Science.gov

Sample records for sandwich panels loaded

  1. Precast concrete sandwich panels subjected to impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Matthew W.

    Precast concrete sandwich panels are a relatively new product in the construction industry. The design of these panels incorporates properties that allow for great resilience against temperature fluctuation as well as the very rapid and precise construction of facilities. The concrete sandwich panels investigated in this study represent the second generation of an ongoing research and development project. This second generation of panels have been engineered to construct midsized commercial buildings up to three stories in height as well as residential dwellings. The panels consist of a double-tee structural wythe, a foam core and a fascia wythe, joined by shear connectors. Structures constructed from these panels may be subjected to extreme loading including the effects of seismic and blast loading in addition to wind. The aim of this work was to investigate the behaviour of this particular sandwich panel when subjected to structural impact events. The experimental program consisted of fourteen concrete sandwich panels, five of which were considered full-sized specimens (2700 mm X 1200mm X 270 mm) and nine half-sized specimens (2700mm X 600mm X 270 mm) The panels were subjected to impact loads from a pendulum impact hammer where the total energy applied to the panels was varied by changing the mass of the hammer. The applied loads, displacements, accelerations, and strains at the mid-span of the panel as well as the reaction point forces were monitored during the impact. The behaviour of the panels was determined primarily from the experimental results. The applied loads at low energy levels that caused little to no residual deflection as well as the applied loads at high energy levels that represent catastrophic events and thus caused immediate failure were determined from an impact on the structural and the fascia wythes. Applied loads at intermediate energy levels representing extreme events were also used to determine whether or not the panels could withstand

  2. Deformation and fracture of impulsively loaded sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadley, H. N. G.; Børvik, T.; Olovsson, L.; Wetzel, J. J.; Dharmasena, K. P.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Deshpande, V. S.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2013-02-01

    Light metal sandwich panel structures with cellular cores have attracted interest for multifunctional applications which exploit their high bend strength and impact energy absorption. This concept has been explored here using a model 6061-T6 aluminum alloy system fabricated by friction stir weld joining extruded sandwich panels with a triangular corrugated core. Micro-hardness and miniature tensile coupon testing revealed that friction stir welding reduced the strength and ductility in the welds and a narrow heat affected zone on either side of the weld by approximately 30%. Square, edge clamped sandwich panels and solid plates of equal mass per unit area were subjected to localized impulsive loading by the impact of explosively accelerated, water saturated, sand shells. The hydrodynamic load and impulse applied by the sand were gradually increased by reducing the stand-off distance between the test charge and panel surfaces. The sandwich panels suffered global bending and stretching, and localized core crushing. As the pressure applied by the sand increased, face sheet fracture by a combination of tensile stretching and shear-off occurred first at the two clamped edges of the panels that were parallel with the corrugation and weld direction. The plane of these fractures always lay within the heat affected zone of the longitudinal welds. For the most intensively loaded panels additional cracks occurred at the other clamped boundaries and in the center of the panel. To investigate the dynamic deformation and fracture processes, a particle-based method has been used to simulate the impulsive loading of the panels. This has been combined with a finite element analysis utilizing a modified Johnson-Cook constitutive relation and a Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion that accounted for local variation in material properties. The fully coupled simulation approach enabled the relationships between the soil-explosive test charge design, panel geometry, spatially varying

  3. Energy absorption capabilities of composite sandwich panels under blast loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Ray, Tirtha

    As blast threats on military and civilian structures continue to be a significant concern, there remains a need for improved design strategies to increase blast resistance capabilities. The approach to blast resistance proposed here is focused on dissipating the high levels of pressure induced during a blast through maximizing the potential for energy absorption of composite sandwich panels, which are a competitive structural member type due to the inherent energy absorption capabilities of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Furthermore, the middle core in the sandwich panels can be designed as a sacrificial layer allowing for a significant amount of deformation or progressive failure to maximize the potential for energy absorption. The research here is aimed at the optimization of composite sandwich panels for blast mitigation via energy absorption mechanisms. The energy absorption mechanisms considered include absorbed strain energy due to inelastic deformation as well as energy dissipation through progressive failure of the core of the sandwich panels. The methods employed in the research consist of a combination of experimentally-validated finite element analysis (FEA) and the derivation and use of a simplified analytical model. The key components of the scope of work then includes: establishment of quantified energy absorption criteria, validation of the selected FE modeling techniques, development of the simplified analytical model, investigation of influential core architectures and geometric parameters, and investigation of influential material properties. For the parameters that are identified as being most-influential, recommended values for these parameters are suggested in conceptual terms that are conducive to designing composite sandwich panels for various blast threats. Based on reviewing the energy response characteristic of the panel under blast loading, a non-dimensional parameter AET/ ET (absorbed energy, AET, normalized by total energy

  4. Preliminary weight and costs of sandwich panels to distribute concentrated loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belleman, G.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Minimum mass honeycomb sandwich panels were sized for transmitting a concentrated load to a uniform reaction through various distances. The form skin gages were fully stressed with a finite element computer code. The panel general stability was evaluated with a buckling computer code labeled STAGS-B. Two skin materials were considered; aluminum and graphite-epoxy. The core was constant thickness aluminum honeycomb. Various panel sizes and load levels were considered. The computer generated data were generalized to allow preliminary least mass panel designs for a wide range of panel sizes and load intensities. An assessment of panel fabrication cost was also conducted. Various comparisons between panel mass, panel size, panel loading, and panel cost are presented in both tabular and graphical form.

  5. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2016-08-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  6. Buckling analysis of curved composite sandwich panels subjected to inplane loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.

    1993-01-01

    Composite sandwich structures are being considered for primary structure in aircraft such as subsonic and high speed civil transports. The response of sandwich structures must be understood and predictable to use such structures effectively. Buckling is one of the most important response mechanisms of sandwich structures. A simple buckling analysis is derived for sandwich structures. This analysis is limited to flat, rectangular sandwich panels loaded by uniaxial compression (N(sub x)) and having simply supported edges. In most aerospace applications, however, the structure's geometry, boundary conditions, and loading are usually very complex. Thus, a general capability for analyzing the buckling behavior of sandwich structures is needed. The present paper describes and evaluates an improved buckling analysis for cylindrically curved composite sandwich panels. This analysis includes orthotropic facesheets and first-order transverse shearing effects. Both simple support and clamped boundary conditions are also included in the analysis. The panels can be subjected to linearly varying normal loads N(sub x) and N(sub y) in addition to a constant shear load N(sub xy). The analysis is based on the modified Donnell's equations for shallow shells. The governing equations are solved by direct application of Galerkin's method. The accuracy of the present analysis is verified by comparing results with those obtained from finite element analysis for a variety of geometries, loads, and boundary conditions. The limitations of the present analysis are investigated, in particular those related to the shallow shell assumptions in the governing equations. Finally, the computational efficiency of the present analysis is considered.

  7. Blast Load Response of Steel Sandwich Panels with Liquid Encasement

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Karr; Marc Perlin; Benjamin Langhorst; Henry Chu

    2009-10-01

    We describe an experimental investigation of the response of hybrid blast panels for protection from explosive and impact forces. The fundamental notion is to dissipate, absorb, and redirect energy through plastic collapse, viscous dissipation, and inter-particle forces of liquid placed in sub-structural compartments. The panels are designed to absorb energy from an impact or air blast by elastic-plastic collapse of the panel substructure that includes fluid-filled cavities. The fluid contributes to blast effects mitigation by providing increased initial mass and resistance, by dissipation of energy through viscosity and fluid flow, and by redirecting the momentum that is imparted to the system from the impact and blast impulse pressures. Failure and deformation mechanisms of the panels are described.

  8. On core compressibility of sandwich composite panels subjected to intense underwater shock loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Ritwik; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2014-01-01

    Novel analytical models have been proposed in this study which extends current available fluid-structure interaction (FSI) theories for explosion induced shock loading on monolithic and laminated composite plates to sandwich composite panels, featuring core compression. The proposed models have been asymptotically validated against other FSI existing theories in low pressure range. A qualitative comparative analysis of the proposed models has been made with other existing FSI theories from the viewpoint of energy conservation. Core compression as predicted by the proposed models can be utilized for more economical, robust design of blast resistant sandwich composite structures.

  9. Evaluation of Composite Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Under Compressive Loads at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Fourteen composite honeycomb sandwich panels were tested to failure under compressive loading. The test specimens included panels with both 8 and 24-ply graphite-bismaleimide composite facesheets and both titanium and graphite-polyimide core materials. The panels were designed to have the load introduced through fasteners attached to pairs of steel angles on the ends of the panels to simulate double shear splice joints. The unloaded edges were unconstrained. Test temperatures included room temperature, 250F, and 300F. For the room and 250F temperature tests, the 24-ply specimen failure strains were close to the unnotched allowable strain values and failure loads were well above the design loads. However, failure strains much lower than the unnotched allowable strain values, and failure loads below the design loads were observed with several of the 8-ply specimens. For each individual test temperature, large variations in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 8-ply specimens. Dramatic decreases in the failure strains and loads were observed for the 24-ply specimens as the test temperature was increased from 250F to 300F. All 8-ply specimens appeared to have failed in a facesheet strength failure mode for all test temperatures. The 24-ply specimens displayed appreciably greater amounts of bending prior to failure than the 8-ply specimens, and panel buckling occurred prior to facesheet strength failure for the 24-ply room and 250F temperature tests.

  10. Dynamic response and optimal design of curved metallic sandwich panels under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chang; Yang, Shu; Yang, Li-Jun; Han, Shou-Hong; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the effect of curvature on the blast response of curved structures so as to seek the optimal configurations of such structures with improved blast resistance. In this study, the dynamic response and protective performance of a type of curved metallic sandwich panel subjected to air blast loading were examined using LS-DYNA. The numerical methods were validated using experimental data in the literature. The curved panel consisted of an aluminum alloy outer face and a rolled homogeneous armour (RHA) steel inner face in addition to a closed-cell aluminum foam core. The results showed that the configuration of a "soft" outer face and a "hard" inner face worked well for the curved sandwich panel against air blast loading in terms of maximum deflection (MaxD) and energy absorption. The panel curvature was found to have a monotonic effect on the specific energy absorption (SEA) and a nonmonotonic effect on the MaxD of the panel. Based on artificial neural network (ANN) metamodels, multiobjective optimization designs of the panel were carried out. The optimization results revealed the trade-off relationships between the blast-resistant and the lightweight objectives and showed the great use of Pareto front in such design circumstances.

  11. Dynamic Response and Optimal Design of Curved Metallic Sandwich Panels under Blast Loading

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu; Han, Shou-Hong; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the effect of curvature on the blast response of curved structures so as to seek the optimal configurations of such structures with improved blast resistance. In this study, the dynamic response and protective performance of a type of curved metallic sandwich panel subjected to air blast loading were examined using LS-DYNA. The numerical methods were validated using experimental data in the literature. The curved panel consisted of an aluminum alloy outer face and a rolled homogeneous armour (RHA) steel inner face in addition to a closed-cell aluminum foam core. The results showed that the configuration of a “soft” outer face and a “hard” inner face worked well for the curved sandwich panel against air blast loading in terms of maximum deflection (MaxD) and energy absorption. The panel curvature was found to have a monotonic effect on the specific energy absorption (SEA) and a nonmonotonic effect on the MaxD of the panel. Based on artificial neural network (ANN) metamodels, multiobjective optimization designs of the panel were carried out. The optimization results revealed the trade-off relationships between the blast-resistant and the lightweight objectives and showed the great use of Pareto front in such design circumstances. PMID:25126606

  12. Analysis of Curved Sandwich Panels Subjected to Combined Temperature Gradient and Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a detailed study of the nonlinear response of curved sandwich panels with composite face sheets and subjected to a temperature gradient through-the-thickness combined with mechanical loadings are presented. The analysis is based on a first-order shear-deformation Sanders-Budiansky type theory with the effects of large displacements, moderate rotations, transverse shear deformation and laminated anisotropic material behavior included. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the panel. The nonlinear displacements, strain energy, principal strains, transverse shear stresses, transverse shear strain energy density, and their hierarchical sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The hierarchical sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the nonlinear response to variations in the panel parameters, the effective properties of the face sheet layers and the core, and the micromechanical parameters. Numerical results are presented for cylindrical panels subjected to combined pressure loading, edge shortening or extension, edge shear and a temperature gradient through the thickness. The results show the effects of variations in the loading and the panel aspect ratio, on the nonlinear response and its sensitivity to changes in the various panel, effective layer and micromechanical parameters.

  13. High temperature structural sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakonstantinou, Christos G.

    High strength composites are being used for making lightweight structural panels that are being employed in aerospace, naval and automotive structures. Recently, there is renewed interest in use of these panels. The major problem of most commercial available sandwich panels is the fire resistance. A recently developed inorganic matrix is investigated for use in cases where fire and high temperature resistance are necessary. The focus of this dissertation is the development of a fireproof composite structural system. Sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices have an excellent potential for use in applications where exposure to high temperatures or fire is a concern. Commercial available sandwich panels will soften and lose nearly all of their compressive strength temperatures lower than 400°C. This dissertation consists of the state of the art, the experimental investigation and the analytical modeling. The state of the art covers the performance of existing high temperature composites, sandwich panels and reinforced concrete beams strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The experimental part consists of four major components: (i) Development of a fireproof syntactic foam with maximum specific strength, (ii) Development of a lightweight syntactic foam based on polystyrene spheres, (iii) Development of the composite system for the skins. The variables are the skin thickness, modulus of elasticity of skin and high temperature resistance, and (iv) Experimental evaluation of the flexural behavior of sandwich panels. Analytical modeling consists of a model for the flexural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels, and a model for deflection calculations of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP subjected to fatigue loading. The experimental and analytical results show that sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices and ceramic spheres do not lose their load bearing capability during severe fire exposure, where temperatures reach several

  14. Structural Analysis of Sandwich Foam Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Huo, X. Sharon

    2010-04-01

    The Sandwich Panel Technologies including Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) can be used to replace the conventional wooden-frame construction method. The main purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and SGI Venture, Inc. was to design a novel high R-value type of metal sandwich panelized technology. This CRADA project report presents design concept discussion and numerical analysis results from thermal performance study of this new building envelope system. The main objective of this work was to develop a basic concept of a new generation of wall panel technologies which will have R-value over R-20 will use thermal mass to improve energy performance in cooling dominated climates and will be 100% termite resistant. The main advantages of using sandwich panels are as follows: (1) better energy saving structural panels with high and uniform overall wall R-value across the elevation that could not be achieved in traditional walls; and (2) reducing the use of raw materials or need for virgin lumber. For better utilization of these Sandwich panels, engineers need to have a thorough understanding of the actual performance of the panels and system. Detailed analysis and study on the capacities and deformation of individual panels and its assembly have to be performed to achieve that goal. The major project activity was to conduct structural analysis of the stresses, strains, load capacities, and deformations of individual sandwich components under various load cases. The analysis simulated the actual loading conditions of the regular residential building and used actual material properties of the steel facings and foam.

  15. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lush, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    Two analytical techniques applicable to large deflection dynamic response calculations for pressure loaded composite sandwich panels are demonstrated. One technique utilizes finite element modeling with a single equivalent layer representing the face sheets and core. The other technique utilizes the modal analysis computer code DEPROP which was recently modified to include transverse shear deformation in a core layer. The example problem consists of a simply supported rectangular sandwich panel. Included are comparisons of linear and nonlinear static response calculations, in addition to dynamic response calculations.

  16. A Numerical Study on the Effect of Facesheet-Core Disbonds on the Buckling Load of Curved Honeycomb Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Krivanek, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical study on the effect of facesheet-core disbonds on the post-buckling response of curved honeycomb sandwich panels is presented herein. This work was conducted as part of the development of a damage tolerance approach for the next-generation Space Launch System heavy lift vehicle payload fairing. As such, the study utilized full-scale fairing barrel segments as the structure of interest. The panels were composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The panels were analyzed numerically using the finite element method. Facesheet and core nodes in a predetermined circular region were detached to simulate a disbond induced via low-speed impact between the outer mold line facesheet and honeycomb core. Surface-to-surface contact in the disbonded region was invoked to prevent interpenetration of the facesheet and core elements. The diameter of this disbonded region was varied and the effect of the size of the disbond on the post-buckling response was observed. A significant change in the slope of the edge load-deflection response was used to determine the onset of global buckling and corresponding buckling load.

  17. Study of compression-loaded and impact-damaged structurally efficient graphite-thermoplastic trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semisandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1992-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semisandwich composite panels is studied to determine their weight savings potential. Sandwich panels with two identical face sheets and a trapezoidal corrugated core between them and semisandwich panels with a corrugation attached to a single skin are considered. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight designs for critical compressive load levels ranging from 3000 to 24,000 lb/in. Graphite-thermoplastic panels based on the optimal minimum weight designs were fabricated and tested. A finite element analysis of several test specimens was also conducted. The results of the optimization study, the finite element analysis, and the experiments are presented. The results of testing impact damage panels are also discussed.

  18. A ceramic damage model for analyses of multi-layered ceramic-core sandwich panels under blast wave pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keejoo

    2005-11-01

    A damage model for ceramic materials is developed and incorporated into the geometrically nonlinear solid shell element formulation for dynamic analyses of multi-layered ceramic armor panels under blast wave pressure loading. The damage model takes into account material behaviors observed from multi-axial dynamic tests on Aluminum Nitride (AlN) ceramic. The ceramic fails in a brittle or gradual fashion, depending upon the hydrostatic pressure and applied strain-rate. In the model, the gradual failure is represented by two states: the initial and final failure states. These states are described by two separate failure surfaces that are pressure-dependent and strain-rate-dependent. A scalar damage parameter is defined via using the two failure surfaces, based on the assumption that the local stress state determines material damage and its level. In addition, the damage model accounts for the effect of existing material damage on the new damage. The multi-layered armor panel of interest is comprised of an AlN-core sandwich with unidirectional composite skins and a woven composite back-plate. To accommodate the material damage effect of composite layers, a composite failure model in the open literature is adopted and modified into two separate failure models to address different failure mechanisms of the unidirectional and woven composites. In addition, the effect of strain-rates on the material strengths is incorporated into the composite failure models. For finite element modeling, multiple eighteen-node elements are used in the thickness direction to properly describe mechanics of the multi-layered panel. Dynamic analyses of a multi-layered armor panel are conducted under blast wave pressure loadings. The resulting dynamic responses of the panel demonstrate that dynamic analyses that do not take into account material damage and failure significantly under-predict the peak displacement. The under-prediction becomes more pronounced as the blast load level increases

  19. Impact-damaged graphite-thermoplastic trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a study of the effects of impact damage on compression-loaded trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich graphite-thermoplastic panels are presented. Sandwich panels with two identical face sheets and a trapezoidal corrugated core between them, and semi-sandwich panels with a corrugation attached to a single skin are considered in this study. Panels were designed, fabricated and tested. The panels were made using the manufacturing process of thermoforming, a less-commonly used technique for fabricating composite parts. Experimental results for unimpacted control panels and panels subjected to impact damage prior to loading are presented. Little work can be found in the literature about these configurations of thermoformed panels.

  20. Buckling Analysis of Debonded Sandwich Panel Under Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Wang, John T.

    1995-01-01

    A sandwich panel with initial through-the-width debonds is analyzed to study the buckling of its faceskin when subject to an in-plane compressive load. The debonded faceskin is modeled as a beam on a Winkler elastic foundation in which the springs of the elastic foundation represent the sandwich foam. The Rayleigh-Ritz and finite-difference methods are used to predict the critical buckling load for various debond lengths and stiffnesses of the sandwich foam. The accuracy of the methods is assessed with a plane-strain finite-element analysis. Results indicate that the elastic foundation approach underpredicts buckling loads for sandwich panels with isotropic foam cores.

  1. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  2. Sound transmission loss of composite sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ran

    Light composite sandwich panels are increasingly used in automobiles, ships and aircraft, because of the advantages they offer of high strength-to-weight ratios. However, the acoustical properties of these light and stiff structures can be less desirable than those of equivalent metal panels. These undesirable properties can lead to high interior noise levels. A number of researchers have studied the acoustical properties of honeycomb and foam sandwich panels. Not much work, however, has been carried out on foam-filled honeycomb sandwich panels. In this dissertation, governing equations for the forced vibration of asymmetric sandwich panels are developed. An analytical expression for modal densities of symmetric sandwich panels is derived from a sixth-order governing equation. A boundary element analysis model for the sound transmission loss of symmetric sandwich panels is proposed. Measurements of the modal density, total loss factor, radiation loss factor, and sound transmission loss of foam-filled honeycomb sandwich panels with different configurations and thicknesses are presented. Comparisons between the predicted sound transmission loss values obtained from wave impedance analysis, statistical energy analysis, boundary element analysis, and experimental values are presented. The wave impedance analysis model provides accurate predictions of sound transmission loss for the thin foam-filled honeycomb sandwich panels at frequencies above their first resonance frequencies. The predictions from the statistical energy analysis model are in better agreement with the experimental transmission loss values of the sandwich panels when the measured radiation loss factor values near coincidence are used instead of the theoretical values for single-layer panels. The proposed boundary element analysis model provides more accurate predictions of sound transmission loss for the thick foam-filled honeycomb sandwich panels than either the wave impedance analysis model or the

  3. Modular container assembled from fiber reinforced thermoplastic sandwich panels

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mathew William; Kasoff, William Andrew; Mcculloch, Patrick Carl; Williams, Frederick Truman

    2007-12-25

    An improved, load bearing, modular design container structure assembled from thermoformed FRTP sandwich panels in which is utilized the unique core-skin edge configuration of the present invention in consideration of improved load bearing performance, improved useful load volume, reduced manufacturing costs, structural weight savings, impact and damage tolerance and repair and replace issues.

  4. Development and Evaluation of Stitched Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Larry E.; Adams, Daniel O.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and potential benefits provided by the addition of through-the-thickness reinforcement to sandwich structures. Through-the-thickness stitching is proposed to increase the interlaminar strength and damage tolerance of composite sandwich structures. A low-cost, out-of-autoclave processing method was developed to produce composite sandwich panels with carbon fiber face sheets, a closed-cell foam core, and through-the-thickness Kevlar stitching. The sandwich panels were stitched in a dry preform state, vacuum bagged, and infiltrated using Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) processing. For comparison purposes, unstitched sandwich panels were produced using the same materials and manufacturing methodology. Test panels were produced initially at the University of Utah and later at NASA Langley Research Center. Four types of mechanical tests were performed: flexural testing, flatwise tensile testing, core shear testing, and edgewise compression testing. Drop-weight impact testing followed by specimen sectioning was performed to characterize the damage resistance of stitched sandwich panels. Compression after impact (CAI) testing was performed to evaluate the damage tolerance of the sandwich panels. Results show significant increases in the flexural stiffness and strength, out-of-plane tensile strength, core shear strength, edgewise compression strength, and compression-after-impact strength of stitched sandwich structures.

  5. Response of Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panel with Minimum Gage GFRP Face-Sheets to Compression Loading After Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2011-01-01

    A compression after impact study has been conducted to determine the residual strength of three sandwich panel constructions with two types of thin glass fiber reinforced polymer face-sheets and two hexagonal honeycomb Nomex core densities. Impact testing is conducted to first determine the characteristics of damage resulting from various impact energy levels. Two modes of failure are found during compression after impact tests with the density of the core precipitating the failure mode present for a given specimen. A finite element analysis is presented for prediction of the residual compressive strength of the impacted specimens. The analysis includes progressive damage modeling in the face-sheets. Preliminary analysis results were similar to the experimental results; however, a higher fidelity core material model is expected to improve the correlation.

  6. Face Sheet/Core Disbond Growth in Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Subjected to Ground-Air-Ground Pressurization and In-Plane Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zhi M.; Krueger, Ronald; Rinker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Typical damage modes in light honeycomb sandwich structures include face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture, both of which can pose a threat to the structural integrity of a component. These damage modes are of particular interest to aviation certification authorities since several in-service occurrences, such as rudder structural failure and other control surface malfunctions, have been attributed to face sheet/core disbonding. Extensive studies have shown that face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture can lead to damage propagation caused by internal pressure changes in the core. The increasing use of composite sandwich construction in aircraft applications makes it vitally important to understand the effect of ground-air-ground (GAG) cycles and conditions such as maneuver and gust loads on face sheet/core disbonding. The objective of the present study was to use a fracture mechanics based approach developed earlier to evaluate the loading at the disbond front caused by ground-air-ground pressurization and in-plane loading. A honeycomb sandwich panel containing a circular disbond at one face sheet/core interface was modeled with three-dimensional (3D) solid finite elements. The disbond was modeled as a discrete discontinuity and the strain energy release rate along the disbond front was computed using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). Special attention was paid to the pressure-deformation coupling which can decrease the pressure load within the disbonded sandwich section significantly when the structure is highly deformed. The commercial finite element analysis software, Abaqus/Standard, was used for the analyses. The recursive pressure-deformation coupling problem was solved by representing the entrapped air in the honeycomb cells as filled cavities in Abaqus/Standard. The results show that disbond size, face sheet thickness and core thickness are important parameters that determine crack tip loading at the disbond front. Further, the pressure

  7. Size Effects in Impact Damage of Composite Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobyns, Alan; Jackson, Wade

    2003-01-01

    Panel size has a large effect on the impact response and resultant damage level of honeycomb sandwich panels. It has been observed during impact testing that panels of the same design but different panel sizes will show large differences in damage when impacted with the same impact energy. To study this effect, a test program was conducted with instrumented impact testing of three different sizes of sandwich panels to obtain data on panel response and residual damage. In concert with the test program. a closed form analysis method was developed that incorporates the effects of damage on the impact response. This analysis method will predict both the impact response and the residual damage of a simply-supported sandwich panel impacted at any position on the panel. The damage is incorporated by the use of an experimental load-indentation curve obtained for the face-sheet/honeycomb and indentor combination under study. This curve inherently includes the damage response and can be obtained quasi-statically from a rigidly-backed specimen or a specimen with any support conditions. Good correlation has been obtained between the test data and the analysis results for the maximum force and residual indentation. The predictions can be improved by using a dynamic indentation curve. Analyses have also been done using the MSC/DYTRAN finite element code.

  8. A study of structurally efficient graphite-thermoplastic trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1993-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich composite panels is studied to determine their weight savings potential. Sandwich panels with two identical face sheets and a trapezoidal corrugated core between them, and semi-sandwich panels with a corrugation attached to a single skin are considered. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight designs for critical compressive load levels ranging from 3,000 to 24,000 lb/in. Graphite-thermoplastic panels based on the optimal minimum weight designs were fabricated and tested. A finite-element analysis of several test specimens was also conducted. The results of the optimization study, the finite-element analysis, and the experiments are presented.

  9. Response of Composite Fuselage Sandwich Side Panels Subjected to Internal Pressure and Axial Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Ambur, Damodar R.; Dopker, Bernard; Shah, Bharat

    1998-01-01

    The results from an experimental and analytical study of two composite sandwich fuselage side panels for a transport aircraft are presented. Each panel has two window cutouts and three frames and utilizes a distinctly different structural concept. These panels have been evaluated with internal pressure loads that generate biaxial tension loading conditions. Design limit load and design ultimate load tests have been performed on both panels. One of the sandwich panels was tested with the middle frame removed to demonstrate the suitability of this two-frame design for supporting the prescribed biaxial loading conditions with twice the initial frame spacing of 20 inches. A damage tolerance study was conducted on the two-frame panel by cutting a notch in the panel that originates at the edge of a cutout and extends in the panel hoop direction through the window-belt area. This panel with a notch was tested in a combined-load condition to demonstrate the structural damage tolerance at the design limit load condition. Both the sandwich panel designs successfully satisfied all desired load requirements in the experimental part of the study, and experimental results from the two-frame panel with and without damage are fully explained by the analytical results. The results of this study suggest that there is potential for using sandwich structural concepts with greater than the usual 20-in. wide frame spacing to further reduce aircraft fuselage structural weight.

  10. Structural Performance of Eco-Core Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Chen, Huanchun

    Eco-Core, a fire resistant core material for sandwich composite structures developed under the US Navy (ONR) program, was used to study its performance as a sandwich beam with glass/vinyl ester face sheet. Performance of Eco-Core was compared with balsa and PVC core sandwich panels. Test specimens were designed to simulate shear, flexural, and edgewise compression loadings. These tests were conducted on Eco-Core as well as balsa and PVC sandwich composite specimens. Failure loads and modes were compared with each other and the analytical prediction. Both Eco-Core and balsa cored sandwich beams had similar failure modes in all three test conditions. In the case of transversely loaded (four-point) beams Eco-Core specimens failed by core shear for span/depth (S/d) ratio less than 4 and the failure mode changed to core tension for S/d >4. This is attributed to weak tensile strength of the core material. An expression for core tension failure load based on beam theory was derived. On the other hand, ductile materials like PVC failed by core indentation. Under edgewise compression, face sheet microbuckling and general buckling are the two potential failure modes for Eco-Core and balsa core sandwich composites. For specimen length/depth ratio L/d <7 the failure is by face sheet microbuckling, for 7 ≤L/d ≤13 the failure is a combination of face sheet microbuckling, debonding and buckling, and for L/d >13 the failure is by general buckling. Predictions from the existing equations agreed well with the experiment for both core materials. For PVC core, wrinkling/shear buckling and general buckling are the potential failure modes. For L/d ≤8.5 the failure is wrinkling and for L/d >8.5 the failure is general buckling.

  11. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  12. Development of lightweight graphite/polyimide sandwich panels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poesch, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    Lightweight graphite/polyimide composite honeycomb core and sandwich panels were fabricated and tested. Honeycomb cores of 1/4-in. and 3/8-in. cell sizes of hexagonal configuration were produced from thin plus or minus 45 deg cross plied sheets of prepreg producing core weights between 1.8 and 3.6 lb/cu ft. Thin gauge prepreg using Hercules graphite tow and Monsanto Skybond 710 polyimide resin were manufactured to produce cured ply thicknesses of 0.001 to 0.002 in. Graphite core properties measured at temperatures from -150 to 600 F are reported. Core properties which are superior to available materials were obtained. Sandwich panels weighing less than 0.5 lb/sq ft were designed and fabricated which meet the support structure loads for the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system.

  13. Multiscale Modeling Methods for Analysis of Failure Modes in Foldcore Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, R.; Schatrow, P.; Klett, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents an homogenised core model suitable for use in the analysis of fuselage sandwich panels with folded composite cores under combined loading conditions. Within a multiscale numerical design process a failure criterion was derived for describing the macroscopic behaviour of folded cores under combined loading using a detailed foldcore micromodel. The multiscale modelling method was validated by simulation of combined compression/bending failure of foldcore sandwich panels.

  14. Probabilistic Structural Evaluation of Uncertainties in Radiator Sandwich Panel Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuguoglu, Latife; Ludwiczak, Damian

    2006-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Space System is part of the NASA's Prometheus Program. As part of the JIMO engineering team at NASA Glenn Research Center, the structural design of the JIMO Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) is evaluated. An initial goal of this study was to perform sensitivity analyses to determine the relative importance of the input variables on the structural responses of the radiator panel. The desire was to let the sensitivity analysis information identify the important parameters. The probabilistic analysis methods illustrated here support this objective. The probabilistic structural performance evaluation of a HRS radiator sandwich panel was performed. The radiator panel structural performance was assessed in the presence of uncertainties in the loading, fabrication process variables, and material properties. The stress and displacement contours of the deterministic structural analysis at mean probability was performed and results presented. It is followed by a probabilistic evaluation to determine the effect of the primitive variables on the radiator panel structural performance. Based on uncertainties in material properties, structural geometry and loading, the results of the displacement and stress analysis are used as an input file for the probabilistic analysis of the panel. The sensitivity of the structural responses, such as maximum displacement and maximum tensile and compressive stresses of the facesheet in x and y directions and maximum VonMises stresses of the tube, to the loading and design variables is determined under the boundary condition where all edges of the radiator panel are pinned. Based on this study, design critical material and geometric parameters of the considered sandwich panel are identified.

