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Sample records for sandstone facies texas

  1. Dakota sandstone facies, western Oklahoma panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Atalik, E.; Mansfield, C.F.

    1984-04-01

    The Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone in Cimarron County comprised three sandstone units and intervening mudrocks; it overlies the Kiowa Shale Member of the Purgatoire Formation. Deposits include shoreface, beach (foreshore) and dune, estuarine and tidal channel, marine marginal bay and swamp/marsh in a generally progradational sequences associated with marine regression in the Western Interior. The shoreface sand, characterized by ripple lamination, bioturbation and the trace fossils Teichichnus and Thalassinoides, is fine-grained, 5-10 m (15-30 ft) thick and grades into the underlying Kiowa Shale. Beach and associated dune deposits are 2-5 m (6-16 ft) thick, medium to fine-grained, medium to thick-bedded, tabular-planar cross-bedded, and lenticular; cross-bed paleocurrent headings are northeasterly and northwesterly. Estuarine channel deposits are 3-5 m (10 to 16 ft) thick, trough to tabular-planar cross-bedded, and medium to coarse-grained with local conglomerate overlying the scoured base which commonly cuts into the Kiowa Shale or overlying shoreface sandstone; rip-up clasts and wood pieces are common but trace fossils are rare; southeasterly and southwesterly paleocurrents predominate. Tidal channel deposits are thinner (up to 2 m of 6 ft) and finer grained (medium to fine-grained) that the estuarine channel deposits; they occur within fine-grained sandstone and mudrock sequences, are trough cross-bedded, and commonly contain trace fossils (e.g., Skolithos) and wood fragments. Marine marginal (tidal flat or bay.) deposits comprise fine-grained sandstone, siltstone and interbedded shale, that are 1-3m (3-10 ft) thick with abundant burrows, small ripple marks, and parallel lamination. These grade into the fine to very fine-grained sandstones, siltstones, shales, and coals of the swamp/marsh deposits that are 1-5m (3-16 ft) thick and contain ripple marks, burrows, other trace fossils, and parallel lamination.

  2. Depositional facies, diagenesis, and reservoir quality of Ivishak sandstone (Sadlerochit Group), Prudhoe Bay field

    SciTech Connect

    McGowen, J.H.; Bloch, S.

    1985-02-01

    The Sadlerochit Group is a large fan-delta system comparable in size to the modern Kosi River wet alluvial fan of Nepal and India. Braided-stream processes distributed chert gravel and quartz and chert sand in radial fashion to construct the subaerial part of the fan delta. Fluvial energy, slope of the fan surface, and grain size decrease in a north to south basinward direction. There is also a decrease in scale of sedimentation units from source area seaward. Facies of the subaerial fan delta can be broadly categorized as midfan delta (alternating conglomerate and sandstone), distal fan-delta (chiefly sandstone), and abandoned channel-fill, overbank, and pond facies (mudstone, siltstone, fine-grained sandstone). Seaward of the subaerial fan delta are the delta-front and prodelta facies. Subaerial fan-delta and delta-front facies compose the Ivishak sandstone, which grades basinward into the Kavik shale, a prodelta facies. Diagenetic effects were gradually superimposed on the sediments deposited in the Sadlerochit fan-delta system. The sedimentary facies, and in particular their textural characteristics, seem to control the side and degree of diagenesis, including enhancement of porosity and permeability. Comparison of permeability trends among the facies of the Ivishak sandstone with permeability patterns displayed by unconsolidated sands with analogous grain size and texture, indicates that the general trends that existed in the Ivishak sediments are still recognizable in spite of the diagenetic overprint.

  3. Facies analysis and petroleum potential of Smackover Formation, western and northern areas, East Texas basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hancharik, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    The Smackover Formation (Upper Jurassic) in northeast Texas is a transgressive-regressive carbonate sequence which has been extensively dolomitized. The Smackover Formation is subdivided informally into a lower and upper member based on distinctive lithologic characteristics. The lower member, which rests conformably on the fluvial-deltaic sandstones of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, contains a laminated, organic carbonate mudstone facies that grades into an overlying locally fossiliferous, pelletalmicritic facies. The upper member of the Smackover Formation consists mainly of broken skeletal debris and pelletal allochems in a micritic matrix. The sediments are better winnowed and better sorted upward in the sequence. Interbedded with and overlying the skeletal-pelletal facies is a clean well-sorted dolomitized oolitic-grainstone facies. This upper-most informal member marks the beginning of a progradational sequence which lasts throughout the remainder of Smackover deposition and continues through deposition of the evaporities and red beds of the overlying Buckner Formation. Most of the Smackover production in northeast Texas occurs along the Mexia-Talco fault zone in the deeper gentle salt-related anticlines and salt-graben systems. Reservoir rocks are primarily leached and dolomitized oolitic grainstones and dolomite. Laminated organic carbonate mudstones which characterize the lower, transgressive phase of the Smackover Formation provide an excellent source rock for petroleum. Exploration targets for the Smackover Formation are the areas were dolomitized oolitic and skeletal grainstones occur on top of structurally high areas such as over salt ridges or swells in the deeper portions of the basin.

  4. Core facies, petrology, and permeability of Tirrawarra Sandstone, Moorari Field, Cooper Basin, South Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Bever, J.M.; Carroll, P.G.; Wild, E.W.; Williams, B.P.J.

    1988-01-01

    The oil and gas-bearing Tirrawarra Sandstone lies in the basal section of the Cooper basin sequence, which is largely Permian in age. The sandstone is characteristically thick, but both interfingers with and conformable overlies glacio-lacustrine diamictites and varvites of the late Carboniferous-Early Permian Merrimeleia Formation. The Tirrawarra Sandstone has previously been interpreted as being deposited in a glacio-fluvial braided river environment. The sandstone produces high gas:oil-ratio oil at the Moorari field, from depths of 9,400 ft below sea level. Appraisal and development of the field has been hampered by the patchy distribution of reservoir quality sandstone. This study investigated the cause of reservoir quality variations. For seven cored wells, core facies analysis, core plug porosity/permeability, petrology, and wireline logs were all matched and compared. The results are as follows. (1) Facies states (grain size and bed form) largely control permeability distribution in the Tirrawarra Sandstone at the Moorari field, such that horizontally bedded medium-coarse sandstones are consistently more permeable than cross-bedded equivalents. (2) Diagenesis levels are high and include extensive silica cement and patchy kaolinite and siderite cements. However, diagenesis rarely operates independently of original depositional fabric. (3) An association between depositional environment and permeability is recognizable, with medial bars in particular providing better reservoir quality.

  5. Facies and stratigraphy of the Pennsylvanian Warren Point Sandstone, central Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, S.A.; Stapor, F.W. Jr. . Earth Sciences Dept.)

    1994-03-01

    The Warren Point Sandstone is a fine-grained, quartz arenite composed primarily of the following three facies: planar bedded 2-D cross beds, low angle cross beds, and broad, shallow channel-fills. Ripple cross lamination, horizontal lamination, and laminated shale facies are also observed. These facies units are grouped into four of Miall's major architectural elements: sandy bedforms, channels, laminated sand sheets, and overbank fines. Paleocurrent measurements made on the 2-D cross beds indicate southwest transport. Throughout this region the Warren Point occurs as a nearly continuous and essentially homogeneous, 7--12 m-thick, sandstone sheet. The authors interpret a sandy braid plain depositional environment for the Warren Point. Initial sand composition data suggest a foreland uplift provenance that along with the southwest transport indicate the Alleghenian orogen as the probable source. The Warren Point disconformably overlies each of it's two stratigraphically subjacent units: the Pennsylvanian Raccoon Mountain (0--5 m-thick) and the upper limestone member of the Mississippian Pennington formations. The Sewanee Conglomerate disconformably overlies the Warren Point and, near Spencer, TN, rests directly on the Pennington limestone member that was a topographic high during Warren Point deposition. The absence of underlying shelfal and marginal marine Pennsylvanian siliciclastics in conjunction with the Warren Point's basal disconformity suggests a sea-level fall that resulted in a basinward facies shift.

  6. Reservoir heterogeneity in middle Frio fluvial sandstones: Case studies in Seeligson field, Jim Wells County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jirik, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Detailed evaluation of middle Frio (Oligocene) fluvial sandstones reveals a complex architectural style potentially suited to the addition of gas reserves through recognition of poorly drained reservoir compartments and bypassed gas zones. Seeligson field is being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/US Department of Energy/State of Texas-sponsored program, with the cooperation of Oryx Energy Company and Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Inc. Four reservoirs, Zones 15, 16D, 16E, and 19C, were studied in a 20 mi{sup 2} area within Seeligson field. Collectively, these reservoirs have produced more than 240 bcf of gas from wells within the study area. Detailed electric log correlation of individual reservoirs enabled subdivision of aggregate producing zones into component genetic units. Cross sections, net-sandstone maps, and log-facies maps were prepared to illustrate depositional style, sand-body geometry, and reservoir heterogeneity. Zones 15 and 19C are examples of laterally stacked fluvial architecture. Individual channel-fill sandstones range from 10 to 50 ft thick, and channel widths are approximately 2,500 ft. Crevasse-splay sandstones may extend a few thousand feet from the main channel system. Multiple, overlapping channel and splay deposits commonly form sand-rich belts that result in leaky reservoir compartments that may be incompletely drained. Zones 16D and 16E are examples of vertically stacked fluvial architecture, with discrete, relatively thin and narrow channel and splay sandstones generally encased within floodplain muds. This architectural style is likely to form more isolated reservoir compartments. Although all of these reservoirs are currently considered nearly depleted, low-pressure producers, recent well completions and bottomhole pressure data indicate that untapped or poorly drained compartments are being encountered.

  7. Fluvial architecture and reservoir heterogeneity of middle Frio sandstones, Seeligson field, Jim Wells and Kleberg Counties, south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jirik, L.A.; Kerr, D.R.; Zinke, S.G.; Finley, R.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Evaluation of fluvial Frio reservoirs in south Texas reveals a complex architectural style potentially suited to the addition of incremental gas reserves through recognition of untapped compartments or bypassed gas zones. Seeligson field is being studied as part of a GRI/DOE/Texas-sponsored program, in cooperation with Oryx Energy Company and Mobil Exploration and Production U.S., Inc., and is designed to develop technologies and methodologies for increasing gas reserves from conventional reservoirs in mature fields. Seeligson field, discovered in 1937, has produced 2.2 tcf of gas from more than 50 middle Frio reservoirs. Cross sections as well as net sand and log facies maps illustrate depositional style, sandstone geometry, and reservoir heterogeneities. Far-offset vertical seismic profiles show laterally discontinuous reflections corresponding to the reservoirs. Lenticular lateral-bar sandstones dominate channel-fill deposits that together are commonly less than 50 ft thick, forming belts of sandstone approximately 2,500 ft wide. Crevasse-splay deposits commonly extend a few thousand feet beyond the channel system. Sand-rich channel-fill deposits are flanked by levee and overbank mudstones, isolating the reservoirs in narrow, dip-elongate trends. Deposition on an aggrading coastal plain resulted in a pattern of laterally stacked sandstone bodies that are widespread across the study area. Alternating periods of more rapid aggradation resulted in deposition of vertically stacked sandstones with limited areal distribution. Facies architecture of both depositional styles has implications for reservoir compartmentalization. Reservoir compartments within a laterally stacked system may be leaky, resulting from sandstone contact from producing wells along depositional axes. This effect is a major factor controlling incremental recovery. Reservoirs in vertically stacked systems should be better isolated.

  8. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado field, South Texas; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. Within the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity. The purpose of this report is (1) to describe and analyze the sand-body architecture, depositional facies variations, and structure of Prado field, (2) to determine controls on distribution of hydrocarbons pertinent to reexploration for bypassed hydrocarbons, (3) to describe reservoir models at Prado field, and (4) to develop new data affecting the suitability of Jackson oil fields as possible candidates for thermally enhanced recovery of medium to heavy oil.

  9. Clarksville field Red River County, Texas: Production and facies interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The Clarksville field was discovered in December in 1985 while targeting a deeper paleozoic horizon. Since production went on line in 1986, this field has produced over 1 million barrels of oil (MMBO) with the appearance of a considerably longer and more lucrative life. The producing horizon is a Jurassic-age lithic conglomerate sitting unconformably on the Paleozoic and Triassic structural front of the buried Ouachita range. Facies correlation out of the basin indicate this unit to be Louark age. Mapping and compositional analysis indicate the depositional environmental of this unit to be an arid climate alluvial fan deposited as a 'Bajada' complex. This fan system was laid down at the updip margin of the actively forming Mesozoic embayment where it meets the Ouachita structural front. The significance of this field is demonstrated by the production yield at a relatively shallow depth (5800 ft). At this time, production similar to Clarksville field has yet to be encountered anywhere along the Mesozoic rim of the East Texas basin but does represent a viable exploration trend, in addition to being a gateway for future paleozoic production in the basin.

  10. Differentiating Detrital and Metamorphic Monazite in Greenschist-Facies Sandstones From the Witwatersrand Supergroup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhling, J. R.; Rasmussen, B.

    2009-05-01

    Monazite is a robust and reliable geochronometer of low-temperature metamorphic and hydrothermal events. It is a widespread accessory phase in sedimentary rocks metamorphosed at prehnite-pumpellyite to lower greenschist facies grade, and also in a range of hydrothermal ore deposits. Its ability to date multiple fluid-flow events in low-grade metasedimentary belts has been largely neglected, possibly because of a misconception that it is rare in these rocks and possibly because of misidentification of metamorphic monazite grains as detrital. Both detrital and metamorphic monazites are present in sandstone and conglomerate from the Witwatersrand Supergroup but can be distinguished by their occurrence, chemistry and age. Detrital grains were unstable during regional greenschist-facies metamorphism, and show evidence for a number of destructive reactions dependent on bulk rock composition and the original composition of the monazite. In quartz sandstone and conglomerate, detrital grains were present in heavy mineral bands with pyrite, zircon and chromite. The monazite grains have been pseudomorphed by intergrowths of apatite, florencite and Th-silicate, as well as matrix muscovite and chlorite. In some samples, Th-silicate forms only minute specks but in others it forms larger prismatic crystals that comprise up to 2% of some pseudomorphs. These variations may reflect differences in the original compositions of the detrital grains. In other samples detrital monazite cores, dated at 2.8-3.0 Ga, are enclosed within 2.04 Ga metamorphic rims. These composite grains formed by dissolution and reprecipitation of monazite during metamorphism. The cores and rims have distinctly different compositions, and the metamorphic rims show pronounced zoning of REE. In more calcic sandstone monazite occurs in heavy mineral bands with chromite, zircon, rutile, pyrite, apatite, Th-silicate, allanite and baddeleyite. These sandstones are notably rich in Ca-bearing minerals such as epidote

  11. Diagenesis of the sandflat and mudflat facies of the upper Queen Formation, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mckone, C.J.; Malicse, A.; Mazzullo, J.M. )

    1991-03-01

    The upper Queen Formation (Permian, Guadalupian) of the Midland basin, Texas, consists of cyclically interbedded clastics and evaporites that were deposited in a fluvial-dominated continental sabkha environment. Fluvial sandflat deposits, consisting of thin units (0.2-5.0 m) of very fine grained arkosic sandstones constitute reservoir horizons, whereas 0.1-1.3 m thick units of coarse siltstones and evaporites of playa-mudflat deposits are nonproductive. This study addresses the diagenetic histories of the reservoir and nonreservoir clastics. The primary porosity of the clastics was first reduced by pore-filling hematitic smectite clay, anhydrite, and dolomite during an early diagenetic phase. Subsequent dissolution of the anhydrite and dolomite by acidic pore-waters created high porosities (mean = 15%) and permeabilities (mean = 70 md) in the sandflat deposits, porosities which were only slightly occluded by later dissolution and reprecipitation of grain-lining smectite. Pore-water movement and subsequent hydrocarbon migration were both controlled by the coarser grain size and lower clay-matrix and silt content of these sandflat deposits. In contrast, the finer grain size and higher clay-matrix and silt content prevented similar dissolution of cements within the mudflat facies, which have significantly lower porosities (mean{lt}10%) and permeabilities (mean{lt}0.1 md). Fluids and gases used in enhanced recovery techniques will follow pathways created by dissolution of anhydrite and dolomite cements within the sandflat facies. However, caution must be used with fluids that can cause swelling of the grain-lining smectite.

  12. Facies architecture of the Bluejacket Sandstone in the Eufaula Lake area, Oklahoma: Implications for the reservoir characterization of the Bartlesville Sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Liangmiao; Yang, Kexian

    1997-08-01

    Outcrop studies of the Bluejacket Sandstone (Middle Pennsylvanian) provide significant insights to reservoir architecture of the subsurface equivalent Bartlesville Sandstone. Quarry walls and road cuts in the Lake Eufaula area offer excellent exposures for detailed facies architectural investigations using high-precision surveying, photo mosaics. Directional minipermeameter measurements are being conducted. Subsurface studies include conventional logs, borehole image log, and core data. Reservoir architectures are reconstructed in four hierarchical levels: multi-storey sandstone, i.e. discrete genetic intervals; individual discrete genetic interval; facies within a discrete genetic interval; and lateral accretion bar deposits. In both outcrop and subsurface, the Bluejacket (Bartlesville) Sandstone comprises two distinctive architectures: a lower braided fluvial and an upper meandering fluvial. Braided fluvial deposits are typically 30 to 80 ft thick, and are laterally persistent filling an incised valley wider than the largest producing fields. The lower contact is irregular with local relief of 50 ft. The braided-fluvial deposits consist of 100-400-ft wide, 5-15-ft thick channel-fill elements. Each channel-fill interval is limited laterally by an erosional contact or overbank deposits, and is separated vertically by discontinuous mudstones or highly concentrated mudstone interclast lag conglomerates. Low-angle parallel-stratified or trough cross-stratified medium- to coarse-grained sandstones volumetrically dominate. This section has a blocky well log profile. Meandering fluvial deposits are typically 100 to 150 ft thick and comprise multiple discrete genetic intervals.

  13. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado Field, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

    1993-09-01

    Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. With the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity.

  14. Impact of depositional facies on the distribution of diagenetic alterations in the Devonian shoreface sandstone reservoirs, Southern Ghadamis Basin, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Muftah Ahmid; Morad, Sadoon

    2015-11-01

    The middle Devonian, shoreface quartz arenites (present-day burial depths 2833-2786 m) are important oil and gas reservoirs in the Ghadamis Basin, western Libya. This integrated petrographic and geochemical study aims to unravel the impact of depositional facies on distribution of diagenetic alterations and, consequently, related reservoir quality and heterogeneity of the sandstones. Eogenetic alterations include the formation of kaolinite, pseudomatrix, and pyrite. The mesogenetic alterations include cementation by quartz overgrowths, Fe-dolomite/ankerite, and illite, transformation of kaolinite to dickite, illitization of smectite, intergranular quartz dissolution, and stylolitization, and albitization of feldspar. The higher energy of deposition of the coarser-grained upper shoreface sandstones combined with less extensive chemical compaction and smaller amounts of quartz overgrowths account for their better primary reservoir quality compared to the finer-grained, middle-lower shoreface sandstones. The formation of kaolin in the upper and middle shoreface sandstones is attributed to a greater flux of meteoric water. More abundant quartz overgrowths in the middle and lower shoreface is attributed to a greater extent of stylolitization, which was promoted by more abundant illitic clays. This study demonstrated that linking the distribution of diagenetic alterations to depositional facies of shoreface sandstones leads to a better understanding of the impact of these alterations on the spatial and temporal variation in quality and heterogeneity of the reservoirs.

  15. Assessment of undiscovered sandstone-hosted uranium resources in the Texas Coastal Plain, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mihalasky, Mark J.; Hall, Susan M.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Tureck, Kathleen R.; Hannon, Mark T.; Breit, George N.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Elliott, Brent

    2015-12-02

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 220 million pounds of recoverable uranium oxide (U3O8 ) remaining as potential undiscovered resources in southern Texas. This estimate used a geology-based assessment method for Tertiary sandstone-hosted uranium deposits in the Texas Coastal Plain sedimentary strata (fig.1).

  16. Facies and architectural element analysis of a meandering fluvial succession: The Permian Warchha Sandstone, Salt Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, Shahid; Mountney, Nigel P.

    2009-11-01

    The 30 to 155 m thick Early Permian (Artinskian) Warchha Sandstone of the Salt Range, Pakistan is a conglomerate, sandstone and claystone succession within which seven lithofacies types (Gt, St, Sp, Sr, Sh, Fl and Fm) occur in a predictable order as repeated fining-upward cycles. Common sedimentary structures in the conglomerates and sandstones include planar and trough cross-bedding, planar lamination, soft sediment-deformed bedding, compound cosets of strata with low-angle inclined bounding surfaces and lags of imbricated pebbles. Structures in the finer-grained facies include desiccation cracks, raindrop imprints, caliche nodules and bioturbation. Groups of associated facies are arranged into nine distinct architectural elements (channels, gravel bars, sandy bedforms, downstream and laterally accreting barforms, sand sheets, crevasse splays, levees, floodplain units and shallow lakes), which is consistent with a fluvial origin for the succession. The types of architectural elements present and their relationship to each other demonstrate that the Warchha Sandstone preserves a record of a meandering river system that drained the northern margin of Gondwanaland. The dominance of fine-grained (floodplain) facies over gravel-grade (channel-base) facies and the widespread occurrence of large-scale lateral accretion elements supports the interpretation of a high-sinuosity, meandering fluvial system in which channel bodies accumulated via the lateral accretion of point bars but in which the active channels covered only a small part of a broad floodplain at any time instant. Although the regional and temporal distribution of these deposits is complex, in broad terms the lower part is dominated by stacked, multistorey channel bodies, whereas single-storey channel elements isolated in abundant fine-grained floodplain deposits dominate the middle and upper parts of the formation.

  17. Identification of remaining oil resource potential in the Frio Fluvial/Deltaic Sandstone play, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, M.H.; McRae, L.E.; Tyler, N.

    1994-05-01

    The Frio Fluvial/Deltaic Sandstone (Vicksburg Fault Zone) oil play of South Texas has produced nearly 1 billion stock tank barrels (BSTB) of oil, yet still contains about 1.2 BSTB of unrecovered mobile oil and an even greater amount of residual oil resources (1.5 BSTB). More than half of the reservoirs in this depositionally complex play have been abandoned, and large volumes of oil may remain unproduced. Interwell-scale geological facies models of Frio fluvial/deltaic reservoirs will be combined with engineering assessments and geophysical evaluations in order to characterize Frio fluvial/deltaic reservoir architecture, flow unit boundaries, and the controls that these characteristics exert on the location and volume of unrecovered mobile and residual oil. Reservoir attribute data were statistically analyzed from oil and gas fields throughout the geographic area covered by the Frio Fluvial/Deltaic Sandstone oil play. General reservoir attributes analyzed in detail included porosity, initial water saturation, residual oil saturation, net pay, reservoir area, and fluid characteristics. Statistical analysis of variance demonstrated no difference between oil reservoir attributes and gas reservoir attributes. Probability functions that describe attribute frequency distributions were determined for use in risk adjusting resource calculations. The oil play was found to contain significant volumes of remaining oil. The volumetric probability distribution between 5- and 95-percent probability for original oil in place ranges from 3.8 to 5.6 BSTB, original mobile oil in place ranges from 2.5 to 3.6 BSTB, and residual oil ranges from 1.5 to 2.3 BSTB. The untapped oil resource may be 10 percent of the original oil in place, or 380 million stock tank barrels.

  18. Assessment of tight-gas resources in Canyon sandstones of the Val Verde Basin, Texas, 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Klett, Timothy R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Marra, Kristen R.; Finn, Thomas M.; Pitman, Janet K.

    2016-07-08

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed mean resources of 5 trillion cubic feet of gas and 187 million barrels of natural gas liquids in tight-gas assessment units in the Canyon sandstones of the Val Verde Basin, Texas.

  19. Upper Permian (Guadalupian) facies and their association with hydrocarbons - Permian basin, west Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.F.; Kendall, C.G.S.C.; Harris, P.M.

    1986-03-01

    Outcrops of Guadalupian sedimentary rocks in the Permian basin of west Texas and southeastern New Mexico are a classic example of the facies relationships that span a carbonate shelf. In the subsurface, these rocks form classic hydrocarbon-facies taps. Proceeding from basin to the updip termination of the shelf, the facies are (1) deep-water basin, (2) an apron of allochthonous carbonates, (3) carbonate shelf margin or reef, (4) carbonate sand flats, (5) carbonate barrier islands, (6) lagoon, and (7) coastal playas and supratidal salt flats (sabkhas). Over a half century of exploration drilling has shown that hydrocarbons in the Permian rocks of the Permian basin have accumulated at the updip contact of the lagoonal dolomites and clastics with the coastal evaporites, and in the basinal channel-fill clastics. The shelf marginal (reef) facies contain cavernous porosity, but commonly are water saturated. These facies relationships and hydrocarbon occurrences provide an exploration model with which to explore and rank hydrocarbon potential in other carbonate provinces. 16 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Lower Cretaceous barrier reef and outer shelf facies, Sligo Formation, south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, B.L.; Lighty, R.G.; Rezak, R.; Tieh, T.T.

    1987-09-01

    Along the south Texas margin, a vast carbonate-shelf complex with an extensive barrier-reef system and abundant shallow-lagoon and skeletal-shoal deposits existed during the Aptian to Albian. The Sligo Formation represents more than 609.6 m (2000 ft) of deposition along this margin. Facies types along the shelf edge were quantitatively delineated by cluster analysis of detailed point-count data from 90 thin sections of whole cores from five wells. In addition, studies of 42.6 m (140 ft) of core slabs and thin sections of well cuttings from four other wells were used to establish a regional depositional model. Along the Sligo shelf edge, three major facies occur: reef or reef rubble (two subfacies), back reef (three subfacies), and lagoonal (two subfacies). Reef facies are dominated by caprinids and also contain solenoporid algae, stromatoporoids, and an assortment of corals. Behind the reef, a spectrum of extensive back-reef deposits interfinger with shallow (< 5 m), lagoonal sediments. Farther behind the shelf-margin reef complex, along the outer shelf, benthic foraminifera, peloids, and ooids were deposited in high-energy shoals, and are interbedded with low-energy lagoonal sediments. The two types of buildups probably existed along the Sligo shelf margin and the equivalent Cupido shelf margin to the south: (1) wave-resistant coral-caprinid-stromatoporid barrier reefs (adjacent to restricted lagoonal facies), and (2) low-lying rudist banks (adjacent to diverse, washed lagoonal facies).

  1. Environment of deposition of downdip Lower Wilcox sandstones, Provident City field, Lavaca County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Vest, S.W.

    1990-09-01

    The Lower Wilcox section at Provident City field produces dry gas from thin-bedded, silty sandstones, at depths of 12,500 to 14,100 ft (3,810 to 4,298 m). Cores show that sandstone cosets range 0.1 to 2.7 ft (0.03 to 0.82 m) and average 0.5 8 ft (0. 18 m) in thickness. Sedimentary structures within the cosets range upward from a massive unit (A) to a planar-laminated unit (B) to a ripple-laminated unit (C). The cosets have an average composition of lithic arkose and show textural grading indicative of deposition from turbidity flows. The sandstones lie within the Wilcox fault zone, downdip of the Colorado and Guadalupe deltas of the Rockdale Delta System. Regional stratigraphy and structural trends indicate that the sandstones were deposited in a deep marine environment. A growth fault, having approximately 1000 ft (3048 m) of throw at a depth of 12,300 ft (3750 m), bounds the field to the northwest and largely controls the distribution of lithofacies. Stacked, AB-type, turbidite cosets indicate channel facies. The M Sandstone was deposited as a constructional channel, with abrupt lateral grading to overbank facies, where turbidites of the BC- and C-type are dominant. The S Sandstone was deposited as a series of thin, constructional channels, mostly with turbidites of the AB- and ABC-type that are generally stacked, causing superimposed, dip-trending lobes on an otherwise strike-trending sandstone.

  2. Sedimentary facies and reservoir characteristics of Cretaceous J Sandstone at Torrington field (North), Goshen County, Wyoming, exploration and development implications

    SciTech Connect

    Mikesh, D.L.; Lafollette, R.F.

    1983-08-01

    Torrington field (North) is productive from the Lower Cretaceous J sandstone in the Wyoming portion of the Denver basin. The trapping mechanism is stratigraphic, with reservoir sandstones enveloped laterally and updip by shale-dominated lithofacies. The field has produced 13,000 bbl of oil from two wells since its discovery in late 1981. Three major sedimentary environments and their associated facies, characteristic of a meandered fluvial system, occur within the J interval in the area: abandoned channel, point bar(s), and interfluvial plain. Production at both Torrington (North) and Torrington is from reservoir development within point bar deposits. Cores of the J point bar at Torrington (North) show that it is comprised primarily of very fine to fine-grained quartzarenites and sublitharenites. Sedimentary structures observed in the cores include burrowing and bioturbation, high-angle plane-parallel cross-bedding, discontinuous wavy shale laminae, climbing ripples, and truncated laminae. Although excellent hydrocarbon shows occur from the base to the top of the point bar, production appears to be confined to thin intervals of medium-grained quartzarenite found near the middle of the vertical sequence. Petrophysical reservoir characteristics of the J sandstone were established through examination of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thin-section petrography, and conventional core analysis data. Microporosity development and geometry also affect production. Field extension locations and an exploratory drill site have been established as a result of this study.

  3. Depositional systems and structural controls of Hackberry sandstone reservoirs in southeast Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.E.; Reed, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Deep-water sandstones of the Oligocene-age Hackberry unit of the Frio Formation contain significant quantities of oil and gas remain potentially one of the most productive exploration targets in southeast Texas. The Hackberry is a wedge of sandstone and shale containing bathyal fauna that separates upper Frio barrier-bar-strandplain sandstones from lower Frio neritic shale and sand. Major Hackberry sandstones lie atop a channeled unconformity that forms the base of the unit. Sandstones in a typical sand-rich channel at Port Arthur field grade upward from a basal, confined channel-fill sandstone to more widespread, broad, fan-channel deposits. Topmost are proximal to medial fan deposits and overbank turbidite deposits. The sequence suggests that Hackberry sandstones were laid down by an onlapping submarine canyon-fan complex deposited in canyons that eroded headward into the contemporaneous Frio barrier system. Regional maps and seismic interpretations outline a network of sand-filled channels extending from the barrier toward the southeast.

  4. Depositional setting, structural style, and sandstone distribution in three geopressured geothermal areas, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, C.D.; Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Garcia, D.D.

    1981-10-01

    Three areas in the Texas Gulf Coast region with different depositional settings, structural styles, and sandstone distribution were studied with well log and seismic data to evaluate some of the controls on subsurface conditions in geopressured aquifers. Structural and stratigraphic interpretations were made primarily on the basis of well log correlations. Seismic data confirm the log interpretations but also are useful in structure mapping at depths below well control.

  5. Lower Permian facies of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas: depositional systems, shelf-margin evolution, paleogeography, and petroleum potential

    SciTech Connect

    Handford, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    A Palo geological study suggests that potential hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in shelf-margin carbonates, delta-front sandstones, and fan-delta arkoses. Zones of porous (greater than 10 percent) dolomite are concentrated near shelf margins and have configurations similar to productive Lower Permian shelf-margin trends in New Mexico. Delta-front sandstones (log-computed porosity of 18 to 25 percent) are similar to producing deltaic sandstones of Morris Buie-Blaco Fields in North-Central Texas. Porous (18 percent) fan-delta sandstones along the south flank of the Amarillo Uplift may form reservoirs similiar to that of the Mobeetie Field on the north side of the Amarillo Uplife in Wheeler County, Texas. Potential hydrocarbon source beds occur in slope and basinal environments. Total organic carbon generally ranges from 1 to 2.3 percent by weight and averages 0.589 percent by weight.

  6. Petrography and diagenesis of Eagle Mills sandstones, subsurface - Northeast Texas and southwest Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, W.C.; Callender, C.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Eagle Mills Formation (Triassic-Jurassic) has been penetrated by several deep wells (12,000 to 18,000 ft) in northeast Texas and southwest Arkansas. It consists of green, red, and pink conglomeratic lithic arenites and fine- to coarse-grained feldspathic arenites, interbedded with red and greenish gray shales and siltstones. Lithic arenites contain basalt, chert, quartzite, and dolomite rock fragments; plagioclase is the predominant feldspar. All Eagle Mills sandstones have low textural and mineralogic maturities. Eagle Mills red beds and associated intrusive igneous rocks (diabase and basalt dikes and sills) represent the fillings of grabens or rift basins that actively subsided during deposition (in alluvial, fluvial-deltaic, and lacustrine paleoenvironments). Eagle Mills lithic and feldspathic sandstones have undergone a complex diagenetic history, including chlorite cementation (pore linings and pore fillings), compaction, quartz and feldspar overgrowths, dolomite cementation, chloritization and albitization of detrital feldspars, local dissolution of framework grains (igneous lithics and feldspars), precipitation of kaolinite, late Fe-calcite cementation, and saddle dolomite formation. Cement mineralogies are strongly correlative with lithofacies. Lithic sandstones contain the highest frequency of chlorite cements, whereas feldspathic sandstones are preferentially cemented with carbonates and anhydrite; quartz and feldspar overgrowths are ubiquitous. The suite of authigenic minerals in Eagle Mills sandstones records progressive burial into a deep, high-temperature (120-150C), semiclosed, diagenetic regime.

  7. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the main glauconite bed in the Middle Eocene of Texas: paleoenvironmental implications for the verdine facies.

    PubMed

    Harding, Sherie C; Nash, Barbara P; Petersen, Erich U; Ekdale, A A; Bradbury, Christopher D; Dyar, M Darby

    2014-01-01

    The Main Glauconite Bed (MGB) is a pelleted greensand located at Stone City Bluff on the south bank of the Brazos River in Burleson County, Texas. It was deposited during the Middle Eocene regional transgression on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Stratigraphically it lies in the upper Stone City Member, Crockett Formation, Claiborne Group. Its mineralogy and geochemistry were examined in detail, and verdine facies minerals, predominantly odinite, were identified. Few glauconitic minerals were found in the green pelleted sediments of the MGB. Without detailed mineralogical work, glaucony facies minerals and verdine facies minerals are easily mistaken for one another. Their distinction has value in assessing paleoenvironments. In this study, several analytical techniques were employed to assess the mineralogy. X-ray diffraction of oriented and un-oriented clay samples indicated a clay mixture dominated by 7 and 14Å diffraction peaks. Unit cell calculations from XRD data for MGB pellets match the odinite-1M data base. Electron microprobe analyses (EMPA) from the average of 31 data points from clay pellets accompanied with Mössbauer analyses were used to calculate the structural formula which is that of odinite: Fe(3+) 0.89 Mg0.45 Al0.67 Fe(2+) 0.30 Ti0.01 Mn0.01) Σ = 2.33 (Si1.77 Al0.23) O5.00 (OH)4.00. QEMSCAN (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy) data provided mineral maps of quantitative proportions of the constituent clays. The verdine facies is a clay mineral facies associated with shallow marine shelf and lagoonal environments at tropical latitudes with iron influx from nearby runoff. Its depositional environment is well documented in modern nearshore locations. Recognition of verdine facies clays as the dominant constituent of the MGB clay pellets, rather than glaucony facies clays, allows for a more precise assessment of paleoenvironmental conditions.

  8. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Main Glauconite Bed in the Middle Eocene of Texas: Paleoenvironmental Implications for the Verdine Facies

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Sherie C.; Nash, Barbara P.; Petersen, Erich U.; Ekdale, A. A.; Bradbury, Christopher D.; Dyar, M. Darby

    2014-01-01

    The Main Glauconite Bed (MGB) is a pelleted greensand located at Stone City Bluff on the south bank of the Brazos River in Burleson County, Texas. It was deposited during the Middle Eocene regional transgression on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Stratigraphically it lies in the upper Stone City Member, Crockett Formation, Claiborne Group. Its mineralogy and geochemistry were examined in detail, and verdine facies minerals, predominantly odinite, were identified. Few glauconitic minerals were found in the green pelleted sediments of the MGB. Without detailed mineralogical work, glaucony facies minerals and verdine facies minerals are easily mistaken for one another. Their distinction has value in assessing paleoenvironments. In this study, several analytical techniques were employed to assess the mineralogy. X-ray diffraction of oriented and un-oriented clay samples indicated a clay mixture dominated by 7 and 14Å diffraction peaks. Unit cell calculations from XRD data for MGB pellets match the odinite-1M data base. Electron microprobe analyses (EMPA) from the average of 31 data points from clay pellets accompanied with Mössbauer analyses were used to calculate the structural formula which is that of odinite: Fe3+0.89 Mg0.45 Al0.67 Fe2+0.30 Ti0.01 Mn0.01) Σ = 2.33 (Si1.77 Al0.23) O5.00 (OH)4.00. QEMSCAN (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy) data provided mineral maps of quantitative proportions of the constituent clays. The verdine facies is a clay mineral facies associated with shallow marine shelf and lagoonal environments at tropical latitudes with iron influx from nearby runoff. Its depositional environment is well documented in modern nearshore locations. Recognition of verdine facies clays as the dominant constituent of the MGB clay pellets, rather than glaucony facies clays, allows for a more precise assessment of paleoenvironmental conditions. PMID:24503875

  9. Clay mineralogy and its controls on production, Pennsylvanian upper Morrow sandstone, Farnsworth field, Ochiltree County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, T.W. )

    1989-12-01

    Farnsworth field in Ochiltree County, Texas, is the most prolific upper Morrow oil field in the Anadarko basin, producing more than 36 million bbl of oil and 27 billion ft{sup 3} of gas since its discovery in 1955. The bulk of the production comes from an upper Morrow-aged sandstone locally referred to as the Buckhaults sandstone. The Buckhaults sandstone is a coarse to very coarse-grained, arkose to arkosic wacke. Grain-size distributions, sedimentary structure analysis, and sand-body geometry indicate that the Buckhaults was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic environment as distributary channel and distributary mouth-bar sands. Depositional strike is northwest to southeast. The source area for the Buckhaults sediments was primarily a plutonic igneous terrane, with a minor contribution from volcanic and reworked sedimentary rocks. The proposed source area is the Amarillo-Wichita uplift to the south. In addition, the Cimarron arch and/or Keyes dome to the west-northwest may also have contributed sediment to the study area. The large (average) grain size, the amount of feldspar present, and the overall immaturity of the Buckhaults sediments indicate a relatively short distance of transport. Detailed scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis of cores from the productive interval coupled with comparisons of varying completion practices across the field indicate a significant correlation between individual well performance, clay mineralogy, and completion technique.

  10. Van Horn Sandstone, Trans-Pecos Texas: Evidence for Late Cambrian rifting along southern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Hongshuan, Ye; Soegaard, K. . Programs in Geosciences)

    1993-02-01

    The Van Horn Sandstone in the Trans-Pecos region of west Texas is interpreted as a rift sequence which developed in response to Cambrian breakup along the southern margin of the North American continent. The Van Horn Sandstone consists exclusively of braided alluvial sediments and occupies relatively small isolated basins in the vicinity of the town of Van Horn. The sandstone is in structural unconformable contact above intensely deformed Precambrian sediments which are < 1,123 Ma old. The Van Horn Sandstone is overlain by more than 650 meters of earliest Ordovician to Mississippian shallow-marine shelf sediments. Geohistory analysis of the overlying Paleozoic shelf sediments indicates that subsidence was driven by thermal contraction of the crust and that the shallow-marine sediments represent a drift sequence. Subsidence history curves correspond with theoretical thermal decay curves where [beta] = 1.2 and suggest that thermal subsidence commenced in Late Cambrian time about 510 Ma ago. Increased crustal attenuation, resulting in development of an ocean basin, occurred between Van Horn and the original location of deep water sediments presently exposed in the Marathon uplift to the south. Proposed Late Cambrian breakup south of Van Horn is coeval with rifting in the southern Oklahoma aulachogen and Rome trough in the Appalachian Mountains, but post-dates the main Late Proterozoic rifting event between 625 and 555 Ma along the eastern and western freeboard of North American. The significance of diachronous rifting in Eocambrian-Cambrian time is unclear at present but has consequences for fragmentation of the late Precambrian supercontinent Rodinia'.

  11. Depositional environments and hydrocarbon occurrence of upper Jurassic Cotton Valley sandstones, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kornfeld, I.

    1985-02-01

    The sandstones of the Kimmeridgian (Jurassic) upper Cotton Valley Formation of Mississippi, northern Louisiana, and eastern Texas were deposited on a stable subsiding shelf. These sands are regressive and are part of a complex of deltaic and marine systems. They are quartz-rich and exhibit a variety of sedimentary structures. Cotton Valley fluvial-deltaic systems drained Paleozoic and younger highlands to the north and northwest, depositing sands on the shelf where they were subsequently reworked. Three depositional environments have been interpreted for these sands in Mississippi: (1) a constructive delta in the west-central part of the state, (2) a destructive delta in the east-central part of the state, and (3) an interdeltaic system in central Mississippi between the other systems. In northern Louisiana and northeastern Texas, the following environments have been interpreted: a proximal destructive delta system in northwest Louisiana and northeast Texas and another delta system in northeastern Louisiana with an interdeltaic system consisting of barrier beaches and barrier bars located centrally between them. Production is controlled by porosity and permeability barriers, fault traps, and salt- and basement-induced structures.

  12. Facies and geochemical characterization of Mississippian rocks in Palo Duro and Hardeman basins, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, S.c.

    1985-02-01

    Mississippian rocks in the southern Texas Panhandle constitute a complex sequence of carbonate deposits formed in a platform-to-basin setting. Following relatively rapid transgression and inundation of the area from the north and east, the Hardeman basin area was characterized by outer platform conditions in which isolated carbonates buildups developed surrounded by relatively deep water. The Palo Duro basin to the west was the site of shallow-water, inner platform deposition. In intermediate areas, limestone turbidites, perhaps derived from carbonate buildups to the east, accumulated in quiet water. After this initial transgression, an upward shallowing trend resulted in the formation of ooid to skeletal shoals throughout the area. Although current production in the area is coincident with the distribution of organic-rich Upper Mississippian shales in the eastern part of the Hardeman basin, TOC studies indicate that potential carbonate source rocks are present in the western Hardeman and eastern Palo Duro basins. Mississippian rocks in the Palo Duro basin proper have little source rock potential. Vitrinite reflectance studies indicate that Hardeman basin rocks are well within the oil window. However, correlative deposits at equivalent depths in most of the Palo Duro basin are only marginally mature. Although thermal maturity seems to be mirrored by the presence geothermal gradient, and source rock quality appears related to depositional setting (depth of water), successful exploration outside currently productive areas will require a detailed analysis of organic geochemistry and depositional facies.

  13. Depositional setting, structural style, and sandstone distribution in three geopressured geothermal areas, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, C.D.; Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Garcia, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three areas in the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain were studied using electric logs and seismic-reflection data to interpret their depositional and structural history and to compare their potential as geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. The Cuero study area, on the lower Wilcox (upper Paleocene) growth-fault trend, is characterized by closely and evenly spaced, subparallel, down-to-the-basin growth faults, relatively small expansion ratios, and minor block rotation. Distributary-channel sandstones in the geopressured lower Wilcox Group of the South Cook fault block appear to be the best geothermal aquifers in the Cuero area. The Blessing study area, on the lower Frio (Oligocene) growth-fault trend, shows wider and more variable fault spacing and much greater expansion ratios and block rotation, particularly during early Frio time. Thick geopressured sandstone aquifers are laterally more extensive in the Blessing area than in the Cuero area. The Pleasant Bayou study area, like the Blessing area, is on the Frio growth-fault trand, and its early structural development was similar rapid movement of widely spaced faults resulted in large expansion ratios and major block rotation. However, a late-stage pattern of salt uplift and withdrawal complicated the structural style. Thick geopressured lower Frio sandstone aquifers are highly permeable and laterally extensive, as in the Blessing area. In all three areas, geopressured aquifers were created where early, rapid movement along down-to-the-basin growth faults juxtaposed shallow-water sands against older shales, probably deposited in slope environments. Major transgressions followed the deposition of reservoir sands and probably also influenced the hydraulic isolation that allowed the build up of abnormal pressures. 26 refs., 49 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Exploration potential and variations in shelf plume sandstones, Navarro group (Maestrichtian), east-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.E. Jr.; Scott, A.J.

    1984-04-01

    Fine-grained marine sandstones within the Kemp Clay of the Navarro Group (Maestrichtian) of east-central Texas were deposited on a muddy, shallow shelf by migrating sandbars. These sands were transported in traction from deltaic headlands by seaward-deflected coastal/shelf currents. The sand formed thin (3-20 ft; 1-6 m) arcuate belts (shelf sand plumes) which were 17-20 mi (27-32 km) wide and extended 27-30 mi (43-48 km) downdrift and 21-40 mi (34-64 km) onto the shelf. Orientation of the long axes of ridges, formed by the stacking of individual bars within the shelf sand plume, changes (from dip to strike-oriented downdrift) corresponding to the flow directions of the shelf currents. Southwestward, fair-weather reworking of these delta-supplied sands by shelf currents resulted in the down-current stratigraphic climbing of the migrating shelf-bar complexes. Onshore stratigraphic climbing in the landward parts of the plume complexes was related to storm activity. Current patterns and the resulting distribution of sand were influenced by the configuration of the shelf and the topographic relief inherited from previously deposited deltaic/shelf depositional platforms. Three variations of the basic shelf sandstone-plume model were recognized in the study area: (1) a rapidly deposited, immature plume, (2) an abandoned, current-reworked plume, and (3) a storm-modified, onshore-reworked plume. Each of these variants displays unique characteristics which influence their potential as hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  15. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  16. Fluvial and deltaic facies and environments of the late permian back-reef shelves of the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, J. )

    1993-02-01

    The Artesia Group is a sequence of carbonates, evaporites, and clastics that was deposited across the back-reef shelves of the Permian Basin during late Permian time. There has been some controversy over the depositional environments of the clastic members of the Artesia Group and the role of sea level fluctuations in their accumulation. However, the results of a regional core study of the Queen Formation of the Artesia Group indicate that they were largely deposited in desert fluvial and deltaic environments during low-stands of sea level. Three fluvial-deltaic facies are recognized within the clastic members of the Queen. The first consists of medium to very find sandstones and silty sandstones with cross-beds, ripple cross-laminae, and planar and wavy laminae. This facies forms wavy sheets that thicken and thin along linear trends, and was deposited in sandy braided streams. The second facies consists of very find to fine sandstones, silty sandstones, and siltstones with ripple cross-laminae, planar and wavy laminae, cross-beds, clay drapes and pedogenetic cutans, as well as siltstones and silty mudstones with haloturbation structures and evaporite nodules. This facies forms thick planar sheets, and was deposited in fluvial sandflats and adjacent fluvial-dominated continental sabkhas. The third facies consists of cyclic deposits of haloturbated silty mudstones that grade into siltstones and very fine sandstones with crossbeds, planar and wavy laminae, haloturbation structures and evaporite nodules. Each cycle forms a lobate body that is bounded by carbonates or evaporites and which was deposited in sheet deltas that formed along the landward margins of a back-reef lagoon.

  17. Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. ); Vidal, J.M. ); Sippel, M.A. ); Ballard, J.R. ); Coover, D.M. Jr. ); Bloxsom, W.E. )

    1993-09-01

    An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

  18. San Andres dolomite reservoir, Emma field, Andrews County, Texas: Depositional facies and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, S.C. )

    1987-02-01

    Although nearly 100% (19 million bbl of oil) of the estimated recoverable oil in the Emma San Andres reservoir has been produced, indications are that as much as 15 million bbl of recoverable, movable oil remains. Detailed study of facies and diagenesis in the reservoir reveals considerable lateral and vertical variability, which has important implications for recovery and injection efficiencies in the field. The upper San Andres Formation in the Emma field comprises a shallowing-upward sequence of pervasively dolomitized, shallow-water subtidal to supratidal carbonates that accumulated on a gently east-sloping ramp. The lowermost part of the reservoir interval is composed of laterally extensive fusulinid packstone deposited in an open-marine ramp setting. Abruptly overlying this facies is a sequence of interbedded fusulinid/algal grainstone, formed in a migrating sand-shoal complex, and burrowed, skeletal mudstone deposited on a restricted inner ramp. The grainstone is restricted to the western and central parts of the field. These deposits are overlain by pisolitic and cryptalgal mudstones and terrigenous siliciclastics of supratidal origin. Anydrite is abundant throughout the section. Porosity and permeability are facies controlled. Highest permeabilities are developed in shoal complex grainstone (100 md) and in fusulinid packstone (925-50 md). Lateral and vertical facies variations resulted in considerable reservoir heterogeneity. Trace-element and isotope data indicate that most of the San Andres dolomite and associated sulfate (anhydrite) precipitated from downward-moving, seawater-derived brines during shallow burial in the late Guadalupian. Subsequent anhydrite dissolution has locally enhanced original porosity.

  19. Evaluation of evaporite facies as a tool for exploration, Yates Field, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, A.W.; Warren, J.K.

    1987-05-01

    Evaporites have long been recognized as the most efficient reservoir seal; however, the seal can itself serve as an exploration tool to locate subtle stratigraphic traps. By analogy with modern environments, thick massive evaporites form subaqueously in ponds (salinas) in topographic lows while sabkhas form on the subaerially exposed supratidal zone on topographic highs. Recognition of evaporite facies distribution can delineate paleotopography where sabkhas form a seal over local highs and closure is provided by salinas forming a lateral seal in lows. These relationships are illustrated by the giant Yates field (2 billion bbl reserves), situated at the southern tip of the Central basin platform in the Permian basin. The seal over the Yates reservoir (San Andres formation) is formed by the evaporites at the base of the Seven Rivers Formation (Guadalupian). Within the evaporite, two distinct depositional facies are recognized: a massive, salina-anhydrite in the central and western parts of the field; and on the east, stacked sabkha sequences consisting of sandy dolomite overlying a sharp base, grading into nodular anhydrite and capped by an erosional surface. The depositional topography on the underlying San Andres reservoir controlled the facies distribution in the basal Seven Rivers. Carbonate buildups formed on the eastern side of the field, while interbedded shales and dolomites accumulated in the quiet lagoonal waters behind. Due to dewatering and compaction during early burial, the lagoons remained topographically low until early Seven Rivers time when they were finally filled with salina evaporites. The rigid shelf margin buildups remained as topographic highs over which sabkhas developed. Only 10% of the production has come from the lagoonal muds under the salinas, while 90% has been produced from the carbonate buildups under the sabkhas.

  20. Stratigraphic hierarchy of organic carbon rich siltstones in deep-water facies, Brushy Canyon Formation (Guadalupian), Delaware Basin, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageman, Bradley B.; Gardner, Michael H.; Armentrout, John M.; Murphy, Adam E.

    1998-05-01

    The first systematic test for a predictive relationship between organic carbon content and stratigraphic hierarchy in a deep-water slope to basin-floor deposit was performed. The studied section includes the Pipeline Shale, the Brushy Canyon Formation, and the lower part of the Cherry Canyon Formation of the Delaware Mountain Group, West Texas. This interval represents one large-scale, 3rd-order genetic sequence within which 4th- and 5th-order stratigraphic cycles are recognized. Samples of fine-grained facies throughout the section were collected from outcrop and analyzed for organic carbon content and hydrogen index. Degree of pyritization was also determined for a subset of the samples. The results indicate that organic enrichment is closely correlated to the stratigraphic hierarchy at the 3rd-, 4th-, and 5th-order levels. The data suggest that quantity and quality of preserved organic matter are controlled by changes in bulk sedimentation rate (dilution vs. condensation), which affect organic matter inputs to the sediment, as well as the balance between (1) burial and preservation of organic matter and (2) its degradation on the sea floor during times of sediment starvation.

  1. Contrasting evolutionary patterns of Lower Permian shelf and basinal facies, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Reid, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    The evolution of carbonate and siliciclastic shelf-to-basin depositional systems of the Lower Permian in the Midland basin was influenced by eustatic fluctuations, changing shelf-margin biota, and concurrent tectonism. The development of these systems from Wolfcampian to Leonardian time (28-m.y. duration) involved seven distinct phases that are recognized seismically as third and lesser order cycles. These phases are (1) highstand progradational shelf carbonate packages, separated by low-stand deltaic and basinal shales, deposited during relatively long-term eustatic cycles (early Wolfcampian); the component carbonate systems evolved from ramps to distally steepened ramps associated with nonframe-building algal reefs and grainstones, with little resedimented foreshelf detritus; (2) dominantly carbonate deposition during the middle and early late Wolfcampian, with construction of offlapping (but laterally juxtaposed) progradational shelves with steep platform margins deposited during a lengthy period of stillstand and/or slow submergence; dolomitized platform-margin facies are composed of marine-cemented, sponge-algal reefs and grainstones, with resedimented carbonate megabreccia to micrite channels and lobes in the contiguous shale basin; (3) shelf emergence and erosion during a major late middle(.) to late Wolfcampian lowstand contemporaneous with basinwide tectonism, with mass wastage into the basin of the terminal Wolfcampian platform-margin carbonate section; (4) regional transgression and black shale deposition followed by a repeat of Phase 2 type systems in the latest Wolfcampian to earliest Leonardian but under arid conditions; rapid vertical platform margin accretion by dolomitized, marine-cemented, sponge-algal-coral reefs and grainstones, and deposition of thick foreshelf megabreccia wedges, aprons, channels, and lobes;

  2. Smackover and Haynesville facies relationships in north-central East Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, S.K.

    1984-09-01

    The Smackover Formation was deposited as a coarsening-upward carbonate unit that developed first with the deposition of transgressive laminated silty limestones in deep anoxic waters. Mudstones and wackestones were deposited during a slow rise in sea level as the carbonate system became established. Packstones and grainstones were deposited at the Smackover shelf margin in thick coarsening-upward sequences. Local lenses of anhydrite and dolomitic mud developed on the shoreward side of the shelf break. Pelleted sands also developed in the low-energy Smackover lagoon. Ultimately, a thin blanket of ooid sands covered the shelf. During Haynesville deposition, a carbonate barrier at the shelf margin created an evaporative lagoon in which Buckner anhydrite and halite precipitated. As sea level rose, limestones and dolomites were deposited along the downdip margin of the Buckner lagoon. Terrigenous clastics began to prograde into the updip areas. Continued sea level rise flooded the shelf, and Gilmer limestones were deposited as far updip as the present Mexia-Talco fault zone. At the end of Haynesville depositions, limestones and shales were deposited on either side of the Gilmer shelf margin as quartzose clastics continued to prograde into updip areas. Evidence in east Texas suggests that the depositional model for the Smackover followed a shelf margin rather than the generally accepted ramp model. The shelf margin is clearly identified as a carbonate barrier during Haynesville deposition, outlining a Buckner lagoon as the depocenter that continued to subside at least through the end of Haynesville deposition.

  3. Relationships of Bexar shale, Hensel sandstone, and Hensel dolomite (basal upper Trinity, Comanchean Cretaceous) in south-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Amsbury, D.L.

    1984-04-01

    The Bexar Shale has been considered the offshore equivalent of the Cow Creek Limestone, the overlying Hensel sandstone, or of the disconformity between them in outcropping sections. Cores and outcrops in Comal, Kendall, and northern Bexar Counties preserve calcitic and dolomitic caliche in the top of the Cow Creek Limestone. Above the caliche is 8-16 m(25-50 ft) of laminated or bioturbated, dolomitic siltstone and silty dolomite (Hensel dolomite). Dolomite is euhedral and silt-sized. The lower part contains collophane grains and oyster shells replaced partly by chalcedony. Carbonate grains within the upper part include angular and well-rounded mollusk and echinoid fragments; many are pyritic and coated by glauconite. Terrigenous grains in Hensel dolomite grade upward from silt to coarse subarkose sand from central Texas. In southern Bexar County, about 35 m (115 ft) of silt-, clay-, and calcite-mudstone referable to the Bexar Shale sharply overlie shallow marine Cow Creek Limestone, and grade abruptly upward into about 7 m (23 ft) of Hensel dolomite. Dolomite is overlain by calcarenite of the Glen Rose Formation containing subarkose sand grains. Similar distinctive sand grains occur in well cuttings of basal Glen Rose beds northeastward through Travis County. The Bexar represents a flood of clay-sized sediment from a distant source, spread across the San Marcos arch during a rapid transgression. Slightly younger sand, silt, and local clay of the Hensel sandstone were eroded from central Texas by a few flash floods during a major period of caliche formation in the area.

  4. Strategies for reservoir characterization and identification of incremental recovery opportunities in mature reservoirs in Frio Fluvial-Deltaic sandstones, south Texas: An example from Rincon Field, Starr County. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, L.; Holtz, M.; Hentz, T.

    1995-11-01

    Fluvial-deltaic sandstone reservoirs in the United States are being abandoned at high rates, yet they still contain more than 34 billion barrels of unrecovered oil. The mature Oligocene-age fluvial-deltaic reservoirs of the Frio Formation along the Vicksburg Fault Zone in South Texas are typical of this class in that, after more than three decades of production, they still contain 61 percent of the original mobile oil in place, or 1.6 billion barrels. This resource represents a tremendous target for advanced reservoir characterization studies that integrate geological and engineering analysis to locate untapped and incompletely drained reservoir compartments isolated by stratigraphic heterogeneities. The D and E reservoir intervals of Rincon field, Starr County, South Texas, were selected for detailed study to demonstrate the ability of advanced characterization techniques to identify reservoir compartmentalization and locate specific infield reserve-growth opportunities. Reservoir architecture, determined through high-frequency genetic stratigraphy and facies analysis, was integrated with production history and facies-based petrophysical analysis of individual flow units to identify recompletion and geologically targeted infill drilling opportunities. Estimates of original oil in place versus cumulative production in D and E reservoirs suggest that potential reserve growth exceeds 4.5 million barrels. Comparison of reservoir architecture and the distribution of completions in each flow unit indicates a large number of reserve-growth opportunities. Potential reserves can be assigned to each opportunity by constructing an Sooh map of remaining mobile oil, which is the difference between original oil in place and the volumes drained by past completions.

  5. Genetic and grade and tonnage models for sandstone-hosted roll-type uranium deposits, Texas Coastal Plain, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Susan M.; Mihalasky, Mark J.; Tureck, Kathleen; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Hannon, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The coincidence of a number of geologic and climatic factors combined to create conditions favorable for the development of mineable concentrations of uranium hosted by Eocene through Pliocene sandstones in the Texas Coastal Plain. Here 254 uranium occurrences, including 169 deposits, 73 prospects, 6 showings and 4 anomalies, have been identified. About 80 million pounds of U3O8 have been produced and about 60 million pounds of identified producible U3O8 remain in place. The development of economic roll-type uranium deposits requires a source, large-scale transport of uranium in groundwater, and deposition in reducing zones within a sedimentary sequence. The weight of the evidence supports a source from thick sequences of volcanic ash and volcaniclastic sediment derived mostly from the Trans-Pecos volcanic field and Sierra Madre Occidental that lie west of the region. The thickest accumulations of source material were deposited and preserved south and west of the San Marcos arch in the Catahoula Formation. By the early Oligocene, a formerly uniformly subtropical climate along the Gulf Coast transitioned to a zoned climate in which the southwestern portion of Texas Coastal Plain was dry, and the eastern portion humid. The more arid climate in the southwestern area supported weathering of volcanic ash source rocks during pedogenesis and early diagenesis, concentration of uranium in groundwater and movement through host sediments. During the middle Tertiary Era, abundant clastic sediments were deposited in thick sequences by bed-load dominated fluvial systems in long-lived channel complexes that provided transmissive conduits favoring transport of uranium-rich groundwater. Groundwater transported uranium through permeable sandstones that were hydrologically connected with source rocks, commonly across formation boundaries driven by isostatic loading and eustatic sea level changes. Uranium roll fronts formed as a result of the interaction of uranium-rich groundwater

  6. Facies and diagenesis of Triassic (Austrian alpine) and upper Permian (New Mexico-Texas) platform-margin carbonates: a comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Lobitzer, H.

    1988-02-01

    Platform-margin carbonates of the Austrian Middle and basal Upper Triassic (Carnian) (Wettersteinkalk) and Upper Permian (Capitan reef, Guadalupian) are similar in terms of facies development, biota, and syndepositional diagenetic fabrics. These similarities are noteworthy because of their occurrence across the Permian-Triassic boundary, and the fact that these carbonates are distinct from younger (Upper Triassic Dachsteinkalk) depositional systems. The Upper Permian and Middle to basal Upper Triassic were deposited as subdued rimmed platforms with component lagoonal, reef-flat, reef, and fore-reef facies belts. The reef facies appear to represent upper slope marginal mounds, and consist mainly of sponges, solitary corals, Tubiphytes, and various encrusting biota; typically, this facies is pervasively marine cemented. The reef-flat facies consist of similarly lithified biograin-stones deposited in high-energy wave-base zones along the platform margins. By contrast, steep rimmed platforms with massive framework coral buildups and relatively less syndepositional marine cements dominate in Upper Triassic units (e.g., Dachsteinkalk, Steinplatte reef). Proximal fore-reef beds in the Upper Permian and Middle to basal Upper Triassic are characterized by carbonate-clast debris cemented by coarse crystalline carbonate. The precipitation of this cement (grossoolith) may have occurred during early shallow burial of the fore-reef beds. Similar depositional and diagenetic facies are poorly developed in the Upper Triassic, instead being represented mainly by bedded micrites.

  7. Analysis of Fault Permeability Using Mapping and Flow Modeling, Hickory Sandstone Aquifer, Central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto Camargo, Jorge E. Jensen, Jerry L.

    2012-09-15

    Reservoir compartments, typical targets for infill well locations, are commonly created by faults that may reduce permeability. A narrow fault may consist of a complex assemblage of deformation elements that result in spatially variable and anisotropic permeabilities. We report on the permeability structure of a km-scale fault sampled through drilling a faulted siliciclastic aquifer in central Texas. Probe and whole-core permeabilities, serial CAT scans, and textural and structural data from the selected core samples are used to understand permeability structure of fault zones and develop predictive models of fault zone permeability. Using numerical flow simulation, it is possible to predict permeability anisotropy associated with faults and evaluate the effect of individual deformation elements in the overall permeability tensor. We found relationships between the permeability of the host rock and those of the highly deformed (HD) fault-elements according to the fault throw. The lateral continuity and predictable permeability of the HD fault elements enhance capability for estimating the effects of subseismic faulting on fluid flow in low-shale reservoirs.

  8. Chemical effects of carbon dioxide sequestration in the Upper Morrow Sandstone in the Farnsworth, Texas, hydrocarbon unit

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmmed, Bulbul; Appold, Martin S.; Fan, Tianguang; McPherson, Brian J. O. L.; Grigg, Reid B.; White, Mark D.

    2016-03-01

    Numerical geochemical modeling was used to study the effects on pore-water composition and mineralogy from carbon dioxide (CO2) injection into the Pennsylvanian Morrow B Sandstone in the Farnsworth Unit in northern Texas to evaluate its potential for long-term CO2 sequestration. Speciation modeling showed the present Morrow B formation water to be supersaturated with respect to an assemblage of zeolite, clay, carbonate, mica, and aluminum hydroxide minerals and quartz. The principal accessory minerals in the Morrow B, feldspars and chlorite, were predicted to dissolve. A reaction-path model in which CO2 was progressively added up to its solubility limit into the Morrow B formation water showed a decrease in pH from its initial value of 7 to approximately 4.1 to 4.2, accompanied by the precipitation of small amounts of quartz, diaspore, and witherite. As the resultant CO2-charged fluid reacted with more of the Morrow B mineral matrix, the model predicted a rise in pH, reaching a maximum of 5.1 to 5.2 at a water–rock ratio of 10:1. At a higher water–rock ratio of 100:1, the pH rose to only 4.6 to 4.7. Diaspore, quartz, and nontronite precipitated consistently regardless of the water–rock ratio, but the carbonate minerals siderite, witherite, dolomite, and calcite precipitated at higher pH values only. As a result, CO2 sequestration by mineral trapping was predicted to be important only at low water–rock ratios, accounting for a maximum of 2% of the added CO2 at the lowest water–rock ratio investigated of 10:1, which corresponds to a small porosity increase of approximately 0.14% to 0.15%.

  9. Diagenesis of the Carrizo sandstone at Bulter salt dome, East Texas Basin: Implications for paleofluid-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    The calcite- and pyrite-cemented Eocene Carrizo sandstone on the flank of Butler salt dome in East Texas was formed by processes similar to those that form calcite cap rocks throughout the Gulf Coast. Isotopic evidence indicates that the bacterial degradation of hydrocarbons combined with the venting of deep sour gas and the dissolution of anhydrite from the dome resulted in the precipitation of these cements. Identification of the origins of these cements has lead to a better understanding of the paleofluid-flow associated with the dome. The Carrizo is a diagenetic quartzarenite with 42-50% concretionary calcite and pyrite cements. The calcite cement is bound to the northwest by a pyrite-cemented normal fault radial to the dome while the pyrite is found on both sides of the fault. Calcite {delta}{sup 13}C (-18 to -37 {per_thousand} (PDB)) and {delta}{sup 18}O (-6 to -9{per_thousand} (PDB)) show a mixed source of both waters (meteoric and deep) and hydrocarbons (oil, gas, and lignite). Heavy pyrite {delta}{sup 34}S (12-15 {per_thousand} (CDI)) represents H{sub 2}S supply from deep sour gas. Deep waters, methane, and H{sub 2}S migrated up the dome flank and out the fault into the Carrizo, already containing oil and lignite, and pyrite precipitated along the fault and in adjacent sediments. Bacteria oxidized the hydrocarbons and, with the meteoric and formation waters, formed bicarbonate. Calcium bearing fluids from the dome moved into the Caffizo, and calcite began to precipitate. However, pyrite cement along the fault prevented northwestern migration of the fluids, confining calcite precipitation to the southeast.

  10. Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117

    SciTech Connect

    Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

  11. [X-ray radiography as a method of detailing the analysis of sedimentary facies, based on example of the Cergowa sandstones (Flysch Carpathians)].

    PubMed

    Pszonka, Joanna; Wendorff, Marek; Jucha, Katarzyna; Bartynowska, Karolina; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the X-ray radiography as a method useful for the visualization of sedimentary structures in macroscopically homogeneous rocks. The radiographic analysis presented here bases on the example the Cergowa turbidite sandstones. The applied technique reveals that some of the apparently homogeneus Cergowa sandstones possess internal sedimentary structure of cross-lamination, which reflects on the sedimentological interpretation of the depositional mechanisms of this rock unit. This is the first application of this method in research on the Carpathian Flysch sedimentation.

  12. Architectural variability of confined turbidite sheet-sands: facies, geometry and infill of associated elementary channels. Examples from the Trois Evêchés Basin, Annot Sandstone Formation, SE France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, S.; Mulder, T.; Pace, A.; Bez, M.; Desaubliaux, G.

    2012-04-01

    The worldwide known Annot Sandstone Formation has been considered as a reference of confined siliciclastic turbidite system. This formation crops out in SE France and represents the Upper Eocene to Lower Oligocene gravitary infill of complex foreland basins, developed in front of the Alpine thrusts. This system can be assimilated as a sand-rich turbidite ramp, sourced by multiple fan deltas leading to topographically complex sub-basins. Highly bypassing channelized systems dominate in the most proximal and most confined areas. They distally evolve to relatively less confined areas, in which sedimentary bodies appear to be more continuous and homogenous on a regional scale. These last architectural elements, defined as sheet-sands or depositional lobes, have been the focus of this study in poorly documented areas. From an important dataset made of very high resolution outcrop correlations (gathered mainly in the Trois Evêchés and Lauzanier sub-basins), we have quantified the complex distribution of sedimentary facies and structures, grain-size and key surfaces in sand-rich sheets. This was done to understand their variability from depositional event to architectural element scales and to better characterize dimensions and characteristics of their components. Six main types of architectural elements were defined, composed of both channelized and unchannelized elements. Channelized units show a high variability in terms of facies, geometry and patterns of infill that are related to multiple erosional and depositional processes, which will be discussed. We notably relate some evidences of sinuous channels, represented by lateral accretion deposits in the channel complex axis and by low angle cross-bedded facies. We interpret this particular facies as the result of flow deconfinement and overbanks above channel margins. The stratigraphic analysis of elementary objects allows us to propose a genetic model and a spatial distribution model of sheet-sand architectural

  13. Revitalizing a mature oil play: Strategies for finding and producing unrecovered oil in frio fluvial-deltaic sandstone reservoirs at South Texas. Annual report, October 1994--October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, M.; Knox, P.; McRae, L.

