationship between asperity interaction, as measured by relocation surface profilimetry and high frequency temperature measurements, and the ratio of film thickness to surface roughness was also studied.

  1. [Venous insufficiency in the pregnant woman. Rheological correction by troxerutin].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, G; Lacombe, C

    1991-02-25

    We realized a double-blind randomized study in 26 pregnant with clinical symptoms of lower limbs venous insufficiency. Both groups were similar and received either (n = 12) troxerutine (4 g/day) or placebo (n = 14), during 30 days. Evaluation at J0 and J30 was both clinical and rheological by mean of Myrenne aggregometer. After blood shear rate of 600 s-1, two parameters were determined: M after roughly stopping shear rate, M1 after diminishing to shear rate of 3 s-1. Results exhibited steady values in patients receiving troxerutine while a significant increasing values in patients receiving placebo for the two parameters M and M1. That result in erythrocyte antiaggregating action of troxerutine, hence lowering viscosity action, in venous insufficiency during pregnancy.

  2. Granular flow down an inclined plane: Bagnold scaling and rheology.

    PubMed

    Silbert, L E; Ertaş, D; Grest, G S; Halsey, T C; Levine, D; Plimpton, S J

    2001-11-01

    We have performed a systematic, large-scale simulation study of granular media in two and three dimensions, investigating the rheology of cohesionless granular particles in inclined plane geometries, i.e., chute flows. We find that over a wide range of parameter space of interaction coefficients and inclination angles, a steady-state flow regime exists in which the energy input from gravity balances that dissipated from friction and inelastic collisions. In this regime, the bulk packing fraction (away from the top free surface and the bottom plate boundary) remains constant as a function of depth z, of the pile. The velocity profile in the direction of flow vx(z) scales with height of the pile H, according to vx(z) proportional to H(alpha), with alpha=1.52+/-0.05. However, the behavior of the normal stresses indicates that existing simple theories of granular flow do not capture all of the features evidenced in the simulations.

  3. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the `cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  4. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    PubMed

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-26

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  5. Rheological behavior of cellulose nanowhisker suspension under magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dah Hee; Song, Young Seok

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the influence of a magnetic field on the rheology of cellulose nanowhisker (CNW) suspension. The morphology of CNWs was analyzed by using polarized optical microscopy (POM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The findings show that the application of the magnetic field leads to an increase in shear viscosity and viscoelastic properties such as the storage and loss moduli. A mesoscale constitutive model was adopted to provide better understanding of the effect of particle concentration on the orientation of CNWs. As the concentration increases, the steric interaction between particles becomes significant and the effect of the applied magnetic field on the internal structure of the CNW suspension was reduced. In addition, the size distribution of CNWs was characterized using a light scattering method.

  6. Electroviscous contribution to the rheology of colloidal unimolecular polymer (CUP) particles in water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minghang; Riddles, Cynthia J; Van De Mark, Michael R

    2013-11-19

    The rheological characteristics of anionic colloidal unimolecular polymer (CUP) particles in water were investigated. The intrinsic viscosities were determined for CUPs with different molecular weights as a function of volume fraction. The specific viscosities were measured and fit with models considering hydrodynamic interaction and electroviscous effects. The rheological characteristics were consistent with a surface layer of water which increases with the particle size or molecular weight of CUPs. The effective charges on the surface of particle were calculated and correlated with the rheological behavior of the CUP particles from the dilute to semidilute range, a volume fraction of 0.0001-0.08.

  7. Stochastic Aspects of Bridging Bonds of Induced Structure of Electro-Rheological Fluids in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riha, P.; Kimura, H.; Takimoto, J.; Koyama, K.

    The bridging of electrodes by clusters of polarizable elements occurs to be a dominant feature of the response of certain electrorheological fluid suspensions and liquid polymeric blends to the imposed electric field. The evolution of the bridging structure in deformation and flow is described as a stochastic process and identified with the macroscopic flow behavior. The effect of structure is introduced into the rheological equation providing its non-linear modification. The comparisons are presented showing how the proposed rheological equation describes rheological characteristics measured at steady shearing flow and start-up shearing flow.

  8. Rheological properties of living cytoplasm: endoplasm of Physarum plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Wong, T Z; Allen, R D

    1983-10-01

    Magnetic sphere viscoelastometry, video microscopy, and the Kamiya double chamber method (Kamiya, N., 1940, Science [Wash. DC], 92:462-463.) have been combined in an optical and rheological investigation of the living endoplasm of Physarum polycephalum. The rheological properties examined were yield stress, viscosity (as a function of shear), and elasticity. These parameters were evaluated in directions perpendicular; (X) and parallel (Y) to the plasmodial vein. Known magnetic forces were used for measurements in the X direction, while the falling ball technique was used in the Y direction (Cygan, D.A., and B. Caswell, 1971, Trans. Soc. Rheol. 15:663-683; MacLean-Fletcher, S.D., and T.D. Pollard, 1980, J. Cell Biol., 85:414-428). Approximate yield stresses were calculated in the X and Y directions of 0.58 and 1.05 dyn/cm2, respectively. Apparent viscosities measured in the two directions (eta x and eta y) were found to fluctuate with time. The fluctuations in eta x and eta y were shown, statistically, to occur independently of each other. Frequency correlation with dynamoplasmograms indicated that these fluctuations probably occur independently of the streaming cycle. Viscosity was found to be a complex function of shear, indicating that the endoplasm is non-Newtonian. Plots of shear stress vs. rate of shear both parallel and perpendicular to the vein, showed that endoplasm is not a shear thinning material. These experiments have shown that living endoplasm of Physarum is an anisotropic viscoelastic fluid with a yield stress. The endoplasm appears not to be a homogeneous material, but to be composed of heterogeneous domains. PMID:6619187

  9. Rheological characterization of a magnetorheological ferrofluid using iron nitride nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Ahuré-Powell, Louise A.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetorheology of a magnetorheological ferrofluid (MRFF) was investigated to study the role of a ferromagnetic nanoparticle (NP) additive in magnetorheological fluids (MRFs). Iron nitride (Fe16N2) NPs, nominally within the diameter range of ˜16-45 nm (spherical NPs) and ˜30-66 nm (cubic NPs), were coated with carboxy-polyethylene glycol (carboxy-PEG) and dispersed in silicone oil in order to produce a magnetic carrier fluid or ferrofluid for two solids loadings: 2 vol. % and 5 vol. %. Conventional spherical carbonyl iron (CI) particles, varying in diameter from 6 to 10 μm, were suspended in the ferrofluid at 25 vol. % solids loading. Rheological properties of the MRFF synthesized with the carboxy-PEG-based ferromagnetic carrier fluid were compared to the MRF synthesized with silicone oil to determine how ferrofluid can influence dynamic viscosity and yield stress. Rheological measurements of both MRF and MRFF samples were carried out using a Paar Physica 300 rheometer to estimate the field-off viscosity and to measure flow curves (i.e., shear stress vs. shear rate) as a function of magnetic field. A Bingham-plastic model was used to characterize the flow curves, and results show that there is an increase in the dynamic viscosity of the MRFF over the MRF. The ferromagnetic carrier fluid greatly increases yield stress as only 2 vol. % of added carboxy-PEG NPs improves the yield stress performance by almost 5%. A second MRFF sample synthesized with 5 vol. % of added carboxy-PEG NPs contained in the ferrofluid significantly enhanced the yield stress performance by 13% over the MRF at the same CI solids loading (25 vol. %).

  10. Experiments on the rheology of vesicle-bearing magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vona, Alessandro; Ryan, Amy G.; Russell, James K.; Romano, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    We present a series of high temperature uniaxial deformation experiments designed to investigate the effect of bubbles on the magma bulk viscosity. Starting materials having variable vesicularity (φ = 0 - 66%) were synthesized by high-temperature foaming (T = 900 - 1050 ° C and P = 1 bar) of cores of natural rhyolitic obsidian from Hrafntinnuhryggur, Krafla, Iceland. These cores were subsequently deformed using a high-temperature uniaxial press at dry atmospheric conditions. Each experiment involved deforming vesicle-bearing cores isothermally (T = 750 ° C), at constant displacement rates (strain rates between 0.5-1 x 10‑4 s‑1), and to total strains (ɛ) of 10-40%. The viscosity of the bubble-free melt (η0) was measured by micropenetration and parallel plate methods and establishes a baseline for comparing data derived from experiments on vesicle rich cores. At the experimental conditions, the presence of vesicles has a major impact on the rheological response, producing a marked decrease of bulk viscosity (maximum decrease of 2 log units Pa s) that is best described by a two-parameter empirical equation: log ηBulk = log η0 - 1.47 * [φ/(1-φ)]0.48. Our model provides a means to compare the diverse behaviour of vesicle-bearing melts reported in the literature and reflecting material properties (e.g., analogue vs. natural), geometry and distribution of pores (e.g. foamed/natural vs. unconsolidated/sintered materials), and flow regime. Lastly, we apply principles of Maxwell relaxation theory, combined with our parameterization of bubble-melt rheology, to map the potential onset of non-Newtonian behaviour (strain localization) in vesiculated magmas and lavas as a function of melt viscosity, vesicularity, strain rate, and geological condition. Increasing vesicularity in magmas can initiate non-Newtonian behaviour at constant strain rates. Lower melt viscosity sustains homogeneous Newtonian flow in vesiculated magmas even at relatively high strain rates.

  11. The Application of Powder Rheology in Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Jamie; Millington-Smith, Doug; Armstrong, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is sensitive to powder variability when applying fine layers in a uniform manner. This demands a high degree of consistency and repeatability in the feedstock. Particle size is often used as a critical quality attribute, but this is not sufficient to fully qualify a feedstock. Indeed, it is inadequate to suggest that any parameter from a single test, e.g., Hall flowmeter or Hausner ratio, can comprehensively describe a powder's characteristics. This article uses four case studies to demonstrate the limitations of single parameter characterization and how the rheological properties of several metal powders used in AM applications are used to establish in-process performance. In the first study, the significantly reduced permeability and increased specific energy of a one batch of powder demonstrate a clear link to poor layer uniformity. The second study investigates the impact of metal powder manufacturing methods and suppliers, and it shows how shear properties alone cannot be relied on to identify properties that influence the process. The effect of additives on the processability of polymer blends used in AM is also evaluated, and the results show that even small quantities can have a significant effect on the permeability and basic flowability energy of feedstocks. The final study demonstrates the how rheological measurements can be used to identify the optimum blend of fresh and used material when reusing metal powders to manufacture components. These case studies illustrate the ability of a modern powder rheometer to detect minor variations in powders that are directly relevant to performance in AM processes in a way that traditional characterization methods cannot.