  15. Impact damage in aircraft composite sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordasky, Matthew D.

    An experimental study was conducted to develop an improved understanding of the damage caused by runway debris and environmental threats on aircraft structures. The velocities of impacts for stationary aircraft and aircraft under landing and takeoff speeds was investigated. The impact damage by concrete, asphalt, aluminum, hail and rubber sphere projectiles was explored in detail. Additionally, a kinetic energy and momentum experimental study was performed to look at the nature of the impacts in more detail. A method for recording the contact force history of the impact by an instrumented projectile was developed and tested. The sandwich composite investigated was an IM7-8552 unidirectional prepreg adhered to a NOMEXRTM core with an FM300K film adhesive. Impact experiments were conducted with a gas gun built in-house specifically for delivering projectiles to a sandwich composite target in this specic velocity regime (10--140 m/s). The effect on the impact damage by the projectile was investigated by ultrasonic C-scan, high speed camera and scanning electron and optical microscopy. Ultrasonic C-scans revealed the full extent of damage caused by each projectile, while the high speed camera enabled precise projectile velocity measurements that were used for striking velocity, kinetic energy and momentum analyses. Scanning electron and optical images revealed specific features of the panel failure and manufacturing artifacts within the lamina and honeycomb core. The damage of the panels by different projectiles was found to have a similar damage area for equivalent energy levels, except for rubber which had a damage area that increased greatly with striking velocity. Further investigation was taken by kinetic energy and momentum based comparisons of 19 mm diameter stainless steel sphere projectiles in order to examine the dominating damage mechanisms. The sandwich targets were struck by acrylic, aluminum, alumina, stainless steel and tungsten carbide spheres of the

  16. Design Considerations for Thermally Insulating Structural Sandwich Panels for Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    2016-01-01

    Simplified thermal/structural sizing equations were derived for the in-plane loading of a thermally insulating structural sandwich panel. Equations were developed for the strain in the inner and outer face sheets of a sandwich subjected to uniaxial mechanical loads and differences in face sheet temperatures. Simple equations describing situations with no viable solution were developed. Key design parameters, material properties, and design principles are identified. A numerical example illustrates using the equations for a preliminary feasibility assessment of various material combinations and an initial sizing for minimum mass of a sandwich panel.

  17. Predicting The Compression Strength Of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James; Jackson, Wade; Schaff, Jeffery

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a technique for predicting the residual compression strength of sandwich panels containing impact damage in one facesheet. The technique was tailored to predict the strength of specimens that exhibit a failure mode involving the formation of kink bands at locations of peak strain in the region of impact damage. Under continued compression loading, the kink bands propagate in a stable manner perpendicular to the applied load. When a critical kink-band length is reached, growth becomes unstable corresponding to panel failure. The analysis follows in two sections. The first section calculates the far-field stress required for stable kink-band growth and the second calculates that required for unstable growth. The residual strength prediction is made when the stress for stable growth becomes equal to that for unstable kink-band growth. Initial comparisons between analysis and experiment show good agreement.

  18. Tests of graphite/polyimide sandwich panels in uniaxial edgewise compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The local and general buckling behavior of graphite/polyimide sandwich panels simply supported along all four edges and loaded in uniaxial edgewise compression were investigated. Material properties of sandwich panel constituents (adhesive and facings) were determined from flatwise tension and sandwich beam flexure tests. Buckling specimens were 30.5 by 33 cm, had quasi-isotropic, symmetric facings, and a glass/polyimide honeycomb core. Core thicknesses were varied and three panels of each thickness were tested at room temperature to investigate failure modes and corresponding buckling loads. Specimens 0.635 cm thick failed by overall buckling at loads close to the analytically predicted buckling load; all other panels failed by face wrinkling. Results of the wrinkling tests indicated that several buckling formulas were unconservative and therefore not suitable for design purposes; a recommended wrinkling equation is presented.

  19. Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Finnveden, Svante; Barbagallo, Mathias; Arteaga, Ines Lopez

    2014-05-01

    Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core, which is modeled by Biot's theory, is investigated using the waveguide finite element method. A waveguide poroelastic element is developed based on a displacement-pressure weak form. The dispersion curves of the sandwich panel are first identified as propagating or evanescent waves by varying the damping in the panel, and wave characteristics are analyzed by examining their motions. The energy distributions are calculated to identify the dominant motions. Simplified analytical models are also devised to show the main physics of the corresponding waves. This wave propagation analysis provides insight into the vibro-acoustic behavior of sandwich panels lined with elastic porous materials.

  20. Mechanical and thermal buckling analysis of rectangular sandwich panels under different edge conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1994-01-01

    The combined load (mechanical or thermal load) buckling equations were established for orthotropic rectangular sandwich panels under four different edge conditions by using the Rayleigh-Ritz method of minimizing the total potential energy of a structural system. Two-dimensional buckling interaction curves and three-dimensional buckling interaction surfaces were constructed for high-temperature honeycomb-core sandwich panels supported under four different edge conditions. The interaction surfaces provide overall comparison of the panel buckling strengths and the domains of symmetrical and antisymmetrical buckling associated with the different edge conditions. In addition, thermal buckling curves of these sandwich panels are presented. The thermal buckling conditions for the cases with and without thermal moments were found to be identical for the small deformation theory.

  1. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  2. Hail Ice Impact of Lightweight Composite Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Sean Dustin

    There is a growing demand for the usage of composite sandwich structures in the aircraft industry. Aircraft may suffer damage from a variety of impact sources such as ground service equipment, runway debris, bird strike, or hail ice. The damage response of hail ice impacts on composite sandwich structures is not well understood and they can often result in core damage without visually detectable surface damage. This seed damage may grow and lead to large-scale failure of the structure through repetitive operational loading, such as ground-air-ground cycles of aircraft (causes core internal pressurization). Therefore, it is necessary to understand the types of damage that can occur as a result of impacts. This study explores the effect of high velocity hail ice impact on damage formation in lightweight composite sandwich panels, particularly at a level that produces barely visible external damage. Panels consisting of two different facesheet thicknesses (1.19 and 1.87 mm) were impacted at angles of 25, 40, and 90 degrees at speeds of 25 and 50 m/s. The tests revealed three different core damage modes. Any level of measurable surface damage was an indicator of the presence of internal core damage, but internal damage could also be present without measurable surface damage. Thus, visual inspection alone was not a reliable method of damage detection. No clear relationship was found between impact energy levels and internal damage state since, for example, both 83 and 20.5 J tests produced core fracture, while a 16 J test did not produce any core damage. All core damage occurred at a depth of 3-5 mm from the impact-side facesheet.

  3. The behavior of bonded doubler splices for composite sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, T. A.; Weisahaar, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the behavior of adhesively bonded doubler splices of two composite material sandwich panels are presented. The splices are studied from three approaches: analytical; numerical (finite elements); and experimental. Several parameters that characterize the splice are developed to determine their influence upon joint strength. These parameters are: doubler overlap length; core stiffness; laminate bending stiffness; the size of the gap between the spliced sandwich panels; and room and elevated temperatures. Similarities and contrasts between these splices and the physically similar single and double lap joints are discussed. The results of this investigation suggest several possible approaches to improving the strength of the sandwich splices.

  4. Actively cooled plate fin sandwich structural panels for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.; Beuyukian, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    An unshielded actively cooled structural panel was designed for application to a hypersonic aircraft. The design was an all aluminum stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich structure which used a 60/40 mixture of ethylene glycol/water as the coolant. Eight small test specimens of the basic platefin sandwich concept and three fatigue specimens from critical areas of the panel design was fabricated and tested (at room temperature). A test panel representative of all features of the panel design was fabricated and tested to determine the combined thermal/mechanical performance and structural integrity of the system. The overall findings are that; (1) the stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich actively cooling concept results in a low mass design that is an excellent contender for application to a hypersonic vehicle, and (2) the fabrication processes are state of the art but new or modified facilities are required to support full scale panel fabrication.

  5. Performance of Novel Composites and Sandwich Structures Under Blast Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Arun; Tekalur, Srinivasan Arjun; Gardner, Nate; Jackson, Matt; Wang, Erheng

    The current chapter focuses on the experimental observations of the resistance of different composite material systems to air blast loadings. These material systems include traditional two dimensional (2D) woven laminated composites, layered composites and sandwich composite materials. A controlled blast loading of pre-defined pressure magnitude and rise time were obtained using a shock tube apparatus. Rectangular plate elements of the desired material system were subjected to such a controlled blast loading and the effect of the blast loading on these elements were studied using optical and residual strength measurements. A high speed imaging technique was utilized to study the damage modes and mechanisms in real time. It was observed that layering of a conventional composite material with a soft visco-elastic polymer provided better blast resistance and sandwiching the polymer greatly enhanced its survivability under extreme air blast conditions. Aside from layering the conventional composite material with a soft visco-elastic polymer, it was observed that layering or grading the core can successfully mitigate the impact damage and thus improve the overall blast resistance as well. In addition to these, three dimensional (3D) woven skin and core reinforcements were introduced in the conventional sandwich composites and their effects on the blast resistance were studied experimentally. It was observed that these reinforcements also enhance the blast resistance of conventional sandwich composites by changing the mechanism of failure initiation and propagation in these sandwich structures. The energies during the blast loading process were estimated to illustrate the energy absorption and energy redistribution properties of the composite panels. The effect of pre-existing impact damage on the failure mechanisms in sandwich structures was also studied.

  6. Development of a finite element model for the simulation of parabolic impact of sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Guérard, Sandra; Mahéo, Laurent; Shankar, Krishna; Viot, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Sandwich panels are lightweight structures of two thin high strength facesheets bonded to either side of a thick low density core such as foams and honeycombs. It is necessary to study the impact response of sandwich structures in order to ensure the reliability and safety of these structures. The response of sandwich panels to impact loading is usually studied for impact at normal angle of incidence. In real engineering situations, the structures are more frequently loaded at some oblique angle or with a complex trajectory. It is easy to carry out normal impact tests using devices like the drop tower, but impacts at oblique angles are difficult to characterise experimentally. A tri-dimensional impact device called Hexapod has been developed to experimentally study the impact loading of sandwich plates with a parabolic trajectory. The Hexapod is a modified Gough-Stewart platform that can be moved independently in the six degrees of freedom, corresponding to three translation axes and three rotation axes. In this paper, an approach for modelling the parabolic impact of sandwich structures with thin metallic facesheets and polymer foam core using commercial finite element code LS-DYNA software is presented. The results of the FE model of sandwich panels are compared with experimental data in terms of the time history of vertical and horizontal components of force. A comparison of the strain history obtained from Digital Image Correlation and LS-Dyna model are also presented.

  7. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    SciTech Connect

    Camarda, C.J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-08-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  8. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat-pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat-load levels. The heat-pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat-pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low-distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  9. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  10. Mechanical and thermal buckling analysis of sandwich panels under different edge conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the Rayleigh-Ritz method of minimizing the total potential energy of a structural system, combined load (mechanical or thermal load) buckling equations are established for orthotropic rectangular sandwich panels supported under four different edge conditions. Two-dimensional buckling interaction curves and three dimensional buckling interaction surfaces are constructed for high-temperature honeycomb-core sandwich panels supported under four different edge conditions. The interaction surfaces provide easy comparison of the panel buckling strengths and the domains of symmetrical and antisymmetrical buckling associated with the different edge conditions. Thermal buckling curves of the sandwich panels also are presented. The thermal buckling conditions for the cases with and without thermal moments were found to be identical for the small deformation theory. In sandwich panels, the effect of transverse shear is quite large, and by neglecting the transverse shear effect, the buckling loads could be overpredicted considerably. Clamping of the edges could greatly increase buckling strength more in compression than in shear.

  11. Failure mechanisms in composite panels subjected to underwater impulsive loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latourte, Félix; Grégoire, David; Zenkert, Dan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2011-08-01

    This work examines the performance of composite panels when subjected to underwater impulsive loads. The scaled fluid-structure experimental methodology developed by Espinosa and co-workers was employed. Failure modes, damage mechanisms and their distributions were identified and quantified for composite monolithic and sandwich panels subjected to typical blast loadings. The temporal evolutions of panel deflection and center deflection histories were obtained from shadow Moiré fringes acquired in real time by means of high speed photography. A linear relationship of zero intercept between peak center deflections versus applied impulse per areal mass was obtained for composite monolithic panels. For composite sandwich panels, the relationship between maximum center deflection versus applied impulse per areal mass was found to be approximately bilinear but with a higher slope. Performance improvement of sandwich versus monolithic composite panels was, therefore, established specially at sufficiently high impulses per areal mass ( I0/ M¯>170 m s -1). Severe failure was observed in solid panels subjected to impulses per areal mass larger than 300 m s -1. Extensive fiber fracture occurred in the center of the panels, where cracks formed a cross pattern through the plate thickness and delamination was very extensive on the sample edges due to bending effects. Similar levels of damage were observed in sandwich panels but at much higher impulses per areal mass. The experimental work reported in this paper encompasses not only characterization of the dynamic performance of monolithic and sandwich panels but also post-mortem characterization by means of both non-destructive and microscopy techniques. The spatial distribution of delamination and matrix cracking were quantified, as a function of applied impulse, in both monolithic and sandwich panels. The extent of core crushing was also quantified in the case of sandwich panels. The quantified variables represent ideal

  12. Methods for Assessing Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Wrinkling Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, Bart F.; Dial, William B.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    Efficient closed-form methods for predicting the facesheet wrinkling failure mode in sandwich panels are assessed. Comparisons were made with finite element model predictions for facesheet wrinkling, and a validated closed-form method was implemented in the HyperSizer structure sizing software.

  13. Compression Response of a Sandwich Fuselage Keel Panel With and Without Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental and analytical study of a sandwich fuselage keel panel with and without damage. The fuselage keel panel is constructed of graphite-epoxy skins bonded to a honeycomb core, and is representative of a highly loaded fuselage keel structure. The face sheets of the panel contain several terminated or dropped plies along the length of the panel. The results presented provide a better understanding of the load distribution in damaged and undamaged thick-face-sheet composite sandwich structure with dropped plies and of the failure mechanisms of such structure in the presence of low-speed impact damage and discrete-source damage. The impact-damage condition studied corresponds to barely visible impact damage (BVID), and the discrete-source damage condition studied is a notch machined through both face sheets. Results are presented from an impact-damage screening study conducted on another panel of the same design to determine the impact energy necessary to inflict BVID on the panel. Results are presented from compression tests of the panel in three conditions: undamaged; BVID in two locations; and BVID in two locations and a notch through both face sheets. Surface strains in the face sheets of the undamaged panel and the notched panel obtained experimentally are compared with finite element analysis results. The experimental and analytical results suggest that for the damage conditions studied, discrete-source damage influences the structural performance more than BVID.

  14. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    Bismaleimide resins are prime candidates for nonflammable aircraft interior panels. Three resin types with different structures and processing characteristics were formulated. Resin M 751 was used to fabricate 100 kg of glass fabric prepregs which were used for the preparation of face sheets for honeycomb sandwich panels. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication are provided. In order to advance beyond the current solvent resin technology for fibre and fabric impregnation, a hot melt solvent-less resin system was prepared and characterized. Preliminary tests were performed to develop a wet bonding process for the fabrication of advanced sandwich honeycomb panels by use of polybismaleimide glass fabric face sheets and polybismaleimide Nomex honeycomb core. B-stage material was used for both the core and the face sheet, providing flatwise tensile properties equivalent to those obtained by the state-of-the-art 3-step process which includes an epoxy adhesive resin.

  15. General stability analysis of composite sandwich plates under thermal load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Shaher A.

    In structures subjected to high temperature change such as high-speed aircraft the panels are stressed more significantly under thermal loading than mechanical loading. This can produce instability within the structure; therefore, the thermal loading may become the primary factor in the design of the structure. For example, buckling and facesheet wrinkling are two major failure modes of the composite sandwich plates subjected to various loadings. The goal of this dissertation is to study the stability analysis of composite sandwich plates due to buckling and wrinkling subjected to thermal loading. The primary objective is to find out the critical failure mode and the associated critical temperature change causing it. For thermal buckling and wrinkling analysis, the critical temperature change Delta Tcr, is of more interest than the critical thermal load. In this study, two different approaches of the stability problem of the composite sandwich plate subjected to thermally induced load are developed. In the first approach, the wrinkling analysis and buckling analysis are performed separately to evaluate their associated critical wrinkling and buckling temperature changes. For the face-wrinkling problem, two different models, the linear decaying Hoff model and exponential decaying Chen model are employed. The global buckling analysis is based on the energy method. The second approach is based on the unified theory of Benson and Mayers. In such an approach, the critical temperature change for both the global buckling and face wrinkling can be evaluated simultaneously. A potential energy based variation principle has been applied to formulate the problem. The Lagrange multipliers are used to satisfy the face-core continuity conditions. The buckling and wrinkling can be analyzed and calculated simultaneously. Therefore, the critical wrinkling temperature and the critical buckling temperature are found in a single analysis. The critical buckling and wrinkling stresses

  16. Advanced robust design optimization of FRP sandwich floor panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Z. K.; Gonzalez, F.; Aravinthan, T.

    2010-06-01

    FRP composite is now being used in the construction of main structural elements, such as the FRP sandwich panel for flooring system and bridges. The objective of this research is to use multi-objective optimization and robust design techniques to minimize the weight of the FRP sandwich floor panel design as well as maximizing the natural frequency. An Australian manufactures has invented a new FRP composite panel suitable for civil engineering constructions. This research work aims to develop an optimal design of structural fibre composite sandwich floor panel by coupling a Finite Element FE and robust design optimization method. The design variables are the skin plies thickness and the core thickness as a robust variable. Results indicate that there is a trade-off between the objectives. The robust design technique is used then to select a set of candidate geometry, which has a high natural frequency, low weight and low standard deviation. The design simulation was formulated by depending on the EUROCOMP standard design constraints.

  17. The dynamic mechanical properties study on the sandwich panel of different thickness steel plate-foam aluminum core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhongliang; Zou, Guangping; Zhao, Weiling; Xia, Peixiu

    2009-12-01

    The foam aluminum belongs to multi-cell materials, and it has good mechanical performance, such as large deformation capacity and good energy absorption, and usually used as core material of sandwich panel, now it is widely used in automotive, aviation, aerospace and other fields, particularly suitable for various anti-collision structure and buffer structure. In this article, based on an engineering background, the INSTRON4505 electronic universal testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) were used for testing the static and dynamic mechanical properties of sandwich panel with different thickness steel plate- foam aluminum core, from the results we can see that the steel plate thickness has big influence on the stress-strain curve of the sandwich panel, and also takes the sandwich panel with 1mm steel panel to study the material strain rate dependence which under different high shock wave stress loaded, the results show that the sandwich panel is strain rate dependence material. And also, in order to get good waveforms in the SHPB experiment, the waveform shaped technique is used in the dynamic experiments, and the study of this paper will good to sandwich panel used in the engineering.

  18. Optimum stacking sequence design of composite sandwich panel using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bir, Amarpreet Singh

    Composite sandwich structures recently gained preference for various structural components over conventional metals and simple composite laminates in the aerospace industries. For most widely used composite sandwich structures, the optimization problems only requires the determination of the best stacking sequence and the number of laminae with different fiber orientations. Genetic algorithm optimization technique based on Darwin's theory of survival of the fittest and evolution is most suitable for solving such optimization problems. The present research work focuses on the stacking sequence optimization of composite sandwich panels with laminated face-sheets for both critical buckling load maximization and thickness minimization problems, subjected to bi-axial compressive loading. In the previous studies, only balanced and even-numbered simple composite laminate panels have been investigated ignoring the effects of bending-twisting coupling terms. The current work broadens the application of genetic algorithms to more complex composite sandwich panels with balanced, unbalanced, even and odd-numbered face-sheet laminates including the effects of bending-twisting coupling terms.

  19. Transmission Loss and Absorption of Corrugated Core Sandwich Panels With Embedded Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of embedded resonators on the diffuse field sound transmission loss and absorption of composite corrugated core sandwich panels has been evaluated experimentally. Two 1.219 m × 2.438 m panels with embedded resonator arrangements targeting frequencies near 100 Hz were evaluated using non-standard processing of ASTM E90-09 acoustic transmission loss and ASTM C423-09a room absorption test measurements. Each panel is comprised of two composite face sheets sandwiching a corrugated core with a trapezoidal cross section. When inlet openings are introduced in one face sheet, the chambers within the core can be used as embedded acoustic resonators. Changes to the inlet and chamber partition locations allow this type of structure to be tuned for targeted spectrum passive noise control. Because the core chambers are aligned with the plane of the panel, the resonators can be tuned for low frequencies without compromising the sandwich panel construction, which is typically sized to meet static load requirements. Absorption and transmission loss performance improvements attributed to opening the inlets were apparent for some configurations and inconclusive for others.

  20. Sound Transmission Loss Through a Corrugated-Core Sandwich Panel with Integrated Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.; Zalewski, Bart F; Beck, Benjamin S.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand the effect of structurally integrated resonators on the transmission loss of a sandwich panel. The sandwich panel has facesheets over a corrugated core, which creates long aligned chambers that run parallel to the facesheets. When ports are introduced through the facesheet, the long chambers within the core can be used as low-frequency acoustic resonators. By integrating the resonators within the structure they contribute to the static load bearing capability of the panel while also attenuating noise. An analytical model of a panel with embedded resonators is derived and compared with numerical simulations. Predictions show that acoustic resonators can significantly improve the transmission loss of the sandwich panel around the natural frequency of the resonators. In one configuration with 0.813 m long internal chambers, the diffuse field transmission loss is improved by more than 22 dB around 104 Hz. The benefit is achieved with no added mass or volume relative to the baseline structure. The embedded resonators are effective because they radiate sound out-of-phase with the structure. This results in destructive interference, which leads to less transmitted sound power.

  1. Evaluation of Thin Kevlar-Epoxy Fabric Panels Subjected to Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of 4-ply Kevlar-49-epoxy panels loaded by in-plane shear are presented. Approximately one-half of the panels are thin-core sandwich panels and the other panels are solid-laminate panels. Selected panels were impacted with an aluminum sphere at a velocity of either 150 or 220 ft/sec. The strength of panels impacted at 150 ft/sec was not reduced when compared to the strength of the undamaged panels, but the strength of panels impacted at 220 ft/sec was reduced by 27 to 40 percent. Results are presented for panels that were cyclically loaded from a load less than the buckling load to a load in the postbuckling load range. The thin-core sandwich panels had a lower fatigue life than the solid panels. The residual strength of the solid and sandwich panels cycled more than one million cycles exceeded the baseline undamaged panel strengths. The effect of hysteresis in the response of the sandwich panels is not significant. Results of a nonlinear finite element analysis conducted for each panel design are presented.

  2. Evaluation of Thin Kevlar-Epoxy Fabric Panels Subjected to Shear Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of 4-ply Kevlar-49-epoxy panels loaded by in-plane shear are presented. Approximately one-half of the panels are thin-core sandwich panels and the other panels are solid-laminate panels. Selected panels were impacted with an aluminum sphere at a velocity of either 150 or 220 ft/sec. The strength of panels impacted at 150 ft/sec was not reduced when compared to the strength of the undamaged panels, but the strength of panels impacted at 220 ft/sec was reduced by 27 to 40 percent. Results are presented for panels that were cyclically loaded from a load less than the buckling load to a load in the postbuckling load range. The thin-core sandwich panels had a lower fatigue life than the solid panels. The residual strength of the solid and sandwich panels cycled more than one million cycles exceeded the baseline undamaged panel strengths. The effect of hysteresis in the response of the sandwich panels is not significant. Results of a nonlinear finite element analysis conducted for each panel design are presented.

  3. Experimental investigation of graphite/polyimide sandwich panels in edgewise compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The local and general buckling behavior of graphite/polyimide sandwich panels simply supported along all four edges and loaded in uniaxial edgewise compression was investigated. Material properties of adhesive and facings were determined from flatwise tension and sandwich beam flexure tests. Tensile and compressive material properties of the facings were determined at 116, R.T., and 589 K (-250, R.T., and 600 F) using the sandwich beam flexure test method. Results indicate that Gr/PI is a usable structural material for short term use at temperatures as high as 589 K (600 F). Buckling specimens were 30.5 X 33.0 cm (12 x 13 in.), had quasi-isotropic symmetric facings and a glass/polyimide honeycomb core. Core thicknesses varied and three panels of each thickness were tested in edgewise compression at room temperature to investigate failure modes and corresponding buckling formulas. Specimens 0.635 cm (0.25 in.) thick failed by overall buckling at loads close to the analytically predicted buckling load; all other panels failed by face wrinkling. Results of the winkling tests indicate that several buckling formulas were unconservative and therefore not suitable for design purposes; recommended wrinkling equations are presented.

  4. Prediction of the ballistic limit of an aluminium sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; De Vuyst, T.; Vignjevic, R.; Hughes, K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents research on modelling the impact of a 150g projectile on a 35mm thick aluminium sandwich panel. The objective of the work is a predictive modelling capability for the ballistic limit of the panel. A predictive modelling capability supports the design of capture and deorbit missions for large items of space debris such as satellites and rocket upper stages. A detailed explicit finite element model was built using the LSDYNA software and results were compared with experimental data for the projectile exit velocity to establish key parameters. The primary parameters influencing the model behaviour were the strength and failure of the aluminium face sheets and the friction between projectile and panel. The model results showed good agreement with experimental results for ogive nose projectiles, but overestimated the exit velocity for flat nose projectiles.

  5. Failure Maps for Rectangular 17-4PH Stainless Steel Sandwiched Foam Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    A new and innovative concept is proposed for designing lightweight fan blades for aircraft engines using commercially available 17-4PH precipitation hardened stainless steel. Rotating fan blades in aircraft engines experience a complex loading state consisting of combinations of centrifugal, distributed pressure and torsional loads. Theoretical failure plastic collapse maps, showing plots of the foam relative density versus face sheet thickness, t, normalized by the fan blade span length, L, have been generated for rectangular 17-4PH sandwiched foam panels under these three loading modes assuming three failure plastic collapse modes. These maps show that the 17-4PH sandwiched foam panels can fail by either the yielding of the face sheets, yielding of the foam core or wrinkling of the face sheets depending on foam relative density, the magnitude of t/L and the loading mode. The design envelop of a generic fan blade is superimposed on the maps to provide valuable insights on the probable failure modes in a sandwiched foam fan blade.

  6. Fatigue and impact properties of metal honeycomb sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Guang ping; Lu, Jie; Liang, Jun; Chang, Zhong liang

    2008-11-01

    Honeycomb sandwich structures are significant to be used as applied to thermal protection system on reusable launch vehicle. In this paper the fatigue and impact properties of a novel metallic thermal protection material have been investigated and predicted at room temperature. A series of strength tests are carried out to obtain parameters firstly for further experiments. A set of tension-tension stress fatigue tests and impact tests based on split-Hopkinson pressure bar are carried out. Different high strain rate impact experiments are accomplished. The curves of dynamical stress, strain and strain rate are obtained. Also the cell units images after impact are presented. The results show the fatigue properties of honeycomb sandwich panels are comparatively better. And it has the advantages of anti-impact resistance and high, energy absorption capability.

  7. Development of lightweight graphite/polyimide sandwich panels, phases 3, 4 and 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merlette, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Work performed in the last three phases of the program included: (1) face sheet processing; (2) honeycomb core manufacture; (3) face sheet-to-core bonding development; and (4) sandwich panel fabrication and testing. Resin cure studies were a major portion of this effort since processing problems traced to the polyimide matrix resin had to be resolved before quality core and face sheets could be fabricated. Honeycomb core fabrication and testing were conducted by Hexcel Corporation. A total of four graphite/polyimide resin composite cores were fabricated, tested, and reported. Two sandwich panels weighing .48 and .58 lb/sq ft, respectively were designed and fabricated which meet the support structure loads for the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system.

  8. Low Velocity Blunt Impact on Lightweight Composite Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Monica Kar

    There is an increased desire to incorporate more composite sandwich structures into modern aircrafts. Because in-service aircrafts routinely experience impact damage during maintenance due to ground vehicle collision, dropped equipment, or foreign object damage (FOD) impact, it is necessary to understand their impact characteristics, particularly when blunt impact sources create internal damage with little or no external visibility. The objective of this investigation is to explore damage formation in lightweight composite sandwich panels due to low-velocity impacts of variable tip radius and energy level. The correlation between barely visible external dent formation and internal core damage was explored as a function of impact tip radius. A pendulum impactor was used to impact composite sandwich panels having honeycomb core while held in a 165 mm square window fixture. The panels were impacted by hardened steel tips with radii of 12.7, 25.4, 50.8, and 76.2 mm at energy levels ranging from 2 to 14 J. Experimental data showed little dependence of external dent depth on tip radius at very low energies of 2 to 6 J, and thus, there was also little variation in visibility due to tip radius. Four modes of internal core damage were identified. Internal damage span and depth were dependent on impact tip radius. Damage depth was also radius-dependent, but stabilized at constant depth independent of kinetic energy. Internal damage span increased with increasing impact energy, but not with increasing tip radius, suggesting a relationship between maximum damage tip radius with core density/size.

  9. Experimental investigation of graphite/polyimide sandwich panels in edgewise compression. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The local and general buckling of graphite/polyimide sandwich panels simply supported along all four edges and loaded in uniaxial edgewise compression is investigated. Material properties of sandwich panel constituents (adhesive and facings) were determined from flatwise tension and sandwich beam flexure tests. An adhesive bond study resulted in the selection of a suitable cure cycle for FM 34 polyimide film adhesive and, a bonding technique using a liquid cell edge version of that adhesive resulted in considerable mass savings. Tensile and compressive material properties of the facings, quasiisotropic, symmetric, laminates (0, +45,90,-45)s of Celion/PMR-15, were determined at 116, R.T., and 589 K (-250, R.T., and 600 F) usng the sandwich beam flexure test method. Results indicate the Gr/PI is a usable structural material for short term use at temperatures as high as 589 K (600 F). Buckling specimens were 1006.5 sq cm. 156 sq in., had quasiisotropic symmetric facings (0, + or - 45,90)s and a glass/polyimide honeycomb core (HRH-327-3/8-4).

  10. Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologies Project - Preliminary Manufacturing Demonstration Articles for Ares V Payload Shroud Barrel Acreage Structure

  11. Elevated-Temperature Tests Under Static and Aerodynamic Conditions on Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Joseph M.; Johnson, Aldie E., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Stainless-steel honeycomb-core sandwich panels which differed primarily in skin thicknesses were tested at elevated temperatures under static and aerodynamic conditions. The results of these tests were evaluated to determine the insulating effectiveness and structural integrity of the panels. The static radiant-heating tests were performed in front of a quartz-tube radiant heater at panel skin temperatures up to 1,5000 F. The aerodynamic tests were made in a Mach 1.4 heated blowdown wind tunnel. The tunnel temperature was augmented by additional heat supplied by a radiant heater which raised the panel surface temperature above 8000 F during air flow. Static radiant-heating tests of 2 minutes duration showed that all the panels protected the load-carrying structure about equally well. Thin-skin panels showed an advantage for this short-time test over thick-skin panels from a standpoint of weight against insulation. Permanent inelastic strains in the form of local buckles over each cell of the honeycomb core caused an increase in surface roughness. During the aero- dynamic tests all of the panels survived with little or no damage, and panel flutter did not occur.

  12. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimassi, M. A.; Brauner, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence.

  13. Dispersion of guided waves in composite laminates and sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Christoph; Mal, Ajit

    2015-03-01

    In composite structures, damages are often invisible from the surface and can grow to reach a critical size, potentially causing catastrophic failure of the entire structure. Thus safe operation of these structures requires careful monitoring of the initiation and growth of such defects. Ultrasonic methods using guided waves offer a reliable and cost-effective method for structural health monitoring in advanced structures. Guided waves allow for long monitoring ranges and are very sensitive to defects within their propagation path. In this work, the relevant properties of guided Lamb waves for damage detection in composite structures are investigated. An efficient numerical approach is used to determine their dispersion characteristics, and these results are compared to those from laboratory experiments. The experiments are based on a pitch-catch method, in which a pair of movable transducers is placed on one surface of the structure to induce and detect guided Lamb waves. The specific cases considered include an aluminum plate and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel with woven composite face sheets. In addition, a disbond of the interface between one of the face sheets and the honeycomb core of the sandwich panel is also considered, and the dispersion characteristics of the two resultant waveguides are determined. Good agreement between numerical and experimental dispersion results is found, and suggestions on the applicability of the pitch-catch system for structural health monitoring are made.