    1996-02-01

    The Frio Fluvial-Deltaic Sandstone oil play of South Texas has produced nearly 1 billion barrels of oil, yet it still contains about 1.6 billion barrels of unrecovered mobile oil and nearly the same amount of residual oil resources. Interwell-scale geologic facise models of Frio Fluvial-deltaic reservoirs are being combined with engineering assessments and geophysical evaluations in order to determine the controls that these characteristics exert on the location and volume or unrecovered mobile and residual oil. Progress in the third year centered on technology transfer. An overview of project tasks is presented.

  14. Facies analysis and sequence stratigraphic framework of upper Campanian strata (Neslen and Mount Garfield formations, Bluecastle Tongue of the Castlegate sandstone, and Mancos shale), Eastern Book cliffs, Colorado and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Hettinger, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    Facies and sequence-stratigraphic analysis identifies six high-resolution sequences within upper Campanian strata across about 120 miles of the Book Cliffs in western Colorado and eastern Utah. The six sequences are named after prominent sandstone units and include, in ascending order, upper Sego sequence, Neslen sequence, Corcoran sequence, Buck Canyon/lower Cozzette sequence, upper Cozzette sequence, and Cozzette/Rollins sequence. A seventh sequence, the Bluecastle sequence, is present in the extreme western part of the study area. Facies analysis documents deepening- and shallowing- upward successions, parasequence stacking patterns, downlap in subsurface cross sections, facies dislocations, basinward shifts in facies, and truncation of strata.All six sequences display major incision into shoreface deposits of the Sego Sandstone and sandstones of the Corcoran and Cozzette Members of the Mount Garfield Formation. The incised surfaces represent sequence-boundary unconformities that allowed bypass of sediment to lowstand shorelines that are either attached to the older highstand shorelines or are detached from the older highstand shorelines and located southeast of the main study area. The sequence boundary unconformities represent valley incisions that were cut during successive lowstands of relative sea level. The overlying valley-fill deposits generally consist of tidally influenced strata deposited during an overall base level rise. Transgressive surfaces can be traced or projected over, or locally into, estuarine deposits above and landward of their associated shoreface deposits. Maximum flooding surfaces can be traced or projected landward from offshore strata into, or above, coastal-plain deposits. With the exception of the Cozzette/Rollins sequence, the majority of coal-bearing coastal-plain strata was deposited before maximum flooding and is therefore within the transgressive systems tracts. Maximum flooding was followed by strong progradation of

  15. Sedimentary depositional environments of uranium and petroleum host rocks of the Jackson Group, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Kendell A.

    1976-01-01

    Determination of depositional environments in rocks of the Jackson Group of late Eocene age aids in the exploration for uranium and petroleum in south Texas. During deposition of the Jackson Group, conditions were similar to those existing along the modern Gulf Coast of Texas except for a less arid climate and a greater supply of volcanic sediment. Sedimentary depositional environments recognized in both the modern coast and the Jackson rocks, in order from sea toward land, are: shoreface, beach, lagoon and bay, and paludal. Sediment deposited in these environments in places is interbedded with or transected by fluvial sediment. Both uranium and petroleum are found in the shoreface, beach, and fluvial facies. These facies are characterized by permeable well-sorted sandstone, which is commonly overlain and underlain by less permeable mudstone. A typical vertical sequence in ascending order through a unit containing a beach sandstone facies is (1) lagoonal or paludal clay stone and siltstone, (2) crossbedded fine-grained beach sandstone which contains Ophiomorpha burrows and, which, in places, is locally interbedded with lacustrine or lagoonal mudstone, (3) weakly laminated beach sandstone which contains root impressions at the top and Ophiomorpha, and (4) lagoonal or paludal claystone and siltstone. Gulfward, the beach sandstone apparently grades into highly burrowed, generally finer grained, more poorly sorted, less porous shoreface rocks. The beach facies may include barrier island beaches and mainland beaches, some of which were probably cheniers. Beach facies sandstone units extend many miles along the depositional strike, which nearly parallels the present outcrop strike, but extend only a mile or two (2-3 km) normal to the depositional strike into the subsurface. Recognition of the various facies in outcrops and drill holes is necessary for determination of true stratigraphic relations and for aid in exploration for beach and fluvial sandstone favorable for

  16. Revitalizing a mature oil play: Strategies for finding and producing unrecovered oil in Frio Fluvial-Deltaic Sandstone Reservoirs of South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, L.E.; Holtz, M.H.; Knox, P.R.

    1995-07-01

    The Frio Fluvial-Deltaic Sandstone Play of South Texas is one example of a mature play where reservoirs are being abandoned at high rates, potentially leaving behind significant unrecovered resources in untapped and incompletely drained reservoirs. Nearly 1 billion barrels of oil have been produced from Frio reservoirs since the 1940`s, yet more than 1.6 BSTB of unrecovered mobile oil is estimated to remain in the play. Frio reservoirs of the South Texas Gulf Coast are being studied to better characterize interwell stratigraphic heterogeneity in fluvial-deltaic depositional systems and determine controls on locations and volumes of unrecovered oil. Engineering data from fields throughout the play trend were evaluated to characterize variability exhibited by these heterogeneous reservoirs and were used as the basis for resource calculations to demonstrate a large additional oil potential remaining within the play. Study areas within two separate fields have been selected in which to apply advanced reservoir characterization techniques. Stratigraphic log correlations, reservoir mapping, core analyses, and evaluation of production data from each field study area have been used to characterize reservoir variability present within a single field. Differences in sandstone depositional styles and production behavior were assessed to identify zones with significant stratigraphic heterogeneity and a high potential for containing unproduced oil. Detailed studies of selected reservoir zones within these two fields are currently in progress.

  17. Production data as an indicator of gas reservoir heterogenesity in the Vicksburg S sandstones (Oligocene), McAllen Ranch field, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Wermund, E.G.; Langford, R.P. )

    1990-09-01

    To assess reservoir heterogeneity in low-permeability Vicksburg S sandstone reservoirs in McAllen Ranch gas field, production and pressure histories of 49 wells were analyzed; predominant well spacing is 80 acres. These histories were compared both fieldwide and in local areas defined by faults or facies. Production is through casing perforations, which commonly extend over 600 ft gross intervals within vertically stacked potential reservoir sandstones. The S reservoir comprises five sand-rich intervals that together have produced 249 bcf of gas since 1965. Cumulative production per well ranges from 39 bcf for 24 years to 0.8 bcf in 11 years. Average cumulative production is 6.3 bcf per well. To date, the largest average monthly production for a well is over 360 Mmcf; the mean for average monthly production (based on publicly available data) for all wells is 30.5 Mmcf. There is poor correlation among gross thicknesses of perforated intervals and cumulative production (R = 0.024). Wellhead shut-in pressures range from 12,500 psi on completion to 1,300 psi at abandonment. Maps of cumulative production and normalized BHP/Z show good production/pressure correlations. The slopes of regression curves for (1) monthly production decline histories and (2) periodic tests of daily production of adjacent well pairs show little influence from adjacent well completions or refracturing, even at relatively close well spacing. Monthly production in a newly completed or refractured adjacent well commonly exceeds the last production rate of a nearby older well. Production and pressure histories in adjacent well pairs suggest that limited communication occurs between S sandstone reservoirs of paired wells. This limited communication may be a consequence of limited drainage radius due to low permeability and of stratigraphic/diagenetic heterogeneity within the reservoir.

  18. Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

  19. Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    In 1997, the Texas Legislature passed a comprehensive revision to the Texas Water Code. This legislation (Senate Bill 1) changed water planning in Texas from a statewide to a regional activity. By September 2001, the 16 regions created by Senate Bill 1 must produce water plans to address their water needs during drought-of-record conditions, and must identify water-management strategies for periods when streamflows, reservoir storage, and groundwater levels are 50 and 75 percent of normal.

  20. Geologic description of the San Andres reservoir facies in the Mabee field

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.D. )

    1992-04-01

    The Mabee field is located in Andrews and Martin counties, Texas, approximately 16 mi northwest of Midland in the Permian basin. Production is from the upper Permian San Andres dolomite at an average depth of 4700 ft. The San Andres/Grayburg formations are the most prolific oil-producing formations in the Permian basin, with total production over 10 billion bbl, and an estimated additional 3.8 billion bbl to be recovered by conventional secondary and tertiary methods. The Mabee field has produced over 90 MMBO by primary and secondary methods since its discovery in 1943. A tertiary CO{sub 2} flood will be implemented in 1992. An essential prerequisite to a successful CO{sub 2} project is a detailed reservoir description and facies analysis. Examination of over 5000 ft of core established six major facies in an overall shallowing-upward sequence. The cap rock consists of dense anhydritic dolomites of the supratidal and oncolite facies. Production primarily is from the underlying dolomitized subtidal and ooid facies. Sandstones interfinger with the ooid facies, but are tightly cemented and act as barriers to fluid migration. The lower-most open-marine facies is below the oil/water contact for the field. Reservoir characterization improves the planning and operation of an enhanced recovery project.

  1. Revitalizing a mature oil play: Strategies for finding and producing oil in Frio Fluvial-Deltaic Sandstone reservoirs of South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, P.R.; Holtz, M.H.; McRae, L.E.

    1996-09-01

    Domestic fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs contain more than 30 Billion barrels (Bbbl) of remaining oil, more than any other type of reservoir, approximately one-third of which is in danger of permanent loss through premature field abandonments. The U.S. Department of Energy has placed its highest priority on increasing near-term recovery from FDD reservoirs in order to prevent abandonment of this important strategic resource. To aid in this effort, the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, began a 46-month project in October, 1992, to develop and demonstrate advanced methods of reservoir characterization that would more accurately locate remaining volumes of mobile oil that could then be recovered by recompleting existing wells or drilling geologically targeted infill. wells. Reservoirs in two fields within the Frio Fluvial-Deltaic Sandstone (Vicksburg Fault Zone) oil play of South Texas, a mature play which still contains 1.6 Bbbl of mobile oil after producing 1 Bbbl over four decades, were selected as laboratories for developing and testing reservoir characterization techniques. Advanced methods in geology, geophysics, petrophysics, and engineering were integrated to (1) identify probable reservoir architecture and heterogeneity, (2) determine past fluid-flow history, (3) integrate fluid-flow history with reservoir architecture to identify untapped, incompletely drained, and new pool compartments, and (4) identify specific opportunities for near-term reserve growth. To facilitate the success of operators in applying these methods in the Frio play, geologic and reservoir engineering characteristics of all major reservoirs in the play were documented and statistically analyzed. A quantitative quick-look methodology was developed to prioritize reservoirs in terms of reserve-growth potential.

  2. Paint Rock and southwest Paint Rock fields, Concho County, Texas: Strawn analogs of modern island carbonate facies of Ambergris Cay, Belize

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, A.M.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1987-02-01

    Lower Strawn (Desmoinesian Goen Limestone) reservoirs at Paint Rock and Southwest Paint Rock fields are a complex of carbonate and associated facies interpreted as having been deposited in various environments on and around large, emergent islands on shallow carbonate shelves. The origin and geometries of the component lithofacies in these fields, and their reservoir diagenetic histories, are similar to those presently accumulating on Ambergris Cay, a linear island complex on the northern shelf of Belize. Paint Rock field originated as a narrow, elongate Chaetetes reef trend that formed the foundation on which the overlying island facies were deposited. As on Ambergris Cay, these reef limestones developed extensive porosity during postdepositional subaerial exposure due to meteoric leaching. In contrast, Southwest Paint Rock field is cored by older island deposits rather than reef limestones. With ensuing stillstand or subsequent sea level rise, beach grainstones were deposited along the windward and leeward margins of the foundation highs in these fields. Tight lagoonal micrites and coals (peat-swamp facies) comprise the inner island facies, and are locally associated with porous supratidal dolomites. These island complexes are transected locally by tidal channels that are filled with nonporous micrites. Repeated sea level fluctuations during the history of these fields resulted in a characteristic cyclic stratigraphy of stacked island facies and reservoirs. The reservoirs in the field are developed in the bedrock or older island cores, as well as in the overlying beach facies and supratidal dolomites. These fields are mappable as linear stratigraphic traps with low-relief closure, and are readily identified by subsurface geologic and facies analyses. Similar shelf island-type fields analogous to these strawn and Holocene Belizean examples are found throughout the Midland basin and Eastern shelf.

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shaieb, Z.; Thomas, R.G.; Stewart, G.F.

    1982-04-01

    Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, eolian and marginal-marine sandstones of the Permian Rush Springs Formation overlying the Cement Anticline are favorable for joint-controlled deposits in sandstone, non-channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits, and Texas roll-front deposits. Three areas contain lithologies favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits: arkosic sandstones and granule conglomerates of the Permian Post Oak Conglomerate south of the Wichita Mountains; subarkosic and sublithic Lower Permian fluvio-deltaic and coastal-plain sandstones of the eastern Red River Valley; and subsurface arkosic, subarkosic, and sublithic alluvial-fan and fan-delta sandstones of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian sequence in the eastern Hollis Basin. The coarse-grained facies of the Cambrian Quanah Granite and genetically related aplite and pegmatite dikes in the Wichita Mountains are favorable for orthomagmatic and autometasomatic deposits, respectively.

  4. Depositional and diagenetic controls on porosity permeability and oil production in McFarland/Magutex (Queen) reservoirs, Andrews County, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, M.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The McFarland/Magutex Queen reservoir complex lies along the northeastern edge of the Central basin platform in the west Texas Permian basin and produces oil from the Permian Queen Formation. Current production from this complex totals 42 million stock-tank barrels (MMSTB) of an estimated 219 MMSTB of original oil in place, with an estimated 90 MMSTB of remaining mobile oil (RMO). The gross pay interval contains two parasequences consisting of progradational, 30-ft-thick, upward-shoaling facies packages. Facies include shoreface, mixed tidal channel and intertidal flat, and supratidal. Elongate shoreface facies are characterized by poorly consolidated, massive to thinly laminated sandstones. The supratidal facies, which act as permeability barriers, are characterized by algal-laminated dolostone and nodular, laminated, and massive anhydrite containing halite and gypsum pseudomorphs. Highest production and the largest amount of the 90 MMSTB of RMO is associated with the shoreface and tidal-channel facies. Bulk pore volume storage capacity and permeability are also highest within these two facies. Sandstones are arkosic, containing anhydrite and dolomite cements. Accessory minerals are clays, authigenic feldspar, and dolomite. Three main pore types are recognized: interparticle, moldic and intraconstituent, and micropores. Moldic and intraconstituent porosity is associated with leached feldspars and anhydrite cement dissolution. Microporosity is associated with syndepositional, grain-coating corrensite, dissolution-enhanced feldspar cleavage planes, and authigenic multifaceted dolomite. Microporosity derived from clays and dolomite is formed preferentially in tidal-channel and intertidal flat facies.

  5. Evolution of salt structures, East Texas Diapir Province, Part 1: Sedimentary record of Halokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Jackson, M.P.A.

    1983-08-01

    Post-Aptian (post-112Ma) strata in the East Texas basin were strongly influenced by halokinesis and therefore record the evolution of associated salt structures. Domeinduced changes in patterns of sandstone distribution, depositional facies, and reef growth indicate that thickness variations in strata surrounding domes were caused by syndepositional processes rather than by tectonic distortion. Salt domes in the East Texas basin exhibit three stages of growth: pillow, diapir, and post-diapir, each of which affected surrounding strata differently. Pillow growth caused broad uplift of strata over the crest of the pillows; the resulting topographic swell influenced depositional trends and was susceptible to erosion. Fluvial channel systems bypassed pillow crests and stacked vertically in primary peripheral sinks on the updip flanks of the pillows. Diapir growth was characterized by expanded sections of shelf and deltaic strata in secondary peripheral sinks around the diapirs. Lower Cretaceous reefs on topographic saddles between secondary peripheral sinks now host major oil production at Fairway field. Post-diapir crestal uplifts and peripheral subsidence affected smaller areas than did equivalent processes during pillow or diapir stages. Documented facies variations over and around domes at different stages of growth enable prediction of subtle facies-controlled hydrocarbon traps. Facies-controlled traps are likely to be the only undiscovered ones remaining in mature petroliferous basins such as the East Texas basin.

  6. Evolution of salt structures, East Texas diapir province, part 1: sedimentary record of halokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Jackson M.P.A.

    1983-08-01

    Post-Aptian (post-112 Ma) strata in the East Texas basin were strongly influenced by halokinesis and therefore record the evolution of associated salt structures. Dome-induced changes in patterns of sandstone distribution, depositional facies, and reef growth indicate that thickness variations in strata surrounding domes were caused by syndepositional processes rather than by tectonic distortion. Salt domes in the East Texas basin exhibit three stages of growth: pillow, diapir, and post-diapir, each of which affected surrounding strata differently. Pillow growth caused broad uplift of strata over the crest of the pillows; the resulting topographic swell influenced depositional trends and was susceptible to erosion. Fluvial channel systems bypassed pillow crests and stacked vertically in primary peripheral sinks on the updip flanks of the pillows. Diapir growth was characterized by expanded sections of shelf and deltaic strata in secondary peripheral sinks around the diapirs. Lower Cretaceous reefs on topographic saddles between secondary peripheral sinks now host major oil production at Fairway field. Post-diapir crestal uplifts and peripheral subsidence affected smaller areas than did equivalent processes during pillow or diapir stages. Documented facies variations over and around domes at different stages of growth enable prediction of subtle facies-controlled hydrocarbon traps. Facies-controlled traps are likely to be the only undiscovered ones remaining in mature petroliferous basins such as the East Texas basin.

  7. Depositional facies of hydrocarbon reservoirs of upper Cherokee Group, Anadarko basin

    SciTech Connect

    Puckette, J.O.; Al-Shaieb, Z. )

    1989-08-01

    The Desmoinesian upper Cherokee Group sequence in the Anadarko basin is the subsurface equivalent of the Cabaniss Group of eastern Oklahoma. This sequence includes the Pink limestone, Skinner sandstone, Verdigris limestone, and Prue sandstone intervals. The upper Skinner sandstone, which has not been well documented, is an important hydrocarbon-producing reservoir in the Anadarko basin. The Skinner sandstone is represented by channel, delta-front-prodelta, and shallow marine facies. Channel facies consist of a primary elongate trend extending 40 mi southeast-northwest across Custer and Roger Mills Counties, Oklahoma. Several small secondary channels trending northeast-southwest were also observed. Active channel-fill sequences in the primary trend exceed 100 ft in thickness and represent the major producing reservoir of the upper Skinner sandstone. Delta-front-prodelta sequences are dominated by shale and interbedded sandstone-shale units. Shallow marine facies consist of massive coarsening-upward units that reach 300 ft in thickness. This facies belt is broad and slightly elongated, approximately 12 mi wide by 20 mi long, and trends northeast-southwest somewhat normal to channel facies orientation. Lithologically, the upper Skinner channel sandstone is feldspathic litharenite with abundant feldspar and quartz overgrowth. Both primary and secondary porosity were observed in the upper Skinner sandstone. Secondary porosity evolved mainly from dissolution of feldspar and lithic fragments. However, extensive cementation in the shallow marine facies has reduced porosity to negligible amounts and consequently reduced reservoir quality.

  8. Trace-fossil and storm-deposit relationships of San Carlos formation, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, C.L.; Bednarski, S.P.

    1986-05-01

    Two distinct assemblages of trace fossils are preserved in the storm deposits in delta-front facies of the Upper Cretaceous San Carlos Formation, west Texas. The assemblages represent two widely differing responses to storm deposition and sediment-trace-fossil relationships, indicating that other environmental parameters, probably water depth and oxygen levels, influenced trace-fossil distribution within the San Carlos delta front. Evidence of the storm-deposited nature of the sandstones includes a scoured basal contact, planar to hummocky cross-stratification, and a upper contact that is either ripple marked or is gradational with overlying shales.

  9. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico-stratigraphic hierarchy and cycle stacking facies distribution, and interwell-scale heterogeneity: Grayburg Formation, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, R.J.; Ward, W.B.; Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-06-01

    The Grayburg Formation (middle Guadalupian) is a major producing interval in the Permian Basin and has yielded more than 2.5 billion barrels of oil in West Texas. Grayburg reservoirs have produced, on average, less than 30 percent of their original oil in place and are undergoing secondary and tertiary recovery. Efficient design of such enhanced recovery programs dictates improved geological models to better understand and predict reservoir heterogeneity imposed by depositional and diagenetic controls. The Grayburg records mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentation on shallow-water platforms that rimmed the Delaware and Midland Basins. Grayburg outcrops in the Guadalupe and Brokeoff Mountains region on the northwest margin of the Delaware Basin present an opportunity to construct a detailed, three-dimensional image of the stratigraphic and facies architecture. This model can be applied towards improved description and characterization of heterogeneity in analogous Grayburg reservoirs. Four orders of stratigraphic hierarchy are recognized in the Grayburg Formation. The Grayburg represents a long-term composite sequence composed of four high-frequency sequences (HFS 1-4). Each HFS contains several composite cycles comprising two or more cycles that define intermediate-scale transgressive-regressive successions. Cycles are the smallest scale upward-shoaling vertical facies successions that can be recognized and correlated across various facies tracts. Cycles thus form the basis for establishing the detailed chronostratigraphic correlations needed to delineate facies heterogeneity.

  10. Lithogenetic stratigraphy of the Triassic Dockum Formation, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Using approximately 350 well logs and cores from 4 wells, the author examines the depositional origin of the Dockum, discusses the distribution of lithofacies within the basin, and assesses the influences on trends in sandstone thickness. Outcrops were examined along the Eastern and Western Caprock Escarpments in Texas and eastern New Mexico, and facies interpretations were projected into the subsurface to improve regional analysis of the Dockum. Four new cores of subsurface Dockum were described and interpreted, forming the nucleus of subsurface lithofacies identification. The book focuses on the lower Dockum, within which the author identified four depositional sequences. These sequences, presented on cross sections and net-sandstone and paleogeographic maps, document a progression from continental-dominated depositional systems to lacustrine-dominated systems.

  11. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew G. Cole; George B. Asquith; Jose I. Guzman; Mark D. Barton; Mohammad A. Malik; Shirley P. Dutton; Sigrid J. Clift

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based enhanced oil recovery. The study focused on the Ford Geraldine unit, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). Reservoirs in this and other Delaware Mountain Group fields have low producibility (average recovery <14 percent of the original oil in place) because of a high degree of vertical and lateral heterogeneity caused by depositional processes and post-depositional diagenetic modification. Outcrop analogs were studied to better interpret the depositional processes that formed the reservoirs at the Ford Geraldine unit and to determine the dimensions of reservoir sandstone bodies. Facies relationships and bedding architecture within a single genetic unit exposed in outcrop in Culberson County, Texas, suggest that the sandstones were deposited in a system of channels and levees with attached lobes that initially prograded basinward, aggraded, and then turned around and stepped back toward the shelf. Channel sandstones are 10 to 60 ft thick and 300 to 3,000 ft wide. The flanking levees have a wedge-shaped geometry and are composed of interbedded sandstone and siltstone; thickness varies from 3 to 20 ft and length from several hundred to several thousands of feet. The lobe sandstones are broad lens-shaped bodies; thicknesses range up to 30 ft with aspect ratios (width/thickness) of 100 to 10,000. Lobe sandstones may be interstratified with laminated siltstones.

  12. Fluvial-deltaic sedimentation and stratigraphy of the ferron sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, P.B.; Chidsey, T.C.; Ryer, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    East-central Utah has world-class outcrops of dominantly fluvial-deltaic Turonian to Coniacian aged strata deposited in the Cretaceous foreland basin. The Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale records the influences of both tidal and wave energy on fluvial-dominated deltas on the western margin of the Cretaceous western interior seaway. Revisions of the stratigraphy are proposed for the Ferron Sandstone. Facies representing a variety of environments of deposition are well exposed, including delta-front, strandline, marginal marine, and coastal-plain. Some of these facies are described in detail for use in petroleum reservoir characterization and include permeability structure.

  13. Geothermal and heavy-oil resources in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Walter, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    In a five-county area of South Texas, geopressured-geothermal reservoirs in the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group lie below medium- to heavy-oil reservoirs in the Eocene Jackson Group. This fortuitous association suggests the use of geothermal fluids for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR). Geothermal fairways are formed where thick deltaic sandstones are compartmentalized by growth faults. Wilcox geothermal reservoirs in South Texas are present at depths of 11,000 to 15,000 ft (3,350 to 4,570 m) in laterally continuous sandstones 100 to 200 ft (30 to 60 m) thick. Permeability is generally low (typically 1 md), porosity ranges from 12 to 24 percent, and temperature exceeds 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C). Reservoirs containing medium (20{degrees} to 25{degrees} API gravity) to heavy (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) oil are concentrated along the Texas Coastal Plain in the Jackson-Yegua Barrier/Strandplain (Mirando Trend), Cap Rock, and Piercement Salt Dome plays and in the East Texas Basin in Woodbine Fluvial/Deltaic Strandplain and Paluxy Fault Line plays. Injection of hot, moderately fresh to saline brines will improve oil recovery by lowering viscosity and decreasing residual oil saturation. Smectite clay matrix could swell and clog pore throats if injected waters have low salinity. The high temperature of injected fluids will collapse some of the interlayer clays, thus increasing porosity and permeability. Reservoir heterogeneity resulting from facies variation and diagenesis must be considered when siting production and injection wells within the heavy-oil reservoir. The ability of abandoned gas wells to produce sufficient volumes of hot water over the long term will also affect the economics of TEOR.

  14. Process regime variability across growth faults in the Paleogene Lower Wilcox Guadalupe Delta, South Texas Gulf Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olariu, Mariana I.; Ambrose, William A.

    2016-07-01

    The Wilcox Group in Texas is a 3000 m thick unit of clastic sediments deposited along the Gulf of Mexico coast during early Paleogene. This study integrates core facies analysis with subsurface well-log correlation to document the sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Lower Wilcox Guadalupe Delta. Core descriptions indicate a transition from wave- and tidally-influenced to wave-dominated deposition. Upward-coarsening facies successions contain current ripples, organic matter, low trace fossil abundance and low diversity, which suggest deposition in a fluvial prodelta to delta front environment. Heterolithic stratification with lenticular, wavy and flaser bedding indicate tidal influence. Pervasively bioturbated sandy mudstones and muddy sandstones with Cruziana ichnofacies and structureless sandstones with Ophiomorpha record deposition in wave-influenced deltas. Tidal channels truncate delta front deposits and display gradational upward-fining facies successions with basal lags and sandy tabular cross-beds passing into heterolithic tidal flats and biologically homogenized mudstones. Growth faults within the lower Wilcox control expanded thickness of sedimentary units (up to 4 times) on the downdip sides of faults. Increased local accommodation due to fault subsidence favors a stronger wave regime on the outer shelf due to unrestricted fetch and water depth. As the shoreline advances during deltaic progradation, successively more sediment is deposited in the downthrown depocenters and reworked along shore by wave processes, resulting in a thick sedimentary unit characterized by repeated stacking of shoreface sequences. Thick and laterally continuous clean sandstone successions in the downthrown compartments represent attractive hydrocarbon reservoirs. As a consequence of the wave dominance and increased accommodation, thick (tens of meters) sandstone-bodies with increased homogeneity and vertical permeability within the stacked shoreface successions are created.

  15. Fluvial to Lacustrine Facies Transitions in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Schieber, Juergen; Palucis, Marisa C.; Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Mangold, Nicolas; Kah, Linda C.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Grotzinger, John P.; Grant, John A., III; Edgar, Lauren A.; Dietrich, William E.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Curiosity rover has documented predominantly fluvial sedimentary rocks along its path from the landing site to the toe of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan (0.5 km to the east) and then along its 8 km traverse across Aeolis Palus to the base of Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp). Lacustrine facies have been identified at the toe of the Peace Vallis fan and in the lowermost geological unit exposed on Aeolis Mons. These two depositional systems provide end members for martian fluvial/alluvial-lacustrine facies models. The Peace Vallis system consisted of an 80 square kilometers alluvial fan with decimeter-thick, laterally continuous fluvial sandstones with few sedimentary structures. The thin lacustrine unit associated with the fan is interpreted as deposited in a small lake associated with fan runoff. In contrast, fluvial facies exposed over most of Curiosity's traverse to Aeolis Mons consist of sandstones with common dune-scale cross stratification (including trough cross stratification), interbedded conglomerates, and rare paleochannels. Along the southwest portion of the traverse, sandstone facies include south-dipping meter-scale clinoforms that are interbedded with finer-grained mudstone facies, interpreted as lacustrine. Sedimentary structures in these deposits are consistent with deltaic deposits. Deltaic deposition is also suggested by the scale of fluvial to lacustrine facies transitions, which occur over greater than 100 m laterally and greater than 10 m vertically. The large scale of the transitions and the predicted thickness of lacustrine deposits based on orbital mapping require deposition in a substantial river-lake system over an extended interval of time. Thus, the lowermost, and oldest, sedimentary rocks in Gale Crater suggest the presence of substantial fluvial flow into a long-lived lake. In contrast, the Peace Vallis alluvial fan onlaps these older deposits and overlies a major unconformity. It is one of the youngest deposits in the crater, and

  16. Provenance of Norphlet sandstone, northern Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.P.; Ward, W.C.; Kuglar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet sandstone of the northern Gulf Coast is predominantly subarkose, with some arkose in the eastern area and sublitharenite and quartzarenite in the western area. Despite great depths of burial and despite feldspar and rock-fragment constituents, diagenesis has not appreciably altered the composition of Norphlet sandstone. Therefore, reconstruction of original composition of Norphlet sandstone presented little difficulty. Variation in detrital modes of the Norphlet suggests compositionally distinct source terranes. Samples from Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi reflect the influence of metamorphic and plutonic rocks of the Appalachian Piedmont Province and of Triassic-Jurassic volcanic rocks. Sandstones in east Texas, northern Louisiana, and southern Arkansas were derived from sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks of the Ouachita system. The Arbuckle Mountains and Llano uplift may have supplied trace amounts of quartzo-feldspathic and volcanic-rock fragments to the extreme western part of the study area. Norphlet sandstones represent a mixture of collision-orogen-derived sediment from the Appalachian and/or Ouachita system and continental-block-derived sediment from paleohighs and uplifts within the Gulf basin. However, Norphlet sandstones plot in the craton-interior and transitional-continental fields on Q-F-L and QM-F-Lt tectonic-provenance diagrams, because of mineralogically mature source rocks, elimination of unstable grains by abrasion and sorting during deposition, and/or sediment mixing from different source terranes.

  17. Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1989-03-01

    Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by the heavy rainfall, soil zones, lush vegetation, and accompanying voluminous production of organic and inorganic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution, causing a net gain in porosity near unconformities. Thus, porosity in sandstones tends to increase toward overlying unconformities. Such porosity trends have been observed in hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, Norwegian North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas. A common attribute of these reservoirs is that they were all subaerially exposed under heavy rainfall conditions. An empirical model has been developed for the Triassic and Jurassic sandstone reservoirs in the Norwegian North Sea on the basis of the observed relationship that shows an increase in porosity in these reservoirs with increasing proximity to the overlying base of Cretaceous unconformity. An important practical attribute of this model is that it allows for the prediction of porosity in the neighboring undrilled areas by recognizing the base of Cretaceous unconformity in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps.

  18. Shannon Sandstone in Wyoming: A shelf-ridge complex reinterpreted as lowstand shoreface deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.G.; Bergman, K.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    The Shannon Sandstone (Campanian) of Wyoming was formerly interpreted as two stacked shelf-ridge complexes. Sand was believed to have been transported from a time-equivalent shoreline 110-150 km to the west and reworked or molded into ridges at the depositional site. The authors show that this time-equivalent shoreline section at Lucerne, Wyoming, consists of not one shoreface sandbody, but two superimposed. They are both storm-dominated, and the lower one terminates in beach facies capped by root traces. There must have been a rise in relative sea level of at least 14m to make accommodation space for the second shoreface sandbody. In the Slat Creek area and the adjacent subsurface Teapot Dome, there are two sandier-upward facies successions. In the lower succession there are abrupt vertical facies contacts between offshore bioturbated sandstones, thicker hummocky cross-stratified sandstones, and coarser cross-bedded sandstones. There is also evidence that the cross-bedded sandstones rest erosively on underlying facies. The trace fauna in the sandstones includes Macaronichnum segregatis, Rosselia socialis, and Ophiomorpha. The M. segregatis suggests a foreshore or upper-shoreface depositional environment, and R. socialis indicates a lower to middle shoreface; neither are characteristic of a shelf-ridge complex. The abrupt and probably erosive facies contacts, along with the trace fauna, suggest that the cross-bedded sandstones in this succession represent a shoreface deposit that formed during a stage of actively falling relative sea level. Overlying muddy bioturbated sandstones indicate that shoreface deposition was terminated by a transgression. The upper sandier-upward succession contains facies and trace fauna similar to those of the lower succession, and is also interpreted as a prograding shoreface.

  19. Sequence Stratigraphic Analysis and Facies Architecture of the Cretaceous Mancos Shale on and Near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-their relation to Sites of Oil Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21

    The purpose of phase 1 and phase 2 of the Department of Energy funded project Analysis of oil- bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico was to define the facies of the oil producing units within the Mancos Shale and interpret the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) redefinition of the area and vertical extent of the ''Gallup sandstone'' or El Vado Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, (2) determination of the facies distribution within the ''Gallup sandstone'' and other oil-producing sandstones within the lower Mancos, placing these facies within the overall depositional history of the San Juan Basin, (3) application of the principals of sequence stratigraphy to the depositional units that comprise the Mancos Shale, and (4) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  20. Sedimentology and genetic stratigraphy of Dean and Spraberry Formations (Permian), Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Handford, C.R.

    1981-09-01

    The Spraberry trend of west Texas, once known as the world's largest uneconomic oil field, will undoubtedly become an increasingly important objective for the development of enhanced oil recovery techniques in fine-grained, low-permeability, low-pressure reservoirs. As the trend expands, facies and stratigraphic data should be integrated into exploration strategies. The Spraberry and Dean Formations may be divided into three genetic sequences, each consisting of several hundred feet of interbedded shale and carbonate overlain by a roughly equal amount of sandstone and siltstone. These sequences record episodes of shelf-margin progradation, deep-water resedimentation of shelf-derived carbonate debris, followed by influxes of terrigenous clastics into the basin by way of feeder channels or submarine canyons, and suspension settling of fine-grained sediment from the water column. Four lithofacies comprise the terrigenous clastics of the Spraberry and Dean Fomations: (1) cross-laminated, massive, and parallel-laminated sandstone, (2) laminated siltstone, (3) bioturbated siltstone, and (4) black, organic-rich shale. Carbonate lithofacies occur mostly in the form of thin-bedded turbidites, slump, and debris-flow deposits. Terrigenous clastic rocks display facies sequences, isopach patterns, and sedimentary structures suggestive of deposition from turbidity currents, and long-lived saline density underflow and interflow currents. Clastic isopach patterns reflect an overall southward thinning of clastics in the Midland basin. Channelized flow and suspension settling were responsible for the formation of elongate fan-shaped accumulations of clastic sediments.

  1. Sedimentology and reservoir characteristics of tight gas sandstones, Frontier formation, southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moslow, T.F.; Tillman, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    The lower Frontier Formation, Moxa arch area, southwestern Wyoming, is one of the most prolific gas-producing formations in the Rocky Mountain region. Lowr Frontier sediments were deposited as strandplains and coalescing wave-dominated deltas that prograding into the western margin of the Cretaceous interior seaway during the Cenomanian. In this study, sedimentologic, petrologic, and stratigraphic analyses were conducted on cores and logs of Frontier wells from the Whiskey Buttes and Moxa fields. Twelve sedimentary facies have been identified. The most common sequence consists of burrowed to cross-bedded near shore marine (delta-front and inner-shelf) sandstones disconformably overlain by crossbedded (active) to deformed (abandoned) distributary-channel sandstones and conglomerates. The sequence is capped by delta-plain mudstones and silty sandstones. Tight-gas sandstone reservoir facies are nonhomogenous and include crevasse splay, abandoned and active distributary channel, shoreface, foreshore, and inner shelf sandstones. Distributary-channel facies represent 80% of perforated intervals in wells in the southern part of the Moxa area, but only 50% to the north. Channel sandstone bodies are occasionally stacked, occur on the same stratigraphic horizon, and are laterally discontinuous with numerous permeability barriers. Percentage of perforated intervals in upper shoreface and foreshore facies increases from 20% in the south to 50% in the north.

  2. Sedimentology and reservoir characteristics of tight gas sandstones, Frontier formation, southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moslow, T.F.; Tillman, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    The lower Frontier Formation, Moxa arch area, southwestern Wyoming, is one of the most prolific gas-producing formations in the Rocky Mountain region. Lower Frontier sediments were deposited as strandplains and coalescing wave-dominated deltas that prograding into the western margin of the Cretaceous interior seaway during the Cenomanian. In this study, sedimentologic, petrologic, and stratigraphic analyses were conducted on cores and logs of Frontier wells from the Whiskey Buttes and Moxa fields. Twelve sedimentary facies have been identified. The most common sequence consists of burrowed to cross-bedded near shore marine (delta-front and inner-shelf) sandstones disconformably overlain by cross-bedded (active) to deformed (abandoned) distributary-channel sandstones and conglomerates. The sequence is capped by delta-plain mudstones and silty sandstones. Tight-gas sandstone reservoir facies are non-homogenous and include crevasse splay, abandoned and active distributary channel, shoreface, foreshore, and inner shelf sandstones. Distributary-channel facies represent 80% of perforated intervals in wells in the southern part of the Moxa area, but only 50% to the north. Channel sandstone bodies are occasionally stacked, occur on the same stratigraphic horizon, and are laterally discontinuous with numerous permeability barriers. Percentage of perforated intervals in upper shoreface and foreshore facies increases from 20% in the south to 50% in the north.

  3. Sedimentation of shelf sandstones in Queen Formation, McFarland and Means fields, central basin platform of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Malicse, A.; Mazzullo, J.; Holley, C.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Queen Formation is a sequence of carbonates, evaporites, and sandstones of Permian (Guadalupian) age that is found across the subsurface of the Central Basin platform of the Permian basin. The formation is a major hydrocarbon reservoir in this region, and its primary reservoir facies are porous shelf sandstones and dolomites. Cores and well logs from McFarland and Means fields (on the northwest margin of the Central Basin platform) were examined to determine the sedimentary history of the shelf sandstones.

  4. Deep-marine facies models: Implications for hydrocarbon exploration and production

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G. )

    1991-03-01

    Facies models serve as a generalized conceptual framework for classifying and understanding sedimentary environments. Deep-marine facies models range in scale from a single facies of a turbidite bed (first-order models) to an association of different facies representing an entire submarine fan or a basin-fill complex (third-order models). At present, numerous facies models exist for modern and ancient deep-marine systems with distinct depositional components. These models are based on (1) types of channel (e.g., convergent and divergent channel systems, low-sinuosity and high-sinuosity channel patterns), (2) types of lobes (e.g., suprafan lobes, depositional lobes, fanlobes, ponded lobes), (3) tectonic settings (e.g., active-margin and mature passive-margin fans), (4) eustatic sea-level changes (e.g., lowstand submarine fans and highstand nonfan turbidites), (5) sediment sources (e.g., canyon-fed submarine fan and delta-fed submarine ramp), and (6) bottom-current reworking. It is also clear that not all submarine fans are composed of identical distribution of depositional facies in time and space. Therefore, no single facies model can adequately explain all submarine fans. Submarine fans can and do vary in their size, shape, lithofacies distribution, sand-body geometry, and reservoir quality. Because facies models differ significantly from each other in terms of reservoir properties, caution must be exercised in selecting a particular facies model for a sandstone reservoir.

  5. Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, T.H. )

    1990-02-01

    The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeastern King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion, and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region of southeastern King County record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region of southeastern King County occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary-bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. Cores of these sandstones represent mainly the uppermost portion of the various sandstone bodies. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000-6,000 ft. Total production within the area is over 100 million bbl of oil since the early 1940s. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve a detailed study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

  6. Regional distribution of wave- and fluvial-dominated deltaic deposits of Olmos formation (upper Cretaceous) in Maverick basin, southwest Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.; Tyler, N.

    1984-04-01

    Regional subsurface analysis in southwest Texas indicates that the Olmos Formation (Gulfian) was deposited by a complex of wave- and fluvial-dominated delta systems in two depocenters. Sediment influx was from the north and northwest. Five deltaic submits, A through E, were deposited in the western depocenter. Three other deltaic wedges (F, G, H) formed the second depocenter farther east in present-day Frio and LaSalle Counties. Subsidence was greater in the western half of the Maverick basin where thickest (1,300 ft; 395 m) deltaic sediments were deposited. Lower Olmos strata represent a succession from wave-reworked, strike-elongate deltas of subunit A, similar to those of the underlying San Miguel Formation, to fluvial-dominated, dip-elongate deltas of subunits B and C. Extensive (1200 mi/sup 2/ or 3100 km/sup 2/ in Texas) aggradational floodplain deposits of B and C are characterized by diverse electric-log patterns; variation in log character is a response to complex depositional facies on the delta platform. Downdip, toward the Cretaceous shelf edge, delta-plain facies merge with upward-coarsening delta-front sandstones. Uppermost subunits D and E were deposited by a prograding barrier-island system in an interdeltaic embayment marginal to high constructive deltas of the easter depocenter. Lagoonal and fluvial-channel deposits are recognized from cores. Eastward migration of deposition was accompanied by an abrupt change of depositional style in the western depocenter from deltaic to coastal-interdeltaic.

  7. Frisco City sandstone: Upper Jurassic play in southern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.; Baria, L.R.; Handford, C.R.

    1997-10-01

    The Frisco City sandstone play in southern Alabama is an example of hydrocarbon entrapment on the flanks of basement erosional features, with principal reservoirs occurring in proximal alluvial-fan to marine shoreface facies. Productive fields are developed on four-way closures of complex geometry, with reservoir sandstones showing maximum thickness along the margins of basement highs that are roughly 1.3-5.18 km{sup 2} in size and have 136-151 m of relief. Detailed analysis of sandstone facies indicates a downdip progression from alluvial-fan through wadi, eolian, beach, tidal-flat, and shoreface deposits. A sequence stratigraphic model based on identification of backstepping strata representing successive transgressive events is useful in predicting maximum reservoir occurrence in the vicinity of inselbergs. Reservoir quality in productive sandstones is high, with porosities ranging from 13 to 27% and permeabilities of 50 md to 5 d. Hydrocarbon occurrence is related to the distribution of high-quality source rock in the Smackover Formation and to maturation history.

  8. Sedimentology of the fluvial and fluvio-marine facies of the Bahariya Formation (Early Cenomanian), Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, M. A.; Catuneanu, O.

    2008-05-01

    The Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation in the Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt, was deposited under two coeval environmental conditions. A fully fluvial system occurs in the southern portion of the Bahariya Oasis, including depositional products of meandering and braided streams, and a coeval fluvio-marine setting is dominant to the north. These deposits are organized into four unconformity-bounded depositional sequences, whose architecture is shaped by a complex system of incised valleys. The fluvial portion of the lower two depositional sequences is dominated by low-energy, meandering systems with a tabular geometry, dominated by overbank facies. The fluvial deposits of the upper two sequences represent the product of sedimentation within braided streams, and consist mainly of amalgamated channel-fills. The braided fluvial systems form the fill of incised valleys whose orientation follows a southeast-northwest trending direction, and which truncate the underlying sequences. Four sedimentary facies have been identified within the braided-channel systems, namely thin-laminated sandstones (Sh), cross-bedded sandstones (Sp, St), massive ferruginous sandstones (Sm) and variegated mudstones (Fm). The exposed off-channel overbank facies of the meandering systems include floodplain (Fm) and crevasse splay (Sl) facies. The fluvio-marine depositional systems consist of interbedded floodplain, coastal and shallow-marine deposits. The floodplain facies include fine-grained sandstones (Sf), laminated siltstones (Stf) and mudstones (Mf) that show fining-upward cycles. The coastal to shallow-marine facies consist primarily of mudstones (Mc) and glauconitic sandstones (Gc) organized vertically in coarsening-upward prograding cyclothems topped by thin crusts of ferricrete (Fc). The four depositional sequences are present across the Bahariya Oasis, albeit with varying degrees of preservation related to post-depositional erosion associated with the formation of sequence

  9. Carbonate facies and Landsat imagery of shelf off Belize, central America

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.F. Jr.; Pusey, W.C. III; Belcher, R.C.; Borger, R.L.

    1985-02-01

    A reevaluation of Holocene sediments on the Belize shelf is based on (1) a newly constructed composite of 7 Landsat images, enhanced and registered to form a regional base map, and (2) a Holocene facies map based on a rigorous treatment of compositional and textural parameters for approximately 600 bottom samples. The sediments are mapped in terms usually applied to lithified carbonate rocks, allowing direct comparisons with carbonate facies in the subsurface. By combining Landsat imagery with this facies map, it is possible to point out the following geologic features: (1) major tectonic elements, such as the Maya Mountains, the Yucatan Plateau, several offshore bridges, and 3 large atolls, (2) major physiographic features such as the Belize barrier reef with its reef platform and crest, middle-shelf shoal deposits, middle-shelf patch reefs (including lagoon reefs or rhomboid reefs), (3) Holocene facies patterns with potential reservoir facies of foraminifera-grainstone bars, Halimeda grainstones, and branching-coral, encrusting red-algae boundstones, and (4) nearshore clastics and a sharp transition eastward to carbonate sediments. An understanding of Holocene facies patterns on the Belize shelf is important to the explorationist, because these facies patterns are living examples of exploration fairways and invite comparisons with several petroleum provinces: (1) Cretaceous reefs of Texas, (2) upper Paleozoic skeletal-grainstone bars in west Texas, and (3) Devonian reefs of the Alberta basin.

  10. Petrology and reservoir paragenesis in the Sussex B sandstone of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale, House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This book of reservoir paragenesis includes detailed descriptions of the petrology of depositional facies of the Sussex B sandstone of the Sussex Sandstone Member of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale in the House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming.

  11. Effect of kaolinite as a key factor controlling the petrophysical properties of the Nubia sandstone in central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassab, Mohamed A.; Abu Hashish, Mohamed F.; Nabawy, Bassem S.; Elnaggar, Osama M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive petrographical and petrophysical investigation for the Late Cretaceous Nubia sandstone from Wadi Kareem in central Eastern Desert to measure their fluid flow properties and to investigate the effect of kaolinite on their petrophysical characteristics. From the petrographical analyses, scanning electron microscope 'SEM' and the X-ray diffraction 'XRD' analysis, it is shown that the studied sandstone samples are quite homogeneous in mineralogy and can be distinguished into four sedimentary microfacies: quartz arenite as a clean sandstone as well as three kaolinitic microfacies; namely they are kaolinitic quartz arenite, kaolinitic subarkose, and calcareous to kaolinitc quartz arenite. The main recognized diagenetic processes that prevailed during the post-depositional history of the Nubia sandstone are; compaction, cementation, alteration and dissolution of feldspar into kaolinite. The petrophysical potentiality of the studied sandstones was studied using the helium pycnometer, gas permeability and mercury injection confining pressure 'MICP' techniques. The investigated sandstones can be classified into three petrophysical facies with varying reservoir performances. The petrophysical behaviour of these facies is dependent mostly on their kaolinite content and its impact on porosity, permeability, irreducible water saturation, R35 (pore aperture corresponding to mercury saturation of 35% pore volume), R50 (median pore-throat radius), and MHR (the mean hydraulic radius). Therefore, the studied petrophysical facies are comparable to the distinguished petrographical facies.

  12. Trace fossils and bioturbation in peritidal facies of the Potsdam-Theresa Formations (Cambrian-Ordovician), Northwest Adirondacks

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerstedt, T.W. ); Erickson, J.M. )

    1989-06-01

    The Cambrian-Ordovician Potsdam Sandstone, Theresa Formation, and Canadian correlatives in the St. Lawrence Lowlands preserve tide-dominated facies during the basal Cambrian transgression. Low intertidal sand flats in the upper Potsdam contain a Skolithos Ichnofacies dominated by Diplocraterion parallelum in clean, herringbone cross-bedded sandstones indicative of high tidal current energy. Wind-wave-driven longshore and tidal currents along a macrotidal coastline were funneled northeast-southwest by Precambrian topographic relief of up to 65 m. This relief is now expressed as the Thousand Islands of New York and Canada. The conformably overlying Theresa Formation preserves a shoaling-upward sequence of mixed clastic-carbonate facies. Shallow subtidal and peritidal facies contain a mixed Skolithos-Cruziana Ichnofacies in sharply alternating lithofacies consisting of gray, intensely bioturbated, poorly sorted calcareous sandstone, and meter-thick, white cross-bedded sandstone. The parallelism between ichnofacies and lithofacies indicates that environmental energy level and persistence rather than water depth controlled trace fossil distribution. Bioturbated sandstones contain a Cruziana ichnofacies of abundant deposit feeders including: Fustiglyphus , Gyrochorte , Neonereites uniserialis , Phycodes flabellum, Planolites beverlyensis, Rosselia socialis, and Teichichnus. Suspension feeders are represented by D. habichi, D. parallelum, Skolithos, Monocraterion, and possibly Palaeophycus tubularis. Scavenging or deposit-feeding arthropods are represented by rare Cruziana furrows. Cross-bedded sandstones contain a Skolithos Ichnofacies of shallow Skolithos and Monocraterion burrows, and an undescribed large epistratal eurypterid( ) trail.

  13. Volcanic Facies of the Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation, Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay, Alaska Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation (Jtk), a >1,000-km-long belt of vol­canic facies within the accreted intra-oceanic Talkeetna Arc has been characterized within the Talkeetna Mountains, but on the Alaska Peninsula Jtk facies have not previously been described in detail. Here we describe facies of the Jtk stretching from the Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay. On the Iniskin Peninsula, a high concentration and great thickness of mafic to intermediate lavas, associated autobreccias and hyaloclastites, fluidal-clast breccias and possible pillows are suggestive of one or more submarine effusive eruption centers. Also volumetrically significant are non-stratified polymictic volcaniclastic breccia facies. Minor facies include thinly bedded volcaniclastic sandstone to pebble breccia-conglomerate facies, some of which are shard- and pumice-bearing pyroclastic deposits preserved in thinly bedded deposits, indicative of episodes of explosive volcanism and the eruption-fed nature of some of the deposits. North of Chinitna Bay, coherent facies tend to be thin and relatively small in volume. Volcaniclastic facies provide evidence of subaerial-fluvial deposition, and pyroclastic activity. Thinly bedded, laterally continuous beds locally exhibit cross-laminations, channel fills, normal grading and lenticular beds, and contain plant fossils. Within this sequence is a 10-m-thick pumice breccia containing fossilized logs, underlain by a thin, weakly laminated, pumice- and lithic-bearing volcaniclastic siltstone to sandstone. The log-bearing pumice breccia and the lithic-bearing laminated basal unit represent pyroclastic density current (PDC) facies deposited in a subaerial or possibly shallow aqueous environment. Underlying the PDC deposit are several 30-cm-thick maroon and olive green volcaniclastic fine-grained sandstone and siltstone beds containing channel fills, cross-beds and lenticular beds. Marbles exposed in the contact zone between the intrusions of Alaska

  14. Internal-tide deposits in an Ordovician submarine channel: Previously unrecognized facies

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhenzhong; Eriksson, K.A. )

    1991-07-01

    A Middle Ordovician submarine-channel deposit in the southern Appalachians is capped by an interval of fine-grained, predominantly cross-laminated sandstones that are interpreted as internal-tide deposits. Two facies are recognized: (1) bidirectional cross-laminated, very fine grained sandstones, and (2) unidirectional cross-bedded and cross-laminated, medium- to fine-grained sandstones. Facies 1 is dominated by bidirectional cross-laminations that dip both landward and seaward parallel to the paleochannel axis. This facies is related to up-channel and down-channel currents caused by internal tides. Facies 2 has both low-angle, tabular cross-beds and cross-laminations that dip landward. The formative up-channel currents are attributed to superimposition of internal waves on internal tides. The vertical transition from high-concentration gravity-flow deposits to intercalated low-concentration turbidites and internal-tide deposits is related to a rise in sea level that resulted in storage of coarse debris landward of the submarine channel.

  15. Sedimentology and cyclicity in the Lower Permian De Chelly Sandstone on the Defiance Plateau: eastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanesco, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Lower Permian (Leonardian) De Chelly Sandstone crops out along a north-south trend on the Defiance Plateau of eastern Arizona. It is divided into lower and upper members separated by a tongue of the Supai Formation that pinches out to the north. Stratigraphy, and lateral and vertical facies relations within the lower and upper members, are discussed. -from Author

  16. Facies architecture and depositional environments of the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Eric M.

    2007-04-01

    The Kaiparowits Formation is an unusually thick package of Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian) strata exposed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument of southern Utah, USA. The formation was deposited within the rapidly subsiding Cordilleran foreland basin as part of a thick clastic wedge derived from sources in the Sevier orogenic belt, thrust sheets in southeastern Nevada and southern California, and the Mogollon slope in southwestern Arizona. Channel systems in the Kaiparowits Formation shifted from northeastward to southeastward flow over time, and for a short period of time, sea level rise in the Western Interior Seaway resulted in tidally influenced rivers and/or estuarine systems. Thick floodbasin pond deposits, large suspended-load channels, and poorly developed, hydromorphic paleosols dominate the sedimentary record, and all are suggestive of a relatively wet, subhumid alluvial system. This is supported by extremely rapid sediment accumulation rates (41 cm/ka), and high diversity and abundance of aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. Facies and architectural analysis was performed on the Kaiparowits Formation, resulting in the identification of nine distinct facies associations: 1) intraformational conglomerate, 2) mollusc-shell conglomerate, 3) major tabular sandstone, 4) major lenticular sandstone, 5) minor tabular and lenticular sandstone, 6) finely laminated, calcareous siltstone, 7) inclined heterolithic sandstone and mudstone, 8) sandy mudstone, and 9) carbonaceous mudstone. These facies associations are interpreted as: 1) channel lags, 2) rare channel-hosted storm beds, 3) meandering channels, 4) anastomosing channels, 5) crevasse splays and crevasse channels, 6) lakes, 7) tidally influenced fluvial and/or estuarine channels, 8) mud-dominated floodplains, and 9) swamps and oxbow lakes. Based on this analysis, the formation is subdivided into three informal units, representative of gross changes in alluvial architecture, including facies

  17. Fault-related Silurian Clinton sandstone deposition in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, A.H. )

    1988-08-01

    Mapping the thickness of the Silurian Clinton sandstone reservoir and associated shale, sandstone, and carbonate facies in the subsurface of 40 counties in eastern Ohio reveals a general correspondence between major patterns of deposition and the location of faults that strike parallel with or subparallel to the depositional trends. Clinton delta-front sandstones, which occur along a line from Hocking and Perry Counties, through Knox, Holmes, and Wayne Counties northeast to Lake County, Ohio, parallel a line of major change in magnetic intensity in the basement, which is interpreted here to be the juncture between the more stable, less subsiding central Ohio carbonate bank and the more subsiding western edge of the Appalachian basin. The principal Clinton deltaic lobes occur in east-central and northeastern Ohio. The Clinton sandstone interval is thinner and starved of coarse clastic sediment close to the Rome trough, which is located along the southeasternmost Ohio border. Sediment distribution patterns indicate that deltaic deposits of Clinton sandstone were captured in the subsiding Rome trough at the border of southern Ohio during the Early Silurian. Farther north, deltaic sediments spread out across eastern Ohio to reach an elongate depocenter caused by minor subsidence at the central Ohio platform edge. There, deltaic sands intermittently filled the delta-edge trough, and spilled out as thin shelf sands onto the more stable platform, a site of predominantly mixed shale and carbonate deposition during the Early Silurian.

  18. Saline-water resources of Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winslow, Allen George; Kister, Lester Ray

    1956-01-01

    Most of the aquifers in Texas contain saline water in some parts, and a few are capable of producing large quantities of saline water. Of the early Paleozoic formations, the Hickory sandstone member of the Riley formation of Cambrian age and the Ellenburger group of Ordovician age are potential sources of small to moderate supplies of saline water in parts of central and west-central Texas.

  19. Organic facies characteristics of the Carboniferous Pamucakyayla Formation, western Taurus, Antalya Nappes, Kemer (Antalya/Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertan Gulludag, Cevdet; Altunsoy, Mehmet; Ozcelik, Orhan

    2015-04-01

    The study area is located in the western part of the Taurus Belt (SW Turkey). This region exhibits a complex structure involving two autochthonous units surrounded and imbricated with three allochthonous complexes. Antalya Nappes is a complex tectonic imbricate structure including sedimantary and ultrabasic rocks. In this study, organic facies characteristics of Carboniferous coaly units in the Pamucakyayla region (Kemer, Antalya-Turkey) were examined. The Carboniferous Pamucakyayla Formation, which is characterized by sandstone, claystone, marl and coaly units. This units includes different levels of coal seams in different thicknesses. Organic matter is composed predominantly of woody and amorphous material, with a minor contribution of planty and coaly material. Kerogen in the deposits is type II/III, as indicated by organic petrographic observations and Rock-Eval data. Total organic carbon (TOC) values are generally between 0.01 and 1.44 %, but reach 5.81 % in the formation. Tmax values vary between 446 and 451 °C and indicate mature zone (Based on the value of 0.25 % TOC). Organic facies type BC, C and CD were identified in the investigated units. Organic facies BC is related sandstoneand marl lithofacies. This facis is deposited under an anoxic water column in a fine grained clastics, where rapid deposition creates anoxia in the sediments after deposition. This facies is characterized by average values of HI around 317 (equivalent to type II kerogene), TOC around 0.02 %, and an average of S2 of 0.04 mg HC/g of rock. Organic facies C is related to sandstone, marl and coal lithofacies. This facies is characterized by average values of HI around 176 (equivalent to type III kerogene), TOC around 0.19 %, and an average of S2 of 0.03 mg HC/g of rock. The organic matter is partly oxidized, and terrestrial. Organic facies C is the "gas-prone" facies. Organic facies CD is related to limestone, marl and coal lithofacies. This facies is characterized by average values

  20. The complex facies architecture and emplacement sequence of a Miocene submarine mega-pillow lava flow system, Muriwai, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, A. N.; Cas, R. A. F.

    2007-02-01

    The early Miocene Waiatarua Formation at Maori Bay, Muriwai, North Island, New Zealand consists of a complex association of basaltic andesite volcanic facies including entablature-jointed thick massive facies, colonnade-jointed thin massive sheet facies, mega-pillow facies, normal pillow facies and minor associated fragmental facies, including vitric sandstone and breccia interpreted as hyaloclastite and peperite. Field observations suggest that the facies, which form the Waiatarua Formation lava, were emplaced as multiple flow lobes in a single lava flow from one sustained eruption. Magma discharge rate at the vent was high; however magma supply rate to the more distal and lateral portions of the flow, as its surface area increased, varied considerably. Higher magma supply rates produced thick, massive and thin sheet facies, whereas mega-pillow facies and normal pillow facies were produced contemporaneously with the thick and thin massive sheet facies but were restricted to portions of the distal flow subjected to lower magma supply rates. The evolution of the Waiatarua formation lava flow at Maori Bay has been reconstructed from the complex facies architecture. This suggests that the propagation of the lava involved 7 discrete lobes that were emplaced successively.

  1. Groundwater flow, late cementation, and petroleum accumulation the Permian Lyons Sandstone, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.K.; Bethke, C.M. )

    1994-02-01

    The gray diagenetic facies of the Permian Lyons Sandstone, associated with all known petroleum accumulations in the formation, formed late in the history of the Denver basin as an alteration product of the formation's red facies. The red facies that makes up most of the sandstone contains iron oxide coating, quartz overgrowths and calcite cements. The gray facies, which occurs locally in the deep basin, is distinguished by pore-filling dolomite and anhydrite cements and by a lack of iron oxide and calcite. The dolomite and anhydrite cements overlie bitumen that was deposited by migrating oil, and hence formed after oil was first generated in the basin, late in the Cretaceous or early in the Tertiary. The isotopic composition of oxygen in the dolomite ranges to such light values that the cement must have formed deep in the basin in the presence of meteoric water. The gray facies likely formed in a regime of groundwater flow resulting from Laramide uplift of the Front Range during the Tertiary. In our model, saline groundwater flowed eastward through the Pennsylvanian Fountain Formation and then upwelled along the basin axis, where is discharged into the Lyons Sandstone. The saline water mixed with more dilute groundwater in the Lyons, driving a reaction that dissolved calcite and, by a common-ion effect, precipitated dolomite and anhydrite. The facies' gray color resulted from reduction of ferric oxide in the presence of migrating oil or the Fountain brine. Underlying source beds by this time had begun to generate petroleum, which migrated by buoyancy into the Lyons. The association of the gray facies with petroleum accumulations can be explained if the Fountain brines discharged across aquitards along the same fractures that transmitted oil. As petroleum accumulated in the Lyons, the newly formed cements prevented continued migration, as is observed in shallower strata, by sealing oil into the reservoirs from which it is produced today. 77 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Classification of six ordinary chondrites from Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, Arthur J.; Keil, Klaus

    1988-12-01

    Based on optical microscopy, modal and electron microprobe analyses, six ordinary chondrites from Texas were classified in compositional groups, petrologic types, and shock facies. These meteorites are Comanche (stone), L5c; Haskell, L5c; Deport (a), H4b; Naruna (a), H4b; Naruna (b), H4b; and Clarendon (b), H5d.

  3. Sedimentary facies analysis, El Dorado Field, Kansas, micellar chemical pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Tillman, R.W.; Jordan, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    The Permian 650-ft sand, one of several productive sands in the El Dorado Field, has yielded 36.5 million bbl by primary and secondary methods, with 71 million bbl remaining. During initial stages of the micellar-polymer tertiary recovery pilot project drilling in 1974, a phase I geologic analysis, using 7 cores, identified distributary channels and associated smaller splay channels as productive facies. The western edge of the pilot area was determined to have the best channel sandstone development. A 2-layer geologic facies model was proposed. Oriented cores were included in the drilling of 24 wells in Phase II. North and northeast flow directions were indicated for the channel sandstones. During Phase III four observation wells were cored. These wells were drilled at internals of 90ft (27 m) diagonally from earlier wells in the north and south block. Micellar injection for the pilot was completed in early 1979 and polmer injection followed.

  4. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1980-07-01

    Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

  5. Ferron sandstone - stratigraphy and reservoir analogs, East-Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.B.; Ryer, T.A.; Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The Ferron Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous) crops out along the west flank of the San Rafael Swell of east-central Utah. Exposures were described on photomosaics to better define the stratigraphy, to enhance facies prediction, and establish rules for reservoir modeling within fluvial-deltaic rocks. Major regressive cycles are recognized as parasequence sets composed of several to many parasequences. Each of the seaward-stepping parasequence sets recognized in the Ferron begins with a rapidly thickening and stratigraphically climbing, wave-modified shoreface. In later stages of progradation, deposition is dominated by river influences. Continued regression of the seaway is recorded in outcrop and shows a complex history of delta lobe progradation, switching, and abandonment. Onlapping and stacking of parasequences creates a collage of potential reservoir sweet spots, baffles, and barriers within a parasequence set. Shoreface and delta-front deposits of the older parasequences are commonly eroded by younger distributary and meanderbelt systems that fed younger parasequences of the parasequence sets. The result is numerous and locally thick channel sandstone bodies incised into shoreface and delta-front deposits. Published studies and recently completed work show that upper shoreface, stream mouth-bar, and channel sandstones constitute the best potential reservoir rocks within the Ferron Sandstone.

  6. Texas Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wind-Whipped Fires in East Texas     View Larger Image ... one-year drought on record and the warmest month in Texas history. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on ...

  7. Metamorphic facies map of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; O-Rourke, E.F.; Reading, K.E.; Fitch, M.R.; Klute, M.A.

    1985-04-01

    A metamorphic-facies of Alaska has been compiled, following the facies-determination scheme of the Working Group for the Cartography of the Metamorphic Belts of the World. Regionally metamorphosed rocks are divided into facies series where P/T gradients are known and into facies groups where only T is known. Metamorphic rock units also are defined by known or bracketed age(s) of metamorphism. Five regional maps have been prepared at a scale of 1:1,000,000; these maps will provide the basis for a final colored version of the map at a scale of 1:2,500,000. The maps are being prepared by the US Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys. Precambrian metamorphism has been documented on the Seward Peninsula, in the Baird Mountains and the northeastern Kuskokwim Mountains, and in southwestern Alaska. Pre-Ordovician metamorphism affected the rocks in central Alaska and on southern Prince of Wales Island. Mid-Paleozoic metamorphism probably affected the rocks in east-central Alaska. Most of the metamorphic belts in Alaska developed during Mesozoic or early Tertiary time in conjuction with accretion of many terranes. Examples are Jurassic metamorphism in east-central Alaska, Early Cretaceous metamorphism in the southern Brooks Range and along the rim of the Yukon-Kovyukuk basin, and late Cretaceous to early Tertiary metamorphism in the central Alaska Range. Regional thermal metamorphism was associated with multiple episodes of Cretaceous plutonism in southeastern Alaska and with early Tertiary plutonism in the Chugach Mountains. Where possible, metamorphism is related to tectonism. Meeting participants are encouraged to comment on the present version of the metamorphic facies map.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDSTONE RESERVOIRS FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY: THE PERMIAN UPPER MINNELUSA FORMATION, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W.; Scheffler, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Upper Minnelusa sandstones form a complex group of reservoirs because of variations in regional setting, sedimentology, and diagenetic alteration. Structural lineaments separate the reservoirs into northern and southern zones. Production in the north is from a single pay sand, and in the south from multi-pay sands due to differential erosion on top of the Upper Minnelusa. The intercalation of eolian dune, interdune, and sabkha sandstones with marine sandstones, carbonates, and anhydrites results in significant reservoir heterogeneity. Diagenetic alterations further enhance heterogeneity, because the degree of cementation and dissolution is partly facies-related.

  9. Geochemistry and hydrodynamics of deep formation brines in the Palo Duro and Dalhart basins, Texas, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, R. L.; Bentley, M. E.

    1982-11-01

    Geological characterization of evaporite deposits as potential host rocks for radioactive waste burial must include hydrogeological investigations on both local and regional scales. The Palo Duro and Dalhart basins of Texas contain candidate salt deposits which are underlain by shelf carbonates and fan-delta sandstones. These basins are ancient intracratonic elements exhibiting regional eastward flow in the deep brine aquifers. Pressures in these aquifers are "subnormal"; however, the major component of flow appears to be parallel to bedding owing to the low permeability of the overlying evaporite strata in the central part of the basin. Salinities computed from geophysical logs or obtained from chemical analyses indicate only small aberrations in the regional salinity profile for brines in carbonate rocks and sandstones of Late Pennsylvanian—Early permian age. Brines reflect reactivity with the host rock deriving salinity primarily from evaporite facies and at present, apparently follow the anhydrite and calcite phase boundaries. Substantial outgassing of CO 2 and oxidation of ferrous iron appear to have occurred during collection of the samples during wildcat drilling by industry. Mass-transfer computer programs have been used to determine the most probable in situ brine composition. Additional support for the computed equilibrium state is the correlation between computed PCO 2 in the brines and observed PCO 2 in adjacent natural gas reservoirs.