  12. Lubrication, adsorption, and rheology of aqueous polysaccharide solutions.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jason R; Macakova, Lubica; Chojnicka-Paszun, Agnieszka; de Kruif, Cornelis G; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2011-04-01

    Aqueous lubrication is currently at the forefront of tribological research due to the desire to learn and potentially mimic how nature lubricates biotribological contacts. We focus here on understanding the lubrication properties of naturally occurring polysaccharides in aqueous solution using a combination of tribology, adsorption, and rheology. The polysaccharides include pectin, xanthan gum, gellan, and locus bean gum that are all widely used in food and nonfood applications. They form rheologically complex fluids in aqueous solution that are both shear thinning and elastic, and their normal stress differences at high shear rates are found to be characteristic of semiflexible/rigid molecules. Lubrication is studied using a ball-on-disk tribometer with hydrophobic elastomer surfaces, mimicking biotribological contacts, and the friction coefficient is measured as a function of speed across the boundary, mixed, and hydrodynamic lubrication regimes. The hydrodynamic regime, where the friction coefficient increases with increasing lubricant entrainment speed, is found to depend on the viscosity of the polysaccharide solutions at shear rates of around 10(4) s(-1). The boundary regime, which occurs at the lowest entrainment speeds, depends on the adsorption of polymer to the substrate. In this regime, the friction coefficient for a rough substrate (400 nm rms roughness) is dependent on the dry mass of polymer adsorbed to the surface (obtained from surface plasmon resonance), while for a smooth substrate (10 nm rms roughness) the friction coefficient is strongly dependent on the hydrated wet mass of adsorbed polymer (obtained from quartz crystal microbalance, QCM-D). The mixed regime is dependent on both the adsorbed film properties and lubricant's viscosity at high shear rates. In addition, the entrainment speed where the friction coefficient is a minimum, which corresponds to the transition between the hydrodynamic and mixed regime, correlates linearly with the ratio

  13. Yoghurt with candied chestnut: freeze drying, physical, and rheological behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sakin-Yilmazer, Melike; Dirim, S Nur; Di Pinto, Davide; Kaymak-Ertekin, Figen

    2014-12-01

    As a novel product, yoghurt powder was produced by freeze drying and with added candied chestnut puree at ratios of 5, 10, and 20 % by weight. During the freeze drying process, mass loss, water activity, and the moisture content of the samples were determined and the colour (Hunter L, a, b) of the yoghurt powder products was measured. Results showed that increasing the percentage of candied chestnut puree resulted in an increase in water activity, moisture content, and colour change values of the end product. The drying behaviour, drying rate versus free moisture content, was also investigated. It was observed that yoghurt with or without added candied chestnut puree could be satisfactorily freeze-dried. Moreover, the performance of the dried product was observed in a ready-to-use, reconstituted form. For this purpose, the obtained powders were reconstituted to their original moisture contents. Shear stress and apparent viscosity against shear rate in a range of 1-1,000 (1/sec) was then measured by a Haake-Mars rotary viscometer. According to the results, the apparent viscosities of reconstituted products, as plain yoghurt and the one with an added 5 % chestnut puree were lower than that of fresh yoghurt. However, reconstituted yoghurts containing 10 % and 20 % chestnut puree had apparent viscosities higher than fresh yoghurt. Power Law explained well the rheological behaviour of reconstituted yoghurt samples for the applied shear rate range. Based on rheological data and sensory analysis, it was concluded that the freeze dried yoghurt containing 10 % (w/w) candied chestnut puree was an acceptable novel product. PMID:25477665

  14. Constraints on Lithospheric Rheology from Observations of Coronae on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Smrekar, Suzanne; Moresi, Louis N.

    2016-10-01

    Coronae are enigmatic, quasi-circular features found in myriad geological environments. They are primarily distinguished as rings of concentric fractures superimposed on various topographic profiles with at least small-scale volcanism. Mantle plumes may produce coronae with interior rises, whereas coronae with central depressions are often attributed to downwellings like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. For almost three decades, modelers have attempted to reproduce the topographic and gravity profiles measured at coronae. Until recently, few studies also considered tectonic deformation and melt production. In particular, "Type 2" coronae have complete topographic rims but arcs of fractures extending less than 180°, signifying both brittle and ductile deformation. Only a narrow range of rheological parameters like temperature and volatile content may be compatible with these observations. Ultimately, identifying how lithospheric properties differ between Earth and Venus is critical to understanding what factors permit plate tectonics on rocky, Earth-sized planets.Here we present a hierarchical approach to study the formation of coronae. First, we discuss an observational survey enabled by a new digital elevation model derived from stereo topography for ~20% of the surface of Venus, which offers an order-of-magnitude improvement over the horizontal resolution (10 to 20 kilometers) of altimetry data from NASA's Magellan mission. Next, we search this new dataset for signs of lithospheric flexure around small coronae. Simple, thin-elastic plate models were fit to topographic profiles of larger coronae in previous studies, but data resolution impeded efforts to apply this method to the entire coronae population. Finally, we show simulations of the formation of coronae using Underworld II, an open-source code adaptable to a variety of geodynamical problems. We benchmark our code using models of pure Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and then investigate the influence of

  15. Serum zinc and blood rheology in sportsmen (football players).

    PubMed

    Khaled, S; Brun, J F; Micallel, J P; Bardet, L; Cassanas, G; Monnier, J F; Orsetti, A

    1997-01-01

    We aimed at investigating relationships between zinc status, blood rheology and blood glucose during exercise. Twenty-one professional football players underwent a triangular maximal exercise test on cycloergometer, with progressively increasing work loads until VO2max. On the whole these subjects had a low serum zinc because nine of them had a hypozincemia (0.54 +/- 0.01 mg/l) which suggested a zinc deficiency. Subjects with low serum zinc were able to perform a lower power output (123 +/- 8.71 vs. 166.27 +/- 14.84 watts, p = 0.029) and exhibited a higher increase in blood lactate during exercise (7.51 +/- 0.81 vs. 5.57 +/- 0.33 mmol/l, p = 0.024) resulting in a lower 2 mmol lactate threshold (44.7 +/- 3.9% vs. 58.9 +/- 4.8% of maximal power output, p = 0.04). They were less able to maintain their plasma glucose and exhibited a tendency towards hypoglycemia (p = 0.0153). Hypozincemia was associated with a higher viscometric RBC rigidity index (p = 0.0009), and this index was negatively correlated to serum zinc (r = -0.68, p = 0.7 x 10(-3)). Blood viscosity at high shear rate (MT90 viscosimeter) corrected for hematocrit (45%) remained higher during exercise in these hypozincemic subjects (p = 0.003). This study suggests that zinc status may influence blood rheology during exercise, either by its direct action on RBC flexibility (demonstrated in vitro) or by its effect on lactate accumulation which may in turn modify erythrocyte fexibility. PMID:9181758

  16. Magneto-rheological (MR) damper for landing gear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khani, Mahboubeh

    2010-11-01

    Depending on the different sink speeds, angles of attack and masses; aircraft landing gears could face a wide range of impact conditions which may possibly cause structural damage or failure. Thus, in hard landing scenarios, the landing gear must absorb sufficient energy in order to minimize dynamic stress on the aircraft airframe. Semi-active control systems are the recent potential solutions to overcome these limitations. Among semi-active control strategies, those based on smart fluids such as magneto-rheological (MR) fluids have received recent attraction as their rheological properties can be continuously controlled using magnetic or electric field and they are not sensitive to the contaminants and the temperature variation and also require lower powers. This thesis focuses on modeling of a MR damper for landing gear system and analysis of semi-active controller to attenuate dynamic load and landing impact. First, passive landing gear of a Navy aircraft is modeled and the forces associated with the shock strut are formulated. The passive shock strut is then integrated with a MR valve to design MR shock strut. Here, MR shock strut is integrated with the landing gear system modeled as the 2DOF system and governing equations of motion are derived in order to simulate the dynamics of the system under different impact conditions. Subsequently the inverse model of the MR shock strut relating MR yield stress to the MR shock strut force and strut velocity is formulated. Using the developed governing equations and inverse model, a PID controller is formulated to reduce the acceleration of the system. Controlled performance of the simulated MR landing gear system is demonstrated and compared with that of passive system.

  17. Cassia spectabilis DC seed galactomannan: structural, crystallographical and rheological studies.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, V P; Taravel, F R; Joseleau, J P; Milas, M; Chanzy, H; Rinaudo, M

    1998-01-01

    The seeds of Cassia spectabilis DC (family: Leguminoseae), an Indian fast growing spreading tree, contain about 40% of endosperm and possess the characteristics of becoming a potential source of commercial gum. The purified galactomannan shows Mw 1.1 x 10(6), intrinsic viscosity [eta] 615ml/g with k' = 1.706 x 10(-1), and a mannose to galactose ration of 2.65. The hydrolysis of the fully methylated polysaccharide reveals clearly the expected structure of legume galactomannans. The orthorhombic lattice constants of the hydrated gums are as follows: a = 9.12 A, b = 25.63 A and c = 10.28 A. The results of X-ray fiber studies show that the b dimension of the unit cell is very sensitive to relative humidity (RH), galactose substitution and orientation of the films. The probable space group symmetry of the unit cell is P2(1)2(1)2. Rheological studies of the galactomannan have shown that the transition from semi-dilute to dilute regime occurs at a critical concentration Cc* = 2.75. The slope of the log-log plot of specific viscosity versus C at zero shear rate is 5.87 in the more concentrated regime. The viscoelastic and critical shear rate behavior indicate the characteristics of a coil polymer. The large dependence of the viscosity on the coil overlap parameter is probably due to polymer-polymer interactions and peculiarity of the galactose distribution along the chain. Above 20 g/L concentration, the rheological behavior of the gum is like the one of a weak-gel.

  18. Experiments on the rheology of vesicle-bearing magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vona, Alessandro; Ryan, Amy G.; Russell, James K.; Romano, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    We present a series of high temperature uniaxial deformation experiments designed to investigate the effect of bubbles on the magma bulk viscosity. Starting materials having variable vesicularity (φ = 0 - 66%) were synthesized by high-temperature foaming (T = 900 - 1050 ° C and P = 1 bar) of cores of natural rhyolitic obsidian from Hrafntinnuhryggur, Krafla, Iceland. These cores were subsequently deformed using a high-temperature uniaxial press at dry atmospheric conditions. Each experiment involved deforming vesicle-bearing cores isothermally (T = 750 ° C), at constant displacement rates (strain rates between 0.5-1 x 10-4 s-1), and to total strains (ɛ) of 10-40%. The viscosity of the bubble-free melt (η0) was measured by micropenetration and parallel plate methods and establishes a baseline for comparing data derived from experiments on vesicle rich cores. At the experimental conditions, the presence of vesicles has a major impact on the rheological response, producing a marked decrease of bulk viscosity (maximum decrease of 2 log units Pa s) that is best described by a two-parameter empirical equation: log ηBulk = log η0 - 1.47 * [φ/(1-φ)]0.48. Our model provides a means to compare the diverse behaviour of vesicle-bearing melts reported in the literature and reflecting material properties (e.g., analogue vs. natural), geometry and distribution of pores (e.g. foamed/natural vs. unconsolidated/sintered materials), and flow regime. Lastly, we apply principles of Maxwell relaxation theory, combined with our parameterization of bubble-melt rheology, to map the potential onset of non-Newtonian behaviour (strain localization) in vesiculated magmas and lavas as a function of melt viscosity, vesicularity, strain rate, and geological condition. Increasing vesicularity in magmas can initiate non-Newtonian behaviour at constant strain rates. Lower melt viscosity sustains homogeneous Newtonian flow in vesiculated magmas even at relatively high strain rates.