  14. Failure Predictions of Out-of-Autoclave Sandwich Joints with Delaminations under Flexure Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordendale, Nikolas; Goyal, Vinay; Lundgren, Eric; Patel, Dhruv; Farrokh, Babak; Jones, Justin; Fischetti, Grace; Segal, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    An analysis and a test program was conducted to investigate the damage tolerance of composite sandwich joints. The joints contained a single circular delamination between the face-sheet and the doubler. The coupons were fabricated through out-of-autoclave (OOA) processes, a technology NASA is investigating for joining large composite sections. The four-point bend flexure test was used to induce compression loading into the side of the joint where the delamination was placed. The compression side was chosen since it tends to be one of the most critical loads in launch vehicles. Autoclave cure was used to manufacture the composite sandwich sections, while the doubler was co-bonded onto the sandwich face-sheet using an OOA process after sandwich panels were cured. A building block approach was adopted to characterize the mechanical properties of the joint material, including the fracture toughness between the doubler and facesheet. Twelve four-point-bend samples were tested, six in the sandwich core ribbon orientation and six in sandwich core cross-ribbon direction. Analysis predicted failure initiation and propagation at the pre-delaminated location, consistent with experimental observations. A building block approach using fracture analyses methods predicted failure loads in close agreement with tests. This investigation demonstrated a small strength reduction due to a flaw of significant size compared to the width of the sample. Therefore, concerns of bonding an OOA material to an in-autoclave material was mitigated for the geometries, materials, and load configurations considered.

  15. Failure Predictions of Out-of-Autoclave Sandwich Joints with Delaminations Under Flexure Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordendale, Nikolas; Goyal, Vinay; Lundgren, Eric; Patel, Dhruv; Farrokh, Babak; Jones, Justin; Fischetti, Grace; Segal, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    An analysis and a test program was conducted to investigate the damage tolerance of composite sandwich joints. The joints contained a single circular delamination between the face-sheet and the doubler. The coupons were fabricated through out-of-autoclave (OOA) processes, a technology NASA is investigating for joining large composite sections. The four-point bend flexure test was used to induce compression loading into the side of the joint where the delamination was placed. The compression side was chosen since it tends to be one of the most critical loads in launch vehicles. Autoclave cure was used to manufacture the composite sandwich sections, while the doubler was co-bonded onto the sandwich face-sheet using an OOA process after sandwich panels were cured. A building block approach was adopted to characterize the mechanical properties of the joint material, including the fracture toughness between the doubler and face-sheet. Twelve four-point-bend samples were tested, six in the sandwich core ribbon orientation and six in sandwich core cross-ribbon direction. Analysis predicted failure initiation and propagation at the pre-delaminated location, consistent with experimental observations. Fracture analyses methods predicted failure loads in close agreement with tests. This investigation demonstrated a strength reduction of 10 percent due to a flaw of significant size compared to the width of the sample. Therefore, concerns of bonding an OOA material to an in-autoclave material was mitigated for the geometries, materials, and load configurations considered.

  16. Failure Predictions of Out-of-Autoclave Sandwich Joints with Delaminations Under Flexure Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordendale, Nikolas A.; Goyal, Vinay K.; Lundgren, Eric C.; Patel, Dhruv N.; Farrokh, Babak; Jones, Justin; Fischetti, Grace; Segal, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis and a test program was conducted to investigate the damage tolerance of composite sandwich joints. The joints contained a single circular delamination between the face-sheet and the doubler. The coupons were fabricated through out-of-autoclave (OOA) processes, a technology NASA is investigating for joining large composite sections. The four-point bend flexure test was used to induce compression loading into the side of the joint where the delamination was placed. The compression side was chosen since it tends to be one of the most critical loads in launch vehicles. Autoclave cure was used to manufacture the composite sandwich sections, while the doubler was co-bonded onto the sandwich face-sheet using an OOA process after sandwich panels were cured. A building block approach was adopted to characterize the mechanical properties of the joint material, including the fracture toughness between the doubler and face-sheet. Twelve four-point-bend samples were tested, six in the sandwich core ribbon orientation and six in sandwich core cross-ribbon direction. Analysis predicted failure initiation and propagation at the pre-delaminated location, consistent with experimental observations. A building block approach using fracture analyses methods predicted failure loads in close agreement with tests. This investigation demonstrated a small strength reduction due to a flaw of significant size compared to the width of the sample. Therefore, concerns of bonding an OOA material to an in-autoclave material was mitigated for the geometries, materials, and load configurations considered.

  17. Analysis and Tests of Reinforced Carbon-Epoxy/Foam-Core Sandwich Panels with Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Rogers, Charles

    1996-01-01

    The results of a study of a low-cost structurally efficient minimum-gage shear-panel design that can be used in light helicopters are presented. The shear-panel design is based on an integrally stiffened syntactic-foam stabilized-skin with an all-bias-ply tape construction for stabilized-skin concept with an all-bias-ply tape construction for the skins. This sandwich concept is an economical way to increase the panel bending stiffness weight penalty. The panels considered in the study were designed to be buckling resistant up to 100 lbs/in. of shear load and to have an ultimate strength of 300 lbs/in. The panel concept uses unidirectional carbon-epoxy tape on a syntactic adhesive as a stiffener that is co-cured with the skin and is an effective concept for improving panel buckling strength. The panel concept also uses pultruded carbon-epoxy rods embedded in a syntactic adhesive and over-wrapped with a bias-ply carbon-epoxy tape to form a reinforcing beam which is an effective method for redistributing load around rectangular cutout. The buckling strength of the reinforced panels is 83 to 90 percent of the predicted buckling strength based on a linear buckling analysis. The maximum experimental deflection exceeds the maximum deflection predicted by a nonlinear analysis by approximately one panel thickness. The failure strength of the reinforced panels was two and a half to seven times of the buckling strength. This efficient shear-panel design concept exceeds the required ultimate strength requirement of 300 lbs/in by more than 100 percent.

  18. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compression Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compression strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compression loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  19. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compressive strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compressive loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  20. Compression After Impact Experiments and Analysis on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels with Thin Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of the effect of impact damage on composite structures is necessary to give the engineer an ability to design safe, efficient structures. Current composite structures suffer severe strength reduction under compressive loading conditions, due to even light damage, such as from low velocity impact. A review is undertaken to access the current state-of-development in the areas of experimental testing, and analysis methods. A set of experiments on honeycomb core sandwich panels, with thin woven fiberglass cloth facesheets, is described, which includes detailed instrumentation and unique observation techniques.

  1. Load characteristics of high power sandwich piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Shuyu, Lin

    2005-03-01

    Based on the equivalent circuit theory, the load characteristics of high power piezoelectric ultrasonic sandwich transducers are studied. Two types of loads are studied. One is liquid load as in ultrasonic cleaning, and the other is solid load as in ultrasonic drilling and machining. The effect of load and structure of the transducer on the resonance frequency of the transducer is analyzed. It is shown that the effect of load on the resonance frequency of sandwich transducers with different structures is different. For liquid load as in ultrasonic cleaning, the effect of the load on the resonance frequency of the sandwich transducer with symmetrical structure is the largest. It is the smallest for the transducer with its displacement node in the back metal cylinder. For solid load as in ultrasonic drilling and machining, the effect of the load on the resonance frequency of the sandwich transducer with its displacement node in the front metal cylinder is the largest. It is also the smallest for the transducer with its displacement node in the back metal cylinder. On the other hand, for some applications, such as ultrasonic drilling, when the lateral dimension of the tool is much less than that of the transducer, its effect on the resonance frequency of the transducer is small. The conclusions are useful in designing vibrating systems for different ultrasonic applications.

  2. Design of Cellular Composite Sandwich Panels for Maximum Blast Resistance Via Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Jennifer Righman; Su, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for optimizing the energy absorption under blast loads of cellular composite sandwich panels. A combination of dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) and simplified analytical modeling techniques are used. The analytical modeling calculates both the loading effects and structural response resulting from user-input charge sizes and standoff distances and offers the advantage of expediting iterative design processes. The FEA and the analytical model results are compared and contrasted then used to compare the energy response of various cellular composite sandwich panels under blast loads, where various core shapes and dimensions are the focus. As a result, it is concluded that the optimum shape consists of vertically-oriented webs while the optimum dimensions can be generally described as those which cause the most inelasticity without failure of the webs. These dimensions are also specifically quantified for select situations. This guidance is employed, along with the analytical method developed by the authors and considerations of the influences of material properties, to suggest a general design procedure that is a simple yet sufficiently accurate method for design. The suggested design approach is also demonstrated through a design example.

  3. Experimental, Theoretical and Numerical Investigation of the Flexural Behaviour of the Composite Sandwich Panels with PVC Foam Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, A.; Shankar, K.; Morozov, E. V.

    2014-08-01

    This study presents the main results of an experimental, theoretical and numerical investigation on the flexural behaviour and failure mode of composite sandwich panels primarily developed for marine applications. The face sheets of the sandwich panels are made up of glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP), while polyvinylchloride (PVC) foam was used as core material. Four-point bending test was carried out to investigate the flexural behaviour of the sandwich panel under quasi static load. The finite element (FE) analysis taking into account the cohesive nature of the skin-core interaction as well as the geometry and materials nonlinearity was performed, while a classical beam theory was used to estimate the flexural response. Although the FE results accurately represented the initial and post yield flexural response, the theoretical one restricted to the initial response of the sandwich panel due to the linearity assumptions. Core shear failure associate with skin-core debonding close to the loading points was the dominant failure mode observed experimentally and validated numerically and theoretically.

  4. Transient Thermal Testing and Analysis of a Thermally Insulating Structural Sandwich Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Bird, Richard K.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    A core configuration was devised for a thermally insulating structural sandwich panel. Two titanium prototype panels were constructed to illustrate the proposed sandwich panel geometry. The core of one of the titanium panels was filled with Saffil(trademark) alumina fibrous insulation and the panel was tested in a series of transient thermal tests. Finite element analysis was used to predict the thermal response of the panel using one- and two-dimensional models. Excellent agreement was obtained between predicted and measured temperature histories.

  5. Predictions of thermal buckling strengths of hypersonic aircraft sandwich panels using minimum potential energy and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal buckling characteristics of hypersonic aircraft sandwich panels of various aspect ratios were investigated. The panel is fastened at its four edges to the substructures under four different edge conditions and is subjected to uniform temperature loading. Minimum potential energy theory and finite element methods were used to calculate the panel buckling temperatures. The two methods gave fairly close buckling temperatures. However, the finite element method gave slightly lower buckling temperatures than those given by the minimum potential energy theory. The reasons for this slight discrepancy in eigensolutions are discussed in detail. In addition, the effect of eigenshifting on the eigenvalue convergence rate is discussed.

  6. Predictions of thermal buckling strengths of hypersonic aircraft sandwich panels using minimum potential energy and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, William L.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal buckling characteristics of hypersonic aircraft sandwich panels of various aspect ratios were investigated. The panel is fastened at its four edges to the substructures under four different edge conditions and is subjected to uniform temperature loading. Minimum potential energy theory and finite element methods were used to calculate the panel buckling temperatures. The two methods gave fairly close buckling temperatures. However, the finite element method gave slightly lower buckling temperatures than those given by the minimum potential energy theory. The reasons for this slight discrepancy in eigensolutions are discussed in detail. In addition, the effect of eigenshifting on the eigenvalue convergence rate is discussed.

  7. Optimization of Sandwich Composites Fuselages Under Flight Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chongxin; Bergsma, Otto; Koussios, Sotiris; Zu, Lei; Beukers, Adriaan

    2012-02-01

    The sandwich composites fuselages appear to be a promising choice for the future aircrafts because of their structural efficiency and functional integration advantages. However, the design of sandwich composites is more complex than other structures because of many involved variables. In this paper, the fuselage is designed as a sandwich composites cylinder, and its structural optimization using the finite element method (FEM) is outlined to obtain the minimum weight. The constraints include structural stability and the composites failure criteria. In order to get a verification baseline for the FEM analysis, the stability of sandwich structures is studied and the optimal design is performed based on the analytical formulae. Then, the predicted buckling loads and the optimization results obtained from a FEM model are compared with that from the analytical formulas, and a good agreement is achieved. A detailed parametric optimal design for the sandwich composites cylinder is conducted. The optimization method used here includes two steps: the minimization of the layer thickness followed by tailoring of the fiber orientation. The factors comprise layer number, fiber orientation, core thickness, frame dimension and spacing. Results show that the two-step optimization is an effective method for the sandwich composites and the foam sandwich cylinder with core thickness of 5 mm and frame pitch of 0.5 m exhibits the minimum weight.

  8. Dispersion of Lamb waves in a honeycomb composite sandwich panel.

    PubMed

    Baid, Harsh; Schaal, Christoph; Samajder, Himadri; Mal, Ajit

    2015-02-01

    Composite materials are increasingly being used in advanced aircraft and aerospace structures. Despite their many advantages, composites are often susceptible to hidden damages that may occur during manufacturing and/or service of the structure. Therefore, safe operation of composite structures requires careful monitoring of the initiation and growth of such defects. Ultrasonic methods using guided waves offer a reliable and cost effective method for defects monitoring in advanced structures due to their long propagation range and their sensitivity to defects in their propagation path. In this paper, some of the useful properties of guided Lamb type waves are investigated, using analytical, numerical and experimental methods, in an effort to provide the knowledge base required for the development of viable structural health monitoring systems for composite structures. The laboratory experiments involve a pitch-catch method in which a pair of movable transducers is placed on the outside surface of the structure for generating and recording the wave signals. The specific cases considered include an aluminum plate, a woven composite laminate and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel. The agreement between experimental, numerical and theoretical results are shown to be excellent in certain frequency ranges, providing a guidance for the design of effective inspection systems. PMID:25287973

  9. Dispersion of Lamb waves in a honeycomb composite sandwich panel.

    PubMed

    Baid, Harsh; Schaal, Christoph; Samajder, Himadri; Mal, Ajit

    2015-02-01

    Composite materials are increasingly being used in advanced aircraft and aerospace structures. Despite their many advantages, composites are often susceptible to hidden damages that may occur during manufacturing and/or service of the structure. Therefore, safe operation of composite structures requires careful monitoring of the initiation and growth of such defects. Ultrasonic methods using guided waves offer a reliable and cost effective method for defects monitoring in advanced structures due to their long propagation range and their sensitivity to defects in their propagation path. In this paper, some of the useful properties of guided Lamb type waves are investigated, using analytical, numerical and experimental methods, in an effort to provide the knowledge base required for the development of viable structural health monitoring systems for composite structures. The laboratory experiments involve a pitch-catch method in which a pair of movable transducers is placed on the outside surface of the structure for generating and recording the wave signals. The specific cases considered include an aluminum plate, a woven composite laminate and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel. The agreement between experimental, numerical and theoretical results are shown to be excellent in certain frequency ranges, providing a guidance for the design of effective inspection systems.

  10. Experimental investigation on the dynamic response of clamped corrugated sandwich plates subjected to underwater impulsive loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Dacheng; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Corrugated sandwich plates are widely used in marine industry because such plates have high strength-to-weight ratios and blast resistance. The laboratory-scaled fluid-structure interaction experiments are performed to demonstrate the shock resistance of solid monolithic plates and corrugated sandwich plates by quantifying the permanent transverse deflection at mid-span of the plates as a function of impulsive loadings per areal mass. Sandwich structures with 6mm-thick and 10mm-thick 3003 aluminum corrugated core and 5A06 face sheets are compared with the 5A06 solid monolithic plates in this paper. The dynamic deformation of plates are captured with the the 3D digital speckle correlation method (DIC). The results affirm that sandwich structures show a 30% reduction in the maximum plate deflection compare with a monolithic plate of identical mass per unit area, and the peak value of deflection effectively reduced by increasing the thickness core. The failure modes of sandwich plates consists of core crushing, imprinting, stretch tearing of face sheets, bending and permanent deformation of entire structure with the increasing impulsive loads, and the failure mechanisms are analyzed with the postmortem panels and dynamic deflection history captured by cameras. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.: 11372088).

  11. Response of fiber reinforced sandwich structures subjected to explosive loading

    SciTech Connect

    Perotti, Luigi E.; El Sayed, Tamer; Deiterding, Ralf; Ortiz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The capability to numerically simulate the response of sandwich structures to explosive loading constitutes a powerful tool to analyze and optimize their design by investigating the influence of different parameters. In order to achieve this objective, the necessary models for foam core and fiber reinforced materials in finite kinematics have been developed together with a finite element scheme which includes C1 finite elements for shells and cohesive elements able to capture the fracture propagation in composite fiber reinforced materials. This computational capability has been used to investigate the response of fiber reinforced sandwich shells to explosive loading. Based on the dissipated fracture energy resulting from these simulations, a factorial design has been carried out to assess the effect of different parameters on the sandwich shell response creating a tool for its optimization.

  12. Extended high order sandwich panel theory for bending analysis of sandwich beams with carbon nanotube reinforced face sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedari Salami, S.

    2016-02-01

    Bending analysis of a sandwich beam with soft core and carbon nanotube reinforced composite (CNTRC) face sheets in the literature is presented based on Extended High order Sandwich Panel Theory (EHSAPT). Distribution of fibers through the thickness of the face sheets could be uniform or functionally graded (FG). In this theory the face sheets follow the first order shear deformation theory (FSDT). Besides, the two dimensional elasticity is used for the core. The field equations are derived via the Ritz based solution which is suitable for any essential boundary condition. The influences of boundary conditions on bending response of the sandwich panel with soft core and CNTRC face sheet are investigated. In each type of boundary condition the effect of distribution pattern of CNTRCs on many essential involved parameters of the sandwich beam with functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced composite (FG- CNTRC) face sheets are studied in detail. Finally, experimental result have been compared with those obtained based on developed solution method. It is concluded that, the sandwich beam with X distribution figure of face sheets is the strongest with the smallest transverse displacement, and followed by the UD, O and ∧-ones, respectively.

  13. Material combinations and parametric study of thermal and mechanical performance of pyramidal core sandwich panels used for hypersonic aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Lorenzini, Giulio; Xie, Gongnan

    2016-11-01

    A novel kind of lightweight integrated thermal protection system, named pyramidal core sandwich panel, is proposed to be a good safeguard for hypersonic aircrafts in the current study. Such system is considered as not only an insulation structure but also a load-bearing structure. In the context of design for hypersonic aircrafts, an efficient optimization should be paid enough attention. This paper concerns with the homogenization of the proposed pyramidal sandwich core panel using two-dimensional model in subsequent research for material selection. According to the required insulation performance and thermal-mechanical properties, several suitable material combinations are chosen as candidates for the pyramidal core sandwich panel by adopting finite element analysis and approximate response surface. To obtain lightweight structure with an excellent capability of heat insulation and load-bearing, an investigation on some specific design variables, which are significant for thermal-mechanical properties of the structure, is performed. Finally, a good balance between the insulation performance, the capability of load-bearing and the lightweight has attained.

  14. Material combinations and parametric study of thermal and mechanical performance of pyramidal core sandwich panels used for hypersonic aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Lorenzini, Giulio; Xie, Gongnan

    2016-07-01

    A novel kind of lightweight integrated thermal protection system, named pyramidal core sandwich panel, is proposed to be a good safeguard for hypersonic aircrafts in the current study. Such system is considered as not only an insulation structure but also a load-bearing structure. In the context of design for hypersonic aircrafts, an efficient optimization should be paid enough attention. This paper concerns with the homogenization of the proposed pyramidal sandwich core panel using two-dimensional model in subsequent research for material selection. According to the required insulation performance and thermal-mechanical properties, several suitable material combinations are chosen as candidates for the pyramidal core sandwich panel by adopting finite element analysis and approximate response surface. To obtain lightweight structure with an excellent capability of heat insulation and load-bearing, an investigation on some specific design variables, which are significant for thermal-mechanical properties of the structure, is performed. Finally, a good balance between the insulation performance, the capability of load-bearing and the lightweight has attained.

  15. Post-Buckling Analysis of Curved Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Containing Interfacial Disbonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Krivanek, Thomas K.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical study on the effect of facesheet-core disbonds on the post-buckling response of curved honeycomb sandwich panels is presented herein. This work was conducted as part of the development of a damage tolerance plan for the next-generation Space Launch System heavy lift launch vehicle payload fairing. As such, the study utilized full-scale fairing barrel segments as the structure of interest. The panels were composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The panels were analyzed numerically using the finite element method incorporating geometric nonlinearity. In a predetermined circular region, facesheet and core nodes were detached to simulate a disbond, between the outer mold line facesheet and honeycomb core, induced via low-speed impact. Surface-to-surface contact in the disbonded region was invoked to prevent interpenetration of the facesheet and core elements and obtain realistic stresses in the core. The diameter of this disbonded region was varied and the effect of the size of the disbond on the post-buckling response was observed. Significant changes in the slope of the edge load-deflection response were used to determine the onset of global buckling and corresponding buckling load. Finally, several studies were conducted to determine the sensitivity of the numerical predictions to refinement in the finite element mesh.

  16. Thermostructural Behavior of a Hypersonic Aircraft Sandwich Panel Subjected to Heating on One Side

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1997-01-01

    Thermostructural analysis was performed on a heated titanium honeycomb-core sandwich panel. The sandwich panel was supported at its four edges with spar-like substructures that acted as heat sinks, which are generally not considered in the classical analysis. One side of the panel was heated to high temperature to simulate aerodynamic heating during hypersonic flight. Two types of surface heating were considered: (1) flat-temperature profile, which ignores the effect of edge heat sinks, and (2) dome-shaped-temperature profile, which approximates the actual surface temperature distribution associated with the existence of edge heat sinks. The finite-element method was used to calculate the deformation field and thermal stress distributions in the face sheets and core of the sandwich panel. The detailed thermal stress distributions in the sandwich panel are presented, and critical stress regions are identified. The study shows how the magnitudes of those critical stresses and their locations change with different heating and edge conditions. This technical report presents comprehensive, three-dimensional graphical displays of thermal stress distributions in every part of a titanium honeycomb-core sandwich panel subjected to hypersonic heating on one side. The plots offer quick visualization of the structural response of the panel and are very useful for hot structures designers to identify the critical stress regions.

  17. Design of Fiber Reinforced Foam Sandwich Panels for Large Ares V Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2010-01-01

    The preliminary design of three major structural components within NASA's Ares V heavy lift vehicle using a novel fiber reinforced foam composite sandwich panel concept is presented. The Ares V payload shroud, interstage, and core intertank are designed for minimum mass using this panel concept, which consists of integral composite webs separated by structural foam between two composite facesheets. The HyperSizer structural sizing software, in conjunction with NASTRAN finite element analyses, is used. However, since HyperSizer does not currently include a panel concept for fiber reinforced foam, the sizing was performed using two separate approaches. In the first, the panel core is treated as an effective (homogenized) material, whose properties are provided by the vendor. In the second approach, the panel is treated as a blade stiffened sandwich panel, with the mass of the foam added after completion of the panel sizing. Details of the sizing for each of the three Ares V components are given, and it is demonstrated that the two panel sizing approaches are in reasonable agreement for thinner panel designs, but as the panel thickness increases, the blade stiffened sandwich panel approach yields heavier panel designs. This is due to the effects of local buckling, which are not considered in the effective core property approach.

  18. Thermo-structural optimization of all-metallic prismatic sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdevit, Lorenzo

    All-metallic sandwich panels with prismatic cores offer tremendous potential for thermostructural applications, due to their exceptional bending response together with the possibility of driving a fluid through their open cores, thus enabling active cooling. This thesis offers a complete thermo-mechanical characterization of prismatic panels with both corrugated and diamond cores, with main emphasis on geometric optimization. For the mechanical study, the panel geometry is analytically optimized for minimum weight under any combination of bending and transverse shear force. For longitudinal loadings (i.e. bending axis parallel to the core corrugation direction), corrugated panels show excellent performance, equivalent to the best concepts available; for transverse loadings (i.e. bending axis perpendicular to the corrugation direction), this goal is achieved with diamond core designs. Failure maps are constructed based on the analytical model to provide easy visualization of the failure modes and allow immediate identification of optimal designs. Such maps are used to design a selected number of experiments, with the three-fold goal of (i) validating the analytical model, (ii) exploring the behavior subsequent to failure initiation (thus assessing the robustness of the chosen designs), and (iii) check the reliability of numerical simulations in capturing limit loads and deformation modes. Good agreement is achieved among analytical, computational and experimental results. In order to assess the active cooling performance of prismatic panels, a scenario is envisioned where a uniform heat flux is impinging on one face, with the rest of the panel being thermally insulated; under these conditions, all the heat flux is transferred to a cooling fluid flowing through the core channels. At any given level of the pressure drop, the panel geometry is optimized for maximum transferred heat flux subject to a temperature constraint on the structure. Although very large optimal

  19. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric; Lear, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Metallic foams are a relatively new class of materials with low density and novel physical, mechanical, thermal, electrical and acoustic properties. Although incompletely characterized, they offer comparable mechanical performance to traditional spacecraft structural materials (i.e. honeycomb sandwich panels) without detrimental through-thickness channeling cells. There are two competing types of metallic foams: open cell and closed cell. Open cell foams are considered the more promising technology due to their lower weight and higher degree of homogeneity. Leading micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields (MMOD) incorporate thin plates separated by a void space (i.e. Whipple shield). Inclusion of intermediate fabric layers, or multiple bumper plates have led to significant performance enhancements, yet these shields require additional non-ballistic mass for installation (fasteners, supports, etc.) that can consume up to 35% of the total shield weight [1]. Structural panels, such as open cell foam core sandwich panels, that are also capable of providing sufficient MMOD protection, represent a significant potential for increased efficiency in hypervelocity impact shielding from a systems perspective through a reduction in required non-ballistic mass. In this paper, the results of an extensive impact test program on aluminum foam core sandwich panels are reported. The effect of pore density, and core thickness on shielding performance have been evaluated over impact velocities ranging from 2.2 - 9.3 km/s at various angles. A number of additional tests on alternate sandwich panel configurations of comparable-weight have also been performed, including aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels (see Figure 1), Nomex honeycomb core sandwich panels, and 3D aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels. A total of 70 hypervelocity impact tests are reported, from which an empirical ballistic limit equation (BLE) has been derived. The BLE is in the standard form suitable for implementation in

  20. Virtual Design Method for Controlled Failure in Foldcore Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Ralf; Fischer, S.

    2015-12-01

    For certification, novel fuselage concepts have to prove equivalent crashworthiness standards compared to the existing metal reference design. Due to the brittle failure behaviour of CFRP this requirement can only be fulfilled by a controlled progressive crash kinematics. Experiments showed that the failure of a twin-walled fuselage panel can be controlled by a local modification of the core through-thickness compression strength. For folded cores the required change in core properties can be integrated by a modification of the fold pattern. However, the complexity of folded cores requires a virtual design methodology for tailoring the fold pattern according to all static and crash relevant requirements. In this context a foldcore micromodel simulation method is presented to identify the structural response of a twin-walled fuselage panels with folded core under crash relevant loading condition. The simulations showed that a high degree of correlation is required before simulation can replace expensive testing. In the presented studies, the necessary correlation quality could only be obtained by including imperfections of the core material in the micromodel simulation approach.

  1. Design and fabrication of a radiative actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, D. A.; Pagel, L. L.; Schaeffer, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    The panel assembly consisted of an external thermal protection system (metallic heat shields and insulation blankets) and an aluminum honeycomb structure. The structure was cooled to temperature 442K (300 F) by circulating a 60/40 mass solution of ethylene glycol and water through dee shaped coolant tubes nested in the honeycomb and adhesively bonded to the outer skin. Rene'41 heat shields were designed to sustain 5000 cycles of a uniform pressure of + or - 6.89kPa (+ or - 1.0 psi) and aerodynamic heating conditions equivalent to 136 kW sq m (12 Btu sq ft sec) to a 422K (300 F) surface temperature. High temperature flexible insulation blankets were encased in stainless steel foil to protect them from moisture and other potential contaminates. The aluminum actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel was designed to sustain 5000 cycles of cyclic in-plane loading of + or - 210 kN/m (+ or - 1200 lbf/in.) combined with a uniform panel pressure of + or - 6.89 kPa (?1.0 psi).

  2. Flexural and impact properties of sandwich panels used in surfboard construction

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, J.A.; Crosky, A.G.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    1993-12-31

    Surfboards represent a particularly simple example of sandwich panel construction and are conventionally made from a preshaped low density polyurethane foam core encased in an E-glass/polyester skin. They are made to minimum weight and thickness and as a result suffer durability problems. The boards are particularly prone to denting due to impact damage, causing principally cosmetic problems. More importantly, they frequently snap under normal service conditions. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the use of higher performance materials for the skins, notably S-glass and epoxy resin, to improve the durability of surfboards. This work examines the failure of simple parallel faced panels fabricated to simulate a section of a surfboard. It is shown that when loaded in four point bending, the panels fail by compression of the core and that this mode of failure produces the same characteristics as seen in service failures. Further, the flexural strength is dominated by the behavior of the core and is not improved appreciably by the use of S-glass or epoxy resin. On the other hand, the impact resistance is improved by the use of S-glass and further improved if epoxy resin is used as the matrix.

  3. Combined load test apparatus for flat panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWithey, Robert R.; Martin, Carl J., Jr.; Cerro, Jeffrey A.

    1992-04-01

    Future hypersonic aircraft such as the National Aero-Space Plane and a high speed civil transport will require the design and use of efficient, highly-loaded, flat structural panels to achieve mission requirements. These panels will be subjected to severe combinations of in-plane mechanical distributed loads (i.e., normal loads in two perpendicular directions plus a shear load), in addition to pressure and thermal loads. A testing apparatus is provided for applying uniform combined in-plane stresses to a flat panel containing an interior test area. Actuators cause two sets of load rods to apply loads to the edge of the flat panel. The first set applies loads which are perpendicular to and independent of the loads applied by the second set. The loads are applied according to a cosine load distribution to obtain a uniform stress field within the test area. The flat panel may be rotated with respect to the applied loads to obtain a wide range of combined stresses in the test area. Movement outside the plane of the flat panel may be selectively prevented by connecting the flat panel to a restraining disk by support rods. The support rods then define the test area. A thermal load may be applied to one side of the flat panel and a pressure load may be applied to the other side. The novelty of this method is found in providing a testing apparatus which allows mechanical, thermal and pressure loads to be applied simultaneously to a flat panel for testing purposes.

  4. The Effects of Various Design Parameters on the Free Vibration of Doubly Curved Composite Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CUNNINGHAM, P. R.; WHITE, R. G.; AGLIETTI, G. S.

    2000-02-01

    Sandwich panels have a very high stiffness to weight ratio, which makes them particularly useful in the aerospace industry where carbon fibre reinforced plastics and lightweight honeycomb cores are being used in the construction of floor panels, fairings and intake barrel panels. In the latter case, the geometry of the panels can be considered doubly curved. This paper presents an introduction to an ongoing study investigating the dynamic response prediction of acoustically excited composite sandwich panels which have double curvature. The final objective is to assess and hopefully produce an up to date set of acoustic fatigue design guidelines for this type of structure. The free vibration of doubly curved composite honeycomb sandwich panels is investigated here, both experimentally and theoretically, the latter using a commerically available finite element package. The design and manufacture of three test panels is covered before presenting experimental results for the natural frequencies of vibration with freely supported boundary conditions. Once validated against the experimental results, the theoretical investigation is extended to study the effects of changing radii of curvature, orthotropic properties of the core, and ply orientation on the natural frequencies of vibration of rectangular panels with various boundary conditions. The results from the parameter studies show curve veering, particularly when studying the effect of changing radii and ply orientation, however, it is not clear whether this phenomenon is due to the approximation method used or occurs in the physical system.