  10. Late Devonian glacigenic and associated facies from the central Appalachian Basin, eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brezinski, D.K.; Cecil, C.B.; Skema, V.W.

    2010-01-01

    Late Devonian strata in the eastern United States are generally considered as having been deposited under warm tropical conditions. However, a stratigraphically restricted Late Devonian succession of diamictite- mudstonesandstone within the Spechty Kopf and Rockwell Formations that extends for more than 400 km along depositional strike within the central Appalachian Basin may indicate other wise. This lithologic association unconformably overlies the Catskill Formation, where a 3- to 5-m-thick interval of deformed strata occurs immediately below the diamictite strata. The diamictite facies consists of several subfacies that are interpreted to be subglacial, englacial, supraglacial meltout, and resedimented deposits. The mudstone facies that overlies the diamictite consists of subfacies of chaotically bedded, clast-poor mudstone, and laminated mudstone sub facies that represent subaqueous proximal debris flows and distal glaciolacustrine rhythmites or varvites, respectively. The pebbly sandstone facies is interpreted as proglacial braided outwash deposits that both preceded glacial advance and followed glacial retreat. Both the tectonic and depositional frameworks suggest that the facies were deposited in a terrestrial setting within the Appalachian foreland basin during a single glacial advance and retreat. Regionally, areas that were not covered by ice were subject to increased rainfall as indicated by wet-climate paleosols. River systems eroded deeper channels in response to sea-level drop during glacial advance. Marine facies to the west contain iceborne dropstone boulders preserved within contemporaneous units of the Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale.The stratigraphic interval correlative with sea-level drop, climate change, and glacigenic succession represents one of the Appalachian Basin's most prolific oil-and gas-producing intervals and is contemporaneous with a global episode of sea-level drop responsible for the deposition of the Hangenberg Shale/Sandstone

  11. Geometry and reservoir heterogeneity of tertiary sandstones: a guide to reservoir continuity and geothermal resource development

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.

    1981-01-01

    External and internal continuity of Tertiary sandstones are controlled by various factors including structural trends, sand body geometry, and the distribution of mineral framework, matrix, and intersticies within the sand body. Except for the limits imposed by faults, these factors are largely inherited from the depositional environment and modified during sandstone compaction and cementation. Sandstone continuity affects energy exploration and production strategies. The strategies range in scope from regional to site-specific and closely parallel a sandstone hierarchy. The hierarchy includes subdivisions ranking from genetically related aquifer systems down to individual reservoirs within a fault-bounded sandstone. Volumes of individual reservoirs are 50% less to 200% more than estimated from conventional geologic mapping. In general, mapped volumes under-estimate actual volumes where faults are nonsealing and overestimate actual volumes where laterally continuous shale breaks cause reductions in porosity and permeability. Gross variations in these pore properties can be predicted on the basis of internal stratification and sandstone facies. Preliminary analyses indicate that large aquifers are found where barrier and strandplain sandstones parallel regional faults or where fluvial (meandering) channels trend normal to regional faults. Within these sand bodies, porosity and permeability are highest in large-scale crossbedded intervals and lowest in contorted, bioturbated, and small-scale ripple cross-laminated intervals.

  12. Trilobites from Lower Mississippian starved basin facies of the southern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brezinski, D.K.

    1998-01-01

    A distinctive trilobite fauna occurs within condensed statigraphic sections of the Lower Mississippian (Tournaisian) Chappel Limestone of the Llano region of Texas, the Welden Limestone of Oklahoma, and the Chouteau Limestone of Union County, Illinois. The seven species comprising this fauna are interpreted to have inhabited sediment-starved basinal environments. The starved-basin facies existed in the south-central United States throughout the Tournaisian (Kinderhookian to Osagean). Two species from this fauna, Australosutura llanoensis, and Carbonocoryphe planucauda, are new. The remaining five species, Griffithidella doris (Hall), Griffithidella alternata (Girty), Carbonocoryphe depressa (Girty), Thigiffides roundyi (Girty), and Pudoproetus chappelensis (Hessler), are restricted to starved-basin facies.

  13. Geology of the Southern Guadalupe Mountains, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Philip B.

    1948-01-01

    This report deals with an area of 425 square miles in the western part of Texas, immediately south of the New Mexico line. The area comprises the south end of the Guadalupe Mountains and the adjacent part of the Delaware Mountains; it includes the highest peaks in the State of Texas. The area is a segment of a large mountain mass that extends 50 miles or more northward and southward. The report describes the geology of the area, that is, the nature of its rocks, tectonics, and surface features, and the evidence that they give as to the evolution of the area through geologic time. Incidental reference is made to the geology of surrounding regions in order to place the area in its environment. Stratigraphy of Permian rocks - The consolidated rocks of the area are all marine sediments of Permian age, whose total exposed thickness is about 4,000 feet. Most of the rocks contain abundant invertebrate fossils, some of which were described by B. F. Shumard in 1858. They were made famous by the classic study of G. H. Girty in 1908. The rocks consist chiefly of sandstones and limestones of various textures and structures, and are notable for their abrupt change from one rock type into another within short distances. This characteristic is believed to have been caused by the rocks being laid down on the margin of the Delaware Basin, a structural feature of Permian time. The margin lay between the more rapidly subsiding basin and a less rapidly subsiding shelf area to the northwest. The lowest exposed formation is the Bone Spring limestone. Two deep wells indicate that it is underlain by the Hueco limestone (of Carboniferous or Permian age), and this by rocks of Pennsylvanian age. The Bone Spring is predominantly black, thin-bedded limestone to the southeast, in the basin area, but to the northwest this facies changes into gray, thicker-bedded limestone. At the margin of the basin, the formation is raised along the Bone Spring flexure, which was apparently in movement toward

  14. Elevated Uranium in Aquifers of the Jacobsville Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, H.; Gierke, J.

    2003-12-01

    The EPA has announced a new standard for uranium in drinking water of 30 parts per billion (ppb). This maximum contaminant level (MCL) takes effect for community water supplies December 2003. The EPA's ruling has heightened awareness among residential well owners that uranium in drinking water may increase the risk of kidney disease and cancer and has created a need for a quantified, scientific understanding of the occurrence and distribution of uranium isotopes in aquifers. The authors are investigating the occurrence of elevated uranium in northern Michigan aquifers of the Middle Proterozoic Jacobsville sandstone, a red to mottled sequence of sandstones, conglomerates, siltstones and shales deposited as basin fill in the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift. Approximately 25% of 300 well water samples tested for isotopic uranium have concentrations above the MCL. Elevated uranium occurrences are distributed throughout the Jacobsville sandstone aquifers stretching across Michigan's Upper Peninsula. However, there is significant variation in well water uranium concentrations (from 0.01 to 190 ppb) and neighboring wells do not necessarily have similar concentrations. The authors are investigating hydrogeologic controls on ground water uranium concentrations in the Jacobsville sandstone, e.g. variations in lithology, mineralogy, groundwater residence time and geochemistry. Approximately 2000' of Jacobsville core from the Amoco St. Amour well was examined in conjunction with the spectral gamma ray log run in the borehole. Spikes in equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from the log are frequently associated with clay and heavy mineral layers in the sandstone core. The lithology and mineralogy of these layers will be determined by analysis of thin sections and x-ray diffraction. A portable spectrometer, model GRS-2000/BL, will be used on the sandstone cliffs along Lake Superior to characterize depositional and lithologic facies of the Jacobsville sandstone in terms of

  15. Silurian and Devonian in Vietnam—Stratigraphy and facies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh, Tống Duy; Phương, Tạ Hoàng; Janvier, Philippe; Hùng, Nguyễn Hữu; Cúc, Nguyễn Thị Thu; Dương, Nguyễn Thùy

    2013-09-01

    Silurian and Devonian deposits in Viet Nam are present in several zones and regions, including Quang Ninh, East Bac Bo, and West Bac Bo Zones of the Bac Bo Region, the Dien Bien-Nghe An and Binh Tri Thien Zones of the Viet-Lao Region, and the South Trung Bo, and Western Nam Bo Zones of the South Viet Nam Region (Fig. 1). The main lithological features and faunal composition of the Silurian and Devonian Units in all these zones are briefly described. The Silurian consists of deep-water deposits of the upper parts of the Co To and Tan Mai Formations in the Quang Ninh Zone, the upper parts of the Phu Ngu Formation in the East Bac Bo Zone and the upper parts of the Long Dai and Song Ca Formations in the Viet-Lao Region. Shallow water facies Silurian units containing benthic faunas are more widely distributed, including the upper part of the Sinh Vinh and Bo Hieng Formations in the West Bac Bo Zone, the Kien An Formation in the Quang Ninh Zone, and, in the Viet-Lao Region, the Dai Giang Formation and the upper part of the Tay Trang Formation. No Lower and Middle Devonian deposits indicate deep water facies, but they are characterized by different shallow water facies. Continental to near shore, deltaic facies characterize the Lower Devonian Song Cau Group in the East Bac Bo Zone, the Van Canh Formation in the Quang Ninh Zone, and the A Choc Formation in the Binh Tri Thien Zone. Similar facies also occur in the Givetian Do Son Formation of the Quang Ninh Zone, and the Tan Lap Formation in the East Bac Bo Zone, and consist of coarse terrigenous deposits—cross-bedded conglomerates, sandstone, etc. Most Devonian units are characterized by shallow marine shelf facies. Carbonate and terrigenous-carbonate facies dominate, and terrigenous facies occur in the Lower and Middle Devonian sections in some areas only. The deep-water-like facies is characteriztic for some Upper Devonian formations in the Bac Bo (Bang Ca and Toc Tat Formations) and Viet-Lao Regions (Thien Nhan and

  16. Influence of relative sea level on facies, stacking patterns and reservoir heterogeneity: Middle Jurassic Brent group, UK North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Jennette, D.C. )

    1996-01-01

    The lower Brent Group, above the genetically distinct lowstand deposits of the Broom Formation, is a progradational sequence set made up of the lower- shoreface Rannoch, the upper-shoreface and beach-plain Etive, and the back-barrier Lower Ness Formations. Much of the reservoir heterogeneity in this sandstone-rich succession can be attributed to facies and stacking-pattern variations within higher frequency systems tracts. Highstand systems tracts have strongly offlapping progradational geometries. Sweep efficiency is influenced by: (1) seaward-dipping, mica-rich bed-sets; (2) high-quality ebb tidal-delta sandstone bodies; and (3) the sharp increase in reservoir quality at the sub-horizontal base of the upper shoreface. The increased permeability leads water in the Etive to overrun oil in the Rannoch. Horizontal wells are targeting unswept reserves in the lower-permeability facies. Relative falls in sea level punctuated highstand progradation and led to the subaerial erosion of the Etive and Rannoch formations. Lowstand deposits are contained within incised valleys and consist of fluvial sandstones, coastal-plain mudstones and coal. Well-performance anomalies and abrupt variations in sandstone thickness are associated with the heterogeneous valley-fills. Shoreface sedimentation resumed during transgressive systems tracts. High sediment flux enabled the nearshore system to stack aggradationally. Diachronous lithostratigraphy, aggradation of the heterolithic back-barrier Ness Formation, interbedding of Rannoch facies in the lower Etive and increased carbonate cement in the lower shoreface Rannoch mark this systems tract.

  17. Revitalizing a mature oil play: Strategies for finding and producing unrecovered oil in Frio Fluvial-Deltaic reservoirs of south Texas. Technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, N.; Levey, R.A.

    1996-07-11

    Advanced reservoir characterization techniques have been applied to selected reservoirs in the Frio Fluvial-Deltaic Sandstone (Vicksburg Fault Zone) trend of South Texas in order to maximize the economic producibility of resources in this mature oil play. More than half of the reservoirs in this depositionally complex play have already been abandoned, and large volumes of oil may remain unproduced unless advanced characterization techniques are applied to define untapped, incompletely drained, and new pool reservoirs as suitable targets for near-term recovery methods. This project has developed interwell-scale geological facies models and has assessed engineering attributes of Frio fluvial-deltaic reservoirs in selected fields in order to characterize reservoir architecture, flow unit boundaries, and the controls that these characteristics exert on the location and volume of unrecovered mobile and residual oil. Results of these studies led to the identification of specific opportunities to exploit these heterogeneous reservoirs for incremental recovery by recompletion and strategic infill drilling.

  18. Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation, northeast Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royhan Gani, M.; Mustafa Alam, M.

    2004-11-01

    The late stage basin-fill history of the fluvial Dupi Tila Group (Plio-Pleistocene) is described. These rocks have been deposited in the Sylhet trough, a sub-basin of the Bengal Basin, in a foreland basin setting. This outcrop study, carried out in Sylhet, Bangladesh, presents the first detailed facies analysis of the Upper Dupi Tila Formation. Four facies have been identified: trough cross-bedded sandstone (St), ripple cross-laminated sandstone (Sr), finely laminated mud with ripples (Fl), and massive mud with rootlets (Fm). Facies analysis supplemented with embedded Markov chain analysis, reveals small-scale fining-upward cycles (average 4.5 m thick). Facies architectural elements include channel (CH), lateral accretion (LA), sandy bedforms (SB), and overbank fines (OF) with limited vertical and lateral connectivity of the sand bodies. The average channel depth and width is 5 and 30 m, respectively. Sand body geometry ranges from tabular, to sheet, to shoestring with a 0.45 net to gross ratio. This study shows that the Upper Dupi Tila Formation is composed of small-scale, mudstone-reach meandering river deposits. In Bangladesh, the Dupi Tila Formation is the main aquifer presently being utilized. Understanding of facies architecture and sand body geometry of this Formation is crucial in examining the issue of arsenic and other contaminations of ground water in Bangladesh.

  19. Internal geometry, seismic facies, and petroleum potential of canyons and inner fan channels of the Indus submarine fan

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, T.R.; Webb, J.E.

    1986-02-01

    The Indus Fan, the second largest submarine fan in the world, covers 1,250,000 km/sup 2/ (500,000 mi/sup 2/) and contains sediment more than 7 km (23,000 ft) thick. Multichannel (24-fold) CDP seismic data provide the bases for evaluating the Indus Fan and consist of four seismic facies. Of these, only the high-amplitude, discontinuous (H-D) facies is thought to contain reservoir-quality sandstones. The H-D facies is confined to the axes of leveed channels. Canyon-channel systems that fed the fan in the past can be divided into three zones. The degradational zone is composed of an erosional canyon complex filled by prodelta mud. The transitional zone, located near the canyon mouth, consists of superimposed channels that initially were erosional but eventually aggraded and developed levees. The headward termination of the H-D facies occurs in this zone. The aggradational zone consists of superimposed leveed channels confined solely by their own levees. The proximal termination of the H-D facies near canyon mouths implies the presence of reservoir-quality sandstone surrounded by source/seal mudstone in the transitional zone. This stratigraphic trapping geometry and structural leads may represent a vast, untapped petroleum province.

  20. Sandstone weathering processes damaging prehistoric rock paintings at the Albarracin Cultural Park, NE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, G.; Machado, M. J.; Sancho, C.

    1993-09-01

    The rock paintings in cliff-foot caves of the Albarracin Cultural Park are known as some of the most important evidences of the Levantine prehistoric art of Spain (8000 3000 BP). The paintings are on sandstone (Buntsandstein facies) of Triasic age, which may develop intense weathering. The analysis of the variables controlling the weathering indicate that salt and wetting-drying weathering are responsible for granular disintegration and flaking, which lead to rock painting deterioration.

  1. Multiscale Fractal Characterization of Hierarchical Heterogeneity in Sandstone Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Yuetian; Sun, Lu; Liu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneities affecting reservoirs often develop at different scales. Previous studies have described these heterogeneities using different parameters depending on their size, and there is no one comprehensive method of reservoir evaluation that considers every scale. This paper introduces a multiscale fractal approach to quantify consistently the hierarchical heterogeneities of sandstone reservoirs. Materials taken from typical depositional pattern and aerial photography are used to represent three main types of sandstone reservoir: turbidite, braided, and meandering river system. Subsequent multiscale fractal dimension analysis using the Bouligand-Minkowski method characterizes well the hierarchical heterogeneity of the sandstone reservoirs. The multiscale fractal dimension provides a curve function that describes the heterogeneity at different scales. The heterogeneity of a reservoir’s internal structure decreases as the observational scale increases. The shape of a deposit’s facies is vital for quantitative determination of the sedimentation type, and thus enhanced oil recovery. Characterization of hierarchical heterogeneity by multiscale fractal dimension can assist reservoir evaluation, geological modeling, and even the design of well patterns.

  2. Eolian sandstone unit of Morrison Formation, central Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, D.M.

    1986-08-01

    The fine-grained quartzarenite that overlies the Sundance Formation in the southwestern Powder River basin, Wind River basin, and southern Bighorn basin is interpreted as being primarily the result of eolian deposition. This unit, often more than 20 m (65.6 ft) thick, is the probable correlative of the Unkpapa Sandstone member of the Morrison Formation of the southeastern Black Hills region. An eolian interpretation is based on the presence of large-scale sets of high-angle, planar cross-stratification. Observed considerable variation in the thickness of the unit is likely to be an expression of the depositional (dune-form) topography rather than the result of later erosion. Discrete dunes are exposed near Thermopolis along the northern margin of the unit: the transitional marine deposits of the uppermost Sundance formation are the most likely source of the wind-transported sand. Stratigraphic and facies relationships and lithologic similarity support correlation of the eolian unit with the Unkpapa Sandstone. Together, the units represent regions of significant eolian deposition within the predominantly fluvial Morrison depositional environment. The properties of the eolian sandstone, its thickness, its superposition above the marine Sundance Formation, and the possibility of its persistence in the subsurface of the southern Powder River basin give it potential as a petroleum reservoir. These anomalous eolian deposits may record the positions of gentle structures developed in central Wyoming and western South Dakota at the onset of, and in association with, Sevier compression.

  3. Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies relationships in a passive margin basin, western North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, B.E.

    1988-02-01

    Correlation of facies from hydrocarbon-bearing continental and transitional marine sandstones to time-equivalent high-energy shelf-margin carbonates provide insight into hydrocarbon habitats of the Baltimore Canyon basin. These facies occur within a thick (> 10,000 ft) prograded wedge of shelf sediments in this passive margin basin. Wells drilled to test structural closures in shallow-water (< 600 ft) areas of Baltimore Canyon penetrate clastic facies which are time-equivalent to the downdip carbonate facies tested in deep-water wells. Numerous hydrocarbon shows, including a noncommercial gas and gas-condensate accumulation, occur with sandstone units that were deposited in prograding continental/fluvial and transitional marine environments located updip of the Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian carbonate shelf edge. The continental and transitional facies are overlain by a fine-grained deltaic complex which forms a regionally extensive top seal unit. The deltaic complex was deposited during aggradation of the Kimmeridgian through Berriasian shelf-margin carbonates penetrated by the deep-water wells. Deep-water wells (> 5000 ft) drilled off the continental shelf edge to test large structural closures along the downdip termination of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous carbonate shelf edge encountered no significant hydrocarbon shows. Reservoir rocks in these wells consist of (1) oolite grainstone which was deposited within a shoal-water complex located at the Aptian shelf edge, and (2) coral-stromatoporoid grainstone and boundstone which formed an aggraded shelf-margin complex located at the Kimmeridgian through Berriasian shelf edge. Structural closures with reservoir and top seals are present in both updip and downdip trends. The absence of hydrocarbon shows in downdip carbonate reservoirs suggests a lack of source rocks available to charge objectives at the shelf margin.

  4. Reservoir characterization of Mesaverde (Campanian) bedload fluvial meanderbelt sandstones, northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.R. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    Reservoir characterization of Mesaverde meanderbelt sandstones is used to determined directional continuity of permeable zones. A 500-m (1600 ft) wide fluvial meanderbelt in the Mesaverde Group is exposed as laterally continuous 3-10-m (10-33-ft) high sandstone cliffs north of Rangely, Colorado. Forty-eight detailed measured sections through 3 point bar complexes oriented at right angles to the long axis of deposition and 1 complex oriented parallel to deposition were prepared. Sections were tied together by detailed sketches delineating and tracing major bounding surfaces such as scours and clay drapes. These complexes contain 3 to 8 multilateral sandstone packages separated by 5-20 cm (2-8 in.) interbedded siltstone and shale beds. Component facies are point bars, crevasse splays, chute bars, and floodplain/overbank deposits. Two types of lateral accretion surfaces are recognized in the point bar facies. Gently dipping lateral accretions containing fining-upward sandstone packages. Large scale trough cross-bedding at the base grades upward into ripples and plane beds. Steeply dipping lateral accretion surfaces enclose beds characterized by climbing ripple cross laminations. Bounding surfaces draped by shale lags can seal vertically stacked point bars from reservoir communication. Scoured boundaries allow communication in some stacked point bars. Crevasse splays showing climbing ripples form tongues of very fine-grained sandstone which flank point bars. Chute channels commonly cut upper point bar surfaces at their downstream end. Chute facies are upward-fining with small scale troughs and common dewatering structures. Siltstones and shales underlie the point bar complexes and completely encase the meanderbelt system. Bounding surfaces at the base of the complexes are erosional and contain large shale rip-up clasts.

  5. Influence of depositional environment and diagenesis on gas reservoir properties in St. Peter Sandstone, Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, W.B. III; Turmelle, T.M.; Barnes, D.A.

    1987-05-01

    The St. Peter Sandstone in the Michigan basin subsurface is rapidly becoming a major exploration target for natural gas. This reservoir was first proven with the successful completion of the Dart-Edwards 7-36 (Falmouth field, Missaukee County, Michigan) in 1981. Fifteen fields now are known, with a maximum of three producing wells in any one field. The production from these wells ranges from 1 to more than 10 MMCFGD on choke, with light-gravity condensate production of up to 450 b/d. Depth to the producing intervals ranges from about 7000 ft to more than 11,000 ft. The St. Peter Sandstone is an amalgamated stack of shoreface and shelf sequences more than 1100 ft in thickness in the basin center and thinning to zero at the basin margins. Sandstone composition varies from quartzarenite in the coarser sizes to subarkose and arkose in the finer sizes. Thin salty/shaly lithologies and dolomite-cemented sandstone intervals separate the porous sandstone packages. Two major lithofacies are recognized in the basin: a coarse-grained, well-sorted quartzarenite with various current laminations and a fine-grained, more poorly sorted subarkose and arkose with abundant bioturbation and distinct vertical and horizontal burrows. Reservoir quality is influenced by original depositional and diagenetic fabrics, but there is inversion of permeability and porosity with respect to primary textures in the major lithofacies. The initially highly porous and permeable, well-sorted, coarser facies is now tightly cemented with syntaxial quartz cement, resulting in a low-permeability, poor quality reservoir. The more poorly sorted, finer facies with initially lower permeabilities did not receive significant fluid flux until it passed below the zone of quartz cementation. This facies was cemented with carbonate which has subsequently dissolved to form a major secondary porosity reservoir.

  6. Petrophysics of Lower Silurian sandstones and integration with the tectonic-stratigraphic framework, Appalachian basin, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, J.W.; Byrnes, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Petrophysical properties were determined for six facies in Lower Silurian sandstones of the Appalachian basin: fluvial, estuarine, upper shoreface, lower shoreface, tidal channel, and tidal flat. Fluvial sandstones have the highest permeability for a given porosity and exhibit a wide range of porosity (2-18%) and permeability (0.002-450 md). With a transition-zone thickness of only 1-6 m (3-20 ft), fluvial sandstones with permeability greater than 5 md have irreducible water saturation (Siw) less than 20%, typical of many gas reservoirs. Upper shoreface sandstones exhibit good reservoir properties with high porosity (10-21%), high permeability (3-250 md), and low S iw (<20%). Lower shoreface sandstones, which are finer grained, have lower porosity (4-12%), lower permeability (0.0007-4 md), thicker transition zones (6-180 m [20-600 ft]), and higher S iw. In the tidal-channel, tidal-flat, and estuarine facies, low porosity (average < 6%), low permeability (average < 0.02 md), and small pore throats result in large transition zones (30-200 m; 100-650 ft) and high water saturations. The most favorable reservoir petrophysical properties and the best estimated production from the Lower Silurian sandstones are associated with fluvial and upper shoreface facies of incised-valley fills, which we interpret to have formed predominantly in areas of structural recesses that evolved from promontories along a collisional margin during the Taconic orogeny. Although the total thickness of the sandstone may not be as great in these areas, reservoir quality is better than in adjacent structural salients, which is attributed to higher energy depositional processes and shallower maximum burial depth in the recesses than in the salients. Copyright ??2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  7. Quartz cementation mechanisms between adjacent sandstone and shale in Middle Cambrian, West Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lingli; Friis, Henrik

    2013-04-01

    Quartz is an important cementing material in siliciclastic sandstones that can reduce porosity and permeability severely. For efficiently predicting and extrapolating petrophysical properties such as porosity and permeability, the controls on the occurrence and the degree of quartz cementation need to be better understood. Because it is generally difficult to identify specific sources for quartz cement, many models attempting to explain quartz cementation conclude that external sources of silica are needed to explain the observed quantity of quartz cement, such as the mass transfer between sandstone and shale. Cambrian sandstones in Lithuania have abundant quartz cement which has significant effect on reservoir properties. The detrital quartz grains have been dissolved extensively along the shale-quartz contacts zones, making it a natural laboratory to study the influence of mass transfer between sandstone and shale to quartz cementation on petrophysical properties and reservoir quality. Our Cambrian shale samples in west Lithuania are mainly silty shale or siltstone (sample locations vary from 330 to 2090 m of burial depth). They are composed of quartz, clay and traces of feldspars, sericite, calcite, and pyrite. The clay minerals are mainly illite, with variable content of kaolinite and traces of chlorite. In the sandstone lamina, authigenic illite occurs as pore-filling cement which was composed of fibrous illite; pore-filling kaolinite is generally well crystallized and occurs as hexagonal plates arranged in booklets; quartz overgrowth are obvious in these sandstone laminas, especially in the contact zones between sandstone and shale. Dolomite and pyrite cementation are also present in some sandstone laminas but with few quartz overgrowth. Depositional facies and architecture played an important role in the precipitation of silica. Three different possible sources are distinguished for the quartz overgrowths in the intercalated sandstones: 1) Pressure

  8. Diagenetic contrast of sandstones in hydrocarbon prospective Mesozoic rift basins (Ethiopia, UK, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A.

    2014-11-01

    Diagenetic studied in hydrocarbon-prospective Mesozoic rift basins were carried out in the Blue Nile Basin (Ethiopia), Ulster Basin (United Kingdom) and Hartford Basin (United States of America). Alluvial fan, single and amalgamated multistorey meandering and braided river, deep and shallow perennial lake, shallow ephemeral lake, aeolian and playa mud-flat are the prominent depositional environments. The studied sandstones exhibit red bed diagenesis. Source area geology, depositional environments, pore-water chemistry and circulation, tectonic setting and burial history controlled the diagenetic evolution. The diagenetic minerals include: facies-related minerals (calcrete and dolocrete), grain-coating clay minerals and/or hematite, quartz and feldspar overgrowths, carbonate cements, hematite, kaolinite, illite-smectite, smectite, illite, chlorite, actinolite, laumontite, pyrite and apatite. Diversity of diagenetic minerals and sequence of diagenetic alteration can be directly related to depositional environment and burial history of the basins. Variation in infiltrated clays, carbonate cements and clay minerals observed in the studied sandstones. The alluvial fan and fluviatile sandstones are dominated by kaolinite, illite calcite and ferroan calcite, whereas the playa and lacustrine sandstones are dominated by illite-smectite, smectite-chlorite, smectite, chlorite, dolomite ferroan dolomite and ankerite. Albite, pyrite and apatite are predominantly precipitated in lacustrine sandstones. Basaltic eruption in the basins modified mechanically infiltrated clays to authigenic clays. In all the studied sandstones, secondary porosity predominates over primary porosity. The oil emplacement inhabited clay authigenesis and generation of secondary porosity, whereas authigenesis of quartz, pyrite and apatite continued after oil emplacement.

  9. Facies architecture of a silicic intrusion-dominated volcanic centre at Highway Reward, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, M. G.; McPhie, J.

    2000-06-01

    The Highway-Reward massive sulphide deposit is hosted by a silicic volcanic succession in the Cambro-Ordovician Seventy Mile Range Group, northeastern Australia. Three principal lithofacies associations have been identified in the host succession: the volcanogenic sedimentary facies association, the primary volcanic facies association and the resedimented syn-eruptive facies association. The volcanogenic sedimentary facies association comprises volcanic and non-volcanic siltstone and sandstone turbidites that indicate submarine settings below storm wave base. Lithofacies of the primary volcanic facies association include coherent rhyolite, rhyodacite and dacite, and associated non-stratified breccia facies (autoclastic breccia and peperite). The resedimented volcaniclastic facies association contains clasts that were initially formed and deposited by volcanic processes, but then redeposited by mass-flow processes. Resedimentation was more or less syn-eruptive so that the deposits are essentially monomictic and clast shapes are unmodified. This facies association includes monomictic rhyolitic to dacitic breccia (resedimented autoclastic facies), siltstone-matrix rhyolitic to dacitic breccia (resedimented intrusive hyaloclastite or resedimented peperite) and graded lithic-crystal-pumice breccia and sandstone (pumiceous and crystal-rich turbidites). The graded lithic-crystal-pumice breccia and sandstone facies is the submarine record of a volcanic centre(s) that is not preserved or is located outside the study area. Pumice, shards, and crystals are pyroclasts that reflect the importance of explosive magmatic and/or phreatomagmatic eruptions and suggest that the source vents were in shallow water or subaerial settings. The lithofacies associations at Highway-Reward collectively define a submarine, shallow-intrusion-dominated volcanic centre. Contact relationships and phenocryst populations indicate the presence of more than 13 distinct porphyritic units with a

  10. Facies mosaic in a fiord: Carboniferous-Permian Talchir Formation, India

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, P.K.; Mukhopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharya, H.N.

    1988-01-01

    Facies analysis of the basal 37m of the Carboniferous-Permian Talchir Formation is a glacier-fed bedrock trough in Dudhi nala, Bihar, India, provides insight into the pattern of sedimentation of course gravels in a fiord. Rapid transitions between 11 recognized facies, together with their complex organization, random variability in bed thickness, and differences in clast, shape, size, and composition indicate coalescence of fans developed from numerous point sources bordering the elongated trough. Converging slide masses and lodgment tillites on the slopes flanking the trough give way to sediment gravity flow deposits composed of an array of conglomerates (matrix and clast supported with normal, inverse of absence of grading), attendant turbidite sands, and prodelta mud. The rheology of the in-trough flows ranged from plastic laminar to fluidal turbulent in response to flow from slope to floor of the trough. Rapid calving of icebergs during the onset of deglaciation established a wave regime at the mouth of the trough and deposited cross-stratified sandstone replete with dripstones. The impact of large dripstones landing triggered turbidity currents. Continued rise in water level led to eventual preservation of the fan complex under onlapping wave-built shoal facies that grade into a sequence of upward-thinning hummocky cross-stratified sandstone beds virtually devoid of dripstones.

  11. Lithological and geochemical facies of Shublik Formation (Triassic), North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, J.T.

    1985-04-01

    The Shublik Formation is a heterogeneous unit consisting of several distinct facies, including: (1) fossiliferous sandstone or siltstone; (2) glauconitic sandstone or siltstone; (3) siltstone, calcareous mudstone, or limestone with phosphate nodules; and (4) black, calcareous mudstone or black limestone, usually fossilferous. This sequence of lithologies is interpreted as having been deposited along an onshore-offshore (north to south) gradient. Bioturbation of the sediments is variable but generally decreases offshore. Organic carbon increases offshore, and phosphate increases from the paleoshoreline and decreases again farthest offshore. The distribution of glauconite, phosphate, and organic-carbon-rich rock is consistent with the facies expected in a zone that has a well-developed oxygen minimum. Glauconite is consistent with dysoxic conditions, and well-laminated, organic-carbon-rich rock in the offshore facies is consistent with anoxic conditions. High biologic productivity coupled with normal oceanic circulation may have caused the basin's low-oxygen conditions, as indicated by the presence of phosphate nodules and the extreme abundance of bivalves that have been interpreted to be pelagic. Phosphate indicates a high rate of supply of organic matter to the sediment-water interface, where it was mobilized from the organic matter within the anoxic zone, and reprecipitated at the zone's edges. Pelagic bivalves (Monotis and Halobia) are present in such large numbers as to suggest unusually abundant food supply; in addition, their distribution is consistent with mass dills, which are common among fish in zones.

  12. Modern Pearl River Delta and Permian Huainan coalfield, China: A comparative sedimentary facies study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suping, P.; Flores, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Sedimentary facies types of the Pleistocene deposits of the Modern Pearl River Delta in Guangdong Province, China and Permian Member D deposits in Huainan coalfield in Anhui Province are exemplified by depositional facies of anastomosing fluvial systems. In both study areas, sand/sandstone and mud/mudstone-dominated facies types formed in diverging and converging, coeval fluvial channels laterally juxtaposed with floodplains containing ponds, lakes, and topogenous mires. The mires accumulated thin to thick peat/coal deposits that vary in vertical and lateral distribution between the two study areas. This difference is probably due to attendant sedimentary processes that affected the floodplain environments. The ancestral floodplains of the Modern Pearl River Delta were reworked by combined fluvial and tidal and estuarine processes. In contrast, the floodplains of the Permian Member D were mainly influenced by freshwater fluvial processes. In addition, the thick, laterally extensive coal zones of the Permian Member D may have formed in topogenous mires that developed on abandoned courses of anastomosing fluvial systems. This is typified by Seam 13-1, which is a blanket-like body that thickens to as much as 8 in but also splits into thinner beds. This seam overlies deposits of diverging and converging, coeval fluvial channels of the Sandstone D, and associated overbank-floodplain deposits. The limited areal extent of lenticular Pleistocene peat deposits of the Modern Pearl River Delta is due to their primary accumulation in topogenous mires in the central floodplains that were restricted by contemporaneous anastomosing channels.

  13. Lithofacies and petrography of Wajid sandstone (Cambrian-Ordovician) Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshrif, M. A.; El-Hiti, A.

    Six lithofacies are recognized in the Wajid sandstone. These litofacies are identified as: silty and argillaceous sandstone; fine-grained sandstones; coarse-grained sandstones; pebbley to very coarse-grained sandstones; conglomerates and massive sandstones. Mineralogic composition suggests that the Wajid sandstone is considered clean sands for it consists 95% of quartz grains 5% heavy minerals, mica, potash feldspar, clay matrix, ferruginous cement and traces of carbonate cement. Quartz grain extinction types and inclusions plus heavy mineral types and shapes suggest nearby igneous and metamorphic sources for these deposits, i.e. the adjacent Arabian Shield rocks, in addition to repeated recycling of these sediments as indicated by the appearance of a small number of rounded to very rounded grains of heavy minerals. Furthermore, perhaps most of the secondary silica present in the Wajid was developed from solution and from silica reprecipitated later during periods of aeolian reworking of these fluvial sediments. Moreover, the ferruginous material in Wajid was very likely derived either from siderite or came in solution from igneous and metamorphic provenance or generally came from both sources. The carbonate material in the sediments might either be derived from post-Wajid carbonate formations or formed from solution of carbonate shells trapped in these sediments. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that kaolinite is the only clay mineral present in the Wajid deposits. On the other hand, spectroscopic analysis reveals the presence of Si, Mg, Al and Ca elements as major constituents in the Wajid sandstone. Moreover, according to facies characteristics, the Wajid sediments were deposited under conditions of fluvial environments.

  14. Cyclic sedimentation, synsedimentary volcanism, microfabrics, and fracture intensity in the Austin Chalk, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, S.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Pelagic depositional environments of the Austin Chalk (Coniacian-Santonian) were influenced by sea-level variation, planktonic productivity, and allochthonous detrital input. Subtle differences in chalk facies influence fracture intensity, therefore imposing stratigraphic variability on hydrologic properties of the Austin Chalk. Variations in fracture intensity may affect ground-water flow through the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site south of Dallas in the same way that they influence hydrocarbon production in South Texas. The lower Austin Chalk was deposited during transgression. Glauconitic sandstone is overlain by cyclic chalk containing chalk-filled channels. Meter-thick chalk/marl cycles have frequencies in the Milankovitch spectrum. Marl accumulated during episodes of decreased planktonic productivity. Maximum flooding is indicated by organic-rich marls in the upper part of the Lower Austin Chalk. Shallowing during deposition of the middle and upper Austin Chalk is indicated by increasing abundance of winnowed lag deposits and firm grounds, resulting in increased faunal diversity. Authigenic clay, a product of alteration of volcanic ash codeposited with the chalk and marl, increases ductility in the middle Austin Chalk. The stratigraphic distribution of authigenic clay corresponds to disseminated biotite, quartz, and feldspar phenocrysts in most samples of the middle Austing Chalk. Authigenic clay decreases porosity, influences porosity-permeability relationships, and provides a regionally traceable low SP log response that correlates with low fracture intensity.

  15. Analysis of glacier facies using satellite techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.S.; Hall, D.K.; Benson, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    Landsat-derived reflectance is lowest for exposed ice and increases markedly at the transient snow line. Above the slush zone is a gradual increase in near-infrared reflectance as a result of decreasing grain-size of the snow, which characterizes drier snow. Landsat data are useful in measuring the areal extent of the ice facies, the slush zone within the wet-snow facies, the snow facies (combined wet-snow, percolation and dry-snow facies), and the respective position of the transient snow line and the slush limit. In addition, fresh snowfall and/or airborne contaminants, such as soot and tephra, can limit the utility of Landsat data for delineation of the glacier facies in some cases. -from Authors

  16. Areal distribution of sedimentary facies determined from seismic facies analysis and models of modern depositional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seramur, K.C.; Powell, R.D.; Carpenter, P.J.

    1988-02-01

    Seismic facies analysis was applied to 3.5-kHz single-channel analog reflection profiles of the sediment fill within Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay, southeast Alaska. Nine sedimentary facies have been interpreted from seven seismic facies identified on the profiles. The interpretations are based on reflection characteristics and structural features of the seismic facies. The following reflection characteristics and structural features are used: reflector spacing, amplitude and continuity of reflections, internal reflection configurations, attitude of reflection terminations at a facies boundary, body geometry of a facies, and the architectural associations of seismic facies within each basin. The depositional systems are reconstructed by determining the paleotopography, bedding patterns, sedimentary facies, and modes of deposition within the basin. Muir Inlet is a recently deglaciated fjord for which successive glacier terminus positions and consequent rates of glacial retreat are known. In this environment the depositional processes and sediment characteristics vary with distance from a glacier terminus, such that during a retreat a record of these variations is preserved in the aggrading sediment fill. Sedimentary facies within the basins of lower Muir Inlet are correlated with observed depositional processes near the present glacier terminus in the upper inlet. The areal distribution of sedimentary facies within the basins is interpreted using the seismic facies architecture and inferences from known sediment characteristics proximal to present glacier termini.

  17. Palynology and Stratigraphy of the Nubian Sandstone in Libya and Comparison with Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekbali, Ali; Hlal, Osama

    2013-04-01

    The so-called "Nubian Sandstone" outcrops along a wide area from Algeria to the Red Sea, forming two regressive phases. The lower phase is represented in Egypt by the Basal Clastic Unit, the Desert Rose Unit, the Abu Ballas Formation and the Matruh Shale. In Libya it is represented by the Mesak Sandstone, Sarir Sandstone, Cabao Sandstone and Kiklah Formation. In both countries, these successions are covered by a carbonate sequence, resulting from the Tethyan transgression during the Cenomanian. In Egypt however, the upper regressive phase is represented by the Taref Sandstone which was deposited during a brief period of active progradation, following the Tethyan incursion. This is not observed in Libya. Comparison of palynological studies in Libya with those documented by several authors in Egypt reveals that the "Nubian" facies in Libya were deposited before equivalent facies in Egypt. The Basal Clastic Unit, dated as Hautrauvian-Barremian, may be equivalent, at least to a part of the Neocomian Cabao Sandstone in NW Libya. Jarmah Member of the Mesak Formation in Libya was dated as Berriasian on the basis of Pilosisporites and Trilobosporites. This makes it older than any "Nubian" unit in Egypt. The Matruh Shale was assigned to the Aptian on the basis of Tricolpites, and the Abu Balls Formation 34 as Aptian-Albian on the basis of Tricolpites and Rousisporites radiatus. Whereas, there is no equivalent to the Aptian in NW Libya, the Aptian-Albian of Egypt is similar to Zone 1 of the Kiklah Formation and As Sarir Sandstone, which were dated as early Albian on the basis of Afropollis spp., and Perotriletes pannuceus, an Albian element not recorded in Egypt. The Plant Beds in southwestern Egypt were dated as Cenomanian on the basis of advanced angiosperm pollen. In Libya, equivalent bodies were considered Vraconian, representing the uppermost Albian, because it lacks Cenomanian pollen (e.g. Tricolpites mutabilis). Comparison of local sea-level changes with global sea

  18. Camorim Field, Brazil: facies and oil qualities controlling reservoir behavior and well performances

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, O.S.; Menezes, S.X.; Bandeira, A. Jr.; Pimental, A.M.; Oliveira, C.M.P.

    1982-05-01

    Camorim Field is located offshore Sergipe State, Brazil. The producing section includes 150 M of Cretaceous conglomerates and coarse to very fine-grained sandstones, interbedded with siltstones and shales. Within this interval, 6 pools are recognized based on log correlation and facies analysis. The field has an area of 25 sq km and the reservoir average depth is 1900 m. Twenty-eight development wells were drilled. Reservoir geology and performance were analyzed by a multidisciplinary group. The reservoirs were fully cored in 5 wells and the correlation between rock and log responses allowed facies mapping throughout the field. The depositional model is interpreted as an alluvial-fan complex prograding toward a lacustrine environment.

  19. Classification of a second group of ordinary chondrites from Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, A. J.; Keil, K.

    1987-03-01

    Based on optical microscopy and electron microprobe analyses of mafic minerals, six previously undescribed or poorly known ordinary chondrites from Texas were classified into compositional groups, petrologic types, and shock facies. These meteorites are Junction, L5d; Anton, H5b; Venus, H4d; Dalhart, H5a; Rosebud, H5c; and Cranfills Gap, H6c.

  20. Classification of a second group of ordinary chondrites from Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlmann, Arthur J.; Keil, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    Based on optical microscopy and electron microprobe analyses of mafic minerals, six previously undescribed or poorly known ordinary chondrites from Texas were classified into compositional groups, petrologic types, and shock facies. These meteorites are Junction, L5d; Anton, H5b; Venus, H4d; Dalhart, H5a; Rosebud, H5c; and Cranfills Gap, H6c.

  1. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

  2. Operation Sandstone: 1948. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhouse, L.H.; Hallowell, J.H.; McMullan, F.W.; Davis, S.E.; Jones, C.B.

    1983-12-19

    SANDSTONE was a three-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during the spring of 1948 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  3. Texas Greenup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    June 2007 was one of the wettest Junes on record for the state of Texas. Starting in late May, a string of low-pressure systems settled in over the U.S. Southern Plains and unleashed weeks of heavy to torrential rain. During the final week of June, much of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas received more than 330 percent of their average rainfall, said the National Climatic Data Center. The widespread heavy rain brought deadly floods to the entire region. On July 6, the Associated Press reported that every major river basin in Texas was at flood stage, an event that had not occurred since 1957. In addition to causing floods, the rains stimulated plant growth. The grassy, often arid, plains and plateaus of northern Mexico (bottom left), Texas (center), and New Mexico (top, left of center) burst to life with dense vegetation as this vegetation anomaly image shows. Regions where plants were growing more quickly or fuller than average are green, while areas where growth is below average are brown. Most of Texas is green, with a concentrated deep green, almost black, spot where vegetation growth was greatest. This area of western Texas is where the Pecos River flows out of New Mexico and heads southeast to the Rio Grande. In the darkest areas, vegetation was more than 100 percent above average. The brown spots in northeastern Texas and Oklahoma (top, right of center) may be areas where persistent clouds or water on the ground are hiding the plants from the satellite's view. Plants may also be growing less than average if swamped by too much rain. The image was made with data collected by the SPOT satellite between June 11 and June 20, 2007. NASA imagery created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using SPOT data provided courtesy of the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service and processed by Jennifer Small and Assaf Anyamba of the GIMMS Group at NASA GSFC.

  4. Multidisciplinary studies on ancient sandstone quarries of Western Sardinia (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, Silvana Maria; Del Vais, Carla; Naitza, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    , Oristano, Santa Giusta). They are prevailing fine-medium grained carbonate sandstones, and subordinate coarse sandstones and micro-conglomerates, variably cemented. In the studied areas, stratigraphic sequences grade from coarser facies of marine environment to fine-grained aeolian deposits, marked by cross-stratification. The Quaternary sedimentary sequence rests on Miocene limestones and clays, and on Plio-Pleistocene basalts. On optical microscopy, sandstones show grain-supported texture, with abundant carbonate bioclasts, intraclasts and algal nodules, with quartz, feldspars and fragments of granitoids, quartzites, volcanics. Grainsize in sandstone sequences progressively decreases towards the top, corresponding to an increase of fine bioclastic components. Terrigenous components change from the northernmost outcrops (Is Arutas quarries), where clasts of granitoid origin are dominant, to the southern outcrops (San Giovanni di Sinis quarries), which show a more marked compositional heterogeneity, with frequent volcanic feldspars and lithoclasts. The calcitic cement also shows distinct variations, both along the stratigraphic sequence and at areal scale, between the sparitic type and the micro/cryptocrystalline type. First evidences on samples from Tharros city walls indicate that sandstone blocks may come, almost in part, from the quarries of San Giovanni di Sinis that, consequently, could have started to work during the Punic age. Other evidences in the area, however, indicate that quarrying activities in Sinis continued well over the Ancient times, presumably including all the Middle Ages.

  5. Facies and petrophysical modelling of a thick lower cretaceous tsunami deposit in E Spain: Up-scaling from sample to outcrop scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, Fernanda M. L.; Liesa, Carlos L.; Soria, Ana R.; Meléndez, Nieves; Frykman, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The tsunami deposit (up to 3 m thick) of the Cretaceous Camarillas Formation in the Galve sub-basin (eastern Spain) is characterized by a large lateral extent (35 km2) and facies uniformity, consisting in fine to coarse subarkosic-arkosic sandstones. At the scale of outcrop observation, different lithofacies were distinguished and related to sedimentation processes. Sand facies distribution conditioned the facies heterogeneity at both mesoscopic or outcrop scales (10- 1-101 m scale) and sample scale (10- 3-10- 2 m). The sample features were up-scaled to that of a facies model using probability functions and variograms as well as to outcrop-scale data (geometry and size) of facies distribution, and it showed a good correlation with the facies distribution at the outcrop. Porosity is strongly correlated to permeability and the pairs of porosity and permeability values fall into the global hydraulic element (GHEs) 5, so that they can be up-scaled into reservoir models in terms of hydraulic properties. From data analysis, no apparent link between sand sorting and porosity and permeability values was observed. The petrophysical models, which were independent of facies models, were up-scaled taking into account the porosity and permeability values from sample data and the statistical analysis of their distribution along the outcrop. The permeability model was carried out as a function of porosity by applying a linear relation, which simplified the modelling process and discarded permeability uncertainties linked to facies distribution in the deposit. In spite of different source data, the petrophysical models show a distribution of lower and higher values that resembles the facies model. Consequently, our modelling results clearly suggest the link of facies type and their grain size distributions with the petrophysical properties into the deposit. Consistency between facies and petrophysical models and outcrop-scale observations make it possible to extrapolate to other

  6. Paleoshorelines in the Upper Cretaceous Point Lookout Sandstone, southern San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zech, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    LANDSAT images and aerial photography reveal several parallel linear features as much as 17 km long and 0.7 km wide. Detailed cross sections normal to a linear feature show it to be an exhumed paleoshoreline containing several overlapping sandstone units. Each unit tends to pinchout into the shales of the overlying Menefee Formation, showing a range of depositional environments including upper shoreface, foreshore, washover and eolian. Paleogeomorphic elements, predominately beach ridges and interridge swales, shape the upper surface of the sandstone and produce a relief as great as 4.2 m. The various components found in the paleoshoreline create a trellis-like drainage pattern that contrasts with the regional dendritic drainage pattern; the resulting linear feature is easily discernible on aerial photography and LANDSAT images. The rapid lithologic and thickness changes of the sandstone bodies in these linear features provide excellent potential as stratigraphic trap for hydrocarbons. Paleoshoreline facies are likely to be preserved in areas of thickest marginal marine regressive sand accumulation and similar paleoshoreline systems may be preserved at depth in the Point Lookout (Sandstone) or other Cretaceous sandstones.

  7. A multistorey sandstone complex in the Himalayan Foreland Basin, NW Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohtash; Sangode, Satish J.; Ghosh, Sumit K.

    2004-07-01

    Ten parallel stratigraphic sections (1500-1800 m thick) spread over an area of >400 km 2 in Dehra Dun sub-basin (DSB) of the Himalayan Foreland Belt (HFB) were studied to understand the anatomy of one of the largest (900-1200 m thick) fluviatile Multistorey Sandstone Complexes (MSC) of the world using fluvial geometry, compositional data and magnetic fabrics over a magnetostratigraphically controlled master section. The multistorey sandstone complex, between 10-5 Ma representing the Middle Siwalik sub-Group, comprises of grey, medium- to fine-grained lithic arenites to lithic greywacke and records tectonic and/or climatic episodes. Three main facies associations are recognised: sandstone-mudstone, sandstone, and conglomerate-sandstone that represent fluvial fan deposit. Palaeocurrent data show radial palaeoflow pattern with major palaeodrainage towards the southern quadrant. The magnetic fabric studies suggest three major tectonic pulses. The first pulse at ˜8.7 Ma resulted in the development of major depocenter for the MSC, the second pulse at ˜7.65 Ma enhanced the sedimentation and progradation, while the third pulse at ˜6.5 Ma records overlapping earlier fluvial fan by another coarse grained piedmont alluvial fan. Thrust movement in the northern fold belt, basement lineaments and rate of basin subsidence controlled the lateral and vertical facies distribution and palaeodrainage. The sedimentation pattern of the multistorey complex is characterised by mainly sheet flood deposits of laterally avulsing unconfined braided rivers and resembles to the modern megafan sedimentation in the Ganga Basin to the south.

  8. Areal distribution of sedimentary facies determined from seismic facies analysis and models of modern depositional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seramur, K.C.; Powell, R.D.; Carpenter, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Seismic facies analysis was applied to 3.5-kHz single-channel analog reflection profiles of the sediment fill within Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay, southeast Alaska. Nine sedimentary facies have been interpreted from seven seismic facies identified on the profiles. The interpretations are based on reflection characteristics and structural features of the seismic facies. The following reflection characteristics and structural features are used: reflector spacing, amplitude and continuity of reflections, internal reflection configurations, attitude of reflection terminations at a facies boundary, body geometry of a facies, and the architectural associations of seismic facies within each basin. The depositional systems are reconstructed by determining the paleotopography, bedding patterns, sedimentary facies, and modes of deposition within the basin. Muir Inlet is a recently deglaciated fjord for which successive glacier terminus positions and consequent rates of glacial retreat are known. In this environment the depositional processes and sediment characteristics vary with distance from a glacier terminus, such that during a retreat a record of these variations is preserved in the aggrading sediment fill. Sedimentary facies within the basins of lower Muir Inlet are correlated with observed depositional processes near the present glacier terminus in the upper inlet.

  9. Facies transition and depositional architecture of the Late Eocene tide-dominated delta in northern coast of Birket Qarun, Fayum, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Zaki A.

    2016-07-01

    Late Eocene successions in the Fayum Depression display notable facies transition from open-marine to brackish-marine realms. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic characteristics of the depositional facies are integrated with ichnological data for the recognition of four facies associations (FA1 to FA4). The transition from open-marine sandstones (FA1) to the brackish-marine deposits (FA2) heralds a transgressive - regressive dislocation. The shallowing- and coarsening-upward progradation from the basal prodelta mudstone-dominated facies (FA2a) to deltafront heterolithics (FA2b) and sandstone facies (FA2c) are overlain by finning-upward delta plain deposits which are expressed by the delta plain mudstone (FA2d) and erosive-based distributary channel fills (FA4). Prodelta/deltfront deposits of FA2 are arranged in thinning- and coarsening-upward parasequences which are stacked in a shallowing-upward progressive cycle. Shallow-marine fossiliferous sandstones (FA3) mark the basal part of each parasequence. Stratigraphic and depositional architectures reflect a tide-dominated delta rather than an estuarine and incised valley (IV) model. This can be evinced by the progressive facies architecture, absence of basal regional incision or a subaerial unconformity and the stratigraphic position above a maximum flooding surface (MFS), in addition to the presence of multiple tidally-influenced distributary channels. Stratigraphic and depositional characteristics of the suggested model resemble those of modern tide-dominated deltaic systems. Accordingly, this model contributes to our understanding of the depositional models for analogous brackish-marine environments, particularly tide-dominated deltas in the rock record.

  10. Facies control on seismites in an alluvial-aeolian system: The Pliocene dunefield of the Teruel half-graben basin (eastern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesa, Carlos L.; Rodríguez-López, Juan Pedro; Ezquerro, Lope; Alfaro, Pedro; Rodríguez-Pascua, Miguel Ángel; Lafuente, Paloma; Arlegui, Luis; Simón, José L.

    2016-10-01

    The recognition of seismically induced soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDS) in sedimentary successions characterized by different facies, and hence by different rheology, is challenging. This is the case for high porosity and high permeability aeolian facies interbedded with muddy wet interdune deposits and alluvial conglomerates and sandstones. Several types of SSDS have been studied in two exposures of the Upper Pliocene (2.9-2.6 Ma) sediments of a fault-bounded intracontinental aeolian dune field in the Teruel Basin (Iberian Chain, eastern Spain). Among SSDS, load and fluid-escape structures, apart from several animal tracks, have been recognized. Those structures show an irregular distribution through the studied stratigraphic sections, being scarce in homogenous aeolian sands and frequent in water-related facies. A detailed study of the distribution and geometry of SSDS and their relationships with respect to the stratigraphic architecture and facies has allowed a critical discrimination of trigger mechanisms, i.e. biological or physical overloading vs. earthquakes. The seismically induced structures are concentrated into seven deformed beds, showing an uneven lateral distribution and geometry closely controlled by the hosting sedimentary facies and their rheology. These seismites resulted from liquefaction during moderate earthquakes (estimated magnitude from 5.0 to 6.8). The most probable seismogenic source was the Sierra del Pobo normal fault zone, located 2 km to the East. Results show how an appropriate recognition of sedimentary facies is crucial to understand the lateral variability of seismites in sedimentary environments characterized by sharp facies changes.

  11. Sequence stratigraphy and depositional facies of the Silurian-Devonian interval of the northern Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Canter, K.L.; Geesaman, R.C. ); Wheeler, D. )

    1992-04-01

    The Silurian and Devonian intervals of the northern Central Basin platform area of west Texas and southeastern New Mexico include the Fusselman, Wristen, and Thirtyone formations and the Woodford Shale. The carbonate-rich Fusselman, Wristen, and Thirtyone formations record a transition from ramp to platform deposition. Oolite grainstones of the lower Fusselman Formation were deposited in a ramp setting during an Upper Ordovician/Lower Silurian transgression. The overlying crinoid packstones and grainstones represent shoals that developed along a break in slope separating the evolving platform from a southward-dipping starved basin. By the close of Fusselman deposition, the platform was well developed, with shallow peridtidal mudstones and wackestones, and high-energy grainstones deposited as near-parallel facies tracts over the platform area. The platform system became fully developed during the deposition of the Wristen Formation. Porous dolomitic peridtidal and platform margin facies grade downdip into nonporous, limy and argillaceous open-shelf facies. Platform facies are typified by numerous shallowing-upward parasequences that terminated at subaerial exposure surfaces. The rocks of the Lower Devonian Thirtyone Formation were deposited as a wedge that onlaps the exposed Silurian platform margin. This formation contains a porous, chert-rich, lowstand deposit; a transgressive disconformity; and variably porous, grain-rich highstand deposits representing an overall sea level rise. A major unconformity marks the contact between the karsted upper surface of the Thirtyone Formation and the overlying organic-rich, anoxic Woodford Shale.

  12. Kamafugitic diatremes: facies characterisation and genesis—examples from the Goiás Alkaline Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira-Brod, Tereza Cristina; Brod, José Affonso; Gaspar, José Carlos; Jost, Hardy

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes the internal organisation of two diatremes (Águas Emendadas and Neuzinha) and one small breccia-filled conduit (Tigre) in the central portion of the Late Cretaceous Goiás Alkaline Province (GAP), central Brazil, and explores the criteria for facies recognition. The GAP kamafugitic diatremes are emplaced into Carboniferous sandstones of the Aquidauana Formation, at the northern margin of the Paraná Basin. They are usually elliptical structures, not longer than 900 m, filled with breccia and partially covered by thin kamafugitic to basanitic lava flows. The breccias are dominated by juvenile pyroclasts, with subordinate amounts of cognate fragments and xenoliths. In addition to variations in ash and lapilli proportions, juvenile fragment types may be used to discriminate genetic processes and the corresponding pyroclastic deposits. An extensive field, textural and compositional dataset was analysed by multivariate statistical techniques. Combined with field observations, this allowed us to define a set of facies for kamafugitic diatremes, and, more importantly, to understand the internal structure of the studied bodies and to cross-correlate them. Seven distinct facies were recognised. The Fluidised Conduit Facies (FCF) represents high-energy, strongly fluidised but only moderately fragmented systems. It occurs in a confined environment, and is typical of deeper parts of the conduit, before the actual diatreme level is reached by the ascending fluidised magma. Large amounts of spinning droplets are formed within this region. The Fluidised Conduit-Diatreme Facies (FCDF) is characteristic of intermediate depths in the conduit, where highly fluidised and highly fragmented systems produce large amounts of ash. Spinning droplets decrease in abundance, ordinary juvenile fragments become very common, and xenoliths from the country rock in the immediate vicinity of the diatreme are present. The Fluidised Fragmented Facies (FFF) and the Magmatic

  13. Reservoir heterogeneity in the middle Frio Formation: Case studies in Stratton and Agua Dulce fields, Nueces County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, D.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Selected middle Frio (Oligocene) reservoirs of Stratton field and the contiguous Agua Dulce field are being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/Department of Energy/State of Texas cosponsored program designed to improve reserve growth in mature gas fields. Over the past four decades, Stratton has produced 2.0 tcf of gas from 113 middle Frio reservoirs, and Agua Dulce has produced 1.6 tcf from 116 reservoirs. Recent drilling and workover activities, however, suggest the presence of additional untapped or bypassed middle Frio reservoirs. Four reservoirs, the E18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, E31/6,100-ft, and E41/Bertram, were evaluated over a 13,000-acre tract that includes areas adjacent to both fields. The middle Frio is composed of sand-rich channel-fill and splay deposits interstratified with floodplain mudstones, all forming part of the Gueydan fluvial system. Channel-fill deposits are 30 ({plus minus}15) ft thick and 2,500 ({plus minus}500) ft wide. Splay deposits are up to 30 ft thick proximal to channels and extend as much as 2 mi from channels. Channel-fill and associated splay sandstones are reservoir facies (porosity 20%; permeability = 10s to 100s md); floodplain mudstones and levee sandy mudstones are barriers to flow facies separating individual reservoirs vertically and laterally. The E41/Bertram reservoir is an example of a laterally stacked channel system deposited during relatively slow aggradation. This reservoir includes sand-on-sand contacts and is composed of mostly leaky compartments. The E 18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, and E31/6,100ft reservoirs are examples of vertically stacked channel systems reflecting higher rates of aggradation. Vertically stacked architectures are more favorable for isolated compartments and therefore are better candidates for infield reserve growth.

  14. Mid-Eocene alluvial-lacustrine succession at Gebel El-Goza El-Hamra (Shabrawet area, NE Eastern Desert, Egypt): Facies analysis, sequence stratigraphy and paleoclimatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanas, H. A.; Sallam, E.; Zobaa, M. K.; Li, X.

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to provide the depositional facies, sequence stratigraphic and paleoclimatic characteristics of the Mid-Eocene (Bartonian) continental succession exposed at Gebel El-Goza El-Hamra (Shabrawet Area, NE Eastern Desert, Egypt). The studied succession consists of siliciclastic rocks followed upward by carbonate rocks. Detailed field observation and petrographic investigation indicate accumulation in floodplain-dominated alluvial and shallow lacustrine systems. The floodplain-dominated alluvial facies (45 m thick) is composed mainly of carbonate nodules-bearing, mottled mudrock with subordinate sandstone and conglomerate beds. The conglomerate and pebbly sandstone bodies interpreted as ephemeral braided channel deposits. The massive, laminated, planner cross-bedded, fine- to medium-grained sandstone bodies interlayered within mudstone reflect sheet flood deposits. The mudrocks associated with paleosols represent distal floodplain deposits. The shallow lacustrine facies (15 m thick) is made up of an alternation of marlstone, micritic limestone, dolostone and mudrock beds with charophytes and small gastropods. Both the alluvial and lacustrine facies show evidence of macro-and micro-pedogenic features. Pollen assemblages, stable δ18O and δ13C isotopes, and paleopedogenic features reflect prevalence of arid to semi-arid climatic conditions during the Bartonian. The sequence stratigraphic framework shows an overall fining-upward depositional sequence, consisting of Low- and High-accommodation Systems Tracts (LAST, HAST), and is bounded by two sequence boundaries (SB-1, SB-2). Conglomerate and pebbly sandstone deposits (braided channel and sheet flood deposits) of the lower part of the alluvial facies reflect a LAST. Mudrock and silty claystone facies (distal floodplain deposits) of the upper part of alluvial facies and its overlying lacustrine facies correspond to a HAST. The LAST, HAST and SB were formed during different accommodation-to-sediment supply (A

  15. Assessing Biogenecity of Stromatolites: Return to the Facies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, R. S.; Jameson, S.; Rutter, A.; McCarthy, K.; Planavsky, N. J.; Severson, M.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of richly microfossiliferous cherty stromatolites near Schreiber and Kakabeka Falls, Ontario, in the 1.9 Ga Gunflint Iron Formation, firmly established the field of pre-Cambrian paleontology. In the half-century since this discovery, paradigm shifts in the ecology of the microfossils as well as the utility of stromatolites as biological markers has caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the pre-Cambrian fossil record. This research summarizes facies evaluation of the two stromatolite marker beds in the Gunflint-correlative Biwabik Iron Formation of Minnesota. The centimeter-scale microstratigraphy of cores drilled through the central and eastern Mesabi Iron Range was coupled with field descriptions of outcrops and mines in both the Biwabik and Gunflint iron formations. Eight lithologic facies associated with the stromatolites are identified: A) Pebble conglomerate clasts ranging in size of 0.5-3 cm, syneresis cracks, and septarian nodules with medium to coarse grain matrix; B) siltstone with subparallel sub-mm to 5 cm magnetitic and non-magnetic bands; C) stromatolitic boundstone comprising stratiform, pseudocolumnar, domal, undulatory, flat-laminated, dendritic, columnar, and mico-digitate forms and oncoids 0.5 to 2 cm diameter; D) grainstone with medium to coarse siliceous and carbonate ooids and peloids; E) massive green crystalline beds with bands of magnetite, quartz, calcite, disseminated pyrite and localized ankerite; F) autobreccicated fabric of 0.3 to 10 mm clasts; G) medium to coarse sandstone; H) quartzite. Correlation between 11 cores near Hoyt Lakes and 9 cores through the basal stromatolite layer at the MinnTac Mine near Virginia revealed that stromatolites formed both on conglomerate and medium quartz sandstone. Multiple forms of stromatolite may occur in a vertical succession (flat-laminated to undulatory to psuedocolumnar to columnar) or a core may be dominated by one type, typically columnar-stratiform. Where stromatolites do

  16. Depositional sequences and facies in the Torok Formation, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    rates of subsidence accommodated the deposition of a "foredeep clinoform wedge" that contains a high proportion of sand-rich LST deposits. In northern NPRA, lower rates of subsidence favored the accumulation of mud-rich HST deposits. The most favorable stratigraphic trapping geometries in the Torok Formation occur where amalgamated sandstones deposited in turbidite channels incised on the mid- to lower-slope and on the proximal parts of submarine fans during regression (LSTs) are capped by relatively condensed mudstone facies deposited during transgression (TSTs). Common successions observed in Torok cores include a spectrum of slope and turbidite facies. Upper slope facies comprise laminated mudstones and siltstones that locally display evidence of slumping, sliding, and chaotic failure. Lower slope facies comprise heterolithic turbidites at some locations and interlaminated mudstones and thin, very fine-grained sandstones at others. Torok turbidites include amalgamated sandstones deposited in channel systems as well as thin-bedded, widespread sandstones deposited by unconfined flows on lobes or in channel overbank settings. These turbidite facies likely occur in both channel-lobe systems and slope apron systems within the Torok.

  17. Facies distribution, depositional environment, and petrophysical features of the Sharawra Formation, Old Qusaiba Village, Central Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Muhammad Asif; Kaminski, Michael; Umran Dogan, A.

    2016-04-01

    moderate-scale transgressive episodes, while the thin shale interbeds in the middle and upper part of the Sharawra Formation represent small-scale transgressions. Overall, the Sharawra Formation contains a series of repetitive transgressive and regressive events and has been interpreted as a pro-deltaic deposit in previous studies. In the present study, the lowermost sandstone thickly bedded facies lie within the transition zone environment. The siltstone facies and the horizontally stratified facies show a middle shore face environment. The middle shore face environment is present locally. The bioturbation in the uppermost facies is indicative of the upper shore face environment. The porosity values do not vary much, as the average porosity for the sandstone facies is about 15%, for the siltstones it ranges about 7%. The permeability is variable throughout the formation, the values range from 50 to 300 md. Although sandstone has a good porosity and permeability, the siltstone facies exhibit poor petrophysical characteristics. In terms of reservoir characterization, the mineralogical mature, moderately well sorted top most sandstone facies, with appreciable porosity and permeability can be considered as a potential reservoir rock. This study has provided a base for future quantitative studies in this important formation in the area.

  18. Sedimentary facies and environmental ichnology of a ?Permian playa-lake complex in western Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, G.; Buatois, L.A.; Mangano, M.G.; Acenolaza, F.G.

    1998-01-01

    A moderately diverse arthropod icnofauna occurs in ?Permian ephemeral lacustrine deposits of the Paganzo Basin that crop out at Bordo Atravesado, Cuesta de Miranda, western Argentina. Sedimentary successions are interpreted as having accumulated in a playa-lake complex. Deposits include three sedimentary facies: (A) laminated siltstone and mudstone: (B) current-rippled cross-laminated very fine grained sandstone: and (C) climbing and wave-rippled cross-laminated fine-grained sandstone deposited by sheet floods under wave influence in the playa-lake complex. Analysis of facies sequences suggests that repeated vertical facies associations result from transgressive regressive episodes of variable time spans. The Bordo Atravesado ichnofauna includes Cruziana problematica, Diplocraterion isp., cf. Diplopadichnus biformis, Kouphichnium? isp., Merostomichnites aicunai, Mirandaichnium famatinense, Monomorphichnus lineatus, Palaeophyeus tubularis, Umfolozia sinuosa and Umfolozia ef. U. longula. The assemblage is largely dominated by arthropod trackways and represents an example of the Scoyenia ichnofacies. Trace fossils are mostly preserved as hypichnial ridges on the soles of facies C beds, being comparatively rare in facies A and B. Ichnofossil preservation was linked to rapid influx of sand via sheet floods entering into the lake. Four taphonomic variants (types 1-4) are recognized, each determined by substrate consistency and time averaging. Type 1 is recorded by the presence of low density assemblages consisting of poorly defined trackways, which suggests that arthropods crawled in soft, probably slightly subaqueous substrates. Type 2 is represented by low to moderate density suites that include sharply defined trackways commonly associated with mud cracks, suggesting that the tracemakers inhabited a firm, desiccated lacustrine substrate. Type 3 displays features of types 1 and 2 and represents palimpsestic bedding surfaces, resulting from the overprint of terrestrial

  19. Enigmatic eight-meter trace fossils in the Lower Pennsylvanian Lee sandstone, central Appalachian basin, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wnuk, C.; Maberry, J.O.