  19. Dynamic rupture in a damage-breakage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ilchev, Assen; Mendecki, Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    We present a thermodynamically based formulation for modelling dynamic rupture processes in the brittle crust using a continuum damage-breakage rheology. The model combines aspects of a continuum viscoelastic damage framework for brittle solids with a continuum breakage mechanics for granular flow within dynamically generated slip zones. The formulation accounts for the density of distributed cracking and other internal flaws in damaged rocks with a scalar damage parameter, and addresses the grain size distribution of a granular phase in the slip zone with a breakage parameter. A dynamic brittle instability is associated with a critical level of damage in the solid, leading to loss of convexity of the solid strain energy, localization and transition to a granular phase associated with lower energy level. The continuum damage-breakage rheology model treats the localization to a slip zone at the onset of dynamic rupture and post-failure recovery process as phase transitions between solid and granular states. The model generates sub- and supershear rupture velocities and pulse-type ruptures seen also in frictional models, and additional important features such as strong dynamic changes of volumetric strain near the rupture front and diversity of nucleation mechanisms. The propagation of rupture front and slip accumulation at a point are correlated with sharp dynamic dilation followed by a gradual decay to a level associated with the final volumetric change associated with the granular phase transition in the slipping zone. The local brittle failure process associated with the solid-granular transition is expected to produce isotropic radiation in addition to the deviatoric terms. The framework significantly extends the ability to model brittle processes in complex geometrical structures and allows analysing the roles of gouge thickness and other parameters on nucleation, rupture and radiation characteristics.

  20. Dynamic rupture in a damage-breakage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ilchev, Assen; Mendecki, Aleksander

    2016-05-01

    We present a thermodynamically-based formulation for modeling dynamic rupture processes in the brittle crust using a continuum damage-breakage rheology. The model combines aspects of a continuum viscoelastic damage framework for brittle solids with a continuum breakage mechanics for granular flow within dynamically generated slip zones. The formulation accounts for the density of distributed cracking and other internal flaws in damaged rocks with a scalar damage parameter, and addresses the grain size distribution of a granular phase in the slip zone with a breakage parameter. A dynamic brittle instability is associated with a critical level of damage in the solid, leading to loss of convexity of the solid strain energy, localization, and transition to a granular phase associated with lower energy level. The continuum damage-breakage rheology model treats the localization to a slip zone at the onset of dynamic rupture and post-failure recovery process as phase transitions between solid and granular states. The model generates sub- and super-shear rupture velocities and pulse-type ruptures seen also in frictional models, and additional important features such as strong dynamic changes of volumetric strain near the rupture front and diversity of nucleation mechanisms. The propagation of rupture front and slip accumulation at a point are correlated with sharp dynamic dilation followed by a gradual decay to a level associated with the final volumetric change associated with the granular phase transition in the slipping zone. The local brittle failure process associated with the solid-granular transition is expected to produce isotropic radiation in addition to the deviatoric terms. The framework significantly extends the ability to model brittle processes in complex geometrical structures and allows analyzing the roles of gouge thickness and other parameters on nucleation, rupture and radiation characteristics.

  1. Flow properties of MK-based geopolymer pastes. A comparative study with standard Portland cement pastes.

    PubMed

    Favier, Aurélie; Hot, Julie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-02-28

    Geopolymers are presented in many studies as alternatives to ordinary Portland cement. Previous studies have focused on their chemical and mechanical properties, their microstructures and their potential applications, but very few have focussed on their rheological behaviour. Our work highlights the fundamental differences in the flow properties, which exist between geopolymers made from metakaolin and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). We show that colloidal interactions between metakaolin particles are negligible and that hydrodynamic effects control the rheological behaviour. Metakaolin-based geopolymers can then be described as Newtonian fluids with the viscosity controlled mainly by the high viscosity of the suspending alkaline silicate solution and not by the contribution of direct contacts between metakaolin grains. This fundamental difference between geopolymers and OPC implies that developments made in cement technology to improve rheological behaviour such as plasticizers will not be efficient for geopolymers and that new research directions need to be explored.

  2. Volcanologists and the geologic past

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Were volcanologists to be asked why they study active volcanoes, they would list many reasons: to understand their dynamics, to use them as windows into the earth, to warn of hazards, to provide nearly real-time information on rates of various physical and chemical processes, and many others. Near the bottom of the list would be "to understand the Earth's past." Generally, that task has been left to other corners of the earth sciences, and volcanologists have kept their sights on the present or near present without worrying much about what happened millions of years ago. But much can be gained from applying a volcanologic perspective to the interpretation of old rocks, and this gain enhances our understanding of both the past and the present. 

  3. Ebolavirus Evolution: Past and Present

    PubMed Central

    de La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Stein, Derek; Kobinger, Gary P

    2015-01-01

    The past year has marked the most devastating Ebola outbreak the world has ever witnessed, with over 28,000 cases and over 11,000 deaths. Ebola virus (EBOV) has now been around for almost 50 years. In this review, we discuss past and present outbreaks of EBOV and how those variants evolved over time. We explore and discuss selective pressures that drive the evolution of different Ebola variants, and how they may modify the efficacy of therapeutic treatments and vaccines currently being developed. Finally, given the unprecedented size and spread of the outbreak, as well as the extended period of replication in human hosts, specific attention is given to the 2014–2015 West African outbreak variant (Makona). PMID:26562671

  4. Effects of nonlinear rheology and anisotropy on the relationship between age and depth at ice divides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C.; Gudmundsson, G. H.

    2012-04-01

    Ice-cores need to be accurately dated to reveal, in detail, past environmental conditions. The ice-core chronology is always incomplete because of ice stratigraphy thinning and distortion due to flow, and timeline extraction is often reliant on simplified models to predict the age of ice. Through numerical modelling using a full Stokes solver and a non-linear anisotropic rheology, we investigate the effects of ice flow on the age versus depth relationship at ice divides. We compare our results with analytical approximations commonly employed in age-depth prediction. Our main findings are: Firstly, once the ice has developed a significant single maximum or vertical girdle fabric, the analytical approximations tend to underestimate the age of ice. Secondly, ice fabric enhance the effect of the bedrock topography on the ice flow. We show that the presence of single maximum fabric close to the bedrock affects strongly the ice stratigraphy and the age-depth relationship. We also study the coupling between anisotropic viscosity and internal heating. It does produce a warm spot and softer ice at the base of the divide when compared with surrounding areas. Finally we study the age-depth distribution in divides that show double-peaked Raymond bump in their radar stratigraphy. They provide ideal locations fore ice-core drilling as they have been stable for a long time when compared with their characteristic time (ice thickness divide by accumulation). Our model shows that the ice in these areas can be up to one order of magnitude older that ice at the same depth both at the flanks of the divide area or on similar divides that have not been stable for that long.

  5. Study and modeling of the rheological properties of concentrated water-in-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Koroleva, M.Yu.; Yurtov, E.V.

    1994-07-01

    Study of the rheological curves of concentrated water-in-oil emulsions indicates that such systems behave like non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic liquids. A number of mathematical models for rheological curves: Chong, Frankel-Acrivos, Ostwald-Weil, Bingham, Stainer, Ferry, Haven, Ellis, and Meter models are considered. The regions of the model adequacy for rheological curves of emulsions with different contents of the dispersed phase are determined. It was shown that only the Ellis model adequately describes the complete rheological curves of concentrated water-in-oil emulsions of the studied composition. Therefore, this model can be applied to the prediction of the viscosity values for emulsions with various phase ratios.

  6. Enhancement of Hydrodynamic Processes in Oil Pipelines Considering Rheologically Complex High-Viscosity Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakhina, I. A.; Khusnutdinova, E. M.; Khamidullina, G. R.; Khamidullina, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model of flow-related hydrodynamic processes for rheologically complex high-viscosity bitumen oil and oil-water suspensions and presents methods to improve the design and performance of oil pipelines.

  7. Rheology, Morphology and Temperature Dependency of Nanotube Networks in Polycarbonate/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Samaneh; Carreau, Pierre J.; Derdouri, Abdessalem

    2008-07-07

    We present several issues related to the state of dispersion and rheological behavior of polycarbonate/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites. The composites were prepared by diluting a commercial masterbatch containing 15 wt% nanotubes using optimized melt-mixing conditions. The state of dispersion was then analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). Rheological characterization was also used to assess the final morphology. Further, it was found that the rheological percolation threshold decreased significantly with increasing temperature and finally reached a constant value. This is described in terms of the Brownian motion, which increases with temperature. However, by increasing the nanotube content, the temperature effects on the complex viscosity at low frequency decreased significantly. Finally, the percolation thresholds were found to be approximately equal to 0.3 and 2 wt% for rheological and electrical conductivity measurements, respectively.

  8. Rheological monitoring of phase separation induced by chemical reaction in thermoplastic-modified epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vinh-Tung, C.; Lachenal, G.; Chabert, B.

    1996-12-31

    The phase separation induced by chemical reaction in blends of tetraglycidyl-diaminodiphenylmethane epoxy resin with an aromatic diamine hardener and a thermoplastic was monitored. Rheological measurements and morphologies are described.

  9. Role of inertia in the rheology of amorphous systems: A finite-element-based elastoplastic model.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Kamran; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2016-02-01

    A simple finite-element analysis with varying damping strength is used to model the athermal shear rheology of densely packed glassy systems at a continuum level. We focus on the influence of dissipation on bulk rheological properties. Our numerical studies, done over a wide range of damping coefficients, identify two well-separated rheological regimes along with a crossover region controlled by a critical damping. In the overdamped limit, inertial effects are negligible and the rheological response is well described by the commonly observed Herschel-Bulkley equation. In stark contrast, inertial vibrations in the underdamped regime prompt a significant drop in the mean-stress level, leading to a nonmonotonic constitutive relation. The observed negative slope in the flow curve, which is a signature of mechanical instability and thus permanent shear banding, arises from the sole influence of inertia, in qualitative agreement with the recent molecular dynamics study of Nicolas et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 058303 (2016).

  10. An Overview of the Basic Rheological Behavior of Polymer Fluids with an Emphasis on Polymer Melts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    Following a rationale for focusing on this topic, a molecular and nonmathematical approach is used to explain the basics of the flow (rheological) behavior of polymer melts, emphasizing the behavior of melts compared to that of solutions. (JN)

  11. SOLUTION RHEOLOGY OF HYPERBRANCHED POLYESTERS AND THEIR BLENDS WITH LINEAR POLYMERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the rheological properties of different generations of hyperbranched polyesters in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone solvent and their blends with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) have ben investigated. All the hyperbranched polyester solutions exhibited Newtonian behavior...

  12. Rheological study of feed stock for NiTi alloy molded parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subuki, I.; Abdullah, Z.; Razali, R.; Ismail, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    A rheological behaviour of the powder-binder mixture is one of essential analysis upon to success of Metal Injection Moulding (MIM) process. The purpose of this experimental work is to investigate the rheological behavior of feedstock containing mixtures of elemental Ni and Ti powders mixed with composite binder of palm stearin (PS) and polyethylene (PE) binder system. An equiatomic Ni-Ti (50-50) ratio was used in the present work for all formulations owing to excellent shape memory behaviour. The experimental rheological result indicated that all the feedstocks exhibited pseudo plastic flow behaviour; viscosity decreasing with temperature and shear rate. Increasing the powder loading resulted in higher viscosity, particularly at the low-range of shear rate. Owing to pseudo-plastic flow, it was found that the feedstock prepared exhibit promising rheological properties, thus resulting successfully injection moulding at an optimum temperature of 130°C.