  5. Design, fabrication and test of liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Camarda, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat-pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich panel construction, were fabricated and tested. The designs utilize two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and potassium or sodium as the working fluid. Panels were tested by radiant heating, and the results indicate successful heat pipe operation at temperatures of approximately 922K (1200F). These panels, in addition to solving potential thermal stress problems in an Airframe-Integrated Scramjet Engine, have potential applications as cold plates for electronic component cooling, as radiators for space platforms, and as low distortion, large area structures.

  6. Design, fabrication and test of liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Camarda, C. J.

    1982-01-01

    Integral heat-pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich panel construction, were fabricated and tested. The designs utilize two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and potassium or sodium as the working fluid. Panels were tested by radiant heating, and the results indicate successful heat pipe operation at temperatures of approximately 922 K (1200 F). These panels, in addition to solving potential thermal stress problems in an Airframe-Integrated Scramjet Engine, have potential applications as cold plates for electronic component cooling, as radiators for space platforms, and as low distortion, large area structures.

  7. Long-term hygrothermal effects on damage tolerance of hybrid composite sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishai, Ori; Hiel, Clement; Luft, Michael

    1995-01-01

    A sandwich construction, composed of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced plastic skins and a syntactic foam core, was selected as the design concept for a wind tunnel compressor blade application, where high damage tolerance and durability are of major importance. Beam specimens were prepared from open-edge and encapsulated sandwich panels which had previously been immersed in water at different temperatures for periods of up to about two years in the extreme case. Moisture absorption and strength characteristics, as related to time of exposure to hygrothermal conditions, were evaluated for the sandwich specimens and their constituents (skins and foam). After different exposure periods, low-velocity impact damage was inflicted on most sandwich specimens and damage characteristics were related to impact energy. Eventually, the residual compressive strengths of the damaged (and undamaged) beams were determined flexurally. Test results show that exposure to hygrothermal conditions leads to significant strength reductions for foam specimens and open-edge sandwich panels, compared with reference specimens stored at room temperature. In the case of skin specimens and for beams prepared from encapsulated sanwich panels that had previously been exposed to hygrothermal conditions, moisture absorption was found to improve strength as related to the reference case. The beneficial effect of moisture on skin performance was, however, limited to moisture contents below 1% (at 50 C and lower temperatures). Above this moisture level and at higher temperatures, strength degradation of the skin seems to prevail.

  8. Impulsive Loading of Cellular Media in Sandwich Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Joseph A.; Gazonas, George A.

    2006-07-01

    Motivated by recent efforts to mitigate blast loading using energy-absorbing materials, this paper investigates the uniaxial crushing of cellular media in sandwich construction under impulsive pressure loading. The cellular core is modeled using a rigid, perfectly-plastic, locking idealization, as in previous studies, and the front and back faces are modeled as rigid, with pressure loading applied to the front face and the back face unrestrained. Predictions of this analytical model show excellent agreement with explicit finite element computations, and the model is used to investigate the influence of the mass distribution between the core and the faces. Increasing the mass fraction in the front face is found to increase the impulse required for complete crushing of the cellular core but also to produce undesirable increases in back-face accelerations. Optimal mass distributions are investigated by maximizing the impulse capacity while limiting the back-face accelerations to a specified level.

  9. Bending and Forced Vibration Response of a Clamped Orthotropic Thick Plate and Sandwich Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LOK, T. S.; CHENG, Q. H.

    2001-08-01

    A closed-form solution for the forced response of an orthotropic thick plate and sandwich panel has been developed and is presented in this paper. The paper outlines the methodology and develops the formulation to enable the solution to be derived. A novel truss-core sandwich panel is introduced and a method is outlined in which the panel is represented as an equivalent homogeneous orthotropic thick plate continuum. The 3-D dynamic finite element method is one of the most versatile developments of the 20th century. However, the software is not as accessible or as user-friendly for engineers who are not trained in such analytical tools. Therefore, alternative methods of analysis must be found, especially in the dynamic assessment of thin-walled truss-core sandwich panels. One way is to transform the sandwich structure into an equivalent homogeneous orthotropic thick plate continuum and to conduct the analysis on the equivalent model. The authors have derived the necessary elastic constants to hasten this transformation. In this paper, the derived elastic constants are used with closed-form solution to determine the bending and forced vibration response of a clamped truss-core sandwich panel, represented as a homogeneous orthotropic thick plate continuum. The Rayleigh-Ritz method is employed for the closed-form solution and the forced response is determined using Duhamel's integral. Admissible functions are taken as a series of products of beam mode-shape functions in the two orthogonal directions. The beam function in either direction is derived from the corresponding beam eigenvalue problem. Numerical examples, which include the influence of transverse shear on the response, show that the closed-form solution agrees with analytical and numerical data available in the literature and also with 3-D finite element results.

  10. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S.; Ordonez, E.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Open cell metallic foam core sandwich panel structures are of interest for application in spacecraft micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields due to their novel form and advantageous structural and thermal performance. Repeated shocking as a result of secondary impacts upon individual foam ligaments during the penetration process acts to raise the thermal state of impacting projectiles ; resulting in fragmentation, melting, and vaporization at lower velocities than with traditional shielding configurations (e.g. Whipple shield). In order to characterize the protective capability of these structures, an extensive experimental campaign was performed by the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility, the results of which are reported in this paper. Although not capable of competing against the protection levels achievable with leading heavy shields in use on modern high-risk vehicles (i.e. International Space Station modules), metallic foam core sandwich panels are shown to provide a substantial improvement over comparable structural panels and traditional low weight shielding alternatives such as honeycomb sandwich panels and metallic Whipple shields. A ballistic limit equation, generalized in terms of panel geometry, is derived and presented in a form suitable for application in risk assessment codes.

  11. Computation of linear transmittance of thermal bridges in precast concrete sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscietti, Davide; Gervasio, Paola; Lezzi, Adriano M.

    2014-11-01

    Precast concrete lightened sandwich panels are widely used building elements. They are made by two concrete wythes separated by a layer of lightweight material: the central layer is inhomogeneous due to the presence of concrete ribs which tie the external wythe and act as thermal bridges. Computation of thermal transmittance of sandwich panels is clearly described in European Standards, but in many cases it requires numerical simulations to determine the linear transmittance ψ associated with lightweight material-concrete interfaces in the inhomogeneous layer. Although simple, these simulations represent a critical issue for many panel manufacturers and they would much rather prefer correlations to compute ψ. In this work we present a correlation based on an artificial neural network (ANN) to estimate linear trasmittauce values for current Italian sandwich panel production. Five input parameters are considered: rib width, lightweight material conductivity, and thickness of the three panel layers. To obtain the data which are necessary to train and test the ANN, a fast and accurate Spectral Element Method is used to solve Laplace equation in the neighborhood of a rib. 5460 ψ values are collected which ensure an accurate network response.

  12. Morphing nacelle inlet lip with pneumatic actuators and a flexible nano composite sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulsine Ozdemir, Nazli; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Craciun, Monica; Remillat, Chrystel; Lira, Cristian; Jagessur, Yogesh; Da Rocha-Schmidt, Luiz

    2015-12-01

    We present a hybrid pneumatic/flexible sandwich structure with thermoplastic (TP) nanocomposite skins to enable the morphing of a nacelle inlet lip. The design consists of pneumatic inflatables as actuators and a flexible sandwich panel that morphs under variable pressure combinations to adapt different flight conditions and save fuel. The sandwich panel forms the outer layer of the nacelle inlet lip. It is lightweight, compliant and impact resistant with no discontinuities, and consists of graphene-doped thermoplastic polyurethane (G/TPU) skins that are supported by an aluminium Flex-core honeycomb in the middle, with near zero in-plane Poisson’s ratio behaviour. A test rig for a reduced-scale demonstrator was designed and built to test the prototype of morphing nacelle with custom-made pneumatic actuators. The output force and the deflections of the experimental demonstrator are verified with the internal pressures of the actuators varying from 0 to 0.41 MPa. The results show the feasibility and promise of the hybrid inflatable/nanocomposite sandwich panel for morphing nacelle airframes.

  13. Variable stiffness sandwich panels using electrostatic interlocking core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2016-04-01

    Structural topology has a large impact on the flexural stiffness of a beam structure. Reversible attachment between discrete substructures allows for control of shear stress transfer between structural elements, thus stiffness modulation. Electrostatic adhesion has shown promise for providing a reversible latching mechanism for controllable internal connectivity. Building on previous research, a thin film copper polyimide laminate has been used to incorporate high voltage electrodes to Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) sandwich structures. The level of electrostatic holding force across the electrode interface is key to the achievable level of stiffness modulation. The use of non-flat interlocking core structures can allow for a significant increase in electrode contact area for a given core geometry, thus a greater electrostatic holding force. Interlocking core geometries based on cosine waves can be Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machined from Rohacell IGF 110 Foam core. These Interlocking Core structures could allow for enhanced variable stiffness functionality compared to basic planar electrodes. This novel concept could open up potential new applications for electrostatically induced variable stiffness structures.

  14. Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts. [airframe integrated scramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon; a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation; nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

  15. Non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels using active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, R.; Venegas, P.; Guerediaga, J.; Vega, L.; López, I.

    2012-11-01

    The aerospace industry is in constant need of ever-more efficient inspection methods for quality control. Product inspection is also essential to maintain the safe operation of aircraft components designed to perform for decades. This paper proposes a method for non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels. Honeycomb sandwich panels are extensively employed in the aerospace industry due to their high strength and stiffness to weight ratios. In order to attach additional structures to them, panels are reinforced by filling honeycomb cells and drilling holes into the reinforced areas. The proposed procedure is designed to detect the position of the holes within the reinforced area and to provide a robust measurement of the distance between each hole and the boundary of the reinforced area. The result is a fast, safe and clean inspection method for drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels that can be used to robustly assess a possible displacement of the hole from the center of the reinforced area, which could have serious consequences. The proposed method is based on active infrared thermography, and uses state of the art methods for infrared image processing, including signal-to-nose ratio enhancement, hole detection and segmentation. Tests and comparison with X-ray inspections indicate that the proposed system meets production needs.

  16. An experimental investigation of sandwich flat panels under low velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Timberlyn M.

    1994-12-01

    This study evaluated the failure modes and mechanisms associated with increasing face sheet thickness of flat sandwich panels under low velocity impact. The sandwich panels were fabricated using 1.27 cm thick, 145 kg/cu m (9 lb/cu ft), 3.175 mm (1/8 in.) cell size Nomex honeycomb core, FM 300-2 film adhesive and AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy face sheets. The thickness of the core remained 1.27 cm, and the thickness of the adhesive remained 0.25 mm. The thickness of the face sheets varied using the following stacking sequences: (O/90)s, (O/90)2s, (O/90)4s, (O/90)8s, and (O/90)12s. The sandwich panels were subjected to various low velocity impacts using the Dynatup Impact Test Machine. Pulse-Echo C-scans and optical microscopy of panel cross-sections were performed to characterize the damage. The cross-sections indicated that delamination and transverse cracking contribute to internal damage of the face sheets, while crushing, buckling, and crippling contribute to damage of the core. Cracks in the adhesive also contribute to damage in some cases.

  17. Analysis of propagation characteristics of flexural wave in honeycomb sandwich panel and design of loudspeaker for radiating inclined sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    A loudspeaker for an auditory guiding system is proposed. This loudspeaker utilizes inclined sound transformed from a flexural wave in a honeycomb sandwich panel. We focused on the fact that the inclined sound propagates extensively with uniform level and direction. Furthermore, sound can be generated without group delay dispersion because the phase velocity of the flexural wave in the sandwich panel becomes constant with increasing frequency. These characteristics can be useful for an auditory guiding system in public spaces since voice-guiding navigation indicates the right direction regardless of position on a pathway. To design the proposed loudspeaker, the behavior of the sandwich panel is predicted using a theoretical equation in which the honeycomb core is assumed as an orthotropic continuum. We calculated the phase velocity dispersion of the flexural wave in the sandwich panel and compared the results obtained using the equation with those of a simulation based on the finite element method and an experiment in order to confirm the applicability of the theoretical equation. It was confirmed that the phase velocities obtained using the theoretical equation and by the simulation were in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. The obtained results suggest that the behavior of the sandwich panel can be predicted using the parameters of the panel. In addition, we designed an optimized honeycomb sandwich panel for radiating inclined sound by calculating the phase velocity characteristics of various panels that have different parameters of core height and cell size using the theoretical equation. Sound radiation from the optimized panel was simulated and compared with that of a homogeneous plate. It was clear that the variance of the radiation angle with varying frequency of the optimized panel was smaller than that of the homogeneous plate. This characteristic of sound radiation with a uniform angle is useful for indicating the destination direction. On

  18. Vibroacoustic flexural properties of symmetric honeycomb sandwich panels with composite faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaumie, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    The vibroacoustic bending properties of honeycomb sandwich panels with composite faces are studied from the wavenumber modulus to the mechanical impedance, passing through the modal density. Numerical results extracted from finite element software computations are compared with analytical results. In both cases, the homogenization method is used to calculate the global properties of the sandwich panel. Since faces are made of composite material, the classical laminate theory serves as reference. With particular conditions used in the application for symmetric panels, the original orthotropic mechanical properties can be reduced simply to three parameters commonly used in vibroacoustic characterizations. These three parameters are the mass per unit area, the bending rigidity and the out-of-plane shear rigidity. They simultaneously govern the wavenumber modulus, the modal frequencies, the modal density and the mechanical impedance. For all of these vibroacoustic characterizations, a special frequency called the transition frequency separates two domains. In the first domain, below the transition frequency or for low frequencies, the orthotropic sandwich panel has a classical isotropic plate behavior. In the second domain, above the transition frequency or for high frequencies, the out-of-plane shear rigidity is very significant and changes the behavior. However, the results discussed are only valid up to a certain frequency which is determined by the thickness and out-of-plane shear stiffness of the honeycomb core, the thickness and the bending stiffness of the laminated face sheets and then the mass per unit area and bending stiffness of the total sandwich structure. All these parameters influence the final choice of model and simplifications presented. Experimental measurements of the bending wavenumber modulus and modal frequencies for our own application were carried out. In the vibroacoustic domain, the critical frequency is also an important frequency. It again

  19. A literature review on computational models for laminated composite and sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreja, Ireneusz

    2011-03-01

    The present paper is devoted to a state-of-the-art review on the computational treatment of laminated composite and sandwich panels. Over two hundred texts have been included in the survey with the focus put on theoretical models for multilayered plates and shells, and FEM implementation of various computational concepts. As a result of the review, one could notice a lack of a single numerical model capable for a universal representation of all layered composite and sandwich panels. Usually, with the increase of the range of rotations considered in the particular model, one can observe the decrease of the degree of complexity of the through-the-thickness representation of deformation profiles.

  20. Compression After Impact on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels with Thin Facesheets, Part 2: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcquigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2012-01-01

    A two part research study has been completed on the topic of compression after impact (CAI) of thin facesheet honeycomb core sandwich panels. The research has focused on both experiments and analysis in an effort to establish and validate a new understanding of the damage tolerance of these materials. Part 2, the subject of the current paper, is focused on the analysis, which corresponds to the CAI testings described in Part 1. Of interest, are sandwich panels, with aerospace applications, which consist of very thin, woven S2-fiberglass (with MTM45-1 epoxy) facesheets adhered to a Nomex honeycomb core. Two sets of materials, which were identical with the exception of the density of the honeycomb core, were tested in Part 1. The results highlighted the need for analysis methods which taken into account multiple failure modes. A finite element model (FEM) is developed here, in Part 2. A commercial implementation of the Multicontinuum Failure Theory (MCT) for progressive failure analysis (PFA) in composite laminates, Helius:MCT, is included in this model. The inclusion of PFA in the present model provided a new, unique ability to account for multiple failure modes. In addition, significant impact damage detail is included in the model. A sensitivity study, used to assess the effect of each damage parameter on overall analysis results, is included in an appendix. Analysis results are compared to the experimental results for each of the 32 CAI sandwich panel specimens tested to failure. The failure of each specimen is predicted using the high-fidelity, physicsbased analysis model developed here, and the results highlight key improvements in the understanding of honeycomb core sandwich panel CAI failure. Finally, a parametric study highlights the strength benefits compared to mass penalty for various core densities.

  1. Sound radiation and transmission loss characteristics of a honeycomb sandwich panel with composite facings: Effect of inherent material damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, M. P.; Jagadeesh, M.; Pitchaimani, Jeyaraj; Gangadharan, K. V.; Babu, M. C. Lenin

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical studies carried out on vibro-acoustic and sound transmission loss behaviour of aluminium honeycomb core sandwich panel with fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) facings. Layered structural shell element with equivalent orthotropic elastic properties of core and orthotropic properties of FRP facing layer is used to predict the free and forced vibration characteristics. Followed by this, acoustic response and transmission loss characteristics are obtained using Rayleigh integral. Vibration and acoustic characteristics of FRP sandwich panels are compared with aluminium sandwich panels. The result reveals that FRP panel has better vibro-acoustic and transmission loss characteristics due to high stiffness and inherent material damping associated with them. Resonant amplitudes of the response are fully controlled by modal damping factors calculated based on modal strain energy. It is also demonstrated that FRP panel can be used to replace the aluminium panel without losing acoustic comfort with nearly 40 percent weight reduction.

  2. Design and fabrication of brazed Rene 41 honeycomb sandwich structural panels for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Swegle, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    The design and fabrication of two large brazed Rene 41 honeycomb panels, the establishment of a test plan, the design and fabrication of a test fixture to subject the panels to cyclic thermal gradients and mechanical loads equivalent to those imposed on an advanced space transportation vehicle during its boost and entry trajectories are discussed. The panels will be supported at four points, creating three spans. The outer spans are 45.7 cm (18 in.) and the center span 76.2 cm (30 in). Specimen width is 30.5 cm (12 in.). The panels were primarily designed by boost conditions simulated by subjecting the panels to liquid nitrogen, 77K (-320 F) on one side and 455K (360 F) on the other side and by mechanically imposing loads representing vehicle fuel pressure loads. Entry conditions were simulated by radiant heating to 1034K (1400 F). The test program subjected the panels to 500 boost thermal conditions. Results are presented.

  3. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Care for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. Traditionally, these components have been fabricated using expensive materials such as light weight titanium alloys, polymeric composite materials and carbon-carbon composites. The present study investigates the use of P sandwich foam fan blade made up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by a foam core. The resulting structure possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. Since the face sheets carry the applied bending loads, the sandwich architecture is a viable engineering concept. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of the sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and P detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of skin thickness and core volume %re presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  4. Compression After Impact on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels With Thin Facesheets. Part 1; Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2012-01-01

    A two part research study has been completed on the topic of compression after impact (CAI) of thin facesheet honeycomb core sandwich panels. The research has focused on both experiments and analysis in an effort to establish and validate a new understanding of the damage tolerance of these materials. Part one, the subject of the current paper, is focused on the experimental testing. Of interest are sandwich panels, with aerospace applications, which consist of very thin, woven S2-fiberglass (with MTM45-1 epoxy) facesheets adhered to a Nomex honeycomb core. Two sets of specimens, which were identical with the exception of the density of the honeycomb core, were tested. Static indentation and low velocity impact using a drop tower are used to study damage formation in these materials. A series of highly instrumented CAI tests was then completed. New techniques used to observe CAI response and failure include high speed video photography, as well as digital image correlation (DIC) for full-field deformation measurement. Two CAI failure modes, indentation propagation, and crack propagation, were observed. From the results, it can be concluded that the CAI failure mode of these panels depends solely on the honeycomb core density.

  5. Optimum Design of Composite Sandwich Structures Subjected to Combined Torsion and Bending Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Gangyan; Wang, Chun H.; You, Min

    2012-06-01

    This research is motivated by the increase use of composite sandwich structures in a wide range of industries such as automotive, aerospace and civil infrastructure. To maximise stiffness at minimum weight, the paper develops a minimum weight optimization method for sandwich structure under combined torsion and bending loads. We first extend the minimum-weight design of sandwich structures under bending load to the case of torsional deformation and then present optimum solutions for the combined requirements of both bending and torsional stiffness. Three design cases are identified for a sandwich structure required to meet multiple design constraints of torsion and bending stiffness. The optimum solutions for all three cases are derived. To illustrate the newly developed optimum design solutions, numerical examples are presented for sandwich structures made of either isotropic face skins or orthotropic composite face skins.

  6. Low-energy impact resistance of graphite-epoxy plates and ALS honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, David

    1989-01-01

    Low energy impact may be potentially dangerous for many highly optimized stiff structures. Impact by foreign objects such as birds, ice, and runways stones or dropping of tools occur frequently and the resulting damage and stress concentrations may be unacceptable from a designer's standpoint. The barely visible, yet potentially dangerous dents due to impact of foreign objects on the Advanced Launch System (ALS) structure are studied. Of particular interest is the computation of the maximum peak impact force for a given impactor mass and initial velocity. The theoretical impact forces will be compared with the experimental dropweight results for the ALS face sheets alone as well as the ALS honeycomb sandwich panels.

  7. Thermal stability tests of CFRP sandwich panels for far infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, W. F.; Helwig, G.; Scheulen, D.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of fabrication methods and low temperature figure tests for CFRP sandwich panels, in order to ascertain their applicability to ultralightweight 3-m aperture primary mirrors for balloon-borne sub-mm and far-IF telescopes that must maintain a 1-2 micron rms surface figure accuracy at -40 to -50 C. Optical figure measurements on the first two of a series of four 0.5-m test panels, replicated to a spherical surface, show a radius-of-curvature change and astigmatism down to -60 C; this approximately follows the composite's theoretical predictions and implies that material and process control is excellent, so that the large scale changes observed can be compensated for.

  8. Response surface characterization of impact damage and residual strength degradation in composite sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarah, Issam Khder

    2003-06-01

    The influence of material configuration and impact parameters on the damage tolerance characteristics of sandwich composites comprised of carbon-epoxy woven fabric facesheets and Nomex honeycomb cores was investigated using empirically based response surfaces. A series of carefully selected tests were used to isolate the coupled influence of various combinations of the number of facesheet plies, core density, core thickness, impact energy, impactor diameter, and impact velocity on the damage formation and residual strength degradation due to normal impact. The ranges of selected material parameters were typical of those found in common aircraft applications. The diameter of the planar damage area associated with Through Transmission Ultrasonic C-scan measurements and the peak residual facesheet indentation depth were used to describe the extent of internal and detectable surface damage, respectively. Standard analysis of variance techniques were used to assess the significance of the regression models, individual model terms, and model lack-of-fit. In addition, the inherent variability associated with given types of experimental measurements was evaluated. Response surface estimates of the size of the planar damage region and compressive residual strength as a continuous function of material system and impact parameters correlated reasonably well with experimentally determined values. For a fixed set of impact parameters, regression results suggest that impact damage development and residual strength degradation is highly material and lay-up configuration dependent. Increasing the number of facesheet plies and the thickness of the core material generally resulted in the greatest improvement in the damage tolerance characteristics. An increase in the impact energy can result in a significant decrease in the estimated residual strength, particularly for those sandwich panels with thicker facesheets. The effects of variable impact velocity on damage formation and loss

  9. Minimum-Weight Sandwich Structure Optimum Design Subjected to Torsional Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Gangyan; Wang, Chun H.; You, Min

    2012-04-01

    As one of the most valued structural engineering innovations developed by the composites industry, sandwich structures are now used extensively in automotive, aerospace and civil infrastructure due to the main advantage of lightweight. This paper develops a minimum weight optimization method for sandwich structure subjected to torsion load. The design process are identified for a sandwich structure required to meet the design constraint of torsion stiffness. The optimum solutions show that at optimum design the core weight accounts for 66.7% of the whole sandwich structure. To illustrate the newly developed optimum design solutions, numerical examples are presented for sandwich structures made of either isotropic face skins or orthotropic composite face skins. Agreement between the theoretical analysis and the examples results is good.

  10. Analysis of an Aircraft Honeycomb Sandwich Panel with Circular Face Sheet/Core Disbond Subjected to Ground-Air Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, Martin; Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James

    2013-01-01

    The ground-air pressurization of lightweight honeycomb sandwich structures caused by alternating pressure differences between the enclosed air within the honeycomb core and the ambient environment is a well-known and controllable loading condition of aerospace structures. However, initial face sheet/core disbonds intensify the face sheet peeling effect of the internal pressure load significantly and can decrease the reliability of the sandwich structure drastically. Within this paper, a numerical parameter study was carried out to investigate the criticality of initial disbonds in honeycomb sandwich structures under ground-air pressurization. A fracture mechanics approach was used to evaluate the loading at the disbond front. In this case, the strain energy release rate was computed via the Virtual Crack Closure Technique. Special attention was paid to the pressure-deformation coupling which can decrease the pressure load within the disbonded sandwich section significantly when the structure is highly deformed.

  11. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel. Part 3; 8-ply Out-of-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10 m diameter barrel section of the heavy lift launch vehicle, were manufactured under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Constellation Ares V program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: inautoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800B/5320-1. Smaller 3- by 5-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of the 3- by 5-ft panels. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panel composed of 8-ply, T40-800B/5320-1 facesheets (referred to as Panel C). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear, two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D), models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was predicted correctly that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength.

  12. Meshless Analysis of Laminated Composite and Sandwich Plates Subjected to Various Types of Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jeeoot; Singh, Sandeep; Shukla, K. K.

    2014-03-01

    The bending analysis of laminated composite and sandwich plates using different radial basis functions and higher-order shear deformation theory is presented. This meshfree technique is insensitive to spatial dimension and considers only a cloud of nodes (centers) for the spatial discretization of both the problem domain and the boundary. Numerical results for simply supported isotropic, symmetric cross-ply composite and sandwich plate are presented. The results are compared with other available results. It is observed that convergence of the polynomial function is faster as compared to other radial basis functions, whereas Gaussian function takes the least solution time. The effect of various types of loadings on sandwich plate is presented.

  13. Development of aircraft lavatory compartments with improved fire resistance characteristics. Phase 2: Sandwich panel resin system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Arnold, D. B.; Johnson, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    A NASA-funded program is described which aims to develop a resin system for use in the construction of lavatory wall panels, sidewall panels, and ceiling panels possessing flammability, smoke and gas emission, and toxicity (FS&T) characteristics superior to the existing epoxy resin. Candidate resins studied were phenolic, polyimide, and bismaleimide. Based on the results of a series of FS&T as well as mechanical and aesthetic property tests, a phenolic resin was chosen as the superior material. Material and process specifications covering the phenolic resin based materials were prepared and a method of rating sandwich panel performance was developed.

  14. Finite element analysis of hypervelocity impact behaviour of CFRP-Al/HC sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, Vaibhav A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical response of CFRP-Al/HC (carbon fibre-reinforced/epoxy composite face sheets with Al honeycomb core) sandwich panels to hyper-velocity impact (up to 1 km/s) is studied using a finite-element model developed in ABAQUS/Explicit. The intraply damage of CFRP face sheets is analysed by mean of a user-defined material model (VUMAT) employing a combination of Hashin and Puck criteria, delamination modelled using cohesive-zone elements. The damaged Al/HC core is assessed on the basis of a Johnson Cook dynamic failure model while its hydrodynamic response is captured using the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state. The results obtained with the developed finite-element model showed a reasonable correlation to experimental damage patterns. The surface peeling of both face sheets was evident, with a significant delamination around the impact location accompanied by crushing HC core.

  15. Optimal locations of piezoelectric patches for supersonic flutter control of honeycomb sandwich panels, using the NSGA-II method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezami, M.; Gholami, B.

    2016-03-01

    The active flutter control of supersonic sandwich panels with regular honeycomb interlayers under impact load excitation is studied using piezoelectric patches. A non-dominated sorting-based multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) is suggested to find the optimal locations for different numbers of piezoelectric actuator/sensor pairs. Quasi-steady first order supersonic piston theory is employed to define aerodynamic loading and the p-method is applied to find the flutter bounds. Hamilton’s principle in conjunction with the generalized Fourier expansions and Galerkin method are used to develop the dynamical model of the structural systems in the state-space domain. The classical Runge-Kutta time integration algorithm is then used to calculate the open-loop aeroelastic response of the system. The maximum flutter velocity and minimum voltage applied to actuators are calculated according to the optimal locations of piezoelectric patches obtained using the NSGA-II and then the proportional feedback is used to actively suppress the closed loop system response. Finally the control effects, using the two different controllers, are compared.

  16. Intermediate-scale Fire Performance of Composite Panels under Varying Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alexander; Jernigan, Dann A.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    New aircraft are being designed with increasing quantities of composite materials used in their construction. Different from the more traditional metals, composites have a higher propensity to burn. This presents a challenge to transportation safety analyses, as the aircraft structure now represents an additional fuel source involved in the fire scenario. Most of the historical fire testing of composite materials is aime d at studying kinetics, flammability or yield strength under fire conditions. Most of this testing is small - scale. Heterogeneous reactions are often length - scale dependent, and this is thought to be particularly true for composites which exhibit signific ant microscopic dynamics that can affect macro - scale behavior. We have designed a series of tests to evaluate composite materials under various structural loading conditions with a consistent thermal condition. We have measured mass - loss , heat flux, and temperature throughout the experiments. Several types of panels have been tested, including simple composite panels, and sandwich panels. The main objective of the testing was to understand the importance of the structural loading on a composite to its b ehavior in response to fire - like conditions. During flaming combustion at early times, there are some features of the panel decomposition that are unique to the type of loading imposed on the panels. At load levels tested, fiber reaction rates at later t imes appear to be independent of the initial structural loading.

  17. Ballistic Resistance of Honeycomb Sandwich Panels under In-Plane High-Velocity Impact

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu; Wang, Dong; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic responses of honeycomb sandwich panels (HSPs) subjected to in-plane projectile impact were studied by means of explicit nonlinear finite element simulations using LS-DYNA. The HSPs consisted of two identical aluminum alloy face-sheets and an aluminum honeycomb core featuring three types of unit cell configurations (regular, rectangular-shaped, and reentrant hexagons). The ballistic resistances of HSPs with the three core configurations were first analyzed. It was found that the HSP with the reentrant auxetic honeycomb core has the best ballistic resistance, due to the negative Poisson's ratio effect of the core. Parametric studies were then carried out to clarify the influences of both macroscopic (face-sheet and core thicknesses, core relative density) and mesoscopic (unit cell angle and size) parameters on the ballistic responses of the auxetic HSPs. Numerical results show that the perforation resistant capabilities of the auxetic HSPs increase as the values of the macroscopic parameters increase. However, the mesoscopic parameters show nonmonotonic effects on the panels' ballistic capacities. The empirical equations for projectile residual velocities were formulated in terms of impact velocity and the structural parameters. It was also found that the blunter projectiles result in higher ballistic limits of the auxetic HSPs. PMID:24187526

  18. Supersonic flutter of panels loaded with inplane shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    A modal flutter analysis for biaxially loaded, orthotropic panels, using linear piston-theory aerodynamics, was extended in order to include the effects of inplane shear loading. Flutter boundaries for shear loads up to buckling are calculated for simply supported, isotropic panels of various length-width ratios and for a square, isotropic panel with elastic boundary conditions along the leading and trailing edges. These flutter boundaries are used to define conservative design curves. Sample calculations made using these design curves indicate that practical panels, which have otherwise been adequately designed, could become flutter critical if the inplane shear loads approach the buckling value.

  19. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel: Comparison of In- and Out-of-Autoclave Facesheet Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan Jorge; Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Kellas, Sotiris; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle, were manufactured and tested under the NASA Composites for Exploration and the NASA Constellation Ares V programs. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.0 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: in-autoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3 ft. by 5 ft. panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections and tested under compressive loading. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of each 3 ft. by 5 ft. panel. To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yielded good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was correctly predicted that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber angle misalignments, and three-dimensional effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  20. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel. Part 2; 6-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Meyers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Dixon, Genevieve D.