    1990-01-01

    Enigmatic tubular trace fossils up to eight meters long occur in the Lower Pennsylvanian Middlesboro Member of the Lee Formation. Two morphotypes occur: type 1 trace fossils are plain, smooth, vertical, nonbranching, parallel-walled, tubular structures, type 2 trace fossils branch, have walls with faint vertical striations, regularly or irregularly spaced nodes, and funnel-shaped terminations. Sandstone casts filling type 2 structures have helical spiral morphology, and, in rare individuals, faint meniscate fills have been observed. Both trace-fossil morphotypes have poorly cemented wall linings containing framboidal pyrite, amorphous carbon, quartz sand, and poorly preserved fecal material. The trace fossils occur in a massive, structureless, channel-form sandstone, originating at the contact between a channel lag and the overlying massive fill representing a barrier island transgressing an estuarine facies. Origin of these structures is uncertain. -from Authors

  20. Pore-throat sizes in sandstones, tight sandstones, and shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2009-01-01

    Pore-throat sizes in silidclastic rocks form a continuum from the submillimeter to the nanometer scale. That continuum is documented in this article using previously published data on the pore and pore-throat sizes of conventional reservoir rocks, tight-gas sandstones, and shales. For measures of central tendency (mean, mode, median), pore-throat sizes (diameters) are generally greater than 2 μm in conventional reservoir rocks, range from about 2 to 0.03 μm in tight-gas sandstones, and range from 0.1 to 0.005 μm in shales. Hydrocarbon molecules, asphaltenes, ring structures, paraffins, and methane, form another continuum, ranging from 100 Å (0.01 μm for asphaltenes to 3.8 A (0.00038 μm) for methane. The pore-throat size continuum provides a useful perspective for considering (1) the emplacement of petroleum in consolidated siliciclastics and (2) fluid flow through fine-grained source rocks now being exploited as reservoirs.

  1. Tide-influenced sedimentary environments and facies

    SciTech Connect

    De Boer, P.L.; Van Gelder, A.; Nio, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains examples of recent as well as fossil tide-influenced sedimentary facies. Studies of recent tidal processes and sediments provide an insight into the way in which tidal facies and sequences develop, and into the processes which are active. The studies performed on fossil rocks give information on one-to-one scale model experiments that have been executed by nature both relatively recently and in the distant past. In this work, the parallel presentation of papers on recent and fossil examples of tide-influenced sedimentary facies and environments follows the philosophy of comparative sedimentology, aiming at an understanding of both the past and the present, with the aim also, of forecasting future developments.

  2. A subsurface study of the Denkman sandstone member, Norphlet Formation, hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Anderson, E.G.; Baria, L.R. ); Higginbotham, R.S.

    1990-09-01

    Hatters Pond field is in east-central Mobile County in southwestern Alabama and it produces from both the Norphlet and Smackover formations. The structural trap involves salt movement along the west side of the Mobile Fault System that resulted in a faulted salt anticline. The Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama consists of red to gray siltstone and pinkish to gray sandstone with conglomerate layers. Three facies have been distinguished within the Norphlet Formation: a lower shale, a red siltstone sequence, and an upper quartzose unit. The thickness of the formation ranges from a feather edge to more than 800 ft (234.8 m) in southwestern Alabama. The Upper Jurassic Denkman Sandstone Member of the Norphlet Formation at Hatters Pond field is a medium- to fine-grained, well-sorted arkosic sandstone between the underlying Norphlet redbed lithofacies and the carbonates of the overlying Smackover Formation. Here, the Denkman Member can be subdivided into a massive upper unit and a low- to high-angle cross-stratified lower unit. The sandstones are quartz-rich with a high percentage of feldspars. The majority of the feldspar grains observed are potassium feldspar. Microcline is usually less altered when compared with other types of feldspar grains. The major types of feldspar replacement include illitization, hematitization, dolomitization, chloritization, calcitization, vacuolization, and anhydritization. Carbonate replacement of feldspars is very abundant, mostly by ferroan dolomite. Rock fragments are not abundant in the Denkman Member, although there is good evidence of a metamorphic/volcanic source area. The sandstones are cemented by dolomite, calcite, anhydrite, and quartz and feldspar overgrowths. The lower Denkman unit is slightly more porous than the upper Denkman unit. The pore-lining authigenic clay, illite, greatly reduces permeability and porosity in these sandstones.

  3. Sequence stratigraphy and onlap relationships of a stratigraphic trap, Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstone, Hilight field, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D.M.; Gustason, E.R. )

    1989-09-01

    In Hilight field more than 74 million bbl of oil and 244 bcf of gas have been produced from thin fluvial and shallow marine sandstones of the Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstone. In this area the Muddy was deposited during a late Albian sea level rise and onlaps a lowstand subaerial surface of erosion including a dendritic valley system incised into the underlying Skull Creek Shale. Transgressive valley-fill deposits of the Muddy Sandstone in the Hilight field area consist of four regionally correlative, time-bounded, back-stepping, progradational units. The retrogradational nature of these units indicates they belong in a transgressive systems tract rather than a lowstand wedge, as is often implied for valley-fill sequences. Each unit is capped by a regionally extensive marine flooding surface. The contact between units is placed at the surface representing maximum flooding or at the correlative horizon landward of the maximum transgression. Two of these contacts include thin bentonite beds which substantiate the time-stratigraphic interpretation. Petroleum is trapped in each unit by the onlap of reservoir sandstone facies against the lowstand surface of erosion on the impermeable Skull Creek Shale. Top seals are formed by mudstones at the base of overlying units or by the Shell Creek Shale, which overlies the Muddy Sandstone above a regionally extensive marine flooding surface. Reservoir heterogeneity is explained by lateral facies changes within each unit. The lateral and vertical distribution of reservoir-quality sandstone in the Muddy sequence in this area can be used as a model to predict occurrences in similar sequences elsewhere.

  4. The Paleozoic sandstones in Wadi Feiran - El Tor area, Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A.

    The Paleozoic sandstone succession between Wadi Feiran and El-Tor in southwestern Sinai has been subdivided into five distinct lithostratigraphic units: the Lower Cambrian Araba Formation; the Upper Cambrian Naqus Formation; the Lower Carboniferous Abu Durba Formation; the Upper Carboniferous Aheimer Formation and the Permian Qiseib Formation. The present study has also proved that the Paleozoic Earth movements have undergone distinct changes in the sedimentary facies, together with lateral variations in the composition and thickness of strata. The distribution of the sediments and their faunal contents point to the existence of five major phases of sedimentation during the Paleozoic Era.

  5. The Manciano Sandstone: a shoreface deposit of Miocene basins of the Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, I. P.; Cascella, A.; Rau, A.

    1995-09-01

    Well exposed, diamond-line cut, quarry-exposures of the Manciano Sandstone allow a detailed analysis of sandy, fossiliferous, nearshore deposits of the shelf of the Northern Apennines. The Manciano Sandstone is characterized by medium to very coarse, washed, fairly well sorted, lithic sandstone, with thin interlayers of sandy conglomerates. It displays two principal, rhythmically alternating sandy facies: (a) slightly burrowed (mostly Macaronichnus, Ophiomorpha, Skolithos) units, trough cross-bedded, locally showing possible tidal bundles with few whole Scutella (echinoid) shells reworked on foresets, or occasional large-scale (approximately 2 m) planar cross-bedded, bar-accretion units; and (b) slightly finer, darker-coloured reddish-brown sandstone units, heavily bioturbated ( Cruziana-Skolithos) ichnofauna) representing slightly more sheltered settings. Large oysters are present in near-living position in a few thin layers and, more commonly, as reworked, comminuted fragments in sandy layers. Many calcareous pebbles and oyster fragments are bored. Other fossils consist of echinoids ( Scutella), some balanids and reworked foraminifera and bryozoa. The Manciano sands were deposited primarily in a wave-dominated shoreface, containing migrating bars/ridges and affected by wave-induced, possibly tidal-enhanced currents. This tidal influence confirms the opening of the Miocene Apenninic Sea to oceans, both the developing Atlantic Ocean to the west and, through a long, narrow seaway, the Asian portion of the Tethys Sea to the east.

  6. Sedimentary facies analysis and depositional model of the Palaeogene West Crocker submarine fan system, NW Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Abdullah Adli; Johnson, Howard D.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Tongkul, Felix

    2013-10-01

    This study outlines a sedimentological analysis of the Palaeogene West Crocker Formation (WCF) around the Kota Kinabalu area of SW Sabah, which represents a large submarine fan depositional system within part of what was the complex and tectonically active margin of NW Borneo. The newly acquired and often extensive outcrop data summarised in this study has resulted in a more complete synthesis of the Crocker fan depositional system than has been previously possible. Seven facies (F1-F7) have been identified which constitute three main facies groups: (1) sand-dominated facies (F1-F3), comprise high- to low-density turbidites and form the dominant part of the WCF, (2) debris flow-dominated facies (F4-F6) comprises mud- and sand-dominant debris flows and mass transport deposits (MTD), which form a secondary but highly distinctive part of the WCF, and (3) mudstone-dominated facies (F7), represent a subordinate part of the WCF. Analysis of the vertical facies successions (from proximal to distal), has resulted in recognition of five major genetic units: (1) channel-levee complex; characterised by thick (30-60 m) thinning and fining upward facies succession, which are dominated in their lower part by thick-bedded (1-6 m), amalgamated high-density (Lowe-type) turbidites with rare debrite beds; the upper part is dominated low-density (Bouma-type) turbidites, without associated debrite beds. (2) Channelised lobes; characterised by 2-10 m thick, coarsening upward, which are overlain by 5-20 m thick fining upward facies successions; these successions are dominated by high-density turbidites (c. 0.5-1 m thick) and linked co-genetic turbidite-debrite beds (0.1-0.5 m thick), with subordinate mudstone facies. (3) Non-channelised lobes; comprise 5-20 m thick coarsening upward facies successions; these start with mudstone facies, which pass gradually upwards into linked co-genetic turbidite-debrite beds; sandstone bed thickness increases upwards, while the debrite caps tend to

  7. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  8. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Texas Heart Institute, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, and The University of Houston. Held most ... for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School ...

  9. A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Gail Mowry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

  10. Mississippian facies relationships, eastern Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, H.W. ); Forgotson, J.M. )

    1991-08-01

    Mississippian strata in the eastern Anadarko basin record a gradual deepening of the basin. Late and post-Mississippian tectonism (Wichita and Arbuckle orogenies) fragmented the single large basin into the series of paired basins and uplifts recognized in the southern half of Oklahoma today. Lower Mississippian isopach and facies trends (Sycamore and Caney Formations) indicate that basinal strike in the study area (southeastern Anadarko basin) was predominantly east-west. Depositional environment interpretations made for Lower Mississippian strata suggest that the basin was partially sediment starved and exhibited a low shelf-to-basin gradient. Upper Mississippian isopach and facies trends suggest that basinal strike within the study area shifted from dominantly east-west to dominantly northwest-southeast due to Late Mississippian and Early Pennsylvanian uplift along the Nemaha ridge. Within the study area, the Chester Formation, composed of gray to dove-gray shales with interbedded limestones deposited on a carbonate shelf, thins depositionally into the basin and is thinnest at its facies boundary with the Springer Group and the upper portion of the Caney Formation. As basin subsidence rates accelerated, the southern edge of the Chester carbonate shelf was progressively drowned, causing a backstepping of the Chester Formation calcareous shale and carbonate facies. Springer Group sands and black shales transgressed northward over the drowned Chester Formation shelf.

  11. Control of facies, burial history, and oil migration on diagenesis and reservoir quality: Maracaribo basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.K.; Di Croce, J.; Isea, A.; Gonzalez, C. )

    1990-05-01

    This regional study of the Eocene Misoa Formation is the first attempt to decipher the role of depositional facies, burial history, and timing of oil migration on diagenetic make-up and reservoir quality in the Maracaibo basin. Subsurface data including cores from 11 wells along a northwest-southeast transect in the Urdaneta, Lagunillas, and Barua-Motatan fields reveal that the depositional facies of the three sandstones range from mainly fluvial (Urdaneta) to deltaic-coastal marine in Lagunillas, and typically sublittoral in the Barua-Motatan area. Both authigenic mineralogy and vitrinite reflectance data suggest progressively greater subsidence from the northwest to southeast. Thus, diagenetic grade is immature on the northwest in Urdaneta and mature to supermature in Barua-Moutan where greater mineralogical diversity and porosity/permeability reduction were noted. Similarly, compaction effects are minimum in Urdaneta, and maximum in Barua-Motatan where porosity is highly reduced, and is totally secondary in nature. Other factors, such as grain size, presence of early pore-lining chlorite (in marine facies), infiltrated grain-coating clays (in fluvial facies), and proximity of reservoirs to the post-Eocene unconformity surface also helped preserve or enhance porosity. Timing of oil migration also contributed to variable regional distribution of porosity and permeability. An early migration in the Urdaneta area helped retain much of the original porosity. In contrast, relatively late migration during upper Miocene, especially in the Barua-Motatan area on the southeast, permitted unimpeded silicification and pressure solution, and consequent destruction of all primary porosity.

  12. Tuffaceous sandstones at Site C0011B, Nankai Trough: Sources and emplacement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutterolf, S.; Scudder, R. P.; Freundt, A.; Labanieh, S.; Naruse, H.; Pickering, K. T.; Underwood, M.; Wu, H.; Saito, S.; Kubo, Y.; Iodp Expedition 322 Scientists

    2010-12-01

    During IODP Expedition 322 at the Nankai Trough, sediments down to the lower Miocene have been drilled, which allows us to constrain the physical, compositional and structural characteristics of the subduction input into the seismogenic zone. One major new discovery was an interval of tuffaceous and volcaniclastic sandstones, which we defined as the middle Shikoku Basin facies. Core, LWD logging and seismic data indicate a channel-fill geometry of the sand body, and transport and deposition probably occurred in the distal part of a submarine fan. This lithologic Unit II is late Miocene (>7.07 to ~9.0 Ma) in age and can be divided into two subunits by the abundance of volcanic glass shards, mineral and/or lithic contents, and bulk-rock XRF data. Subunit IIA consists of moderately lithified bioturbated silty claystone with interbeds of tuffaceous sandstone containing 25 to 75 vol% volcanic glass. Major and trace element glass compositions show that the tuffaceous sandstones all came from a similar source region, probably located along the northeast margin of the Shikoku Basin. Relatively low K concentrations indicate source areas at the Izu-Bonin rear arc (Low K facies of Straub 2003). Chemical variations within the single sandstone packages can be attributed to 1) alteration effects (depletion of Mg, Si, Ca, Fe, Ti, and total oxides and increase of Al and K), and 2) a continuous chemical variation in the glass shard compositions of single depositional units, which reflects the tapping of a source of compositionally zoned tephras. The fact that glass shards in each sandstone either have homogeneous composition or define a well-constrained compositional variation trend argues for spatially restricted source areas as opposed to gravity currents resulting, for example, from collapse of large slope sections. The assemblage of lithic components (unimodal volcanic lithic fragments), the vesicularity (amount and vesicle texture) of pumices, and the deposit structure

  13. Measuring and predicting reservoir heterogeneity in complex deposystems: The fluvial-deltaic Big Injun sandstone in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, D.G.; Hohn, M.E.; Aminian, K.; Donaldson, A.; Shumaker, R.; Wilson, T.

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop techniques to measure and predict heterogeneities in oil reservoirs that are the products of complex deposystems. The unit chosen for study is the Lower Mississippian Big Injun sandstone, a prolific oil producer (nearly 60 fields) in West Virginia. This research effort has been designed and is being implemented as an integrated effort involving stratigraphy, structural geology, petrology, seismic study, petroleum engineering, modeling and geostatistics. Sandstone bodies are being mapped within their regional depositional systems, and then sandstone bodies are being classified in a scheme of relative heterogeneity to determine heterogeneity across depositional systems. Facies changes are being mapped within given reservoirs, and the environments of deposition responsible for each facies are being interpreted to predict the inherent relative heterogeneity of each facies. Structural variations will be correlated both with production, where the availability of production data will permit, and with variations in geologic and engineering parameters that affect production. A reliable seismic model of the Big Injun reservoirs in Granny Creek field is being developed to help interpret physical heterogeneity in that field. Pore types are being described and related to permeability, fluid flow and diagenesis, and petrographic data are being integrated with facies and depositional environments to develop a technique to use diagenesis as a predictive tool in future reservoir development. Another objective in the Big Injun study is to determine the effect of heterogeneity on fluid flow and efficient hydrocarbon recovery in order to improve reservoir management. Graphical methods will be applied to Big Injun production data and new geostatistical methods will be developed to detect regional trends in heterogeneity.

  14. Diagenetic Patterns of the Cretaceous Baseline Sandstone, Southern Nevada: Implications for Controls on Iron-Oxide Cementation and Coloration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, C. J.; Chan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cretaceous Baseline Sandstone of the Sevier foreland basin deposits in southern Nevada exhibits intense diagenetic iron-oxide coloration and bleaching, and contains abundant cemented masses. The Baseline Formation is ~1 km thick with three alluvial to fluvial members: the basal White (Kbw) Member, overlain by coeval Red (Kbr) and Overton Conglomerate (Kbo) Members. Iron-oxide diagenetic features occur in two broad classes: 1) bedding parallel coloration facies of diffuse to banded red, pink, purple, white, to yellow colors; and 2) concretionary facies of heavily cemented horizons, pods/lenses, spherical to spheroidal concretions, boxworks, pipes, and irregular concretion forms. A distinctive geometry is the occurrence of large (~1 m diameter) spherical "beach ball" concretions within the Kbr. Preliminary mapping of diagenetic features shows that concretionary facies are more common within a ~125 m interval near the bottom of Kbw, and within the lower ~125 m of Kbr. Intense coloration changes are present throughout Kbw but occur only in the lowermost ~150 m of Kbr. In the Kbw, concretionary forms commonly occur in stratigraphic intervals of fine-grained sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone lithologies, whereas cemented masses are much less common in stratigraphic intervals composed of medium-grained sandstone and conglomerate lithologies. Additionally, both Kbw and Kbr Members exhibit rare examples of wood fragments in the center of iron-oxide concretions, suggesting the importance of organics as nucleation sites for precipitation. The distribution of complex and overprinted diagenetic patterns indicates nested scales of processes involving iron-oxide dissolution, mobilization, and precipitation. Overall stratigraphic architecture influenced formation-scale patterns, but specific lithologies and textures influenced the type and distribution of diagenetic facies at outcrop scales, and organic content encouraged cementation at grain-scales.

  15. Evaluation of stratigraphic relations of sandstone-producing reservoirs in upper Council Grove and Chase groups (Permian) in north-central Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplin, J.R. )

    1989-08-01

    Poor well control and the absence of surface stratigraphic control made previous interpretations of the stratigraphic relations of sandstone-producing reservoirs tenuous. Recent extensive analyses of surface outcrops and well and core data support the contention that the major sandstone-producing reservoirs can be physically correlated with formations in the outcrop section. Sandstone bodies within the upper Council Grove Group include Neva sand and Blackwell sand (Neva Limestone), Hotson-Kisner sand (Eskridge Shale), and the Whitney-Hodges sand. The Whitney-Hodges sand correlates, in part, with the Speiser Shale (Garrison Formation) of the outcrop section. However, previous usage suggested tentative correlations with sandstone bodies stratigraphically lower in the section. These sands were probably deposited in channels that were, in part, fluvial, tidal, or estuarine. Production from the Chase Group occurs locally within channelform sandstone bodies referred to as the Hoy-Matfield sand. These sands appear to be equivalent, occupying essentially the position of the Kinney Limestone Member (Matfield Shale) of the outcrop section. Detailed core-hole data at and in the vicinity of Kaw Dam, southeastern Kay County, and outcrops along the shoreline of Kaw Lake at Kaw City, Kay County, clearly demonstrate the facies distribution of the Hoy sand. Core-hole data has also delineated additional potential sandstone reservoirs within and near or at the top of the Fort Riley Limestone Member (Barneston Limestone). The Wolfe sand, a producing sandstone locally, occupies a stratigraphic position within the Doyle Shale.

  16. Paleolatitudinal changes in vertical facies transitions recording late Paleozoic glaciations: a case study from eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, C. R.; Frank, T. D.; Shultis, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Stratigraphic records of the complex and multi-phase late Paleozoic Ice Age (LPIA) have been examined over a 2000 km paleo-polar to paleo-mid latitude transect from Tasmania to Queensland, eastern Australia. In this presentation, we summarize changes in facies assemblages within glacial and nonglacial epochs and the transitions between them, within the coastal to shallow marine Permian succession. In the earliest Permian P1 glacial interval, facies represent proximal proglacial to locally glacial environments in Tasmania (TAS), and an array of mainly marine proglacial to glacimarine environments in New South Wales (NSW) and Queensland (QLD). A trend of more ice-proximal to less ice-proximal facies assemblages is evident from south to north. The end of P1 is represented both by abrupt flooding trends in some areas and by thicker intervals of more gradually fining-upward facies recording progressive deepening elsewhere. The onset of the Sakmarian/Artinskian P2 glacial interval is best-exposed in southern NSW, where an abrupt change to marine proglacial facies is accompanied by evidence for deepening, suggesting isostatic loading of the sedimentary surface. P2 glacial facies are more proximal in NSW than in QLD. Both P1 and P2 intervals preserve complex internal stratigraphy, in many cases recording multiple glacial-interglacial cycles. The close of P2 is again recorded in a variety of ways, with many sections showing a gradual fining-upward and decrease in indicators of glacial conditions. The Kungurian to Capitanian P3 and P4 glacial intervals are in general represented by less proximal facies than their predecessors, typically intervals of outsize clast-bearing mudrocks and sandstones. These in many areas show diffuse boundaries with the nonglacial facies that enclose them. Furthermore, no significant paleolatitudinal changes in the P3 and P4 facies assemblages are evident from TAS to QLD. The documented patterns support the view that the P1 glacial represents the

  17. SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC ANALYSIS AND FACIES ARCHITECTURE OF THE CRETACEOUS MANCOS SHALE ON AND NEAR THE JICARILLA APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION, NEW MEXICO-THEIR RELATION TO SITES OF OIL ACCUMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jennie Ridgley

    2000-03-31

    Oil distribution in the lower part of the Mancos Shale seems to be mainly controlled by fractures and by sandier facies that are dolomite-cemented. Structure in the area of the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation consists of the broad northwest- to southeast-trending Chaco slope, the deep central basin, and the monocline that forms the eastern boundary of the San Juan Basin. Superimposed on the regional structure are broad low-amplitude folds. Fractures seem best developed in the areas of these folds. Using sequence stratigraphic principals, the lower part of the Mancos Shale has been subdivided into four main regressive and transgressive components. These include facies that are the basinal time equivalents to the Gallup Sandstone, an overlying interbedded sandstone and shale sequence time equivalent to the transgressive Mulatto Tongue of the Mancos Shale, the El Vado Sandstone Member which is time equivalent to part of the Dalton Sandstone, and an unnamed interbedded sandstone and shale succession time equivalent to the regressive Dalton Sandstone and transgressive Hosta Tongue of the Mesaverde Group. Facies time equivalent to the Gallup Sandstone underlie an unconformity of regional extent. These facies are gradually truncated from south to north across the Reservation. The best potential for additional oil resources in these facies is in the southern part of the Reservation where the top sandier part of these facies is preserved. The overlying unnamed wedge of transgressive rocks produces some oil but is underexplored, except for sandstones equivalent to the Tocito Sandstone. This wedge of rocks is divided into from two to five units. The highest sand content in this wedge occurs where each of the four subdivisions above the Tocito terminates to the south and is overstepped by the next youngest unit. These terminal areas should offer the best targets for future oil exploration. The El Vado Sandstone Member overlies the transgressive wedge. It produces most of

  18. First occurrence of the Salvador Formation in the Jatobá Basin (Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil): Facies characterization and depositional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Bruno Ludovico Dihl; Melo Ferrer de Morais, Débora

    2016-12-01

    Fan deltas, constituting proximal depositional systems adjacent to boundary faults, are common features associated with rift basins. The Cretaceous fan delta systems of the Salvador Formation, deposited during the rift phase of the Recôncavo-Tucano-Jatobá Basin, were first reported in the Recôncavo Basin and later discovered in the Tucano Basin. Because of the absence of any outcrops in the Jatobá Basin until now, these alluvial fans were interpreted solely through seismic analysis. We report the first revealed outcrops of the Salvador Formation in that basin and characterize their depositional systems as interlayered with the lacustrine Candeias Formation. Based on facies and architecture, the alluvial system can be subdivided into three associations: (1) proximal fan delta, characterized by meter-scale conglomerate bodies with a predominance of boulders and cobbles with thin sandstone layers; (2) distal fan delta, characterized by sheet-like pebble conglomerate and sandstone layers with flame and load structures; and (3) lacustrine, further subdivided into shallow lake facies reddish shales and mudstones with oolitic limestones and deep lake facies grey to green shales with pyrite. Paleocurrent measurements for the proximal fan association show paleoflow direction varying from SW to SE, which is expected for the rift phase alluvial system. The Recôncavo-Tucano-Jatobá rift system has two conglomeratic units, namely the Salvador and Marizal Formations, the former a syn-rift and the latter a post-rift unit. The absence of sedimentary clasts in the conglomerates, very low maturity, the presence of giant clasts, and a visible relationship between boundary faults in the outcrop, define the syn-rift Salvador Formation characteristics. Based on the facies and paleocurrent analyses, the Salvador Formation deposits in Jatobá Basin were interpreted as a deposition of a debris flow-dominated fan delta, indicating the lacustrine setting represented by the Candeias

  19. Sedimentology, petrology, and gas potential of the Brallier Formation: upper Devonian turbidite facies of the Central and Southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Lundegard, P.D.; Samuels, N.D.; Pryor, W.A.

    1980-03-01

    The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches 1000 meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate differences between the depositional system of the Brallier Formation and those of modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences. The Brallier system is of finer grain size and lower flow intensity. In addition, the stratigraphic transition from turbidites to deltaic sediments is gradual and differs in its facies succession from the deposits of the proximal parts of modern submarine fans. Such features as massive and pebbly sandstones, conglomerates, debris flows, and massive slump structures are absent from this transition. Paleocurrents are uniformly to the west at right angles to basin isopach, which is atypical of ancient turbidite systems. This suggests that turbidity currents had multiple point sources. The petrography and paleocurrents of the Brallier Formation indicate an eastern source of sedimentary and low-grade metasedimentary rocks with modern relief and rainfall. The depositional system of the Brallier Formation is interpreted as a series of small ephemeral turbidite lobes of low flow intensity which coalesced in time to produce a laterally extensive wedge. The lobes were fed by deltas rather than submarine canyons or upper fan channel systems. This study shows that the present-day turbidite facies model, based mainly on modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences, does not adequately describe prodeltaic turbidite systems such as the Brallier Formation. Thickly bedded siltstone bundles are common features of the Brallier Formation and are probably its best gas reservoir facies, especially when fracture porosity is well developed.

  20. Recent Developments in Facies Models for Siliciclastic Sediments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miall, Andrew D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses theory of facies models (attempts to synthesize/generalize information about depositional environments), strengths/weaknesses of facies modelling, recent advances in facies models for siliciclastic sediments (focusing on fluvial, lacustrine, eolian and glacial environments, clastic shorelines and continental shelves, and clastic…

  1. Depositional architecture of Springer Old Woman sandstone, central Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, M.R.; Haiduk, J.P.

    1987-08-01

    The fluvial meander belt containing the Old Woman sandstone served as a conduit for clastics transported into the Anadarko basin. Mappable for a distance of more than 30 mi (48 km), sand bodies characterizing this system average 0.5 mi (0.8 km) in width and attain maximum thicknesses of 50-70 ft (15-20 m). Channel and point-bar sandstone facies display a fining-upward sequence and sharp basal contact, as inferred from gamma-ray and resistivity logs. Sandstones of the Old Woman fluvial complex overlie the laminated shales and silts of the penecontemporaneous flood-plain environment. These flood-plain deposits are underlain by crinoidal wackestones and packstones deposited in the subtidal regime. Encroachment of the fluvial complex into a marine setting is interpreted from this sequence. Thin flood-plain deposits and lack of shallow marine clastic sediments suggest rapid advancement. Quartzitic and petrologically mature, the Old Woman sandstone is fine grained, with small-scale troughs and laminations, and a few mudstone rip-up clasts. Diagenesis has altered the mineralogic composition mainly by siliceous and carbonate cementation. Porosity is secondary, resulting from dissolution of various metastable constituents. The Old Woman sandstone was established as a hydrocarbon reservoir in the early 1960s, and sporadic development continued for years. The present-day petroleum market has prompted a resurgence in drilling activity owing to the economic viability of this reservoir. Successful wells are concentrated in newly discovered meander-belt bends; however, the elusiveness of this fluvial system challenges today's exploration geologists as it has for the past quarter century.

  2. Reservoir sandstone bodies in lower Silurian Clinton sandstone interval, eastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    The stratigraphic relationships of the sandstones, shales, limestones, dolomites, and related beds of the Lower Silurian Clinton sandstone interval in Ohio have been examined using several thousand well logs from Medina County to Coshocton County in eastern Ohio. This north-south band of counties lies semiparallel to the north-northeast-trending depositional edge of the Clinton lower deltaic and coastal plain. Continuous and discontinuous bar sandstones with patterns similar to barrier island deposits are found at the edge of the deltaic plain. The thicker sandstone reservoirs in these deposits have been prolific oil and gas pools. The discontinuous bar sands are more common, however, and where drilling is sparse or where only the cleaner sandstones are mapped, these bar sands appear as isolated, thick, porous sandstone bodies. Examples exist in Holmes and Wayne Counties, Ohio. Elongate, nearly straight, narrow sandstone bodies occur on the lower deltaic plain, and were deposited in channels that were fluvial or partly estuarine. The channel sandstones are less than 1000 ft wide, extend for distances up to 10 mi and can be seen in Coshocton, Summit, and Medina Counties. The reservoirs in these sandstones are prolific oil and gas producers, but they are not easy to locate. At the seaward end of the elongate channel, sandstones are thick, localized sand bodies that fit in the sedimentological picture as river mouth bars. An example from Medina County illustrates this reservoir geometry at the site of excellent oil production from the Clinton interval.

  3. Facies in stratigraphy: from 'terrains' to 'terranes'.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Concepts of lateral variation in sedimentary rocks and fossil assemblages developed in France from the 1760s; the definitive definition of facies was provided in 1838 by the Swiss geologist Amanz Gressly (1814-65) in his detailed field study of the eastern Jura. His maps and cross-sections of variations in Jurassic and Triassic rocks are illustrated. He believed that variations reflected environmental conditions, as in modern seas, and would eventually permit former depths to be reconstructed. Gressly studied at Strasbourg under Voltz and Thurmann: he collaborated with L.Agassiz, E.Desor and C.Vogt. His work influenced German and French geologists and provided a basis for interpretations of the Alps. But the facies concept was not deeply rooted in American geology until around 1884 (H.S.Williams) and in Britain and Russia until around 1900. I.S.Evans

  4. Magnetic hysteresis of limestones: facies control?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Chow, Nancy; Werner, Tomasz

    1993-03-01

    The hysteresis properties of 116 non-red, marine limestones from 92 localities indicate that remanence is carried by magnetite of pseudo-single-domain (PSD) and small multidomain (MD) size. Pelagic limestones have paramagnetic matrices and hysteresis properties compatible with larger PSD or MD grain sizes of magnetite, probably associated with detrital clay minerals introduced by pelagic rain-out. Thus they may be less suitable recorders of stable remanence. Other limestone facies (excepting dolomitized examples) have diamagnetic matrices. They include shallow—subtidal limestones which tend to have smaller PSD sizes of magnetite, as do backreef—lagoonal, undifferentiated-shelf and reef facies. It is believed that the wide geographical and temporal range of samples minimizes effects related to post-compaction groundwater flow (late diagenesis) and that the associations recognized should be tested in future studies.

  5. Surface gamma-ray logs as a correlation tool between outcrop and subsurface: Application to the Silurian-Devonian of west Texas and southern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Colleary, W.M. ); Crafton, J.W. Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL )

    1992-04-01

    Outcrop gamma-ray logs are an excellent tool for correlation between surface measured sections and subsurface well logs. The work presented here illustrates the utility of constructing such profiles and the applicability of this technique to carbonate sequences such as those of the Permian basin. Outcrop sections with gamma-ray profiles have been measured over the Silurian-Devonian section in three separate areas. These sections are located in the Sacramento Mountains of southern New Mexico, and the northern Franklin Mountains and Hueco Mountains of west Texas. A hand-held Scintrex Model BGS-4 Digital Scintillometer was used to measure surface gamma radiation while detailed stratigraphic sections were being measured and described. Data were collected at regularly spaced intervals along the section. The scintillometer detects natural radiation emitted by radioactive elements that occur in most clay minerals and generally are more abundant in shales than in sandstones or carbonates. The lithology of poorly exposed or covered units also may be inferred from surface gamma-ray profiles. Organic-rich black shales are particularly radioactive, as are condensed sections. The strength of this method does not lie in the absolute reading of gamma radiation. The value of this tool lies in recognizing patterns within each profile, directly relating these patterns to their associated facies, and correlating them with subsurface profiles.

  6. Sequence stratigraphy and facies model of an incised valley fill: The Gironde estuary, France

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G.P. ); Posamentier, H.W. )

    1993-05-01

    The Gironde estuary was formed by the Holocene drowning of a fluvial valley incised during the Wuerm global sea-level fall. A depositional sequence accumulated in the valley during the eustatic lowstand, the Holocene rise, and the post-Holocene highstand. The sequence comprises a diverse assemblage of lithofacies that can be grouped into lowstand, transgressive, and highstand systems tracts. The objective of this paper is to describe the facies and stratal architecture of this incised-valley fill, and to propose a sequence-stratigraphic model for incised-valley fills in this type of mixed tide- and wave-influenced coastal setting. this study is based on a compilation of the abundant core, borehole, and hydrological data published by a number of authors. The valley fills forms regionally elongated belts of channelized sandstones and are the subject of considerable interest because they furnish potentially important new hydrocarbon play concepts.

  7. Application of actualistic models to unravel primary volcanic control on sedimentation (Taveyanne Sandstones, Oligocene Northalpine Foreland Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Andrea; Groppelli, Gianluca

    2016-05-01

    This work is focused on the Taveyanne Sandstones (Grés de Taveyanne), an Oligocene volcaniclastic turbidite sequence cropping out in the Northern Alpine Molassa between SE France and Central Switzerland, with the aim to investigate the temporal relationship between volcanic activity and sediment supply. Detailed stratigraphic, sedimentological, and petrographic (XRD analyses on mudstones and point counts on sandstones) studies conducted on three sections (Col de l'Oulette and Flaine in SE France, Taveyanne in SW Switzerland) allow a discrimination of three main facies, among which only one is extremely enriched in volcaniclastic detritus and characterized by features similar to those of disaggregated pyroclastic density current deposits. The other two facies are characterized by variable to no volcanic detritus but supplied by crystalline and sedimentary detritus. Such sediment trends are similar to those of modern, volcanically controlled source-to-sink systems. This allows a reinterpretation of the Taveyanne Sandstones as a syn-volcanic turbidite system, episodically supplied by large amounts of volcanic detritus, which periodically modified the drainage paths. Moreover, the well-known temporal and spatial persistence of such modifications in modern settings leads to conciliate the syn-volcanic supply with the location of the volcanic centers in the internal part of the Alps, without invoking particular climatic and tectonic conditions controlling foreland sedimentation.

  8. Facies, Stratigraphic and Depositional Model of the Sediments in the Abrolhos Archipelago (Bahia, BRAZIL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matte, R. R.; Zambonato, E. E.

    2012-04-01

    Located in the Mucuri Basin on the continental shelf of southern Bahia state, northeast Brazil, about 70 km from the city of Caravelas,the Abrolhos archipelago is made up of five islands; Santa Barbara, Redonda, Siriba, Guarita and Sueste. The exhumed sediments in the Abrolhos archipelago are a rare record of the turbidite systems which fill the Brazilian Atlantic Basin, and are probably an unprecedented example of a plataform turbidite system (Dr. Mutti, personal communication). Despite the limited area, the outcrops display a wide facies variation produced by different depositional processes, and also allow for the observation of the layer geometries. Associated with such sedimentary rocks, the Abrolhos Volcanic Complex belongs stratigraphically to the Abrolhos Formation. These igneous rocks were dated by the Ar / Ar method, with ages ranging from 60 to 40 My, placing such Volcanic Complex between the Paleocene and Eocene. The sedimentary section is best exposed in the Santa Barbara and Redonda islands and altogether it is 70 m thick. The measured vertical sections show a good stratigraphic correlation between the rocks of the western portion of the first island and those of Redonda Island. However, there is no correlation between the eastern and western portions of Santa Barbara Island, since they are very likely interrupted by the igneous intrusion and possibly by faulting. The sedimentary stack consists of deposits with alternated regressive and transgressive episodes interpreted as high frequency sequences. The coarse facies, sandstones and conglomerates, with abrupt or erosive bases record regressive phases. On the other hand, finer sandstones and siltstones facies, which are partly bioturbated, correspond to phases of a little sediment supply. In the central and eastern portions of Santa Barbara Island, there is a trend of progradational stacking, while both in the western portion of Santa Barbara and in Redonda islands an agradational trend is observed

  9. Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W. ); McJannet, G.S. )

    1996-01-01

    A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

  10. Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W.; McJannet, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

  11. Experimental Investigation on Dilation Mechanisms of Land-Facies Karamay Oil Sand Reservoirs under Water Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Botao; Jin, Yan; Pang, Huiwen; Cerato, Amy B.

    2016-04-01

    The success of steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is strongly dependent on the formation of a homogeneous and highly permeable zone in the land-facies Karamay oil sand reservoirs. To accomplish this, hydraulic fracturing is applied through controlled water injection to a pair of horizontal wells to create a dilation zone between the dual wells. The mechanical response of the reservoirs during this injection process, however, has remained unclear for the land-facies oil sand that has a loosely packed structure. This research conducted triaxial, permeability and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests on the field-collected oil sand samples. The tests evaluated the influences of the field temperature, confining stress and injection pressure on the dilation mechanisms as shear dilation and tensile parting during injection. To account for petrophysical heterogeneity, five reservoir rocks including regular oil sand, mud-rich oil sand, bitumen-rich oil sand, mudstone and sandstone were investigated. It was found that the permeability evolution in the oil sand samples subjected to shear dilation closely followed the porosity and microcrack evolutions in the shear bands. In contrast, the mudstone and sandstone samples developed distinct shear planes, which formed preferred permeation paths. Tensile parting expanded the pore space and increased the permeability of all the samples in various degrees. Based on this analysis, it is concluded that the range of injection propagation in the pay zone determines the overall quality of hydraulic fracturing, while the injection pressure must be carefully controlled. A region in a reservoir has little dilation upon injection if it remains unsaturated. Moreover, a cooling of the injected water can strengthen the dilation potential of a reservoir. Finally, it is suggested that the numerical modeling of water injection in the Karamay oil sand reservoirs must take into account the volumetric plastic strain in hydrostatic loading.

  12. Behavior of Sandstones Under Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppert, M.; Fořt, J.; Trník, A.; Koňáková, D.; Vejmelková, E.; Pokorný, J.; Svora, P.; Pavlík, Z.; Černý, R.

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of materials behavior under heat treatment is of high importance in construction and safety engineering; tunnels represent a special field because of their specific safety issues. In the case of fire, tunnel structure and surrounding rock are subjected to extreme temperatures which induces irreversible changes in the material's microstructure and consequently its mechanical properties. Significant portion of the Earth's crust is formed by sandstones; this group of sedimentary rocks is highly variable in structure, composition and engineering properties. Quartz grains (alternatively together with other minerals) form the clastic part of sandstones; the space between clasts is filled by variable amount of cement and matrix which can contain particularly clay minerals, quartz and calcite. The porosity of sandstones is again highly variable from a nearly compact material to a highly porous one. The paper aims to find out and explain differences in response of various kinds of sandstones to heat treatment. The behavior of a representative set of sandstones under heat treatment was studied by TG/DSC, thermodilatometry and residual strength measurement. These experiments were accompanied by SEM and porosimetry measurement. The effect of increased temperature on the compressive strength was found to be crucially dependent on the nature of the cement and matrix present in the individual rock. The rocks with calcite cement which had high initial strength and low porosity were damaged by calcite decomposition. The siliceous sandstones were damaged by cracking due to thermally induced volume changes. In contrary, the strength of the clayey sandstones was even improved after the heat treatment. It can be concluded that behavior of sandstone under heat treatment is controlled by its composition and diagenesis.

  13. Cambrian/Early Ordovician sequence stratigraphy and Mt. Simon sandstone petrology - Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cottingham, J.T.

    1990-05-01

    Rocks of Cambrian and Early Ordovician age are well known in Wisconsin and otber areas surrounding the Michigan basin but because of burial depth ranging from 3,000 to 16,000 ft relatively little is known about these rocks in Michigan. Core and cuttings examination demonstrate that similar stratigraphic sequences exist between the central Michigan basin and surrounding regions. Basinal lithofacies are similar to their outcrop counterparts in Wisconsin and are correlated on the basis of sediment types, sedimentary structures, and the concept of sequence stratigraphy. The Mount Simon Sandstone in Michigan correlates with that observed in Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Iowa. Isopach data throughout the Midwest indicates a single depocenter in northeastern Illinois, with an arm extending into the central Michigan basin. Sedimentary structures and lithology indicate a subtidal marine environment that may be a transition to a shoreward nonmarine fluvial to eolian environment. Observed diagenetic facies are influenced primarily by depth of burial. The deep facies (below 14,250 ft) exhibits extreme physical and chemical compaction of quartz grains. Quartz cement is predominant with less than 1% porosity present. The shallow facies (above 8,900 ft) exhibits pervasive dolomite and quartz cements and authigenic clays, Secondary porosity developed from dissolution of carbonate, quartz, and K-feldspar.

  14. Sedimentology and reservoir heterogeneity of a valley-fill deposit-A field guide to the Dakota Sandstone of the San Rafael Swell, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Valley-fill deposits form a significant class of hydrocarbon reservoirs in many basins of the world. Maximizing recovery of fluids from these reservoirs requires an understanding of the scales of fluid-flow heterogeneity present within the valley-fill system. The Upper Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone in the San Rafael Swell, Utah contains well exposed, relatively accessible outcrops that allow a unique view of the external geometry and internal complexity of a set of rocks interpreted to be deposits of an incised valley fill. These units can be traced on outcrop for tens of miles, and individual sandstone bodies are exposed in three dimensions because of modern erosion in side canyons in a semiarid setting and by exhumation of the overlying, easily erodible Mancos Shale. The Dakota consists of two major units: (1) a lower amalgamated sandstone facies dominated by large-scale cross stratification with several individual sandstone bodies ranging in thickness from 8 to 28 feet, ranging in width from 115 to 150 feet, and having lengths as much as 5,000 feet, and (2) an upper facies composed of numerous mud-encased lenticular sandstones, dominated by ripple-scale lamination, in bedsets ranging in thickness from 5 to 12 feet. The lower facies is interpreted to be fluvial, probably of mainly braided stream origin that exhibits multiple incisions amalgamated into a complex sandstone body. The upper facies has lower energy, probably anastomosed channels encased within alluvial and coastal-plain floodplain sediments. The Dakota valley-fill complex has multiple scales of heterogeneity that could affect fluid flow in similar oil and gas subsurface reservoirs. The largest scale heterogeneity is at the formation level, where the valley-fill complex is sealed within overlying and underlying units. Within the valley-fill complex, there are heterogeneities between individual sandstone bodies, and at the smallest scale, internal heterogeneities within the bodies themselves. These

  15. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Marfa Quadrangle, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, C D; Duex, T W; Wilbert, W P

    1982-09-01

    The uranium favorability of the Marfa 1/sup 0/ by 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Texas, was evaluated in accordance with criteria established for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface and subsurface studies, to a 1500 m (5000 ft) depth, and chemical, petrologic, hydrogeochemical, and airborne radiometric data were employed. The entire quadrangle is in the Basin and Range Province and is characterized by Tertiary silicic volcanic rocks overlying mainly Cretaceous carbonate rocks and sandstones. Strand-plain sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous San Carlos Formation and El Picacho Formation possess many favorable characteristics and are tentatively judged as favorable for sandstone-type deposits. The Tertiary Buckshot Ignimbrite contains uranium mineralization at the Mammoth Mine. This deposit may be an example of the hydroauthigenic class; alternatively, it may have formed by reduction of uranium-bearing ground water produced during diagenesis of tuffaceous sediments of the Vieja Group. Although the presence of the deposit indicates favorability, the uncertainty in the process that formed the mineralization makes delineation of a favorable environment or area difficult. The Allen intrusions are favorable for authigenic deposits. Basin fill in several bolsons possesses characteristics that suggest favorability but which are classified as unevaluated because of insufficient data. All Precambrian, Paleozoic, other Mesozoic, and other Cenozoic environments are unfavorable.

  16. Neotectonic evolution of the Brazilian northeastern continental margin based on sedimentary facies and ichnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandini, Rosana; Rossetti, Dilce de Fátima; Netto, Renata Guimarães; Bezerra, Francisco Hilário Rego; Góes, Ana Maria

    2014-09-01

    Quaternary post-Barreiras sediments are widespread along Brazil's passive margin. These deposits are well exposed in the onshore Paraíba Basin, which is one of the rift basins formed during the Pangean continental breakup. In this area, the post-Barreiras sediments consist of sandstones with abundant soft-sediment deformation structures related to seismicity contemporaneous with deposition. The trace fossils Thalassinoides and Psilonichnus are found up to 38 m above modern sea level in sandstones dated between 60.0 (± 1.4) and 15.1 (± 1.8) ka. The integration of ichnological and sedimentary facies suggests nearshore paleoenvironments. Such deposits could not be related to eustatic sea-level rise, as this time coincides with the last glaciation. Hence, an uplift of 0.63 mm/yr, or 1.97 mm/yr if sea level was 80 m lower in the last glaciation, would have been required to ascend the post-Barreiras sediments several meters above the present-day sea level during the last 60 ka. This would suggest that the post-rift stage of the South American eastern passive margin may have experienced tectonic reactivation more intense than generally recognized. Although more complete data are still needed, the information presented herein may play an important role in studies aiming to decipher the Quaternary evolution of this passive margin.

  17. Microstructure of deformed graywacke sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Dengler, L.A.

    1980-03-05

    Microsctures in low-permeability graywacke sandstones were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM specimens were prepared by ion-bombardment of thick polished samples. The undeformed rock contains grains in a matrix composed primarily of authigenic chlorite and kaolinite. Chlorite platelets are randomly arranged in face-to-edge relation to one another. Kaolinite occurs as pseudohexagonal crystals stacked face-to-face in pore filling books. Uniaxial-stress experiments covered a range of confining pressures from .1 to 600 MPa. Below 50 MPa confining pressure, intergranular fracturing occurs within the fault zone and near the sample's cylindrical surface. Between 100 and 300 MPa confining pressure, fault zones contain highly fractured grains, gauge and slickensides on grain surfaces. At 600 MPa, the sample contains a diffuse shear zone of highly fractured grains and no well-defined fault. In all samples, the distribution of microcracks is heterogeneous. Different clay minerals exhibit different modes of deformation. Chlorite structure responds to applied stress by compaction, reducing both pore size and volume. Chlorite platelets are plastically deformed in even the least strained samples. Kaolinite does not deform plastically in any of the samples examined. Deformation of kaolinite is restricted to toppling of the book structure. Dilatant crack growth was studied in two samples unloaded prior to failure. Uniaxially-strained samples deform primarily along grain boundaries, producing intergranular cracks and realignment of chlorite platelets. Intragranular crack density is linearly related to axial-strain, although grains are less fractured than in uniaxially-stressed samples tested at equivalent mean pressures. Cracks are rarely longer than a grain diameter. Nuclear-explosively deformed samples were recovered after the Rio Blanco gas stimulation experiment. (JGB)

  18. Diagenetic capping of carbonate reservoir facies

    SciTech Connect

    Lighty, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    The diagenetic model proposed involves the effect of submarine cementation on previously lithified carbonates, such as submerged relict shelf-margin buildups (e.g., drowned reefs, ooid shoals) or previously subaerially exposed formations (e.g., dune ridges) that were submerged by later sea level rise. These deposits generally have pronounced topographic relief (visible on seismic), good reservoir geometries, and high internal porosity of either primary or secondary origin. Petrologic studies on examples of both of these situations, a submerged early Holocene barrier reef off Florida and a 175-km (110-m) long submerged Pleistocene eolian ridge in the Bahamas, show that their exposed surface and uppermost facies (0.1 m, or 0.3 ft, below top) are further infilled and cemented, creating an extensively lithified, low porosity/low permeability zone or diagenetic cap rock. Quantitative mineralogic studies of occluding cements reveal an exponential reduction in porosity while moving upward into the seal zone. Submarine cements effectively infill and form a surficial permeability barrier that acts to impede further diagenesis and porosity reduction within underlying potential reservoir facies. To form this diagenetic seal only requires that the original carbonate buildup be resubmerged for some brief period of time prior to subsequent burial by sediments. If buildup accumulation later resumes without intermediate sediment burial, a common stratigraphic situation, the diagenetic seal would represent a disconformity separating two similar facies. The early formation of a diagenetic cap rock lends support to models of early hydrocarbon migration and emplacement. Prediction and recognition of submarine diagenetic seals will aid in exploration and development of obvious buildup reservoirs as well as subtle intraformational traps.

  19. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  20. Evolution of Permian evaporite basin in Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Presley, M.W. )

    1987-02-01

    Permian (Leonardian to Ochoan) evaporites in the Texas Panhandle were deposited in a range of marine shelf to supratidal environments along an arid coastline. Carbonates in these strata generally were deposited in inner shelf systems and include subtidal to supratidal facies. Landward of shelf environments, evaporites were deposited in brine pans and salt flats. Brine-pan facies are laminated anhydrite and banded salt that formed in shallow, hypersaline water such as restricted lagoons or supratidal salines. Salt-flat facies are mainly chaotic mixtures of mudstone and halite possibly formed by salt deposition on and within mud flats that bordered brine pans, or in brine-soaked mud-flat depressions. Periodically, mud flats built across the evaporite systems and were supplied with red terrestrial clastics, mainly mud and silt. These facies occur together in at least three different types of lithogenetic units. Strata in the Clear Fork Group (Leonardian) are considered deposits of a coastal evaporite basin that was progressively filled by terrestrial clastics. These rocks exhibit regressive cycles of brine-pan, salt-flat, and mud-flat facies. In contrast, San Andres strata (Guadalupian) were deposited in a broad marine embayment with persistent brine-pan conditions, and contain cycles of inner shelf and brine-pan facies. Post-San Andres strata (late Guadalupian and Ochoan) were deposited in the inner reaches of a broad interior salt basin and are composed mainly of mud-flat, salt-flat, and halite-rich brine-pan facies. 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Reservoir quality in relation to facies, burial history, and oil migration: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.K. )

    1993-02-01

    The diagenetic make-up and, in consequence, the ultimate reservoir quality of a sand body depends on depositional facies, as well as on burial history, diagenetic fluid chemistry and timing of oil migration. A regional subsurface study in the Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela along a northwest-southeast transect in the Urdaneta, Lagunillas and Barua-Motatan fields reveal that depositional facies of the reservoir sandstones range from mainly fluvial (Urdaneta) to deltaic-coastal marine in Lagunillas, and typically sublittoral in the Barua-Motatan area. Factors such as granulometry, development of early pore-lining chlorite (in marginal marine facies), infiltrated grain-coating clays (fluvial B-6 sands), and proximity of reservoirs to the post-Eocene unconformity, have preserved, enhanced or otherwise influenced reservoir quality. Data on authigenic mineralogy, vitrinite reflectance and burial history indicate a progressively greater subsidence from northwest to southeast. As a result, diagenetic grade is immature in Urdaneta where porosity/permeability values are the highest. In contrast, the Barua-Motatan field in the southeast is typified by a higher grade of diagenesis, varied authigenic mineralogy, and severe deterioration of reservoir quality. Similarly, degree of compaction progressively increases from northwest to southeast. Timing of oil migration have parallelly contributed to systematic regional variation in reservoir quality. An early migration in Urdaneta has been favorable to preservation of original porosity. In contrast, late migration during Upper Miocene, in the Barua-Motatan field, indirectly permitted abundant silicification and consequent destruction of virtually all primary porosity. Thus both pre- and post-depositional parameters are important constraints which should be considered while evaluating quality of siliciclastic reservoirs.

  2. Geologic controls on reservoir properties of low-permeability sandstone, Frontier Formation, Moxa Arch, southwest Wyoming. Topical report, April 1989-April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.; Scott, H.; Laubach, S.E.

    1992-06-01

    The report examines the influence of stratigraphy, diagenesis, natural fractures, and in situ stress on low-permeability, gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation along the Moxa Arch in the Green River Basin, southwestern Wyoming. The main stratigraphic controls on distribution and quality of Frontier reservoirs are sandstone continuity and detrital clay content. The Frontier was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic system, in which most reservoirs lie in marine upper shoreface and fluvial channel-fill sandstone facies. The major causes of porosity loss in Frontier sandstones during burial diagenesis were mechanical and chemical compaction and cementation by calcite, quartz, and authigenic clays. Despite extensive diagenetic modification, reservoir quality is best in facies that had the highest porosity and permeability at the time of deposition. Natural fractures are sparse in Frontier core, but outcrop studies show that fractures commonly are in discrete, irregularly spaced swarms separated by domains having few fractures. Natural fracture swarms are potential high-permeability 'sweet spots.' Stress-direction indicators give highly scattered estimates of maximum horizontal compression direction ranging from north to east or northeast. The scatter may reflect interference of natural fractures with measurements of stress directions, as well as spatially variable stress directions and low horizontal stress anisotropy.

  3. Origin of the Nubian and similar sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.D.

    1963-01-01

    The Nubian Sandstone and similar sandstone bodies exposed across much of northern Africa and adjoining parts of Asia are characteristically formed of clean sand that is conspicuously cross stratified throughout. Such sandstone, here called Nubian-type sandstone, ranges from Cambrian through Cretaceous in age and its genesis has been interpreted in many ways. Studies of its primary structures, and of the direction of sand transport, based on statistical measurements of foreset dip directions, have contributed new data on its genesis. By far the most common structure in Nubian-type sandstone is a medium-scale planar-type cross stratification in which sets of evenly dipping cross beds are bounded by essentially flat-lying top and bottom surfaces to form tabular bodies. Other less numerous but typical structures are large-scale, truncated-wedge cross strata, trough-type cross strata, intraformational recumbent folds, small-scale ripple laminae, and dipping sets of tabular-planar cross beds. An analysis of these structures suggests that in the typical Nubian Sandstone of Cretaceous age eolian deposits are not represented and normal marine types probably also are lacking; flood plain, pond or lagoon, and other continental and marginal environments are indicated. In the Carboniferous rocks of Sinai Peninsula some beach sandstone and possibly some eolian, in addition to the types described, form part of the sequence. Direction of sand transport, as determined from cross-bed dips, was northerly in the Cretaceous Nubian of Libya, Sudan, and Egypt; easterly in the Jurassic Adigrat of Ethiopia; westerly in the Carboniferous of Sinai; northwesterly in the early Paleozoic of Jordan. ?? 1963 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  4. Treasured Texas Theaters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Dallas artist Jon Flaming's deep love of Texas is evident in his paintings and sculpture. Although he has created one sculptural Texas theater, his work primarily showcases old Texas barbershops, vacant homes, and gas stations. In this article, the author describes how her students, inspired by Flaming's works, created three-dimensional historical…

  5. East Texas Storytellers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Brandi, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Written and published by the students at Gary High School, Gary, Texas, "Loblolly Magazine" is published twice a year. Issues are frequently devoted to a distant theme. The theme of this issue, "East Texas Storytellers," attempts to capture some of the local color and regional history of eastern Texas. The first article,…

  6. New insights into the provenance of Saudi Arabian Palaeozoic sandstones from heavy mineral analysis and single-grain geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassis, Alexander; Hinderer, Matthias; Meinhold, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Saudi Arabian Palaeozoic siliciclastics cover a stratigraphic range from the Cambrian to the Permian. They crop out along the eastern margin of the Arabian Shield and are comprised of highly mature sandstones. Their heavy mineral assemblage reflects their mineralogical maturity and is dominated by the ultra-stable phases zircon, tourmaline and rutile. Less stable accessories are apatite, staurolite and garnet. Standard heavy mineral analysis of samples from two study areas in central/northern (Tabuk area) and southern (Wajid area) Saudi Arabia reveals distinct changes in provenance. Cambrian-Ordovician sandstones are first-cycle sediments, probably sourced from the 'Pan-African' basement. The overlying Hirnantian glaciogenic deposits consist of recycled Cambrian-Ordovician material. Devonian-Permian sandstones show a significant influx of fresh basement material, as attested by an increase of meta-stable heavy minerals. Single-grain geochemical analysis of rutile and garnet has proven to be a powerful supplementary technique. Rutile varietal studies reveal distinct differences in host rock lithologies between the two study areas: the Tabuk area contains predominantly felsic rutiles, whereas the Wajid area has more mafic input. Zr-in-rutile thermometry identified granulite-facies detritus in the lower Palaeozoic of the Tabuk area and has the potential to further define source areas. The distribution patterns of garnet host rock lithologies are remarkably similar in both study areas. They are dominated by amphibolite-facies metasediments and intermediate to felsic igneous rocks. Garnets derived from granulite-facies metasediments, which are scarce in the Arabian-Nubian Shield, also occur. Possible source rocks for high-grade garnets can be found in Yemen or farther south in the Mozambique Belt.

  7. Multi-waveform classification for seismic facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chengyun; Liu, Zhining; Wang, Yaojun; Li, Xingming; Hu, Guangmin

    2017-04-01

    Seismic facies analysis provides an effective way to delineate the heterogeneity and compartments within a reservoir. Traditional method is using the single waveform to classify the seismic facies, which does not consider the stratigraphy continuity, and the final facies map may affect by noise. Therefore, by defining waveforms in a 3D window as multi-waveform, we developed a new seismic facies analysis algorithm represented as multi-waveform classification (MWFC) that combines the multilinear subspace learning with self-organizing map (SOM) clustering techniques. In addition, we utilize multi-window dip search algorithm to extract multi-waveform, which reduce the uncertainty of facies maps in the boundaries. Testing the proposed method on synthetic data with different S/N, we confirm that our MWFC approach is more robust to noise than the conventional waveform classification (WFC) method. The real seismic data application on F3 block in Netherlands proves our approach is an effective tool for seismic facies analysis.

  8. Synsedimentary tectonics, distribution, and reservoir quality of Rotliegende sandstones: Emsland Province, northwest Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, M. )

    1993-09-01

    The exploration for gas in the Rotliegende of the Emsland province, northwest Germany, has had very limited success so far. This fact is contrasted by less than 30 km distance to the giant Groningen gas field. Risks concerning Rotliegende hydrocarbon reservoirs in this area are (a) severe deterioration of permeability by widespread growth of illite in pore space and (b) absence of upper Rotliegende strata in certain areas. The Rotliegende of the Emsland was deposited in an embayment of the main west-northwest-east-southeast Rotliegende basin. Intensive growth of illite area. A southern part, about 50 km southward, with only limited well control in between, displays an erratic spatial distribution of clay- and sandstones. A total of 450-m conventional cores of 22 wells in the rotliegende were evaluated as to their sedimentary facies and petrography. A plateau basalt represents the lower Rotliegende, with a maximum thickness of 135 m. It was covered by a red-laminated claystone of up to 65 m thickness. After deposition of this claystone, a half-garben structure was formed, filled up with clean mature medium-grained sandstones up to 150 m thick, and deposited in a desert environment. Subsidence in the southern part ended after deposition of the so-called Haren sandstone, which is of good reservoir quality. The northern part continued to subside, and sandstones of a regressive lakeshore environment alternate with transgressive claystones. Erosion of the southern area is documented (a) in the distinct amount of detrital basalt fragments in the sands shedded to the north and (b) the absence of upper Rotliegende strata. We assume the composition of detritus, together with depth, to be the main factors creating illite growth in this northern area.

  9. Geometric and sedimentologic characteristic of Mid-Miocene lowstand reservoir sandstones, offshore northwest Java, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, P.; Kusumanegara, Y.; Warman, S.

    1996-12-31

    Numerous reservoirs in the Upper Cibulakan Formation (Mid-Miocene) of the Offshore Northwest Java shelf occur in sharp-based sandbodies that range from less than 1 m up to 10 m in thickness. Well-log derived net-sand isopach and seismic amplitude maps of these sandbodies depict elongate features, that are 1-2 km wide and 5-8 km long. The orientation of the longest axis of these sandbodies is predominantly north-south. Conventional cores reveal that these sandbodies are burrowed to completely bioturbated sandstones. Common trace fossils associated with these sandbodies include Ophiomorpha, Teichichnus and Thalassinoides. The lower contact of these sands is typically sharp and is commonly associated with a Glossifungites surface and siderite mud clasts. Overlying and underlying mudstones are relatively devoid of burrowing. Benthonic foraminifera assemblages within these mudstones indicate inner to outer neritic conditions in a relatively restricted marine setting. The upper contact of these sandstones is gradational over a 0.5 to 1m interval. Sandbodies of the same age and similar facies were observed in outcrops in onshore west Java. Here, they can be observed to pinch out over a distance of 500 m. The lower bounding contact appears discordant with underlying interbedded sandstones and mudstones. Several of the sandstones contain abundant accumulations of the large, open marine, benthonic foraminifera Cycloclypeus and Lepidocyclina. Occasionally the concentration of these large foraminifera form limestones within the sharp-based sandbodies. These bioclastic deposits commonly exhibit planar-tabular and trough cross-stratification. The sandbodies are interpreted as having been emplaced during relative falls in sea-level within a large Mid-Miocene embayment. Our understanding of their geometry and sedimentologic characteristics is leading to a more effective exploitation strategy for these sandbodies in the Offshore Northwest Java area.

  10. Anatomy of an ancient aeolian sandstone on Mars: the Stimson formation, Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Banham, Steven; Rubin, David; Watkins, Jessica; Sumner, Dawn; Grotzinger, John P.; Lewis, Kevin; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Edgar, Lauren; Stack, Kathryn; Day, McKenzie; Ewing, Ryan; Lapotre, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    Since landing in 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity has traversed the plains and foothills of Aeolis Mons (informally known as Mt. Sharp) investigating the environments preserved in the stratigraphic record of Gale crater. Recently, the Curiosity team has been investigating the Stimson formation, a sandstone exhibiting abundant crossbedding that drapes the underlying Murray formation mudstones. The contact between the Stimson and underlying Murray formation exhibits several meters relief over several 100 m hundred metres where encountered thus far. The Stimson is observed to onlap onto this contact, indicating that accumulating Stimson sandstones unconformably onlapped or buried local palaeotopography.Facies and architectural elements observed within the Stimson are interpreted to represent deposition within an ancient dune field. The Stimson formation is typically composed of decimeter-scale and meter-scale crossbedded sandstones, (exhibiting wind-ripple lamination and well rounded particles up to granule size). Architectural elements are visible in outcrops oriented perpendicular to the regional northwest dip. These consist of undulating surfaces parallel to the regional dip with observed lateral extents up to 30 m that truncate underlying cross-sets and commonly act as basal surfaces to overlying cross-sets. Undulating surfaces are interpreted possibly to be deflationary supersurfaces, which formed in response to deflation or dune-field stabilisation across a regional extent. Surfaces inclined relative to the regional dip ascend between supersurfaces towards the north east at an observed angle of 3-4°. These surfaces are interpreted to be dune bounding surfaces, which are preserved when dunes climb as a result of dune-field aggradation. Aggradation of the system during the duration of the dune field's existence possibly occurred as a response to episodic increases of sediment supply into the basin, allowing dunes to climb and preserving

  11. New Perspectives on the Old Red Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miall, Andrew D.

    The Old Red Sandstone is amongst the most distinctive and well-known stratigraphic units in the British Isles. It is mainly of Devonian age; in fact, its lower boundary was used to define the base of the Devonian until relatively recently and it was called "Old" back in the nineteenth century to distinguish it from a superficially similar succession of Triassic age named the New Red Sandstone. The Old Red Sandstone has long been known to be a non-marine syntectonic to post-tectonic deposit associated with the Caledonian Orogeny One of the most famous outcrops of the red sandstone is at Siccar Point in northeast England at one of several outcrops named "Hutton's unconformity" where it lies, with marked angularity on Silurian lithic sandstones and shales. It was at these outcrops, toward the end of the eigthteenth century that James Hutton first came to understand the meaning of angular unconformities as structures representing vast amounts of missing time during which major upheavals of the Earth's crust occurred.

  12. Statewide summary for Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Gibeaut, Jim; Thatcher, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Seafood landed at Texas ports valued $240 million in 2011, and recreational saltwater fishing alone provided nearly 17,000 jobs (Texas GLO, 2013). Fishes directly dependent upon wetland habitats include multiple shrimp species, blue crab, eastern oyster, black drum, flounder, sheepshead, and snapper. Texas has the highest number of hunters, anglers, and hunting expenditures in the nation (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2012). Hunting yields $2.3 billion for the state, and recreational fishing yields $3.2 billion. Texas is the top birding destination in the Nation. Tourism in Texas generates $7.5 billion for the state, and wildlife viewing generates $2.9 billion.

  13. Facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy of the Cenomanian-Turonian mixed siliciclastic-carbonate sediments in west Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan, Tarek I.

    2014-06-01

    The unconformity bounded Cenomanian-Turonian succession in west Sinai is subdivided into three formations: the Raha, Abu Qada, and Wata. These rock units were deposited in a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate system on a ramp setting. The studied ramp only includes inner and mid-ramp facies, whereas the outer ramp facies occurs in northern Sinai. Four sequence boundaries (SB) were recognized in the studied formations due to the presence of subaerial exposure or flooding events in the facies stacking pattern. The first and last sequence boundaries (SB1 and SB4) might be considered as Type 1 sequence boundary attributable to the presence of widespread erosion. It is difficult to determine type of the second and third sequence boundaries (SB2 and SB3) because of their minor unconformity and minimal erosion. Determination of systems tracts within the Wata Formation is debatable owing to the action of dolomitization that has destroyed both original components and sedimentary structures. The lowstand systems tracts of the recorded sequences are characterized by sandstones, siltstones, and sandy shales, while fossiliferous shale and limestone with oysters prevailed during sea level rise. The highstand systems tracts are generally characterized by shallow intertidal and subtidal deposits that are made up of abundant oyster wackestones with benthic foraminifera and ostracods.

  14. Shoreline depositional environments of Glen Rose Formation (lower Cretaceous) in type area, Somervell and Hood Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Bergan, G.R.

    1988-09-01

    The studied interval of the Glen Rose Formation (Aptian-Albian) comprises a clastic-to-carbonate sequence, which was deposited in a seaward-fining tidal flat-salt marsh complex. Eight distinct facies were identified, including the calcareous sandstone, calcareous shale, bivalve shale, oyster shale, transitional terrigenous-carbonate, dolomite, bioclastic packstone-grainstone, and shell-fragment wackestone facies. These facies were deposited in sand flats; small fluvial creeks; an ecologically complex, mud-dominated intertidal flat; and a subtidal, nearshore lagoon. Thin bioclastic packstone-grainstones and dolomites of the high energy intertidal and supratidal environments regularly interrupt the terrigenous clastic facies. Abundant nearshore features include salt-tolerant land plants, dinosaur tracks, desiccation cracks, and localized concentrations of evaporites. A warm semi-arid to arid climate is indicated. This sequence is interpreted as being comparable to the Holocene salt marshes on Sapelo Island, Georgia, based on similar lithofacies, sedimentary structures, and biological components.