  13. The Compatibility Effect Of Coupling Agent On Rheological-Morphological Relationship Of Banana Fibre Reinforced Polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. Y.; Shamsudin, Z.

    2009-06-01

    The rheological properties of banana fibre reinforced polypropylene (PP/BF) composites at different composition were analysed using Shimadzu capillary rheometer. The effect of coupling agent concentration on the rheological properties was studied and followed by drawing a relationship of rheological-morphological properties of PP/BF composites. It was found that all composite system exhibits pseudoplasticity and incorporation of treated fibres consequents enhanced viscosity due to improved interfacial adhesion at fibre-matrix interface. However, it was observed that PP/BF composite with 2 wt% silane concentration does not yield further enhancement in the rheological properties when compared to that of 1 wt%. Composites with 1 wt% silane concentration were found to yield most promising compatibility effect with well-oriented and uniformly dispersed fibre morphology.

  14. Past and Current Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes Rodríguez Ruibal, Ma

    2014-05-01

    In 1837 the Swiss geologist and palaeontologist Louis Agassiz was the first scientist to propose the existence of an ice age in the Earth's past. Nearly two centuries after discussing global glacial periods... while the average global temperature is rising very quickly because of our economic and industrial model. In tribute to these pioneers, we have selected a major climate change of the past as the Snowball Earth and, through various activities in the classroom, compared to the current anthropogenic climate change. First, we include multiple geological processes that led to a global glaciation 750 million years ago as the decrease in the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4, the effect of climate variations in solar radiation due to emissions of volcanic dust and orbital changes (Milankovitch cycles), being an essential part of this model the feedback mechanism of the albedo of the ice on a geological scale. Moreover, from simple experiments and studies in the classroom this time we can compare the past with the current anthropogenic global warming we are experiencing and some of its consequences, highlighting that affect sea level rise, increased extreme and effects on health and the biosphere weather.

  15. Constraints on Lithosphere Rheology from Observations of Volcano-induced Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, S.; Watts, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    Mantle rheology at lithospheric conditions (i.e., temperature < 1200 oC) is important for understanding fundamental geodynamic problems including the dynamics of plate tectonics, subducted slabs, and lithosphere-mantle interaction. Laboratory studies suggest that the rheology at lithospheric conditions can be approximately divided into three different regimes: brittle or frictional sliding, semi-brittle, and plastic flow. In this study, we seek to constrain lithospheric rheology, using observations of deformation at seamounts and oceanic islands caused by volcanic loading. Volcano-induced surface deformation depends critically on lithospheric rheology at the time of seamount and oceanic island emplacement and while it changes rapidly on short time-scales it does not change significantly on long time-scales. In an earlier study [Watts and Zhong, 2000], we used the effective elastic thickness at seamounts and oceanic islands inferred from the observations of deformation and gravity to determine an effective activation energy of 120 KJ/mol for lithospheric mantle with Newtonian rheology. We have now expanded this study to incorporate non-Newtonian power-law and frictional sliding rheologies, and more importantly, to include realistic 3-D volcanic load geometries. We use the Hawaiian Islands as an example. We construct 3-D loads for the Hawaiian Islands by applying an appropriate median filter to remove Hawaiian swell topography and correcting for lithospheric age effect on the bathymetry. The loads are then used in 3-D finite element loading models with viscoelastic, non-Newtonian and frictional sliding rheologies to determine the lithospheric response including surface vertical motions and lithospheric stresses. Comparisons of our new model predictions to observations suggest that the activation energy of lithospheric mantle is significantly smaller than most experimentally determined values for olivine at high temperatures, but may be consistent with more recent

  16. Different macro- and micro-rheological properties of native porcine respiratory and intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Bokkasam, Harish; Ernst, Matthias; Guenther, Marco; Wagner, Christian; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-08-20

    Aim of this study was to investigate the similarities and differences at macro- and microscale in the viscoelastic properties of mucus that covers the epithelia of the intestinal and respiratory tract. Natural mucus was collected from pulmonary and intestinal regions of healthy pigs. Macro-rheological investigations were carried out through conventional plate-plate rheometry. Microrheology was investigated using optical tweezers. Our data revealed significant differences both in macro- and micro-rheological properties between respiratory and intestinal mucus.

  17. Rheology of dense suspensions of non colloidal spheres in yield-stress fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzelli, Elisabeth; Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Hormozi, Sarah; Pouliquen, Olivier; Aix-Marseille Université, Cnrs, Iusti Umr 7343 Team; Department Of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio University Team

    2015-11-01

    Pressure-imposed rheometry is used to study the rheological properties of suspensions of non colloidal spheres in yield stress fluids. Accurate measurements for both the shear stress and particle normal stress are obtained in the dense regime. The rheological measurements are favourably compared to a model based on scaling arguments and homogenisation methods. The detailed account of this study can be found in. ANR-13-IS09-0005-01, Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowships Program PDF-439036-2013.

  18. In vitro/in vivo and analytical evaluation of sunless tanning formulations containing different rheology modifiers.

    PubMed

    Dueva-Koganov, Olga V; Mandalia, Yamini; Brito, Juan; Rocafort, Colleen; Orofino, Steven; Vazquez, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    In vitro data suggest that different in vivo performances are expected for two dihydroxyacetone (DHA)-containing formulations with similar concentrations of DHA and excipients but different commercially available rheology modifiers: one with a cationic polymer-based rheology modifier (blend) [dimethylacrylamide/ethyltrimonium chloride methacrylate copolymer (and) propylene glycol dicaprylate/dicaprate (and) PPG-1 trideceth-6 (and) C10-11 isoparaffin]; and the other with a polyacrylamide-based rheology modifier (blend) [polyacrylamide (and) C13-14 isoparaffin (and) laureth-7]. Both rheology modifiers (blends) contained comparable levels of polymers and were used at 3% w/w (as supplied). Differences in color development were illustrated in vitro with respect to the yellow/red and lightness/chroma parameters, which were confirmed in the followup in vivo studies. The test article with the cationic polymer-based rheology modifier produced a more natural sunless tan, comparable to a desirable sun-induced tan, for all panelists, one that was more uniform and lasted longer compared with the sunless tan generated by the test article with the polyacrylamide-based rheology modifier. A method for HPLC analysis of DHA in sunless tanning formulations was established and utilized to confirm concentrations of DHA in test articles.

  19. Recent advances in the GPUSPH model for the thermal and rheological evolution of lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Vito; Bilotta, Giuseppe; Cappello, Annalisa; Dalrymple, Robert A.; Fortuna, Luigi; Ganci, Gaetana; Herault, Alexis; Del Negro, Ciro

    2016-04-01

    GPUSPH is a fully three-dimensional model for the simulation of the thermal and rheological evolution of lava flows that relies on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) numerical method. Thanks to the Lagrangian, meshless nature of SPH, the model incorporates a more complete physical description of the emplacement process and rheology of lava that considers the free surface, the irregular boundaries represented by the topography, the solidification fronts and the non-Newtonian rheology. Because of the very high degree of parallelism, GPUSPH is implemented very efficiently on high-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) employing the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a parallel programming language developed by NVIDIA for GPU computing. GPUSPH follows the very general Herschel-Bulkley rheological model, which encompasses Newtonian, power-law and Bingham flow behaviour and can thus be used to explore in detail the impact of rheology on the behaviour of lava flows and on their emplacement. We present here the first validation tests of the GPUSPH model against well known analytical problems, considering the different rheological models, heat exchanges by thermal conduction and radiation, and providing the relative error estimates.

  20. In vitro/in vivo and analytical evaluation of sunless tanning formulations containing different rheology modifiers.

    PubMed

    Dueva-Koganov, Olga V; Mandalia, Yamini; Brito, Juan; Rocafort, Colleen; Orofino, Steven; Vazquez, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    In vitro data suggest that different in vivo performances are expected for two dihydroxyacetone (DHA)-containing formulations with similar concentrations of DHA and excipients but different commercially available rheology modifiers: one with a cationic polymer-based rheology modifier (blend) [dimethylacrylamide/ethyltrimonium chloride methacrylate copolymer (and) propylene glycol dicaprylate/dicaprate (and) PPG-1 trideceth-6 (and) C10-11 isoparaffin]; and the other with a polyacrylamide-based rheology modifier (blend) [polyacrylamide (and) C13-14 isoparaffin (and) laureth-7]. Both rheology modifiers (blends) contained comparable levels of polymers and were used at 3% w/w (as supplied). Differences in color development were illustrated in vitro with respect to the yellow/red and lightness/chroma parameters, which were confirmed in the followup in vivo studies. The test article with the cationic polymer-based rheology modifier produced a more natural sunless tan, comparable to a desirable sun-induced tan, for all panelists, one that was more uniform and lasted longer compared with the sunless tan generated by the test article with the polyacrylamide-based rheology modifier. A method for HPLC analysis of DHA in sunless tanning formulations was established and utilized to confirm concentrations of DHA in test articles. PMID:20447361

  1. Studies on Rheology of E-printing Inks by μ-PIV in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Young-Sik; Song, Simon

    2009-11-01

    Using printing technologies for electronic circuits, such as antennas for radio frequency identification (RFID) chips, has been paid attention to recently in order to reduce production costs. In general, E-printing inks used for printed electronics have non-Newtonian properties because they contain metallic particles. Thus, it is important to investigate rheological behaviors of E-printing inks and suggest proper rheological models for developing printing devices for printed electronics. Also, the rheological models are necessary to accurately predict ink behaviors using CFD. However, classic methods to study rheological models are somewhat irrelevant since they require the mass consumption of expensive E-printing inks. Thus, to study rheological models suitable for commercial E-printing inks, we use microfluidic chips that only requires nascent E-printing inks. We measured flow velocities using μPIV and pressure drops along the microchannel to determine a relationship between stress and strain rate of ink flows. We found that the E-printing inks exhibit shear-thinning behaviors. In the presentation, we will propose rheology models suitable for the E-printing inks.