    2013-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panel types, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), were manufactured and tested under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Constellation Ares V program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: in-autoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3- by 5-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of each 3- by 5-ft panel. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panels composed of 6-ply, IM7/977-3 facesheets (referred to as Panels B-1 and B-2). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was correctly predicted that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber angle misalignments, and three-dimensional (3-D) effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  1. Comparison of decentralized velocity feedback control for thin homogeneous and stiff sandwich panels using electrodynamic proof-mass actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlfing, J.; Gardonio, P.; Thompson, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    Theoretical and experimental work is presented to compare the effect of decentralised velocity feedback control on thin homogeneous and sandwich panels. The decentralised control system consists of five control units, which are composed of a proof-mass electrodynamic actuator with an accelerometer underneath its footprint and an analogue controller. The stability of the feedback loops is analysed by considering the sensor-actuator open-loop frequency response function of each control unit and the eigenvalues of the fully populated matrix of open-loop frequency response functions between the five sensors and five actuators. The control performance is then analysed in terms of the time-averaged total kinetic energy and total sound power radiated by the two panels. The results show that for a stiff sandwich panel higher stable feedback gains can be implemented than on a thin homogeneous panel of comparable weight per unit area. Moreover the implementation of decentralised velocity feedback can offset some of the undesirable sound transmission properties of lightweight sandwich structures by efficiently reducing structural vibration and sound power radiation in the mid audio frequency range.

  2. Analysis of wave propagation in sandwich plates with and without heavy fluid loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, S. V.

    2004-04-01

    The paper addresses wave motions in an unbounded sandwich plate with and without heavy fluid loading in a plane problem formulation. A sandwich plate is composed of two identical isotropic skin plies and an isotropic core ply. Several alternative theories for stationary dynamics of such a plate or a beam are derived, including a formulation in the framework of a theory of elasticity applied for a core ply. 'In-phase' and 'anti-phase' wave motions (with respect to transverse deflections of skins) of a sandwich beam are analyzed independently of each other. Dispersion curves obtained by the use of 'elementary' theories are compared with those obtained by the use of an 'exact' theory (which involves the theory of elasticity in a description of wave motion in a core ply) for a plate without fluid loading. It is shown that these simplified models are capable of giving a complete and accurate description of all propagating waves in not too high-frequency range, which is sufficient in practical naval and aerospace engineering. In the case of heavy fluid loading, similar analysis is performed for 'anti-phase' wave motions of a beam. Two simplified theories as well as an 'exact' one are extended to capture fluid loading effects. A good agreement between results obtained in 'elementary' and 'exact' problem formulations is demonstrated. The role of fluid's compressibility in the generation of propagating waves in a sandwich plate is explored. It is shown that, whereas analysis of wave motions in the case of an incompressible fluid predicts an existence of two propagating waves, only one such wave exists when a fluid is sufficiently compressible. The threshold magnitude of the ratio of a sound speed in an acoustic medium to a sound speed in a skin's material is found, which separates these two regimes of wave motions for a given set of parameters of sandwich plate composition.

  3. Free vibrations of delaminated unidirectional sandwich panels with a transversely flexible core—a modified Galerkin approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarts-Givli, H.; Rabinovitch, O.; Frostig, Y.

    2007-03-01

    A theoretical approach for the free vibration analysis of delaminated unidirectional sandwich panels is developed. The theoretical model accounts for the flexibility of the core in the out of plane (vertical) direction and the resulting high-order displacement, acceleration, and velocity fields within the core. The analytical approach is based on Hamilton's variational principle along with the high-order unidirectional sandwich panel theory and the modified Galerkin method. The two types of models investigated include delaminated regions with and without contact. The ability of the model to describe the high-order effects such as the pumping phenomenon and the localized effects in the vicinity of the delaminated regions is examined. A numerical example that focuses on the free vibration behavior of simply supported delaminated unidirectional sandwich panels is presented and discussed. A parametric study that examines the influence of the length of the delaminated region, its location, and the mechanical properties of the core material is presented. The numerical results are also compared with finite element analysis and with some special asymptotic cases for which the free vibrations behavior is analytically evaluated. A summary and conclusions close the paper.

  4. Experimental Tests on the Composite Foam Sandwich Pipes Subjected to Axial Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Zhao, QiLin; Xu, Kang; Zhang, DongDong

    2015-12-01

    Compared to the composite thin-walled tube, the composite foam sandwich pipe has better local flexural rigidity, which can take full advantage of the high strength of composite materials. In this paper, a series of composite foam sandwich pipes with different parameters were designed and manufactured using the prefabricated polyurethane foam core-skin co-curing molding technique with E-glass fabric prepreg. The corresponding axial-load compressive tests were conducted to investigate the influence factors that experimentally determine the axial compressive performances of the tubes. In the tests, the detailed failure process and the corresponding load-displacement characteristics were obtained; the influence rules of the foam core density, surface layer thickness, fiber ply combination and end restraint on the failure modes and ultimate bearing capacity were studied. Results indicated that: (1) the fiber ply combination, surface layer thickness and end restraint have a great influence on the ultimate load bearing capacity; (2) a reasonable fiber ply combination and reliable interfacial adhesion not only optimize the strength but also transform the failure mode from brittle failure to ductile failure, which is vital to the fully utilization of the composite strength of these composite foam sandwich pipes.

  5. Seismic load tests on reinforced concrete beam-column sandwich joints with strengthening measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi-Hong; Li, Ying-Min; Liu, Jian-Wei

    2009-12-01

    Reinforced concrete high-rise buildings with high strength concrete (HSC) column and normal strength concrete (NSC) floor are popular nowadays. For these structures, it is ineffective to construct beam-column joint with high strength concrete. So beam-column joints with normal strength concrete attract abundant attention and are strongly recommended in china recent years. In this paper, we refer to this type of joints as sandwich joints. In order to improve seismic behavior of sandwich joints with high stress, strengthening measures including addition of vertical dowels, addition of diagonal bars, and enhancement of joint constraint were proposed to apply to engineering practice recent years. In this paper, 6 full scale sandwich joint specimens were test under cyclic load to investigate the validity of strengthening measures. Tested specimens were consist of 1 specimen with additional vertical dowels, 2 specimens with additional diagonal bars, and 1 specimen with additional lateral beams, compared with 2 specimens without strengthening measures. Integrated seismic performances of these specimens were studied, such as load resistance behavior, deflection performance, ductility, energy dissipation behavior, beam bars anchorage capacity and so on. Based on the experimental results, the effect and mechanical behavior of strengthening measures were analyzed.

  6. Seismic load tests on reinforced concrete beam-column sandwich joints with strengthening measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi-hong; Li, Ying-min; Liu, Jian-wei

    2010-03-01

    Reinforced concrete high-rise buildings with high strength concrete (HSC) column and normal strength concrete (NSC) floor are popular nowadays. For these structures, it is ineffective to construct beam-column joint with high strength concrete. So beam-column joints with normal strength concrete attract abundant attention and are strongly recommended in china recent years. In this paper, we refer to this type of joints as sandwich joints. In order to improve seismic behavior of sandwich joints with high stress, strengthening measures including addition of vertical dowels, addition of diagonal bars, and enhancement of joint constraint were proposed to apply to engineering practice recent years. In this paper, 6 full scale sandwich joint specimens were test under cyclic load to investigate the validity of strengthening measures. Tested specimens were consist of 1 specimen with additional vertical dowels, 2 specimens with additional diagonal bars, and 1 specimen with additional lateral beams, compared with 2 specimens without strengthening measures. Integrated seismic performances of these specimens were studied, such as load resistance behavior, deflection performance, ductility, energy dissipation behavior, beam bars anchorage capacity and so on. Based on the experimental results, the effect and mechanical behavior of strengthening measures were analyzed.

  7. Light-weight sandwich panel honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber composite skin for electric vehicle application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyono, Sukmaji Indro; Widodo, Angit; Anwar, Miftahul; Diharjo, Kuncoro; Triyono, Teguh; Hapid, A.; Kaleg, S.

    2016-03-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite is relative high cost material in current manufacturing process of electric vehicle body structure. Sandwich panels consisting polypropylene (PP) honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber composite skin were investigated. The aim of present paper was evaluate the flexural properties and bending rigidity of various volume fraction carbon-glass fiber composite skins with the honeycomb core. The flexural properties and cost of panels were compared to the reported values of solid hybrid Carbon/Glass FRP used for the frame body structure of electric vehicle. The finite element model of represented sandwich panel was established to characterize the flexural properties of material using homogenization technique. Finally, simplified model was employed to crashworthiness analysis for engine hood of the body electric vehicle structure. The good cost-electiveness of honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber skin has the potential to be used as a light-weight alternative material in body electric vehicle fabricated.

  8. Effects of external and gap mean flows on sound transmission through a double-wall sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Sebastian, Alexis

    2015-05-01

    This paper studies analytically the effects of an external mean flow and an internal gap mean flow on sound transmission through a double-wall sandwich panel lined with poroelastic materials. Biot's theory is employed to describe wave propagation in poroelastic materials, and the transfer matrix method with three types of boundary conditions is applied to solve the system simultaneously. The random incidence transmission loss in a diffuse field is calculated numerically, and the limiting angle of incidence due to total internal reflection is discussed in detail. The numerical predictions suggest that the sound insulation performance of such a double-wall panel is enhanced considerably by both external and gap mean flows particularly in the high-frequency range. Similar effects on transmission loss are observed for the two mean flows. It is shown that the effect of the gap mean flow depends on flow velocity, flow direction, gap depth and fluid properties and also that the fluid properties within the gap appear to influence the transmission loss more effectively than the gap flow. Despite the implementation difficulty in practice, an internal gap flow provides more design space for tuning the sound insulation performance of a double-wall sandwich panel and has great potential for active/passive noise control.

  9. Flutter of a sandwich cylindrical shell supported with annular ribs and loaded with axial forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, V. N.; Volkov, E. N.; Nedbaj, A. Ya.

    2015-08-01

    The supersonic flutter of a sandwich cylindrical shell supported from within with annular ribs and loaded with axial forces on the end faces is investigated. The shell motion is described by the equations of the theory of sandwich orthotropic shells. The solution of the equations is sought as a trigonometric series with respect to the axial coordinate. With the help of the Bubnov—Galerkin method, this problem is reduced to the set of algebraic equations for the analysis of the stability of which one uses the Routh—Hurwits criterion. By a numerical example, the effect of the number and the heights of the ribs on the critical velocity of the flow around the shell is shown.

  10. Skin, Stringer, and Fastener Loads in Buckled Fuselage Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a numerical study to assess the effect of skin buckling on the internal load distribution in a stiffened fuselage panel, with and without longitudinal cracks, are presented. In addition, the impact of changes in the internal loads on the fatigue life and residual strength of a fuselage panel is assessed. A generic narrow-body fuselage panel is considered. The entire panel is modeled using shell elements and considerable detail is included to represent the geometric-nonlinear response of the buckled skin, cross section deformation of the stiffening components, and details of the skin-string attachment with discrete fasteners. Results are presented for a fixed internal pressure and various combinations of axial tension or compression loads. Results illustrating the effect of skin buckling on the stress distribution in the skin and stringer, and fastener loads are presented. Results are presented for the pristine structure, and for cases where damage is introduced in the form of a longitudinal crack adjacent to the stringer, or failed fastener elements. The results indicate that axial compression loads and skin buckling can have a significant effect on the circumferential stress in the skin, and fastener loads, which will influence damage initiation, and a comparable effect on stress intensity factors for cases with cracks. The effects on stress intensity factors will influence damage propagation rates and the residual strength of the panel.

  11. Damping Properties of Sandwich Truss Core Structures by Strain Energy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesolowski, M.; Rucevskis, S.; Janeliukstis, R.; Polanski, M.

    2015-11-01

    Sandwich panel structures with stiff face sheets and cellular cores are widely used to support dynamic loads. Combining face sheets made of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRPs) with an aluminium pyramidal truss improves the damping performance of the structure due to viscoelastic character of CRFP composites. To predict the damping characteristics of the pyramidal truss core sandwich panel the strain energy method is adopted. The procedure for evaluating the damping of the sandwich panel was performed using commercial finite element software NASTRAN and MATLAB. Non-contact vibration tests were performed on the real sandwich panels in order to extract the modal characteristics and compare them with the numerical predictions.

  12. Analytical determination of the ultimate strength of sandwich beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theotokoglou, Efstathios E.

    1996-09-01

    An analytical determination of the ultimate strength of a typical GRP/PVC sandwich beam has been performed. These beams represent common building practise in marine applications. Equations describing the behaviour of a sandwich panel under beam loading and various failure modes have been developed. The method has been applied to predict the ultimate load for a simple supported sandwich beam. The critical loads have been compared with those from the experimental investigation of a typical bulkhead-to-hull GRP/PVC sandwich T-joint under pull out forces.

  13. Fabrication and evaluation of enhanced diffusion bonded titanium honeycomb core sandwich panels with titanium aluminide face sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, E. K.; Bird, R. K.; Bales, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    A joining process was developed for fabricating lightweight, high temperature sandwich panels for aerospace applications using Ti-14Al-21Nb face sheets and Ti-3Al-2.5V honeycomb core. The process, termed Enhanced Diffusion Bonding (EDB), relies on the formation of a eutectic liquid through solid-state diffusion at elevated temperatures and isothermal solidification to produce joints in thin-gage titanium and titanium aluminide structural components. A technique employing a maskant on the honeycomb core was developed which permitted electroplating a controlled amount of EDB material only on the edges of the honeycomb core in order to minimize the structural weight and metallurgical interaction effects. Metallurgical analyses were conducted to determine the interaction effects between the EDB materials and the constituents of the sandwich structure following EDB processing. The initial mechanical evaluation was conducted with butt joint specimens tested at temperatures from 1400 - 1700 F. Further mechanical evaluation was conducted with EDB sandwich specimens using flatwise tension tests at temperatures from 70 - 1100 F and edgewise compression tests at ambient temperature.

  14. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. The present study investigates the use of a sandwich foam fan blade mae up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The resulting structures possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and a detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of kin thickness and core volume are presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  15. Damage Detection and Impact Testing on Laminated and Sandwich Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Derke R.; Craft, William J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Naser, Ahmad S.; Martin, William N.

    1998-01-01

    This research investigates health monitoring of sandwich shell composites to determine if the Transmittance Functions (TF) are effective in determining the present of damage. The health monitoring test was conducted on the sandwich plates before and after low velocity impacts using the health monitoring technique given in TFs are a NDE (Nondestructive Evaluation) technique that utilizes the ratios of cross-spectrums to auto-spectrums between two response points on the sandwich composites. The test for transmittance was conducted on the same density foam core throughout the experiment. The test specimens were 17.8 cm by 25.4 cm in dimension. The external sheets (face sheets) were created from graphite/epoxy laminate with dimension of 1.58 mm thick. The polymethacrylide (Rohacell) foam core was 12.7 mm thick. These samples experienced a transformation in the TF that was considered the low velocity impact damage. The low velocity damage was observed in the TFs for the sandwich composites.

  16. A preliminary report on the effect of elevated temperature exposure on the mechanical properties of titanium-alloy honeycomb-core sandwich panels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Cain, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    A study has been initiated to determine the effects of elevated-temperature exposure on the room-temperature mechanical properties of titanium honeycomb-core sandwich panels fabricated by brazing or spot diffusion bonding. Only flatwise tensile properties following exposure have been determined to date. Preliminary results indicate very little change in the flatwise tensile strength of sandwich panels fabricated by spot diffusion bonding following exposures of 10,000 hr at 600 and 800 F and 1000 hr at 1000 F. Titanium panels fabricated by using a Ti-Zr-Be braze alloy are susceptible to oxidation at elevated temperature and experience flatwise tensile strength degradation after continuous exposures of 7500 hr at 600 F, 1000 hr at 800 F, and less than 100 hr at 1000 F. It is possible that the exposure life of the brazed panels may be substantially increased if the panel edges are sealed to prevent oxidation of the braze alloy.

  17. Effects of Tangential Edge Constraints on the Postbuckling Behavior of Flat and Curved Panels Subjected to Thermal and Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, W.; Librescu, L.; Nemeth, M. P.; Starnes, J. H. , Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of tangential edge constraints on the postbuckling response of flat and shallow curved panels subjected to thermal and mechanical loads is presented. The mechanical loads investigated are uniform compressive edge loads and transverse lateral pressure. The temperature fields considered are associated with spatially nonuniform heating over the panels, and a linear through-the-thickness temperature gradient. The structural model is based on a higher-order transverse-shear-deformation theory of shallow shells that incorporates the effects of geometric nonlinearities, initial geometric imperfections, and tangential edge motion constraints. Results are presented for three-layer sandwich panels made from transversely isotropic materials. Simply supported panels are considered in which the tangential motion of the unloaded edges is either unrestrained, partially restrained, or fully restrained. These results focus on the effects of the tangential edge restraint on the postbuckling response. The results of this study indicate that tangentially restraining the edges of a curved panel can make the panel insensitive to initial geometric imperfections in some cases.

  18. Damage Evolution in Composite Materials and Sandwich Structures Under Impulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Michael Lee

    Damage evolution in composite materials is a rather complex phenomenon. There are numerous failure modes in composite materials stemming from the interaction of the various constituent materials and the particular loading conditions. This thesis is concerned with investigating damage evolution in sandwich structures under repeated transient loading conditions associated with impulse loading due to hull slamming of high-speed marine craft. To fully understand the complex stress interactions, a full field technique to reveal stress or strain is required. Several full field techniques exist but are limited to materials with particular optical properties. A full field technique applicable to most materials is known as thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) and reveals the variation in sum of principal stresses of a cyclically loaded sample by correlating the stresses to a small temperature change occurring at the loading frequency. Digital image correlation (DIC) is another noncontact full field technique that reveals the deformation field by tracking the motion of subsets of a random speckle pattern during the loading cycles. A novel experimental technique to aid in the study of damage progression that combines TSA and DIC simultaneously utilizing a single infrared camera is presented in this thesis. A technique to reliably perform DIC with an infrared (IR) camera is developed utilizing variable emissivity paint. The thermal data can then be corrected for rigid-body motion and deformation such that each pixel represents the same material point in all frames. TSA is then performed on this corrected data, reducing motion blur and increasing accuracy. This combined method with a single infrared camera has several advantages, including a straightforward experimental setup without the need to correct for geometric effects of two spatially separate cameras. Additionally, there is no need for external lighting in TSA as the measured electromagnetic radiation is emitted by the

  19. Enhancements of Tow-Steering Design Techniques: Design of Rectangular Panel Under Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatting, Brian F.; Setoodeh, Shahriar; Gurdal, Zafer

    2005-01-01

    An extension to existing design tools that utilize tow-steering is presented which is used to investigate the use of elastic tailoring for a flat panel with a central hole under combined loads of compression and shear. The elastic tailoring is characterized by tow-steering within individual lamina as well as a novel approach based on selective reinforcement, which attempts to minimize compliance through the use of Cellular Automata design concepts. The selective reinforcement designs lack any consideration of manufacturing constraints, so a new tow-steered path definition was developed to translate the prototype selective reinforcement designs into manufacturable plies. The minimum weight design of a flat panel under combined loading was based on a model provided by NASA-Langley personnel and analyzed by STAGS within the OLGA design environment. Baseline designs using traditional straight fiber plies were generated, as well as tow-steered designs which incorporated parallel, tow-drop, and overlap plies within the laminate. These results indicated that the overlap method provided the best improvement with regards to weight and performance as compared to traditional constant stiffness monocoque panels, though the laminates did not measure up to similar designs from the literature using sandwich and isogrid constructions. Further design studies were conducted using various numbers of the selective reinforcement plies at the core and outer surface of the laminate. None of these configurations exhibited notable advantages with regard to weight or buckling performance. This was due to the fact that the minimization of the compliance tended to direct the major stresses toward the center of the panel, which decreased the ability of the structure to withstand loads leading to instability.

  20. Vibration Characteristics Determined for Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels With a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Min, James B.; Raj, Sai V.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is to provide fan materials that are safer, weigh less, and cost less than the currently used titanium alloy or polymer matrix composite fans. The proposed material system is a sandwich fan construction made up of thin solid face sheets and a lightweight metal foam core. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by the foam layer. The resulting structure has a high stiffness and lighter weight in comparison to the solid facesheet material alone. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads (ref. 1). The metal foam core must resist the transverse shear and transverse normal loads, as well as keep the facings supported and working as a single unit. Metal foams have ranges of mechanical properties, such as light weight, impact resistance, and vibration suppression (ref. 2), which makes them more suitable for use in lightweight fan structures. Metal foams have been available for decades (refs. 3 and 4), but the difficulties in the original processes and high costs have prevented their widespread use. However, advances in production techniques and cost reduction have created a new interest in this class of materials (ref. 5). The material chosen for the face sheet and the metal foam for this study was the aerospace-grade stainless steel 17-4PH. This steel was chosen because of its attractive mechanical properties and the ease with which it can be made through the powder metallurgy process (ref. 6). The advantages of a metal foam core, in comparison to a typical honeycomb core, are material isotropy and the ease of forming complex geometries, such as fan blades. A section of a 17-4PH sandwich structure is shown in the following photograph. Part of process of designing any blade is to determine the natural frequencies of the particular blade shape. A designer needs to predict the resonance frequencies of a new blade design to properly identify a useful

  1. Progressive Failure Studies of Stiffened Panels Subjected to Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Hilburger, Mark W.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for progressive failure of stiffened composite panels with and without a notch and subjected to in plane shear loading well into their postbuckling regime. Initial geometric imperfections are included in the finite element models. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Experimental results from the test include strain field data from video image correlation in three dimensions in addition to other strain and displacement measurements. Results from nonlinear finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for the stitched stiffened composite panels studied.

  2. Load-dependent Optimization of Honeycombs for Sandwich Components - New Possibilities by Using Additive Layer Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riss, Fabian; Schilp, Johannes; Reinhart, Gunther

    Due to their feasible geometric complexity, additive layer manufacturing (ALM) processes show a highpotential for the production of lightweight components.Therefore, ALM processes enable the realization of bionic-designedcomponents like honeycombs, which are optimized depending upon load and outer boundary conditions.This optimization is based on a closed-loop, three-steps methodology: At first, each honeycomb is conformed to the surface of the part. Secondly, the structure is optimizedfor lightweight design.It is possible to achieve a homogeneous stress distribution in the part by varying the wall thickness, honeycombdiameter and the amount of honeycombs, depending on the subjected stresses and strains. At last, the functional components like threads or bearing carriers are integrated directly into the honeycomb core.Using all these steps as an iterative process, it is possible to reduce the mass of sandwich components about 50 percent compared to conventional approaches.

  3. Analytical structural efficiency studies of borsic/aluminum compression panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwithey, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    Analytically determined mass-strength curves, strain-strength curves, and dimensions are presented for structurally efficient hat-stiffened panels, corrugation-stiffened panels, hat-stiffened honeycomb-core sandwich panels, open-section corrugation panels, and honeycomb-core sandwich panels. The panels were assumed to be fabricated from either titanium, borsic/aluminum, or a combination of these materials. Borsic/aluminum panels and titanium panels reinforced with borsic/aluminum were lighter and stiffer than comparably designed titanium panels. Reinforced titanium panels had the same extensional stiffness as comparably designed Borsic/aluminum panels. For a given load, the structural efficiency of the hat-stiffened honeycomb-core sandwich panel was higher than the structural efficiency of the other stiffened panels.

  4. Mechanical stability analysis on spherical sandwich sheet at low temperature loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshuai; Li, Shuhui; Li, Zhimin

    2013-12-01

    The spherical sandwich sheet (S-S-S) is generally used in the aerospace industry, for example, the airplane, the rocket's fairing, the spacecraft and the satellite for the purpose of heat-insulation, weight-saving and dimension-reducing. The stability of the S-S-S is of general concern because of its particularly thin but large size. For some S-S-S used in fuel tank storing liquid oxygen of the rocket, it must be facing low temperature down to about -183 °C. Low temperature condition affects the stability of the S-S-S and then causes buckling of the structure. In this paper, a finite element (FE) model is established for evaluating the stability of the S-S-S via the sequential coupling mode. The material mechanical properties related to temperature are concerned in the FE model. The buckling modes and critical buckling loading are predicted accurately, since the FE model includes heat transfer simulating, thermal stress computing, buckling and post buckling process. It is found that the thermal stress generated from the low temperature loading reduces the critical buckling loading and changes the buckling modes of the S-S-S.

  5. Modified Mode-I Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) Fracture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    2001-01-01

    Five composite sandwich panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Four of these panels had E-glass/vinylester facesheets and one had carbon/epoxy facesheets. The sandwich panels had different density PVC foam cores. The four E-glass panels had core densities of 80, 100, 130, 200 kg/cu m. The sandwich with carbon/epoxy 3 facesheets had a core with density of 100 kg/cu m. Fracture tests were conducted using a modified Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) test configuration. Load displacement curves were obtained for loading and unloading of the specimens during crack growth. Various increments of crack growth were monitored. Critical Strain Energy Release Rates (SERR) were determined from the tests using the area method. The critical values of SERR can be considered the fracture toughness of the sandwich material. The fracture toughness ranged 367 J/sq m to 1350 J/sq m over the range of core densities. These results are compared to the Mode-I fracture toughness of the PVC foam core materials and values obtained for foam-cored sandwiches using the TSD specimen. Finite-element analyses (FEA) were performed for the test configuration and Strain Energy Release Rates were calculated using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). The SERR values determined from the FEA were scaled to the fracture loads, or critical loads, obtained from the modified CSB tests. These critical loads were in close agreement with the test values.

  6. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel Part 1: 8-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets. Part 1; 8-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David E.; Pineda, Evan J.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2013-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the heavy lift launch vehicle, were manufactured under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Space Launch Systems program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: inautoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3.00- by 5.00-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to predict the compressive response of the 3.00- by 5.00-ft panels. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panel composed of 8-ply, IM7/977-3 facesheets (referred to Panel A). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was predicted correctly that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber misalignments, and three-dimensional (3 D) effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  7. Stiffener-skin interactions in pressure-loaded composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loup, D. C.; Hyer, M. W.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of flange thickness, web height, and skin stiffness on the strain distributions in the skin-stiffener interface region of pressure-loaded graphite-epoxy panels, stiffened by the type-T stiffener, were examined at pressure levels up to one atmosphere. The results indicate that at these pressures geometric nonlinearities are important, and that the overall stiffener stiffness has a significant effect on panel response, particularly on the out-of-plane deformation or pillowing of the skin. The strain gradients indicated that the interface between the skin and the stiffener experiences two components of shear stress, in addition to a normal (peel) stress. Thus, the skin-stiffener interface problem is a three-dimensional problem rather than a two-dimensional one, as is often assumed.

  8. Frequency domain analysis of the random loading of cracked panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    The primary effort concerned the development of analytical methods for the accurate prediction of the effect of random loading on a panel with a crack. Of particular concern was the influence of frequency on the stress intensity factor behavior. Many modern structures, such as those found in advanced aircraft, are lightweight and susceptible to critical vibrations, and consequently dynamic response plays a very important role in their analysis. The presence of flaws and cracks can have catastrophic consequences. The stress intensity factor, K, emerges as a very significant parameter that characterizes the crack behavior. In analyzing the dynamic response of panels that contain cracks, the finite element method is used, but because this type of problem is inherently computationally intensive, a number of ways of calculating K more efficiently are explored.

  9. Fatigue flaw growth behavior in stiffened and unstiffened panels loaded in biaxial tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect was investigated of biaxial loading on the flaw growth rate of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy that would be typical of Space Shuttle cryogenic tankage design. The stress distribution and stress concentration factors for several integrally stiffened panels under various loading conditions were obtained. The flaw growth behavior of both stiffened and unstiffened panels under biaxial loading conditions was determined. The effect of a complex stress state was studied by introducing flaws in fillet areas of biaxially loaded stiffened panels.

  10. Structural Stability of a Stiffened Aluminum Fuselage Panel Subjected to Combined Mechanical and Internal Pressure Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Young, Richard D.; Gehrki, Ralph R.

    2003-01-01

    Results from an experimental and analytical study of a curved stiffened aluminum panel subjected to combined mechanical and internal pressure loads are presented. The panel loading conditions were simulated using a D-box test fixture. Analytical buckling load results calculated from a finite element analysis are presented and compared to experimental results. Buckling results presented indicate that the buckling load of the fuselage panel is significantly influenced by internal pressure loading. The experimental results suggest that the stress distribution is uniform in the panel prior to buckling. Nonlinear finite element analysis results correlates well with experimental results up to buckling.

  11. Fiber Composite Sandwich Thermostructural Behavior - Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Aiello, Robert A.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1988-01-01

    Four computational simulation methods with different levels of sophistication were used to simulate thermal behavior and structural changes of composite sandwich panels with a honeycomb core subjected to a variety of environmental effects. The models on thich these methods are based include three-dimensional finite-element modeling, three-dimensional finite-element modeling assuming a homogeneous core, laminate theory, and simple equations for predicting the equivalent properties of the honeycomb core. A procedure was developed and embedded in a composite mechanics computer code, which made it possile to conduct parametric studies to determine 'optimum' composite sandwich configurations for specific applications. The procedure was applied for the evaluation of composite sandwich behavior at the global, local, laminate, ply, and micromechanics levels when the composite sandwich is subjected to hygral, thermal, and mechanical loading environments.

  12. Structural Response of Compression-Loaded, Tow-Placed, Variable Stiffness Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Guerdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Results of an analytical and experimental study to characterize the structural response of two compression-loaded variable stiffness composite panels are presented and discussed. These variable stiffness panels are advanced composite structures, in which tows are laid down along precise curvilinear paths within each ply and the fiber orientation angle varies continuously throughout each ply. The panels are manufactured from AS4/977-3 graphite-epoxy pre-preg material using an advanced tow placement system. Both variable stiffness panels have the same layup, but one panel has overlapping tow bands and the other panel has a constant-thickness laminate. A baseline cross-ply panel is also analyzed and tested for comparative purposes. Tests performed on the variable stiffness panels show a linear prebuckling load-deflection response, followed by a nonlinear response to failure at loads between 4 and 53 percent greater than the baseline panel failure load. The structural response of the variable stiffness panels is also evaluated using finite element analyses. Nonlinear analyses of the variable stiffness panels are performed which include mechanical and thermal prestresses. Results from analyses that include thermal prestress conditions correlate well with measured variable stiffness panel results. The predicted response of the baseline panel also correlates well with measured results.

  13. Nonlinear and Buckling Behavior of Curved Panels Subjected to Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the nonlinear and buckling response characteristics of curved panels subjected to combined loads are presented. Aluminum and laminated composite panels are considered in the study and a flat and shallow curved panel configurations are considered as well. The panels are subjected to combined axial compression and transverse tension or compression loads or combined axial compression and inplane shear loads. Results illustrating the effects of various combined load states on the buckling response of the panels are presented. In addition, results illustrating the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy and panel curvature on the panel response are presented. The results indicate that panel curvature can have a significant effect on the nonlinear and buckling behavior of the panels subjected to combined loads. Results are included that show that geometrically perfect panels do not exhibit bifurcation points for some combined loads. Results are also presented that show the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the interaction of combined loads.