  15. Tidal-bundle sequences in the Jordan Sandstone (Upper Cambrian), southeastern Minnesota, U.S.A.: Evidence for tides along inboard shorelines of the Sauk Epicontinental Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tape, C.H.; Cowan, Clinton A.; Runkel, Anthony C.

    2003-01-01

    This study documents for the first time tidal bundling in a lower Paleozoic sheet sandstone from the cratonic interior of North America, providing insights into the hydrodynamics of ancient epicontinental seas. The Jordan Sandstone (Upper Cambrian) in the Upper Mississippi Valley contains large-scale planar tabular cross-sets with tidal-bundle sequences, which were analyzed in detail at an exceptional exposure. Tidal-bundle sequences (neap-spring-neap cycles) were delineated by foreset thickening-thinning patterns and composite shale drapes, the latter of which represent accumulations of mud during the neap tides of neap-spring-neap tidal cycles. Fourier analysis of the bundle thickness data from the 26 measurable bundle sequences revealed cycles ranging from 15 to 34 bundles per sequence, which suggests a semidiurnal or mixed tidal system along this part of the Late Cambrian shoreline. We extend the tidal interpretation to widespread occurrences of the same facies in outcrops of lesser quality, where the facies is recognizable but too few bundles are exposed for tidal cycles to be measured. By doing so, this study shows that tidally generated deposits have a significant geographic and temporal extent in Upper Cambrian strata of central mid-continent North America. The deposition and preservation of tidal facies was related to the intermittent development of shoreline embayments during transgressions. The tidally dominated deposits filled ravined topographies that were repeatedly developed on the updip parts of the shoreface. Resulting coastal geomorphologies, accompanied perhaps by larger-scale changes in basinal conditions and/or configuration, led to changes in depositional conditions from wave-dominated to tide-dominated. Outcrops of the Jordan Sandstone tidal facies in the Upper Mississippi Valley represent the farthest inboard recorded transmission of ocean-generated tides in the Laurentian epicontinental seas, demonstrating that tidal currents were

  16. Geological Modeling and Fluid Flow Simulation of Acid Gas Storage, Nugget Sandstone, Moxa Arch, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Du, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Moxa Arch Anticline is a regional-scale northwest-trending uplift in western Wyoming where geological storage of acid gases (CO2, CH4, N2, H2S, He) from ExxonMobile's Shute Creek Gas Plant is under consideration. The Nugget Sandstone, a deep saline aquifer at depths exceeding 17,170 ft, is a candidate formation for acid gas storage. As part of a larger goal of determining site suitability, this study builds three-dimensional local to regional scale geological and fluid flow models for the Nugget Sandstone, its caprock (Twin Creek Limestone), and an underlying aquifer (Ankareh Sandstone), or together, the ``Nugget Suite''. For an area of 3000 square miles, geological and engineering data were assembled, screened for accuracy, and digitized, covering an average formation thickness of ~1700 feet. The data include 900 public-domain well logs (SP, Gamma Ray, Neutron Porosity, Density, Sonic, shallow and deep Resistivity, Lithology, Deviated well logs), 784 feet of core measurements (porosity and permeability), 4 regional geological cross sections, and 3 isopach maps. Data were interpreted and correlated for geological formations and facies, the later categorized using both Neural Network and Gaussian Hierarchical Clustering algorithms. Well log porosities were calibrated with core measurements, those of permeability estimated using formation-specific porosity-permeability transforms. Using conditional geostatistical simulations (first indicator simulation of facies, then sequential Gaussian simulation of facies-specific porosity), data were integrated at the regional-scale to create a geological model from which a local-scale simulation model surrounding the Shute Creek injection site was extracted. Based on this model, full compositional multiphase flow simulations were conducted with which we explore (1) an appropriate grid resolution for accurate acid gas predictions (pressure, saturation, and mass balance); (2) sensitivity of key geological and engineering

  17. Trace fossils and sedimentary facies from a Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician tide-dominated shelf (Santa Rosita Formation, northwest Argentina): Implications for ichnofacies models of shallow marine successions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangano, M.G.; Buatois, L.A.; Acenolaza, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    The Santa Rosita Formation is one the most widely distributed lower Paleozoic units of northwest Argentina. At the Quebrada del Salto Alto section, east of Purmamarca, Jujuy Province, it is represented by four sedimentary facies: thick-bedded planar cross-stratified quartzose sandstones (A), thin-bedded planar cross-stratified quartzose sandstones and mudstones (B), wave-rippled sandstones and bioturbated mudstones (C), and black and greenish gray shales (D). Paleocurrent data, sandstone architecture, and sedimentary structures from facies A and B indicate bipolar/bimodal paleoflows, suggesting the action of tidal currents. The succession is interpreted as that of a tide-dominated shelf, with only secondary influence of wave processes. Trace fossils are restricted to facies B and C. The Cruziana ichnocoenosis is preserved on the soles of thin-bedded planar cross-stratified quartzose sandstones (facies B). This ichnocoenosis consists of Conostichus isp., Cruziana omanica, C. semiplicata, C. cf. tortworthi, Cruziana isp. Helminthopsis abeli, Monomorphichnus bilinearis, M. multilineatus, Palaeophycus tubularis, Rusophycus carbonarius, R. latus, and R. isp. The occurrence of Cruziana semiplicata, C. omanica, C. cf. tortworthi, and Rusophycus latus supports a Late Cambrian-Tremadoc age. Slabbing of Cruziana shows complex interactions between biologic and sedimentologic processes, and suggests a predominance of exhumed traces, washed out and recast by tractive sand deposition. Sandstone soles are densely packed with biogenic structures and exhibit distinctive clusters of Rusophycus isp. that most likely represent trilobite nesting burrows. The Cruziana ichnocoenosis records the resident fauna of a protected, lower intertidal to subtidal interbar setting. The Skolithos ichnocoenosis is represented by high to low density vertical burrows of Skolithos linearis, which extend downwards to the quartzose sandstone soles of facies B and cross the Cruziana ichnocoenosis. The

  18. Eolian sabkha sandstones in the Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic), Vernal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, C.J.; Peterson, F. )

    1991-06-01

    The Jurassic Nugget Sandstone in the Vernal, Utah, area is characterized by thick (up to 25 m) sets of cross-stratified eolian dune sandstone separated by either erosional planar bounding surfaces or thin (mostly < 3 m) sandstones interpreted as sabkha sandstones. Structures in Nugget sabkha sandstones are predominantly wavy or irregular bedding and thin, remnant sets of dune cross-strata consisting of eolian ripple and avalanche strata. The types of sedimentary structures and erosional features in Nugget sabkha sandstones indicate a close relationship between sand deposition and erosion and fluctuations in the local water table. Thin, remnant eolian dune sets are common in Nugget sabkha sandstones. The remnant sets form when dunes migrating across a sabkha are partially wetted as the water table rises slightly (on a scale of tens of centimeters); the lower part of the dune with wetted sand remains on the sabkha as the rest of the dune continues to migrate. Typically, ripple strata of the dune apron and the toes of avalanche strata are preserved in dune remnants. The avalanche strata, being slightly coarser grained, are preferentially deflated, leaving microtopography. This topography is commonly filled in with ripple strata that form as dry sand again blows across the sabkha. Stacked sets of remnant dunes separated by erosional surfaces illustrate the control of sand deposition on eolian sabkhas by the local water table.

  19. Revitalizing a mature oil play: Strategies for finding and producing unrecovered oil in Frio fluvial-deltaic reservoirs of South Texas. Technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, N.; Levey, R.A.

    1995-10-10

    Advanced reservoir characterization techniques are being applied to selected reservoirs in the Frio fluvial-deltaic sandstone trend in order to maximize the economic producibility of resources in this mature oil play. More than half of the reservoirs in this play have already been abandoned, and large volumes of oil may remain unproduced unless advanced characterization techniques are applied to define untapped, incompletely drained, and new pool reservoirs as suitable targets for near-term recovery methods. This project is developing interwell-scale geological facies models and assessing engineering attributes of reservoirs in selected fields in order to characterize reservoir architecture, flow unit boundaries, and the controls that these characteristics exert on the location and volume of unrecovered mobile and residual oil. Phase 1 consisted of reservoir selection and initial framework characterization. Phase 2 involved advanced characterization to delineate incremental resource opportunities. Subtasks included volumetric assessments of untapped and incompletely drained oil along with an analysis of specific targets for recompletion and strategic infill drilling. The third phase of the project consists of documentation of Phase 2 results, technology transfer, and the extrapolation of specific results from reservoirs in this study to other heterogeneous fluvial-deltaic reservoirs within and beyond the Frio play in South Texas. Project work during this quarter consisted of (1) documentation of Phase 2 tasks associated with the delineation of untapped and incompletely drained reservoir compartments and new pool reservoirs in selected Frio fluvial-deltaic sandstone intervals in Rincon and Tijerina-Canales-Blucher fields, as well as (2) Phase 3 tasks related to the transfer of the technologies to industry that aided in delineation.

  20. Tubiphytes-archaeolithoporella-girvanella reefal facies in Permian buildup, Mino terrane, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Hiroyoshi; Horibo, Kenji; Kumamoto, Yasuko

    1990-10-01

    The Lower to Middle Permian Okumino buildup of the Mino terrane, central Japan, formed a carbonate cap on a seamount which was sitting in an open-ocean realm. Microscopic examination reveals considerable amounts of Tubiphytes, Archaeolithoporella, and Girvanella in these rocks. These low laminar encrusting organisms together with cystopore bryozoa and syndepositional radial-fibrous cements formed bindstones. The bindstones are interpreted as having formed wave-resistant algal reefal mounds on the marginal terrace of the Okumino buildup which also has the lagoonal flat, sand bar or shoal, and foreslope facies. The Okumino buildup is closer in its biotic association of major encrusting organisms to the Trogkofel buildup in southern Alps than to the Capitan Reef Complex in New Mexico and Texas. The similarity implies that Tubiphytes and Archaeolithoporella were the most predominant and significant rock-forming encrusting organisms in Early to early Middle Permian times.

  1. An overview of the Cretaceous stratigraphy and facies development of the Yazd Block, western Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmsen, Markus; Fürsich, Franz Theodor; Majidifard, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-04-01

    The Cretaceous successions of the Yazd Block, the western of three structural blocks of the Central-East Iranian Microcontinent (CEIM), have been studied using an integrated approach of litho-, bio- and sequence stratigraphy associated with litho-, bio- and microfacies analyses. The Cretaceous System of that area is in excess of 5 km thick and a generalized relative sea-level curve can be inferred from the facies and thickness development. This curve can be subdivided into two transgressive-regressive megacycles (TRMs), separated by a major tectonic unconformity in the Upper Turonian. TRM 1 comprises the Early Cretaceous to Middle Turonian, TRM 2 the Coniacian to Maastrichtian. TRM 1 starts with up to 1500-m-thick conglomerates and sandstones covering Palaeozoic-Triassic basement rocks, metasediments, or Upper Jurassic-lowermost Cretaceous granites. The basal tectonic unconformity, related to the Late Cimmerian event (Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary interval), shows a pronounced palaeo-relief that is levelled by the basal siliciclastic formations. Sparse biostratigraphic data from calcareous intercalations in the upper part of these strata indicate a Hauterivian to Barremian age. The Aptian facies development is marked by the onlap of thick-bedded, micritic carbonates with abundant orbitolinid foraminifera and rudists representing a large-scale shallow-marine carbonate platform system that fringed the Yazd Block in the north and west. These platforms are up to 1000 m thick and drowned during the middle to Late Aptian, followed by up to 1500-m-thick basinal marly sediments of Late Aptian to mid-Late Albian ages, representing the maximum relative sea-level during TRM 1. During the latest Albian-Middle Turonian, a gradual shallowing is indicated by progradation of shallow-water skeletal limestones separated by marl tongues, representing a carbonate ramp system. Strata of TRM 2 overlie older units along a regional angular unconformity and indicate tectonic stability and

  2. Coupling among Microbial Communities, Biogeochemistry, and Mineralogy across Biogeochemical Facies.

    PubMed

    Stegen, James C; Konopka, Allan; McKinley, James P; Murray, Chris; Lin, Xueju; Miller, Micah D; Kennedy, David W; Miller, Erin A; Resch, Charles T; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2016-07-29

    Physical properties of sediments are commonly used to define subsurface lithofacies and these same physical properties influence subsurface microbial communities. This suggests an (unexploited) opportunity to use the spatial distribution of facies to predict spatial variation in biogeochemically relevant microbial attributes. Here, we characterize three biogeochemical facies-oxidized, reduced, and transition-within one lithofacies and elucidate relationships among facies features and microbial community biomass, richness, and composition. Consistent with previous observations of biogeochemical hotspots at environmental transition zones, we find elevated biomass within a biogeochemical facies that occurred at the transition between oxidized and reduced biogeochemical facies. Microbial richness-the number of microbial taxa-was lower within the reduced facies and was well-explained by a combination of pH and mineralogy. Null modeling revealed that microbial community composition was influenced by ecological selection imposed by redox state and mineralogy, possibly due to effects on nutrient availability or transport. As an illustrative case, we predict microbial biomass concentration across a three-dimensional spatial domain by coupling the spatial distribution of subsurface biogeochemical facies with biomass-facies relationships revealed here. We expect that merging such an approach with hydro-biogeochemical models will provide important constraints on simulated dynamics, thereby reducing uncertainty in model predictions.

  3. Impact Metamorphism of Sandstones at Amguid Crater, Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoui, R.; Belhai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Amguid is a 450 m diameter sample crater; it is emplaced in Lower Devonian sandstones.We have carried out a petrographic study in order to investigate shock effects recorded in these sandstones and define shock stages in Amguid.

  4. Anatomy and dimensions of fluvial crevasse-splay deposits: Examples from the Cretaceous Castlegate Sandstone and Neslen Formation, Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, C. E.; Mountney, N. P.; Hodgson, D. M.; Colombera, L.

    2017-04-01

    Crevasse-splay deposits form a volumetrically significant component of many fluvial overbank successions (up to 90% in some successions).Yet the relationships between the morphological form of accumulated splay bodies and their internal facies composition remains poorly documented from ancient successions. This work quantifies lithofacies distributions and dimensions of exhumed crevasse-splay architectural elements in the Campanian Castlegate Sandstone and Neslen Formation, Mesaverde Group, Utah, USA, to develop a depositional model. Fluvial crevasse-splay bodies thin from 2.1 m (average) to 0.8 m (average) and fine from a coarsest recorded grain size of lower-fine sand to fine silt away from major trunk channel bodies. Internally, the preserved deposits of splays comprise laterally and vertically variable sandstone and siltstone facies associations: proximal parts are dominated by sharp and erosional-based sandstone-prone units, which may be structureless or may comprise primary current lineation on beds and erosional gutter casts; medial parts comprise sets of climbing-ripple strata and small scale deformed beds; distal parts comprise sets of lower-stage plane beds and complex styles of lateral grading into fine-grained floodbasin siltstones and coals. Lithofacies arrangements are used to establish the following: (i) recognition criteria for crevasse-splay elements; (ii) criteria for the differentiation between distal parts of crevasse-splay bodies and floodplain fines; and (iii) empirical relationships with which to establish the extent (ca. 500 m long by 1000 m wide) and overall semi-elliptical planform shape of crevasse-splay bodies. These relationships have been established by high-resolution stratigraphic correlation and palaeocurrent analysis to identify outcrop orientation with respect to splay orientation. This permits lateral changes in crevasse-splay facies architecture to be resolved. Facies models describing the sedimentology and architecture of

  5. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Northrop, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This project is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Harvey E. Yates Company being conducted under the auspices of the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project seeks to apply perspectives related to the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology to the simulation and production of low-permeability gas reservoirs to low-permeability oil reservoirs as typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Permian Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report presents the results and analysis obtained in 1989 from 233 ft of oriented core, comprehensive suite of logs, various in situ stress measurements, and detailed well tests conducted in conjunction with the drilling of two development wells. Natural fractures were observed in core and logs in the interbed carbonates, but there was no direct evidence of fractures in the sandstones. However, production tests of the sandstones indicated permeabilities and behavior typical of a dual porosity reservoir. A general northeast trend for the maximum principal horizontal stress was observed in an elastic strain recovery measurements and in strikes of drilling-induced fractures; this direction is subparallel to the principal fracture trend observed in the interbed carbonates. Many of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L.

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  7. Reservoir characterization through facies analysis of core and outcrop of the Lower Green River Formation: Hydrocarbon production enhancement in the Altamont-Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, M.; Garner, A.; Morris, T.H.

    1995-06-01

    The Altamont-Bluebell Field has produced over 125 million barrels of oil from lacustrine rocks of the Green River Formation, yet operators have not been able to accurately distinguish productive zones from non-productive, thief, and water-bearing zones. Low recoverability is largely due to the lack of understanding of the relationship between heterolithic facies, reservoir fracture systems and clay migration. These areas were investigated by analyzing over 457 meters of core from the Bluebell area and 843 meters of outcrop from the Willow Creek area. Approximately 60% of the core consists of carbonates and 40% consists of clastics (predominantly sandstones). The carbonate rocks in general have good porosity and randomly oriented, interconnected fractures, whereas the fractures in the sandstones are more vertical and isolated. The sandstones, however, do have the best reservoir capacity due to inherent interparticle porosity. Preliminary analysis of clay types indicates swelling illite-smectite mixed layer clays as well as kaolinite in both the elastic and carbonate rocks. These swelling clay types combine with the high pour point waxy oils to reduce production efficiency and total recovery. Outcrop studies conducted in the Willow Creek Canyon area help establish facies heterogeneity and reservoir storage capacity of lithology within the facies belts that have been defined in the Altamont-Bluebell field. Although production primarily occurs from fractured lithology, core plug analyses of more than 10 lithology indicate that arenites have the greatest potential for reservoir capacity, with porosities as high as 27%. This suggests that an association of arenites with fractured lithology would provide the best scenario for long-term production.

  8. Spectral Induced Polarization of Sandstones: Temperature Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A.; Kruschwitz, S.; Lesmes, D.

    2007-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for a wide range of environmental applications, in particular those focused on hydrogeological investigations. Recent experimental work has demonstrated that the mean relaxation time of electrical impedance spectra measured in sandstones is linked to the grain surface area and strongly correlated to some measure of a dominant pore throat size. Such empirically derived relationships lead to potential models of SIP - hydraulic conductivity, which has immense value for the hydrological community. Furthermore, the links between surface area and electrical response may lead to other, equally exciting, applications, such as in characterizing geochemical reactivity of sediments. However, there is a need to understand the fundamental behavior of SIP in such porous media in order for such models to be applied usefully. In an attempt to address this, we focus here on the influence of temperature on the SIP behavior of a range of sandstones. Classical models of dielectric dispersion in colloids have proposed direct inverse relationships between relaxation time and temperature. Through a series of experimental trials we have studied this behavior: examining the impedance spectra (in the 1 mHz to 1 kHz range) of four different sandstones over a temperature range of 5 to 30 degrees Celsius. Analysis of the spectra with the widely used Pelton Cole-Cole model has confirmed hypothesized effects on a mean relaxation time but revealed that the responses to temperature change is a function of physical properties of the sandstone. In addition, the analysis has illustrated how temperature effects on surface complex conductivity of the sandstones differ as a function of pore fluid and formation factor. The results add to the growing experimental evidence of controls on spectral impedance in porous media and help ascertain generalized petrophysical models for a wide range of applications.

  9. Eccentricity and precession forced cyclicity in the Upper Silurian Williamsport Sandstone Member of the Wills Creek Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, S.D.; Anderson, E.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Williamsport Sandstone Member, located at the base of the Wills Creek Formation, contains a complete 5th order sequence, traceable for more than 100 kilometers. This 5th order sequence is initiated with a massive iron-rich sandstone unit. The upper iron-rich sand of the Williamsport Member marks the beginning of the next 5th order sequence. The first 5th order rock cycle, interpreted as the product of the 100 k.y. Milankovitch eccentricity cycle, is divisible into five meter-scale 6th order precessional cycles (PACs). At Cedar Cliff, Maryland, the lithology of each of the five 6th order cycles is distinct. The first cycle (.8m thick) is a massive iron-rich sandstone. The second cycle (.75m thick) is an argillaceous nodular micrite. The third cycle (.75m thick) consists totally of thin-bedded quartz sandstone. The fourth cycle (2m thick) is represented by bedded limestones that thicken upward. The fifth cycle (.6m thick) is very thin-bedded to nodular limestone. This 5th order sequence and most of its internal cyclic elements can be traced over 100 kilometers to Mount Union, Pennsylvania where its facies are largely non-marine. Detailed correlation of these 6th order cycles reveals that the uppermost PAC is missing at Cumberland and Mount Union. At these localities, the prominent iron bed of the next 5th order sequence rests unconformably on the fourth PAC in the sequence. The fifth 6th order cycle was either not deposited or removed by erosion at these proximal localities. The laterally traceable hierarchic cyclic structure in the Williamsport Sandstone is consistent with the Milankovitch forcing model and provides a detailed stratigraphic basis for analysis of lateral patterns of cyclic accumulation in the late Silurian of the central Appalachians.

  10. Seismic facies interpretation of Mesozoic sequences, Shiwandashan basin, China

    SciTech Connect

    Leu, Leikuang; Armentrout, J.M.; Faz, J.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Integration of outcrop and subsurface geologic data with seismic facies analysis identified three exploration plays in Shiwandashan basin, southeastern China: Triassic Submarine Fan: Elongate-mounded packages of variable amplitude, discontinuous, nonparallel reflections occur basinward of the slope and are downlapped by prograding slope clinoforms. This facies is undrilled. Basin modeling suggests the mounded seismic facies correlates with outcrops of Triassic marine siliclastic turbidites which grade laterally into basinal mudstone/limestone couplets. Triassic Shelf Carbonates: Localized, high amplitude parallel reflections occur in a retrograde succession at the top of the Triassic prograding clinoform. These high amplitude seismic facies are calibrated with drilled carbonate facies and are correlated with outcrops of upper Triassic shelf and shelf-edge reefs that contain two generations of migrated hydrocarbons. Jurassic Fan Deltas: Thick northeast-southwest bidirectional downlapping hummocks of variable amplitude reflections and intersecting northwest downlapping clinoforms form large mounds and grade laterally to moderately continuous parallel reflections. The hummocky-clinoform mound facies is calibrated by drilled, poorly sorted conglomerates and correlates with outcrops of a Jurassic synrift basin-fill succession. These Jurassic rocks are interpreted as fan-deltas grading laterally to sandy fluvial and shaley lacustrine facies. The geochemical data suggest a potential gas-prone play for the Triassic submarine fans and potential oil-prone play for the stratigraphically shallower Triassic shelf and shelf-edge reefs. The Jurassic fan delta play drilled tight with no hydrocarbons.

  11. Coupling among Microbial Communities, Biogeochemistry, and Mineralogy across Biogeochemical Facies

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, James C.; Konopka, Allan; McKinely, Jim; Murray, Christopher J.; Lin, Xueju; Miller, Micah D.; Kennedy, David W.; Miller, Erin A.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2016-07-29

    Physical properties of sediments are commonly used to define subsurface lithofacies and these same physical properties influence subsurface microbial communities. This suggests an (unexploited) opportunity to use the spatial distribution of facies to predict spatial variation in biogeochemically relevant microbial attributes. Here, we characterize three biogeochemical facies—oxidized, reduced, and transition—within one lithofacies and elucidate relationships among facies features and microbial community biomass, diversity, and community composition. Consistent with previous observations of biogeochemical hotspots at environmental transition zones, we find elevated biomass within a biogeochemical facies that occurred at the transition between oxidized and reduced biogeochemical facies. Microbial diversity—the number of microbial taxa—was lower within the reduced facies and was well-explained by a combination of pH and mineralogy. Null modeling revealed that microbial community composition was influenced by ecological selection imposed by redox state and mineralogy, possibly due to effects on nutrient availability or transport. As an illustrative case, we predict microbial biomass concentration across a three-dimensional spatial domain by coupling the spatial distribution of subsurface biogeochemical facies with biomass-facies relationships revealed here. We expect that merging such an approach with hydro-biogeochemical models will provide important constraints on simulated dynamics, thereby reducing uncertainty in model predictions.

  12. Coupling among Microbial Communities, Biogeochemistry, and Mineralogy across Biogeochemical Facies

    PubMed Central

    Stegen, James C.; Konopka, Allan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Chris; Lin, Xueju; Miller, Micah D.; Kennedy, David W.; Miller, Erin A.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2016-01-01

    Physical properties of sediments are commonly used to define subsurface lithofacies and these same physical properties influence subsurface microbial communities. This suggests an (unexploited) opportunity to use the spatial distribution of facies to predict spatial variation in biogeochemically relevant microbial attributes. Here, we characterize three biogeochemical facies—oxidized, reduced, and transition—within one lithofacies and elucidate relationships among facies features and microbial community biomass, richness, and composition. Consistent with previous observations of biogeochemical hotspots at environmental transition zones, we find elevated biomass within a biogeochemical facies that occurred at the transition between oxidized and reduced biogeochemical facies. Microbial richness—the number of microbial taxa—was lower within the reduced facies and was well-explained by a combination of pH and mineralogy. Null modeling revealed that microbial community composition was influenced by ecological selection imposed by redox state and mineralogy, possibly due to effects on nutrient availability or transport. As an illustrative case, we predict microbial biomass concentration across a three-dimensional spatial domain by coupling the spatial distribution of subsurface biogeochemical facies with biomass-facies relationships revealed here. We expect that merging such an approach with hydro-biogeochemical models will provide important constraints on simulated dynamics, thereby reducing uncertainty in model predictions. PMID:27469056

  13. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-04-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  14. Reservoir heterogeneity in carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-06-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  15. Sequence stratigraphy of the Aux Vases Sandstone: A major oil producer in the Illinois basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leetaru, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    The Aux Vases Sandstone (Mississippian) has contributed between 10 and 25% of all the oil produced in Illinois. The Aux Vases is not only an important oil reservoir but is also an important source of groundwater, quarrying stone, and fluorspar. Using sequence stratigraphy, a more accurate stratigraphic interpretation of this economically important formation can be discerned and thereby enable more effective exploration for the resources contained therein. Previous studies have assumed that the underlying Spar Mountain, Karnak, and Joppa formations interfingered with the Aux Vases, as did the overlying Renault Limestone. This study demonstrates that these formations instead are separated by sequence boundaries; therefore, they are not genetically related to each other. A result of this sequence stratigraphic approach is the identification of incised valleys, paleotopography, and potential new hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Spar Mountain and Aux Vases. In eastern Illinois, the Aux Vases is bounded by sequence boundaries with 20 ft (6 m) of relief. The Aux Vases oil reservoir facies was deposited as a tidally influenced siliciclastic wedge that prograded over underlying carbonate-rich sediments. The Aux Vases sedimentary succession consists of offshore sediment overlain by intertidal and supratidal sediments. Low-permeability shales and carbonates typically surround the Aux Vases reservoir sandstone and thereby form numerous bypassed compartments from which additional oil can be recovered. The potential for new significant oil fields within the Aux Vases is great, as is the potential for undrained reservoir compartments within existing Aux Vases fields.

  16. Geologic observations of the Whirlpool Sandstone in Western Warren County, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Ensign, J. )

    1991-08-01

    The Whirlpool Sandstone represents the lowest member of the Lower Silurian Medina Group. The sandstone is ubiquitous in western New York and northwestern Pennsylvania, but economic development is difficult to predict and locate on a consistent basis. This reservoir appears to be composed of a basal beach sand, which in some areas is overlain by what appears to be prograding tidal/channel facies. Gross sequence of strata maps and unique vertical-profile maps have been helpful in reconstructing the depositional history of this reservoir. Porosity-foot maps have been very helpful for most development drilling decisions. Detailed cross sections have also provided valuable insight regarding subtle, but important, structural trends. Sonic logs and QLA2 logging software have helped to accurately determine that the cementation exponent is lower than 2.0, which is thought to be characteristic of intergranular porosity. This has justified recompletions in some areas where the Whirlpool was originally not completed due to overly pessimistic water saturations. A multiple regression equation has been used to identify those parameters possessing the highest degrees of correlation when compared to reserves. The maximum value for r-squared was 0.66. The equation-generated reserves were compared against decline-curve reserves and the results were extremely close, suggesting that the regression equations could be used to predict lifetime reserves even before the well is completed. However, since the independent variables are geographically sensitive, this equation can be used only in very specific areas.

  17. Fault control of channel sandstones in Dakota Formation, southwest Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.R.

    1983-08-01

    The Dakota Formation is an important oil reservoir in the southwestern Powder River basin and adjoining Casper arch. Two fields, Burke Ranch and South Cole Creek, are used as examples to show the depositional environments of the Dakota and to indicate the influence of tectonic control on the distribution of the environments. Burke Ranch field is a stratigraphic trap which produces oil from the upper bench of the Dakota. The environment of deposition of the reservoir, determined by subsurface analysis, is a channel sandstone. South Cole Creek field is a structural-stratigraphic trap which produces from the lower bench of the Dakota. Two distinct facies, a channel and channel margin sandstone, exist at South Cole Creek. At both Burke Ranch and South Cole Creek it can be shown that the Dakota channels were deposited on the downthrown side of faults, which were present during Dakota time and which now are reflected on the surface by drainage patterns. An understanding of the environments of deposition of the Dakota and control of the environments by paleotectonics is necessary for exploration for these prolific reservoirs.

  18. Coal facies studies in the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Eble, C.F.

    2004-01-01

    Coals in the eastern United States (east of the Mississippi River) have been the subject of a number of coal facies studies, going back to the 19th century. Such studies would not necessarily fall within a strict modern classification of coal facies studies, but if a study encompassed some aspects of paleobotany, palynology, petrology, geochemistry, or sedimentology, we assumed that some data and interpretations may be of use in evaluations of the facies. References are presented, as a guide for further research, with annotation in the tables. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Migrant Programs in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrasco, Frank, Ed.

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide information on migrant programs and services in the state of Texas. Data are gathered from 92 of the 254 counties in Texas. There is a profile for each county selected and for all migrant programs identified in each county. Descriptions of Title III-B migrant programs, the High School Equivalency program,…

  20. Earthquake history of Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Hake, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Seventeen earthquakes, intensity V or greater, have centered in Texas since 1882, when the first shock was reported. The strongest earthquake, a maximum intensity VIII, was in western Texas in 1931 and was felt over 1 165 000 km 2. Three shocks in the Panhandle region in 1925, 1936, and 1943 were widely felt. 

  1. Fireball Over Texas

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video of the fireball seen over Texas this morning (12/7/12); it was taken by a NASA camera located near Mayhill, New Mexico. It is very unusual for us to see a meteor all the way across Texas. The...

  2. Reservoir uncertainty, Precambrian topography, and carbon sequestration in the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leetaru, H.E.; McBride, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Sequestration sites are evaluated by studying the local geological structure and confirming the presence of both a reservoir facies and an impermeable seal not breached by significant faulting. The Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone is a blanket sandstone that underlies large parts of Midwest United States and is this region's most significant carbon sequestration reservoir. An assessment of the geological structure of any Mt. Simon sequestration site must also include knowledge of the paleotopography prior to deposition. Understanding Precambrian paleotopography is critical in estimating reservoir thickness and quality. Regional outcrop and borehole mapping of the Mt. Simon in conjunction with mapping seismic reflection data can facilitate the prediction of basement highs. Any potential site must, at the minimum, have seismic reflection data, calibrated with drill-hole information, to evaluate the presence of Precambrian topography and alleviate some of the uncertainty surrounding the thickness or possible absence of the Mt. Simon at a particular sequestration site. The Mt. Simon is thought to commonly overlie Precambrian basement granitic or rhyolitic rocks. In places, at least about 549 m (1800 ft) of topographic relief on the top of the basement surface prior to Mt. Simon deposition was observed. The Mt. Simon reservoir sandstone is thin or not present where basement is topographically high, whereas the low areas can have thick Mt. Simon. The paleotopography on the basement and its correlation to Mt. Simon thickness have been observed at both outcrops and in the subsurface from the states of Illinois, Ohio, Wisconsin, and Missouri. ?? 2009. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  3. Sedimentological characterization of flood-tidal delta deposits in the Sego Sandstone, subsidence analysis in the Piceance Creek Basin, and uranium-lead geochronology (NW Colorado, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Carly C.

    The Sego Sandstone located in western Colorado is a member of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and is considered an analogue of the Canadian heavy oil sands. Deposition of the Sego Sandstone occurred during the Upper Campanian (~78 Ma) at the end of the Sevier Orogeny and the beginning of the Laramide Orogeny on the western edge of the Cretaceous Interior Seaway. Although regional studies have detailed time equivalent deposits in the Book Cliffs, UT, the tidally influenced and marginal marine lithofacies observed north of Rangely, CO are distinctly different from the dominately fluvial and tidally-influenced delta facies of Book Cliff outcrops to the southwest. This study characterized flood-tidal delta deposits within the Sego Sandstone, the subsidence history of the Upper Cretaceous sedimentary rocks within the present day Piceance Creek Basin in NW Colorado, and the detrital zircon signal and oldest depositional age of the Sego Sandstone. The goals of this study are to (i) identify relative controls on reservoir characteristics of marginal marine deposits, specifically in flood-tidal delta deposits; (ii) identify the possible mechanisms responsible for subsidence within the present day Piceance Creek Basin during the Late Cretaceous; and (iii) better constrain the provenance and maximum depositional age of the Sego Sandstone. In this study I compared grain size diameter, grain and cement composition, and the ratio of pore space/cement from thin sections collected in tidal, shoreface, and flood-tidal delta facies recognized along detailed measured stratigraphic sections. This analysis provides a detailed comparison between different depositional environments and resultant data showed that grain size diameter is different between tidal, shoreface, and flood-tidal delta facies. Identifying the subsidence mechanisms affecting the Piceance Creek Basin and sediment source of the Late Cretaceous sediments, on the other hand, is important for evaluation of controls

  4. Preservation of anomalously high porosity in deeply buried sandstones by grain-coating chlorite: Examples from the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenberg, S.N. )

    1993-07-01

    Five Lower to Middle Jurassic sandstone reservoirs from the Norwegian sector provide examples of deep porosity preservation caused by grain-coating, authigenic chlorite. Wide porosity variations in clean sandstones correlate with an abundance of grain-coating chlorite and consequent inhibition of quarts cementation. Maximum porosities tend to decrease with increasing depth but generally are 10-15% higher than would be predicted from regional trends of mean porosity vs. depth. It is proposed in this paper that the high chlorite content of the porous zones reflects syndepositional concentration of Fe-rich marine clays analogous to minerals of the modern verdine facies. Fe-clay mineralization would have been localized where Fe-rich river water was discharged into the sea. The syndepositional clays were transformed during burial diagenesis into grain coatings of radially oriented chlorite crystals. Petrographic relationships indicate that these coatings grew mainly before the beginning of quartz cementation and feldspar grain dissolution (probably within the first 2 km of burial) but after grain contacts had become adjusted by mechanical compaction. The Norwegian examples demonstrate that a wide range of nearshore marine sand-body types is susceptible to chlorite mineralization. The distribution of anomalous porosity and the proportion of the net sand affected depend upon sedimentary facies architecture and the pattern of discharge of Fe-rich river water during sand deposition. This phenomenon can be critically important for hydrocarbon exploration because it can provide good reservoir quality at depths far below the [open quotes]economic basement[close quotes] originally defined on the basis of sandstones lacking chlorite coatings. 58 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Experimental research on seismoelectric effects in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rong; Wei, Jian-Xing; Di, Bang-Rang; Ding, Pin-Bo; Liu, Zi-Chun

    2016-09-01

    The seismoelectric effects induced from the coupling of the seismic wave field and the electromagnetic field depend on the physical properties of the reservoir rocks. We built an experimental apparatus to measure the seismoelectric effects in saturated sandstone samples. We recorded the seismoelectric signals induced by P-waves and studied the attenuation of the seismoelectric signals induced at the sandstone interface. The analysis of the seismoelectric effects suggests that the minimization of the potential difference between the reference potential and the baseline potential of the seismoelectric disturbance area is critical to the accuracy of the seismoelectric measurements and greatly improves the detectability of the seismoelectric signals. The experimental results confirmed that the seismoelectric coupling of the seismic wave field and the electromagnetic field is induced when seismic wave propagating in a fluid-saturated porous medium. The amplitudes of the seismoelectric signals decrease linearly with increasing distance between the source and the interface, and decay exponentially with increasing distance between the receiver and the interface. The seismoelectric response of sandstone samples with different permeabilities suggests that the seismoelectric response is directly related to permeability, which should help obtaining the permeability of reservoirs in the future.

  6. Matrix versus fracture permeability in a regional sandstone aquifer (Wajid sandstone, SW Saudi Arabia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Ajmi, Hussain; Hinderer, Matthias; Rausch, Randolf; Hornung, Jens; Bassis, Alexander; Keller, Martin; Schüth, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Sandstones are often characterized as fractured aquifers. We present a case study of the Wajid sandstone, which forms a regional aquifer system in SW Saudi Arabia, where matrix, fracture, and large-scale hydraulic conductivities are coincident. The measurements deal with different scales and methods and are based on porosity and permeability measurements in the laboratory, as well as pumping tests in the field. Porosities of the sandstone samples in general are high and range between less than 5 % and more than 45 %. Gas permeabilities for strongly cemented samples are < 1 mD, whereas most samples range in between 500 and 5,000 mD. There is only a weak anisotropy with preference of the horizontal x-, y-directions. Hydraulic conductivities of the matrix samples (5.5 · 10-6 m/s and 1.1 · 10-5 m/s for the Upper and Lower Wajid sandstone, respectively) were in the same order of magnitude compared to hydraulic conductivities derived from pumping tests (8.3 · 10-5 m/s and 2.2 · 10-5 m/s for the Upper and Lower Wajid sandstone, respectively).

  7. Ordovician conodonts and stratigraphy of the ST. Peter sandstone and glen wood shale, central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witzke, B.J.; Metzger, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    The age of the St. Peter Sandstone in the central and northern Midcontinent has long been considered equivocal because of the general absence of biostratigraphically useful fossils. Conodonts recovered from the St. Peter Sandstone in Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Kansas for this study help place some age constraints on this renowned formation in its northern and western extent. Faunas from the lower St. Peter include Phragmodus flexuosus, Cahabagnathus sp., and Leptochirognathus sp., and a late Whiterockian (Chazyan) correlation is indicated. Juvenile or immature elements of P. flexuosus from these collections show morphologies trending toward P. cognitus and P. inflexus, and paedomorphic derivation of these latter species is proposed. Diverse assemblages of hyaline forms also occur in the St. Peter strata (Erismodus spp., Erraticodon sp., Curtognathus sp., Coleodus sp., Archeognathus sp., Stereoconus sp., others) along with various albid elements (Plectodina sp., Eoplacognathus sp., others). The overlying Glenwood Shale contains abundant conodonts dominated by Phragmodus cognitus, Erismodus sp., and Chirognathus duodactylus, and the fauna is interpreted as an early Mohawkian (Blackriveran) association. Certain thin shale units in the St. Peter-Glenwood succession represent condensed intervals, in part reflected by their exceptionally high conodont abundances. Some organic-rich phosphatic shale units in the lower St. Peter of western Iowa have produced equivalent yields of tens of thousands of conodonts per kilogram, and many Glenwood Shale samples yield thousands of conodonts per kilogram. Previous depositional models have proposed that the St. Peter is primarily a succession of littoral and nearshore facies forming a broadly diachronous transgressive sheet sand. However, broad-scale diachroneity cannot be demonstrated with available biostratigraphic control. The recognition of condensed marine shale units, phosphorites, ironstones, and pyritic hardgrounds in the

  8. Synkinematic quartz cementation in partially open fractures in sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukar, Estibalitz; Laubach, Stephen E.; Fall, Andras; Eichhubl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Faults and networks of naturally open fractures can provide open conduits for fluid flow, and may play a significant role in hydrocarbon recovery, hydrogeology, and CO2 sequestration. However, sandstone fracture systems are commonly infilled, at least to some degree, by quartz cement, which can stiffen and occlude fractures. Such cement deposits can systematically reduce the overall permeability enhancement due to open fractures (by reducing open fracture length) and result in permeability anisotropies. Thus, it is important to identify the factors that control the precipitation of quartz in fractures in order to identify potential fluid conduits under the present-day stress field. In many sandstones, quartz nucleates syntaxially on quartz grain or cement substrate of the fracture wall, and extends between fracture walls only locally, forming pillars or bridges. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images reveal that the core of these bridges are made up of bands of broken and resealed cement containing wall-parallel fluid inclusion planes. The fluid inclusion-rich core is usually surrounded by a layer of inclusion-poor clear quartz that comprises the lateral cement. Such crack-seal textures indicate that this phase was precipitating while the fractures were actively opening (synkinematic growth). Rapid quartz accumulation is generally believed to require temperatures of 80°C or more. Fluid inclusion thermometry and Raman spectroscopy of two-phase aqueous fluid-inclusions trapped in crack-seal bands may be used to track the P-T-X evolution of pore fluids during fracture opening and crack-seal cementation of quartz. Quartz cement bridges across opening mode fractures in the Cretaceous Travis Peak Formation of the tectonically quiescent East Texas Basin indicate individual fractures opened over a 48 m.y. time span at rates of 16-23 µm/m.y. Similarly, the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Piceance Basin, Colorado contains fractures that

  9. Lower Permian fluvial cyclicity and stratigraphic evolution of the northern margin of Gondwanaland: Warchha Sandstone, Salt Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, Shahid; Mountney, Nigel P.; Sharif, Sadaf

    2015-06-01

    During the Lower Permian (Artinskian), fluvial conditions prevailed in what is now the Salt Range of northern Pakistan. Deposits of the Warchha Sandstone are characterised by a range of fluvial facies and architectural elements that together record both the proximal and distal parts of a meandering river system that drained the northern margin of Gondwanaland. Stratigraphic units are arranged into vertically stacked fining-upward cycles represented by thin accumulations of channel-lag deposits at their bases, and sandstone-dominated channel fill and thicker accumulations of overbank mudstone at their tops. Sedimentary cyclicity records fluvial system development on a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Overall, the Warchha Sandstone preserves a series of three to ten vertically stacked fining-upward cycles that form part of a larger-scale, third-order sequence that is itself bounded by regionally extensive and laterally correlatable unconformities that were generated in response to combined tectonic and eustatic changes. The sequence-stratigraphic architecture reflects regional palaeogeographic development of the Salt Range region. The small-scale fluvial cycles originated through autogenic mechanisms, predominantly as a result of repeated channel avulsion processes that occurred concurrently with on-going subsidence and the progressive generation of accommodation. Each erosively based fining-upward fluvial cycle is divided into three parts: a lower part of trough cross-bedded conglomerate and coarse sandstone; a middle part of tabular cross-bedded, ripple cross-laminated and horizontally laminated sandstone; and an upper part of predominantly horizontally laminated and massive mudstone. Overall, the Warchha Sandstone records the progradation of a wedge of non-marine strata into a previously shallow-marine depositional setting. The underlying marine Dandot Formation is terminated by a major unconformity that represents a type-I sequence boundary associated with

  10. Jonah field, sublette county, Wyoming: Gas production from overpressured Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Green River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, S.L.; Robinson, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Jonah field, located in the northwestern Green River basin, Wyoming, produces gas from overpressured fluvial channel sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation. Reservoirs exist in isolated and amalgamated channel facies 10-100 ft (3-30 m) thick and 150-4000 ft (45-1210 m) wide, deposited by meandering and braided streams. Compositional and paleocurrent studies indicate these streams flowed eastward and had their source area in highlands associated with the Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt to the west. Productive sandstones at Jonah have been divided into five pay intervals, only one of which (Jonah interval) displays continuity across most of the field. Porosities in clean, productive sandstones range from 8 to 12%, with core permeabilities of .01-0.9 md (millidarcys) and in-situ permeabilities as low as 3-20 ??d (microdarcys), as determined by pressure buildup analyses. Structurally, the field is bounded by faults that have partly controlled the level of overpressuring. This level is 2500 ft (758 m) higher at Jonah field than in surrounding parts of the basin, extending to the top part of the Lance Formation. The field was discovered in 1975, but only in the 1990s did the area become fully commercial, due to improvements in fracture stimulation techniques. Recent advances in this area have further increased recoverable reserves and serve as a potential example for future development of tight gas sands elsewhere in the Rocky Mountain region.

  11. Depositional history of Dakota Sandstone, Moxa Arch and vicinity, southwestern Wyoming - implications for early evolution of Cretaceous Foreland Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ryer, T.A.; McClurg, J.J.; Muller, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    The Dakota Sandstone in the vicinity of the Moxa Arch is divided into upper and lower parts using an unconformity identified on the basis of petrographic evidence and facies relationships. The unconformity is believed to be of subaerial origin and came into being during a pronounced lowering of relative sea level during the late Albian. The lower Dakota consists predominantly of shoreline sandstone and offshore marine shale on the northern part of the Moxa Arch; it consists predominantly of fluvial strata on the southern part of the arch. Meander belts of the lower Dakota trend north-northeastward toward the west-northwest-trending shoreline of the Thermopolis Sea. The upper Dakota consists predominantly of strata deposited in low-energy, restricted marine paleoenvironments that came into being during gradual transgression of the Shell Creek/Mowery Sea. Barrier-island sandstones bodies are elongate toward the northeast, indicating that the shoreline trended in that direction. The reorientation of the shoreline from west-northwest-trending in the lower Dakota to northeast-trending in the upper Dakota is attributed to acceleration in the rate of subsidence in the foreland basin. The Shell Creek Sea advanced down the eastern side of the foreland basin, transgressing over lacustrine deposits that accumulated there during the low-stand of sea level. The Moxa Arch appears to have served as the eastern hinge of the foreland basin during the Dakota; only later, in the Late Cretaceous, did it assume the characteristics of a foreland welt.

  12. Sedimentary facies of alluvial fan deposits, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, G.V. )

    1992-01-01

    Fans in Death Valley include both diamicts and bedded gravels. Seven facies may be recognized. The diamicts include: (1) matrix-rich, coarse wackestones; (2) thin, matrix-rich, fine wackestones, that may show grading; (3) matrix-poor, coarse packstones, transitional to wackestones. The bedded facies include: (4) weakly bedded, poorly sorted packstones or grainstones, that show patchy imbrication, and cut-and-fill structures; (5) packed, imbricated cobble lenses, generally interbedded in facies 4; (6) distinctly bedded gravels, that are better bedded, finer and better sorted, and show better imbrication than facies 4, but still do not show clear separation of sand and gravel beds; (7) backfill cross-bedded gravels. Sand beds are not seen in fan deposits. Sand is present in eolian deposits, as plane-laminated, back-eddy deposits in Death Valley Wash, and as laminated or rippled sand in the Amargosa River. The most remarkable features of the fan deposits are the very weak segregation of sand and gravel, and the complete absence of any lower flow-regime structures produced by ripples or dunes. During floods, the slope of fan and even large wash surfaces is steep enough to produce upper flow regimes. There are also very few trends in facies abundance down fans: most fans in Death Valley itself are not strongly dominated by debris flow deposits (diamicts). The facies characteristics of a given fan vary little from proximal to distal regions, but may differ strongly from the facies seen in adjacent fans. Ancient deposits that show clear segregation of gravel from cross-bedded sand beds, or strong proximal to distal facies transitions, must have been deposited in environments quite different from Death Valley.

  13. Palynostratigraphy and sedimentary facies of Middle Miocene fluvial deposits of the Amazonas Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dino, Rodolfo; Soares, Emílio Alberto Amaral; Antonioli, Luzia; Riccomini, Claudio; Nogueira, Afonso César Rodrigues

    2012-03-01

    Palynostratigraphic and sedimentary facies analyses were made on sedimentary deposits from the left bank of the Solimões River, southwest of Manaus, State of Amazonas, Brazil. These provided the age-dating and subdivision of a post-Cretaceous stratigraphic succession in the Amazonas Basin. The Novo Remanso Formation is subdivided into upper and lower units, and delineated by discontinuous surfaces at its top and bottom. The formation consists primarily of sandstones and minor mudstones and conglomerates, reflecting fluvial channel, point bar and floodplain facies of a fluvial meandering paleosystem. Fairly well-preserved palynoflora was recovered from four palynologically productive samples collected in a local irregular concentration of gray clay deposits, rich in organic material and fossilized wood, at the top of the Novo Remanso Formation upper unit. The palynoflora is dominated by terrestrial spores and pollen grains, and is characterized by abundant angiosperm pollen grains ( Tricolpites, Grimsdalea, Perisyncolporites, Tricolporites and Malvacearumpollis). Trilete spores are almost as abundant as the angiosperm pollen, and are represented mainly by the genera Deltoidospora, Verrutriletes, and Hamulatisporis. Gymnosperm pollen is scarce. The presence of the index species Grimsdalea magnaclavata Germeraad et al. (1968) indicates that these deposits belong to the Middle Miocene homonymous palynozone (Lorente, 1986; Hoorn, 1993; Jaramillo et al., 2011). Sedimentological characteristics (poorly sorted, angular to sub-angular, fine to very-coarse quartz sands facies) are typical of the Novo Remanso Formation upper part. These are associated with a paleoflow to the NE-E and SE-E, and with an entirely lowland-derived palinofloristic content with no Andean ferns and gymnosperms representatives. All together, this suggests a cratonic origin for this Middle Miocene fluvial paleosystem, which was probably born in the Purus Arch eastern flank and areas surrounding the

  14. Fluvial architecture of the buntsandstein-facies redbeds in the middle to upper triassic (Ladinian-Norian) of the southeastern edge of the Iberian Meseta (Southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Juan; Dabrio, Cristino

    In the southeastern edge of the Iberian Meseta in Southern Spain, fluvial continental Buntsandstein-facies red beds of Middle to Upper Triassic (Ladinian — Norian) age unconformably overlie the folded and eroded Hercynian basement. The Betic Belts consist of an internal metamorphosed part and an external sedimentary zone containing the Triassic deposits, with the latter seam being in turn divided into the Prebetic Zone with continental to shallow marine facies and the Subbetic Zone with pelagic facies. The Buntsandstein-facies red bed series is vertically split into three main facies associations: alluvial fans and pebbly braided rivers (conglomerates and sandstones), low-sinuosity proximal and distal sandy braided rivers (sandstones and mudstones) and coastal evaporitic sabkha (mudstones, marls and gypsum). Alluvial-fan and pebbly braided river sediments occur at the base of the sequence and cover the palaeorelief of the pre-Triassic morphology. The inner fan zone is characterized by debris-flows or mud-flows, the mid fan zone is dominated by sheet floods, and the outer fan zone is governed by stream flood and stream flow passing into pebbly braided rivers in front of the fans. With transition from restricted alluvial fans to an open braidplain, the pebbly rivers soon evolve both vertically and horizontally into sandy stream networks consisting of channels and floodplains. The channel facies comprises sheet-type and ribbon-type sandstone layers. The sheets form complexes up to 15 m and more thickness due to amalgamation by multilateral coalescence and multivertical stacking of individual genetical units. In the lower part of the series, the number of channels is rather high suggesting a non-hierarchical channel pattern where high- and low-sinuosity rivers coexist. The middle portion reflects a smaller number of very large channels thus indicating an amelioration of the hierarchical pattern. The upper part consists of variegated sabkha plain mudstones and

  15. Sedimentary facies and depositional environments of early Mesozoic Newark Supergroup basins, eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The early Mesozoic Newark Supergroup consists of continental sedimentary rocks and basalt flows that occupy a NE-trending belt of elongate basins exposed in eastern North America. The basins were filled over a period of 30-40 m.y. spanning the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, prior to the opening of the north Atlantic Ocean. The sedimentary rocks are here divided into four principal lithofacies. The alluvial-fan facies includes deposits dominated by: (1) debris flows; (2) shallow braided streams; (3) deeper braided streams (with trough crossbeds); or (4) intense bioturbation or hyperconcentrated flows (tabular, unstratified muddy sandstone). The fluvial facies include deposits of: (1) shallow, ephemeral braided streams; (2) deeper, flashflooding, braided streams (with poor sorting and crossbeds); (3) perennial braided rivers; (4) meandering rivers; (5) meandering streams (with high suspended loads); (6) overbank areas or local flood-plain lakes; or (7) local streams and/or colluvium. The lacustrine facies includes deposits of: (1) deep perennial lakes; (2) shallow perennial lakes; (3) shallow ephemeral lakes; (4) playa dry mudflats; (5) salt-encrusted saline mudflats; or (6) vegetated mudflats. The lake margin clastic facies includes deposits of: (1) birdfoot deltas; (2) stacked Gilbert-type deltas; (3) sheet deltas; (4) wave-reworked alluvial fans; or (5) wave-sorted sand sheets. Coal deposits are present in the lake margin clastic and the lacustrine facies of Carnian age (Late Triassic) only in basins of south-central Virginia and North and South Carolina. Eolian deposits are known only from the basins in Nova Scotia and Connecticut. Evaporites (and their pseudomorphs) occur mainly in the northern basins as deposits of saline soils and less commonly of saline lakes, and some evaporite and alkaline minerals present in the Mesozoic rocks may be a result of later diagenesis. These relationships suggest climatic variations across paleolatitudes, more humid to the

  16. Build-and-fill sequences: How subtle paleotopography affects 3-D heterogeneity of potential reservoir facies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKirahan, J.R.; Goldstein, R.H.; Franseen, E.K.

    2005-01-01

    This study analyzes the three-dimensional variability of a 20-meter-thick section of Pennsylvanian (Missourian) strata over a 600 km2 area of northeastern Kansas, USA. It hypothesizes that sea-level changes interact with subtle variations in paleotopography to influence the heterogeneity of potential reservoir systems in mixed carbonate-silidclastic systems, commonly produdng build-and-fill sequences. For this analysis, ten lithofacies were identified: (1) phylloid algal boundstone-packstone, (2) skeletal wackestone-packstone, (3) peloidal, skeletal packstone, (4) sandy, skeletal grainstone-packstone, (5) oolite grainstone-packstone, (6) Osagia-brachiopod packstone, (7) fossiliferous siltstone, (8) lenticular bedded-laminated siltstone and fine sandstone, (9) organic-rich mudstone and coal, and (10) massive mudstone. Each facies can be related to depositional environment and base-level changes to develop a sequence stratigraphy consisting of three sequence boundaries and two flooding surfaces. Within this framework, eighteen localities are used to develop a threedimensional framework of the stratigraphy and paleotopography. The studied strata illustrate the model of "build-and-fill". In this example, phylloid algal mounds produce initial relief, and many of the later carbonate and silidclastic deposits are focused into subtle paleotopographic lows, responding to factors related to energy, source, and accommodation, eventually filling the paleotopography. After initial buildup of the phylloid algal mounds, marine and nonmarine siliciclastics, with characteristics of both deltaic lobes and valley fills, were focused into low areas between mounds. After a sea-level rise, oolitic carbonates formed on highs and phylloid algal facies accumulated in lows. A shift in the source direction of siliciclastics resulted from flooding or filling of preexisting paleotopographic lows. Fine-grained silidclastics were concentrated in paleotopographic low areas and resulted in clay

  17. Radiogenic heat production in sedimentary rocks of the Gulf of Mexico Basin, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, T.E.; Sharp, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiogenic heat production within the sedimentary section of the Gulf of Mexico basin is a significant source of heat. Radiogenic heat should be included in thermal models of this basin (and perhaps other sedimentary basins). We calculate that radiogenic heat may contribute up to 26% of the overall surface heat-flow density for an area in south Texas. Based on measurements of the radioactive decay rate of ??-particles, potassium concentration, and bulk density, we calculate radiogenic heat production for Stuart City (Lower Cretaceous) limestones, Wilcox (Eocene) sandstones and mudrocks, and Frio (Oligocene) sandstones and mudrocks from south Texas. Heat production rates range from a low of 0.07 ?? 0.01 ??W/m3 in clean Stuart City limestones to 2.21 ?? 0.24??W/m3 in Frio mudrocks. Mean heat production rates for Wilcox sandstones, Frio sandstones, Wilcox mudrocks, and Frio mudrocks are 0.88, 1.19, 1.50, and 1.72 ??W/m3, respectively. In general, the mudrocks produce about 30-40% more heat than stratigraphically equivalent sandstones. Frio rocks produce about 15% more heat than Wilcox rocks per unit volume of clastic rock (sandstone/mudrock). A one-dimensional heat-conduction model indicates that this radiogenic heat source has a significant effect on subsurface temperatures. If a thermal model were calibrated to observed temperatures by optimizing basal heat-flow density and ignoring sediment heat production, the extrapolated present-day temperature of a deeply buried source rock would be overestimated.Radiogenic heat production within the sedimentary section of the Gulf of Mexico basin is a significant source of heat. Radiogenic heat should be included in thermal models of this basin (and perhaps other sedimentary basins). We calculate that radiogenic heat may contribute up to 26% of the overall surface heat-flow density for an area in south Texas. Based on measurements of the radioactive decay rate of ??-particles, potassium concentration, and bulk density, we

  18. Fine-Grained Turbidites: Facies, Attributes and Process Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stow, Dorrik; Omoniyi, Bayonle

    2016-04-01

    Within turbidite systems, fine-grained sediments are still the poor relation and sport several contrasting facies models linked to process of deposition. These are volumetrically the dominant facies in deepwater and, from a resource perspective, they form important marginal and tight reservoirs, and have great potential for unconventional shale gas, source rocks and seals. They are also significant hosts of metals and rare earth elements. Based on a large number of studies of modern, ancient and subsurface systems, including 1000s of metres of section logging, we define the principal genetic elements of fine-grained deepwater facies, present a new synthesis of facies models and their sedimentary attributes. The principal architectural elements include: non-channelised slope-aprons, channel-fill, channel levee and overbank, turbidite lobes, mass-transport deposits, contourite drifts, basin sheets and drapes. These comprise a variable intercalation of fine-grained facies - thin-bedded and very thin-bedded turbidites, contourites, hemipelagites and pelagites - and associated coarse-grained facies. Characteristic attributes used to discriminate between these different elements are: facies and facies associations; sand-shale ratio, sand and shale geometry and dimensions, sand connectivity; sediment texture and small-scale sedimentary structures; sediment fabric and microfabric; and small-scale vertical sequences of bed thickness. To some extent, we can relate facies and attribute characteristics to different depositional environments. We identify four distinct facies models: (a) silt-laminated mud turbidites, (b) siliciclastic mud turbidites, (c) carbonate mud turbidites, (d) disorganized silty-mud turbidites, and (e) hemiturbidites. Within the grainsize-velocity matrix turbidite plot, these all fall within the region of mean size < 0.063mm, maximum grainsize (one percentile) <0.2mm, and depositional velocity 0.1-0.5 m/s. Silt-laminated turbidites and many mud

  19. A shallow marine volcaniclastic facies model: an example from sedimentary rocks bounding the subaqueously welded Ordovician Garth Tuff, North Wales, U.K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, William J.; Howells, Malcolm F.

    1991-11-01

    Volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks bounding the Ordovician Garth Tuff in North Wales were deposited in a shallow marine setting adjacent to a magmatic arc. The volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks are primarily of angular to euhedral quartz, angular euhedral feldspar, and volcanic rock fragments. These grains are of a pyroclastic origin, but have been reworked to various degrees. Sedimentary rock fragments, rounded quartz, muscovite, biotite, iron-rich chlorite and various clay minerals occur in lesser amounts. The sedimentary rocks can be divided into a proximal offshore to foreshore facies association (POFFA) and an offshore to lower shoreface facies association (OLSFA). The sand-dominated POFFA, exposed near Capel Curig, is characterized by large wave ripples, hummocky cross-stratification, co-sets of trough cross-beds, reactivation surfaces, plane beds, and graded turbidite layers in suspension-deposited mudstone. Water depths calculated from bedding plane exposure of large wave ripples and determined by the presence of hummocky cross-stratification and by facies association vary from a few meters to around 30 m (45-50 m theoretical maximum) in a 45 m-thick stratigraphic section beneath the tuff. Eight kilometers to the southeast, the Garth Tuff is bounded by a thick sequence of suspension-deposited laminated mudstone with thin graded beds of siltstone and fine-grained sandstone. This facies association (OLSFA) represents the introduction of material by distal turbidites and by pelagic sedimentation. The OLSFA was deposited in water depths well below storm wave base, possibly in excess of 200 m. No evidence of storm waves or surface-generated currents occur until over 40 m above the tuff. This study documents marine sedimentary rocks, deposited in water depths ranging from foreshore to offshore, as the bounding facies of the Garth Tuff. It is, thus, reasonable to conclude that the Garth Tuff was emplaced and welded in water depths greater than the thickness of the

  20. Putative domal microbial structures in fluvial siliciclastic facies of the Mesoproterozoic (1.09 Ga) Copper Harbor Conglomerate, Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Wilmeth, Dylan T; Dornbos, Stephen Q; Isbell, John L; Czaja, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The Copper Harbor Conglomerate is a Mesoproterozoic (1.09 Ga) freshwater sedimentary sequence that outcrops in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The formation was deposited during infilling of the failed Midcontinent Rift and contains fluvial, lacustrine, and alluvial fan facies. This study describes and analyzes the formation of small domal structures preserved in fluvial sandstone facies within the lower portion of the formation. These domal structures range from millimeters to several centimeters in diameter and height, and are preserved in convex epirelief on fine-grained sandstone beds. The structures have a pustulose texture and a patchy distribution on bedding planes. Slabs containing the structures were collected in the field and analyzed in the laboratory through inspection of cut slabs, petrographic thin sections, X-radiographs, and RAMAN spectroscopy. Results of these analyses reveal that the domal structures often contain weak, wavy horizontal bedding and laminae, and lack any vertical structures. These results support a biogenic origin of the domal structures instead of through abiogenic processes such as loading, sand volcanoes, or adhesion warts. These structures are akin to what were traditionally labeled as 'sand stromatolites', but are now known as 'domal sand structures'. Along with previous descriptions of carbonate stromatolites, organic-rich paleosols, and microbial sand structures, our findings provide further evidence that mat-forming microbial communities thrived in the late Mesoproterozoic freshwater systems of the Midcontinent Rift.

  1. Facies comparison of autochthonous and allochthonous Permian and Triassic units, north-central Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K.E.

    1985-04-01

    Eight stratigraphic sections of Permian and Triassic rocks have been studied over a 30 km by 150 km area in the Endicott and Philip Smith Mountains of the central Brooks Range. Six of the sections are located on the Endicott Mountains allochthon, and the remaining two are parautochthonous columns in the Mount Doonerak area. The sections record a facies transition between the autochthonous Sadlerochit Group and Shublik Formation of the northeastern Brooks Range and the characteristically siliceous rocks of the allochthonous Siksikpuk and Otuk formations of the western Brooks Range. Laterally continuous and bioturbated beds of fine-grained sandstone, siltstone, and shale dominantly compose the Permian sequence, whereas the Triassic rocks consist of black shales, thin rhythmically bedded siliceous mudstones, and fossiliferous limestones. When the allochthonous sections are restored to a position south of the Mount Doonerak area, a general shallowing trend from southwest to northwest becomes evident within the reconstructed marine basin. To the south and west, the Permian sediments show a marked increase in silica content, with the occurrence of barite and a corresponding decrease in the thickness of the basal, coarser grained clastics. The Triassic formations also document an increase in silica and the presence of barite to the south and west, while becoming significantly sooty and phosphatic to the north and east. Ongoing petrographic and micropaleontologic studies of the field data will clarify these general paleogeographic relationships.

  2. Petrology and palaeoenvironmental significance of authigenic iron-rich clays, carbonates and apatite in the Claiborne Group, Middle Eocene, NE Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, J. M.; Gale, A. S.; McCarty, D.

    2010-07-01

    The Claiborne Group (Eocene) in North East Texas consists of clayey sandstones and mudrocks, both with variable proportions of dark green to brown clay pellets deposited in a marginal to open marine setting on the Gulf Coast margin. The composition of concretionary carbonate and clay pellets, from 5 localities, has been investigated using a wide variety of analytical techniques. Our palaeontological, sedimentological, C/S and stable isotope data support an interpretation of marginal marine facies with limited freshwater input, for the Claiborne Group. Dark green (mature) pellets are predominantly associated with transgressive, bioturbated, marine sediments. From the Weches Formation through to the youngest Crockett Formation there is a trend from pellets composed mostly of dark green serpentine-rich mixed layer clay to those of mostly brown (immature) nontronite-rich mixed layer clay. The serpentine is intermediate between odinite and berthierine and may have been originally odinite that has undergone partial transformation to berthierine. Pellet maturity apparently corresponds with the degree of winnowing and sedimentation rate. It does not appear to correspond with global temperature fluctuations, though the serpentine-rich rather than glauconite-rich composition may do. Siderite cement, mostly in the form of concretions, post-dates the iron-rich clay pellets and pre-dates calcite cement. Carbonate and apatite concretions show a wide range of mineral cement textures, reflecting variation in sedimentary environment and early diagenetic processes. Based on water temperatures derived from verneriacardia bivalves a precipitation temperature of 20 °C is assumed for the concretionary siderite. Using this temperature we surmise that the siderite precipitated from marine pore waters with intermittent meteoric water mixing.

  3. Mechanical stratigraphy of deep-water sandstones: insights from a multisciplinary field and laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Corradetti, Amerigo; Cantalamessa, Gino

    2010-05-01

    Turbidite sandstones found in deep-water fold-and-thrust belts are increasingly exploited as hydrocarbon reservoirs. Within these rocks, the fluid flow is profoundly affected by the complex interaction between primary sedimentological and stratigraphic attributes (i.e, facies, layering, reservoir quality, stacking patterns, bed connectivity and lateral extent) and fracture characteristics (i.e., length, spacing, distribution, orientation, connectivity). Unfortunately, most of these features are at, or below, the resolution of conventional seismic datasets and, for this reason, their identification and localization represent one of the fundamental challenges facing exploration, appraisal and production of the sandstone reservoirs. In this respect, whereas considerable effort has been afforded to a characterization of the sedimentological and stratigraphic aspects of sandstones, detailed analysis of fractures in this type of successions has received significantly less attention. In this work, we combine field and laboratory analyses to assess the possible mechanical control exerted by the rock properties (grain size, intergranualr porosity, and Young modulus), as well as the influence of bed thickness, on joint density in turbidite sandstones. Joints are mode-I fractures occurring parallel to the greatest principle stress axis, which solve opening displacement and do not show evidence of shearing and enhance the values of total porosity forming preferential hydraulic conduits for fluid flow. Within layered rocks, commonly, joints form perpendicular to bedding due to overburden or exhumation. The empirical relation between joint spacing and bed thickness, documented in the field by many authors, has been mechanically related to the stress perturbation taking place around joints during their formation. Furthermore, close correlations between joint density and rock properties have been already established. In this present contribution, we focus on the bed

  4. Controls on stratigraphic architecture in contemporaneous delta systems from the Eocene Roda Sandstone, Tremp-Graus Basin, northern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leren, Beate L. S.; Howell, John; Enge, Håvard; Martinius, Allard W.