  2. Rheological flow laws for multiphase magmas: An empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Mattia; Cordonnier, Benoît; Ulmer, Peter; Caricchi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The physical properties of magmas play a fundamental role in controlling the eruptive dynamics of volcanoes. Magmas are multiphase mixtures of crystals and gas bubbles suspended in a silicate melt and, to date, no flow laws describe their rheological behaviour. In this study we present a set of equations quantifying the flow of high-viscosity (> 105 Pa·s) silica-rich multiphase magmas, containing both crystals (24-65 vol.%) and gas bubbles (9-12 vol.%). Flow laws were obtained using deformation experiments performed at high temperature (673-1023 K) and pressure (200-250 MPa) over a range of strain-rates (5 · 10- 6 s- 1 to 4 · 10- 3 s- 1), conditions that are relevant for volcanic conduit processes of silica-rich systems ranging from crystal-rich lava domes to crystal-poor obsidian flows. We propose flow laws in which stress exponent, activation energy, and pre-exponential factor depend on a parameter that includes the volume fraction of weak phases (i.e. melt and gas bubbles) present in the magma. The bubble volume fraction has opposing effects depending on the relative crystal volume fraction: at low crystallinity bubble deformation generates gas connectivity and permeability pathways, whereas at high crystallinity bubbles do not connect and act as "lubricant" objects during strain localisation within shear bands. We show that such difference in the evolution of texture is mainly controlled by the strain-rate (i.e. the local stress within shear bands) at which the experiments are performed, and affect the empirical parameters used for the flow laws. At low crystallinity (< 44 vol.%) we observe an increase of viscosity with increasing strain-rate, while at high crystallinity (> 44 vol.%) the viscosity decreases with increasing strain-rate. Because these behaviours are also associated with modifications of sample textures during the experiment and, thus, are not purely the result of different deformation rates, we refer to "apparent shear-thickening" and

  3. On the dependence of stress states on viscoelastic rheologies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Jan; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    According to the World Stress Map, stresses in the earth crust change as a function of location and depth. Explaining the origin of the stresses is usually done by referring to active tectonic processes and by assuming that the crust is critically stressed. Although this is true in many areas around the world, we believe that the rheology of the rocks can also have an impact on the stress situation observed at depth. Considering viscoelastic materials, we investigate how the viscous component can lead to changes in stress situations with time and depth. Our setup is taken to represent a succession of perfectly bonded horizontal layers with different material properties overlain on top of each other. We use MILAMIN, a fast finite element code, to numerically study the impact of different viscoelastic rheologies on the stress distribution as a function of time. The code is purely mechanical but assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth and an Arrhenius law for viscosity we also include a first degree approximation of the temperature dependence of viscosity. Using our numerical code, we consider two sets of boundary conditions for a setup where a low viscosity layer is surrounded by much viscous ones. In the first set, we prescribe velocities at the bottom boundary and we determine how low a low viscosity layer should be to decouple the deformations seen in the layers above and below for time scales much shorter than the tectonic ones. We provide orders of magnitude for these low viscosities. In the second set, we prescribe tractions along a vertical boundary and we study how the stresses away from this boundary get redistributed between layers as a function of time. The low viscosity layer quickly reaches a hydrostatic state and the neighboring layers have to support the extra deviatoric stresses. Both sets of boundary conditions show that viscoelasticity can have an impact on the stress situation even at short time scales compared to the tectonic ones. It

  4. Colloids on the frontier of ferrofluids. Rheological properties.

    PubMed

    López-López, Modesto T; Gómez-Ramírez, Ana; Rodríguez-Arco, Laura; Durán, Juan D G; Iskakova, Larisa; Zubarev, Andrey

    2012-04-17

    This paper is devoted to the steady-state rheological properties of two new kinds of ferrofluids. One of these was constituted by CoNi nanospheres of 24 nm in diameter, whereas the other by CoNi nanofibers of 56 nm in length and 6.6 nm in width. These ferrofluids were subjected to shear rate ramps under the presence of magnetic fields of different intensity, and the corresponding shear stress values were measured. From the obtained rheograms (shear stress vs shear rate curves) the values of both the static and the dynamic yield stresses were obtained as a function of the magnetic field. The magnetoviscous effect was also obtained as a function of both the shear rate and the magnetic field. The experimental results demonstrate that upon magnetic field application these new ferrofluids develop yield stresses and magnetoviscous effects much greater than those of conventional ferrofluids, based on nanospheres of approximately 10 nm in diameter. Besides some expected differences, such as the stronger magnetorheological effect in the case of ferrofluids based on nanofibers, some intriguing differences are found between the rheological behaviors of nanofiber ferrofluids and nanosphere ferrofluid. First, upon field application the rheograms of nanofiber ferrofluids present N-shaped dependence of the shear stress on the shear rate. The decreasing part of the rheograms takes place at low shear rate. These regions of negative differential viscosity, and therefore, unstable flow is not observed in the case of nanosphere ferrofluids. The second intriguing difference concerns the curvature of the yield stress vs magnetic field curves. This curvature is negative in the case of nanosphere ferrofluid, giving rise to saturation of the yield stress at medium field, as expected. However, in the case of nanofiber ferrofluid this curvature is positive, which means a faster increase of the yield stress with the magnetic field the higher the magnitude of the latter. These interesting

  5. Rheological quality of pearl millet porridge as affected by grits size.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Deep N; Chhikara, Navnidhi; Anand, Tanupriya; Sharma, Monika; Singh, Ashish K

    2014-09-01

    Study was conducted to optimize pearl millet grits size for the preparation of acceptable porridge with skimmed milk powder (SMP). Pearl millet porridge was prepared with different grits size (1.410, 0.841, 0.595, and 0.420 mm). A positive (r = 0.904) correlation was observed between water absorption index and grits size. Porridge showed shear thinning behavior as, initially shear stress increased with increase in shear rate and later on decreased. Porridge prepared with larger grits (1.410 mm) exhibited higher firmness (38.4 ± 1.27 N) and viscosity (446 ± 3.9 cP), whereas smaller grits (0.420 mm) resulted in less viscous (118.8 ± 1.74 cP) and firm (20.4 ± 1.85 N) porridge. The medium grits (0.841 mm) produced porridge with acceptable firmness (30.7 ± 1.56 N) and viscosity (298.1 ± 8.81 cP) with moderate (6.0 ± 0.10) acceptability. To improve sensory quality of porridge (grits size 0.841 mm); skimmed milk powder at different levels (0, 5, 10 and 15 %) was added and its effect on various quality parameters was studied. SMP addition significantly (P ≤ 0.05) modified the gelatinization and gelling behavior of grits and decreased (P ≤ 0.05) all the pasting characteristics except pasting temperature, which increased from 77.1 ± 1.85 to 85.9 ± 3.46 °C. The peak (499 ± 6.6 cP) and final viscosity (450 ± 11.9 cP) of porridge (0.841 mm) prepared with 15 % SMP are quite similar. Hence, it maintains viscosity on cooling, similar to maximum viscosity attained during cooking. Keeping in view the rheological, firmness and sensory quality, 0.841 mm grits of pearl millet with 15 % SMP was found optimum for preparation of acceptable porridge.

  6. Life: past, present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Conrad, P. G.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular methods of taxonomy and phylogeny have changed the way in which life on earth is viewed; they have allowed us to transition from a eukaryote-centric (five-kingdoms) view of the planet to one that is peculiarly prokarote-centric, containing three kingdoms, two of which are prokaryotic unicells. These prokaryotes are distinguished from their eukaryotic counterparts by their toughness, tenacity and metabolic diversity. Realization of these features has, in many ways, changed the way we feel about life on earth, about the nature of life past and about the possibility of finding life elsewhere. In essence, the limits of life on this planet have expanded to such a degree that our thoughts of both past and future life have been altered. The abilities of prokaryotes to withstand many extreme conditions has led to the term extremophiles, used to describe the organisms that thrive under conditions thought just a few years ago, to be inconsistent with life. Perhaps the most extensive adaptation to extreme conditions, however, is represented by the ability of many bacteria to survive nutrient conditions not compatible with eukaryotic life. Prokaryotes have evolved to use nearly every redox couple that is in abundance on earth, filling the metabolic niches left behind by the oxygen-using, carbon-eating eukaryotes. This metabolic plasticity leads to a common feature in physically stratified environments of layered microbial communities, chemical indicators of the metabolic diversity of the prokaryotes. Such 'metabolic extremophily' forms a backdrop by which we can view the energy flow of life on this planet, think about what the evolutionary past of the planet might have been, and plan ways to look for life elsewhere, using the knowledge of energy flow on earth.

  7. Life: past, present and future.

    PubMed Central

    Nealson, K H; Conrad, P G

    1999-01-01

    Molecular methods of taxonomy and phylogeny have changed the way in which life on earth is viewed; they have allowed us to transition from a eukaryote-centric (five-kingdoms) view of the planet to one that is peculiarly prokarote-centric, containing three kingdoms, two of which are prokaryotic unicells. These prokaryotes are distinguished from their eukaryotic counterparts by their toughness, tenacity and metabolic diversity. Realization of these features has, in many ways, changed the way we feel about life on earth, about the nature of life past and about the possibility of finding life elsewhere. In essence, the limits of life on this planet have expanded to such a degree that our thoughts of both past and future life have been altered. The abilities of prokaryotes to withstand many extreme conditions has led to the term extremophiles, used to describe the organisms that thrive under conditions thought just a few years ago, to be inconsistent with life. Perhaps the most extensive adaptation to extreme conditions, however, is represented by the ability of many bacteria to survive nutrient conditions not compatible with eukaryotic life. Prokaryotes have evolved to use nearly every redox couple that is in abundance on earth, filling the metabolic niches left behind by the oxygen-using, carbon-eating eukaryotes. This metabolic plasticity leads to a common feature in physically stratified environments of layered microbial communities, chemical indicators of the metabolic diversity of the prokaryotes. Such 'metabolic extremophily' forms a backdrop by which we can view the energy flow of life on this planet, think about what the evolutionary past of the planet might have been, and plan ways to look for life elsewhere, using the knowledge of energy flow on earth. PMID:10670014

  8. Acupuncture: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Mittelman, Michele

    2014-01-01

    During the past 40 years, acupuncture, a therapeutic technique of oriental medicine, has become more and more popular, evolving into one of the most utilized forms of complementary integrative medicine interventions in the United States. In fact, more than 10 million acupuncture treatments are administered annually in the United States alone.1 Its rise in popularity, particularly in the West, can be attributed in part to its effectiveness for pain relief and in part to the fact that scientific studies have begun to prove its efficacy. PMID:25105069

  9. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gömze, László A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the rheological properties of materials and their rheological behaviors during their manufacturing processes and in their applications in many cases can help to increase the efficiency and competitiveness not only of the finished goods and products but the organizations and societies also. The more scientific supported and prepared organizations develop more competitive products with better thermal, mechanical, physical, chemical and biological properties and the leading companies apply more competitive knowledge, materials, equipment and technology processes. The idea to organize in Hungary the 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials we have received from prospective scientists, physicists, chemists, mathematicians and engineers from Asia, Europe, North and South America including India, Korea, Russia, Turkey, Estonia, France, Italy, United Kingdom, Chile, Mexico and USA. The goals of ic-rmm1 the 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials are the following: • Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of modeling and measurements of rheological properties and behavior of materials under processing and applications. • Change information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implantations. • Promote the communication between the scientists of different disciplines, nations, countries and continents. The international conference ic-rmm1 provides a platform among the leading international scientists, researchers, PhD students and engineers for discussing recent achievements in measurement, modeling and application of rheology in materials technology and materials science of liquids, melts, solids, crystals and amorphous structures. Among the major fields of interest are the influences of material structures, mechanical stresses temperature and deformation speeds on rheological and physical properties, phase transformation of

  10. Turbulent Flow Past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2009-11-01

    Flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to a non-spinning forebody is considered from a computational and experimental point of view. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. The experimental results of Carlucci & Thangam (2001) are used to benchmark flow over spinning cylinders. The data is extended to munitions spinning in the wake of other munitions. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  11. Strain-dependent rheology and the memory of plasticine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpfer, Martin P. J.; Zulauf, Gernold

    2002-08-01

    Plasticine and plasticine-like materials have been widely used as analogue materials for experimental deformation, but not many workers have conducted detailed investigations on their rheology. The physical properties of Beck's green and black plasticine, a modelling material made in Gomaringen, Germany, and plasticine/oil mixtures were investigated by means of uniaxial compression and relaxation tests. Beck's plasticine is a non-Newtonian fluid characterised by strain rate-dependent plastic yielding and strain hardening. Strain hardening is more pronounced at low strain rates leading to an increase of both stress exponent and viscosity. The addition of oil leads to an increase of the stress exponent and a decrease in viscosity. The strain dependence of viscosity decreases with increasing oil content. Compression tests on preflattened plasticine were also conducted in order to study possible 'strain memory' of the materials. Preflattened plasticine is characterised by a later onset of yielding and an increase in both stress exponent and viscosity. Our results suggest that Beck's green and black plasticine is a suitable analogue material for modelling rocks that deform by dislocation creep and exhibit pronounced strain hardening. Nevertheless, plane strain modelling of boudinage has verified analytical solutions for the dominant wavelength at viscosity contrasts of approximately 1.5 and 2.5.