  14. An Investigation on Low Velocity Impact Response of Multilayer Sandwich Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Jedari Salami, S.; Sadighi, M.; Shakeri, M.; Moeinfar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of adding an extra layer within a sandwich panel and two different core types in top and bottom cores on low velocity impact loadings are studied experimentally in this paper. The panel includes polymer composite laminated sheets for faces and the internal laminated sheet called extra layer sheet, and two types of crushable foams are selected as the core material. Low velocity impact tests were carried out by drop hammer testing machine to the clamped multilayer sandwich panels with expanded polypropylene (EPP) and polyurethane rigid (PUR) in the top and bottom cores. Local displacement of the top core, contact force and deflection of the sandwich panel were obtained for different locations of the internal sheet; meanwhile the EPP and PUR were used in the top and bottom cores alternatively. It was found that the core material type has made significant role in improving the sandwich panel's behavior compared with the effect of extra layer location. PMID:24453804

  15. Fatigue studies of polyurethane sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishna, M.; Narasimha Murthy, H. N.; Sathyamoorthy, M.; Bhattacharya, Debes

    2004-10-01

    The fatigue characteristics of polyurethane foam-cored (PUF) composite sandwich structures were investigated using three-point bending tests carried out according to ASTM C 393. Three types of specimens (epoxy/glass-PUF-epoxy/glass, polyester/glass-PUF-polyester/glass, and epoxy/glass-PUF-polyester/glass) were considered for investigation. Experimental results indicate that degradation of stiffness occurs due to debonding and sliding between the skin and the foam during fatigue cycles. Epoxy/glass-PUF-epoxy/glass sandwich structures exhibit higher bending strength along with higher stiffness degradation than the other two types of sandwich panels, due to higher initial fatigue loading. The lowest fatigue properties have been obtained for the polyester/glass-PUF-polyester/glass sandwich panel specimens. Better performance of the epoxy/glass-PUF-epoxy/glass sandwich panels is most likely due to the superior properties of the outer thin skins. Most of the specimens fail within the foam region and not at the skin level. This situation is possibly due to debonding between the foam and the skin. The fatigue damage development in the foam and skin has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Behavior of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels with Stringer Terminations and Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of graphite-epoxy stiffened panels with impact-damaged stringer terminations are presented. Five stitched graphite-epoxy panels with stiffeners with a gradual reduction in either thickness or height were examined. Panels were analyzed using finite element analysis and tested by loading them in axial compression to a predetermined load. The panels were then subjected to impact damage and loaded to failure. Axial midplane strains, surface strains, interlaminar strains and failure results are discussed.

  17. The Study of Stability of Compression-Loaded Multispan Composite Panel Upon Failure of Elements Binding it to Panel Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamula, G. N.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Fomin, V. P.; Grishin, V. I.; Kalmykova, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report carried out within co-operation between United States'NASA Langley RC and Russia's Goskomoboronprom in aeronautics, and continues similar programs, accomplished in 1996, 1997, and 1998, respectively). The report provides results of "The study of stability of compression-loaded multispan composite panels upon failure of elements binding it to panel supports"; these comply with requirements established at TsAGI on 24 March 1998 and at NASA on 15 September 1998.

  18. Specification for Sandwich Panels B and C Layer MDT Supports D0 Upgrade Forward Muon Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Levand, T.; /Fermilab

    1999-05-21

    The panels will be used to fabricate B and C layer MDT octant supports. The octant support arrangements can be seen on the accompanying figures, Fig 1 and Fig 2. Currently we are considering buying 60 inch wide rectangular panels and cutting and splicing them-to-the octant shape. Proposals for octant panels cut to size and panels of different width will be considered.

  19. A Numerical and Experimental Study of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels With Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2006-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study on the effects of laminate orthotropy and circular cutout size on the response of compression-loaded composite curved panels are presented. Several 60-in-radius composite panels with four different laminate configurations were tested with cutout diameters that range from 10% to 60% of the panel width. Finite-element analyses were performed for each panel in order to identify the effects boundary conditions, measured initial geometric imperfections and thickness variations had on the nonlinear and buckling behavior of the panels. The compression-loaded panels considered herein exhibited two separate types of behavior depending on the laminate stacking sequence and cutout size. More specifically, some of the panels exhibited the classical snap-through type buckling response; however, some of the panels exhibited a monotonically increasing stable response and achieved compressive loads in excess of twice the predicted linear bifurcation buckling load. In general, the finite-element analyses were able to predict accurately the nonlinear response and buckling loads of the panels and the prebuckling and postbuckling out-of-plane deformations and strains.

  20. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel PART I : Proposal of a heat source model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Jang, Beom Seon; Kim, Yong Tai; Chun, Kwang San

    2013-09-01

    The use of I-Core sandwich panel has increased in cruise ship deck structure since it can provide similar bending strength with conventional stiffened plate while keeping lighter weight and lower web height. However, due to its thin plate thickness, i.e. about 4~6 mm at most, it is assembled by high power CO2 laser welding to minimize the welding deformation. This research proposes a volumetric heat source model for T-joint of the I-Core sandwich panel and a method to use shell element model for a thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation. This paper, Part I, focuses on the heat source model. A circular cone type heat source model is newly suggested in heat transfer analysis to realize similar melting zone with that observed in experiment. An additional suggestion is made to consider negative defocus, which is commonly applied in T-joint laser welding since it can provide deeper penetration than zero defocus. The proposed heat source is also verified through 3D thermal elasto-plastic analysis to compare welding deformation with experimental results. A parametric study for different welding speeds, defocus values, and welding powers is performed to investigate the effect on the melting zone and welding deformation. In Part II, focuses on the proposed method to employ shell element model to predict welding deformation in thermal elasto-plastic analysis instead of solid element model.

  1. Experimental Study of the Bending Properties and Deformation Analysis of Web-Reinforced Composite Sandwich Floor Slabs with Four Simply Supported Edges

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yujun; Fang, Hai; Liu, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    Web-reinforced composite sandwich panels exhibit good mechanical properties in one-way bending, but few studies have investigated their flexural behavior and deformation calculation methods under conditions of four simply supported edges. This paper studies the bending performance of and deformation calculation methods for two-way web-reinforced composite sandwich panels with different web spacing and heights. Polyurethane foam, two-way orthogonal glass-fiber woven cloth and unsaturated resin were used as raw materials in this study. Vacuum infusion molding was used to prepare an ordinary composite sandwich panel and 5 web-reinforced composite sandwich panels with different spacing and web heights. The panels were subjected to two-way panel bending tests with simple support for all four edges. The mechanical properties of these sandwich panels during the elastic stage were determined by applying uniformly distributed loads. The non-linear mechanical characteristics and failure modes were obtained under centrally concentrated loading. Finally, simulations of the sandwich panels, which used the mechanical model established herein, were used to deduce the formulae for the deflection deformation for this type of sandwich panel. The experimental results show that webs can significantly improve the limit bearing capacity and flexural rigidity of sandwich panels, with smaller web spacing producing a stronger effect. When the web spacing is 75 mm, the limit bearing capacity is 4.63 times that of an ordinary sandwich panel. The deduced deflection calculation formulae provide values that agree well with the measurements (maximum error <15%). The results that are obtained herein can provide a foundation for the structural design of this type of panel. PMID:26871435

  2. Experimental Study of the Bending Properties and Deformation Analysis of Web-Reinforced Composite Sandwich Floor Slabs with Four Simply Supported Edges.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yujun; Fang, Hai; Liu, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    Web-reinforced composite sandwich panels exhibit good mechanical properties in one-way bending, but few studies have investigated their flexural behavior and deformation calculation methods under conditions of four simply supported edges. This paper studies the bending performance of and deformation calculation methods for two-way web-reinforced composite sandwich panels with different web spacing and heights. Polyurethane foam, two-way orthogonal glass-fiber woven cloth and unsaturated resin were used as raw materials in this study. Vacuum infusion molding was used to prepare an ordinary composite sandwich panel and 5 web-reinforced composite sandwich panels with different spacing and web heights. The panels were subjected to two-way panel bending tests with simple support for all four edges. The mechanical properties of these sandwich panels during the elastic stage were determined by applying uniformly distributed loads. The non-linear mechanical characteristics and failure modes were obtained under centrally concentrated loading. Finally, simulations of the sandwich panels, which used the mechanical model established herein, were used to deduce the formulae for the deflection deformation for this type of sandwich panel. The experimental results show that webs can significantly improve the limit bearing capacity and flexural rigidity of sandwich panels, with smaller web spacing producing a stronger effect. When the web spacing is 75 mm, the limit bearing capacity is 4.63 times that of an ordinary sandwich panel. The deduced deflection calculation formulae provide values that agree well with the measurements (maximum error <15%). The results that are obtained herein can provide a foundation for the structural design of this type of panel. PMID:26871435

  3. Experimental Study of the Bending Properties and Deformation Analysis of Web-Reinforced Composite Sandwich Floor Slabs with Four Simply Supported Edges.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yujun; Fang, Hai; Liu, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    Web-reinforced composite sandwich panels exhibit good mechanical properties in one-way bending, but few studies have investigated their flexural behavior and deformation calculation methods under conditions of four simply supported edges. This paper studies the bending performance of and deformation calculation methods for two-way web-reinforced composite sandwich panels with different web spacing and heights. Polyurethane foam, two-way orthogonal glass-fiber woven cloth and unsaturated resin were used as raw materials in this study. Vacuum infusion molding was used to prepare an ordinary composite sandwich panel and 5 web-reinforced composite sandwich panels with different spacing and web heights. The panels were subjected to two-way panel bending tests with simple support for all four edges. The mechanical properties of these sandwich panels during the elastic stage were determined by applying uniformly distributed loads. The non-linear mechanical characteristics and failure modes were obtained under centrally concentrated loading. Finally, simulations of the sandwich panels, which used the mechanical model established herein, were used to deduce the formulae for the deflection deformation for this type of sandwich panel. The experimental results show that webs can significantly improve the limit bearing capacity and flexural rigidity of sandwich panels, with smaller web spacing producing a stronger effect. When the web spacing is 75 mm, the limit bearing capacity is 4.63 times that of an ordinary sandwich panel. The deduced deflection calculation formulae provide values that agree well with the measurements (maximum error <15%). The results that are obtained herein can provide a foundation for the structural design of this type of panel.

  4. Combined Loads Test Fixture for Thermal-Structural Testing Aerospace Vehicle Panel Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Roger A.; Richards, W. Lance; DeAngelis, Michael V.

    2004-01-01

    A structural test requirement of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program has resulted in the design, fabrication, and implementation of a combined loads test fixture. Principal requirements for the fixture are testing a 4- by 4-ft hat-stiffened panel with combined axial (either tension or compression) and shear load at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 915 F, keeping the test panel stresses caused by the mechanical loads uniform, and thermal stresses caused by non-uniform panel temperatures minimized. The panel represents the side fuselage skin of an experimental aerospace vehicle, and was produced for the NASP program. A comprehensive mechanical loads test program using the new test fixture has been conducted on this panel from room temperature to 500 F. Measured data have been compared with finite-element analyses predictions, verifying that uniform load distributions were achieved by the fixture. The overall correlation of test data with analysis is excellent. The panel stress distributions and temperature distributions are very uniform and fulfill program requirements. This report provides details of an analytical and experimental validation of the combined loads test fixture. Because of its simple design, this unique test fixture can accommodate panels from a variety of aerospace vehicle designs.

  5. Fracture analysis of stiffened panels under biaxial loading with widespread cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite-element analysis with a critical crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion was used to model stable crack growth and fracture of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy (bare and clad) panels for several thicknesses. The panels had either single or multiple-site damage (MSD) cracks subjected to uniaxial or biaxial loading. Analyses were also conducted on cracked stiffened panels with single or MSD cracks. The critical CTOA value for each thickness was determined by matching the failure load on a middle-crack tension specimen. Comparisons were made between the critical angles determined from the finite-element analyses and those measured with photographic methods. Predicted load-against-crack extension and failure loads for panels under biaxial loading, panels with MSD cracks, and panels with various numbers of stiffeners were compared with test data whenever possible. The predicted results agreed well with the test data even for large-scale plastic deformations. The analyses were also able to predict stable tearing behavior of a large lead crack in the presence of MSD cracks. The analyses were then used to study the influence of stiffeners on residual strength in the presence of widespread fatigue cracking. Small MSD cracks were found to greatly reduce the residual strength for large lead cracks even for stiffened panels.

  6. The Study of Stability of Compression-loaded Multispan Composite Panel Upon Failure of elements Binding it to Panel Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamula, G. N.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Fomin, V. P.; Grishin, V. I.; Kalmykova, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report under the NCC-1-233 research program (dated September 15, 1998; see Appendix 5) carried out within co-operation between United States'NASA Langley RC and Russia's Goskomoboronprom in aeronautics, and continues similar programs, NCCW-73, NCC-1-233 and NCCW 1-233 accomplished in 1996, 1997, and 1998, respectively. The report provides results of "The study of stability of compression-loaded multispan composite panels upon failure of elements binding it to panel supports"; these comply with requirements established at TsAGI on 24 March 1998 and at NASA on 15 September 1998.

  7. Evaluation of a Compression-Loaded-Stitched-Multi-Bay Fuselage Panel With Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Li, Ji-An

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results from a stitched VaRTM carbon-epoxy composite panel tested under uni-axial compression loading are presented along with nonlinear finite element analysis prediction of the response. The curved panel is divided by frames and stringers into six bays with a column of three bays along the compressive loading direction. The frames are supported at the frame ends to resist out-of-plane translation. Back-to-back strain gages are used to record the strain and displacement transducers were used to record the out-of-plane displacements. In addition a full-field-displacement measurement technique that utilizes a camera-based-stereo-vision system was used to record the displacements. The panel was loaded to 1.5 times the predicted initial buckling load (1st bay buckling load, P(sub er) from the nonlinear finite element analysis and then was removed from the test machine for impact testing. After impacting with 20 ft-lbs of energy using a spherical impactor to produce barely visible damage the panel was loaded in compression until failure. The buckling load of the first bay to buckle was 97% of the buckling load before impact. The stitching constrained the impact damage from growing during the loading to failure. Impact damage had very little overall effect on panel stiffness. Panel stiffness measured by the full-field-displacement technique indicated a 13% loss in stiffness after impact. The panel failed at 1.64 times the first panel buckling load. The barely visible impact damage did not grow noticeably as the panel failed by global instability due to stringer-web terminations at the frame locations. The predictions from the nonlinear analysis of the finite element modeling of the entire specimen were very effective in the capture of the initial buckling and global behavior of the panel. In addition, the prediction highlighted the weakness of the panel under compression due to stringer web terminations. Both the test results and the nonlinear

  8. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II : Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Jang, Beom Seon; Kang, Sung Wook

    2014-06-01

    I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO-laser welding. Kim et al. (2013) proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  9. Damage Tolerance of Pre-Stressed Composite Panels Under Impact Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alastair F.; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Schueler, Dominik

    2014-02-01

    An experimental test campaign studied the structural integrity of carbon fibre/epoxy panels preloaded in tension or compression then subjected to gas gun impact tests causing significant damage. The test programme used representative composite aircraft fuselage panels composed of aerospace carbon fibre toughened epoxy prepreg laminates. Preload levels in tension were representative of design limit loads for fuselage panels of this size, and maximum compression preloads were in the post-buckle region. Two main impact scenarios were considered: notch damage from a 12 mm steel cube projectile, at velocities in the range 93-136 m/s; blunt impact damage from 25 mm diameter glass balls, at velocities 64-86 m/s. The combined influence of preload and impact damage on panel residual strengths was measured and results analysed in the context of damage tolerance requirements for composite aircraft panels. The tests showed structural integrity well above design limit loads for composite panels preloaded in tension and compression with visible notch impact damage from hard body impact tests. However, blunt impact tests on buckled compression loaded panels caused large delamination damage regions which lowered plate bending stiffness and reduced significantly compression strengths in buckling.

  10. Tow-Steered Panels With Holes Subjected to Compression or Shear Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    2005-01-01

    Tailoring composite laminates to vary the fiber orientations within a fiber layer of a laminate to address non-uniform stress states and provide structural advantages such as the alteration of principal load paths has potential application to future low-cost, light-weight structures for commercial transport aircraft. Evaluation of this approach requires the determination of the effectiveness of stiffness tailoring through the use of curvilinear fiber paths in flat panels including the reduction of stress concentrations around the holes and the increase in load carrying capability. Panels were designed through the use of an optimization code using a genetic algorithm and fabricated using a tow-steering approach. Manufacturing limitations, such as the radius of curvature of tows the machine could support, avoidance of wrinkling of fibers and minimization of gaps between fibers were considered in the design process. Variable stiffness tow-steered panels constructed with curvilinear fiber paths were fabricated so that the design methodology could be verified through experimentation. Finite element analysis where each element s stacking sequence was accurately defined is used to verify the behavior predicted based on the design code. Experiments on variable stiffness flat panels with central circular holes were conducted with the panels loaded in axial compression or shear. Tape and tow-steered panels are used to demonstrate the buckling, post-buckling and failure behavior of elastically tailored panels. The experimental results presented establish the buckling performance improvements attainable by elastic tailoring of composite laminates.

  11. Dynamic Fracture of Nanocomposites and Response of Fiber Composite Panels to Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Arun

    2009-06-01

    This lecture will present studies on the response of novel engineering materials to extreme dynamic loadings. In particular, the talk will focus on the behavior of sandwich composite materials to shock loading and dynamic fracture of nano-composite materials. Results from an experimental study on the response of sandwich materials to controlled blast loading will be presented. In this study, a shock tube facility was utilized to apply blast loading to simply supported plates of E-glass vinyl ester/PVC foam sandwich composite materials. Pressure sensors were mounted at the end of the muzzle section of the shock tube to measure the incident pressure and the reflected pressure profiles during the experiment. A high speed digital camera was utilized to capture the real time side deformation of the materials, as well as the development and progression of damage. Macroscopic and microscopic examination was then implemented to study the post-mortem damage. Conclusions on the relative performance of sandwich composites under blast loadings will also be discussed. Results from an experimental investigation conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of novel materials fabricated using nano sized particles in polymer matrix will also be presented. Unsaturated polyester resin specimens embedded with small loadings of nano sized particles of TiO2 and Al2O3 were fabricated using a direct ultrasonification method to study the effects of nanosized particles on nanocomposite fracture properties. The ultrasonification method employed produced nanocomposites with excellent particle dispersion as verified by TEM. Experiments were conducted to investigate the dynamic crack initiation and rapid crack propagation in theses particle reinforced materials. High-speed digital imaging was employed along with dynamic photoelasticity to obtain real time, full-field quantification of the stress field associated with the dynamic fracture process. Birefringent coatings were used to conduct

  12. Compression-Loaded Composite Panels With Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  13. Water ingress detection in honeycomb sandwich panels by passive infrared thermography using a high-resolution thermal imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Brault, L.; Marcotte, F.; Genest, M.; Farley, V.; Maldague, X.

    2012-06-01

    Water ingress in honeycomb structures is of great concern for the civil and military aerospace industries. Pressure and temperature variations during take-off and landing produce considerable stress on aircraft structures, promoting moisture ingress (by diffusion through fibers or by direct ingress through voids, cracks or unsealed joints) into the core. The presence of water (or other fluids such as kerosene, hydraulic fluid and de-icing agents) in any of its forms (gas vapor, liquid or ice) promotes corrosion, cell breakage, and induce composite layer delaminations and skin disbonds. In this study, testing specimens were produced from unserviceable parts from military aircraft. In order to simulate atmospheric conditions during landing, selected core areas were filled with measured quantities of water and then frozen in a cold chamber. The specimens were then removed from the chamber and monitored for over 20 minutes as they warm up using a cooled high-resolution infrared camera. Results have shown that detection and quantification of water ingress on honeycomb sandwich structures by passive infrared thermography is possible using a HD mid-wave infrared cameras for volumes of water as low as 0.2 ml and from a distance as far as 20 m from the target.

  14. 308 Building electrical load list and panel schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Giamberardini, S.J.

    1994-09-13

    This report contains two lists. The first lists equipment, load location, source of power, and breaker identification. The second compiles the same information but in a different format, namely, for each power source, the breaker, equipment, and location is given. Building 308 is part of the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility which houses the Secure Automated Fabrication process line for fabrication of reactor fuels and the Breeder Processing Engineering Test for processing Fast Flux Test Facility fuel to demonstrate closure of the fuel cycle.

  15. Application of Wave Propagation and Vibration-based Structural Health Monitoring Techniques to Friction Stir Welded Plate and Sandwich Honeycomb Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, S.; White, J. R.; Adams, D. E.; Jata, K. V.

    2007-03-01

    Wave propagation and vibration-based structural health monitoring methodologies are presented to detect, locate and quantify dent/crack, thermal debond, and corrosion damage in a solid aluminum friction stir weld plate and a sandwich honeycomb thermal protection panel. A wave propagation based method can identify small defects because propagating waves typically consist of small wavelengths while a vibration-based scheme is better equipped to quantify damage over wide areas of large structures. Near-real time online diagnostics is achieved by using localized sensing (wave propagation) and distributed sensing (vibration-based) in an active measurement array. Sensor/actuator arrays have been developed to implement these techniques and portable health management systems have been developed based on the combination of damage detection algorithms, active sensing, and graphical user interfaces. Propagating waves are shown to have a heightened sensitivity to damage located at the anti-nodes of a friction stir wed plate forced by low frequency environmental vibrations. Measurement of the input forcing in the vibration-based method is shown to enable damage quantification.

  16. Numerical analysis of impact-damaged sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Youngkeun

    Sandwich structures are used in a wide variety of structural applications due to their relative advantages over other conventional structural materials in terms of improved stability, weight savings, and ease of manufacture and repair. Foreign object impact damage in sandwich composites can result in localized damage to the facings, core, and core-facing interface. Such damage may result in drastic reductions in composite strength, elastic moduli, and durability and damage tolerance characteristics. In this study, physically-motivated numerical models have been developed for predicting the residual strength of impact-damaged sandwich composites comprised of woven-fabric graphite-epoxy facesheets and Nomex honeycomb cores subjected to compression-after-impact loading. Results from non-destructive inspection and destructive sectioning of damaged sandwich panels were used to establish initial conditions for damage (residual facesheet indentation, core crush dimension, etc.) in the numerical analysis. Honeycomb core crush test results were used to establish the nonlinear constitutive behavior for the Nomex core. The influence of initial facesheet property degradation and progressive loss of facesheet structural integrity on the residual strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels was examined. The influence of damage of various types and sizes, specimen geometry, support boundary conditions, and variable material properties on the estimated residual strength is discussed. Facesheet strains from material and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses correlated relatively well with experimentally determined values. Moreover, numerical predictions of residual strength are consistent with experimental observations. Using a methodology similar to that presented in this work, it may be possible to develop robust residual strength estimates for complex sandwich composite structural components with varying levels of in-service damage. Such studies may facilitate sandwich

  17. Sandwich Construction Solar Structural Facets

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, R. B.; Grossman, J.W.

    1998-12-22

    Silver/glass mirrors have excellent optical properties but need a method of support in order to be used in concentrating solar thermal systems. In collaboration with the Cummins dish/Stirling development program, they started investigating sandwich construction as a way to integrate silver/glass mirrors into solar optical elements. In sandwich construction, membranes such as sheet metal or plastic are bonded to the front and back of a core (like a sandwich). For solar optical elements, a glass mirror is bonded to one of the membranes. This type of construction has the advantages of a high strength-to-weight ratio, and reasonable material and manufacturing cost. The inherent stiffness of sandwich construction mirror panels also facilitates large panels. This can have cost advantages for both the amount of hardware required as well as reduced installation and alignment costs. In addition, by incorporating the panels into the support structure reductions in the amount of structural support required are potentially possible.

  18. Development of beryllium honeycomb sandwich composite for structural and other related applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogan, J. W.; Grant, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating large beryllium honeycomb panels was demonstrated. Both flat and curved sandwich structures were manufactured using practical, braze bonding techniques. The processes developed prove that metallurgically assembled beryllium honeycomb panels show decided potential where rigid, lightweight structures are required. Three panels, each 10 square feet in surface area, were fabricated, and radiographically inspected to determine integrity. This examination revealed a 97 percent braze in the final panel. It is believed that ceramic dies for forming and brazing would facilitate the fabrication techniques for higher production rates. Ceramic dies would yield a lower thermal gradient in the panel during the braze cycle. This would eliminate the small amount of face sheet wrinkling present in the panels. Hot forming the various panel components demonstrated efficient manufacturing techniques for scaling up and producing large numbers of hot formed beryllium components and panels. The beryllium honeycomb panel demonstrated very good vibrational loading characteristics under test with desirable damping characteristics.

  19. Structural Performance of a Compressively Loaded Foam-Core Hat-Stiffened Textile Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Dexter, Benson H.

    1996-01-01

    A structurally efficient hat-stiffened panel concept that utilizes a structural foam as a stiffener core material has been designed and developed for aircraft primary structural applications. This stiffener concept is fabricated from textile composite material forms with a resin transfer molding process. This foam-filled hat-stiffener concept is structurally more efficient than most other prismatically stiffened panel configurations in a load range that is typical for both fuselage and wing structures. The panel design is based on woven/stitched and braided graphite-fiber textile preforms, an epoxy resin system, and Rohacell foam core. The structural response of this panel design was evaluated for its buckling and postbuckling behavior with and without low-speed impact damage. The results from single-stiffener and multi-stiffener specimen tests suggest that this structural concept responds to loading as anticipated and has excellent damage tolerance characteristics compared to a similar panel design made from preimpregnated graphite-epoxy tape material.

  20. Improvements to a method for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of compressively loaded stiffened composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report describes progress made during the period July 1991 to December 1991 on the tasks identified in the technical proposals for the subject grant. The plans for further effort on each of the tasks are outlined. The computer implementation of the method of analysis under development is referred to in this document as NLPAN. These tasks included: (1) implementation of continuation methods; (2) dynamic analysis capability; (3) additional boundary condition options for the panel ends; (4) transverse pressure loading; (5) second-order displacement fields; and (6) results for an i-stiffened panel with a complex cross section.

  1. Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Arora, H.; Kelly, M.; Worley, A.; Del Linz, P.; Fergusson, A.; Hooper, P. A.; Dear, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene–acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3 m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson–Cranz scaled distance of 3.02 m kg−1/3, 100 kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14 m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411–413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast. PMID:24711494

  2. Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials.

    PubMed

    Arora, H; Kelly, M; Worley, A; Del Linz, P; Fergusson, A; Hooper, P A; Dear, J P

    2014-05-13

    Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3 m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson-Cranz scaled distance of 3.02 m kg(-1/3), 100 kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14 m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411-413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast.

  3. Experimental Study of Deformation and of Effective Width in Axially Loaded Sheet-stringer Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramberg, Walter; MCPHERSON ALBERT E; Levy, Sam

    1939-01-01

    The deformation of two sheet-stringer panels subjected to end compression under carefully controlled end conditions was measured at a number of points and at a number of loads, most of which were above the load at which the sheet had begun to buckle. The two panels were identical except for the sheet, which was 0.70-inch 24st alclad for specimen 1 and 0.025-inch 24st aluminum alloy for specimen 6. A technique was developed for attaching Tuckerman optical strain gauges to the sheet without disturbing the strain distribution in the sheet by the method of attachment. This technique was used to explore the strain distribution in the sheet at various loads. The twisting and the bending of the stringers was measured by means of pointers attached to the stringers. The shape of the buckles in the sheet of specimen 6 was recorded at two loads by means of plaster casts. The sheet and the stringer loads at failure are compared with the corresponding loads for five similar panels tested at the Navy Model Basin. A detailed comparison is made between the measured deformation of the buckled sheet and the deformation calculated from approximate theories for the deformation in a rectangular sheet with freely supported edges buckling under end compression advanced by Timoshenko, Frankland, and Marguerre. The measured effective width for the specimens is compared with the effective width given by nine different relations for effective width as a function of the edge stress divided by the buckling stress of the sheet. The analysis of the measured stringer deformation is confined to an application of Southwell's method of plotting deformation against deformation over load. It was concluded that the stringer failure in both specimens were due to an instability in which the stringer was simultaneously twisted and bent as a column.

  4. Identifying and Characterizing Discrepancies Between Test and Analysis Results of Compression-Loaded Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2005-01-01

    Results from a study to identify and characterize discrepancies between validation tests and high-fidelity analyses of compression-loaded panels are presented. First, potential sources of the discrepancies in both the experimental method and corresponding high-fidelity analysis models were identified. Then, a series of laboratory tests and numerical simulations were conducted to quantify the discrepancies and develop test and analysis methods to account for the discrepancies. The results indicate that the discrepancies between the validation tests and high-fidelity analyses can be attributed to imperfections in the test fixture and specimen geometry; test-fixture-induced changes in specimen geometry; and test-fixture-induced friction on the loaded edges of the test specimen. The results also show that accurate predictions of the panel response can be obtained when these specimen imperfections and edge conditions are accounted for in the analysis. The errors in the tests and analyses, and the methods used to characterize these errors are presented.

  5. Behavior and Failure Modes of Sandwich T-Joint Using Cohesive Zone Material Model and Contact Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, S. M. R.; Ghaznavi, A.

    2013-02-01

    One of the significant concerns of sandwich panels is their joints. T-joint is one the most common joint in sandwich structures. This paper deals with the numerical study of triangle T-joint under static loading. The results of numerical solution obtained by ANSYS modeling are verified with the results of experimental tests obtained in the literature. In general, the results obtained for anticipated failure load by numerical solution with the results of experimental test is in good agreement. Contact elements and cohesive zone material model are used to model the adhesive layer, hence debonding and fracture of adhesive is observed by the numerical modeling. Also, by using a written macro code in the ANSYS software, the ability of damage is explained for the core of sandwich panels; thus both the modes in fracture of T-joints (core shear failure in base panel and debonding of adhesive) are modeled. Core materials consist of Divinycell H100, H160, H250, and HCP70 are used for modeling sandwich panels, so that the function of joint is studied under different conditions of the sandwich core material. Nine different geometrical models are created by changing the base angle of the core triangle. The absorbed energy associated with different segments of the T-joint are used to investigate the effect of joint geometry and core material on the load transfer and failure mode of the T-joint.

  6. Improvements to a method for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of compressively loaded stiffened composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, Frederick

    1993-01-01

    The NLPAN computer code uses a finite-strip approach to the analysis of thin-walled prismatic composite structures such as stiffened panels. The code can model in-plane axial loading, transverse pressure loading, and constant through-the-thickness thermal loading, and can account for shape imperfections. The NLPAN code represents an attempt to extend the buckling analysis of the VIPASA computer code into the geometrically nonlinear regime. Buckling mode shapes generated using VIPASA are used in NLPAN as global functions for representing displacements in the nonlinear regime. While the NLPAN analysis is approximate in nature, it is computationally economical in comparison with finite-element analysis, and is thus suitable for use in preliminary design and design optimization. A comprehensive description of the theoretical approach of NLPAN is provided. A discussion of some operational considerations for the NLPAN code is included. NLPAN is applied to several test problems in order to demonstrate new program capabilities, and to assess the accuracy of the code in modeling various types of loading and response. User instructions for the NLPAN computer program are provided, including a detailed description of the input requirements and example input files for two stiffened-panel configurations.

  7. Sandwich construction solar structural facets

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, R.B.; Grossman, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    Silver/glass mirrors have excellent optical properties but need a method of support in order to be used in concentrating solar thermal systems. In collaboration with the Cummins dish/Stirling development program, the authors started investigating sandwich construction as a way to integrate silver/glass mirrors into solar optical elements. In sandwich construction, membranes such as sheet metal or plastic are bonded to the front and back of a core (like a sandwich). For solar optical elements, a glass mirror is bonded to one of the membranes. This type of construction has the advantages of a high strength-to-weight ratio, and reasonable material and manufacturing cost. The inherent stiffness of sandwich construction mirror panels also facilitates large panels. This can have cost advantages for both the amount of hardware required as well as reduced installation and alignment costs. In addition, by incorporating the panels into the support structure reductions in the amount of structural support required are potentially possible. The authors have investigated sandwich construction panels that employ cores of polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyurethane foams as well as conventional aluminum and cardboard honeycombs. The authors investigations have involved fabricating 0.5 x 0.6-m (20 x 24-inch) spherical-contour panels and testing their optical properties and environmental durability. The authors have also performed preliminary cost and performance studies. Evaluations included optical testing with the SunLab 2f and VSHOT tools both before and after exposures to environmental chamber testing. The results showed that sandwich mirror panels are potentially very accurate. However, long-term degradation due to creep was evident in all of the foam core facets. The aluminum honeycomb core facets were accurate and durable. In this paper, the design principles that guided the investigations, estimates of cost, and the results of the experimental investigations are

  8. A variable transverse stiffness sandwich structure using fluidic flexible matrix composites (F2MC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suyi; Lotfi, Amir; Shan, Ying; Wang, K. W.; Rahn, Christopher D.; Bakis, Charles E.