    2010-07-01

    The Eocene Roda Sandstone of the Spanish Pyrenees is comprised of two coeval coarse-grained delta systems which share correlatable surfaces but show a markedly different internal facies architecture. The two deltas developed contemporaneously with the differences in internal architecture attributed to basin morphology and the role of two, distinct sediment sources, while the correlatability of the larger-scale packages indicates an external, allocyclic control. As such the Roda Sandstone provides the possibility to address the relative roles of different parameters known to interact and control stratal architecture. The Roda Sandstone crops out at the NE-margin of the Tremp-Graus Basin, a "piggyback" basin initiated in Palaeogene times in the foreland of the Southern Pyrenees. The study area (˜ 30 km 2) is composed of the well-understood and well-exposed parts of the Roda Sandstone cropping out along the Isabena Valley, and the less-worked and less-exposed outcrops to the north along Barranco de Ricans and Barranco de Codoñeras. Data for this study include a combination of conventional sedimentology data coupled with analyses of 3D Virtual Outcrop Models. Based on these methods 8 different facies associations have been distinguished. Their distribution suggests that the Roda Sandstone is composed of two different but coeval delta systems and their linked subenvironments; a Gilbert-type delta outcropping along Isabena Valley, and a shoal-water fan delta along Barranco de Ricans and Barranco de Codoñeras. Along the Isabena Valley the outcrops of the Gilbert-type deltaic system are composed of at least 6 distinct packages (Roda U-Z) characterized by texturally mature, delta-front sandstones separated by offshore mudstones. The stacked basinward-stepping architecture of the Roda U-Y units here represents a minimum of 3 major phases of SW-directed progradation, capped by hardground horizons formed during the subsequent flooding phases. Tidally-modified delta

  5. More CBE in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoz, Ellis

    1977-01-01

    New accreditation regulations in Texas require competency-based education programs for all districts. All districts must be accredited to receive state aid, which makes up 85 cents of every dollar spent locally. (Author/IRT)

  6. Late Neogene stratigraphy and tectonic control on facies evolution in the Laguna Salada Basin, northern Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Barajas, A.; Vázquez-Hernández, S.; Carreño, A. L.; Helenes, J.; Suárez-Vidal, F.; Alvarez-Rosales, J.

    2001-10-01

    The Laguna Salada Basin (LSB) in northeastern Baja California records late-Neogene marine incursions in the Salton Trough and progradation of the Colorado River delta. Early subsidence and subsequent tectonic erosion are related to evolution of the Sierra El Mayor detachment fault during late Miocene time (<12 Ma). The stratigraphy of uplifted blocks on the east-central margin of the Laguna Salada Basin and from three exploratory wells allows reconstruction of the main sedimentary and tectonic events. Marine mudstone and sandstone, and subordinate conglomerate of the Imperial Formation tectonically overlie metamorphic and granitic basement. Microfossils, lithology, and sedimentary structures in the Imperial Formation define Upper Miocene (<6 Ma) outer-shelf facies that grade up-section into inner-shelf and tide-dominated delta plain deposits of the ancient Colorado River. Lower Pliocene (˜4-2 Ma) reddish, sub-arkosic fluvial sandstone and siltstone of the Palm Spring Formation defines progradation of non-marine fluvio-deltaic deposits over the marine Imperial Formation. Continuous outcrops of the Palm Spring are less than 170-m thick, but correlative deposits are more than 570 m thick in the lower part of a 2400-m deep geothermal exploratory well on the eastern margin of LSB. Interfingering fluvial-sandstone deposits and prograding alluvial fanglomerates with coarse debris-flow and rock-avalanche deposits crudely mark the onset of vertical slip along the Laguna Salada fault and rapid uplift of Sierra Cucapa and Sierra El Mayor. Up to 2 km of Quaternary alluvial-fan and lacustrine deposits accumulated along the eastern margin of LSB, whereas lower subsidence rates produced a thinner sedimentary wedge over a ramp-like crystalline basement along the western margin. In early Pleistocene time (˜2-1 Ma), the Laguna Salada became progressively isolated from the Colorado River delta complex, and the Salton Trough by activity on the Elsinore and Laguna Salada fault zones.

  7. Poncho field - Cretaceous J sandstone stratigraphic traps - Denver basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, F.G.; Ziegler, J.R.

    1983-08-01

    Distributary channel and delta destructional sandstones of Early Cretaceous age are important reservoirs for stratigraphic traps in the J sandstone at Poncho field, Adams and Arapahoe Counties, Colorado. Cores and logs from the field area reveal a lowermost, nonproductive, northeast-trending delta front sandstoe (J-3); a middle complex of southeast- and east-trending, productive distributary channel sandstones (J-2) that grade into tightly cemented delta fringe marine sediments to the southeast and northeast; and an upper, northeast trending, productive delta destructional sandstone (J-1). Vertical and lateral sequences of sedimentary structures, textures, trace fossil assemblages, and geometry and trend of sandstone bodies suggest that these units were part of a wave-dominated delta complex that prograded to the east and southeast from the area of Lonetree field. Thin section and SEM analyses reveal that the principal cements in both reservoir sandstones are quartz overgrowths, kaolinite, and chlorite, and that the bulk of the porosity is secondary and related to dissolution of carbonate cement and feldspar grains. Porosities and permeabilities are most variable and lowest in the nonproductive delta front sandstones, averaging 15% and 7 md; variable and intermediate in the productive distributary channel sandstones, averaging 16% and 28 md; and most uniform and highest in the overlying delta destructional sandstones, averaging 21% and 88 md.

  8. Paluxy of the Central Basin-East Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Presley, M.W. )

    1993-09-01

    The Paluxy Formation (Lower Cretaceous) has been a consistent sandstone exploration objective in the central East Texas basin, occurring at moderate depths on the order of 5000-8000 ft with oil in reservoirs with good permeability and porosity and reserves in the range of 200,000 to 500,000 bbl per well. Since the 1940s, the pace of Paluxy field discovery has been steady, generally a new field or two every one or two years, and there is every reason to believe that there is continued potential for the Paluxy in the future. The central part of the East Texas basin, in Smith County and adjacent areas, has complex structure with numerous salt domes and intervening sediment wedges (turtles) that formed during movement of the salt. Paluxy oil and gas in this area occurs mainly in combination structural-stratigraphic traps along normal faults that cut turtles. Major exploration trends in the central basin include (1) the Lindale turtle with a number of widely spaced fields, generally with only a few wells but with relatively good per-well reserves, (2) the Tyler turtle with the largest fields and some of the most prolific Paluxy production in the central basin, (3) the Flint and Irene turtles with relatively thin sandstones and modest production, (4) the Lane Chapel turtle with some exciting new Paluxy discoveries, and (5) the rim areas of salt domes.

  9. Anisotropy of permeability in faulted porous sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, N. J. C.; Healy, D.; Taylor, C. W.

    2014-06-01

    Studies of fault rock permeabilities advance the understanding of fluid migration patterns around faults and contribute to predictions of fault stability. In this study a new model is proposed combining brittle deformation structures formed during faulting, with fluid flow through pores. It assesses the impact of faulting on the permeability anisotropy of porous sandstone, hypothesising that the formation of fault related micro-scale deformation structures will alter the host rock porosity organisation and create new permeability pathways. Core plugs and thin sections were sampled around a normal fault and oriented with respect to the fault plane. Anisotropy of permeability was determined in three orientations to the fault plane at ambient and confining pressures. Results show that permeabilities measured parallel to fault dip were up to 10 times higher than along fault strike permeability. Analysis of corresponding thin sections shows elongate pores oriented at a low angle to the maximum principal palaeo-stress (σ1) and parallel to fault dip, indicating that permeability anisotropy is produced by grain scale deformation mechanisms associated with faulting. Using a soil mechanics 'void cell model' this study shows how elongate pores could be produced in faulted porous sandstone by compaction and reorganisation of grains through shearing and cataclasis.

  10. Compaction of Norphlet sandstones, Rankin County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, E.F.

    1987-09-01

    Fabric and porosity changes resulting from compaction were studied in sandstones from three cores sampled at depths between 15,900 and 22,500 ft. Point counts of 30 thin sections indicate that 0.4% of the rock volume was lost by ductile grain deformation and 3% by pressure solution at both grain contacts and at widely spaced stylolites. Pre-cement porosities of eolian sandstone range from 27 to 35% (mean = 29%), indicating that a total of from 10 to 18% porosity (mean = 16%) was lost by compaction (assuming 45% initial porosity). The difference between the total porosity loss and the sum of the other two processes is assumed to be the porosity lost by grain rearrangement (mean = 12.6%). The amount of pressure solution at grain contacts for each well is independent of depth, temperature, and amount of both quartz cement and total cement. Stylolites transect both grains and cements, which indicates they formed late in the diagenetic sequence. Silica released by pressure solution at quartz grain contacts could not be the sole source and was probably not even the major source of quartz cement in the formation, because cementation by quartz preceded the episode of strong pressure solution. In addition, the volume of silica released by pressure solution appears to have been inadequate to provide the volume of quartz cement present.

  11. Is there a basin-centered gas accumulation in Cotton Valley Group Sandstones, Gulf Coast Basin, U.S.A.?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartberger, Charles E.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Condon, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is reevaluating the resource potential of selected domestic basin-centered gas accumulations. Basin-centered gas accumulations are characterized by presence of gas in extensive low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in which conventional seals and trapping mechanisms are absent, abnormally high or low reservoir pressures exist, and gas-water contacts are absent. In 1995, the USGS assessed one basin-centered gas play and two conventional plays within the trend of Jurassic and Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group fl uvial-deltaic and barrierisland/ strandplain sandstones across the onshore northern Gulf of Mexico Basin. Detailed evaluation of geologic and production data provides new insights into these Cotton Valley plays. Two Cotton Valley sandstone trends are identifi ed based on reservoir properties and gas-production characteristics. Transgressive blanket sandstones across northern Louisiana have relatively high porosity and permeability and do not require fracture stimulation to produce gas at commercial rates. South of this trend, and extending westward into eastern Texas, massive sandstones of the Cotton Valley trend exhibit low porosity and permeability and require fracture stimulation. The high permeability of Cotton Valley blanket sandstones is not conducive to the presence of basin-centered gas, but lowpermeability massive sandstones provide the type of reservoir in which basin-centered gas accumulations commonly occur. Data on source rocks, including burial and thermal history, are consistent with the interpretation of potential basincentered gas within Cotton Valley sandstones. However, pressure gradients throughout most of the blanket- and massivesandstone trends are normal or nearly normal, which is not characteristic of basin-centered gas accumulations. The presence of gas-water contacts in at least seven fi elds across the blanket-sandstone trend together with relatively

  12. A locally adaptive kernel regression method for facies delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez-Garcia, D.; Barahona-Palomo, M.; Henri, C. V.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2015-12-01

    Facies delineation is defined as the separation of geological units with distinct intrinsic characteristics (grain size, hydraulic conductivity, mineralogical composition). A major challenge in this area stems from the fact that only a few scattered pieces of hydrogeological information are available to delineate geological facies. Several methods to delineate facies are available in the literature, ranging from those based only on existing hard data, to those including secondary data or external knowledge about sedimentological patterns. This paper describes a methodology to use kernel regression methods as an effective tool for facies delineation. The method uses both the spatial and the actual sampled values to produce, for each individual hard data point, a locally adaptive steering kernel function, self-adjusting the principal directions of the local anisotropic kernels to the direction of highest local spatial correlation. The method is shown to outperform the nearest neighbor classification method in a number of synthetic aquifers whenever the available number of hard data is small and randomly distributed in space. In the case of exhaustive sampling, the steering kernel regression method converges to the true solution. Simulations ran in a suite of synthetic examples are used to explore the selection of kernel parameters in typical field settings. It is shown that, in practice, a rule of thumb can be used to obtain suboptimal results. The performance of the method is demonstrated to significantly improve when external information regarding facies proportions is incorporated. Remarkably, the method allows for a reasonable reconstruction of the facies connectivity patterns, shown in terms of breakthrough curves performance.

  13. Madison Group (Mississippian) reservoir facies of Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, R.F.

    1985-02-01

    Twenty-seven oil fields producing from the Mission Canyon Limestone and Charles Formation (Madison Group) were studied: 1) along the eastern basin margin (Bluell, Sherwood, Mohall, Glenburn, Haas, and Chola fields), 2) northeast of Nesson anticline (Foothills, North Black Slough, South Black Slough, Rival, Lignite, and Flaxton), 3) along Nesson anticline (North Tioga, Tioga, Beaver Lodge, Capa, Hoffland, Charlson, Hawkeye, Blue Buttes, Antelope, and Clear Creek), and 4) south of the basin center (Lone Butte, Little Knife, Big Stick, Fryburg, and Medora). Mission Canyon reservoirs along the eastern margin are in several shoaling-upward carbonate to anhydrite cycles of pisolitic packstone or grainstone buildups. South of the basin center, only a single shoaling-upward sequence is present, with dolomitized, mostly restructed-marine skeletal wackstone to pelletal wackstone or packstone reservoir facies. Nesson anticline, between these 2 areas, contains a single shoaling-upward sequence without an anhydrite cap. In northern Nesson anticline, Mission Canyon reservoir facies are oolitic-pisolitic, intraclastic wackestone or grainstone buildups or open-marine skeletal packstone or grainstone. Both limestones and dolostones are productive in southern Nesson anticline. Limestone reservoir facies are transitional, open to restricted-marine slightly intraclastic, skeletal wackestone or packstone facies. Dolostone reservoir facies are restricted-marine mudstone to skeletal mudstone and pelletal wackestone or packstone. Northeast of the Nesson anticline, production is from oolitic to pisolitic packstone or grainstone buildups in the Rival subinterval and from restricted-marine, dolomitized spiculitic mudstone in the Midale subinterval (base of Charles Formation). In the northern Nesson anticline, Rival reservoir facies are offshore open to restricted-marine, skeletal, intraclastic, pelletal wackestone and/or packstones.

  14. Recognition and significance of parasequences and parasequence sets in Leonard carbonate reservoirs, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, S.C. )

    1991-03-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from reservoirs of Leonardian age is sizable (cumulative production from the Leonardian on the Central Basin Platform (CBP) alone totals 1.4 billion bbls), recovery efficiencies from these restricted, shallow-water platform carbonate deposits are among the lowest in west Texas, averaging only about 19%. Detailed examination of the Leonard section in the Dollarhide and Monahans fields on the CBP indicates that poor recovery from these reservoirs is a function of extreme vertical heterogeneity produced by high-order oscillations of relative sea level. The Leonard sequence is composed of thin (1- to 2-m thick), upward-shallowing parasequences, each of which is marked at its base by a prominent marine flooding surface. Parasequences are, in turn, packaged into 15- to 20-m parasequence set defined by variations in parasequence facies stacking patterns. Reservoir porosity is typically preferentially developed in very thin (less than 1 m) zones of grain-rich subtidal facies within parasequences, although porosity may also be encountered in capping tidal-flat deposits. Because these facies display distinct pore and permeability characteristics, with subtidal facies usually exhibiting the highest permeabilities, development of accurate reservoir models for simulation and exploitation depends on the ability to distinguish and map these deposits. Recognition and correlation of parasequences and parasequence stacking patterns in parasequence sets provide a powerful tool for more accurate mapping of facies and attendant porosity development and facilitate development of improved models necessary for efficient exploitation of these highly heterogeneous reservoirs.

  15. Diagenesis of the Almond sandstone in the Washakie Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Peigui; Liu, Jie; Surdam, C.R. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    The marginal marine and nonmarine Almond sandstones are mostly sublitharenite, litharenite, and lithic arkose. The sandstones are fine-to very-fine-grained, and are well-sorted. The framework composition, authigenic minerals, and porosity and permeability distributions in the Almond sandstones are different below and above 8,000 feet, resulting in a variation in hydrocarbon reservoir types. The shallow conventional reservoirs are permeable, producing both liquid oil and gas, whereas the deep gas-bearing sandstones are very tight and overpressured. Porosity of the shallow Almond sandstones have been significantly enhanced by dissolution of the feldspar grains and lithic fragments. Quartz overgrowth cement and authigenic clay rims have occluded most of the intergranular pores, as well as the previously leached pores. The Almond sandstones have been buried deeper than their present depths. The sandstones in each part of the Washakie Basin have experienced different uplift and subsidence. Reconstruction of the burial history and diagenetic modeling are essential steps for understanding the diagenetic evolution of the Almond sandstones.

  16. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  17. Provenance of sandstones in the Golconda terrane, north central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.A. )

    1991-02-01

    The upper Paleozoic Golconda terrane of north-central Nevada is a composite of several structurally bounded subterranes made of clastic, volcanic, and carbonate rocks. The clastic rocks provide important clues for the interpretation of the provenance and paleogeographic settings of the different lithologic assemblages found in these subterranes. Two petrographically distinct sandstones are identified in the Golconda terrane in the Osgood Mountains and the Hot springs Range of north-central Nevada. The sandstone of the Mississippian Farrel Canyon Formation, part of the Dry Hills subterrane, is characterized by quartzose and sedimentary and lithic-rich clasts with a small feldspar component. in contrast, the sandstone of the Permian Poverty Peak (II) subterrane is a silty quartzarenite with no lithic component, and a very limited feldspar component. The sandstone of the Farrel Canyon Formation is similar to nonvolcanic sandstones reported from elsewhere in the Golconda terrane. Modal data reflect a provenance of a recycled orogen and permit the interpretation that it could have been derived from the antler orogen as has been proposed for other sandstones of the golconda terrane. The sandstone of the Poverty Peak (II) subterrane is more mature than any of the other sandstones in either the Golconda terrane, the Antler overlap sequence, or the Antler foreland basin sequence. Modal data put the Poverty Peak (II) sandstone in the continental block provenance category. The distinct extrabasinal provenances represented in these different sandstones support the idea that the Golconda basin was made up of complex paleogeographic settings, which included multiple sources of extrabasinal sediment.

  18. Grampian high-pressure-granulite-facies metamorphism of the Slishwood Division, NW Ireland and its enigmatic eclogite-facies precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, J. S.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Whitehouse, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    The Slishwood Division of NW Ireland is located along the SW margin of the Grampian belt, whose metamorphism and deformation is generally attributed to the collision of outboard magmatic arcs with the Laurentian continental margin during the c. 470 Ma Grampian Orogeny. The unusual metamorphic history of the Slishwood Division (with eclogite-facies and later high-pressure-granulite-facies assemblages) is a unique feature of the Grampian belt and has long been regarded as evidence for pre-Caledonian tectonism, possibly of Grenvillian age. Detrital zircon U-Pb dating of Slishwood Division metasediments shows that they were deposited after c. 926 Ma, ruling out a Grenville event. A maximum age for the eclogite-facies event is provided by a U-Pb zircon age of 596 ± 6 Ma for a suite of metabasite intrusives, which exhibit varying degrees of decompression from eclogite- to high pressure granulite-facies or amphibolite-facies assemblages accompanied by the development of migmatitic leucosomes. Zircons in these leucosomes yield U-Pb zircon ages of c. 470 Ma identical to metamorphic zircons in a relatively dry partially decompressed eclogite. Following polyphase deformation, migmatitic leucosomes in metasediments crystallized under high pressure granulite-facies conditions during sinistral transtension. Dating these leucosomes has been challenging because the majority of zircons within them are inherited and generally only thin (< 15 μm) euhedral magmatic zircon overgrowths are present. Careful targeting with the ion microprobe yields U-Pb ages of c. 470 Ma, consistent with a U-Pb zircon age of c. 470 Ma from a cross-cutting granite pegmatite. In addition the high pressure granulite facies mineral fabrics are cut by tonalite bodies also dated at 470 Ma (ref. 1). Based on these results, we interpret the Slishwood Division as a Neoproterozoic metasedimentary sequence deposited after c. 926 Ma on what became a microcontinental fragment that detached from Laurentia during the

  19. Texas State Technical College Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aumack, Bruce; Blake, Larry J.

    Texas educational legislation for 1991 required the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) to review the operations of, and the continuing need for, each of the four main campuses and five extension centers of the Texas State Technical College System (TSTCS), and to make recommendations concerning the facilities' continuation and/or…

  20. Attenuation of Landfill Leachate In Unsaturated Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, A. P.; Brook, C.; Godley, A.; Lewin, K.; Young, C. P.

    Landfill leachate emanating from old "dilute and disperse" sites represents a potential (and in many cases actual) threat to the integrity of groundwater. Indeed, this concern has been included in EU legislation (80/86/EEC), where key contaminants (e.g. ammonia, various toxic organic compounds and heavy metals) are explicitly highlighted in terms of their impact on groundwater. In the UK, whilst there are a substantial number of unlined landfills sited on major aquifers, many of these are in locations where there is a substantial unsaturated zone. Thus, there exists the opportunity for the modification and attenuation of contaminants prior to it encountering the water table. An understanding of likely changes in leachate content and concentrations at such sites will enable a more comprehensive assessment of the potential risks and liabilities posed by such sites to be evaluated. The Burntstump landfill, situated 8 km north of Nottingham (UK), is sited on an outcrop of Sherwood sandstone. The fine friable sand has been quarried since the 1960s and the excavated volume used to store municipal waste. Filling at the site commenced in the mid 1970s and originally was unlined. In 1978 the first of what was to become a series of boreholes was installed within an area of roughly 5 m radius over one of the original waste cells. Cores of the waste and underlying sandstone were extracted and analysed for a range of physical and chemical parameters. The most recent set of analyses were obtained in 2000. The series of investigations therefore provide an important record of leachate migration and modification through the unsaturated zone for over twenty years. The progression of the leachate front is clearly delineated by the chloride concentration profile with an average velocity of around 1.6 m.yr-1. Combining this value with an average (and reasonably uniform) measured moisture content of about 7% gives a mean inter-granular specific discharge of 110 mm.yr-1. An interesting

  1. Depositional and diagenetic variability within the Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone: Implications for carbon dioxide sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, B.B.; Ochoa, R.I.; Wilkens, N.D.; Brophy, J.; Lovell, T.R.; Fischietto, N.; Medina, C.R.; Rupp, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is the major target reservoir for ongoing geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations throughout the midwest United States. The potential CO2 reservoir capacity, reactivity, and ultimate fate of injected CO2 depend on textural and compositional properties determined by depositional and diagenetic histories that vary vertically and laterally across the formation. Effective and efficient prediction and use of the available pore space requires detailed knowledge of the depositional and diagenetic textures and mineralogy, how these variables control the petrophysical character of the reservoir, and how they vary spatially. Here, we summarize the reservoir characteristics of the Mount Simon Sandstone based on examination of geophysical logs, cores, cuttings, and analysis of more than 150 thin sections. These samples represent different parts of the formation and depth ranges of more than 9000 ft (>2743 m) across the Illinois Basin and surrounding areas. This work demonstrates that overall reservoir quality and, specifically, porosity do not exhibit a simple relationship with depth, but vary both laterally and with depth because of changes in the primary depositional facies, framework composition (i.e., feldspar concentration), and diverse diagenetic modifications. Diagenetic processes that have been significant in modifying the reservoir include formation of iron oxide grain coatings, chemical compaction, feldspar precipitation and dissolution, multiple generations of quartz overgrowth cementation, clay mineral precipitation, and iron oxide cementation. These variables provide important inputs for calculating CO2 capacity potential, modeling reactivity, and are also an important baseline for comparisons after CO2 injection. Copyright ??2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  2. Contractional deformation of porous sandstone: Insights from the Aztec Sandstone, SE Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossen, Haakon; Zuluaga, Luisa F.; Ballas, Gregory; Soliva, Roger; Rotevatn, Atle

    2015-05-01

    Contractional deformation of highly porous sandstones is poorly explored, as compared to extensional deformation of such sedimentary rocks. In this work we explore the highly porous Aztec Sandstone in the footwall to the Muddy Mountain thrust in SE Nevada, which contains several types of deformation bands in the Buffington tectonic window: 1) Distributed centimeter-thick shear-enhanced compaction bands (SECBs) and 2) rare pure compaction bands (PCBs) in the most porous parts of the sandstone, cut by 3) thin cataclastic shear-dominated bands (CSBs) with local slip surfaces. Geometric and kinematic analysis of the SECBs, the PCBs and most of the CSBs shows that they formed during ∼E-W (∼100) shortening, consistent with thrusting related to the Cretaceous to early Paleogene Sevier orogeny of the North American Cordilleran thrust system. Based on stress path modeling, we suggest that the compactional bands (PCBs and SECBs) formed during contraction at relatively shallow burial depths, before or at early stages of emplacement of the Muddy Mountains thrust sheet. The younger cataclastic shear bands (CSBs, category 3), also related to E-W Sevier thrusting, are thinner and show larger shear offsets and thus more intense cataclasis, consistent with the initiation of cataclastic shear bands in somewhat less porous materials. Observations made in this work support earlier suggestions that contraction lead to more distributed band populations than what is commonly found in the extensional regime, and that shear-enhanced compaction bands are widespread only where porosity (and permeability) is high.

  3. Wettability Behavior of Crude Oil-Silica Nanofluids-Sandstone Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lingyun; Li, Chunyan; Pales, Ashley; Huibers, Britta; Ladner, David; Daigle, Hugh; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Mobilizing and recovering crude oils from geological formations is critical for the management and exploitation of petroleum reservoirs. Nanoparticles, with their unique physico-chemical properties can increase the efficiency of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by decreasing interfacial tension (IFT) between the oil and aqueous phase systems, and altering rock wettability. Our research examines the potential use of nanoparticles as a means of EOR by studying the influence of silicon oxide (SIO2) nanoparticles on the wettability and interfacial tension of different crude oil-silica nanofluids-sandstone systems. We designed nanofluid treatments to manipulate changes in wettability of Berea and Boise sandstones simulating petroleum reservoir. Experiments were performed to measure the IFT and wettability involving different concentrations of nanoparticles with and without the addition of surfactant to determine which nanofluids produced the most favorable wettability changes for optimal EOR with light crude oil (e.g., West Texas, API: 40), medium crude oil (Prudhoe Bay, API: 28), and heavy crude oil (e.g., Lloydminster, API: 20). We investigated the addition of Tween 20 nonionic surfactant to the nanoparticle dispersions - made from SiO2 nanoparticles - that allows the optimum mobility in porous media through optimization of interfacial tension (IFT) and contact angle, and conducted tests. Batch studies were conducted to measure the IFT and wettability of the nanofluids of different range of nanoparticle concentrations (0-0.1 wt. %) in different reservoir conditions, i.e. brine and brine-surfactant systems made with 5% brine and 2CMC of Tween 20 nonionic surfactants. The dynamic behavior of IFT was monitored using a pendant drop method. Five percent brine-nanoparticle systems containing 0.001 and 0.01 wt.% of nanoparticles resulted in a significant decrease of IFT for light and medium crude oils, while the highest decrease of IFT for heavy crude oil was observed with 0.1 wt

  4. Predicted seafloor facies of Central Santa Monica Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gardner, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Summary -- Mapping surficial seafloor facies (sand, silt, muddy sand, rock, etc.) should be the first step in marine geological studies and is crucial when modeling sediment processes, pollution transport, deciphering tectonics, and defining benthic habitats. This report outlines an empirical technique that predicts the distribution of seafloor facies for a large area offshore Los Angeles, CA using high-resolution bathymetry and co-registered, calibrated backscatter from multibeam echosounders (MBES) correlated to ground-truth sediment samples. The technique uses a series of procedures that involve supervised classification and a hierarchical decision tree classification that are now available in advanced image-analysis software packages. Derivative variance images of both bathymetry and acoustic backscatter are calculated from the MBES data and then used in a hierarchical decision-tree framework to classify the MBES data into areas of rock, gravelly muddy sand, muddy sand, and mud. A quantitative accuracy assessment on the classification results is performed using ground-truth sediment samples. The predicted facies map is also ground-truthed using seafloor photographs and high-resolution sub-bottom seismic-reflection profiles. This Open-File Report contains the predicted seafloor facies map as a georeferenced TIFF image along with the multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data used in the study as well as an explanation of the empirical classification process.

  5. Marginal erg facies: A trial approach toward a descriptive classification

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, M.V. ); Langford, R.P. )

    1991-03-01

    During the late 1970s and early 1980s, sedimentologists began recognizing the margins of eolian sand seas as separate, components which differed from interior sand seas in geometry, extent, and facies. Stratigraphers have now observed these differences in eolian rocks. Erg margins may be grouped in five ways: (1) by associations with extradunal environments-coastal plain, lacustrine, periglacial, marine (tidal flat, coastal sabkha, beach, and lagoon), and arid alluvial (alluvial fan, fluvial, playa, inland sabkha); (2) by allocyclic controls-eustasy, plate tectonism, and climate; (3) by autocyclic controls-local tectonism, topography, vegetation, hydrology, structure, sediment source and supply, and wind regime; (4) by geographic position-upwind, downwind, and along-wind margins; and (5) by sedimentary facies-texture and architecture. In contrast with erg interiors, erg margins are characterized by smaller, less complex dune-forms related to thinner sand accumulation; elementary dune architecture; more vegetation and bioturbation; high occurrence of sand sheet, zibar, and serir facies; expansive, low-relief interdunes with widely distributed dunes; and a greater proportion of interbedded extradunal deposits. Some of the published studies on ancient eolian systems have identified erg margin facies that have been influences by marine and arid alluvial processes. Few reports have described lacustrine-eolian and periglacial-eolian interactions. This study is an attempt to organize known features of modern and ancient erg margins into a scheme based on erg margin controls.

  6. Chemostratigraphic and sedimentologic evolution of Wajid Group (Wajid Sandstone): An outcrop analog study from the Cambrian to Permian, SW Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassin, Mohamed A.; Abdullatif, Osman M.

    2017-02-01

    The Paleozoic age succession in Saudi Arabia represents one of the most prolific petroleum producing systems in the Arabian Peninsula. This succession is also considered important for unconventional tight gas and shale gas reservoirs. The Wajid Group (Wajid Sandstone) in SW Saudi Arabia consists of four formations, namely, Dibsiyah (Lower and Upper), Sanamah, Khusayyayn and Juwayl from bottom to top. This study investigates the major oxides, trace and rare earth elements for the Wajid Group formations in southwestern Saudi Arabia. We characterize and compare the sandstone types, provenance, tectonic setting, and climate. Moreover, we applied the chemostratigraphic technique for stratigraphic differentiation. Concentrations of certain elements indicate that Wajid Group was deposited in a passive continental margin. The geochemical analysis reveals that Wajid Group sediments were likely derived from the upper and bulk continental crust and mafic igneous provenance. The elemental geochemical data has been applied in this study to improve the stratigraphic subdivision and correlation. Using selected elements, geochemical vertical profiles, binary, and ternary diagrams allow clearly distinguishing between Wajid Group formations. Thus supports the established formation boundaries that constructed using lithostratigraphy and sedimentology. The geochemical elements variation between formations can be related to differences in rock-forming minerals, facies change, climate, and provenance. The results of this study may help in constraining and correlating complex facies strata and can be used as a guide for stratigraphic correlations in the subsurface within the Wajid basin and other equivalent stratigraphic successions within Saudi Arabia.

  7. Provenance, sedimentology, and tectonic setting of ancient sandstones and conglomerates in a Continental rift basin: Espanola basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cavazza, W.

    1988-02-01

    The Miocene fill of the Espanola basin half-graben is composed of two lithosomes with different provenance, paleocurrents, sandstone and conglomerate petrology, and sedimentary facies. Lithosome A has westward paleocurrents, basement-derived detrital composition, and represents sedimentation in a braid plain-sand flat-ephemeral lake system. Lithosome B has south-southwest-directed paleocurrents, a large volcaniclastic and sedimentary clastic detrital component, and represents a perennial fluvial system. Despite being derived from the unfaulted side of the Espanola half-graben, both lithosomes display upward-fining megasequences (100-400 m thick), comparable to similar megasequences derived from tectonically active basin margins. Thus, vertical arrangement of sedimentary deposits along the unfaulted margin of an asymmetrical rift basin can be determined by tectonism along the opposite, deeper margin. Continental rifts are ideal settings for detailed provenance studies. Variety of lithologies in the sediment source area (basement, sedimentary cover, and volcanic strata) provides petrologic tracers to delineate the sediment paleodispersal system. For the Miocene fill of the Espanola basin, integration of petrologic (sandstone point-counting, conglomerate clast-counting) and sedimentologic (paleocurrent and facies analyses) techniques resulted in identification of two genetically significant rock bodies not corresponding to previously established lithostratigraphic units.

  8. Outdoor Education in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Ray H.

    In Dallas in 1970, high school outdoor education began as a cocurricular woods and waters boys' club sponsored by a community sportsman. Within one year, it grew into a fully accredited, coeducational, academic course with a curriculum devoted to the study of wildlife in Texas, ecology, conservation, hunting, firearm safety, fishing, boating and…

  9. Texas Hunter Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Steve

    This handbook serves as a reference for the mandatory hunter education course in Texas. The "Introduction" explains hunter education's goal to produce safe, knowledgeable, responsible, and informed hunters. It also gives information related to hunting opportunities, administration, and management. Chapter 2, "Our Hunting…

  10. The Woodlands, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHaney, Larry J.; Bernhardt, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe the "central project" concept for implementing technology education while addressing education reform. The central project is a topic around which students, teachers, administrators, and the community focus their energies as a team. At McCullough High School (Texas), the central project involved design and…

  11. Texas Migrant Council, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarreal, Oscar L.

    Operating various programs, the Texas Migrant Council, a multi-service agency, administers assistance to migrants during their stay in their home base state, as well as on their migrant trek. Its Head Start program serves mobile migrant children from the ages of 0 to 5 and gives continuity of services by following them to the northern states…

  12. Library Laws of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidenberg, Ed, Ed.

    Compiled to provide a central reference point for all legislative information pertaining to libraries in the state of Texas, this publication includes all pertinent legislation as amended through the 66th Legislature, Regular Session, 1979. It contains articles dealing specifically with archives, buildings and property, city libraries, non-profit…

  13. Library Laws of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Richard E., Comp.

    Compiled to provide a central reference point for all legislative information pertaining to libraries in the State of Texas, this publication includes all pertinent legislation as amended through the 71st Legislature, 1989, Regular Session. This update of the 1980 edition has been expanded to include statutes pertaining to the school and academic…

  14. Texas-Oklahoma

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered ... flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River. A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and ...

  15. East Texas Quilts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside, Karen, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Patchwork quilting is an original folk art in the United States. Pilgrims first used worn out scraps of cloth to make bed covers in an age of scarcity. Featured here are stories on East Texas Quilts, their origins, the love and hard work which goes into the making of a quilt (Ira Barr and others). The techniques needed to construct a quilt are…

  16. Texas Irrigation Situation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The irrigation situation in Texas is an interaction between hydrology and water policies. In 2012, according to National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) four High Plains counties, Gainesville, Yoakum, Terry and Cochran, accounted for approximately 60% of the 150,000 acres of peanut productio...

  17. Texas and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Texas and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead…

  18. Tornado from Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Santa Fe School Superintendent Yvonne Gonzales, the "Texas Tornado," was hired to fix a 40% student-dropout rate and a white/Hispanic gap in achievement test scores. Gonzales is an avid integrationist; relies on humor, appeasement, and persuasion tactics; and has alienated some school employees by increasing central office…

  19. Prolific Overton field gas reservoirs within large transverse oolite shoals, Upper Jurassic Haynesville, Eastern Margin East Texas basin

    SciTech Connect

    Glynn, W.G.; Covington, T.E.; Lighty, R.G.; Ahr, W.M.

    1985-02-01

    Late Triassic rifting along a northeast-southwest spreading center in east Texas resulted in basement highs along the eastern margin of the East Texas basin that became sites of extensive ooid shoal deposition during Late Jurassic time. Reservoirs within oolite facies at Overton field contain over 1 tcf of natural gas. These large shoals, each approximately 15 mi (24 km) long and 3 mi (4.8 km) wide, trend north-south as a group and northeast-southwest individually. They are oblique to the basin margin but parallel with Jurassic diffracted tidal currents within the East Texas embayment. Modern Bahamian ooid shoals of similar size, trend, and depositional setting occur at the terminus of the deep Tongue-Of-The-Ocean platform reentrant. Overton field reservoirs are in ooid grainstone shoal facies and in transitional shoal margins of skeletal-oolitic-peloidal grainstones and packstones. Adjacent nonreservoir facies are peloidal-skeletal-siliciclastic wackestones and mudstones. Early diagenesis of grainstone reservoir facies included meteoric dissolution and grain stabilization, resulting in abundant chalky intraparticle porosity and equant and bladed calcite cements filling interparticle porosity. Subsequent burial diagenesis resulted in intense solution compaction and coarse equant calcite and saddle crystal dolomite that occluded remaining interparticle porosity. Whole-rock trace element analysis indicates greatest diagenetic flushing (less magnesium, strontium) in porous zones. Stable isotopes for grains and cements show strong overprint of later burial diagenesis, with greater depletion of delta/sup 18/O in reservoir facies. However, hydrocarbons were emplaced prior to late cementation, and unlike other Jurassic Gulf Coast reservoirs, deep burial diagenesis provided no late-stage formation of porosity.

  20. Linkage between fluid-rock-interactions and facial, petrographical, and geochemical properties of Buntsandstein aquifer sandstones of the Thuringian Basin, Central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilse, U.; Beyer, D.; Kunkel, C.; Aehnelt, M.; Pudlo, D.; Voigt, T.; Gaupp, R.

    2012-04-01

    This study is part of a collaborative research project examining the basin wide movement of fluids in the subsurface (INFLUINS - integrated fluid dynamics in sediment basins). The Lower Triassic Buntsandstein is a major aquifer in Thuringia and adjacent areas in central Germany. The sediments exhibit an overall trend of base level and associated environmental changes. In the Lower Buntsandstein, deposition started with sediments indicating a playa-like setting. The Middle Buntsandstein consists of sediments of wide floodplains with very shallow rivers and eolian reworking in the lower part, and of deeper, long-ranged braided to meandering river systems in the upper part. Outcrop samples and core material were used for investigations and following discussion. For understanding fluid-rock-interactions in these sediments it is important to investigate the linkage between facies, rock composition, and mineral surfaces exposed to the pore space, as well as bulk rock and mineral chemistry. Compared to the clay rich lacustrine sediments of the Lower Buntsandstein the more porous fluvial and eolian sandstones of the Middle Buntsandstein represent better pathways for fluid migration in the present and past. The lacustrine and fluvial sandstones are mostly arkoses and subarkoses, whereas the eolian sandstones are often characterized by quartzarenitic composition. Facies variations and associated compositional differences are reflected in the geochemical composition of the rocks determined by ICP-MS/OES and XRF measurements. Sandstones of the Lower Buntsandstein are characterized by high contents of e.g. Al, Na, K, Fe, and Li, caused by the enrichment of clays and feldspars in the lacustrine sediments. Due to their higher compositional maturity, the fluvial (and eolian) sediments of the Middle Buntsandstein exhibit an increase of stable minerals towards the top, which is also reflected in geochemical data (increasing Si by decreasing Al, Na, K). By scanning electron

  1. Catalogue of Texas spiders

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the “Bibliography of Texas Spiders” published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated “Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks.” This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  2. Depositional facies mosaics and their time lines in Lower Ordovician carbonates of central Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, C.T.; Goldhammer, R.K.; Hardie, L.A.

    1985-02-01

    A comparative sedimentology and facies stratigraphy study of the Lower Ordovician carbonate of the central Appalachians (Beekmantown Group and equivalents) has been carried out. Our approach used subfacies (rock record of subenvironments) as the basin units of section measurement. The authors differentiated related sets of subfacies into larger facies units (rock record of environments). Facies were then correlated from section to section using fossils and lithostratigraphy to make a 3-dimensional facies mosaic. Within this mosaic, time lines were constructed using onlap-offlap tongues and cyclic sequences. These time lines cut across facies boundaries. Using this approach, the authors have established that the lower 600 m of the Lower Ordovician carbonate sequence is made up of 4 main facies: (1) cyclic laminite facies composed of a package of shoaling-upward shelf lagoon-peritidal cycles, (2) thin-bedded grainstone facies deposited in a shelf lagoon, (3) Renalcis bioherm facies recording a shelf lagoon patch-reef environment, and (4) Epiphyton bioherm facies recording a shelf-edge reef system. The distribution of these facies along time lines across the strike of the central Appalachians is markedly zoned. Epiphyton bioherm facies dominate the eastern margin while cyclic laminite facies dominate the western margin, with thin-bedded grainstone and Renalcis bioherm facies making up the central belt. This zonation of facies is a typical shallow carbonate shelf system with fringing reefs along the eastern, seaward margin and tidal flats along the western, landward margin. Vertical distribution of these facies across strike records 3 major sea level changes during deposition of the lower 600 m of this extensive Lower Ordovician carbonate shelf.

  3. A two scale analysis of tight sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Davy, C. A.; Song, Y.; Troadec, D.; Hauss, G.; Skoczylas, F.

    2015-12-01

    Tight sandstones have a low porosity and a very small permeability K. Available models for K do not compare well with measurements. These sandstones are made of SiO_2 grains, with a typical size of several hundreds of micron. These grains are separated by a network of micro-cracks, with sizes ranging between microns down to tens of nm. Therefore, the structure can be schematized by Voronoi polyhedra separated by plane and permeable polygonal micro-cracks. Our goal is to estimate K based on a two scale analysis and to compare the results to measurements. For a particular sample [2], local measurements on several scales include FIB/SEM [3], CMT and 2D SEM. FIB/SEM is selected because the peak pore size given by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry is of 350nm. FIB/SEM imaging (with 50 nm voxel size) identifies an individual crack of 180nm average opening, whereas CMT provides a connected porosity (individual crack) for 60 nm voxel size, of 4 micron average opening. Numerical modelling is performed by combining the micro-crack network scale (given by 2D SEM) and the 3D micro-crack scale (given by either FIB/SEM or CMT). Estimates of the micro-crack density are derived from 2D SEM trace maps by counting the intersections with scanlines, the surface density of traces, and the number of fracture intersections. K is deduced by using a semi empirical formula valid for identical, isotropic and uniformly distributed fractures [1]. This value is proportional to the micro-crack transmissivity sigma. Sigma is determined by solving the Stokes equation in the micro-cracks measured by FIB/SEM or CMT. K is obtained by combining the two previous results. Good correlation with measured values on centimetric plugs is found when using sigma from CMT data. The results are discussed and further research is proposed. [1] Adler et al, Fractured porous media, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012. [2] Duan et al, Int. J. Rock Mech. Mining Sci., 65, p75, 2014. [3] Song et al, Marine and Petroleum Eng., 65, p63

  4. The flora of the Catahoula Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Edward Wilber

    1916-01-01

    During the progress of my studies of the fossil floras of the Gulf Coastal Plain, embracing all horizons from the Lower Cretaceous to the Pleistocene and prosecuted under the general direction of T. Wayland Vaughan, material representing the floras of all the major stratigraphic units in the area extending from western Florida to central Texas has been discovered. Field work and office studies of all these floras have proceeded more or less simultaneously, and a large amount of manuscript in various stages of completion has been accumulated. The floras of the Upper Cretaceous and Eocene of South Carolina and Georgia have been described and a report on the very large lower Eocene floras is now in press.

  5. Geohydrology of the Delaware Basin and vicinity, Texas and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, S.F.; Wells, J.G.; Stephens, K.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Delaware Basin study area includes four major aquifers: Capitan aquifer, Rustler Formation, Santa Rosa Sandstone (Dockum Group), and aquifers in the Cenozoic alluvium. Water from the Capitan aquifer is used for domestic and irrigation purposes in Eddy County, New Mexico, and for irrigation and industrial purposes in Texas. Available analyses indicate that dissolved solids concentrations range from 303 to 31,700 mg/L, chloride concentrations range from 16 to 16,689 mg/L, and fluoride concentrations range from 0.5 to 3.0 mg/L. The Rustler Formation contains water that generally is not suitable for domestic use because of its salinity. Chloride concentrations range from 15 to 210,000 mg/L, and dissolved solids concentrations range from 286 to 325,800 mg/L. Fluoride concentrations range from 0.5 to 11.4 mg/L. Water from this aquifer is used for irrigation and stock watering where it is of suitable quality. The Santa Rosa Sandstone is the principal source of groundwater in the western third of Lea County and in the eastern part of Eddy County. In parts of Texas, the Santa Rosa Sandstone and the Cenozoic alluvium are hydraulically connected and are called the Allurosa aquifer. The Santa Rosa Sandstone-Allurosa aquifer is the source of municipal supply for the cities of Barstow, Pecos, Monahans, and Kermit, Texas. Water quality is variable. For those analyses where the Santa Rosa Sandstone is a distinct entity, chloride concentrations range from 10 to 4,800 mg/L, dissolved solids concentrations range from 205 to 2,990 mg/L, and fluoride concentrations range from 0.4 to 5.0 mg/L. Water from the Cenozoic alluvium is used extensively for public water supplies, irrigation, industry, livestock watering, and rural-domestic supply throughout the Delaware Basin. The quality of water in the Cenozoic alluvium is variable. Chloride concentrations range from 5 to 7,400 mg/L, dissolved solids concentrations range from 188 to 15,000 mg/L, and fluoride concentrations range from 0

  6. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text

  7. Depositional environments and diagenetic features of a Cretaceous clastic sequence, Fox Hills Sandstone of Northern Great Plains Province

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.M.

    1986-08-01

    The Fox Hills Sandstone, youngest formation of the Montana Group, is a geographically extensive, thin unit that is composed primarily of silty sandstone and shale. This formation records the final withdrawal of the Upper Cretaceous epicontinental sea from the Western Interior of the US. It extends from central Canada southward through Montana, the Dakotas, Wyoming, and Colorado. This typical shoreline sequence is exposed along the flanks of the Cedar Creek anticline, which trends southeastward from eastern Montana into North and South Dakota. The upper Fox Hills consists of stacked, upward-fining, trough to planar cross-bedded sandstone bodies. These sequences grade laterally and vertically into interbedded clay and silt units containing root casts and are interpreted as deposits of a braided-stream system. A matrix mineral assemblage of chlorite, montmorillonite, calcite, and minor dolomite is characteristic of distributary channels and river mouth-bar facies. The lower Fox Hills consists of either irregularly stacked upward-coarsening, trough cross-bedded sand sequences or massive sand bodies separated by erosional surfaces. Outcrops locally contain the trace fossil Ophiomorpha or limestone concretions containing marine to brackish-water fossils, and have been interpreted as deposits of a rapidly advancing shoreline and strand plain. In the matrix, illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite with minor calcite characterize beach, subtidal, and crevasse-splay environments. Diagenetic features include quartz overgrowths, clay alterations of potassium feldspar and rock fragments, and authigenic clay rims. Petrographic evidence indicates multiple source areas for these sediments and the primary influence of depositional environments on clay formation.

  8. Uranium migration through intact sandstone cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D.; Lawless, T. A.; Sims, R. J.; Butter, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    Uranium is often considered to be a mobile radioelement in the natural environment owing to its tendency to form stable complexes with a number of aqueous anions, particularly in oxidising milieu. A series of infiltration experiments were devised to investigate this migration behaviour under rigidly controlled laboratory conditions. Intact cores of Permo-Triassic Clashach Sandstone were pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater solutions and continuous flow-through of uranium monitored together with pH and concentrations of other ions. Prior to performing each experiment a simulation was carried out using a one-dimensional coupled chemical transport code, encompassing a thermodynamic description of the electrical double layer. These calculations together with electron microscopy indicated the potential role played by iron oxyhydroxide grain coatings in retarding the uranium plume. Thus, a second series of experiments was initiated on pre-acidified cores from which all surface exposed iron had been removed, allowing an assessment of the retention capacity of non-ferric components. Taken together, the data clearly illustrate the strong affinity of aqueous uranium species for natural surfaces even under strongly oxidising conditions. The success of the model in predicting a priori the dominant trends in uranium migration behaviour is encouraging and may aid in prioritising analytical requirements for investigations in more complex geochemical situations than those studied here.

  9. Provenance of sandstones from Caledonian nappes in Finnmark, Norway: Implications for Neoproterozoic-Cambrian palaeogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Roberts, D.; Pease, V.

    2016-11-01

    U-Pb detrital zircon age spectra from four formations in the Laksefjord and Kalak nappe complexes, Finnmark Caledonides, northern Norway, show peaks ranging from Neoarchaean through Late Palaeoproterozoic to Late Mesoproterozoic. Together with an extensive database of palaeocurrent flow measurements indicating derivation of the sediments from source regions to the S-SE on the Fennoscandian Shield, the successions in the lower thrust sheets of the Kalak Nappe Complex and the entire Laksefjord Nappe Complex are inferred to be of Baltican origin. These results are contrary to a previous suggestion that the sandstone-dominated Middle Allochthon is exotic to Baltica. The lithostratigraphical successions in these two nappe complexes show a south to north progression from alluvial-fan conglomerates through extensive fluvial to shallow-marine facies into deeper-marine turbiditic sequences. This pattern reflects the palaeogeographic transition from the shallow platform to deep-basinal oceanic development recorded along the c. 2000 km pre-Timanian passive margin of the northeastern Fennoscandian Shield.

  10. Chromite in Lower Pennsylvanian Nuttall sandstone from West Virginia - Possible Blue Ridge province source

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, J.T. )

    1989-08-01

    Detrital chromite grains from heavy mineral separates of three samples of the Lower Pennsylvanian Nuttall Sandstone Member of the New River Formation were examined by use of a reflected-light petrographic microscope, a scanning electron microscope, and an electron microprobe. Some textures observed microscopically in the chromite grains are similar to those in chromite grains in dunite from the Blue Ridge province of North Carolina that has undergone regional metamorphism. Additional exsolution features are also observed in the chromites of this study. The major-oxide compositions of the detrital chromite grains vary more widely than those of the chromites of the Blue Ridge, possibly due to a larger sampling base. The detrital grain compositions (Cr/(Cr + Al), Mg/(Mg + Fe{sup +2})) plot near the fields of the Blue Ridge chromites, although the appearance of both more aluminum-rich and magnesium-poor compositions possibly indicate a higher facies of metamorphism than the Blue Ridge samples studied to date.

  11. Ejecta Dynamics during Hypervelocity Impacts into Dry and Wet Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.; Poelchau, M.; Kenkmann, T.; Deutsch, A.

    2011-03-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments into dry and water saturated porous Seeberger sandstone were conducted at the two-stage light gas accelerator at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI) and the ejecta dynamics were analyzed.

  12. Alluvial fan facies of the Yongchong Basin: Implications for tectonic and paleoclimatic changes during Late Cretaceous in SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liuqin; Steel, Ronald J.; Guo, Fusheng; Olariu, Cornel; Gong, Chenglin

    2017-02-01

    Late Cretaceous continental redbeds, the Guifeng Group of the Yongchong Basin in SE China have been investigated to conduct detailed fan facies description and interpretation. Tectonic activities determined the alluvial fan development along the basin margin, but the alluvial facies was linked with paleoclimate changes. The Guifeng Group is divided into the Hekou, Tangbian and Lianhe formations in ascending order. The Hekou conglomerates are typically polymict, moderately sorted with erosional bases, cut-and-fill features, normal grading and sieve deposits, representing dominant stream-flows on alluvial fans during the initial opening stage of the basin infill. The Tangbian Formation, however, is characterized by structureless fine-grained sediments with dispersed coarse clasts, and couplets of conglomerate and sandstone or siltstone and mudstone, recording a change to a playa and ephemeral lake environments with occasional stream flooding, thus indicating a basin expanding stage. The hallmark of the Lianhe Formation is disorganized, poorly sorted conglomerates lack of erosional bases, and a wide particle-size range from clay to boulders together reflect mud-rich debris-flows accumulating on fans, likely related to reactivation of faulting along the northwestern mountain fronts during a post-rift stage. The depositional system changes from stream-flows up through playa with ephemeral streams to debris-flows during the accumulation of the three formations are thus attributed to different source rocks and climatic conditions. Therefore, the fluvial-dominated fans of the Hekou Formation recorded a subhumid paleoclimate (Coniacian-Santonian Age). The dominant semiarid climate during the Campanian Age produced abundant fine-grained sediments in the playa and ephemeral lake environments of the Tangbian Formation. A climatic change towards more humidity during the late stage of the Guifeng Group (Maastrichtian Age) probably yielded high deposition rate of coarse clasts in

  13. Muddy and dolomitic rip-up clasts in Triassic fluvial sandstones: Origin and impact on potential reservoir properties (Argana Basin, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henares, Saturnina; Arribas, Jose; Cultrone, Giuseppe; Viseras, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    The significance of rip-up clasts as sandstone framework grains is frequently neglected in the literature being considered as accessory components in bulk sandstone composition. However, this study highlights the great value of muddy and dolomitic rip-up clast occurrence as: (a) information source about low preservation potential from floodplain deposits and (b) key element controlling host sandstone diagenetic evolution and thus ultimate reservoir quality. High-resolution petrographic analysis on Triassic fluvial sandstones from Argana Basin (T6 and T7/T8 units) highlights the significance of different types of rip-up clasts as intrabasinal framework components of continental sediments from arid climates. On the basis of their composition and ductility, three main types are distinguished: (a) muddy rip-up clasts, (b) dolomitic muddy rip-up clasts and (c) dolomite crystalline rip-up clasts. Spatial distribution of different types is strongly facies-related according to grain size. Origin of rip-up clasts is related to erosion of coeval phreatic dolocretes, in different development stages, and associated muddy floodplain sediments. Cloudy cores with abundant inclusions and clear outer rims of dolomite crystals suggest a first replacive and a subsequent displacive growth, respectively. Dolomite crystals are almost stoichiometric. This composition is very similar to that of early sandstone dolomite cement, supporting phreatic dolocretes as dolomite origin in both situations. Sandstone diagenesis is dominated by mechanical compaction and dolomite cementation. A direct correlation exists between: (1) muddy rip-up clast abundance and early reduction of primary porosity by compaction with irreversible loss of intergranular volume (IGV); and (2) occurrence of dolomitic rip-up clasts and dolomite cement nucleation in host sandstone, occluding adjacent pores but preserving IGV. Both processes affect reservoir quality by generation of vertical and 3D fluid flow baffles and

  14. Comparison of four approaches to a rock facies classification problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dubois, M.K.; Bohling, G.C.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, seven classifiers based on four different approaches were tested in a rock facies classification problem: classical parametric methods using Bayes' rule, and non-parametric methods using fuzzy logic, k-nearest neighbor, and feed forward-back propagating artificial neural network. Determining the most effective classifier for geologic facies prediction in wells without cores in the Panoma gas field, in Southwest Kansas, was the objective. Study data include 3600 samples with known rock facies class (from core) with each sample having either four or five measured properties (wire-line log curves), and two derived geologic properties (geologic constraining variables). The sample set was divided into two subsets, one for training and one for testing the ability of the trained classifier to correctly assign classes. Artificial neural networks clearly outperformed all other classifiers and are effective tools for this particular classification problem. Classical parametric models were inadequate due to the nature of the predictor variables (high dimensional and not linearly correlated), and feature space of the classes (overlapping). The other non-parametric methods tested, k-nearest neighbor and fuzzy logic, would need considerable improvement to match the neural network effectiveness, but further work, possibly combining certain aspects of the three non-parametric methods, may be justified. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagenesis Along Fractures in an Eolian Sandstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Yen, A. S.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Downs, R.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.; Vaniman, D. T.; Gellert, R.; Sutter, B.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring sedimentary deposits in Gale crater since August 2012. The rover has traversed up section through approx.100 m of sedimentary rocks deposited in fluvial, deltaic, lacustrine, and eolian environments (Bradbury group and overlying Mount Sharp group). The Stimson formation lies unconformable over a lacustrine mudstone at the base of the Mount Sharp group and has been interpreted to be a cross-bedded sandstone of lithified eolian dunes. Mineralogy of the unaltered Stimson sandstone consists of plagioclase feldspar, pyroxenes, and magnetite with minor abundances of hematite, and Ca-sulfates (anhydrite, bassanite). Unaltered sandstone has a composition similar to the average Mars crustal composition. Alteration "halos" occur adjacent to fractures in the Stimson. Fluids passing through these fractures have altered the chemistry and mineralogy of the sandstone. Silicon and S enrichments and depletions in Al, Fe, Mg, Na, K, Ni and Mn suggest aqueous alteration in an open hydrologic system. Mineralogy of the altered Stimson is dominated by Ca-sulfates, Si-rich X-ray amorphous materials along with plagioclase feldspar, magnetite, and pyroxenes, but less abundant in the altered compared to the unaltered Stimson sandstone and lower pyroxene/plagioclase feldspar. The mineralogy and geochemistry of the altered sandstone suggest a complicated history with several (many?) episodes of aqueous alteration under a variety of environmental conditions (e.g., acidic, alkaline).

  16. Arctic Creek facies, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Northeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, J.; Camber, W.; Vandergon, M.A.; Crowder, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    The Arctic Creek section is dissimilar to the typical Cretaceous section exposed elsewhere in Ignek Valley. The more typical Ignek Valley sequence consists of Kingak Shale (Jurassic to Neocomian), Kemik Sandstone (Hauterivian), Pebble Shale (Hauterivian-Barremian), Hue Shale (Aptian.to Santonian), and turbidites of the Canning Formation (Campanian to Paleocene). The two main differences that distinguish the Arctic Creek section from the typical Ignek Valley section are: (1) lack of the regionally persistent Kemik Sandstone in the Arctic Creek section, and (2) lack of Albian turbidites in the typical Ignek Valley section. The Arctic Creek section is more similar to the Cretaceous section exposed at Bathtub Ridge about 180 km to the southeast. The Bathtub Ridge section consists of black shale with local siltstone beds (Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous), manganiferous shale, interbedded shale and siltstone turbidites (Albian), and sandstone turbidites (Albian.). The authors believe that the Arctic Creek and Bathtub Ridge sections were once part of a continuous depositional basin, and that the Arctic Creek section has been thrust northward into juxtaposition with the typical Ignek Valley strata.

  17. Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Facies characterization at Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, John Grayson

    The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a shallow-marine carbonate unit in the subsurface of the U.S. Gulf Coast, spanning from south Texas to west Florida. This field case-study focuses on Little Cedar Creek Field located in southeastern Conecuh County, Alabama. The objectives of this study are to (1) construct a 3-D depositional model for the Smackover Formation at Little Cedar Creek Field; (2) establish a sequence stratigraphic framework for the construction of the depositional model; (3) characterize and map lithofacies with high resource potential based on the depositional model; and (4) demonstrate the use of the depositional model to maximize hydrocarbon recovery in the field area. Little Cedar Creek Field is located near the up-dip limit of the Smackover Formation. The top of the Smackover is found at depths between 10,000 to 12,000 feet, and the formation ranges in thickness from 60 to 120 feet. The Smackover Formation overlies the Callovian-Oxfordian Norphlet Formation and underlies the Kimmeridgian Haynesville Formation. The petroleum reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, unlike most Smackover fields in the eastern Gulf region, are composed predominantly of limestone, not dolomite, and do not possess a Buckner Anhydrite top seal immediately above the reservoir. Beginning from the top of the Smackover, the facies are: (S-1) Peritidal lime mudstone-wackestone; (S-2) tidal channel conglomeratic floatstone-rudstone; (S-3) peloid-ooid shoal grainstone-packstone; (S-4) subtidal lime wackestone-mudstone; (S-5) microbially-influenced packstone-wackestone; (S-6) microbial (thrombolite) boundstone; and (S-7) transgressive lime mudstone-dolostone. Production is from both the thrombolite boundstone and shoal grainstone facies, though pressure and fluid data indicate no communication between the two reservoirs. The data indicate that the microbial communities developed on subtle topographic highs overlying the transgressive lime mudstone-dolostone in

  18. Corpus Christi, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This near vertical view of the south Texas coast shows the city of Corpus Christi (28.0N, 97.0W) and Corpus Christi Bay. Mustang Island and the Gulf of Mexico are seen in the Southeast corner of the view. The Nueces River flows into the bay from the west. The light toned squiggly lines in Corpus Christi Bay are mud trails caused by shrimp boats dragging their nets along the shallow bottom of the bay.

  19. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  20. Facies analysis of yedoma thermokarst lakes on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Louise; Anthony, Katey Walter; Bigelow, Nancy; Edwards, Mary; Grosse, Guido

    2016-07-01

    Thermokarst lakes develop as a result of the thaw and collapse of ice-rich, permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Of particular sedimentological importance are thermokarst lakes forming in late Pleistocene icy silt (yedoma), which dramatically alter the land surface by lowering surface elevation and redistributing upland sediment into lower basins. Our study provides the first description of yedoma thermokarst lake sedimentology based on the cross-basin sampling of an existing lake. We present lake sediment facies descriptions based on data from sediment cores from two thermokarst lakes of medium depth, Claudi and Jaeger (informal names), which formed in previously non thermokarst-affected upland yedoma on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. We identify four prominent facies using sedimentological, biogeochemical, and macrofossil indicators: a massive silt lacking aquatic macrofossils and other aquatic indicators situated below a sub-lacustrine unconformity (Facies 1); two basal deposits: interbedded organic silt and chaotic silt (Facies 2-3); and a silt-rich mud (Facies 4). Facies 1 is interpreted as yedoma that has thawed during lake formation. Facies 3 formed adjacent to the margin due to thaw and collapse events from the lake shore. Material from Facies 3 was reworked by wave action to form Facies 2 in a medium energy margin environment. Facies 4 formed in a lower energy environment toward the lake basin center. This facies classification and description should enhance our ability (i) to interpret the spatial and temporal development of lakes and (ii) to reconstruct long-term patterns of landscape change.

  1. Geochemistry of Eagle Ford group source rocks and oils from the first shot field area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edman, Janell D.; Pitman, Janet K.; Hammes, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Total organic carbon, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, and vitrinite reflectance analyses performed on Eagle Ford Group core and cuttings samples from the First Shot field area, Texas demonstrate these samples have sufficient quantity, quality, and maturity of organic matter to have generated oil. Furthermore, gas chromatography and biomarker analyses performed on Eagle Ford Group oils and source rock extracts as well as weight percent sulfur analyses on the oils indicate the source rock facies for most of the oils are fairly similar. Specifically, these source rock facies vary in lithology from shales to marls, contain elevated levels of sulfur, and were deposited in a marine environment under anoxic conditions. It is these First Shot Eagle Ford source facies that have generated the oils in the First Shot Field. However, in contrast to the generally similar source rock facies and organic matter, maturity varies from early oil window to late oil window in the study area, and these maturity variations have a pronounced effect on both the source rock and oil characteristics. Finally, most of the oils appear to have been generated locally and have not experienced long distance migration. 

  2. Subsurface Glen Rose reef trend in east Texas and west-central Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.S.

    1983-03-01

    The subsurface Glen Rose reef trend in east Texas and west-central Louisiana (Lower Cretaceous Comanchean) is a regressive carbonate complex deposited on a broad shallow water shelf. The Glen Rose reef trend can be differentiated into two separate reef tracts that prograded seaward over a slowly subsiding shelf. It remains to be seen whether the Glen Rose reefs are actual framework reefs or mounds of transported material. Reef facies include poorly sorted caprinidcoral grainstones, moderately sorted peloid and oncolite packstones and grainstones, and well-sorted, very fine grained skeletal grainstones. Coated grains, abraded skeletal fragments, scoured bedding surfaces, and minor cross-beds are evidence for deposition of the reef facies in a high-energy shoal setting. The reefal buildups grade laterally into low-energy shallow water wackestones and mudstones containing toucasids, orbitolinids, and serpulid burrows. Porosities associated with the reefal buildups appear facies controlled. Caprinid-coral packstones and grainstones exhibit intraparticle, moldic, and vuggy porosities of 10 to 15%. Pinpoint microporosity of 5 to 10% are found within the finegrained skeletal grainstones. Fracture porosity enhances permeability in several facies. Moldic and vuggy porosity types are generally secondary whereas intraparticle porosity may be preserved primary. Coarse equant calcite commonly occludes intraparticle, moldic, vuggy, and fracture porosities. Dolomitization within the reef limestones may have acted to create or preserve porosities. Poor production from the Glen Rose reef trend has been attributed to the lack of structural closure.

  3. The role of diagenetic studies in flow-unit modeling: San Andres formation, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, S. )

    1994-03-01

    The Permian San Andres Formation represents one of the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing intervals of the Permian basin. Dolostone lithofacies intercalated with thin evaporites accommodate highly compartmentalized reservoirs resulting from complex depositional and diagenetic histories. This compartmentalization often facilitates the use of these reservoirs in flow-unit studies. Perhaps more important than the relationship of productive intervals to depositional facies is the degree to which diagenetic processes have influenced reservoir properties. Detailed petrographic evaluation of the reservoir in question, though often overlooked, should be an integral part of flow-unit studies. Once a diagenetic sequence is established, the information may be incorporated in to the facies model to better understand how to subdivide the reservoir. Such an investigation has been conducted on the San Andres Formation in Reeves field of southeastern Yoakum County, Texas. Here, multistage diagenetic overprints are superimposed on depositional facies that vary in degree of lateral extent, thereby complicating the geometries of individual productive zones within the reservoir. Analysis of the reservoir reveals that Reeves San Andres sediments were subjected to dominant diagenetic processes, including dolomitization and sulfate implacement, both of which are major factors in porosity preservation, and a variety of minor processes that have had little effect on reservoir quality. The recognition of diagenetic facies, and understanding of the processes that have created them, and identification of the implications of these processes on reservoir properties is a vital part of any flow-unit study.

  4. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  5. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Mendez, Daniel L.

    2001-05-08

    The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstone's of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover oil more economically through geologically based field development. This project was focused on East Ford field, a Delaware Mountain Group field that produced from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 9160, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO2 flood was being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  6. High resolution reservoir architecture of late Jurassic Haynesville ramp carbonates in the Gladewater field, East Texas Salt Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhammer, R.K.

    1996-12-31

    The East Texas Salt Basin contains numerous gas fields within Upper Jurassic Haynesville ramp-complex reservoirs. A sequenced-keyed, high-resolution zonation scheme was developed for the Haynesville Formation in Gladewater field by integrating core description, well-log, seismic, porosity and permeability data. The Haynesville at Gladewater represents a high-energy ramp system, localized on paleotopographic highs induced by diapirism of Callovian Age Salt (Louann). Ramp crest grainstones serve as reservoirs. We have mapped the distribution of reservoir facies within a hierarchy of upward-shallowing parasequences grouped into low-frequency sequences. The vertical stacking patterns of parasequences and sequences reflect the interplay of eustasy, sediment accumulation patterns, and local subsidence (including salt movement and compaction). In this study we draw on regional relations from analogous, Jurassic systems in Mexico to constrain the stratigraphic architecture, age model, and facies model. Additionally, salt-cored Holocene, grain-rich shoals from the Persian Gulf provide excellent facies analogs. The result is a new high-resolution analysis of reservoir architecture at a parasequence scale that links reservoir facies to depositional facies. The new stratigraphy scheme demonstrates that different geographic portions of the field have markedly distinct reservoir intervals, both in terms of total pay and the sequence-stratigraphic interval within which it occurs. Results from this study are used to evaluate infill drill well potential, in well planning, for updating reservoir models, and in refining field reserve estimates.

  7. High resolution reservoir architecture of late Jurassic Haynesville ramp carbonates in the Gladewater field, East Texas Salt Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhammer, R.K. )

    1996-01-01

    The East Texas Salt Basin contains numerous gas fields within Upper Jurassic Haynesville ramp-complex reservoirs. A sequenced-keyed, high-resolution zonation scheme was developed for the Haynesville Formation in Gladewater field by integrating core description, well-log, seismic, porosity and permeability data. The Haynesville at Gladewater represents a high-energy ramp system, localized on paleotopographic highs induced by diapirism of Callovian Age Salt (Louann). Ramp crest grainstones serve as reservoirs. We have mapped the distribution of reservoir facies within a hierarchy of upward-shallowing parasequences grouped into low-frequency sequences. The vertical stacking patterns of parasequences and sequences reflect the interplay of eustasy, sediment accumulation patterns, and local subsidence (including salt movement and compaction). In this study we draw on regional relations from analogous, Jurassic systems in Mexico to constrain the stratigraphic architecture, age model, and facies model. Additionally, salt-cored Holocene, grain-rich shoals from the Persian Gulf provide excellent facies analogs. The result is a new high-resolution analysis of reservoir architecture at a parasequence scale that links reservoir facies to depositional facies. The new stratigraphy scheme demonstrates that different geographic portions of the field have markedly distinct reservoir intervals, both in terms of total pay and the sequence-stratigraphic interval within which it occurs. Results from this study are used to evaluate infill drill well potential, in well planning, for updating reservoir models, and in refining field reserve estimates.