  12. Rheological Signature of Frictional Interactions in Shear Thickening Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Royer, John R; Blair, Daniel L; Hudson, Steven D

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal shear thickening presents a significant challenge because the macroscopic rheology becomes increasingly controlled by the microscopic details of short ranged particle interactions in the shear thickening regime. Our measurements here of the first normal stress difference over a wide range of particle volume fractions elucidate the relative contributions from hydrodynamic lubrication and frictional contact forces, which have been debated. At moderate volume fractions we find N_{1}<0, consistent with hydrodynamic models; however, at higher volume fractions and shear stresses these models break down and we instead observe dilation (N_{1}>0), indicating frictional contact networks. Remarkably, there is no signature of this transition in the viscosity; instead, this change in the sign of N_{1} occurs while the shear thickening remains continuous. These results suggest a scenario where shear thickening is driven primarily by the formation of frictional contacts, with hydrodynamic forces playing a supporting role at lower concentrations. Motivated by this picture, we introduce a simple model that combines these frictional and hydrodynamic contributions and accurately fits the measured viscosity over a wide range of particle volume fractions and shear stress. PMID:27203345

  13. Rheology and retained gas measurements in Hanford tank 101-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, C.L.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Terrones, G.

    1995-12-31

    Several high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford site are known to produce flammable gases. The best known of these tanks is tank 241-SY-101, and to mitigate the safety concerns associated with flammable gas release from this tank, a mixer pump was installed in mid-1993 to mix the waste contents and thereby eliminate or reduce the capability of the waste to retain gas. The mixer pump has proven very effective and only needs to be operated for 30 min about every other day. Large periodic gas release events no longer occur in this tank. However, specific information about the Theological character of the mixed waste and the amount of retained gas has been lacking. In order to determine the amount of gas still retained in the waste and the rheology of the mixed fluid, which is important in establishing the capability of the waste for retaining gas, two instruments were developed to probe the waste in situ. These instruments were the ball rheometer and the void fraction instrument (VFI).

  14. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    PubMed

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets. PMID:27562366

  15. The rheological injectability of N-succinyl-chitosan solutions.

    PubMed

    Rogalsky, Allan; Kwon, Hyock Ju; Lee-Sullivan, Pearl

    2016-10-20

    The viscosity of a set of N-succinyl-chitosan (NSC) solutions was characterized near the 0.2Pas rheological injectability limit. This is believed to be the first such report in the open literature. Viscosity was characterized at physiological pH and ionic strength as a function of NSC degree of substitution, NSC concentration, temperature, and shear rate. NSC was synthesized via Yamaguci's method and characterized using H-NMR, membrane osmometry, TGA and isothermal vacuum drying. NSC synthesis results were shown to fit a reproducible log-linear correlation and both optimum drying temperature and thermal decomposition temperature were found to be a function of NSC degree of substitution. Viscosity results were explained using Katchalsky's full model for polyampholyte ionization combined with a charge induced excluded volume model proposed by Higgs. The model predicted a polyelectrolyte/polyampholyte transition which agreed well with experimental data. For minimally injectable formulations a maximum in primary amine concentration is expected at 32sub% amine NSC. PMID:27474658

  16. Analysis of a magneto-rheological coupler with misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guangtao; Li, Yourong; Song, Gangbing

    2011-10-01

    In most modeling analyses of drum type magneto-rheological (MR) fluid coupling devices, the centerlines of the drums are often assumed to be coincident; however, misalignments often exist in many practical applications, which change the characteristics of the MR fluid devices. This paper focuses on the characteristics of a rotary drum type MR coupler with a misalignment. In this paper, we discuss the operational modes of MR fluids and derive equations to describe the behavior of MR fluids in MR couplers with misalignment by using the Navier-Stokes equation. Based on the results of numerical computation, we found that the misalignment due to different tolerance grades has a limited effect on the pressure in the drums, the shear stress of the MR fluid, and the torque of an MR coupler. However, when the eccentricity ratio increases to 23.3% or the tolerance grade of the two drums is 10 (ISO standard), the effect, especially the effect on the pressure, increases greatly, and should be considered during the design of seals for MR couplers. In addition, the pressure and the shear forces will apply forces on the drums along the vertical and horizontal directions, and change periodically as the drums rotate, which should be considered when designing them.

  17. Beyond rheology modification: hydrophilically modified silicone elastomers provide new benefits.

    PubMed

    Starch, Michael S; Fiori, Jean E; Lin, Zuchen

    2003-01-01

    The development of silicone elastomers with hydrophilic functionality in the form of PEG substituents provides benefits beyond the rheology modification (thickening) that can be achieved with silicone elastomers that lack functional substituents. We have shown that PEG-modified dimethicone crosspolymer (PEG-DCP) is an effective emulsifier for water-in-silicone (w/s) emulsions where the continuous phase is cyclopentasiloxane. The utility of PEG-DCP for producing simple antiperspirant gels and also multiple emulsions (w/s/w) was demonstrated. Additional benefits for PEG-DCP such as improved compatibility with polar organic oils and reduced syneresis in anhydrous antiperspirants were also shown to be associated with the addition of hydrophilic groups to the silicone elastomer. The performance and physical properties of a series of PEG-DCP samples from a two-level factorial design were evaluated. The variables studied were the level of PEG substitution, the length of the PEG chains, and crosslink density. All of the PEG-DCP samples were synthesized and tested in the form of dispersions in cyclopentasiloxane. Variations in the composition of PEG-DCP such as the level of PEG substitution and the length of the PEG chain were shown to have a significant effect on the viscosity of the PEG-DCP and its emulsification performance in a simple w/s emulsion. Variation of a process parameter that affects the crosslink density of the elastomer also changed the emulsification properties of the PEG-DCP.

  18. Nonlinear signatures of entangled polymer solutions in active microbead rheology

    PubMed Central

    Cribb, J. A.; Vasquez, P. A.; Moore, P.; Norris, S.; Shah, S.; Forest, M. G.; Superfine, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental data and numerical modeling of a nonlinear phenomenon in active magnetic microbead rheology that appears to be common to entangled polymer solutions (EPS). Dynamic experiments in a modest range of magnetic forces show: 1. a short-lived high viscosity plateau, followed by 2. a bead acceleration phase with a sharp drop in apparent viscosity, and 3. a terminal steady state that we show resides on the shear-thinning slope of the steady-state flow curve from cone and plate data. This latter feature implies a new protocol to access the nonlinear steady-state flow curve for many biological EPS only available in microliter-scale volumes. We solve the moment-closure form of the Rolie-Poly kinetic model for EPS hydrodynamics, together with a decoupling approximation that obviates the need for a full 3D flow solver, and show that the model qualitatively reproduces the dynamic experimental sequence above. In this way, we explain the phenomenon in terms of entangled polymer physics, and show how the nonlinear event (acceleration and termination on the shear-thinning response curve) is tunable by the interplay between molecular-scale mechanisms (relaxation via reptation and chain retraction) and magnetic force controls. The experimental conditions mimic movement of cilia tips, bacteria, and sperm in mucus barriers, implying a physiological relevance of the phenomenon, and compelling further development of the fully coupled, 3D flow-microstructure model to achieve quantitative accuracy. PMID:24526800

  19. Tailored interfacial rheology for gastric stable adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Scheuble, N; Geue, T; Windhab, E J; Fischer, P

    2014-08-11

    Human lipid digestion begins at the interface of oil and water by interfacial adsorption of lipases. Tailoring the available surface area for lipase activity can lead to specific lipid sensing in the body, thus, tailored satiety hormone release. In this study we present biopolymer layers at the MCT-oil/water interface with different stabilities under human gastric environment (37 °C, pH 2, pepsin). Physicochemical changes and enzymatic degradation of interfacial layers were monitored online by interfacial shear rheology. We show the weakening of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) layers at body temperature and acidification and their hydrolysis by pepsin. If sufficient concentrations of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) are given to an existing β-lg layer, this weakening is buffered and the proteolysis delayed. A synergistic, composite layer is formed by adding methylated NCC to the β-lg layer. This layer thermogels at body temperature and resists hydrolysis by pepsin. Coexistence of these two emulsifiers at the air/water interface is evidenced by neutron reflectometry measurements, where morphological information are extracted. The utilized layers and their analysis provide knowledge of physicochemical changes during in vitro digestion of interfaces, which promote functional food formulations. PMID:25029559

  20. Chain-configuration dependent rheological properties in transient networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Michelle; Wang, Zhen-Gang; McKinley, Gareth; Olsen, Bradley

    2014-03-01

    Complex associative networks capable of shear thinning followed by recovery on the order of seconds are of interest as injectable biomaterials. However, there is a limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to rheological properties such as the network's yield stress and rate of self-healing. Here we present a transient network theory for associative physical gels arising from the chemical kinetic form of the Smoluchowski Equation capable of modeling the full chain end-to-end distance distribution while tracking the fraction of looped, bridged, and free chain configurations in the gel. By varying the equilibrium association rate relative to the material relaxation time, we are able to track the evolution of loop and bridge chain fraction as the system undergoes stress instabilities. We have evidence that these instabilities result from non-monotonic trends in loop and bridge chain fraction when the end group association rate is high relative to the dissociation rate. This behavior provides insight into the complex kinetic interactions responsible for certain mechanical behaviors while serving as a valuable predictive tool for gel design. Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Department of Defense National Defense Science and Engineering Fellowship Program

  1. Microfluidic rheology of active particle suspensions: Kinetic theory.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Matilla, Roberto; Ezhilan, Barath; Saintillan, David

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the effective rheology of a dilute suspension of self-propelled slender particles confined between two infinite parallel plates and subject to a pressure-driven flow. We use a continuum kinetic model to describe the configuration of the particles in the system, in which the disturbance flows induced by the swimmers are taken into account, and use it to calculate estimates of the suspension viscosity for a range of channel widths and flow strengths typical of microfluidic experiments. Our results are in agreement with previous bulk models, and in particular, demonstrate that the effect of activity is strongest at low flow rates, where pushers tend to decrease the suspension viscosity whereas pullers enhance it. In stronger flows, dissipative stresses overcome the effects of activity leading to increased viscosities followed by shear-thinning. The effects of confinement and number density are also analyzed, and our results confirm the apparent transition to superfluidity reported in recent experiments on pusher suspensions at intermediate densities. We also derive an approximate analytical expression for the effective viscosity in the limit of weak flows and wide channels, and demonstrate good agreement between theory and numerical calculations.