    2008-03-01

    Presented in this paper is the development of a novel honeycomb sandwich panel with variable transverse stiffness. In this structure, the traditional sandwich face sheets are replaced by the fluidic flexible matrix composite (F2MC) tube layers developed in recent studies. The F2MC layers, combined with the anisotropic honeycomb core material properties, provide a new sandwich structure with variable stiffness properties for transverse loading. In this research, an analytical model is derived based on Lekhitskii's anisotropic pressurized tube solution and Timoshenko beam theory. Experimental investigations are also conducted to verify the analytical findings. A segmented multiple-F2MC-tube configuration is synthesized to increase the variable stiffness range. The analysis shows that the new honeycomb sandwich structure using F2MC tubes of 10 segments can provide a high/low transverse stiffness ratio of 60. Segmentation and stiffness control can be realized by an embedded valve network, granting a fast response time.

  9. Minimum-mass design of filamentary composite panels under combined loads: Design procedure based on a rigorous buckling analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Agranoff, N.; Anderson, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for designing uniaxially stiffened panels made of composite material and subjected to combined inplane loads. The procedure uses a rigorous buckling analysis and nonlinear mathematical programing techniques. Design studies carried out with the procedure consider hat-stiffened and corrugated panels made of graphite-epoxy material. Combined longitudinal compression and shear and combined longitudinal and transverse compression are the loadings used in the studies. The capability to tailor the buckling response of a panel is also explored. Finally, the adequacy of another, simpler, analysis-design procedure is examined.

  10. A Study on Response of a Contoured Composite Panel with Co-cured Stiffeners Under Transient Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Shahnaaz; Jain, Prakash Chand; Venkatesh, Siddu

    2016-07-01

    Composite materials are emerging to be the best applied materials for aerospace applications. With rapid improvement in computational facilities, it is now possible to design the best composite lay up for a particular kind of application. This paper presents the development of a Finite Element model of a contoured composite panel with co-cured stiffeners using Finite Element Simulation. Commercial package ANSYS 15.0 is used for this study. Such half contoured panels find wide application in Aerospace industry. The panel is hinged at one of the ends and dynamically loaded at the other end over a relatively small surface area by transverse load. The response of the panel is observed for variation in stresses, deflections and failure criteria. The panel is expected to rotate about the hinge point by 4° from the initial point. The transient response of the composite panel has been observed for expected load and two test load cases and results reported in this paper. Analysis has become useful input for the design of panel.

  11. Prediction of response of aircraft panels subjected to acoustic and thermal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1992-01-01

    The primary effort of this research project has been focused on the development of analytical methods for the prediction of random response of structural panels subjected to combined and intense acoustic and thermal loads. The accomplishments on various acoustic fatigue research activities are described first, then followed by publications and theses. Topics covered include: transverse shear deformation; finite element models of vibrating composite laminates; large deflection vibration modeling; finite element analysis of thermal buckling; and prediction of three dimensional duct using boundary element method.

  12. A nonlinear solid shell element formulation for analysis of composite panels under blast wave pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hun

    A comprehensive methodology to accurately predict the dynamic response of composite panels under blast wave pressure loading has been successfully developed for the first time. It includes the modeling of geometrically nonlinear dynamic effect, progressive failure and strain-rate effect on constitutive equation and strength. For dynamic analysis, a nonlinear solid shell element formulation is combined with the trapezoidal rule for numerical integration in time. The progressive damage incorporates the effect of the material failure, such as fiber failure, matrix cracking and fiber-matrix shearing failure on the stiffness and strength. Material degradation models based on the rule of mixtures are proposed for each failure mode. To implement the strain-rate effect on the constitutive equation of the material, a viscoplastic model is adopted. In this model, three material parameters are determined by conducting uniaxial tension tests on off-axis specimen. The effect of strain rates on material strength is implemented via the linear least square fit of the test data. A key ingredient of the analysis is a geometrically nonlinear solid shell element based on the assumed strain formulation to alleviate element locking. In this approach, the composite shell is treated as a three-dimensional solid. Accordingly, the change of shell thickness is allowed and the kinematics of deformation is described by six vector components at a point on the shell midsurface. The mass matrix always remains constant during the analysis. Example problems under static and dynamic loadings are solved to investigate the behavior of composite panels undergoing large deformation while experiencing material damage. The analysis results are compared with the test data available. Results of the numerical analysis show that the effect of the progressive failure and strain-rates on structural responses are considerable. For a composite plate under static pressure loadings, maximum displacement and

  13. Piezoelectrically-induced guided wave propagation for health monitoring of honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fei

    Honeycomb sandwich structures have been widely used in marine and aerospace applications due to their high strength/stiffness-to-weight ratio. However, an excessive load or repeated loading in the core tends to induce debonding along the skin-core interface, threatening the integrity and safety of the whole structure. This dissertation focuses on development of guided wave strategies for health monitoring of honeycomb sandwich structures, based on a piezoelectric actuator/sensor network. The honeycomb sandwich panels, which are composed of aluminum alloy (T6061) skins and hexagonal-celled Nomex core, are specifically considered in the study. First, elastic wave propagation mechanism in honeycomb sandwich structures is numerically and experimentally investigated, based on a piezoelectric actuator/sensor system. Influences of cell geometry parameters upon wave propagation are also discussed. Some wave propagation characteristics, such as wave group velocity dispersion relation and mode tuning capabilities, in the honeycomb composite panels are experimentally characterized. Secondly, effects of skin-core debonding upon the leaky guided wave propagation in honeycomb sandwich structures are studied by the finite element simulation. An appropriate signal difference coefficient is defined to represent the differential features caused by debonding. By means of probability analysis of differential features of transmitted guided waves and the image fusion, the final image of the structure is constructed with improved detection precision. A multilevel sensor network strategy is proposed to detect multiple debondings in the honeycomb sandwich structure. Thirdly, an analytical model considering coupled piezo-elastodynamics is developed to quantitatively describe dynamic load transfer between a surface-bonded piezoelectric wafer actuator and a prestressed plate. The finite element method is used to evaluate the accuracy of the analytical prediction. Effects of prestresses on the

  14. Effects of Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should also be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  15. Methodology for Selection of Optimum Light Stringers in Functionally Graded Panels Designed for Prescribed Fundamental Frequency or Buckling Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birman, Victor; Byrd, Larry W.

    2008-02-01

    The interest to functionally graded materials (FGM) and structures has been generated by their potential advantages, including enhanced thermal properties, reduced or eliminated delamination concerns, a potential for an improved stress distribution, etc. Various aspects of the processing, design, micromechanics and analysis of FGM have been outlined in a number of reviews, mentioned here are [1-3]. In particular, functionally graded panels may be advantageous compared to their conventional counterparts in numerous applications. However, a typical FGM panel is asymmetric about its middle plane resulting in lower buckling loads and fundamental frequencies as well as higher stresses and deformations than the counterpart with a symmetric distribution of the same constituents. The reduced stiffness of FGM panels can be compensated by reinforcing them with stringers. For example, metallic stringers at the metal-rich surface of a FGM ceramic-metal panel may provide an efficient solution enabling a designer to increase both buckling loads as well as natural frequencies. The list of studies on optimization of FGM is extensive as could be anticipated for such tailored structural elements. For example, recent papers by Batra and his collaborators present optimization of the natural frequencies of a FGM plate through material grading [4] and through the graded fiber orientation [5]. The present paper is concerned with an optimum design of the system of stringers for a specified FGM panel. The task is to design the lightest system of stringers enabling the panel to achieve prescribed buckling loads or fundamental frequency.

  16. Response of laminated composite flat panels to sonic boom and explosive blast loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Nosier, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals with a theoretical analysis of the dynamic response of shear deformable symmetrically laminated rectangular composite flat panels exposed to sonic boom and explosive blast loadings. The pertinent governing equations incorporating transverse shear deformation, transverse normal stress, as well as the higher-order effects are solved by using the integral-transform technique. The obtained results are compared with their counterparts obtained within the framework of the first-order transverse shear deformation and the classical plate theories and some conclusions concerning their range of applicability are outlined. The paper also contains a detailed analysis of the influence played by the various parameters characterizing the considered pressure pulses as well as the material and geometry of the plate.

  17. Low-Velocity Impact Response of Sandwich Beams with Functionally Graded Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apetre, N. A.; Sankar, B. V.; Ambur, D. R.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of low-speed impact of a one-dimensional sandwich panel by a rigid cylindrical projectile is considered. The core of the sandwich panel is functionally graded such that the density, and hence its stiffness, vary through the thickness. The problem is a combination of static contact problem and dynamic response of the sandwich panel obtained via a simple nonlinear spring-mass model (quasi-static approximation). The variation of core Young's modulus is represented by a polynomial in the thickness coordinate, but the Poisson's ratio is kept constant. The two-dimensional elasticity equations for the plane sandwich structure are solved using a combination of Fourier series and Galerkin method. The contact problem is solved using the assumed contact stress distribution method. For the impact problem we used a simple dynamic model based on quasi-static behavior of the panel - the sandwich beam was modeled as a combination of two springs, a linear spring to account for the global deflection and a nonlinear spring to represent the local indentation effects. Results indicate that the contact stiffness of thc beam with graded core Increases causing the contact stresses and other stress components in the vicinity of contact to increase. However, the values of maximum strains corresponding to the maximum impact load arc reduced considerably due to grading of thc core properties. For a better comparison, the thickness of the functionally graded cores was chosen such that the flexural stiffness was equal to that of a beam with homogeneous core. The results indicate that functionally graded cores can be used effectively to mitigate or completely prevent impact damage in sandwich composites.

  18. Experimental investigation on dynamic response of aircraft panels excited by high-intensity acoustic loads in thermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, Z. Q.; LI, H. B.; ZHANG, W.; CHENG, H.; KONG, F. J.; LIU, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Metallic and composite panels are the major components for thermal protection system of aircraft vehicles, which are exposed to a severe combination of aerodynamic, thermal and acoustic environments during hypersonic flights. A thermal-acoustic testing apparatus which simulates thermal and acoustic loads was used to validate the integrity and the reliability of these panels. Metallic and ceramic matrix composite flat panels were designed. Dynamic response tests of these panels were carried out using the thermal acoustic apparatus. The temperature of the metallic specimen was up to 400 °C, and the temperature of the composite specimen was up to 600 °C. Moreover, the acoustic load was over 160 dB. Acceleration responses of these testing panels were measured using high temperature instruments during the testing process. Results show that the acceleration root mean square values are dominated by sound pressure level of acoustic loads. Compared with testing data in room environment, the peaks of the acceleration dynamic response shifts obviously to the high frequency in thermal environment.

  19. Process Factors and Edgewise Compressive Properties of Scarf-repaired Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sui; Guan, Zhidong; Guo, Xia; Sun, Kai; Kong, Jiaoyue; Yan, Dongxiu

    2014-10-01

    Bonded repairs were conducted on flat and edge-closed composite sandwich panels that had undergone different levels of initial damage, and edgewise compression behaviors of repaired panel were tested. Experimental results indicate that these repair techniques can restore the compression performance of damaged panels effectively. The repaired specimens recovered an average of over 83 % of their strength. A k-sample Anderson-Darling test was used to analyze the influence of various parameters, including curing temperature, curing pressure, and repair configurations. After a thorough comparison, it was concluded that a high-temperature, high-pressure treatment can improve the mechanical performance of repaired panels, but the improvement is closely related to the structural complexity of the repaired region. A double-side repair scheme could be used to prevent the degradation of mechanical performance caused by the additional bending moment. The conclusions drawn in the present study provide further insight into the mechanical performance of repaired sandwich panels under edgewise compressive loads. These data facilitate the improved design methodology on bonded repair of composite sandwich structures.

  20. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  1. Acoustically Tailored Composite Rotorcraft Fuselage Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen; Shepherd, Micah; Koudela, Kevin; Wess, Denis; Snider, Royce; May, Carl; Kendrick, Phil; Lee, Edward; Cai, Liang-Wu

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft roof sandwich panel has been redesigned to optimize sound power transmission loss (TL) and minimize structure-borne sound for frequencies between 1 and 4 kHz where gear meshing noise from the transmission has the most impact on speech intelligibility. The roof section, framed by a grid of ribs, was originally constructed of a single honeycomb core/composite face sheet panel. The original panel has coincidence frequencies near 700 Hz, leading to poor TL across the frequency range of 1 to 4 kHz. To quiet the panel, the cross section was split into two thinner sandwich subpanels separated by an air gap. The air gap was sized to target the fundamental mass-spring-mass resonance of the double panel system to less than 500 Hz. The panels were designed to withstand structural loading from normal rotorcraft operation, as well as 'man-on-the-roof' static loads experienced during maintenance operations. Thin layers of VHB 9469 viscoelastomer from 3M were also included in the face sheet ply layups, increasing panel damping loss factors from about 0.01 to 0.05. Measurements in the NASA SALT facility show the optimized panel provides 6-11 dB of acoustic transmission loss improvement, and 6-15 dB of structure-borne sound reduction at critical rotorcraft transmission tonal frequencies. Analytic panel TL theory simulates the measured performance quite well. Detailed finite element/boundary element modeling of the baseline panel simulates TL slightly more accurately, and also simulates structure-borne sound well.

  2. Test and Modelling of Impact on Pre-Loaded Composite Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, A. K.; Fouinneteau, M. R. C.; Middendorf, P.

    2009-08-01

    Currently test and simulation of low and high speed impact of Aerospace composite structures is undertaken in an unloaded state. In reality this may not be the case and significant internal stresses could be present during an impact event such as bird strike during landing, or takeoff. In order to investigate the effects of internal loading on damage and failure of composite materials a series of experimental and simulation studies have been undertaken on three composite types having different fibres, resins and lay-ups. For each composite type panels have been manufactured and transversely impacted under the condition of ‘unloading’ or ‘pre-loading’. For preloading a rig has been constructed that can impose a constant in plane strain of up to 0.25% prior to impact. Results have clearly shown that preloading does lower the composite impact tolerance and change the observed failure modes. Simulation of experiments have also been conducted and have provided an encouraging agreement with test results in terms of both impact force time histories and prediction of the observed failure mechanisms.

  3. High Velocity Impact Response of Composite Lattice Core Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Zhang, Guoqi; Wang, Shixun; Ma, Li; Wu, Linzhi

    2014-04-01

    In this research, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite sandwich structures with pyramidal lattice core subjected to high velocity impact ranging from 180 to 2,000 m/s have been investigated by experimental and numerical methods. Experiments using a two-stage light gas gun are conducted to investigate the impact process and to validate the finite element (FE) model. The energy absorption efficiency (EAE) in carbon fiber composite sandwich panels is compared with that of 304 stainless-steel and aluminum alloy lattice core sandwich structures. In a specific impact energy range, energy absorption efficiency in carbon fiber composite sandwich panels is higher than that of 304 stainless-steel sandwich panels and aluminum alloy sandwich panels owing to the big density of metal materials. Therefore, in addition to the multi-functional applications, carbon fiber composite sandwich panels have a potential advantage to substitute the metal sandwich panels as high velocity impact resistance structures under a specific impact energy range.

  4. Post buckling behaviour of stiffened composite panels loaded in cyclic compression and shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, A.; Frostig, Y.; Shalev, D.; Weller, T.; Sheinman, Y.

    1993-02-01

    This paper presents the summary of a multiphase experimental - analytical study of the post-buckling mechanical behavior of a graphite/epoxy integrally stiffened panel. The first phase of the study included cyclic compression tests in the post-buckling regime of flat panels stiffened by either 'I' or 'J' shaped stiffeners. Static residual strength of the panels after 250,000 cycles was greater than the reference strength; however, some stiffness loss was observed. A series of tests of individual stiffeners, identical to those in the panels, was also carried out and the results showed the same trends as had been observed in the panels. There were no cases of early failure during the cyclic tests. The second phase included an experimental study of the post-buckling behavior of cylindrical panels integrally stiffened in the axial and transverse directions. Panels were tested in cyclic compression, cyclic torsion, and in combinations of both. The panels were stressed through 40,000 cycles, damage was inflicted, and an additional 40,000 cycles were imposed. No damage development was observed. The third phase of the study included an analytical effort for the development of a computer code, PBCOMP, for the buckling and post-buckling analysis of stiffened laminated flat and curved panels. The results of this study clearly show a great potential for the safe use of stiffened graphite/epoxy panels in aircraft structures.

  5. The research of the solar panels-commutator-inverter-load system with the pulse-amplitude control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taissariyeva, K. N.; Issembergenov, N. T.

    2014-11-01

    The system "solar panels-commutator-inverter-load" with amplitude-impulse control was researched. It was shown that if the solar panels are located in a certain way at the input of the inverter, it will be possible to get multilevel voltage close to sine wave with the help of amplitude-impulse control of commutator at the output of inverter. Herewith the effect is saving of solar panels depending on the quantity of voltage level, and also the enhanced voltage distortion coefficient (THD). For instance, with 8-level of voltage 28,2% and THD=4,64%, with 13-level of voltage, 30,5% and THD=2,65%, and with 26-level of voltage 31,7% and THD=1,22%. The given results were obtained through computer modeling and experimental research.

  6. Effects of moisture, elevated temperature, and fatigue loading on the behavior of graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels with center cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fatigue loading combined with moisture and heat on the behavior of graphite epoxy panels with either Kevlar-49 or S-glass buffer strips were studied. Buffer strip panels, that had a slit in the center to represent damage, were moisture conditioned or heated, fatigue loaded, and then tested in tension to measure their residual strength. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading direction and were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with Kevlar-49 epoxy or S-glass epoxy on a 1-for-1 basis. The panels were subjected to a fatigue loading spectrum. One group of panels was preconditioned by soaking in 60 C water to produce a 1 percent weight gain then tested at room temperature. One group was heated to 82 C during the fatigue loading. Another group was moisture conditioned and then tested at 82 C. The residual strengths of the buffer panels were not highly affected by the fatigue loading, the number of repetitions of the loading spectrum, or the maximum strain level. The moisture conditioning reduced the residual strengths of the S-glass buffer strip panel by 10 to 15 percent below the ambient results. The moisture conditioning did not have a large effect on the Kevlar-49 panels.

  7. Minimum-mass design of filamentary composite panels under combined loads: Design procedure based on simplified buckling equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Agranoff, N.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical procedure is presented for designing hat stiffened and corrugated panels made of composite material and subjected to longitudinal (in the direction of the stiffeners) compression and shear loadings. The procedure is based on nonlinear mathematical programming techniques and a simplified set of buckling equations. Design requirements considered are buckling, strength, and extensional and shear stiffness. The effects of specified thickness, variation of cross-section dimensions, stiffness requirements, local buckling boundary conditions, and the effect of combined compression and shear loadings are shown.

  8. Plate Deformation Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composite-Ti Honeycomb-Metal Sandwiches for Pressurized Propulsion Component Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelsen, William D.; Shin, E. eugene; Thesken, John C.; Sutter, James K.; Martin, Rich

    2004-01-01

    THe objectives are: 1. To experimentally validate bi-axial plate flexural performance of PMC-Ti H/C-A286 sandwich panels for the internally pressurized RBCC combustion chamber support structure. 2. To explore ASTM 2-D plate flexure test (D 6416) to simulate the internal pressure loading and to correlate the results with analytical and FE modeling based on 2-D flexure properties.

  9. A study of the structural efficiency of fluted core graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1990-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded graphite-epoxy sandwich panels with fluted cores is studied to determine their weight saving potential. Graphite-epoxy equilateral triangular elements are used to construct the fluted cores for the sandwich panels. Two panel configurations are considered. One configuration has two layers of triangular elements in the fluted core and the second configuration has only one layer of triangular elements in the core. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight design for each panel configuration. Laminate ply orientations are limited to approx. 45, 0, and 90 deg. A constraint on the axial stiffness is included in the design process so the panel will conform to typical constraints for aircraft wing structures. Minimum thickness requirements for each laminate and maximum allowable strains are also included. A comparison is made of the calculated structural efficiency of the fluted core panels to the structural efficiency of aluminum transport aircraft structures and simple blade-stiffened graphite-epoxy panels. Limited experimental results are also included for comparison with the analytical predictions and to identify the critical failure mechanisms of graphite-epoxy fluted-core sandwich panels.

  10. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight-saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum-weight hat-stiffened and open-corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programing technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience to date suggests that most of the theoretical weight-saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  11. An analytical and experimental investigation of sandwich composites subjected to low-velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Todd Alan

    1999-12-01

    This study involves an experimental and analytical investigation of low-velocity impact phenomenon in sandwich composite structures. The analytical solution of a three-dimensional finite-geometry multi-layer specially orthotropic panel subjected to static and transient transverse loading cases is presented. The governing equations of the static and dynamic formulations are derived from Reissner's functional and solved by enforcing the continuity of traction and displacement components between adjacent layers. For the dynamic loading case, the governing equations are solved by applying Fourier or Laplace transformation in time. Additionally, the static solution is extended to solve the contact problem between the sandwich laminate and a rigid sphere. An iterative method is employed to determine the sphere's unknown contact area and pressure distribution. A failure criterion is then applied to the sandwich laminate's stress and strain field to predict impact damage. The analytical accuracy of the present study is verified through comparisons with finite element models, other analyses, and through experimentation. Low-velocity impact tests were conducted to characterize the type and extent of the damage observed in a variety of sandwich configurations with graphite/epoxy face sheets and foam or honeycomb cores. Correlation of the residual indentation and cross-sectional views of the impacted specimens provides a criterion for the extent of damage. Quasi-static indentation tests are also performed and show excellent agreement when compared with the analytical predictions. Finally, piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) film sensors are found to be effective in detecting low-velocity impact.

  12. High Strain Rate Response of Sandwich Composites with Nanophased Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Uddin, Mohammed F.; Rangari, Vijaya K.; Saha, Mrinal C.; Zainuddin, Shaik; Jeelani, Shaik

    2005-05-01

    Polyurethane foam materials have been used as core materials in a sandwich construction with S2-Glass/SC-15 facings. The foam material has been manufactured from liquid polymer precursors of polyurethane. The precursors are made of two components; part-A (diphenylmethane diisocyanate) and part-B (polyol). In one set of experiments, part-A was mixed with part-B to manufacture the foam. In another set, TiO2 nanoparticles have been dispersed in part-A through ultrasonic cavitation technique. The loading of nanoparticles was 3% by weight of the total polymer precursor. The TiO2 nanoparticles were spherical in shape, and were about 29 nm in diameter. Sonic cavitation was carried out with a vibrasound liquid processor at 20 kHz frequency with a power intensity of about 100 kW/m2. The two categories of foams manufactured in this manner were termed as neat and nanophased. Sandwich composites were then fabricated using these two categories of core materials using a co-injection resin transfer molding (CIRTM) technique. Test samples extracted from the panel were subjected to quasi-static as well as high strain rate loadings. Rate of loading varied from 0.002 s-1 to around 1300 s-1. It has been observed that infusion of nanoparticles had a direct correlation with the cell geometry. The cell dimensions increased by about 46% with particle infusion suggesting that nanoparticles might have worked as catalysts during the foaming process. Correspondingly, enhancement in thermal properties was also noticed especially in the TGA experiments. There was also a significant improvement in mechanical properties due to nanoparticle infusion. Average increase in sandwich strength and energy absorption with nanophased cores was between 40 60% over their neat counterparts. Details of manufacturing and analyses of thermal and mechanical tests are presented in this paper.

  13. Composite Sandwich Technologies Lighten Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Leveraging its private resources with several Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with both NASA and the U.S. Department of Defense, WebCore Technologies LLC, of Miamisburg, Ohio, developed a fiber-reinforced foam sandwich panel it calls TYCOR that can be used for a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications. Testing at Glenn Research Center?s Ballistic Impact Facility demonstrated that the technology was able to exhibit excellent damage localization and stiffness during impact. The patented and trademarked material has found use in many demanding applications, including marine, ground transportation, mobile shelters, bridges, and most notably, wind turbines.

  14. Elastic buckling analysis for composite stiffened panels and other structures subjected to biaxial inplane loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, A. V.; Tamekuni, M.

    1973-01-01

    An exact linear analysis method is presented for predicting buckling of structures with arbitrary uniform cross section. The structure is idealized as an assemblage of laminated plate-strip elements, curved and planar, and beam elements. Element edges normal to the longitudinal axes are assumed to be simply supported. Arbitrary boundary conditions may be specified on any external longitudinal edge of plate-strip elements. The structure or selected elements may be loaded in any desired combination of inplane transverse compression or tension side load and axial compression load. The analysis simultaneously considers all possible modes of instability and is applicable for the buckling of laminated composite structures. Numerical results correlate well with the results of previous analysis methods.

  15. Thermo-Elastic Triangular Sandwich Element for the Complete Stress Field Based on a Single-Layer Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, M.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Ambur, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a new triangular finite element for modeling thick sandwich panels, subjected to thermo-mechanical loading, based on a {3,2}-order single-layer plate theory. A hybrid energy functional is employed in the derivation of the element because of a C interelement continuity requirement. The single-layer theory is based on five weighted-average field variables arising from the cubic and quadratic representations of the in-plane and transverse displacement fields, respectively. The variations of temperature and distributed loading acting on the top and bottom surfaces are non-uniform. The temperature varies linearly through the thickness.

  16. Evaluation of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) for unsteady air loads prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appa, Kari; Smith, Michael J. C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper evaluates the capability of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) code to predict unsteady aerodynamic pressures, lift and moment distributions, and generalized forces for general wing-body configurations in supersonic flow. Stability derivatives are computed and correlated for the X-29 and an Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, and a flutter analysis is carried out for a wing wind tunnel test example. Most results are shown to correlate well with test or published data. Although the emphasis of this paper is on evaluation, an improvement in the CPM code's handling of intersecting lifting surfaces is briefly discussed. An attractive feature of the CPM code is that it shares the basic data requirements and computational arrangements of the doublet lattice method. A unified code to predict unsteady subsonic or supersonic airloads is therefore possible.

  17. Post-buckling of geometrically imperfect shear-deformable flat panels under combined thermal and compressive edge loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Souza, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The static post-buckling of simply-supported flat panels exposed to a stationary nonuniform temperature field and subjected to a system of subcritical in-plane compressive edge loads is investigated. The study is performed within a refined theory of composite laminated plates incorporating the effect of transverse shear and the geometric nonlinearities. The influence played by a number of effects, among them transverse shear deformation, initial geometric imperfections, the character of the in-plane boundary conditions and thickness ratio are studied and a series of conclusions are outlined. The influence played by the complete temperature field (i.e., the uniform through thickness and thickness-wise gradient) as compared to the one induced by only the uniform one, is discussed and the peculiarities of the resulting post-buckling behaviors are enlightened.

  18. An ultrasensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor based on signal amplification strategy of gold nanoparticles functionalized magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes loaded with lead ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Faying; Han, Jian; Jiang, Liping; Wang, Yulan; Li, Yueyun; Dong, Yunhui; Wei, Qin

    2015-06-15

    In this study, a novel and ultrasensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor was prepared for the quantitative detection of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), a well-known hepatocellular carcinoma biomarker. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) functionalized magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-Fe3O4) were prepared and utilized for the adsorption of lead ions (Pb(2+)) and the secondary antibodies (Ab2). The resultant nanocomposites (Pb(2+)@Au@MWCNTs-Fe3O4) were used as the label for signal amplification, showing better electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than MWCNTs, MWCNTs-Fe3O4 or Au@MWCNTs-Fe3O4 due to the synergetic effect presented in Pb(2+)@Au@MWCNTs-Fe3O4. Moreover, Au NPs were electrodeposited on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the effective immobilization of primary antibodies (Ab1). Under the optimal conditions, a linear range from 10 fg/mL to 100 ng/mL and a detection limit of 3.33 fg/mL were obtained. The proposed electrochemical sandwich-type immunosensor shows high sensitivity, good selectivity and stability for the quantitative detection of AFP, holding a great potential in clinical and diagnostic applications.

  19. A comparative study of the impact properties of sandwich materials with different cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, K. R.; Shankar, K.; Viot, P.; Guerard, S.

    2012-08-01

    Sandwich panels are made of two high strength skins bonded to either side of a light weight core and are used in applications where high stiffness combined with low structural weight is required. The purpose of this paper is to compare the mechanical response of several sandwich panels whose core materials are different. Sandwich panels with glass fibre-reinforced polymer face sheets were used, combined with five different cores; polystyrene foam, polypropylene honeycomb, two different density Balsa wood and Cork. All specimens were subjected to low velocity impact and their structural response (Force-displacement curves) were compared to quasistatic response of the panel tested using an hemispherical indenter.

  20. Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring frame/stringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin veil- efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels was made -hick incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining their strength. The majority of the designs were centered around the concept of creating areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced/recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  1. Use of an In Vitro, Nuclear Receptor Assay Panel to Characterize the Endocrine-Disrupting Activity Load of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent Extracts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of an In Vitro, Nuclear Receptor Assay Panel to Characterize the Endocrine-Disrupting Activity Load of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent Extracts Katie B. Paul 1.2, Ruth Marfil-Vega 1 Marc A. Mills3, Steve 0. Simmons2, Vickie S. Wilson4, Kevin M. Crofton2 10ak Rid...

  2. Thermal insulating concrete wall panel design for sustainable built environment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ao; Wong, Kwun-Wah; Lau, Denvid

    2014-01-01

    Air-conditioning system plays a significant role in providing users a thermally comfortable indoor environment, which is a necessity in modern buildings. In order to save the vast energy consumed by air-conditioning system, the building envelopes in envelope-load dominated buildings should be well designed such that the unwanted heat gain and loss with environment can be minimized. In this paper, a new design of concrete wall panel that enhances thermal insulation of buildings by adding a gypsum layer inside concrete is presented. Experiments have been conducted for monitoring the temperature variation in both proposed sandwich wall panel and conventional concrete wall panel under a heat radiation source. For further understanding the thermal effect of such sandwich wall panel design from building scale, two three-story building models adopting different wall panel designs are constructed for evaluating the temperature distribution of entire buildings using finite element method. Both the experimental and simulation results have shown that the gypsum layer improves the thermal insulation performance by retarding the heat transfer across the building envelopes. PMID:25177718

  3. Thermal Insulating Concrete Wall Panel Design for Sustainable Built Environment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ao; Wong, Kwun-Wah

    2014-01-01

    Air-conditioning system plays a significant role in providing users a thermally comfortable indoor environment, which is a necessity in modern buildings. In order to save the vast energy consumed by air-conditioning system, the building envelopes in envelope-load dominated buildings should be well designed such that the unwanted heat gain and loss with environment can be minimized. In this paper, a new design of concrete wall panel that enhances thermal insulation of buildings by adding a gypsum layer inside concrete is presented. Experiments have been conducted for monitoring the temperature variation in both proposed sandwich wall panel and conventional concrete wall panel under a heat radiation source. For further understanding the thermal effect of such sandwich wall panel design from building scale, two three-story building models adopting different wall panel designs are constructed for evaluating the temperature distribution of entire buildings using finite element method. Both the experimental and simulation results have shown that the gypsum layer improves the thermal insulation performance by retarding the heat transfer across the building envelopes. PMID:25177718

  4. Thermal insulating concrete wall panel design for sustainable built environment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ao; Wong, Kwun-Wah; Lau, Denvid

    2014-01-01

    Air-conditioning system plays a significant role in providing users a thermally comfortable indoor environment, which is a necessity in modern buildings. In order to save the vast energy consumed by air-conditioning system, the building envelopes in envelope-load dominated buildings should be well designed such that the unwanted heat gain and loss with environment can be minimized. In this paper, a new design of concrete wall panel that enhances thermal insulation of buildings by adding a gypsum layer inside concrete is presented. Experiments have been conducted for monitoring the temperature variation in both proposed sandwich wall panel and conventional concrete wall panel under a heat radiation source. For further understanding the thermal effect of such sandwich wall panel design from building scale, two three-story building models adopting different wall panel designs are constructed for evaluating the temperature distribution of entire buildings using finite element method. Both the experimental and simulation results have shown that the gypsum layer improves the thermal insulation performance by retarding the heat transfer across the building envelopes.