  8. Sandstone Diagenesis at Gale Crater, Mars, As Observed By Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebach, K. L.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McLennan, S. M.; Hurowitz, J.; Kah, L. C.; Edgett, K. S.; Williams, R. M. E.; Wiens, R. C.; Schieber, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, has encountered a significant number of poorly-sorted and very well-lithified sandstones along its traverse on the floor of Gale Crater. We use images from the hand-lens imager (MAHLI) and elemental chemistry from the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument (LIBS) and the alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer (APXS) to begin to constrain the diagenetic history of these sandstones, including lithification and possible later dissolution. Investigation of MAHLI images reveals that the sediments are poorly-sorted and show very low apparent porosity, generally less than ~5%. However, in some cases, such as the Gillespie Lake sandstone identified in Yellowknife Bay, this apparent porosity includes a significant fraction of void spaces larger than typical sediment grain sizes (~30% by number or 75% of void spaces by area). One possible explanation of these larger pits is that they represent recent removal of soft intraclasts by eolian abrasion. Another possibility is that later diagenetic fluids caused dissolution of more soluble grains, and production of secondary porosity. Investigation into the elemental chemistry of the sandstones has shown that they have a relatively unaltered basaltic bulk composition in spite of possessing a variety of secondary minerals and amorphous material, indicating isochemical diagenetic processes. The chemistry and mineralogy of the cement is not immediately evident based on the initial analyses; there is not a high percentage of salts or evaporative minerals that may easily cement near-surface sandstones. Furthermore, these sandstones lack textures and compositions consistent with pedogenic processes, such as calcrete, silcrete, or ferricrete. Instead, they may record burial and cementation at depth. Cement composition may be constrained through comparison to terrestrial basaltic sandstones, and studying chemical variations along ChemCam and APXS transects of the rocks.

  9. Lawyers for Texas. A study of Legal Education in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    In response to requests from Texas institutions of higher education to establish additional legal education programs, the Coordinating Board, Texas College and University System in October 1972, appointed two groups to undertake a cooperative study to assist in determining whether or not additional opportunities for legal education were needed in…

  10. Solar Hot Water for Motor Inn--Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Final report describes solar domestic-hot-water heater installation at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas which furnished 63% of total hot-water load of new 98-unit inn. Report presents a description of system, drawings and photographs of collectors, operations and maintenance instructions, manufacturers' specifications for pumps, and an engineer's report on performance.

  11. Depositional sequence stratigraphy and architecture of the cretaceous ferron sandstone: Implications for coal and coalbed methane resources - A field excursion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, J.R.; Van Den, Bergh; Barker, C.E.; Tabet, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    This Field Excursion will visit outcrops of the fluvial-deltaic Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, known as the Last Chance delta or Upper Ferron Sandstone. This field guide and the field stops will outline the architecture and depositional sequence stratigraphy of the Upper Ferron Sandstone clastic wedge and explore the stratigraphic positions and compositions of major coal zones. The implications of the architecture and stratigraphy of the Ferron fluvial-deltaic complex for coal and coalbed methane resources will be discussed. Early works suggested that the southwesterly derived deltaic deposits of the the upper Ferron Sandstone clastic wedge were a Type-2 third-order depositional sequence, informally called the Ferron Sequence. These works suggested that the Ferron Sequence is separated by a type-2 sequence boundary from the underlying 3rd-order Hyatti Sequence, which has its sediment source from the northwest. Within the 3rd-order depositional sequence, the deltaic events of the Ferron clastic wedge, recognized as parasequence sets, appear to be stacked into progradational, aggradational, and retrogradational patterns reflecting a generally decreasing sediment supply during an overall slow sea-level rise. The architecture of both near-marine facies and non-marine fluvial facies exhibit well defined trends in response to this decrease in available sediment. Recent studies have concluded that, unless coincident with a depositional sequence boundary, regionally extensive coal zones occur at the tops of the parasequence sets within the Ferron clastic wedge. These coal zones consist of coal seams and their laterally equivalent fissile carbonaceous shales, mudstones, and siltstones, paleosols, and flood plain mudstones. Although the compositions of coal zones vary along depositional dip, the presence of these laterally extensive stratigraphic horizons, above parasequence sets, provides a means of correlating and defining the tops

  12. Geologic and Engineering Characterization of East Ford Field, Reeves County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Guzman, Jose I.; Zirczy, Helena

    1999-08-16

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through geologically based field development. The project focused on reservoir characterization of the East Ford unit, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey Sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit: it contained an estimated 18.4 million barrels (MMbbl) of original oil in place.

  13. Petrographic and geochemical analysis of the Givetian-Frasnian sandstones in the Kuh-e-Tizi section, southeastern Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazi, S. H.; Adabi, M. H.; Moussavi Harami, S. R.; Khosro Tehrani, K.

    2009-04-01

    .P., Ramasamy, S., 2004. Geochemistry of sandstones from the Upper Miocene Kudankulam Formation, southern India: implication for provenance, weathering and tectonic setting. J. Sediment. Res. 74, 285-297. Basu, A., Young, S.W., Suttner, L.J., James, W.C., Mack, G.H., 1975. Re-evaluation of the use of undulatory extinction and polycrystallinity in detrital quartz for provenance interpretation. J. Sed. Petrol. 45, 873-882. Bhatia, M.R., 1983. Plate tectonics and geochemical composition of sandstones. J. Geol. 91, 611-627. Bhatia, M.R., Crook, K.A.W., 1986. Trace element characteristics of graywackes and tectonic setting discrimination of sedimentary basins. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 92, 181-193. Dickinson, W.R., Beard, L.S., Brakenridge, G.R., Erjavec, J.L., Ferguson, R.C., Inman, K.F., Knepp, R.A., Lindberg, F.A., Ryberg, P.T., 1983. Provenance of North American Phanerozoic sandstones in relation to tectonic setting. Bull. Am. Geol. Soc. 94, 222-235. Kroonenberg, S.B., 1994. Effects of provenance, sorting and weathering on the geochemistry of fluvial sands from different tectonic and climatic environments. Proceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress, Part A, 69-81. Roser, B.P., Korsch, R.J., 1986. Determination of tectonic setting of sandstonemudstone suites using SiO2 content and K2O/Na2O ratio. J. Geol. 94, 635-650. Wendt, J., Kaufmann, B., Belka, Z., Farsan, N. & Karimi bavandpur, A. 2002. Devonian/Lower Carboniferous stratigraphy, facies patterns and palaeogeography of Iran. Part I. Southeastern Iran. Acta Geol. Polo. 52, 129-168.

  14. Biostratigraphy of Albian-Cenomanian boundary in Texas and implications for middle Cretaceous stratigraphy elsewhere in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.A.; Ravn, R.L.; Wood, G.D. )

    1987-02-01

    On the basis of comparison of ammonite zonations in Texas and western Europe, the Albian-Cenomanian boundary in Texas is placed in the lower part of the Grayson Formation of the Washita Group. This position contrasts with the Comanchean-Gulfian Series boundary, normally placed at the top of the Washita Group. Comparison of polynomorphs from the Grayson and associated strata with those of other North American middle Cretaceous units reveals inconsistencies in the designations of Albian ages in other areas. Spore-pollen assemblages from the subsurface Dantzler Formation in Mississippi and Louisiana (previously considered Albian) include age-diagnostic taxa characteristic of the Maness and lower Woodbine formations (Cenomanian) in Texas. The Albian-Cenomanian boundary therefore occurs at a major unconformity between the Dantzler and underlying Fredericksburg Group, rather than at the unconformable top of the Dantzler, below Tuscaloosa Group sandstones. Palynology also indicates correlation of the type Dakota Formation of Nebraska and Iowa to the Cenomanian Maness-Woodbine in Texas, overlying the major middle Cretaceous unconformity. In northern Arizona, the Dakota Sandstone contains a Cenomanian assemblage similar to that of the type Dakota, but in Wyoming and Colorado, units traditionally referred to the Dakota Group (e.g., Muddy formation) are clearly Albian in age, and lie below the middle Cretaceous unconformity. These correlations shed new light on the sedimentary and stratigraphic relationships of unconformities and lithologic units in the middle Cretaceous of central and western North America.

  15. Development of Shear Banding in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, J. J.; Labuz, J. F.

    2004-05-01

    Closed-loop, servo-controlled testing was used to investigate the development of shear failure in Berea sandstone under low confining pressure. The experiments were performed with the University of Minnesota Plane-Strain Apparatus, designed to allow the failure plane to propagate in an unrestricted manner. Deformation was imposed into the strain softening regime and controlled so that the specimens remained intact. Thin-section microscopy provided direct observation in, adjacent to, and around the tip of the rupture zone. The shear band appeared to initiate near a stress concentration, either the corner of the specimen or, when present, an imperfection (3 mm diameter hole) introduced into the specimen. Intragranular microcracking was the dominant observable failure mechanism. The intensity of grain cracking was greatest near the initiation point and decreased as the failure surface was traced towards the tip. Areas of high crack density also appeared to have the greatest amount of grain size reduction and there seemed to be a larger amount of pore space. In areas where intragranular microcracks were distinguishable, (e.g. near the tip of the rupture zone), microcracks showed very little or no shear displacement, suggesting the features were not reoriented after formation. Microcrack orientations showed a dominant direction of -16 degrees from the maximum principal stress direction and -26 degrees from the failure surface. A numerical imaging technique was developed to provide an efficient means for analyzing the relative porosity of epoxy-impregnated thin-sections. The code was set up to receive a digital image (*.bmp), where three parameters (R, G, and B) describe the color of each pixel. The intensity of the R channel consistently defined the boundary of grain and pore space and was used to differentiate blue pore space from the white grains composing the matrix. Porosity increase within the rupture zone was 3-4 grain diameters wide. An absence of notable

  16. Biogenic caliches in Texas: The role of organisms and effect of climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Chafetz, Henry S.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic constituents are ubiquitous and abundant in the caliches of Texas. Investigation of 51 caliche profiles on various host strata (alluvium, limestone, igneous rocks, etc.) across approximately 900 km of Texas from subhumid east to arid west has shown that 43 of these profiles exhibit prominent biogenic constituents. These profiles exhibit significant differences in thickness (varying from centimeters to meters) and maturity (varying from I to VI). All of the different caliche facies are composed of low-Mg calcite. Biogenic features generally occur in the upper part of the profiles, including the uppermost portion of massive caliche horizons, platy horizons, laminar crusts, and pisoids. The main biogenic caliche facies include rhizoliths (calcified root structures), stromatolite-like laminar crusts, and coated grains. Compared to the abiogenic massive micritic to microsparitic calcite groundmass, biogenic constituents are morphologically distinct. These biogenic constituents are composed of several microscopic mineral components, including calcified filaments, needle fiber calcite (e.g., single crystalline needles and needle pairs, triangular crystals, and polycrystalline chains of rhombohedrons), spherulites, micro-rods, and nano-spheres. A large number of calcified root cellular structures and micro-organisms, e.g., fungal filaments, actinomycetes, and rod-like bacteria, are also present. Plant roots as well as soil biota produce distinctive structures and also enhance lithification by inducing calcite precipitation in the caliches, i.e., biologically controlled or influenced processes. Host strata did not significantly influence the abundance nor type of biogenic features in the caliches. In contrast, climate had an evident effect on the development of biogenic constituents in these caliches in terms of the amount as well as type. The thickness of laminar crusts and grain coatings and the abundance of biotic constituents within those facies decrease as the

  17. Facies analysis and depositional environment of the Ames Marine Member of the Conemaugh Group in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qayim, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    The lithologic and paleontological aspects for fifty localities of the Ames Marine Member were examined. The regional stratigraphic reconstruction shows that it is variably composed of limestone and shale, and often associated with a thin basal coal seam. A generalized, composite stratigraphic section of the Ames Member consists of the following units from top to bottom: the Grafton Sandstone, Nonmarine Shale, Upper Ames Shale, Upper Ames Limestone, Middle Ames Shale, Lower Ames Limestone, Lower Ames Shale, Ames Coal, Nonmarine Silty Shale, and Harlem Coal. Harlem coal is commonly the basal coal in Ohio, and the Ames Coal is common in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Insoluble residue analysis of 223 samples shows that quartz and glauconite are the major and significant residues. The major petrographic components of the Ames rocks are bioclastic grains of echinoderm, brachiopods, molluscs, bryozoa, and foraminifera in a matrix variably composed of clay and calcium carbonate. A quantitative microfacies study applying factor and cluster analysis reveals five basin-wide biofacies and four lithofacies reflecting a gradient from shoreline to an offshore position. The areal and vertical distribution of the different facies reflects the transgression-regression history of the Ames Cycle. A uniform slow eustatic rise of sea level with an early rapid transgression was responsible for the deposition of most of the Ames marine section. The small, upper, underdeveloped regressive section suggests a rapid regression by active prograding deltaic deposits which rapidly terminated the marine conditions over most the the Appalachian Basin.

  18. Carbonate to siliciclastic transitional facies in tectonic delta complex-basal Upper Devonian of east-central New York state

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.G.

    1985-02-01

    In an early stage of building of the Devonian Catskill delta complex of New York state, a submarine topographic high developed 100 km offshore. On the landward side of the high, in an intermittently subsiding trough, sediment from an eastern source terrane accumulated as a landward-thickening and coarsening lithosome (Gilboa Formation) of interlensing gray siltstone and shale and very fine-grained sandstone with subordinate coquinite lenses. Locally abundant in the lithosome are ball-and-pillow structures, thin conglomerates, trace fossils, and fossil seed ferns, sole markings, shallow cross-bedding, laminations, and ripple marks. The high was a barrier to clastic influx. On its seaward side, a carbonate lithosome (Tully Formation) formed. This formation has been subdivided into facies including: abraded calcarenite, chamoside oolite, skeletal calcilutite, barren shaly calcilutite, mound calcilutite, back-mound calcilutite, and encrinite. The effect of combined intermittent subsidence in the basin-margin trough and variation in rate of terrigenous influx is well expressed in the seaward part of the siliciclastic lithosome. Rapid subsidence and low terrigenous influx finally resulted in a short-lived carbonate transgression across the barrier prior to overwhelming of the shelf by terrigenous influx.

  19. Tertiary age for upper Nubian sandstone formation, central Sudan

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, G.; Lejal-Nicol, A.; Vaudois-Mieja, N.

    1986-02-01

    In central and northern Sudan, oil exploration is now active in the basins containing sediments of the Nubian Sandstone Formation. On the evidence of planned pipeline construction, significant volumes of oil appear to have been discovered in southwestern Sudan. A newly discovered flora from the upper Nubian Sandstone Formation near Khartoum in central Sudan is Tertiary in age. The flora is well preserved, and comprises leaves, flowers, and fruits, many not yet described. At the generic level, they are comparable to forms that are known fro the Eocene to Miocene. Aquatic plants indicate a lacustrine paleoenvironment; humid tropical forests thrived on the lakeshores. The Nubian Sandstone Formation of Sudan had been considered to be entirely of Cretaceous age; this new flora shifts the upper boundary into the Tertiary. The Tertiary Hudi Chert, found in scattered outcrops in the region of Atbara, was considered to overlie the Nubian Sandstone Formation. The authors suggest that the Hudi Chert is partly age equivalent to the Tertiary upper Nubian Sandstone at Jebel Mudaha.

  20. Transport of engineered silver (Ag) nanoparticles through partially fractured sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Christoph; Braun, Anika; Azzam, Rafig

    2014-08-01

    Transport behavior and fate of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in the subsurface is of major interest concerning soil and groundwater protection in order to avoid groundwater contamination of vital resources. Sandstone aquifers are important groundwater resources which are frequently used for public water supply in many regions of the world. The objective of this study is to get a better understanding of AgNP transport behavior in partially fractured sandstones. We executed AgNP transport studies on partially fissured sandstone drilling cores in laboratory experiments. The AgNP concentration and AgNP size in the effluent were analyzed using flow field-flow fractionation mainly. We employed inverse mathematical models on the measured AgNP breakthrough curves to identify and quantify relevant transport processes. Physicochemical filtration, time-dependent blocking due to filling of favorable attachment sites and colloid-facilitated transport were identified as the major processes for AgNP mobility. Physicochemical filtration was found to depend on solute chemistry, mineralogy, pore size distribution and probably on physical and chemical heterogeneity. Compared to AgNP transport in undisturbed sandstone matrix reported in the literature, their mobility in partially fissured sandstone is enhanced probably due to larger void spaces and higher hydraulic conductivity.

  1. Texas Education Miracle No Mirage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.

    2000-01-01

    Defends the significant increases seen in Texas student achievement during the 1990s, addressing attacks on the validity of these improvements. Supports the governor's emphasis on accountability testing because of its positive results, concluding that the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills holds students and schools accountable and provides…

  2. Overview: Research Funding in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining more federal funds is the expressed research goal in "Closing the Gaps by 2015." It states: By 2015, increase the level of federal science and engineering research and development obligations to Texas institutions to 6.5 percent of obligations to higher education institutions across the nation. In 2006, Texas institutions of…

  3. Texas Coastal Cleanup Report, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Kathryn; And Others

    During the 1986 Coastweek, a national event dedicated to improvement of the marine environment, a large beach cleanup was organized on the Texas coast. The goals of the cleanup were to create public awareness of the problems caused by marine debris, and to collect data on the types and quantities of debris found on the Texas coastline. The…

  4. Alternative Teacher Certification in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This publication describes alternative teacher certification programs in Texas that train interns who are generally mature, mid-career individuals. The document is organized into seven sections: (1) "Alternative Certification in Texas" discusses the history and background of the programs including legislation, the first alternative…

  5. Facies patterns and depositional environments of Palaeozoic cephalopod limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, J.; Aigner, T.

    1985-07-01

    In the eastern Anti-Atlas (Morocco) a platform and basin topography was established during the late Devonian, probably as a result of early Variscan tensional tectonics. Cephalopod limestones were deposited on shallow pelagic platforms, platform slopes and shallow, slowly subsiding basins. On the platform a transition from land areas into nearshore quartzose brachiopod coquinas, crinoidal limestones, condensed cephalopod limestones and finally into nodular limestones is observed. The latter often become disintegrated into incipient debris flows which pass into nodular limestone/marl alternations of a shallow basin. Deeper basins with shale sedimentation lack cephalopod limestones. Similar facies types also occur in the late Devonian of the Montagne Noire (France), Rheinisches Schiefergebirge (West Germany), Moravian Karst (Czechoslovakia), Holy Cross Mountains (Poland) and in the early Carboniferous of the Cantabrian Mountains (Spain). Due to strong late Variscan compressional tectonics and limited outcrops, detailed facies patterns could not be mapped in these regions, but the same facies types as in the eastern Anti-Atlas suggest similar coast/platform, slope and shallow basin topographies. During cephalopod limestone deposition water depth on the platforms was in the order of several tens to about one hundred metres, as is inferred from repeated subaerial exposures and distinctive depositional and faunal/floral features. Water depth in the adjacent shallow basins might have reached several hundreds of metres. Cephalopod limestones represent a typical stage in the evolution of geosynclines, characterized by extremely low sedimentation rates (1-5 m m.y. -1). This stage is preceded by deposition of thick neritic clastics and/or carbonates and is succeeded by deposition of deep-water clastics or flysch.

  6. Trace fossil analysis of lacustrine facies and basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buatois, L.A.; Mangano, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    Two ichnofacies are typical of lacustrine depositional systems. The Scoyenia ichnofacies characterizes transitional terrestrial/nonmarine aquatic substrates, periodically inundated or desiccated, and therefore is commonly present in lake margin facies. The Mermia ichnofacies is associated with well oxygenated, permanent subaqueous, fine-grained substrates of hydrologically open, perennial lakes. Bathymetric zonations within the Mermia ichnofacies are complicated by the wide variability of lacustrine systems. Detected proximal-distal trends are useful within particular lake basins, but commonly difficult to extrapolate to other lakes. Other potential ichnofacies include the typically marine Skolithos ichnofacies for high-energy zones of lakes and substrate-controlled, still unnamed ichnofacies, associated to lake margin deposits. Trace fossils are useful for sedimentologic analysis of event beds. Lacustrine turbidites are characterized by low-diversity suites, reflecting colonization by opportunistic organisms after the turbidite event. Underflow current beds record animal activity contemporaneous with nearly continuous sedimentation. Ichnologic studies may also help to distinguish between marine and lacustrine turbidites. Deep-marine turbidites host the Nereites ichnofacies that consists of high diversity of ornate grazing traces and graphoglyptids, recording highly specialized feeding strategies developed to solve the problem of the scarcity of food in the deep sea. Deep lacustrine environments contain the Mermia ichnofacies, which is dominated by unspecialized grazing and feeding traces probably related to the abundance and accessibility of food in lacustrine systems. The lower diversity of lacustrine ichnofaunas in comparison with deep-sea assemblages more likely reflects lower species diversity as a consequence of less stable conditions. Increase of depth and extent of bioturbation through geologic time produced a clear signature in the ichnofabric record of

  7. Temporal evolution of depth-stratified groundwater salinity in municipal wells in the major aquifers in Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sriroop; Ale, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-15

    We assessed spatial distribution of total dissolved solids (TDS) in shallow (<50 m), intermediate (50-150 m), and deep (>150 m) municipal (domestic and public supply) wells in nine major aquifers in Texas for the 1960s-1970s and 1990s-2000s periods using geochemical data obtained from the Texas Water Development Board. For both time periods, the highest median groundwater TDS concentrations in shallow wells were found in the Ogallala and Pecos Valley aquifers and that in the deep wells were found in the Trinity aquifer. In the Ogallala, Pecos Valley, Seymour and Gulf Coast aquifers, >60% of observations from shallow wells exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) for TDS (500 mg L(-1)) in both time periods. In the Trinity aquifer, 72% of deep water quality observations exceeded the SMCL in the 1990s-2000s as compared to 64% observations in the 1960s-1970s. In the Ogallala, Edwards-Trinity (plateau), and Edwards (Balcones Fault Zone) aquifers, extent of salinization decreased significantly (p<0.05) with well depth, indicating surficial salinity sources. Geochemical ratios revealed strong adverse effects of chloride (Cl(-)) and sulfate (SO4(2-)) on groundwater salinization throughout the state. Persistent salinity hotspots were identified in west (southern Ogallala, north-west Edwards-Trinity (plateau) and Pecos Valley aquifers), north central (Trinity-downdip aquifer) and south (southern Gulf Coast aquifer) Texas. In west Texas, mixed cation SO4-Cl facies led to groundwater salinization, as compared to Na-Cl facies in the southern Gulf Coast, and Ca-Na-HCO3 and Na-HCO3 facies transitioning to Na-Cl facies in the Trinity-downdip regions. Groundwater mixing ensuing from cross-formational flow, seepage from saline plumes and playas, evaporative enrichment, and irrigation return flow had led to progressive groundwater salinization in west Texas, as compared to ion-exchange processes in the north-central Texas, and seawater intrusion coupled with salt

  8. Producing physicians for south Texas.

    PubMed

    Thomson, W A; Denk, J P; Ferry, P G; Martinez-Wedig, C; Michael, L H

    1999-01-01

    South Texas, one of the fastest growing regions in the country, remains among the most medically underserved, in part, because few students from South Texas enter medical school. To address this issue and to increase the diversity of the matriculant pool, Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) and The University of Texas-Pan American (UT-PA) established in 1994 the Premedical Honors College (PHC), a rigorous undergraduate program at UT-PA for students from South Texas high schools. Students who complete all PHC requirements and BCM prerequisites are accepted into BCM upon graduation from UT-PA. Those in good standing receive counseling, enrichment experiences, and tuition and fee waivers from UT-PA and BCM. The program is increasing the number of students from South Texas universities matriculating into medical school, and is expanding the involvement of local physicians in undergraduate education, heightening visibility for partner institutions, and becoming an effective, replicable bachelor of science/doctor of medicine model.

  9. Heavy mineral sorting and distributions within massive sandstone divisions (Bouma A divisions) of Brushy Canyon Formation turbidites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motanated, K.; Tice, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    KANNIPA MOTANATED and MICHAEL M. TICE Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3115, USA Sediment sorting data are commonly used for interpreting depositional environments, analyzing mechanisms of deposition and transportation, and inferring relative transport distance of sediments. Typically, sorting in sandstones is estimated by point-counting thin sections which is a time consuming procedure and requires cutting sections of rock samples. We demonstrate a new technique for quantifying sediment sorting using element distribution maps obtained by x-ray fluorescence microscopy. We show that hydraulic sorting of Zr- and Ti- bearing grains (probably zircon and rutile, respectively) results in characteristic vertical profiles of Zr and Ti abundances within the Bouma A divisions of turbidites of the Brushy Canyon Formation, Delaware Basin, southern New Mexico. Zr- and Ti- bearing grains decrease in abundance and diameter from bases to tops of A divisions in every sample examined in this study. These results contrast with previous observations which suggest that grading in Brushy Canyon Formation structureless sandstones is absent or rare. The data support turbiditic interpretations of these rocks against traction current interpretations which rely on the lack of textural grading. Grading is reflected in vertical profiles of Ti/Al, Zr/Al and Zr/Ti ratios, which each decrease upward. These compositional variations could potentially be used as geochemical proxies for physical sorting, and might be useful for inferring depositional processes and relative transport distances.

  10. Spatial Persistence of Macropores and Authigenic Clays in a Reservoir Sandstone: Implications for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO2 Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow in clay-rich sandstone reservoirs is important to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and the geologic storage of CO2. Understanding geologic controls on pore structure allows for better identification of lithofacies that can contain, storage, and/or transmit hydrocarbons and CO2, and may result in better designs for EOR-CO2 storage. We examine three-dimensional pore structure and connectivity of sandstone samples from the Farnsworth Unit, Texas, the site of a combined EOR-CO2 storage project by the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP). We employ a unique set of methods, including: robotic serial polishing and reflected-light imaging for digital pore-structure reconstruction; electron microscopy; laser scanning confocal microscopy; mercury intrusion-extrusion porosimetry; and relative permeability and capillary pressure measurements using CO2 and synthetic formation fluid. Our results link pore size distributions, topology of porosity and clay-rich phases, and spatial persistence of connected flow paths to multiphase flow behavior. The authors gratefully acknowledge the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory for sponsoring this project through the SWP under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42591. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Feldspar diagenesis in the Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas Gulf Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Lynton S.; Milliken, Kitty L.

    1981-07-01

    Tremendous quantities of detrital feldspar have been dissolved or albitized below about 14,000 ft (4,267 m) in the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Chocolate Bayou Field, Brazoria County, Texas. Some sandstones no longer contain any unmodified detrital feldspar grains. Material transfer involved in these reactions is immense, affecting at least 15% of the rock volume. Thus, albitization has important implications for several other diagenetic processes that involve feldspars or their components. These processes include formation of secondary porosity, precipitation of quartz and carbonate cements, and the evolution of Na-Ca-Cl formation water.

  12. Effective Thermal Conductivity Modeling of Sandstones: SVM Framework Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Alireza; Masoudi, Mohammad; Ghaderi-Ardakani, Alireza; Arabloo, Milad; Amani, Mahmood

    2016-06-01

    Among the most significant physical characteristics of porous media, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is used for estimating the thermal enhanced oil recovery process efficiency, hydrocarbon reservoir thermal design, and numerical simulation. This paper reports the implementation of an innovative least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm for the development of enhanced model capable of predicting the ETCs of dry sandstones. By means of several statistical parameters, the validity of the presented model was evaluated. The prediction of the developed model for determining the ETCs of dry sandstones was in excellent agreement with the reported data with a coefficient of determination value ({R}2) of 0.983 and an average absolute relative deviation of 0.35 %. Results from present research show that the proposed LS-SVM model is robust, reliable, and efficient in calculating the ETCs of sandstones.

  13. Optical coherence tomography for vulnerability assessment of sandstone.

    PubMed

    Bemand, Elizabeth; Liang, Haida

    2013-05-10

    Sandstone is an important cultural heritage material, in both architectural and natural settings, such as neolithic rock art panels. The majority of deterioration effects in porous materials such as sandstone are influenced by the presence and movement of water through the material. The presence of water within the porous network of a material results in changes in the optical coherence tomography signal intensity that can be used to monitor the wetting front of water penetration of dry porous materials at various depths. The technique is able to detect wetting front velocities from 1 cm s(-1) to 10(-6) cm s(-1), covering the full range of hydraulic conductivities likely to occur in natural sandstones from pervious to impervious.

  14. The Texas We Create: State of Texas Children 2012--Texas KIDS COUNT Annual Data Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deviney, Frances; Hattemer, Kori

    2012-01-01

    The 2012 data book explores how our kids have fared during the last decade--some outcomes are positive, some negative. But positive or negative outcomes for kids don't just happen. They are the inevitable results of effective or failed policy choices. The State of Texas Children 2012 combines data and policy to tell the story of Texas kids. It's…

  15. Diagenetic pathways for sandstones: The role of initial composition

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, N.B.

    1995-09-01

    The initial composition of a clastic section is critical in determining the diagenetic reactions that a sandstone will undergo during burial, reactions which strongly influence its reservoir properties. The role of initial composition is illustrated for Middle Jurassic sandstones of northwest Europe (including the Brent sandstone of the North Sea) and Tertiary sandstones of the Gulf of Mexico. The composition of the former evolves from arkose to quartz arenite, with massive dissolution first of plagioclase and subsequently K-feldspar. As the bulk composition changes, the suite of clay minerals changes from kaolinite-dominated to illite-dominated, suite of clay minerals changes from kaolinite-dominated to illite-dominated, typically accompanied by a pronounced decrease in permeability. The Gulf of Mexico sandstones are also initially arkoses. Their composition, however, evolves toward a mixture of quartz and compositionally pure albite. Kaolinite remains the dominant authigenic clay within the sandstones; however detrital clays change from a Na-rich, smectitic mixed layer clay to a K-rich, illitic mixed layer clay. The contrasting diagenetic pathways result from differing mineralogy in the clastic section. The smectite-rich mudstones in the Gulf of Mexico provide a powerful sink for potassium and source of sodium. The resulting low potassium activity results in K-feldspar dissolution; it also prevents illite formation, while high sodium activity stabilizes albite. The Middle Jurassic clastic section in northwest Europe contains relatively little smectite, thus lacks the potassium sink and sodium source. Sodium activity is low, so plagioclases preferentially dissolve. K-feldspars also dissolve, but the potassium here is available for illite formation.

  16. Microbial contamination of two urban sandstone aquifers in the UK.

    PubMed

    Powell, Karen L; Taylor, Richard G; Cronin, Aidan A; Barrett, Mike H; Pedley, Steve; Sellwood, Jane; Trowsdale, Sam A; Lerner, David N

    2003-01-01

    Development of urban groundwater has historically been constrained by concerns about its quality. Rising urban water tables and overabstraction from rural aquifers in the UK have led to a renewed interest in urban groundwater, particularly the possibility of finding water of acceptable quality at depth. This study assessed the microbial quality of groundwater collected from depth-specific intervals over a 15-month period within the Permo-Triassic Sherwood Sandstone aquifers underlying the cities of Nottingham and Birmingham. Sewage-derived bacteria (thermotolerant coliforms, faecal streptococci and sulphite-reducing clostridia) and viruses (enteroviruses, Norwalk-like viruses, coliphage) were regularly detected to depths of 60 m in the unconfined sandstone and to a depth of 91 m in the confined sandstone. Microbial concentrations varied temporally and spatially but increased frequency of contamination with depth coincided with geological heterogeneities such as fissures and mudstone bands. Significantly, detection of Norwalk-like viruses and Coxsackievirus B4 in groundwater corresponded with seasonal variations in virus discharge to the sewer system. The observation of low levels of sewage-derived microbial contaminants at depth in the Triassic Sandstone aquifer is explained by the movement of infinitesimal proportions of bulk (macroscopic) groundwater flow along preferential pathways (e.g., fissures, bedding planes). The existence of very high microbial populations at source (raw sewage) and their extremely low detection limits at the receptor (multilevel piezometer) enable these statistically extreme (microscopic) flows to be traced. Rapid penetration of microbial contaminants into sandstone aquifers, not previously reported, highlights the vulnerability of sandstone aquifers to microbial contamination.

  17. A depositional model for late Jurassic Reef Building in the East Texas Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, E.M. ); Brinton, L. )

    1996-01-01

    The authors propose a depositional setting for the Upper Jurassic reef facies occurring at the upper Cotton Valley Lime, (Gilmer) sequence boundary in the East Texas Basin. The development of uncommonly thick, microbially bound reefal buildups positioned near the western margin of the basin was controlled by sea-level variations and gravity faulting, suggested to be concurrent. Gas bearing reefs occur as isolated features along faulted margins and have been successfully located using 3-D seismic. Reefs of this type and age appear to be rare in their occurrence worldwide. Structurally generated circumstances facilitated margin bypass of terrigenous clastics shed from the north and west. Protection from clastic influx contributed to conditions required for development of the 400 feet of reefal buildup penetrated by the Marathon Oil Company Poth No. 1 during early 1993. Core from this well provides insight into character, composition, and depositional setting of reefs along the western flank of the East Texas Basin during Late Jurassic time.

  18. A depositional model for late Jurassic Reef Building in the East Texas Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, E.M.; Brinton, L.

    1996-12-31

    The authors propose a depositional setting for the Upper Jurassic reef facies occurring at the upper Cotton Valley Lime, (Gilmer) sequence boundary in the East Texas Basin. The development of uncommonly thick, microbially bound reefal buildups positioned near the western margin of the basin was controlled by sea-level variations and gravity faulting, suggested to be concurrent. Gas bearing reefs occur as isolated features along faulted margins and have been successfully located using 3-D seismic. Reefs of this type and age appear to be rare in their occurrence worldwide. Structurally generated circumstances facilitated margin bypass of terrigenous clastics shed from the north and west. Protection from clastic influx contributed to conditions required for development of the 400 feet of reefal buildup penetrated by the Marathon Oil Company Poth No. 1 during early 1993. Core from this well provides insight into character, composition, and depositional setting of reefs along the western flank of the East Texas Basin during Late Jurassic time.

  19. Blueschist-facies metamorphism related to regional thrust faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blake, M.C.; Irwin, W.P.; Coleman, R.G.

    1969-01-01

    Rocks of the blueschist (glaucophane schist) facies occur throughout the world in narrow tectonic belts associated with ultramafic rocks. In the Coast Range province of California, blueschist rocks are devloped in the eugeosynclinal Franciscan Formation of Late Mesozoic age. The blueschist rocks form a narrow belt for more than 800 km along the eastern margin of this province and commonly are separated from rocks of an overlying thrust plate by serpentinite. Increasing metamorphism upward toward the thrust fault is indicated mineralogically by a transition from pumpellyite to lawsonite and texturally by a transition from metagraywacke to schist. The blueschist metamorphism probably occurred during thrusting in a zone of anomalously high water pressure in the lower plate along the sole of the thrust fault. This tectonic mode of origin for blueschist differs from the generally accepted hypothesis involving extreme depth of burial. Other belts of blueschist-facies rocks, including the Sanbagawa belt of Japan, the marginal synclinal belt of New Zealand, and the blueschist-ultramafic belts of Venezuela, Kamchatka, Ural mountains, and New Caledonia have similar geologic relations and might be explained in the same manner. ?? 1969.

  20. A review of 35 cases of asymmetric crying facies.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Odabaş, D; Tuncer, O; Kirimi, E; Tombul, T; Ikbal, M; Ataş, B; Ari Yuca, S

    2004-01-01

    A review of 35 cases of asymmetric crying facies: Congenital asymmetric crying facies (ACF) is caused by congenital hypoplasia or agenesis of the depressor anguli oris muscle (DAOM) on one side of the mouth. It is well known that this anomaly is frequently associated with cardiovascular, head and neck, musculoskeletal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, and genitourinary anomalies. In this article we report 35 ACF patients (28 children and 7 adults) and found additional abnormalities in 16 of them (i.e. 45%). The abnormalities were cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, mega-cisterna magna, mental motor retardation, convulsions, corpus callosum dysgenesis, cranial bone defect, dermoid cyst, spina bifida occulta, hypertelorism, micrognatia, retrognatia, hemangioma on the lower lip, short frenulum, cleft palate, low-set ears, preauricular tag, mild facial hypoplasia, sternal cleft, congenital heart defect, renal hypoplasia, vesicoureteral reflux, hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, congenital joint contractures, congenital hip dislocation, polydactyly, and umbilical and inguinal hernia. Besides these, one infant was born to a diabetic mother, and had atrial septal defect and the four other children had 4p deletion, Klinefelter syndrome, isolated CD4 deficiency and Treacher-Collins like facial appearance, respectively Although many of these abnormalities were reported in association with ACF, cerebellar atrophy, sternal cleft, cranial bone defect, infant of diabetic mother, 4p deletion, Klinefelter syndrome, isolated CD4 deficiency and Treacher-Collins like facial appearance were not previously published.

  1. Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program: A Collaboration between the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, South Texas College, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. CBE Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca; Glancey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This case study is part of a series on newer competency-based degree programs that have been emerging in recent years. In January 2014, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), South Texas College (STC), and Texas A&M University-Commerce (A&M Commerce) launched the Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program, the state's first…

  2. Population Change and the Future of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, F. Ray; Bouvier, Leon F.

    The future is filled with demographic change for the State of Texas. As the population becomes more ethnically diverse, the Texas demographic, economic, and sociocultural profiles also will change. This volume presents a wide range of demographic information on the State of Texas. The 10 chapters look at: (1) the population of Texas: past,…

  3. TEXAS MIGRANT LABOR, THE 1964 MIGRATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    THE MAJORITY OF TEXAS MIGRANTS LIVE IN SOUTH TEXAS AND APPROXIMATELY 95 PERCENT OF THEM ARE OF MEXICAN EXTRACTION. MOST OF THE OTHER FIVE PERCENT ARE EAST TEXAS NEGROES. THE MECHANIZATION OF COTTON HARVESTING AND THE EXPIRATION OF THE "BRACERO PROGRAM" IN 1964 HAVE CAUSED MORE TEXAS MIGRANTS TO SEEK EMPLOYMENT OUTSIDE OF THE STATE. DURING 1964,…

  4. Water supply and needs for West Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation focused on the water supplies and needs of West Texas, Texas High Plains. Groundwater is the most commonly used water resources on the Texas High Plains, with withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer dominating. The saturation thickness of the Ogallala Aquifer in Texas is such that t...

  5. Charter Schools in Texas: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Francisco; Slate, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we analyzed the literature regarding charter schools in the State of Texas. We specifically examined the evolution of the charter school movement in Texas. Moreover, data regarding the effectiveness/ineffectiveness of charter schools in Texas were discussed. Our overview of Texas charter schools, given their widespread presence in…

  6. 78 FR 11579 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... and updating of data into the Applicant Violator System. Additionally, Texas is adding new language... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 943 Texas Regulatory Program AGENCY... the Texas regulatory program (Texas program) under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act...

  7. Reservoir properties of submarine- fan facies: Great Valley sequence, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLean, H.

    1981-01-01

    Submarine-fan sandstones of the Great Valley sequence west of the Sacramento Valley, California, have low porosities and permeabilities. However, petrography and scanning electron microscope studies indicate that most sands in almost all submarine-fan environments are originally porous and permeable. Thin turbidite sandstones deposited in areas dominated by shale in the outer-fan and basin-plain are cemented mainly by calcite; shale dewatering is inferred to contribute to rapid cementation early in the burial process. Sands deposited in inner- and middle-fan channels with only thin shale beds have small percentrages of intergranular cement. The original porosity is reduced mechanically at shallow depths and by pressure solution at deeperlevels. Permeability decreases with increasing age of the rocks, as a result of increasing burial depths. Computer-run stepwise regression analyses show that the porosity is inversely related to the percentage of calcite cement. The results reported here indicate original porosity and permeability can be high in deep-water submarine fans and that fan environments dominated by sand (with high sand/shale ratios) are more likely to retain higher porosity and permeability to greater depths than sand interbedded with thick shale sequences.-from Author

  8. Hydrogeology of the Potsdam Sandstone in northern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Franzi, David A.; Romanowicz, Edwin A.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2010-01-01

    The Potsdam Sandstone of Cambrian age forms a transboundary aquifer that extends across northern New York and into southern Quebec. The Potsdam Sandstone is a gently dipping sequence of arkose, subarkose, and orthoquartzite that unconformably overlies Precambrian metamorphic bedrock. The Potsdam irregularly grades upward over a thickness of 450 m from a heterogeneous feldspathic and argillaceous rock to a homogeneous, quartz-rich and matrix-poor rock. The hydrogeological framework of the Potsdam Sandstone was investigated through an analysis of records from 1,500 wells and geophysical logs from 40 wells, and through compilation of GIS coverages of bedrock and surficial geology, examination of bedrock cores, and construction of hydrogeological sections. The upper several metres of the sandstone typically is weathered and fractured and, where saturated, readily transmits groundwater. Bedding-related fractures in the sandstone commonly form sub-horizontal flow zones of relatively high transmissivity. The vertical distribution of sub-horizontal flow zones is variable; spacings of less than 10 m are common. Transmissivity of individual flow zones may be more than 100 m2/d but typically is less than 10 m2/d. High angle fractures, including joints and faults, locally provide vertical hydraulic connection between flow zones. Hydraulic head gradients in the aquifer commonly are downward; a laterally extensive series of sub-horizontal flow zones serve as drains for the groundwater flow system. Vertical hydraulic head differences between shallow and deep flow zones range from 1 m to more than 20 m. The maximum head differences are in recharge areas upgradient from the area where the Chateauguay and Chazy Rivers, and their tributaries, have cut into till and bedrock. Till overlies the sandstone in much of the study area; its thickness is generally greatest in the western part, where it may exceed 50 m. A discontinuous belt of bedrock pavements stripped of glacial drift extends

  9. Architectural evidence of dune collapse in the Navajo Sandstone, Zion National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Colby; Bryant, Gerald; Nick, Kevin E.

    2016-10-01

    The Canyon Overlook Trail of Zion National Park follows an outcrop of Navajo Sandstone, which displays a uniquely well-exposed assemblage of features associated with failure of the lee face of a large eolian dune, and run-out over an expanse of interdune sediments downwind of that bedform. Exposed features include dramatic folds in the interdune succession and a stacked series of thrust sheets incorporating both interdune and overlying dune deposits. Thrust surfaces display consistent strikes, parallel to those of undeformed foresets, and incorporate zones of brittle failure and fluid deformation, including folds overturned in the direction of foreset dip. These features correspond to predictions made by a previous researcher's model of dune collapse, formulated from less fortuitously exposed architectures in the Navajo Sandstone. Unlike the previous model, however, this site preserves distinct indications that the bulk of deformed material accumulated above the level of the contemporary interdune surface, in an aggradational succession. Paleotopographic reconstruction, based on preserved facies relationships at this site, indicates the presence of a large dune, partially encroached upon a well-developed wet interdune succession, made up of two half-meter carbonate mud layers, separated by a meter of medium-grained sand. Trapping of pore water pressure between these mud layers during liquefaction reduced shear strength in this interval, facilitating the collapse of the lee face of the upwind dune into the interdune area, and transmitted resultant shear forces to distal portions of the interdune expanse, in the shallow subsurface. Shear failure developed along bedding planes in the horizontally laminated carbonate muds, which provided both lubrication of the shear surfaces and structural support for the preservation of coherent thrust sheets during production of an imbricated succession of shear zones in the toe portion of the slump. Individual shear surfaces

  10. Effects of the Laramide Structures on the Regional Distribution of Tight-Gas Sandstone in the Upper Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaula, R. P.; Aschoff, J.

    2013-12-01

    Regional-scale sequence stratigraphic correlation, well log analysis, syntectonic unconformity mapping, isopach maps, and depositional environment maps of the upper Mesaverde Group (UMG) in Uinta basin, Utah suggest higher accommodation in northeastern part (Natural Buttes area) and local development of lacustrine facies due to increased subsidence caused by uplift of San Rafael Swell (SRS) in southern and Uinta Uplift in northern parts. Recently discovered lacustrine facies in Natural Buttes area are completely different than the dominant fluvial facies in outcrops along Book Cliffs and could have implications for significant amount of tight-gas sand production from this area. Data used for sequence stratigraphic correlation, isopach maps and depositional environmental maps include > 100 well logs, 20 stratigraphic profiles, 35 sandstone thin sections and 10 outcrop-based gamma ray profiles. Seven 4th order depositional sequences (~0.5 my duration) are identified and correlated within UMG. Correlation was constructed using a combination of fluvial facies and stacking patterns in outcrops, chert-pebble conglomerates and tidally influenced strata. These surfaces were extrapolated into subsurface by matching GR profiles. GR well logs and core log of Natural Buttes area show intervals of coarsening upward patterns suggesting possible lacustrine intervals that might contain high TOC. Locally, younger sequences are completely truncated across SRS whereas older sequences are truncated and thinned toward SRS. The cycles of truncation and thinning represent phases of SRS uplift. Thinning possibly related with the Uinta Uplift is also observed in northwestern part. Paleocurrents are consistent with interpretation of periodic segmentation and deflection of sedimentation. Regional paleocurrents are generally E-NE-directed in Sequences 1-4, and N-directed in Sequences 5-7. From isopach maps and paleocurrent direction it can be interpreted that uplift of SRS changed route of

  11. Upper Cretaceous molluscan record along a transect from Virden, New Mexico, to Del Rio, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, W.A.; Hook, S.C.; McKinney, K.C.

    2008-01-01

    Updated age assignments and new collections of molluscan fossils from lower Cenomanian through upper Campanian strata in Texas permit a much refined biostratigraphic correlation with the rocks of New Mexico and the Western Interior. Generic names of many Late Cretaceous ammonites and inoceramid bivalves from Texas are updated to permit this correlation. Strata correlated in the west-to-east transect include the lower Cenomanian Beartooth Quartzite and Sarten Sandstone of southwest New Mexico, and the Eagle Mountains Formation, Del Rio Clay, Buda Limestone, and. basal beds of the Chispa Summit, Ojinaga, and Boquillas Formations of the Texas-Mexico border area. Middle Cenomanian strata are lacking in southwestern New Mexico but are present in the lower parts of the Chispa Summit and Boquillas Formations in southwest Texas. Upper Cenomanian and lower Turonian rocks are present at many localities in New Mexico and Texas in the Mancos Shale and Chispa Summit, Ojinaga, and Boquillas Formations. Middle Turonian and younger rocks seem to be entirely nonmarine in southwestern New Mexico, but they are marine in the Rio Grande area in the Chispa. Summit, Ojinaga, and Boquillas Formations. The upper part of the Chispa Summit and Boquillas contain late Turonian fossils. Rocks of Coniacian and Santonian age are present high in the Chispa Summit, Ojinaga, and Boquillas Formations, and in the lower part of the Austin. The San Carlos, Aguja, Pen, and Austin Formations contain fossils of Campanian age. Fossils representing at least 38 Upper Cretaceous ammonite zones are present along the transect. Collections made in recent years in southwestern New Mexico and at Sierra de Cristo Rey just west of downtown El Paso, Texas, have been well treated and do not need revision. Taxonomic names and zonations published in the pre-1970 literature on the Rio Grande area of Texas have been updated. New fossil collections from the Big Bend National Park, Texas, allow for a much refined correlation

  12. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  13. Depositional setting and vertebrate biostratigraphy of the Triassic Dockum Group of Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Thomas; Chatterjee, Sankar

    2005-06-01

    Triassic strata of the Dockum Group in Texas comprise two major upward-fining alluvial-lacustrine depositional sequences. The two sequences are represented by the (1) Santa Rosa-Tecovas, and (2) Trujillo-Cooper Canyon Formations. The second sequence is much thicker than the first, and occupies a greater geographic part of the Dockum basin. Each sequence of alluvial and lacustrine sediment accumulation is characterized by sediment derivation from a different source terrain. The unconformable relationship between the two depositional sequences, the change in mineralogical composition and presumed source areas between these units, differences in paleocurrent orientation between units, and evidence for intervening episodes of local deformation indicate that the sequences are of tectonic origin. These strata are not the product of a single sediment dispersal system, such as the centripetally-drained lacustrine delta complex previously envisioned for the Dockum basin. Both Dockum sequences are comprised largely of two typical alluvial facies associations; stream channel facies, and overbank flood-plain facies, that are similar to those described in nearly all fluvial deposits. In addition, the Dockum Group contains a peculiar lacustrine facies that accumulated in local flood-plain depressions, and probably resulted from subsidence over areas of subsurface salt dissolution. Vertebrate fossil assemblages are found in all three Dockum facies associations. Five fossiliferous sites in the Dockum are discussed in the context of these three depositional settings. The Dockum tetrapod diversity is reviewed in a hierarchical phylogeny with remarks on the history of collection, stratigraphic distribution of genera, and their taxonomic status. The stratigraphic ranges of tetrapod taxa do not support the recently proposed successive Otischalkian, Adamanian, Revueltian, and Apachean biochrons within the Dockum Group. Instead, a few index fossils provide a broad framework for

  14. Depositional facies and Hohokam settlement patterns of Holocene alluvial fans, N. Tucson Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of depositional facies on eight Holocene alluvial fans of varying dimensions is used to evaluate prehistoric Hohokam agricultural settlement patterns. Two facies are recognized: channel gravelly sand facies and overbank silty sand facies. No debris flow deposits occur. The channel facies is characterized by relatively well sorted stratified sands and gravels with common heavy mineral laminations. Overbank facies deposits are massive and very poorly sorted due to heavy bioturbation. Lithostratigraphic profiles from backhoe trenches and sediment size analysis document headward migration of depositional facies which results in fining upward sequences. Each sequence is a channel fan lobe with an underlying coarse grained channel sand which fines to overbank silty sands. Lateral and vertical variations in facies distributions show that depositional processes are affected by drainage basin area (fan size) and distance from fan head. Gravelly channel sands dominate at the headward portions of the fan and are more pervasive on large fans; overbank silty sands are ubiquitous at fan toes and approach closer to the fan head of smaller alluvial fans. When depositional facies are considered as records of water flow over an alluvial surface, the farming potential of each fan can be analyzed. Depositional models of alluvial fan sedimentation provide the basis for understanding Hohokam settlement patterns on active alluvial surfaces.

  15. Sedimentology and clast fabric of subaerial debris flow facies in a glacially-influenced alluvial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, N.; Kocsis, S.

    1988-09-01

    A large alluvial fan (2 km 2), constructed between 11,000 and 7000 years B.P. at the mouth of Cinquefoil Creek in interior British Columbia, Canada, is identified as "glacially-influenced, debris flow-dominated". The fan was rapidly constructed during and immediately after deglaciation when large volumes of glacial debris were resedimented downslope; fans of this type are widespread in the glaciated portion of the North American Cordillera. Diamict facies, deposited as debris flows, account for 48% of the fan volume, sheetflodd gravels 37%, and other facies 15%. Diamicts show three facies types; crudely-bedded facies containing rafts of soft sediment that are attributed to downslope collapse and mixing of heterogeneous glacial deposits. These occur within the core of the fan. Massive and weakly graded (inverse to normal) diamict facies, derived from the downslope flow of weathered volcanic bedrock, occur within a well-defined bed that can be traced across the entire fan. The occurrence of weakly graded facies as lateral equivalents to massive facies within the same bed, implies the partial development of turbulent, high-velocity "streams" within a viscous debris flow moving over a slope of 6°. Clast fabrics in these facies show weakly-clustered a-axes dipping up and downslope comparable to other debris flows and lahars. The Cinquefoil fan, its internal structure and facies, provides a good "modern" analogue for ancient diamictite sequences deposited in areas of active uplift, rifting and glaciation.

  16. Facies and depositional architecture according to a jet efflux model of a late Paleozoic tidewater grounding-line system from the Itararé Group (Paraná Basin), southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Carolina Danielski; Buso, Victoria Valdez; Faccini, Ubiratan Ferrucio; Milana, Juan Pablo; Paim, Paulo Sergio Gomes

    2016-04-01

    During the Late Paleozoic, the Gondwana supercontinent was affected by multiple glacial and deglacial episodes known as "The Late Paleozoic Ice Age" (LPIA). In Brazil, the evidence of this episode is recorded mainly by widespread glacial deposits preserved in the Paraná Basin that contain the most extensive record of glaciation (Itararé Group) in Gondwana. The Pennsylvanian to early Permian glaciogenic deposits of the Itararé Group (Paraná Basin) are widely known and cover an extensive area in southern Brazil. In the Doutor Pedrinho area (Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil), three glacial cycles of glacier advance and retreat were described. The focus of this article is to detail the base of the second glacial episodes or Sequence II. The entire sequence records a deglacial system tract that is represented by a proximal glacial grounding-line system covered by marine mudstones and shales associated with a rapid flooding of the proglacial area. This study deals with the ice proximal grounding-line systems herein interpreted according to lab model named plane-wall jet with jump. Detailed facies analysis allowed the identification of several facies ranging from boulder-rich conglomerates to fine-grained sandstones. No fine-grained deposits such as siltstone or shale were recorded. According to this model, the deposits are a product of a supercritical plane-wall outflow jet that changes to a subcritical jet downflow from a hydraulic jump. The hydraulic jump forms an important energy boundary that is indicated by an abrupt change in grain size and cut-and-fill structures that occur at the middle-fan. The sedimentary facies and facies associations show a downflow trend that can be subdivided into three distinct stages of flow development: (1) a zone of flow establishment (ZFE), (2) a zone of transition (ZFT), and (3) an established zone (ZEF). The proximal discharge is characterized by hyperconcentrated-to-concentrated flow due to the high energy and sediment

  17. Texas floods of 1940

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breeding, Seth D.

    1948-01-01

    Floods occurred in Texas during, June, July, and November 1940 that exceeded known stages on many small streams and at a few places on the larger streams. Stages at several stream-gaging stations exceeded the maximum known at those places since the collection of daily records began. A storm, haying its axis generally on a north-south line from Cameron to Victoria and extending across the Brazos, Colorado, Lavaca, and Guadalupe River Basins, caused heavy rainfall over a large part of south-central Texas. The maximum recorded rain of 22.7 inches for the 2-day period June 29-30 occurred at Engle. Of this amount, 17.5 inches fell in the 12-hour period between 8 p.m. June 29, and 8 a.m. June 30. Light rains fell at a number of places on June 28, and additional light rains fell at many places within the area from July 1 to 4. During the period June 28 to July 4 more than 20 inches of rain fell over an area of 300 square miles, more than 15 inches over 1,920 square miles, and more than 10 inches over 5,100 square miles. The average annual rainfall for the area experiencing the heaviest rainfall during this storm is about 35 inches. Farming is largely confined to the fertile flood plains in much of the area subjected to the record-breaking floods in June and July. Therefore these floods, coming at the height of the growing season, caused severe losses to crops. Much damage was done also to highways and railways. The city of Hallettsville suffered the greatest damage of any urban area. The Lavaca River at that place reached a stage 8 feet higher than ever known before, drowned several people, destroyed many homes, and submerged almost the entire business district. The maximum discharge there was 93,100 second-feet from a drainage area of 101 square miles. Dry Creek near Smithville produced a maximum discharge of 1,879 second-feet from an area of 1.48 square miles and a runoff of 11.3 inches in a 2-day period from a rainfall of 19.5 inches. The area in the Colorado River

  18. A new bee species that excavates sandstone nests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many wonder why animals act in seemingly injurious ways. Understanding the behavior of pollinators such as bees is especially important because of the necessary ecosystem service they provide. The new species Anthophora pueblo, discovered excavating sandstone nests, provides a model system for addre...

  19. Oxidative dissolution of uraninite precipitated on Navajo sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelouas, A.; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, H. E.

    1999-03-01

    Column and batch experiments were conducted with sandstone and ground water samples to investigate oxidation of uraninite precipitated by microbially mediated reduction of U(VI), a contaminant in ground water beneath a uranium mill tailings site near Tuba City, AZ, USA. Uraninite precipitated together with mackinawite (FeS 0.9) because Fe(III) from the sandstone and sulfate, another contaminant in the water were reduced together with U(VI). After completion of U(VI) reduction, experiments were conducted to find out whether uraninite is protected by mackinawite against reoxidation. Uncontaminated ground water from the same site, containing 7 mg/l of dissolved oxygen, was passed through the columns or mixed with sandstone in batch experiments. The results showed that small masses of uraninite, 0.1 μg/g of sandstone, are protected by mackinawite from reoxidation. Uraninite masses on the order of 0.1 μg/g correspond to U(VI) concentrations of 0.5 mg/l, typically encountered in uranium contaminated ground waters. Mackinawite is an effective buffer and is formed in sufficient quantity to provide long-term protection of uraninite. Uranium concentrations in ground water passed through the columns are too low (4 μg/l) to distinguish between dissolution and oxidative dissolution of uraninite. However, batch experiments showed that uraninite oxidation takes place.

  20. Epilithic lichens in the Beacon sandstone formation, Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, M. E.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The epilithic lichen flora on the Beacon sandstone formation in Victoria Land consists of seven species: Acarospora gwynnii Dodge & Rudolph, Buellia grisea Dodge & Baker, B. pallida Dodge & Baker, Carbonea capsulata (Dodge & Baker) Hale comb. nov., Lecanora fuscobrunnea Dodge & Baker, Lecidea cancriformis Dodge & Baker, and L. siplei Dodge & Baker. The typification of the species is given along with descriptions and distribution in Antarctica.

  1. Evidence for preferential flow through sandstone aquifers in Southern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, S.K.; Bahr, J.M.; Bradbury, K.R.; Anderson, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Sandstones often escape extensive hydrogeologic characterization due to their high primary porosity and perceived homogeneity of permeability. This study provides evidence for laterally extensive, high permeability zones in the Tunnel City Group, an undeformed, Cambrian-aged sandstone unit that exists in the subsurface throughout much of central and southern Wisconsin, USA. Several discrete high-permeability zones were identified in boreholes using flow logging and slug tests, and the interconnectedness of the features was tested using a site-specific numerical model for springs in the region. Explicit incorporation of a high-permeability layer leads to improvements in the flux calibration over simulations that lack the features, thus supporting the hydraulic continuity of high-permeability zones in the sandstone aquifer over tens of kilometers. The results suggest that stratigraphically controlled heterogeneities like contrasts in lithology or bedding-plane fractures, which have been shown to strongly influence the flow of groundwater in more heterogeneous sedimentary rocks, may also deserve close examination in sandstone aquifers. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A complex investigation of building sandstones from Saxony (Germany)

    SciTech Connect

    Goetze, Jens Siedel, Heiner

    2007-11-15

    The present paper provides a methodology for the investigation and characterization of building sandstones. This analytical scheme was designed for distinguishing mature arenites, which in general show very similar properties and are difficult to distinguish. This is shown for Cretaceous sandstones from various occurrences in Saxony (Germany), which have been used for centuries as building materials. The procedure is mainly based on the combination of macroscopic rock description, thin section polarizing microscopy (phase composition, texture, grain-size distribution) and cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy (quartz types, feldspar and kaolinite content) coupled with image analysis, scanning electron microscopy (accessories, pore cement, diagenetic grain surface features), and analysis of pore space data. Sometimes, additional data from X-ray diffraction or chemical analyses (major and trace elements) can be used. Especially in the case of quartz rich arenites, CL is a powerful tool for provenance analysis. The detailed analysis of sandstone material in most cases allows us to assign historically used building material to a specific sandstone occurrence. These results are important for both interpreting the weathering behaviour of the building material and the conservation, reconstruction and stone replacement of historical monuments.

  3. Imaging Sand Bars using 3D GPR in an Outcrop Reservoir Analog: Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone, South-East Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, A. S.; Stewart, R. R.; Ullah, M. S.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2015-12-01

    Outcrop analog studies provide crucial information on geometry and facies patterns to improve the understanding of the complex subsurface reservoir architecture for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) planning during field development. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has greatly facilitated analog outcrop study progress by bridging the gap in image resolution between seismic and well data. A 3D GPR survey was conducted to visualize architectural elements of friction-dominated distributary mouth bars within proximal delta front deposits in Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone at the top of the Notom Delta in south-east Utah. Sensors and Software's Noggin 250 MHz system was used over a 25 m x 15 m grid. We employed a spatial sampling of 0.5 m for the inline (dip direction) and 1.5 m for the crossline (strike direction). Standard processing flows including time-zero correction, dewow, gain, background subtraction and 2D migration were used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Formation velocity estimates from the hyperbola matching yielded 0.131 m/ns which is comparable to the literature velocity of about 0.125 m/ns. The calculated average dielectric constant (directly related to volumetric water content) is 5.2 matches unsaturated sandstone. The depth of GPR penetration is limited to approximately 3 m - likely due to the compaction/carbonate cementation in the rock and interbedded layers of finer-grained material contributing to higher attenuation of the GPR signal. The vertical resolution is about 0.125 m, enabling the imaging of the dune-scale cross sets (15-20 cm thickness). Calculation of the medium porosity via an adapted Wyllie Time Average equation yields 7.8 % which is consistent with the average porosity (5-10%) obtained from the literature. Bedding diagrams from local cliff exposures in the previous studies show gently NE dipping accretion of single large foresets that were interpreted as small-scale unit bars, the amalgamation of which resulted in the progradation of

  4. Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N.

    1983-01-01

    The intrinsic properties of the genetic sandstone units that typify many geopressured geothermal aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Gulf Coast region were systematically investigated classified, and differentiated. The following topics are coverd: structural and stratigraphic limits of sandstone reservoirs, characteristics and dimensions of Gulf Coast sandstones; fault-compartment areas; comparison of production and geologic estimates of aquifer fluid volume; geologic setting and reservoir characteristics, Wells of Opportunity; internal properties of sandstones; and implications for geopressured fluid production. (MHR)

  5. Stratigraphy and correlation of Upper Triassic strata between west Texas and eastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, S.G. ); Anderson, O.J. )

    1992-04-01

    Lithostratigraphy and vertebrate biochronology allow precise correlation of Upper Triassic strata between west Texas and eastern New Mexico. Upper Triassic strata are well exposed in west Texas from Oldham to Scurry counties, and are assigned to the Dockum Formation of the Chinle Group. Fossil vertebrates from the Camp Springs and Tecovas Members are of late Carnian age, whereas those from the Copper Member are of early Norian age. Upper Triassic strata in east-central New Mexico, across the Llano Estacado from the west Texas outcrops, correlate as follows: Camper Springs = lower Santa Rose; Tecovas = upper Santa Rosa/Garita Creek; Trujillo = Trujillo ('Cuervo'); Cooper = lower Bull Canyon. Upper Triassic strata in southeastern New Mexico and in Howard and adjacent counties in Texas are the lower Santa Rosa/Camper Springs overlain by mudstones and sandstones that contain late Carnian vertebrates and are informally termed upper member of Dockum Formation. Available data refute several long-held ideas about the Upper Triassic of west Texas. These data demonstrate that: (1) there is a pervasive unconformity at the base of the Dockum Formation that represents much of Triassic time; (2) the Trujillo Member is not correlative with the Santa Rosa of eastern New Mexico: Trujillo is a medial Dockum unit, whereas Santa Rosa is at the base of the Upper Triassic section; (3) very little Dockum mudrock was deposited in lakes; and (4) Dockum rivers flowed almost exclusively to the north, northwest, and west, so there was no closed depositional basin in west Texas during the Late Triassic.

  6. An experimental study of iron release from red sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purser, Gemma; Rochelle, Christopher; Rushton, Jeremy; Pearce, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to better understand the features of a natural CO2 -rich system at Saltwash Graben, Utah, USA. This site is associated with numerous CO2 rich springs linked to faults and fractures. In this area, a key feature of the red Entrada sandstone formation is the presence of significant rock bleaching (iron reduction and mobilisation) that occurs subparallel to bedding, typically at the base of large sandstone units and adjacent to some subvertical fractures. The difference in total iron content between the bleached and unbleached sandstones is very small, with the bleached sandstone containing slightly less total iron. In contrast to widely-reported regional bleaching, attributed to hydrocarbon accumulations towards structural crests, it has been suggested that the bleaching may be associated with the presence of modern day CO2 in the area and we sought to test this. Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess reaction processes that may have caused the observed iron reduction and mobilisation. Fixed volume batch reactors, containing either small cores of red or bleached sandstone were exposed to representative local ground waters (a dilute or a saline fluid), which were pressurised with either CO2 or N2 (the latter as a control) to 50 bar and placed inside an oven at 40° C to simulate subsurface conditions . The experiments ran for up to nine months with fluids being sampled periodically, though solids were only analysed once experiments were completed. Very little reaction was found to occur in the presence of CO2. It seems possible therefore that the modern CO2 rich fluids were not the cause of the sandstone bleaching. The study therefore assessed how the presence of reducing agents such as methane (CH4) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) may result in the bleaching of the bulk sandstone. H2S was introduced into the experiments as a breakdown product of thioacetamide (0.1% v/v fluid containing thioacetamide was added to the

  7. The making of a sandstone colossus: Tectonically and climatically induced flushing of 'Nubian' sands in the Early Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthi, Stefan M.; Hagadorn, James W.; Donselaar, Marinus E.

    2013-04-01

    Massive 'Nubian' sandstones of Cambro-Ordovician age drape most of the Arabian and northern African tectonic plates and preserve a sensitive record of how continental margins evolve under greenhouse conditions. These strata also contain important aquifers, petroleum reservoirs, and archaeological monuments such as Petra, and they were formed by a geologically sudden and long-lasting influx of >500,000 km3 of predominantly quartz sand. The cause and timing of this continent-scale sedimentation event were so far unknown. Here we constrain the depositional history of these strata and hypothesize that poleward migration of the Gondwanan supercontinent out of the horse latitudes caused a five-fold increase in sedimentation rates and buildup of one of the largest epicratonic sand wedges in earth history. Geohistorical sedimentation and subsidence modeling of these sandstones is presented, based on sedimentologic, biostratigraphic, basement paleotopographic, facies, and tectonic dip analyses of a well-preserved paleoslope-axial transect of 542-462 million-year-old strata in Jordan. This region experienced a ~25 m/Ma increase in sedimentation rate over ~30 Ma, concomitant with near-equilibrium plate subsidence response. Sedimentary rocks in the studied sequences exhibit coeval compositional variations that suggest a change in sedimentation style from immature to ultramature clastics. Our results are internally consistent with movement of a continent from an arid subtropical high toward a wet subpolar low, which would have caused widespread flushing of hypermature sands sourced from the interior of the African-Nubian Shield toward the continent margin.

  8. Post-granulite facies fluid infiltration in the Adirondack Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.; Valley, J.W.

    1988-06-01

    Granulite facies lithologies from the Adirondack Mountains of New York contain alteration assemblages composed dominantly of calcite +/- chlorite +/- sericite. These assemblages document fluid infiltration at middle to upper crustal levels. Cathodoluminescence of samples from the Marcy anorthosite massif indicates that the late fluid infiltration is more widespread than initially indicated by transmitted-light petrography alone. Samples that appear unaltered in transmitted light show extensive anastomosing veins of calcite (< 0.05 mm wide) along grain boundaries, in crosscutting fractures, and along mineral cleavages. The presence of the retrograde calcite documents paleopermeability in crystalline rocks and is related to the formation of high-density CO/sub 2/-rich fluid inclusions. Recognition of this process has important implications for studies of granulite genesis and the geophysical properties of the crust.

  9. Sedimentary Facies Analysis Using AVIRIS Data: A Geophysical Inverse Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardmann, Joe W.; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    AVIRIS data can be used to quantitatively analyze and map sedimentary lithofacies. The observed radiance spectra can be reduced to 'apparent reflectance' spectra by topographic and reflectance characterization of several field sites within the image. These apparent reflectance spectra correspond to the true reflectance at each pixel, multiplied by an unknown illumination factor (ranging in value from zero to one). The spatial abundance patterns of spectrally defined lithofacies and the unknown illumination factors can be simultaneously derived using constrained linear spectral unmixing methods. Estimates of the minimum uncertainty in the final results (due to noise, instrument resolutions, degree of illumination and mixing systematics) can be made by forward and inverse modeling. Specific facies studies in the Rattlesnake Hills region of Wyoming illustrate the successful application of these methods.