  2. Tethered Nanoparticle -Polymer Composites: Phase behavior and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangal, Rahul; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites with particle radius (a) approaching the radius of gyration (Rg) of entangled host polymer have been reported to exhibit an unusual negative reinforcement effect, which leads to an anomalous reduction in relative an anomalous reduction in relative viscosity at low particle loadings (φ) . This so-called Non-Einsteinian flow behavior is understood to be sensitive to the dispersion state of particles in host polymer. We studied suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles tethered with polethylene glycol (PEG) in polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) with molecular weights (Mw) from 17 KDa to 280 KDa. Due to strong enthalpic interactions between PEG and PMMA (χ = -0.65), nanoparticles are expected to be well-dispersed, independent of Mw of PMMA. Using small angle x-ray scattering measurements we show that the phase stability of suspensions depends on Mw of the tethered PEG, host PMMA, and φ. Particles functionalized with low molecular weight PEG aggregate at low φ, but disperse at high φ. In contrast, nanoparticles functionalized with higher molecular weight PEG are well dispersed for host chain lengths (P) to tethered chain length (N), (P/N), is as high as 160. The stability boundary of these suspensions extends well beyond expectations for nanocomposites based on tethered PEG chains suspended in PEG. Through in-depth analysis of rheology and x-ray photon correlation spectra we explore the fundamental origins of non-Einsteinian flow behavior. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Advanced Photon Source (APS).

  3. Rheological equations in asymptotic regimes of granular flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper assesses the validity of the generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in light of the established constitutive relations in two asymptotic flow regimes, namely, the macroviscous and grain-inertia regimes. A comprehensive review of the literature on constitutive relations in both regimes reveals that except for some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution, the normalized shear stress in both regimes varies only with the grain concentration, C. It is found that Krieger-Dougherty's relative viscosity, ??*(C), is sufficiently coherent among the monotonically nondecreasing functions of C used in describing the variation of the shear stress with C in both regimes. It not only accurately represents the C-dependent relative viscosity of a suspension in the macroviscous regime, but also plays a role of the radial distribution function that describes the statistics of particle collisions in the grain-inertia regime. Use of ??*(C) alone, however, cannot link the two regimes. Another parameter, the shear-rate number, N, is needed in modelling the rheology of neutrally buoyant granular flows in transition between the two asymptotic regimes. The GVF model proves compatible with most established relations in both regimes.

  4. Rheological behaviour of nanocellulose reinforced unsaturated polyester nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chirayil, Cintil Jose; Mathew, Lovely; Hassan, P A; Mozetic, Miran; Thomas, Sabu

    2014-08-01

    Nanocellulose (NC) reinforced unsaturated polyester (UPR) composites were prepared by mechanical mixing process. Effect of isora nanocellulose on the properties of polyester composites has been studied in detail. Rheological properties of unsaturated polyester resin suspensions containing various amounts (0.5, 1 and 3wt%) of nanocellulose were investigated by oscillatory rheometer with parallel plate geometry. Analysis of curing revealed that the time required for gelation in NC filled UPR is lower than neat resin, which describe the catalytic action of NC on cure reaction. NC reinforced polyester suspensions showed shear thinning behaviour initially and at higher shear rates they showed Newtonian behaviour. Tensile and impact properties showed superior behaviour revealing improved interfacial bonding between nanofiller and the polymer matrix. With respect to the neat polyester the percentage increase in tensile strength of 0.5wt% NC reinforced composite is 57%. Optical and atomic force microscopic studies confirmed that the dispersion state of NC within the polyester matrix was adequate. Maximum glass transition temperature is obtained for 0.5wt% NC reinforced composite, which showed an increase of 10°C than neat resin.

  5. Soft water-soluble microgel dispersions: structure and rheology.

    PubMed

    Omari, A; Tabary, R; Rousseau, D; Calderon, F Leal; Monteil, J; Chauveteau, G

    2006-10-15

    The size and structural characteristics of polyacrylamide-based water-soluble microgel dispersions were investigated by optical and rheological methods. Microgel hydrodynamic radii Rh were measured by light scattering and derived from intrinsic shear viscosity [eta]0. The variations of Rh3 and [eta]0 with the crosslink density Nx, follow the scaling law Rh3 congruent withNx(-alpha) with alpha close to 0.63, in good agreement with the simple structural model proposed in this paper showing how the exact value of alpha depends on inner structural details of the microgel. The plateau viscosity versus particle apparent volume fraction shows a monotonous change from hard sphere dispersions (high crosslink density of microgels) to flexible linear polymer solutions. Measurements of the first normal stress difference N1 show that increasing the microgel crosslink density affects the system viscosity more than its elasticity. Under oscillatory shear flow, loss and storage moduli undergo both qualitative and quantitative changes with crosslink density. At moderate concentrations, the elastic modulus is the most affected and its slope in low frequency regime decreases from two to less than one as Nx increases. We discuss the experimental results within the frame of knowledge on linear, branched polymer solutions and soft microgel suspensions.

  6. Rheological modelling of physiological variables during temperature variations at rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaere, P.; de Meyer, F.

    1990-06-01

    The evolution with time of cardio-respiratory variables, blood pressure and body temperature has been studied on six males, resting in semi-nude conditions during short (30 min) cold stress exposure (0°C) and during passive recovery (60 min) at 20°C. Passive cold exposure does not induce a change in HR but increases VO 2, VCO 2 Ve and core temperature T re, whereas peripheral temperature is significantly lowered. The kinetic evolution of the studied variables was investigated using a Kelvin-Voigt rheological model. The results suggest that the human body, and by extension the measured physiological variables of its functioning, does not react as a perfect viscoelastic system. Cold exposure induces a more rapid adaptation for heart rate, blood pressure and skin temperatures than that observed during the rewarming period (20°C), whereas respiratory adjustments show an opposite evolution. During the cooling period of the experiment the adaptative mechanisms, taking effect to preserve core homeothermy and to obtain a higher oxygen supply, increase the energy loss of the body.

  7. Intermittency of rheological regimes in uniform liquid-granular flows.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Aronne; Larcher, Michele; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2009-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a free surface-saturated liquid-granular mixture flowing over a static loose bed of grains, where the coexistence of layers dominated by collisional and frictional interactions among particles was observed. Kinetic theory was applied to the flow described above and it proved suitable for describing a realistic behavior of the collisional layers, although it failed to interpret the regions of the flow domain dominated by the frictional contacts. The paper provides a conceptual scheme with which to overcome this problem by focusing on the mechanisms governing the transition from the frictional to the collisional regime. In particular we observed that in highly concentrated flows the transition layer exhibits a typical intermittency of the dominating rheological regime, switching alternately from the frictional to the collisional one. By filtering the velocity signal, we introduced an intermittency function that made it possible to extend the validity of the equations derived from dense gas analogy, typical of the collisional regimes, also in the intermittent phase of the flow. Owing to the small values of the Stokes number, in the application of the kinetic theory we accounted for the possible variation of the elastic restitution coefficient along the flow depth. PMID:19518448

  8. Volatiles, rheology, and mantle convection: Comparing Earth, Venus, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicate rheology is controlled in part by volatile content. The variation of viscosity with position in the mantle will influence the nature of mantle convection; hence, modeling mantle convection and its effect on surface observables such as the geoid places constraints on the viscosity structure of a planet's mantle and may indirectly constrain the volatile distribution. Models of viscous mantle flow and the Earth's geoid indicate that there is roughly a two order of magnitude variation in viscosity between the upper and lower mantles, although there is some disagreement over the depth of the viscosity minimum in the upper mantle. Some studies of post-glacial rebound also support such a viscosity contrast between the upper and lower mantles. On Venus, several highland regions appear to be supported by mantle plumes. Modeling of the geoid and topography of these regions indicates that if these features are plume-related, then the mantle of Venus can not have an Earth-like low viscosity zone in its upper mantle. On Mars, the Tharsis volcanic province has alternatively been explained as supported either by mantle convection or by flexure of a thick lithosphere. If the convective model is correct, then the large geoid anomaly requires that Mars can not have a low viscosity zone in its upper mantle.

  9. Rheological and microstructural properties of the chia seed polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Timilsena, Yakindra Prasad; Adhikari, Raju; Kasapis, Stefan; Adhikari, Benu

    2015-11-01

    Chia seed polysaccharide (CSP) was extracted from chia (Salvia hispanica) seeds, and its rheological and microstructural properties in aqueous solutions were studied. CSP solution exhibited Newtonian and shear thinning flow patterns depending on shear rate when the concentration was ≤0.06% (w/v). CSP solutions at concentrations >0.06% (w/v) exhibited strong shear thinning behaviour within the shear rate tested (0.001-300s(-1)). The transition from dilute to semi-dilute regime occurred at a critical concentration (C*) of 0.03gdL(-1). The intrinsic viscosity was high (∼16dLg(-1)) and concentration dependence of zero shear viscosity in the semi-dilute regime followed η0∝C(2.7) relationship. The storage modulus (G') was higher than the loss modulus (G″) at all experimental frequencies and their frequency dependence was negligible at all tested concentrations. Apparent shear viscosity was smaller than dynamic complex viscosity at equivalent values of deformation and G' varied with the square of concentration indicating a gel-like behaviour in CSP solutions within 0.02-3.0% (w/v) concentrations. Controlled acid hydrolysis of purified CSP yielded various low molecular fractions with fairly uniform polydispersity giving a Mark-Houwink-Sakurada relationship of intrinsic viscosity equaling to 1.52×10(-4) (molecular weight)(0.803) (dLg(-1)).

  10. Evaluating sand and clay models: do rheological differences matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstadt, Gloria; Sims, Darrell

    2005-08-01

    Dry sand and wet clay are the most frequently used materials for physical modeling of brittle deformation. We present a series of experiments that shows when the two materials can be used interchangeably, document the differences in deformation patterns and discuss how best to evaluate and apply results of physical models. Extension and shortening produce similar large-scale deformation patterns in dry sand and wet clay models, indicating that the two materials can be used interchangeably for analysis of gross deformation geometries. There are subtle deformation features that are significantly different: (1) fault propagation and fault linkage; (2) fault width, spacing and displacement; (3) extent of deformation zone; and (4) amount of folding vs. faulting. These differences are primarily due to the lower cohesion of sand and its larger grain size. If these features are of interest, the best practice would be to repeat the experiments with more than one material to ensure that rheological differences are not biasing results. Dry sand and wet clay produce very different results in inversion models; almost all faults are reactivated in wet clay, and few, if any, are significantly reactivated in sand models. Fault reactivation is attributed to high fluid pressure along the fault zone in the wet clay, a situation that may be analogous to many rocks. Sand inversion models may be best applied to areas where most faults experience little to no reactivation, while clay models best fit areas where most pre-existing normal faults are reactivated.

  11. Pectin from Abelmoschus esculentus: optimization of extraction and rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Sun, Han-Ju; Wei, Zhao-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the parameters of pectin extraction from okra pods. The extracted okra pectin was then investigated by steady-shear and oscillatory rheological measurements. Statistical analysis showed that the linear term of the liquid-solid ratio, the quadratic term of the pH, and the linear term of the extraction time showed highly significant effects on pectin yield. The optimal extraction conditions that maximized the pectin yield within the experimental range of the variables researched were a pH of 3.9, an extraction time of 64 min, an extraction temperature of 60°C, and a liquid-solid ratio of 42:1. Under these conditions, the pectin yield was predicted to be 2.71%. At a liquid-solid ratio less than 2.5% w/w in aqueous solution, the pectin extracted from okra presented non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior and could be well described by the Cross model. The okra pectin showed predominantly viscous responses (G'

  12. Rheology of Dead Sea shampoo containing the antidandruff climbazole.

    PubMed

    Abu-Jdayil, B; Mohameed, H A

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the effect of the antidandruff climbazole on the rheology of hair shampoo containing Dead Sea (DS) salt was investigated. The presence of either DS salt or the climbazole led to increase in the shampoo viscosity. An optimum concentration was found where the viscosity of shampoo was maximum. In the absence of DS salt, the viscosity of hair shampoo increased with increasing the climbazole concentration to reach a maximum value at 1.0 wt%. Further addition of climbazole decreased the viscosity of shampoo. Adjusting the pH of the shampoo at 5.5 and 5.0 shifted the optimum climbazole concentration (corresponds to maximum viscosity) to 0.8 wt% and led to increase in the viscosity of shampoo. On the other hand, the addition of climbazole to the shampoo containing DS salt resulted in a decrease in shampoo viscosity. This decrease of shampoo viscosity became more pronounced with increasing the climbazole and/or DS salt concentrations. By controlling the pH of shampoo, an optimum formula of shampoo comprising both climbazole and DS salt and having maximum viscosity was obtained.

  13. Anisometric Particle Systems—from Shape Characterization to Suspension Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorová, Eva; Pabst, Willi; Vaněrková, Lucie

    2009-06-01

    Methods for the characterization of anisometric particle systems are discussed. For prolate particles, the aspect ratio determination via microscopic image analysis is recalled, and aspect ratio distributions as well as shape-size dependences are commented upon. For oblate particles a simple relation is recalled with can be used to determine an average aspect ratio when size distributions are available from two methods, typically from sedimentation analysis and laser diffraction. The connection between particle shape (aspect ratio) and suspension rheology is outlined and it is shown how a generic procedure, based on Brenner's theory, can be applied to predict the intrinsic viscosity when the aspect ratio is known. On the other hand it is shown, how information on the intrinsic viscosity and the critical solids volume fraction can be extracted from experiments, when the measured concentration dependence of the effective suspension viscosity is adequately interpreted (using the Krieger relation for fitting). The examples mentioned in this paper include systems with oblate or prolate ceramic particles (kaolins, pyrophyllite, wollastonite, silicon carbide) as well as (prolate) pharmaceuticals (mesalamine, ibuprofen, nifuroxazide, paracetamol).

  14. Microscopic and rheological studies of fat crystal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narine, Suresh S.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.

    1999-03-01

    This talk discusses the quantification of microstructure in fat crystal networks by using the relationship of the elastic moduli ( G') to the solid fat content (SFC) via the fractal dimension (D) of the network. Results from application of a scaling theory developed for colloidal gels [W.H. Shih et al., Phys. Rev. A 42 (1990) 4772] to chemically and enzymatically interesterified and non-interesterified butterfat/canola oil mixtures and to cocoa butter and Salatrim TM are presented and discussed. In situ images from confocal laser microscopy and polarized light microscopy of the crystal network of butterfat and butterfat-canola oil blends yielded fractal dimensions of D=1.88 and D=2.02±2% respectively, which are in good agreement. The use of rheological measurements to calculate a fractal dimension of the crystal network of butterfat-canola oil blends yielded D=1.99, in good agreement with D calculated from the confocal laser microscopy and the polarized light microscopy images.

  15. Observations of flexure and the rheology of the oceanic lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Bodine, J.H.; Steckler, M.S.; Bodine, J.H.; Watts, A.B.

    1981-05-10

    Observations of flexure indicate that the effective flexural rigidity of oceanic lithosphere is a function of the age of the lithosphere at the time of loading, and hence temperature. We have used a yield stress envelope model constrained by data from experimental rock mechanics to determine how the flexure parameters and rheologic properties of oceanic lithosphere are related. The results of our model for seamounts and oceanic island loads in the interior of plates suggest that following loading, rapid stress relaxation occurs as the plate 'thins' from its short-term to its long-term (>10/sup 6/ years) mechanical thickness. The mechanical thickness, which determines the effective flexural rigidity of the plate, is strongly dependent on temperature and weakly dependent on load size and duration (>1-10 m.y.). The results of our model for convergent plate boundaries suggest that changes in the shape of the Outer Rise along an individual trench system may be due to variations in the horizontal load acting across the boundary (<1 kbar). The model predicts a narrow zone of high strain accumulation seaward of a trench which is in agreement with variations in crustal velocities and seismicity patterns observed along some trench systems.

  16. Pectin from Abelmoschus esculentus: optimization of extraction and rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Sun, Han-Ju; Wei, Zhao-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the parameters of pectin extraction from okra pods. The extracted okra pectin was then investigated by steady-shear and oscillatory rheological measurements. Statistical analysis showed that the linear term of the liquid-solid ratio, the quadratic term of the pH, and the linear term of the extraction time showed highly significant effects on pectin yield. The optimal extraction conditions that maximized the pectin yield within the experimental range of the variables researched were a pH of 3.9, an extraction time of 64 min, an extraction temperature of 60°C, and a liquid-solid ratio of 42:1. Under these conditions, the pectin yield was predicted to be 2.71%. At a liquid-solid ratio less than 2.5% w/w in aqueous solution, the pectin extracted from okra presented non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior and could be well described by the Cross model. The okra pectin showed predominantly viscous responses (G'

  17. Dispersion and rheology of surfactant-mediated silver nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Nan; Huang, Chih-Ta; Tseng, Wenjea J.; Wei, Ming-Hsiung

    2010-11-01

    Polycrystalline silver (Ag) nanoparticles were dispersed in solvent mixtures consisting of 2-butoxyethyl acetate (BCA) and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate (CA) in a BCA:CA weight ratio of 5:1. Three commercially available polymeric surfactants were used, and the gravitational sedimentation, agglomerate-size distribution, isothermal adsorption, and rheological behavior of the nanoparticle suspensions were examined. One of the surfactants (hereafter termed 9250) was found effective in stabilizing the Ag nanoparticle suspensions. Both the adsorption isotherm and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the preferential adsorption of the 9250 surfactant molecules on the nanoparticle surface, forming a Langmuir-type monolayer adsorption in the given solvents so that a steric stabilization was rendered. An optimal surfactant concentration of 5 wt.% (in terms of the solids weight) was determined experimentally. In addition, the Ag suspensions with a broad range of solids concentration (ϕ = 1-16 vol.%) showed a shear-thinning flow character over a shear-rate range from 1 to 4000 s-1, revealing that an attractive interparticle interaction was operative. Relative viscosity (ηr) of the nanoparticle suspensions deviated from the linearity when ϕ was greater than ˜10 vol.%; at which, the attractive potential began to dominate the interparticle interactions. This ηr-ϕ dependence was compared with various existing models and the (viscosity) predictive capability of the models was discussed.

  18. Rheological behaviour of nanocellulose reinforced unsaturated polyester nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chirayil, Cintil Jose; Mathew, Lovely; Hassan, P A; Mozetic, Miran; Thomas, Sabu

    2014-08-01

    Nanocellulose (NC) reinforced unsaturated polyester (UPR) composites were prepared by mechanical mixing process. Effect of isora nanocellulose on the properties of polyester composites has been studied in detail. Rheological properties of unsaturated polyester resin suspensions containing various amounts (0.5, 1 and 3wt%) of nanocellulose were investigated by oscillatory rheometer with parallel plate geometry. Analysis of curing revealed that the time required for gelation in NC filled UPR is lower than neat resin, which describe the catalytic action of NC on cure reaction. NC reinforced polyester suspensions showed shear thinning behaviour initially and at higher shear rates they showed Newtonian behaviour. Tensile and impact properties showed superior behaviour revealing improved interfacial bonding between nanofiller and the polymer matrix. With respect to the neat polyester the percentage increase in tensile strength of 0.5wt% NC reinforced composite is 57%. Optical and atomic force microscopic studies confirmed that the dispersion state of NC within the polyester matrix was adequate. Maximum glass transition temperature is obtained for 0.5wt% NC reinforced composite, which showed an increase of 10°C than neat resin. PMID:24877644

  19. Oscillatory and steady shear rheology of gellan/dextran blends.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nurul Hawa; Ahmed, Jasim; Hashim, Dzulkifly M; Manap, Yazid Abdul; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2015-05-01

    Oscillatory and steady shear rheology of gellan (G) and dextran (D) solution individually, and in blends (G/D ratio 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 w/v) with a total hydrocolloid concentration of 3 % (w/v) were studied at 25 °C. Individually, 1.5 % dextran and 1.5 % gellan in solution exhibited Newtonian and non-Newtonian behavior, respectively. A blend of equal proportion of dextran and gellan (G/D = 1:1) exhibits a distinct gel point (G' = G″), and further addition of dextran in the blend (G/D = 1:2 and 1:3) resulted predominating liquid-like (G″ > G') behavior. A plot of G' vs G″ distinctly showed the gradual transition of the blend. Shear stress (τ)-shear rate ([Formula: see text]) data fitted well the Herschel-Bulkley model. The G/D blend exhibited shear thinning behavior with flow behavior index less than unity. The Cox-Merz rule did not fit well for the complex shear viscosity (η*) and apparent viscosity (η) of the blend. PMID:25892789

  20. Probing nano-rheology in thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2013-03-01

    In this talk I will summarize our recent work on using stepped films to uncover some of the physics relevant to polymer rheology on length scales comparable to the size of polymer molecules. The work presented will focus on the efforts of a larger collaboration (Elie Raphael's theory group in Paris and James Forrest's group in Waterloo). The simple geometry of a polymer film on a substrate with a step at the free surface is unfavourable due to the excess interface induced by the step. Laplace pressure will drive flow within the film which can be studied with optical and atomic force microscopies. Because of the excellent agreement between theory and experiment when we probe ``bulk-like'' properties, these studies provide an opportunity to study how such systems transition from the bulk to confined. Starting with some of the results of levelling experiments on simple stepped films as well as the levelling of polymer droplets on thin films, I will finish with a discussion on our more recent efforts to elucidate confinement effects.