  10. Alisitos Formation calcareous facies - Early Cretaceous episode of tectonic calm

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez-Vidal, F.

    1986-04-01

    The Alisitos Formation (Aptian-Albian), shaped as a marine volcanic arc, crops out along the western side of Baja California bounding the Peninsula Range batholith. Lithologically, this formation is formed by volcanic breccias, porphyritic flows, biohermal limestones, and tuffaceous and pyroclastic sediments. The distribution of the different facies depends on the nature of volcanism and the distance from a volcanic center, although the presence of massive biohermal limestone indicates that in the Early Cretaceous (during tectonic episodes), the volcanic activity decreased to the level that the environmental conditions were favorable for the development of an organic barrier reef behind an island arc. Such conditions pertained south of the Agua Blanca fault and extended to El Arco, Baja California. Based on field observation and petrologic analysis in the Alisitos limestone, an attempt has been made to re-create the environmental condition in the Punta China and San Fernando, Baja California, sites.

  11. Alisitos Formation, calcareous facies: Early Cretaceous episode of tectonic calm

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez-Vidal, F.

    1986-07-01

    The Alisitos Formation (Aptian-Albian), shaped as a marine volcanic arc, crops out along the western side of the peninsula of Baja California bounding the Peninsular Range batholith. Lithologically, this formation is formed by volcanic-breccias, porphyritic flows, biohermal limestones, and tuffaceous and pyroclastic sediments. The distribution of the different facies depends on the nature of volcanism and the distance from a volcanic center, although the presence of massive biohermal limestone indicates that in the Early Cretaceous (during the tectonic episodes), the volcanic activity decreased to the level that the environmental conditions were favorable for the development of an organic reef barrier, behind an island arc. Such conditions existed south of the Agua Blanca fault and extended to El Arco, Baja California. Based upon field observations and petrological analysis of the Alisitos limestone, an attempt is made to recreate the environmental condition in the Punta China and San Fernando, Baja California, sites.

  12. Water Finance Forum-Texas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Regional Finance Forum: Financing Resilient and Sustainable Water Infrastructure, held in Addison, Texas, September 10-11, 2015.Co-sponsored by EPA's Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance Center and the Environmental Finance Center Network.

  13. Dalhart Texas 1972-2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    A water-rich polka dot pattern takes over the traditional rectangular patchwork of fields in this 40 year sequence of Landsat images of the dry Texas panhandle near the town of Dalhart. In this ser...

  14. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    SciTech Connect

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  15. Coastal Inlets of Texas, USA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Caney Creek Freeport Ship Channel San Luis Pass Galveston Pass Rollover Fish Pass Sabine Pass Texas Victoria Houston Port Arthur Corpus Christi...1960) provide design guidance for constructing fish passes along the Texas coast, it appears that an update based on more recent experiences and...Hall Pier at Corpus Christi; and bay gauges (Rawlings at Mouth of Colorado River; Lavaca, and Port Isabel in the lower Laguna Madre ) for year 1999

  16. Shale depositional processes: Example from the Paleozoic Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouelresh, Mohamed; Slatt, Roger

    2011-12-01

    A long held geologic paradigm is that mudrocks and shales are basically the product of `hemipelagic rain' of silt- and/or clay-sized, detrital, biogenic and particulate organic particles onto the ocean floor over long intervals of time. However, recently published experimental and field-based studies have revealed a plethora of micro-sedimentary features that indicate these common fine-grained rocks also could have been transported and/or reworked by unidirectional currents. In this paper, we add to this growing body of knowledge by describing such features from the Paleozoic Barnett Shale in the Fort Worth Basin, Texas, U.S.A. which suggests transport and deposition was from hyperpycnal, turbidity, storm and/or contour currents, in addition to hemipelagic rain. On the basis of a variety of sedimentary textures and structures, six main sedimentary facies have been defined from four 0.3 meter intervals in a 68m (223 ft) long Barnett Shale core: massive mudstone, rhythmic mudstone, ripple and low-angle laminated mudstone, graded mudstone, clay-rich facies, and spicule-rich facies. Current-induced features of these facies include mm- to cmscale cross- and parallel-laminations, scour surfaces, clastic/biogenic particle alignment, and normal- and inverse-size grading. A spectrum of vertical facies transitions and bed types indicate deposition from waxing-waning flows rather than from steady `rain' of particles to the sea floor. Detrital sponge spicule-rich facies suggests transport to the marine environment as hypopycnal or hyperpycnal flows and reversal in buoyancy by transformation from concentrated to dilute flows; alternatively the spicules could have originated by submarine slumping in front of contemporaneous shallow marine sponge reefs, and then transported basinward as turbidity current flows. The occurrence of dispersed biogenic/organic remains and inversely size graded mudstones also support a hyperpycnal and/or turbidity flow origin for a significant part of

  17. Comparison of Geostatistical Kriging Algorithms for Intertidal Surface Sediment Facies Mapping with Grain Size Data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the predictive performance of different geostatistical kriging algorithms for intertidal surface sediment facies mapping using grain size data. Indicator kriging, which maps facies types from conditional probabilities of predefined facies types, is first considered. In the second approach, grain size fractions are first predicted using cokriging and the facies types are then mapped. As grain size fractions are compositional data, their characteristics should be considered during spatial prediction. For efficient prediction of compositional data, additive log-ratio transformation is applied before cokriging analysis. The predictive performance of cokriging of the transformed variables is compared with that of cokriging of raw fractions in terms of both prediction errors of fractions and facies mapping accuracy. From a case study of the Baramarae tidal flat, Korea, the mapping method based on cokriging of log-ratio transformation of fractions outperformed the one based on cokriging of untransformed fractions in the prediction of fractions and produced the best facies mapping accuracy. Indicator kriging that could not account for the variation of fractions within each facies type showed the worst mapping accuracy. These case study results indicate that the proper processing of grain size fractions as compositional data is important for reliable facies mapping. PMID:24688362

  18. Comparison of geostatistical kriging algorithms for intertidal surface sediment facies mapping with grain size data.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Wook; Jang, Dong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the predictive performance of different geostatistical kriging algorithms for intertidal surface sediment facies mapping using grain size data. Indicator kriging, which maps facies types from conditional probabilities of predefined facies types, is first considered. In the second approach, grain size fractions are first predicted using cokriging and the facies types are then mapped. As grain size fractions are compositional data, their characteristics should be considered during spatial prediction. For efficient prediction of compositional data, additive log-ratio transformation is applied before cokriging analysis. The predictive performance of cokriging of the transformed variables is compared with that of cokriging of raw fractions in terms of both prediction errors of fractions and facies mapping accuracy. From a case study of the Baramarae tidal flat, Korea, the mapping method based on cokriging of log-ratio transformation of fractions outperformed the one based on cokriging of untransformed fractions in the prediction of fractions and produced the best facies mapping accuracy. Indicator kriging that could not account for the variation of fractions within each facies type showed the worst mapping accuracy. These case study results indicate that the proper processing of grain size fractions as compositional data is important for reliable facies mapping.

  19. A Lower Ordovician sponge/algal facies in the southern United States and its counterparts elsewhere in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Alberstadt, L. ); Repetski, J.E. )

    1989-06-01

    Subsurface Ordovician rocks in the Black Warrior Basin, Mississippi Embayment, and the eastern part of the Arkoma Basin reflect a different depositional history than coeval rocks exposed in the Nashville Basin, Ozark Dome, and southern Appalachians. The succession consists of four informal lithologic units. From top to bottom these are: (1) Stones River limestones, (2) upper dolostone, (3) sponge/algal limestones characterized by the presence of Nuia, and (4) lower dolostone. Of these, the sponge/algal limestone unit is the most atypical. It has a conspicuous biotic assemblage which can be recognized petrographically in well cuttings. The diagnostic fossil allochems are: sponges, sponge spicules, Nuia, Girvanella, and Sphaerocodium. Conodonts from the sponge/algal limestones are probably entirely Early Ordovician (Canadian) and include cold- and deep-water species found in the North Atlantic Province, whereas those in the overlying dolostones represent exclusively warm-water, shelf environments. The conodonts in the Black Warrior Basin suggest that an unconformity between Lower and Middle Ordovician carbonates (Knox unconformity) does not exist in much of that region. The sponge/algal limestones represent a different facies than their coeval shelf rocks in the interior of the continent. The limestone contains a distinctive biotic assemblage recognized in Lower Ordovician rocks in Newfoundland, in the Arbuckle and Wichita mountains of Oklahoma, in West Texas, and in the Great Basin of Nevada and Utah.

  20. Lower and middle Guadalupian shelf carbonates, eastern margin of Central Basin platform, Permian basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.F.; Chalcraft, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Lower and middle Guadalupian shelf carbonates serve as the reservoir for a nearly continuous band of oil fields extending 100 mi along the eastern margin of the Central Basin platform of west Texas. Approximately 5 billion bbl of oil have been produced from stratigraphic-structural traps within the Upper Permian (Gaudalupian Series) dolomites of the San Andrea and Grayburg Formations in Upton, Crane, Ector, Pecos, and Andrews Counties, Texas. The San Andrea and Grayburg Formations are cyclical shallowing-upward carbonate sequences of open shelf through sabkha facies whose depositional strike parallels the eastern margin of the Central Basin platform. Porosity and permeability of reservoir rock are governed by diagenetic processes such as dolomitization, anhydrite porosity occlusion, leaching, silicification, and authigenic clay formation. Self sediments are primarily burrowed wackestones and packstones that locally contain pelletal, skeletal, and ooid grainstones. Typical subtidal shelf sediments are capped by algal-laminated dolomite, nodular anhydritic dolomite, and bedded anhydrite. The fauna is normally sparse and dominated by foraminifera and algae. Less common faunal components include pelecypods, crinoids, sponges, Bryozoa, brachiopods, gastropods, and coral that are associated with the development of small scattered patch reefs. Lowering the sea level during the early Guadalpian initiated basinward progradation of San Andres carbonate facies with hydrocarbon reservoirs best developed in shallow self fusulinid wackestones to packstone and oolitic grainstone. Reservoir dolomites of the Grayburg formation are present east of San Andres fields with optimal reservoir properties occurring near the San Andreas outer shelf margin.

  1. Depositional systems and Karst geology of the Ellenburger group (lower ordovician), subsurface West Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerans, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Ellenburger Group of Texas contains estimated reserves of 1.15 billion barrels of oil and 2.2 billion barrels of oil equivalent. Despite its economic significance, comparatively little is known about the subsurface Ellenburger in West Texas; thus, this book presents a regional model of Ellenburger deposition and diagenesis. Using associations of lithologies and sedimentary structures observed in core, the author identified six depositional systems in the Ellenburger: fan delta-marginal marine, lower tidal flat, high-energy restricted shelf, low-energy restricted shelf, upper tidal flat, and open shallow water shelf. Diagenesis was dominated by three major styles of dolomitization: very fine crystalline dolomite (5-20 {mu}m), in tidal-flat facies; fine to medium crystalline dolomite (20-100 {mu}m), widespread in all facies; and coarse crystalline replacement mosaic dolomite and saddle dolomite cement, which formed in a burial setting after pre-Simpson karst formation and before Pennsylvanian faulting, uplift, and erosion. Other diagenetic events were karst-related dissolution episodes associated with repeated uplift and exposure and subsequent dedolomitization of the Ellenburger platform.

  2. Stratigraphy, facies architecture, and palaeoenvironment of Neoproterozoic volcanics and volcaniclastic deposits in Fatira area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, Ezz El Din Abdel Hakim

    Fatira area in the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt, is a composite terrane consisting of Neoproterozoic volcanics and sediments laid down in submarine to subaerial environment, intruded by voluminous old to young granitic rocks. The various lithofacies of the study area can be grouped in three distinct lithostratigraphic sequences, which are described here in stratigraphic order, from base to top as the Fatira El Beida, Fatira El Zarqa and Gabal Fatira sequences. Each depositional sequence, is intimately related to volcanic activity separated by time intervals of volcanic inactivity, such as marked hiatuses, reworked volcaniclasts, and or turbidite sedimentation. Four submarine facies groups have been recognized within the oldest, folded eruption sequence of Fatira El Beida. The southern part of the study area is occupied by sheet lava (SL), pillow lavas (PL), pillow breccias (PB), and overlying Bouma turbiditic volcaniclastites (VC). The four facies groups of Fatira El Beida sequence occur in a predictable upward-deepening succession, essentially from base to top, an SL-PL-PB-VC stacking pattern. The coeval tholeiitic mafic and felsic volcaniclastic rocks of this sequence indicate an extensional back-arc tectonic setting. The El Beida depositional sequence appears to fit a submarine-fan and slope-apron environment in an intra-arc site. The Fatira El Zarqa sequence involves a large volume of subaerial calc-alkaline intermediate to felsic volcanics and an unconformably overlying siliciclastic succession comprising clast-supported conglomerates (Gm), massive sandstone sheet floods (Sm) and mudstones (FI), together with a lateritic argillite paleosol (P) top formed in an alluvial-fan system. The youngest rock of Gabal Fatira sequence comprises anorogenic trachydacites and rhyolites with locally emergent domes associated with autobrecciation and sill-dyke rock swarms that could be interpreted as feeders and subvolcanic intrusions. Unconformity and lithofacies assemblages

  3. Source rock study of Smackover Formation from east Texas to Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, R.; Moore, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    Analyses of core and crude oil samples indicate that the laminated lime mudstone facies of the lower Smackover Formation is a significant source rock across the trend. The source facies was deposited in an anoxic and hypersaline environment that permitted preservation of algal kerogen. Moreover, source potential also occurs in undifferentiated Gilmer-Smackover rocks of east Texas deposited in a carbonate slope environment. Thermal maturity is the key factor that controls the generation of crude oil by the carbonate source facies and the eventual destruction of hydrocarbons in upper Smackover and Norphlet reservoirs. Once the regional thermal maturity framework is understood, it is possible to construct a source rock model that explains the distribution of crude oil, gas condensate, and methane across the trend. Calculated thermal maturity histories provide insight to the timing of hydrocarbon generation and migration and to the timing of hydrocarbon destruction and sulfate reduction in deep reservoirs. Basic geochemical strategies for exploration are suggested. One strategy is to focus exploration effort on traps formed prior to the time of crude oil migration that were nearest to effective source rocks. Another strategy is to avoid drilling reservoir rocks that are thermally overmature for preservation of hydrocarbons.

  4. Depositional facies and eustatic effects in Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Ripley Formation, central and eastern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Skotnicki, M.C.; King, D.T. Jr. )

    1989-09-01

    In eastern and central Alabama, the Upper Cretaceous Ripley Formation (40-175 m thick) is comprised of five depositional facies. Facies 1 (barrier-island shoreface and tidal-inlet fill) is a medium to coarse, intraclastic quartzose sand that is planar and trough cross-stratified and has abundant Ophiomorpha traces. Facies 2 (back-barrier lagoon or marsh) is a bioturbated, micaceous, carbonaceous silt that contains macerated plant debris and bivalve molds and impressions. Interbedded with facies 2 is facies 3 (storm-washover deposits), a hummocky cross-stratified, micaceous fine sand. Facies 4 (back-barrier tidal flat) is a micaceous silty clay lacking body fossils and plant debris. Facies 5 (lower shoreface) is a glauconitic, clayey and micaceous, fine to medium sand that is highly bioturbated and commonly has abundant marine macrofauna. The Ripley is divided into two genetic packages of facies; the genetic packages are bounded by stratigraphic breaks or discontinuities. The package-bounding breaks are correlated biostratigraphically with discrete third-order eustatic drops on the world sea level curve. The basal Ripley break is correlated with the end of Campanian (about 74 Ma) eustatic drop, and the middle Ripley break (separating the two genetic packages) marks the mid-Maastrichtian (71 Ma) sea level drop. The basal and middle Ripley breaks are low-relief surfaces marked by sharp facies discontinuities (correlatable across 130 km) and terminal coarsening-upward cycles (5 m thick); the estimated eustatic sea level fall in both instances was about 50 m. The break at the top of the Ripley has 70 m of erosional relief and a bone bed up to 80 cm thick. This break represents a late Maastrichtian (about 68 Ma) sea level fall estimated to have been nearly 95 m. Facies of the superjacent Prairie Bluff Chalk and Providence Sand overlie the erosional surface.

  5. Traces of the heritage arising from the Macelj sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golež, Mateja

    2014-05-01

    The landscape of Southeast Slovenia and its stone heritage principally reveal itself through various Miocene sandstones. The most frequently found type on the borderline between Slovenia and Croatia, i.e. east of Rogatec, is the micaceous-quartz Macelj sandstone. This rock ranges in colour from greenish grey to bluish grey and yellowish, depending on the content of glauconite, which colours it green. In its composition, the rock is a heterogeneous mixture of grains of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, microcline, anorthite and glauconite. The average size of grains is 300μm. In cross-section, they are oblong, semi-rounded or round. The mechanical-physical and durability properties of the Macelj sandstone, which have been characterised pursuant to the applicable standards for natural stone, reveal that the rock exhibits poor resistance to active substances from the atmosphere, particularly in the presence of salt. In the surroundings of Rogatec, there are around 45 abandoned quarries of the Macelj sandstone, which are the result of the exploitation of this mineral resource from the 17th century on. The local quarrymen earned their bread until 1957, when the Kambrus quarry industry closed down. From the original use of this mineral resource as construction and decorative material, the useful value of the Macelj sandstone expanded during the development of the metals industry to the manufacture of large and small grindstones for the needs of the domestic and international market. Therefore, traces of quarrying can not only be seen in the disused quarries, but also in the rich architectural heritage of Rogatec and its surroundings, the stone furniture - from portals, window frames, wells, various troughs, pavements to stone walls - and other. The living quarrying heritage slowly passed into oblivion after World War II, although the analysis of the social image of the people residing in Rogatec and its surroundings revealed that there was an average of one stonemason in

  6. Chagas Disease Risk in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E.; Frank, David M.; Rivaldi, Chissa–Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sánchez–Cordero, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species) in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. Methods and Findings The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five–stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post–1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc–minute). The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence–based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag–York–Mollié model and post–1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This risk

  7. Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic significance of biogenic structures from a late Paleozoic marginal- to open-marine reservoir, Morrow Sandstone, subsurface of southwest Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buatois, L.A.; Mangano, M.G.; Alissa, A.; Carr, T.R.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated ichnologic, sedimentologic, and stratigraphic studies of cores and well logs from Lower Pennsylvanian oil and gas reservoirs (lower Morrow Sandstone, southwest Kansas) allow distinction between fluvio-estuarine and open marine deposits in the Gentzler and Arroyo fields. The fluvio-estuarine facies assemblage is composed of both interfluve and valley-fill deposits, encompassing a variety of depositional environments such as fluvial channel, interfluve paleosol, bay head delta, estuary bay, restricted tidal flat, intertidal channel, and estuary mouth. Deposition in a brackish-water estuarine valley is supported by the presence of a low diversity, opportunistic, impoverished marine ichnofaunal assemblage dominated by infaunal structures, representing an example of a mixed, depauperate Cruziana and Skolithos ichnofacies. Overall distribution of ichnofossils along the estuarine valley was mainly controlled by the salinity gradient, with other parameters, such as oxygenation, substrate and energy, acting at a more local scale. The lower Morrow estuarine system displays the classical tripartite division of wave-dominated estuaries (i.e. seaward-marine sand plug, fine-grained central bay, and sandy landward zone), but tidal action is also recorded. The estuarine valley displays a northwest-southeast trend, draining to the open sea in the southeast. Recognition of valley-fill sandstones in the lower Morrow has implications for reservoir characterization. While the open marine model predicts a "layer-cake" style of facies distribution as a consequence of strandline shoreline progradation, identification of valley-fill sequences points to more compartmentalized reservoirs, due to the heterogeneity created by valley incision and subsequent infill. The open-marine facies assemblage comprises upper, middle, and lower shoreface; offshore transition; offshore; and shelf deposits. In contrast to the estuarine assemblage, open marine ichnofaunas are characterized by a

  8. Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic significance of biogenic structures from a late Paleozoic marginal- to open-marine reservoir, Morrow Sandstone, subsurface of southwest Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatois, Luis A.; Mángano, M. Gabriela; Alissa, Abdulrahman; Carr, Timothy R.

    2002-09-01

    Integrated ichnologic, sedimentologic, and stratigraphic studies of cores and well logs from Lower Pennsylvanian oil and gas reservoirs (lower Morrow Sandstone, southwest Kansas) allow distinction between fluvio-estuarine and open marine deposits in the Gentzler and Arroyo fields. The fluvio-estuarine facies assemblage is composed of both interfluve and valley-fill deposits, encompassing a variety of depositional environments such as fluvial channel, interfluve paleosol, bay head delta, estuary bay, restricted tidal flat, intertidal channel, and estuary mouth. Deposition in a brackish-water estuarine valley is supported by the presence of a low diversity, opportunistic, impoverished marine ichnofaunal assemblage dominated by infaunal structures, representing an example of a mixed, depauperate Cruziana and Skolithos ichnofacies. Overall distribution of ichnofossils along the estuarine valley was mainly controlled by the salinity gradient, with other parameters, such as oxygenation, substrate and energy, acting at a more local scale. The lower Morrow estuarine system displays the classical tripartite division of wave-dominated estuaries (i.e. seaward-marine sand plug, fine-grained central bay, and sandy landward zone), but tidal action is also recorded. The estuarine valley displays a northwest-southeast trend, draining to the open sea in the southeast. Recognition of valley-fill sandstones in the lower Morrow has implications for reservoir characterization. While the open marine model predicts a "layer-cake" style of facies distribution as a consequence of strandline shoreline progradation, identification of valley-fill sequences points to more compartmentalized reservoirs, due to the heterogeneity created by valley incision and subsequent infill. The open-marine facies assemblage comprises upper, middle, and lower shoreface; offshore transition; offshore; and shelf deposits. In contrast to the estuarine assemblage, open marine ichnofaunas are characterized by a

  9. Paleohydrology of Southwestern Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochel, R. Craig; Baker, Victor R.; Patton, Peter C.

    1982-08-01

    Current statistical methods may be unable to accurately predict recurrence intervals of rare, large-magnitude floods, especially in semiarid regions having positively skewed annual flood distributions, great hydrologic variability, and widely spaced gaging stations. Current approaches rely on historical data, but catastrophic floods may have recurrence intervals far greater than the length of historical records. In the lower Pecos and Devils Rivers of southwestern Texas, paleoflood discharge and frequency estimates are extended over 10,000 years by the study of slack-water flood sediments. Slack-water deposits are typically fine-grained sand and silt that accumulate during floods in areas where current velocity is reduced, i.e., in back-flooded tributary mouths, channel expansions, downstream from bedrock spurs and/or slump blocks, and in shallow caves along bedrock walls. Radiocarbon dating of organic detritus in slack-water deposits establishes the flood chronology while paleoflood discharges can be estimated by slope-area techniques. Paleoflood information extracted from slack-water sediments can greatly extend flood records. These floods may be weighted like historical data in log Pearson type 3 calculations of flood frequency. Our morphostratigraphic approach combines recorded data with geomorphic evidence to derive estimates of flood frequency. This technique offers an inexpensive and rapid way to assess catastrophic flood risk.

  10. New model of succession of Middle and Late Pennsylvanian fossil communities in north Texas, Mid-Continent, and Appalachians with implications on black shale controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, D.R. II; Yancey, T.E.; Mapes, R.H.; Malinky, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    A new model for the succession of Pennsylvanian fossil communities, preserved in cyclothems, is proposed on the basis of more than 200 fossil localities in the Mid-Continent, Appalachians, and north Texas. Early models for Mid-Continent cyclothems placed the black shales in shallow water, with maximum transgression at the fusulinid-bearing zone in the overlying limestone. The most recent model proposed that the black phosphatic shales, which commonly occur between two subtidal carbonates, are widespread and laterally continuous over great distances and represent maximum transgression. The black phosphatic shales contain: ammonoids; inarticulate brachiopods; radiolarians; conularids; shark material and abundant and diverse conodonts. The black shales grade vertically and laterally into dark gray-black shales which contain many of the same pelagic and epipelagic forms found in the phosphatic black shales. This facies contains the deepest water benthic community. Most of these forms are immature, pyritized, and generally are preserved as molds. The dark gray-black facies grades into a medium gray shale facies which contains a mature molluscan fauna. The medium gray shale grades into a lighter gray facies, which is dominated by brachiopods, crinoids, and corals, with occasional bivalves and gastropods. (These facies are interpreted as being a moderate to shallow depth shelf community). The brachiopid-crinoid community is succeeded by shallow water communities which may have occupied shoreline, lagoonal, bay, interdeltaic, or shallow prodeltaic environments.

  11. Deep-water environments for the putative Early Archean life: Chert units depositional facies, Warrawoona Group, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dromart, G.; Coltice, N.; Flament, N.; Olivier, N.; Rey, P.

    2008-12-01

    The principal objective of this work is to find and interpret evidence for the depositional conditions of the greenstone-belt facies that possibly hosted primitive life forms. That information is critical to any attempt to assess the habitability of Early Earth's environments, as well as their potential for fossil preservation. Chert members of the Duffer Fm and the Apex chert, which bears fossil-like filaments (3.465 Ga), are exposed in the vicinity of Marble Bar. The Marble Bar Chert is made up of dm-scale sequences of interbedded red, white and black finely crystalline silica. Sticky beds consist of flow-oriented clasts (i.e., large, angular, elongated, light-colored clasts showing load-structures, and regularly-inclined and vertically- oriented imbrications) interpreted here as gravity flows of early-lithified sediments. The Chinaman Pool Chert Mb is incised by a deep scour upon which sandstone beds with chert interlayers onlap. This unit includes coarse mafic sands, and conglomerates with chert lithoclasts and felsic pebbles. Locally, m-scale growth faults localize sand-filled channels. The depositional architectures and facies of this upper unit are indicative of a deep-water fan depositional system. This interpretation conflicts with the current view that chert units derived from hydrothermalism overprint of original shallow deposits, and that hydrothermalism hampered microfossil preservation. Alternatively, we suggest that deep-water environments and early lithification of siliceous sediments may have favored life preservation. Earth's oldest stromatolites (3.49-3.47 Ga) of the Dresser Fm are exposed in the North Pole Dome area. Autochtonous stromatolites consist of banded microstructures with iron-rich, wavy and wrinkle laminae, and form regular domes. The stromatolite layers cap a sandstone bed at the top of which asymmetric ripples show steeply-inclined sets of laminae that typically represent overturned ripples at uppermost turbiditic flow deposits. The

  12. Joint inversion of geophysical data using petrophysical clustering and facies deformation wth the level set technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2015-12-01

    Geological expertise and petrophysical relationships can be brought together to provide prior information while inverting multiple geophysical datasets. The merging of such information can result in more realistic solution in the distribution of the model parameters, reducing ipse facto the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. We consider two level of heterogeneities: facies, described by facies boundaries and heteroegenities inside each facies determined by a correlogram. In this presentation, we pose the geophysical inverse problem in terms of Gaussian random fields with mean functions controlled by petrophysical relationships and covariance functions controlled by a prior geological cross-section, including the definition of spatial boundaries for the geological facies. The petrophysical relationship problem is formulated as a regression problem upon each facies. The inversion of the geophysical data is performed in a Bayesian framework. We demonstrate the usefulness of this strategy using a first synthetic case for which we perform a joint inversion of gravity and galvanometric resistivity data with the stations located at the ground surface. The joint inversion is used to recover the density and resistivity distributions of the subsurface. In a second step, we consider the possibility that the facies boundaries are deformable and their shapes are inverted as well. We use the level set approach to perform such deformation preserving prior topological properties of the facies throughout the inversion. With the help of prior facies petrophysical relationships and topological characteristic of each facies, we make posterior inference about multiple geophysical tomograms based on their corresponding geophysical data misfits. The method is applied to a second synthetic case showing that we can recover the heterogeneities inside the facies, the mean values for the petrophysical properties, and, to some extent, the facies boundaries using the 2D joint inversion of

  13. Role of fluid mixing and fault-related sulfide in the origin of the Ray Point uranium district, south Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, M.B.; Reynolds, R.L.; Rye, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    The Lamprecht and Felder deposits are two of many roll-type uranium deposits hosted by the Miocene Oakville sandstone in the Ray Point district, Live Oak County, S Texas. Both deposits show similar patterns of geochemical zonation and distribution of authigenic iron disulphide minerals, and both appear to be genetically related to the nearby Oakville fault. Distribution of U, Mo and Se are typical of roll-type deposits. Sulphur isotope data indicate four stages of FeS2 mineral formation. Geochemical data suggest that the host sandstone near the Oakville fault is the site of a complex zone of mixing between fault-derived saline brines and oxygenated meteoric water. Conditions were thus provided in this zone for the proliferation of sulphate-reducing bacteria that in turn gave rise to the ore mineralization. A detailed discussion of the geological evolution of these deposits is presented.-J.E.S.

  14. NMR spectroscopic examination of shocked sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Boslough, M.B.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1993-08-01

    Solid state silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize the formation of high pressure silica polymorphs and amorphous material associated with the shocked Coconino Sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona. Five samples of the sandstone were obtained from several locations at the crater to represent a range of shock conditions associated with the hypervelocity impact of a 30 m-diameter meteorite. The NMR spectra for these powdered materials exhibit peaks assigned to quartz, coesite, stishovite, and glass. A new resonance in two of the moderately shocked samples is also observed. This resonance has been identified as a densified form of amorphous silica with silicon in tetrahedra with one hydroxyl group. Such a phase is evidence for a shock-induced reaction between quartz and steam under high pressure conditions.

  15. NMR spectroscopic examination of shocked sandstone from meteor crater, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Boslough, M.B. ); Kirkpatrick, R.J. )

    1994-07-10

    Solid state silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize the formation of high pressure silica polymorphs and amorphous material associated with the shocked Coconino Sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona. Five samples of the sandstone were obtained from several locations at the crater to represent a range of shock conditions associated with the hypervelocity impact of a 30 m-diameter meteorite. The NMR spectra for these powdered materials exhibit peaks assigned to quartz, coesite, stishovite, and glass. A new resonance in two of the moderately shocked samples is also observed. This resonance has been identified as a densified form of amorphous silica with silicon in tetrahedra with one hydroxyl group. Such a phase is evidence for a shock-induced reaction between quartz and steam under high pressure conditions. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics

  16. Kemik sandstones, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Mull, C.G.; Paris, C.; Adams, K.E.

    1985-04-01

    In the Sadlerochit Mountains area of ANWR, the Kemik Sandstone of Hauterivian-Barremian age ranges to at least 35 m (120 ft) of very well sorted, fine-grained quartzose sandstone with minor pebble conglomerate. It is an elongate body traceable for over 160 km (100 mi) from the eastern Sadlerochit Mountains into the subsurface near the Sagavanirtok River to the west. In the northeast, it crops out in a belt about 16 km (10 mi) wide; to the southwest in the subsurface, it expands to about 65 km (40 mi) wide. It is a potential petroleum reservoir in the subsurface of ANWR, but is distribution north and east of the Salderochit Mountains is unknown.

  17. Pore-throat sizes in sandstones, siltstones, and shales: Reply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2011-01-01

    In his discussion of my article (Nelson, 2009), W. K. Camp takes issue with the concept that buoyancy is not the dominant force in forming and maintaining the distribution of gas in tight-gas accumulations (Camp, 2011). I will restrict my response to the issues he raised regarding buoyant versus nonbuoyant drive and to a few comments regarding water saturation and production. I claim that the pressure generated in petroleum source rocks (Pg), instead of the buoyancy pressure (Pb), provides the energy to charge most tight sandstones with gas. The arguments are fourfold: (1) buoyant columns of sufficient height seldom exist in low-permeability sand-shale sequences, (2) tight-gas systems display a pressure profile that declines instead of increases upward, (3) gas is pervasive in overpressured systems, and (4) source rocks can generate pore pressures sufficiently high to charge tight sandstones.

  18. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the Updip Jurassic trend of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Subsequent to the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sand of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical for wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields; API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sand and the Megargel sand. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked fining-upward sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Petrophysical properties differ between the two areas. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporate minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

  19. Experimental flow-through study of artificial diagenesis in sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Donahoe, R.J.; Leard, L.E.

    1986-05-01

    During petroleum reservoir development and production, various fluids are injected into well bores. Because these fluids differ compositionally from the reservoir rock pore fluids, induced fluid/rock interactions can range from none to extreme in their effect on reservoir rock properties. These induced reactions, considered artificial diagenesis, can be studied using a new low-temperature flow-through hydrothermal apparatus. The flow-through apparatus is presented as an alternative to conventional high-temperature, high-pressure permeameters for studying water/rock interactions. This equipment is designed to study water/rock interactions under variable fluid-flow rate (0.0005-10 ml/min), temperature (50/sup 0/-300/sup 0/C), and pressure (50-500 bar) conditions; to allow in-situ measurements of permeability; and to accommodate packed column or 1-in. diameter core samples. An experimental and computational study was conducted at 250/sup 0/C to investigate the effects of fluid flow rate, fluid composition, and sandstone mineralogy on disaggregated sandstone sample alteration mineralogy and permeability. Three series of flow-through experiments were conducted with the following variables: (1) sandstone composition (quartzarenite, 2 arkose); (2) fluid composition (distilled, deionized water and aqueous solutions of HF/HCl and NaOH); and (3) fluid-flow rate (0.001-1 ml/min). Preliminary results from these experiments are presented. The variables listed above are discussed in terms of their effect on sandstone alteration mineralogy and permeability. In addition, computer chemical-equilibrium programs used to model these man-made diagenetic systems are evaluated.

  20. Regional Haze Plan for Texas and Oklahoma

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA partially approved and partially disapproved the Texas regional haze plan. EPA also finalized a plan to limit sulfur dioxide emissions from eight Texas coal-fired electricity generating facilities

  1. Libraries in Texas: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amarillo Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Harrington Library of the ... bell_parrish_medical_libr.asp El Paso Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center at El Paso Gallo ...

  2. Controls on the variability of net infiltration to desert sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; McKinney, T.S.; Zhdanov, M.S.; Watt, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in and climates and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration becomes critically important for accurately inventorying water resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. This paper presents a conceptual model of net infiltration to desert sandstone and then develops an empirical equation for its spatial quantification at the watershed scale using linear least squares inversion methods for evaluating controlling parameters (independent variables) based on estimated net infiltration rates (dependent variables). Net infiltration rates used for this regression analysis were calculated from environmental tracers in boreholes and more than 3000 linear meters of vadose zone excavations in an upland basin in southwestern Utah underlain by Navajo sandstone. Soil coarseness, distance to upgradient outcrop, and topographic slope were shown to be the primary physical parameters controlling the spatial variability of net infiltration. Although the method should be transferable to other desert sandstone settings for determining the relative spatial distribution of net infiltration, further study is needed to evaluate the effects of other potential parameters such as slope aspect, outcrop parameters, and climate on absolute net infiltration rates. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  4. Depositional facies and diagenetic history of Trenton Limestone in northern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, D.R.; Keith, B.D.

    1984-12-01

    Subsurface cores were studied petrographically to determine the facies and diagenetic history of the Trenton Limestone on a regional scale in northern Indiana. The Trenton Limestone is a yellowish olive-gray fossiliferous limestone, which is replaced by a light-gray dolostone in northern Indiana. Facies composing the Trenton are: 1) bryozoan-echinoderm packstone, 2) bryozoan-echinoderm grainstone, 3) bryozoan packstone to wackestone, 4) lime mudstone, and 5) dolostone. The bryozoan-echinoderm packstone is the major facies. Coarse-grained (1-4 mm) grainstones are typically 1 ft (30 cm) thick, have abrupt bases, and become muddy upward. They are considered storm deposits. Hardgrounds occur throughout the limestone facies, but they are most numerous toward the base. These facies indicate deposition below wave base, interrupted by periods of high energy during storms. Fossiliferous white and gray chert nodules are scattered throughout the unit. Also found in the limestone facies are prevalent stylolites and microstylolites, an indication of chemical compaction. The dolostone facies consists of coarsely crystalline (0.4 mm) idiotopic dolomite. Pyrite is associated with the dolomite. Porosity, found only in the dolostone, is discontinuous and characterized as intercrystalline, vuggy, and moldic. Porous zones are commonly oil stained or have been plugged by poikilotopic selentic gypsum. Minor amounts of celestite are found as cavity fillings.

  5. Spatial Variability of Soil Hydraulic Paramaters in Relation to Sedimentary Facies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onsoy, Y.; Harter, T.; Ginn, T.

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the hypothesis that spatial heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties can vary significantly with major stratigraphic units identified based on a visual texture determination of soil samples collected at the Kearney Research Site in Fresno, California. We used the concept of facies to characterize the heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties that are defined in the form of van Genuchten model. Undisturbed and disturbed cores were collected from 60 boreholes drilled to a depth of 16 m in a nectarine orchard subject to a long-term nitrate experiment and were used to give a detailed subsurface sedimentologic description by color, texture, and moisture. Visual inspection was used to identify laterally continuous major stratigraphic units, referred to as facies. Undisturbed samples were originally grouped according to their core scale characterization of soil texture prior to conducting a multistep outflow experiment in conjunction with inverse modeling for laboratory determination of van Genuchten parameters. Correlations between the facies and van Genuchten parameters were tested by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Subsequently, Post Hoc Turkey HSD comparison technique was used to elucidate significant differences for the van Genuchten parameters between the facies and the correlations between facies for a given soil hydraulic parameter. Both ANOVA and pairwise comparisons suggested that facies bounding surfaces tend to separate regions with different soil hydraulic properties. In this application a facies-based approach provides a good basis to conceptualize subsurface heterogeneity.

  6. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. These conditions were probably assisted by contemporaneous faulting along structurally weak hinge lines where the dominant structural elements are normal step faults. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type.

  7. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - Northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-12-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type. 14 figures.

  8. Source facies and oil families of the Malay Basin, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Creaney, S.; Hussein, A.H. ); Curry, D.J.; Bohacs, K.M. ); Hassan, R. )

    1994-07-01

    The Malay Basin consists of a number of separate petroleum systems, driven exclusively by nonmarine source rocks. These systems range from lower Oligocene to middle Miocene and show a progression from lacustrine-dominated source facies in the lower Oligocene to lower Miocene section to coastal plain/delta plain coal-related sources in the lower to middle Miocene section. Two lacustrine sources are recognized in the older section, and multiple source/reservoir pairs are recognized in the younger coaly section. The lacustrine sources can be recognized using well-log analysis combined with detailed core and sidewall core sampling. Chemically, they are characterized by low pristane/phytane ratios, low oleanane contents, and a general absence of resin-derived terpanes. These sources have TOCs in the 1.0-4.0% range and hydrogen indices of up to 750. In contrast, the coal-related sources are chemically distinct with pristane/phytane ratios of up to 8, very high oleanane contents, and often abundant resinous compounds. All these sources are generally overmature in the basin center and immature toward the basin margin. The oils sourced from all sources in the Malay Basin are generally low in sulfur and of very high economic value. Detailed biomarker analysis of the oils in the Malay Basin has allowed the recognition of families associated with the above sources and demonstrated that oil migration has been largely strata parallel with little cross-stratal mixing of families.

  9. Nature and origin of fluids in granulite facies metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    The various models for the nature and origin of fluids in granulite facies metamorphism were summarized. Field and petrologic evidence exists for both fluid-absent and fluid-present deep crustal metamorphism. The South Indian granulite province is often cited as a fluid-rich example. The fluids must have been low in H2O and thus high in CO2. Deep crustal and subcrustal sources of CO2 are as yet unproven possibilities. There is much recent discussion of the possible ways in which deep crustal melts and fluids could have interacted in granulite metamorphism. Possible explanations for the characteristically low activity of H2O associated with granulite terranes were discussed. Granulites of the Adirondacks, New York, show evidence for vapor-absent conditions, and thus appear different from those of South India, for which CO2 streaming was proposed. Several features, such as the presence of high-density CO2 fluid inclusions, that may be misleading as evidence for CO2-saturated conditions during metamorphism, were discussed.

  10. Cyclicity, facies, and diagenesis of Wahoo Formation, Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Extensive development drilling the Lisburne oil field has provided new data on the geological setting and processes of porosity development in the Pennsylvanian Wahoo Formation. The Wahoo productive interval was deposited as a mosaic of lagoonal and shoal facies in a platform interior setting. Sixteen upward-shoaling depositional cycles are present. The thickness and bathymetric range of cycles decrease upward, suggesting shallowing through time. Wahoo Formation porosity is diagenetic, associated with three separate episodes of dissolution and dolomitization. Earliest porosity formed during the Pennsylvanian as the tops of some cycles were exposed subaerially. Regional subaerial exposure, developement of a regional mixing zone, and dolomitization followed during the Permian-Triassic. Intercrystalline porosity formed during subsequent burial by expulsion of fluids from shales and neomorphism of early dolomite. The youngest stage of porosity is Cretaceous/Tertiary, associated with deep burial and hydrocarbon maturation. Extensive dissolution resulted in moldic and micromoldic porosity on the eastern side of the field. The interaction between early and late processes accounts for the observed range in reservoir properties and pore types throughout the Lisburne field. Most porosity is of burial origin and likely to be found in similar geological settings elsewhere. Although burial processes generally are perceived as being destructive to porosity in carbonates, the Lisburne field is an example where late processes combine to enhance reservoir quality.

  11. Middle Eocene seagrass facies from Apennine carbonate platforms (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassetti, Laura; Benedetti, Andrea; Brandano, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Two stratigraphic sections located in the Latium-Abruzzi (Monte Porchio, Central Apennines, Central Italy) and in the Apulian carbonate platform (S. Cesarea-Torre Tiggiano, Salento, Southern Italy) were measured and sampled to document the sedimentological characteristic and the faunistic assemblages of Middle Eocene seagrass deposits. The faunistic assemblages are dominated by porcellaneous foraminifera Orbitolites, Alveolina, Idalina, Spiroloculina, Quinqueloculina, Triloculina and abundant hooked-shaped gypsinids, associated with hooked red algae and green algae Halimeda. Fabiania, rotaliids and textulariids as well as nummulitids are subordinated. The samples were assigned to Lutetian (SBZ13-16) according to the occurrence of Nummulites cf. lehneri, Alveolina ex. gr. elliptica, Idalina berthelini, Orbitolites complanatus, Slovenites decastroi and Medocia blayensis. At Santa Cesarea reticulate nummulites occur in association with Alveolina spp. and Halkyardia minima marking the lower Bartonian (SBZ17). Three main facies associations have been recognised: I) larger porcellaneous foraminiferal grainstones with orbitolitids and alveolinids deposited into high-energy shallow-water settings influenced by wave processes that reworked the sediments associated with a seagrass; II) grainstone to packstone with small porcellaneous foraminifera and abundant permanently-attached gypsinids deposited in a more protected (e.g., small embayment) in situ vegetated environment; III) bioclastic packstone with parautochthonous material reworked from the seagrass by rip currents and accumulated into rip channels in a slightly deeper environment. The biotic assemblages suggest that the depositional environment is consistent with tropical to subtropical vegetated environments within oligotrophic conditions.

  12. Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, Wyoming. Annual report, October 1, 1994-- September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.L.

    1996-03-01

    This research is to provide improved strategies for enhanced oil recovery from the Tensleep Sandstone oil reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Because of the great range of API gravities of the oils produced from these reservoirs, the proposed study concentrates on understanding the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability within the Tensleep Sandstone. This research will associate those spatial distributions and anisotropies with the depositional subfacies and zones of diagenetic alteration found within the sandstone. The associations of the above with pore geometry will link relative permeability with the dimensions of lithofacies and authigenic mineral facies. Hence, the study is to provide criteria for scaling this parameter on a range of scales, from the laboratory to the basin-wide scale of subfacies distribution. Effects of depositional processes and burial diagenesis will be investigated. Image analysis of pore systems will be done to produce algorithms for estimating relative permeability from petrographic analyses of core and well cuttings. In addition, these studies are being coupled with geochemical modeling and coreflood experiments to investigate the potential for wellbore scaling and formation damage anticipated during EOR, eg., CO{sub 2} flooding. This will provide a regional basis for EOR strategies for the largest potential target reservoir in Wyoming; results will have application to all eolian reservoirs through correlations of relative permeability variation and anisotropy with eolian depositional lithofacies.

  13. Tectonic implications of facies patterns, Lower Permian Dry Mountain trough, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, D.M.; Snyder, W.S.; Spinosa, C. )

    1991-02-01

    Paleozoic tectonism is indicated by a study of a west-east facies analysis transect across the northern portion of the Lower Permian Dry Mountain trough (DMT). In an attempt to characterize the Early Permian basin-filling sequences, three broadly recognizable facies packages have been identified across the DMT: the western margin facies and the central basin facies of the DMT and an eastern shelf facies. In the western margin facies of the basin, pulses of tectonic activity are recorded at McCloud Spring in the Sulphur Springs Range. Here, shallow open-marine carbonate overlies eroded Vinini Formation and, in turn, is unconformably overlain by basinal marine carbonate. An unconformity also marks the contact with the overriding prograding coarse clastic facies. These abrupt transitions suggest the sediments were deposited in a tectonically active area where they preservation of Waltherian sequences is unlikely to occur. Similarly abrupt transitions are evident in the western part of the central basin facies. At Portuguese Springs n the Diamond Range, a thin basal marine conglomerate delineates Lower Permian sedimentation over the Pennsylvanian Ely Formation. Coarsening-upward basinal carbonate strata of pelagic, hemipelagic, and turbidite components overlie the basal conglomerate. this progression of sediments is unconformably overlain by a subaerial sequence of coarse clastic deposits. Within the eastern part of the central basin facies in the Maverick Spring Range, the Lower Permian sediments are open-marine siltstone, wackestone, packstone, and grainstone. The sediments are assigned to a gradually sloping ramp, indicating the effects of tectonism on this margin of the basin were subdued.

  14. Geologic Map Database of Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoeser, Douglas B.; Shock, Nancy; Green, Gregory N.; Dumonceaux, Gayle M.; Heran, William D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to release a digital geologic map database for the State of Texas. This database was compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Program, National Surveys and Analysis Project, whose goal is a nationwide assemblage of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and other data. This release makes the geologic data from the Geologic Map of Texas available in digital format. Original clear film positives provided by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology were photographically enlarged onto Mylar film. These films were scanned, georeferenced, digitized, and attributed by Geologic Data Systems (GDS), Inc., Denver, Colorado. Project oversight and quality control was the responsibility of the U.S. Geological Survey. ESRI ArcInfo coverages, AMLs, and shapefiles are provided.

  15. Texas Migrant Labor. Annual Report, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    Among the responsibilities of the Good Neighbor Commission of Texas are (1) a survey of conditions and (2) a study of problems related to migrant labor in Texas. This annual report of the 1969 migrant scene shows the results of that survey and study. Beginning with an overview of Texas migrant labor, which goes back several years and includes a…

  16. Texas Emergency Resource Management. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-30

    and the transportation of essential supplies such as food and medical . FINDINGS 1. Basic operational concepts contain.d in the Texas Emer- gency...19. (Cont.) Economic Stabilization Health and Medical Petroleum, Gas and Solid Fuel Electric Power, Water Industrial Production Manpower...Government - State of Texas Emergency Resources Management Organization, Health and Medical , State to Local Government - State of Texas Emergency Resources

  17. Ready Texas: Stakeholder Convening. Proceedings Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intercultural Development Research Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    With the adoption of substantial changes to Texas high school curricula in 2013 (HB5), a central question for Texas policymakers, education and business leaders, families, and students is whether and how HB5 implementation impacts the state of college readiness and success in Texas. Comprehensive research is needed to understand the implications…

  18. Texas Real Estate Curriculum Workshop Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Robert

    The Texas Real Estate Research Center-Texas Education Agency (TRERC-TEA) curriculum workshop was attended by over 40 participants representing 26 Texas community colleges. These participants divided into eight small groups by real estate specialty area and developed curriculum outlines and learning objectives for the following real estate courses:…

  19. Overview of the Texas Youth Fitness Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, James R., Jr.; Martin, Scott B.; Welk, Gregory J.; Zhu, Weimo; Meredith, Marilu D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the historical and legislative backgrounds leading to statewide testing of health-related physical fitness in Texas children grades 3-12 as mandated by Texas Senate Bill 530. The rationale and goals for an associated research project (the Texas Youth Fitness Study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) to evaluate…

  20. The Demographics of Corporal Punishment in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the student discipline policies of 1,025 Texas school districts, as well as data from the Texas Education Agency's Academic Excellence Indicator System in order to identify demographic patterns regarding corporal punishment policies in Texas schools. The study also studied the relationship between a district's corporal…

  1. Testing in Texas: Accountability for Bilingual Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Rosalie Pedalino, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This issue has a special, multi-article section on student testing in Texas and contains three additional and unrelated articles. "The Texas Testing Case Documents: G.I. Forum, et al. v. Texas Education Agency, et al." section has five articles: "Overview" (Roger Clegg); a copy of the "First Amended Complaint";…

  2. In Texas, a Statewide Commitment to Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bonita C.; Cutright, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The Texas Transfer Success Conference, held at eight sites across Texas in May 2009, drew more than 1,000 attendees from Texas and international colleges and universities. The purpose of the conference was to discuss strategies and principles for increasing the effectiveness of inter-institutional transfer for students. The conference was planned…

  3. Research on Texas Water and Recreation Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

    The need for research pertaining to the best use of water and recreation resources in Texas is emphasized in these four papers presented at the 1968 Experiment Station Conference, College Station, Texas. "Parameters of Water Resources in Texas" identifies and elaborates upon the important elements presently constituting the water…

  4. Experimental deformation in sandstone, carbonates and quartz aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Cecilia See Nga

    2015-05-01

    The first part of my thesis is mainly focused on the effect of grain size distribution on compaction localization in porous sandstone. To identify the microstructural parameters that influence compaction band formation, I conducted a systematic study of mechanical deformation, failure mode and microstructural evolution in Bleurswiller and Boise sandstones, of similar porosity (~25%) and mineralogy but different sorting. Discrete compaction bands were observed to develop over a wide range of pressure in the Bleurswiller sandstone that has a relatively uniform grain size distribution. In contrast, compaction localization was not observed in the poorly sorted Boise sandstone. My results demonstrate that grain size distribution exerts important influence on compaction band development, in agreement with recently published data from Valley of Fire and Buckskin Gulch, as well as numerical studies. The second part aimed to improve current knowledge on inelastic behavior, failure mode and brittle-ductile transition in another sedimentary rock, porous carbonates. A micritic Tavel (porosity of ~13%) and an allochemical Indiana (~18%) limestones were deformed under compaction in wet and dry conditions. At lower confining pressures, shear localization occurred in brittle faulting regime. Through transitional regime, the deformation switched to cataclastic flow regime at higher confining pressure. Specifically in the cataclastic regime, the (dry and wet) Tavel and dry Indiana failed by distributed cataclastic flow, while in contrast, wet Indiana failed as compaction localization. My results demonstrate that different failure modes and mechanical behaviors under different deformation regimes and water saturation are fundamental prior to any geophysical application in porous carbonates. The third part aimed to focus on investigating compaction on quartz aggregate starting at low (MPa) using X-ray diffraction. We report the diffraction peak evolution of quartz with increasing

  5. Origins of massive-type sandstones in braided river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Charlotte A. L.; Turner, Brian R.

    1998-07-01

    This study details largely ignored massive-type, predominantly structureless sandstones preserved within braided fluvial successions of Carboniferous to Triassic age. Architectural element analysis reveals that these sediments were deposited within sand-dominated perennial systems of low braiding index. Cross-stratified braid bar deposits are interbedded with, and laterally equivalent to geometrically distinct, largely structureless massive-type sandbodies identified as two separate architectural elements: channel-like (SMC) and sheet-like (SMS). Sub-divisions within these broad categories define six geometric units which are texturally distinct from each other and from the structured sediments of the same lithological unit. Since massive-type sandstone elements have many features in common with the deposits of highly concentrated, laminar sediment/water flows, they are interpreted in terms of similar depositional processes. SMC elements form elongate channel-like features which trend both at high angles to, and parallel with, the palaeoflow of host fluvial channels. The lower bounding surfaces of SMC elements may be either erosive or non-erosive, and describe symmetrical cross-sections with margins dipping <50°. Concentric laminae are preserved parallel to the scour margins which grade into a structureless sandstone fill. Diffuse laminae and water escape structures are commonly preserved in the upper portion of these elements, which are interpreted as the deposits of sandy debris flows related to fluvial bank and/or bar collapse. SMS elements form sandsheets up to 8 m in thickness which may be traced >250 m parallel and transverse to the fluvial palaeoflow direction established from cross-stratified sandstones of adjacent architectural elements. The basal surface of SMS elements may either be undulose (where the sandbodies are termed SMSU) or erosional (where they are termed SMSE). Internally SMSU elements preserve parallel laminae marginal to basal scours

  6. Sedimentation of the Triassic Jurassic Adigrat Sandstone Formation, Blue Nile (Abay) Basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A.

    2008-09-01

    Exploration of oil and gas deposits in the Blue Nile Basin targeted the Adigrat Sandstone Formation as a reservoir objective. Conglomerates, gravely sandstones, coarse to medium-grained sandstones, very fine-grained cross-bedded sandstones, siltstones and mudstones of the Adigrat Sandstone Formation were deposited in semi-arid to arid climates. The North-western highlands are the main source for the sedimentation. The poorly-sorted, crudely-bedded conglomerates and gravely sandstones are interpreted as alluvial fan deposits. The basal polymictic orthoconglomerate passes up vertically into gravely sandstone, possibly indicating proximal to mid-fan sedimentation. The alluvial fan sedimentation passes up vertically into channel, point bars and flood-plain fines. The meandering river sedimentation is characterized by single and amalgamated multi-storey sandstone bodies. In places, the uppermost part of the Adigrat Sandstone Formation is represented by coal-bearing sediments possibly reflect lacustrine depositional environment. The medium-coarse-grained sandstone is a possible oil and gas reservoir, whilst the fine-grained sediments are a possible gas reservoir.

  7. Complex facies relationships and regional stratigraphy of the Mississippian Ste. Genevieve, Paoli, and Aux Vases Formations, Illinois basin: A major hydrocarbon-producing interval

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.D.; Nelson, W.J. )

    1993-03-01

    The Mississippian Ste. Genevieve and Paoli Limestones and sandstones of the Aux Vases Formation are lateral facies of one another. This interpretation is based on comprehensive investigations of outcrops, and selected cores, samples of well cuttings, and geophysical logs conducted over a period of four years. Both units exhibit similar sedimentological characteristics and represent open marine, shallow subtidal, and intertidal environments. The presence of low-angle cross-laminae, ripple- and plane-laminae, climbing ripples, and ooid shoals suggest most deposition occurred under low energy conditions. Lenticular, channel-like scour and fill structures that contain both fine-grained quartz sand and abraded, disarticulated fossil fragments indicate localized higher energy deposition. The authors studies indicate that siliciclastic vs. carbonate deposition was controlled strictly by available sediment, and not by regressive (siliciclastic) and transgressive (carbonate) events, as inferred by previous workers. This conclusion is based on lateral facies relationships, and the supplanting of carbonates by clastics occurring in the upper part of the Ste. Genevieve through the middle part of the Paoli. The Aux Vases is thickest, coarsest, and least mature in the northwestern part of the Illinois Basin, and pinches out to the southeast. This implies a northwesterly source for clastics, perhaps the Transcontinental Arch. After early Chesterian time, the Transcontinental Arch apparently supplied little or no sediment to any flanking basin. The Ste. Genevieve, Paoli, and Aux Vases are major oil-producing units in the Illinois Basin. New understanding of regional relationships should enhance exploratory success and improve recovery from established fields.

  8. The influence of complex intra- and extra-vent processes on facies characteristics of the Koala Kimberlite, NWT, Canada: volcanology, sedimentology and intrusive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, Lucy A.; Cas, Ray A. F.

    2011-08-01

    The Koala kimberlite, Northwest Territories, Canada, is a small pipe-like body that was emplaced into the Archean Koala granodiorite batholith and the overlying Cretaceous to Tertiary sediments at ~53 Ma. Koala is predominantly in-filled by a series of six distinct clastic deposits, the lowermost of which has been intruded by a late stage coherent kimberlite body. The clastic facies are easily distinguished from each other by variations in texture, and in the abundance and distribution of the dominant components. From facies analysis, we infer that the pipe was initially partially filled by a massive, poorly sorted, matrix-supported, olivine-rich lapilli tuff formed from a collapsing eruption column during the waning stage of the pipe-forming eruption. This unit is overlain by a granodiorite cobble-boulder breccia and a massive, poorly sorted, mud-rich pebbly-sandstone. These deposits represent post-eruptive gravitational collapse of the unstable pipe walls and mass wasting of tephra forming the crater rim. The crater then filled with water within which ~20 m of non-kimberlitic, wood-rich, silty sand accumulated, representing up to 47,000 years of quiescence. The upper two units in the Koala pipe are both olivine rich and show distinct grain-size grading. These units are interpreted to have been deposited sub-aqueously, from pyroclastic flows sourced from one or more other kimberlite volcanoes. The uppermost units in the Koala pipe highlight the likelihood that some kimberlite pipes may be only partially filled by their own eruptive products at the cessation of volcanic activity, enabling them to act as depocentres for pyroclastic and sedimentary deposits from the surrounding volcanic landscape. Recognition of these exotic kimberlite deposits has implications for kimberlite eruption and emplacement processes.

  9. Oil recovery in a low-permeability, wave-dominated, Cretaceous, deltaic reservoir, Big Wells (San Miguel) field, south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, N.; Gholston, J.C.; Ambrose, W.A.

    1987-10-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Big Wells (San Miguel) reservoir in Dimmit and Zavala Counties, south Texas, produces from a broadly lenticular, wave-dominated deltaic sandstone encased in prodelta and shelf mudstones. An updip porosity pinch-out coincides with a gentle undulation on a uniformly gulfward-dipping monocline and forms a structurally modified stratigraphic trap. The reservoir is relatively tight and has an average porosity of 21% and average permeability of 6 md; wells require fracturing to stimulate production. Ultimate recovery, based on current production trends and technology, is projected to be 57 million bbl, or 29% of the 198 million bbl field. 24 figures, 1 table.

  10. The State of Texas Children: 2003. Texas Kids Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Center for Public Policy Priorities.

    This Kids Count report details trends in the well-being of children in Texas. The statistical portrait is based on indicators in the areas of: (1) family and community population; (2) economic resources, security, and opportunity; (3) early care and education; (4) school success; (5) teens at risk; (6) physical, social, and emotional health; (7)…

  11. Burrow-generated false facies and phantom sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Wanless, H.R.; Tagett, M.

    1986-05-01

    Callianassa (=Ophiomorpha) and other burrowers deeply rework shallow marine sequences. Through in-situ reworking, they create false sedimentary facies and stratigraphic sequences. Callianassa's key to effectiveness is that it expels sand and mud from burrow excavations but concentrates coarse material at the base of the burrow complex. Coarse material can be derived by falling into the burrow entrance, by reworking the existing sediment sequence, or by a combination of both. Examples come from shallow marine carbonate environments of south Florida and the Turks and Caicos Islands, British West Indies. Many mudbanks in south Florida are formed as stacks of layered mudstone units 20-100 cm thick. Between events, seagrasses may recolonize, and a burrowing benthic community may repopulate the substrate. The layered mudstone beneath older areas of mudbank flats can gradually be converted to a bioturbated skeletal wackestone by the deep burrowing community. Burrowing also causes mixing of faunal assemblages. On Caicos Bank, an extensive carbonate tidal flat (3-4 m thick) is slowly being transgressed. About 1 m of tidal-flat sequence is eroded at the shoreline. The remaining 2-3 m could be preserved as part of the transgressive sequence. Callianassa burrowing, however, quickly reworks the sequence, replacing tidal-flat sands and muds with marine peloidal and skeletal sediment. Within 100 m of the shoreline, the only evidence of the tidal-flat sequence is a concentration of high-spired gastropods in Calliannassa burrows at the base of the Holocene sequence and a few patches of tidal-flat sediment that burrowers missed. What looks like a basal transgressive lag is in fact a biogenic concentrate from in-situ reworking of a now phantom sequence.

  12. Barrier backbeach shell assemblages from the central Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Albertzart, L.S.; Wilkinson, B.H. )

    1990-08-01

    Lateral variation in the abundance, taxonomic composition and amount of abrasion of approximately 14,000 mollusc shells, from 135 km of backbeach along Matagorda Island and Matagorda Peninsula of the central Texas coast, primarily reflect long-term patterns of shoreline progradation and recession. Disarticulated shell is concentrated as a gravel lag during landward transport of barrier island/peninsula sediment from storm washover and during lateral transport by fairweather longshore currents. Taxonomic dominance within any backbeach area directly relates to long-term Holocene patterns of shoreline migration. Shell along progradational Matagorda Island is largely derived from gulfward shoreface communities and valves of normal marine species are predominant. Shell along recessive beaches of Matagorda Peninsula, on the other hand, is primarily derived from the erosion of older bay-estuarine facies now exposed to shoreface currents, and values of brackish lagoonal species are predominant. Degree of valve abrasion reflects both the residence time of shell in shoreface settings and occurrence of shell with coarse, poorly sorted sediment. Central Texas coast backbeach molluscan death assemblages largely reflect a time-averaged census of both living communities and older shell assemblages that are sampled over an along-shore length of several kilometers and over a shore-to-basin distance of several hundred meters. These assemblages, accumulated over a time span of several thousand years, reflect the spatial and the temporal proximity of specific sedimentary environments to sites of sediment accumulation. Backbeach shell assemblages record both the ecologic preference of individual taxonomic groups to specific environmental parameters as well as the dominant processes of sediment transport in littoral depositional systems.

  13. Geometries and Facies Distributions in Yellowstone's Siliceous Hotsprings: Implications for Martian Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    Synthesis of features from several siliceous hotsprings yields a relatively simple facies model. This model facilitates our ability to recognize these hotsprings in the terrestrial and probably extraterrestrial rock record. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Hydrochemical facies and ground-water flow patterns in northern part of Atlantic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, William

    1966-01-01

    Flow patterns of fresh ground water shown on maps and in cross sections have been deduced from available water-level data. These patterns are controlled by the distribution of the higher landmasses and by the depth to either bedrock or to the salt-water interface. The mapping of hydrochemical facies shows that at shallow depths within the Coastal Plain (less than about 200 ft) the calcium-magnesium cation facies generally predominates. The bicarbonate anion facies occurs within more of the shallow Coastal Plain sediments than does the sulfate or the chloride facies. In deeper formations, the sodium chloride character predominates. The lower dissolved-solids content of the ground water in New Jersey indicates less upward vertical leakage than in Maryland and Virginia, where the shallow formations contain solutions of higher concentration.

  15. "Fisher v. Texas": Strictly Disappointing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieli, Russell K.

    2013-01-01

    Russell K. Nieli writes in this opinion paper that as far as the ability of state colleges and universities to use race as a criteria for admission goes, "Fisher v. Texas" was a big disappointment, and failed in the most basic way. Nieli states that although some affirmative action opponents have tried to put a more positive spin on the…

  16. How Texas Rewrote Your Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Wayne A.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews issues and events related to adopting high school biology textbooks in Texas. Specific reference is given to the viewpoints of Mel and Norma Gabler. It is argued that factors controlling textbook content should not result from past market forces, but from a permanent science constituency and an informed public. (DH)

  17. A Big LEAP for Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Loraine; Roach, David; Williamson, Celia

    2014-01-01

    In Texas, educators working to coordinate the efforts of fifty community colleges, thirty-eight universities, and six university systems are bringing the resources of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) initiative to bear in order to ensure that the state's nearly 1.5…

  18. Texas Endangered Species Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathleen Marie; Campbell, Linda

    This publication is the result of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Division's (TPWD's) commitment to education and the fertile partnerships formed between TPWD biologists and educators. This activity book brings together the expertise and practical knowledge of a classroom teacher with the technical knowledge and skills of a TPWD biologist and artist.…

  19. CBTE: The Nays of Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoz, Ellis

    1974-01-01

    A heated controversy occurred when the Texas State Board of Education mandated competency based teacher education (CBTE) for all of the State's 66 teacher preparatory institutions. The author, who has led a movement of professional groups seeking an attorney general's ruling against the mandate, argues that this mandate violates the professor's…

  20. Texas A&M University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osters, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Texas A&M University is a research extensive institution located in College Station. More than 45,000 students attend the university (about 20% are graduate or professional students). Academically, the university is known for its engineering, business, and agricultural and veterinary medicine programs, although there are more than 150 programs…

  1. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Texas Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Texas state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student, or…

  2. South Texas Maquiladora Suppliers Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, J. Michael

    This project was undertaken to assist South Texas industries in improving export to nearby Mexican maquiladoras (factories). The maquiladora program is based on co-production by two plants under a single management, one on each side of the border. Activities addressed four objectives: (1) to determine the dollar value, quantity, and source of the…

  3. Texas Educational History: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, James H., Comp.

    The bibliography provides a comprehensive listing of the literature of Texas educational history up to March, 1978. Objectives are to provide access to the sources and to stimulate interest and research in the field. Over 1050 books, journal articles, pamphlets, theses, and doctoral dissertations are arranged in nine subject sections: General…

  4. Drilling history and stratigraphic correlation of Rose Run sandstone of northeastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, C.C.

    1988-08-01

    To date, 40 known tests have penetrated the Knox unconformity in Ashtabula, Lake, Trumbull, Geauga, and Portage Counties, Ohio. Prior to 1980, there were only 22 tests. Of these, only 10 penetrated and logged rocks older than the Rose Run sandstone. In the period 1980-1986, two Rose Run discoveries were drilled, one in New Lyme Township of Ashtabula County and one in Burton Township of Geauga County. Both discovery wells have been offset. Attempts have been made to correlate these two areas with older tests in northeastern Ohio and with the Rose Run sandstones of Coshocton County. In northeastern Ohio, preliminary studies indicate a Rose Run sandstone and/or dolomite interval approximately 100 ft thick. The upper 50 ft is predominantly sandstone and the lower 50 ft changes locally from sandstone to dolomite. The upper sandy member can be correlated to the A, B, and C sandstone units of Coshocton County.

  5. Controls on hydrocarbon production from Lower Silurian Clinton sandstone reservoir in Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.T.; Coogan, A.H. )

    1989-08-01

    The Lower Silurian Clinton section (Ordovician Queenston Shale to Packer Shell/Brassfield Limestone) represents a deltaic sequence in Portage County where it occurs approximately 25 mi east of the delta edge and 50 mi east of the sandstone depositional limit. In Portage County, the Clinton section is approximately 190 ft thick. The mean sandstone thickness is 53 ft (range from > 100 to < 10 ft). The mean sandstone thickness is much greater than it is for the Clinton sandstone reservoir closer to the delta edge, where hydrocarbon production is comparable to, or surpasses that in Portage County. It is now evident that the occurrence of thick, clean Clinton sandstone is not the only primary geologic factor for high production from the reservoir. Two productive areas were studied to isolate controls on hydrocarbon occurrence and production. One area is structurally low, the other is structurally high, but both have about the same mean Clinton sandstone thickness.

  6. Sorting and wave abrasion: Controls on composition and diagenesis in lower frontier sandstones, Southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, R.D.; Bishop, M.G.; Stonecipher, S.A.

    1984-03-01

    Lower Frontier sandstones on the Moxa arch were deposited in a wave-dominated, multi-river delta plain which prograded eastward into the Cretaceous Interior seaway; headwaters were in the Sevier thrust belt. Sands were deposited as fluvial units, as marine shoreline sequences, and as offshore sand ridges. Fluvial sandstones, some pebbly, are dominated by trough crossstratification and by climbing ripple lamination. These sandstones are associated with flood-basin mudstones that contain abundant root t