  5. Development, testing, and numerical modeling of a foam sandwich biocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachra, Ricky

    This study develops a novel sandwich composite material using plant based materials for potential use in nonstructural building applications. The face sheets comprise woven hemp fabric and a sap based epoxy, while the core comprises castor oil based foam with waste rice hulls as reinforcement. Mechanical properties of the individual materials are tested in uniaxial compression and tension for the foam and hemp, respectively. The sandwich composite is tested in 3 point bending. Flexural results are compared to a finite element model developed in the commercial software Abaqus, and the validated model is then used to investigate alternate sandwich geometries. Sandwich model responses are compared to existing standards for nonstructural building panels, showing that the novel material is roughly half the strength of equally thick drywall. When space limitations are not an issue, a double thickness sandwich biocomposite is found to be a structurally acceptable replacement for standard gypsum drywall.

  6. Multiscale Failure Analysis of Laminated Composite Panels Subjected to Blast Loading Using FEAMAC/Explicit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Waas, Anthony M.; Berdnarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.; Collier, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    This preliminary report demonstrates the capabilities of the recently developed software implementation that links the Generalized Method of Cells to explicit finite element analysis by extending a previous development which tied the generalized method of cells to implicit finite elements. The multiscale framework, which uses explicit finite elements at the global-scale and the generalized method of cells at the microscale is detailed. This implementation is suitable for both dynamic mechanics problems and static problems exhibiting drastic and sudden changes in material properties, which often encounter convergence issues with commercial implicit solvers. Progressive failure analysis of stiffened and un-stiffened fiber-reinforced laminates subjected to normal blast pressure loads was performed and is used to demonstrate the capabilities of this framework. The focus of this report is to document the development of the software implementation; thus, no comparison between the results of the models and experimental data is drawn. However, the validity of the results are assessed qualitatively through the observation of failure paths, stress contours, and the distribution of system energies.

  7. Development and Mechanical Behavior of FML/Aluminium Foam Sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baştürk, S. B.; Tanoğlu, M.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the Fiber-Metal Laminates (FMLs) containing glass fiber reinforced polypropylene (GFPP) and aluminum (Al) sheet were consolidated with Al foam cores for preparing the sandwich panels. The aim of this article is the comparison of the flexural properties of FML/Al foam sandwich panels bonded with various surface modification approaches (silane treatment and combination of silane treatment with polypropylene (PP) based film addition). The FML/foam sandwich systems were fabricated by laminating the components in a mould at 200 °C under 1.5 MPa pressure. The energy absorbtion capacities and flexural mechanical properties of the prepared sandwich systems were evaluated by mechanical tests. Experiments were performed on samples of varying foam thicknesses (8, 20 and 30 mm). The bonding among the sandwich components were achieved by various surface modification techniques. The Al sheet/Al foam sandwiches were also consolidated by bonding the components with an epoxy adhesive to reveal the effect of GFPP on the flexural performance of the sandwich structures.

  8. Reduced Order Model-Based Prediction of the Nonlinear Geometric Response of a Panel Under Thermal, Aerodynamic, and Acoustic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matney, Andrew

    This paper addresses some aspects of the development of fully coupled thermal-structural reduced order modeling of planned hypersonic vehicles. A general framework for the construction of the structural and thermal basis is presented and demonstrated on a representative panel considered in prior investigations. The thermal reduced order model is first developed using basis functions derived from appropriate conduction eigenvalue problems. The modal amplitudes are the solution of the governing equation, which is nonlinear due to the presence of radiation and temperature dependent capacitance and conductance matrices, and the predicted displacement field is validated using published data. A structural reduced order model was developed by first selecting normal modes of the system and then constructing associated dual modes for the capturing of nonlinear inplane displacements. This isothermal model was validated by comparison with full finite element results (Nastran) in static and dynamic loading environments. The coupling of this nonlinear structural reduced order model with the thermal reduced order model is next considered. Displacement-induced thermal modes are constructed in order to account for the effect that structural deflections will have on the thermal problem. This coupling also requires the enrichment of the structural basis to model the elastic deformations that may be produced consistently with the thermal reduced order model. The validation of the combined structural-thermal reduced order model is carried out with pure mechanical loads, pure thermal loads, and combined mechanical-thermal excitations. Such comparisons are performed here on static solutions with temperature increases up to 2200F and pressures up to 3 psi for which the maximum displacements are of the order of 3 thicknesses. The reduced order model predicted results agree well with the full order finite element predictions in all of these various cases. A fully coupled analysis was

  9. Comprehensive cancer-gene panels can be used to estimate mutational load and predict clinical benefit to PD-1 blockade in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Campesato, Luís Felipe; Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Jimenez, Leandro; Correa, Bruna R; Sabbaga, Jorge; Hoff, Paulo M; Reis, Luiz F L; Galante, Pedro Alexandre F; Camargo, Anamaria A

    2015-10-27

    Cancer gene panels (CGPs) are already used in clinical practice to match tumor's genetic profile with available targeted therapies. We aimed to determine if CGPs could also be applied to estimate tumor mutational load and predict clinical benefit to PD-1 and CTLA-4 checkpoint blockade therapy. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) mutation data obtained from melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients published by Snyder et al. 2014 and Rizvi et al. 2015, respectively, were used to select nonsynonymous somatic mutations occurring in genes included in the Foundation Medicine Panel (FM-CGP) and in our own Institutional Panel (HSL-CGP). CGP-mutational load was calculated for each patient using both panels and was associated with clinical outcomes as defined and reported in the original articles. Higher CGP-mutational load was observed in NSCLC patients presenting durable clinical benefit (DCB) to PD-1 blockade (FM-CGP P=0.03, HSL-CGP P=0.01). We also observed that 69% of patients with high CGP-mutational load experienced DCB to PD-1 blockade, as compared to 20% of patients with low CGP-mutational load (FM-CGP and HSL-CGP P=0.01). Noteworthy, predictive accuracy of CGP-mutational load for DCB was not statistically different from that estimated by WES sequencing (P=0.73). Moreover, a high CGP-mutational load was significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS) in patients treated with PD-1 blockade (FM-CGP P=0.005, HR 0.27, 95% IC 0.105 to 0.669; HSL-CGP P=0.008, HR 0.29, 95% IC 0.116 to 0.719). Similar associations between CGP-mutational load and clinical benefit to CTLA-4 blockade were not observed. In summary, our data reveals that CGPs can be used to estimate mutational load and to predict clinical benefit to PD-1 blockade, with similar accuracy to that reported using WES. PMID:26439694

  10. Comprehensive cancer-gene panels can be used to estimate mutational load and predict clinical benefit to PD-1 blockade in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Campesato, Luís Felipe; Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Jimenez, Leandro; Correa, Bruna R.; Sabbaga, Jorge; Hoff, Paulo M.; Reis, Luiz F. L.; Galante, Pedro Alexandre F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene panels (CGPs) are already used in clinical practice to match tumor's genetic profile with available targeted therapies. We aimed to determine if CGPs could also be applied to estimate tumor mutational load and predict clinical benefit to PD-1 and CTLA-4 checkpoint blockade therapy. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) mutation data obtained from melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients published by Snyder et al. 2014 and Rizvi et al. 2015, respectively, were used to select nonsynonymous somatic mutations occurring in genes included in the Foundation Medicine Panel (FM-CGP) and in our own Institutional Panel (HSL-CGP). CGP-mutational load was calculated for each patient using both panels and was associated with clinical outcomes as defined and reported in the original articles. Higher CGP-mutational load was observed in NSCLC patients presenting durable clinical benefit (DCB) to PD-1 blockade (FM-CGP P=0.03, HSL-CGP P=0.01). We also observed that 69% of patients with high CGP-mutational load experienced DCB to PD-1 blockade, as compared to 20% of patients with low CGP-mutational load (FM-CGP and HSL-CGP P=0.01). Noteworthy, predictive accuracy of CGP-mutational load for DCB was not statistically different from that estimated by WES sequencing (P=0.73). Moreover, a high CGP-mutational load was significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS) in patients treated with PD-1 blockade (FM-CGP P=0.005, HR 0.27, 95% IC 0.105 to 0.669; HSL-CGP P=0.008, HR 0.29, 95% IC 0.116 to 0.719). Similar associations between CGP-mutational load and clinical benefit to CTLA-4 blockade were not observed. In summary, our data reveals that CGPs can be used to estimate mutational load and to predict clinical benefit to PD-1 blockade, with similar accuracy to that reported using WES. PMID:26439694

  11. Buckling loads of stiffened panels subjected to combined longitudinal compression and shear: Results obtained with PASCO, EAL, and STAGS computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Greene, W. H.; Anderson, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    Buckling analyses used in PASCO are summarized with emphasis placed on the shear buckling analyses. The PASCO buckling analyses include the basic VIPASA analysis, which is essentially exact for longitudinal and transverse loads, and a smeared stiffener solution, which treats a stiffened panel as an orthotropic plate. Buckling results are then presented for seven stiffened panels loaded by combinations of longitudinal compression and shear. The buckling results were obtained with the PASCO, EAL, and STAGS computer programs. The EAL and STAGS solutions were obtained with a fine finite element mesh and are very accurate. These finite element solutions together with the PASCO results for pure longitudinal compression provide benchmark calculations to evaluate other analysis procedures.

  12. Aerothermal loads analysis for high speed flow over a quilted surface configuration. [metallic Thermal Protection System panels simulation for Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. C.; Smith, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to hypersonic laminar flow over a quilted surface configuration that simulates an array of Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System panels bowed in a spherical shape as a result of thermal gradients through the panel thickness. Pressure and heating loads to the surface are determined. The flow field over the configuration was mathematically modeled by means of time-dependent, three-dimensional conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations. A boundary mapping technique was then used to obtain a rectangular, parallelepiped computational domain, and an explicit MacCormack (1972) explicit time-split predictor-corrector finite difference algorithm was used to obtain steady state solutions. Total integrated heating loads vary linearly with bowed height when this value does not exceed the local boundary layer thickness.

  13. Finite Element Development of Honeycomb Panel Configurations with Improved Transmission Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob; Castle, William D.

    2006-01-01

    The higher stiffness-to-mass ratio of a honeycomb panel compared to a homogeneous panel results in a lower acoustic critical frequency. Above the critical frequency the panel flexural wave speed is acoustically fast and the structure becomes a more efficient radiator with associated lower sound transmission loss. Finite element models of honeycomb sandwich structures are presented featuring areas where the core is removed from the radiating face sheet disrupting the supersonic flexural and shear wave speeds that exist in the baseline honeycomb panel. These modified honeycomb panel structures exhibit improved transmission loss for a pre-defined diffuse field sound excitation. The models were validated by the sound transmission loss of honeycomb panels measured in the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. A honeycomb core panel configuration is presented exhibiting a transmission loss improvement of 3-11 dB compared to a honeycomb baseline panel over a frequency range from 170 Hz to 1000 Hz. The improved transmission loss panel configuration had a 5.1% increase in mass over the baseline honeycomb panel, and approximately twice the deflection when excited by a static force.

  14. Experimental evaluation of two 36 inch by 47 inch graphite/epoxy sandwich shear webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The design is described and test of two large (36 in. x 47 in.) graphite/epoxy sandwich shear webs. One sandwich web was designed to exhibit strength failure of the facings at a shear load of 7638 lbs/in., which is a characteristic loading for the space shuttle orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. The second sandwich web was designed to exhibit general instability failure at a shear load of 5000 lbs/in., to identify problem areas of stability critical sandwich webs and to assess the adequacy of contemporary analysis techniques.

  15. Salads, Sandwiches and Desserts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on salads, sandwiches, and desserts is designed to provide Marine food service personnel with a general background in the proper techniques for the preparation of these items. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI students and a…

  16. BMI Sandwich Wing Box Analysis and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Tod; Mahler, Mary; Shah, Chandu; Rouse, Marshall; Bush, Harold; Wu, Chauncey; Small, William J.

    2000-01-01

    A composite sandwich single bay wing box test article was developed by Northrop Grumman and tested recently at NASA Langley Research Center. The objectives for the wing box development effort were to provide a demonstration article for manufacturing scale up of structural concepts related to a high speed transport wing, and to validate the structural performance of the design. The box concept consisted of highly loaded composite sandwich wing skins, with moderately loaded composite sandwich spars. The dimensions of the box were chosen to represent a single bay of the main wing box, with a spar spacing of 30 inches, height of 20 inches constant depth, and length of 64 inches. The bismaleimide facesheet laminates and titanium honeycomb core chosen for this task are high temperature materials able to sustain a 300F service temperature. The completed test article is shown in Figure 1. The tests at NASA Langley demonstrated the structures ability to sustain axial tension and compression loads in excess of 20,000 lb/in, and to maintain integrity in the thermal environment. Test procedures, analysis failure predictions, and test results are presented.

  17. Development of Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring framelstringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin very efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels were made which incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining its strength. The majority of the desi gns were centered around the concept of creatin g areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced./recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  18. Finite-element nonlinear transient response computer programs PLATE 1 and CIVM-PLATE 1 for the analysis of panels subjected to impulse or impact loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, R. L.; Witmer, E. A.; French, S. E.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two computer programs are described for predicting the transient large deflection elastic viscoplastic responses of thin single layer, initially flat unstiffened or integrally stiffened, Kirchhoff-Lov ductile metal panels. The PLATE 1 program pertains to structural responses produced by prescribed externally applied transient loading or prescribed initial velocity distributions. The collision imparted velocity method PLATE 1 program concerns structural responses produced by impact of an idealized nondeformable fragment. Finite elements are used to represent the structure in both programs. Strain hardening and strain rate effects of initially isotropic material are considered.

  19. Cross Cell Sandwich Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A sandwich core comprises two faceplates separated by a plurality of cells. The cells are comprised of walls positioned at oblique angles relative to a perpendicular axis extending through the faceplates. The walls preferably form open cells and are constructed from open cells and are constructed from rows of ribbons. The walls may be obliquely angled relative to more than one plane extending through the perpendicular axis.

  20. Compressive Behavior of Frame-Stiffened Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Jegley, Dawn C.

    2011-01-01

    New technologies are being developed under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program aimed at reducing fuel burn and emissions in large commercial aircraft. A Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept is being developed which offers advantages over traditional metallic structure. In this concept a stitched carbon-epoxy material system is employed with the potential for reducing the weight and cost of transport aircraft structure by eliminating fasteners and producing a more damage tolerant design. In addition, by adding unidirectional carbon rods to the top of stiffeners and minimizing the interference between the sandwich frames and the rod-stiffened stringers, the panel becomes more structurally efficient. This document describes the results of experimentation on a PRSEUS panel in which the frames are loaded in unidirectional compression beyond the local buckling of the skin of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft. A comparison with analytical predictions and the relationship between these test results and the global aircraft design is presented.

  1. Approaches to Design and Evaluation of Sandwich Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, I. S. (Technical Monitor); Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes research during the period June 15, 1997 to October 31, 2000. This grant yielded a low cast manufacturing of composite sandwich structures technology and characterization interfacial and subinterfacial cracks in foam core sandwich panels. The manufacturing technology is called the vacuum assisted resin transfer (VARTM). The VARTM is suitable for processing composite materials both at ambient and elevated temperatures and of unlimited component size. This technology has been successfully transferred to a small business fiber preform manufacturing company 3TEX located in Cary, North Carolina. The grant also supported one Ph.D, one M.S and a number of under graduate students, and nine publications and Presentations.

  2. Resonant loading of aircraft secondary structure panels for use with thermoelastic stress analysis and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, Rachael C.; Dulieu-Barton, Janice M.; Quinn, S.

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) is an established active thermographic approach which uses the thermoelastic effect to correlate the temperature change that occurs as a material is subjected to elastic cyclic loading to the sum of the principal stresses on the surface of the component. Digital image correlation (DIC) tracks features on the surface of a material to establish a displacement field of a component subjected to load, which can then be used to calculate the strain field. The application of both DIC and TSA on a composite plate representative of aircraft secondary structure subject to resonant frequency loading using a portable loading device, i.e. `remote loading' is described. Laboratory based loading for TSA and DIC is typically imparted using a test machine, however in the current work a vibration loading system is used which is able to excite the component of interest at resonant frequency which enables TSA and DIC to be carried out. The accuracy of the measurements made under remote loading of both of the optical techniques applied is discussed. The data are compared to extract complimentary information from the two techniques. This work forms a step towards a combined strain based non-destructive evaluation procedure able to identify and quantify the effect of defects more fully, particularly when examining component performance in service applications.

  3. Plate-fin panel heat exchanger and panel components thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Heronemus, W.E.

    1985-02-05

    A plate-fin panel for a heat exchanger may be either formed as an aluminum extrusion or fabricated from a corrugated metal sheet sandwiched between two flat metal sheets. The extruded aluminum version may be clad with protective sheet metal jackets made of, or coated with, a corrosion resistant Cu-Ni alloy. Individual panel sections can be joined together by tongue and groove engagement to obtain a total desired panel width if available extrusion press or rolling mill capacity is insufficient. The plate-fin panels are assembled into slotted headering plates, and a layer of synthetic plastics potting compound seals dissimilar metal joints against electrolytic corrosion as well as leakage and provides sufficient adhesive strength to reduce or eliminate the need for welding the panels to the headers. Mechanical brush or hydraulic jet apparatus is capable of continuously or intermittently cleaning slime or encrustations from all panel surfaces exposed to seawater.

  4. Lightweight composites for modular panelized construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Amol S.

    Rapid advances in construction materials technology have enabled civil engineers to achieve impressive gains in the safety, economy, and functionality of structures built to serve the common needs of society. Modular building systems is a fast-growing modern, form of construction gaining recognition for its increased efficiency and ability to apply modern technology to the needs of the market place. In the modular construction technique, a single structural panel can perform a number of functions such as providing thermal insulation, vibration damping, and structural strength. These multifunctional panels can be prefabricated in a manufacturing facility and then transferred to the construction site. A system that uses prefabricated panels for construction is called a "panelized construction system". This study focuses on the development of pre-cast, lightweight, multifunctional sandwich composite panels to be used for panelized construction. Two thermoplastic composite panels are proposed in this study, namely Composite Structural Insulated Panels (CSIPs) for exterior walls, floors and roofs, and Open Core Sandwich composite for multifunctional interior walls of a structure. Special manufacturing techniques are developed for manufacturing these panels. The structural behavior of these panels is analyzed based on various building design codes. Detailed descriptions of the design, cost analysis, manufacturing, finite element modeling and structural testing of these proposed panels are included in this study in the of form five peer-reviewed journal articles. The structural testing of the proposed panels involved in this study included flexural testing, axial compression testing, and low and high velocity impact testing. Based on the current study, the proposed CSIP wall and floor panels were found satisfactory, based on building design codes ASCE-7-05 and ACI-318-05. Joining techniques are proposed in this study for connecting the precast panels on the construction

  5. STS-43 Pilot Baker eats a sandwich on OV-104's forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-43 Pilot Michael A. Baker, seated at the forward flight deck pilots station controls, eats a freefloating peanut butter and jelly sandwich while holding a carrot. Surrounding Baker on Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, flight deck are procedural checklists, control panels, and windows. A lemonade drink bag is velcroed to overhead panel O9.

  6. Experimental study of acoustical characteristics of honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Portia Renee

    Loss factor measurements were performed on sandwich panels to determine the effects of different skin and core materials on the acoustical properties. Results revealed inserting a viscoelastic material in the core's mid-plane resulted in the highest loss factor. Panels constructed with carbon-fiber skins exhibited larger loss factors than glass-fiber skins. Panels designed to achieve subsonic wave speed did not show a significant increase in loss factor above the coincidence frequency. The para-aramid core had a larger loss factor value than the meta-aramid core. Acoustic absorption coefficients were measured for honeycomb sandwiches designed to incorporate multiple sound-absorbing devices, including Helmholtz resonators and porous absorbers. The structures consisted of conventional honeycomb cores filled with closed-cell polyurethane foams of various densities and covered with perforated composite facesheets. Honeycomb cores filled with higher density foam resulted in higher absorption coefficients over the frequency range of 50 -- 1250 Hz. However, this trend was not observed at frequencies greater than 1250 Hz, where the honeycomb filled with the highest density foam yielded the lowest absorption coefficient among samples with foam-filled cores. The energy-recycling semi-active vibration suppression method (ERSA) was employed to determine the relationship between vibration suppression and acoustic damping for a honeycomb sandwich panel. Results indicated the ERSA method simultaneously reduced the sound transmitted through the panel and the panel vibration. The largest reduction in sound transmitted through the panel was 14.3% when the vibrations of the panel were reduced by 7.3%. The influence of different design parameters, such as core density, core material, and cell size on wave speeds of honeycomb sandwich structures was experimentally analyzed. Bending and shear wave speeds were measured and related to the transmission loss performance for various material

  7. Vibroacoustic Model Validation for a Curved Honeycomb Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Robinson, Jay H.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2001-01-01

    Finite element and boundary element models are developed to investigate the vibroacoustic response of a curved honeycomb composite sidewall panel. Results from vibroacoustic tests conducted in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission facility are used to validate the numerical predictions. The sidewall panel is constructed from a flexible honeycomb core sandwiched between carbon fiber reinforced composite laminate face sheets. This type of construction is being used in the development of an all-composite aircraft fuselage. In contrast to conventional rib-stiffened aircraft fuselage structures, the composite panel has nominally uniform thickness resulting in a uniform distribution of mass and stiffness. Due to differences in the mass and stiffness distribution, the noise transmission mechanisms for the composite panel are expected to be substantially different from those of a conventional rib-stiffened structure. The development of accurate vibroacoustic models will aide in the understanding of the dominant noise transmission mechanisms and enable optimization studies to be performed that will determine the most beneficial noise control treatments. Finite element and boundary element models of the sidewall panel are described. Vibroacoustic response predictions are presented for forced vibration input and the results are compared with experimental data.

  8. Impact damage analysis of balsawood sandwich composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalslam, Suof Omran

    In this study, a new composite sandwich structure with a balsa wood core (end grain and regular balsa) in conjunction with E-glass/epoxy face sheets was proposed, fabricated, impact tested, and modeled. The behavior of the sandwich structure under low velocity impact and compression after impact was investigated. Low velocity impact tests were carried out by drop-weight impact tower at different energy levels (8J-35J) to evaluate the impact response of the sandwich structure. Visual inspection, destructive and non destructive evaluation methods have been conducted. For the sandwich plate with end grain core, the damage was very clear and can be visually detected. However, the damage in regular balsa core was not clearly visible and destructive evaluation method was used. Compression testing was done after subjecting the specimens to impact testing. Impact test results; load-time, load-deflection history and energy absorption for sandwich composites with two different cores, end grain and regular balsa were compared and they were investigated at three different impact energies. The results show that the sandwich structures with end grain core are able to withstand impact loading better than the regular balsa core because the higher stiffness of end grain core informs of sustaining higher load and higher overall energy. The results obtained from compression after impact testing show that the strengths of sandwich composites with end grain and regular balsa cores were reduced about 40% and 52%, respectively, after impact. These results were presented in terms of stress-strain curves for both damaged and undamaged specimens. Finite element analysis was conducted on the sandwich composite structure using LS-DYNA code to simulate impact test. A 3- D finite element model was developed and appropriate material properties were given to each component. The computational model was developed to predict the response of sandwich composite under dynamic loading. The experimental

  9. An Investigation of Sheet-stiffener Panels Subjected to Compression Loads with Particular Reference to Torsionally Weak Stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Louis G

    1940-01-01

    A total of 183 panel specimens of 24ST aluminum alloy with nominal thickness of 0.020, and 0.040 inch with extruded bulb-angle sections of 12 shapes spaced 4 and 5 inches as stiffeners were tested to obtain the buckling stress and the amplitude of the maximum wave when buckled. Bulb angles from 3 to 27 1/2 inches long were tested as pin-end columns. The experimental data are presented as stress-strain and column curves and in tabular form. Some comparisons with theoretical results are presented. Analytical methods are developed that make it possible for the designer to predict with reasonable accuracy the buckling stress and the maximum-wave amplitude of the sheet in stiffened-panel combinations. The scope of the tests was insufficient to formulate general design criteria but the results are presented as a guide for design and an indication of the type of theoretical and experimental work that is needed.

  10. Design, fabrication and test of lightweight shell structure. [axial compression loads and torsion stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lager, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A cylindrical shell structure 3.66 m (144 in.) high by 4.57 m (180 in.) diameter was designed using a wide variety of materials and structural concepts to withstand design ultimate combined loading 1225.8 N/cm (700 lb/in.) axial compression and 245.2 N/cm (140 lb/in.) torsion. The overall cylinder geometry and design loading are representative of that expected on a high performance space tug vehicle. The relatively low design load level results in designs that use thin gage metals and fibrous-composite laminates. Fabrication and structural tests of small panels and components representative of many of the candidate designs served to demonstrate proposed fabrication techniques and to verify design and analysis methods. Three of the designs evaluated, honeycomb sandwich with aluminum faceskins, honeycomb sandwich with graphite/epoxy faceskins, and aluminum truss with fiber-glass meteoroid protection layers, were selected for further evaluation.

  11. Full-scale testing and progressive damage modeling of sandwich composite aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    A comprehensive experimental and computational investigation was conducted to characterize the fracture behavior and structural response of large sandwich composite aircraft fuselage panels containing artificial damage in the form of holes and notches. Full-scale tests were conducted where panels were subjected to quasi-static combined pressure, hoop, and axial loading up to failure. The panels were constructed using plain-weave carbon/epoxy prepreg face sheets and a Nomex honeycomb core. Panel deformation and notch tip damage development were monitored during the tests using several techniques, including optical observations, strain gages, digital image correlation (DIC), acoustic emission (AE), and frequency response (FR). Additional pretest and posttest inspections were performed via thermography, computer-aided tap tests, ultrasound, x-radiography, and scanning electron microscopy. The framework to simulate damage progression and to predict residual strength through use of the finite element (FE) method was developed. The DIC provided local and full-field strain fields corresponding to changes in the state-of-damage and identified the strain components driving damage progression. AE was monitored during loading of all panels and data analysis methodologies were developed to enable real-time determination of damage initiation, progression, and severity in large composite structures. The FR technique has been developed, evaluating its potential as a real-time nondestructive inspection technique applicable to large composite structures. Due to the large disparity in scale between the fuselage panels and the artificial damage, a global/local analysis was performed. The global FE models fully represented the specific geometries, composite lay-ups, and loading mechanisms of the full-scale tests. A progressive damage model was implemented in the local FE models, allowing the gradual failure of elements in the vicinity of the artificial damage. A set of modifications

  12. Structural modeling of sandwich structures with lightweight cellular cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Deng, Z. C.; Lu, T. J.

    2007-10-01

    An effective single layered finite element (FE) computational model is proposed to predict the structural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels having two dimensional (2D) prismatic or three dimensional (3D) truss cores. Three different types of cellular core topology are considered: pyramidal truss core (3D), Kagome truss core (3D) and corrugated core (2D), representing three kinds of material anisotropy: orthotropic, monoclinic and general anisotropic. A homogenization technique is developed to obtain the homogenized macroscopic stiffness properties of the cellular core. In comparison with the results obtained by using detailed FE model, the single layered computational model can give acceptable predictions for both the static and dynamic behaviors of orthotropic truss core sandwich panels. However, for non-orthotropic 3D truss cores, the predictions are not so well. For both static and dynamic behaviors of a 2D corrugated core sandwich panel, the predictions derived by the single layered computational model is generally acceptable when the size of the unit cell varies within a certain range, with the predictions for moderately strong or strong corrugated cores more accurate than those for weak cores.

  13. Hypervelocity Impact Evaluation of Metal Foam Core Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, John; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    A series of hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF) [1], building 267 (Houston, Texas) between January 2003 and December 2005 to test the HVI performance of metal foams, as compared to the metal honeycomb panels currently in service. The HITF testing was conducted at the NASA JSC White Sands Testing Facility (WSTF) at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Eric L. Christiansen, Ph.D., and NASA Lead for Micro-Meteoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) Protection requested these hypervelocity impact tests as part of shielding research conducted for the JSC Center Director Discretionary Fund (CDDF) project. The structure tested is a metal foam sandwich structure; a metal foam core between two metal facesheets. Aluminum and Titanium metals were tested for foam sandwich and honeycomb sandwich structures. Aluminum honeycomb core material is currently used in Orbiter Vehicle (OV) radiator panels and in other places in space structures. It has many desirable characteristics and performs well by many measures, especially when normalized by density. Aluminum honeycomb does not perform well in Hypervelocity Impact (HVI) Testing. This is a concern, as honeycomb panels are often exposed to space environments, and take on the role of Micrometeoroid / Orbital Debris (MMOD) shielding. Therefore, information on possible replacement core materials which perform adequately in all necessary functions of the material would be useful. In this report, HVI data is gathered for these two core materials in certain configurations and compared to gain understanding of the metal foam HVI performance.

  14. Facesheet Delamination of Composite Sandwich Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Herring, Helen M.

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of space transportation vehicles will require advances in lightweight structural materials and related design concepts to meet the increased demands on performance. One potential source for significant structural weight reduction is the replacement of traditional metallic cryogenic fuel tanks with new designs for polymeric matrix composite tanks. These new tank designs may take the form of thin-walled sandwich constructed with lightweight core and composite facesheets. Life-time durability requirements imply the materials must safely carry pressure loads, external structural loads, resist leakage and operate over an extremely wide temperature range. Aside from catastrophic events like tank wall penetration, one of the most likely scenarios for failure of a tank wall of sandwich construction is the permeation of cryogenic fluid into the sandwich core and the subsequent delamination of the sandwich facesheet due to the build-up of excessive internal pressure. The research presented in this paper was undertaken to help understand this specific problem of core to facesheet delamination in cryogenic environments and relate this data to basic mechanical properties. The experimental results presented herein provide data on the strain energy release rate (toughness) of the interface between the facesheet and the core of a composite sandwich subjected to simulated internal pressure. A unique test apparatus and associated test methods are described and the results are presented to highlight the effects of cryogenic temperature on the measured material properties.

  15. Properties of polyurethane foam/coconut coir fiber as a core material and as a sandwich composites component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, M. A.; Abdullah, H. Z.; Idris, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    This research focuses on the fabrication and characterization of sandwich composite panels using glass fiber composite skin and polyurethane foam reinforced coconut coir fiber core. The main objectives are to characterize the physical and mechanical properties and to elucidate the effect of coconut coir fibers in polyurethane foam cores and sandwich composite panels. Coconut coir fibers were used as reinforcement in polyurethane foams in which later were applied as the core in sandwich composites ranged from 5 wt% to 20 wt%. The physical and mechanical properties found to be significant at 5 wt% coconut coir fiber in polyurethane foam cores as well as in sandwich composites. It was found that composites properties serve better in sandwich composites construction.

  16. Modeling of Sandwich Sheets with Metallic Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Mata, H.; Jorge, R. Natal; Fernandes, A. A.; Parente, M. P. L.; Santos, A.; Valente, R. A. F.

    2011-08-22

    World-wide vehicles safety experts agree that significant further reductions in fatalities and injuries can be achieved as a result of the use of new lightweight and energy absorbing materials. On this work, the authors present the development and evaluation of an innovative system able to perform reliable panels of sandwich sheets with metallic foam cores for industrial applications. The mathematical model used to describe the behavior of sandwich shells with metal cores foam is presented and some numerical examples are presented. In order to validate those results mechanical experiments are carried out. Using the crushable foam constitutive model, available on ABAQUS, a set of different mechanical tests were simulated. There are two variants of this model available on ABAQUS: the volumetric hardening model and the isotropic hardening model. As a first approximation we chose the isotropic hardening variant. The isotropic hardening model available uses a yield surface that is an ellipse centered at the origin in the p-q stress plane. Based on this constitutive model for the foam, numerical simulations of the tensile and bulge test will be conducted. The numerical results will be validated using the data obtained from the experimental results.

  17. Evaluation of modal-based damage detection techniques for composite aircraft sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    Composite sandwich structures are important as structural components in modern lightweight aircraft, but are susceptible to catastrophic failure without obvious forewarning. Internal damage, such as disbonding between skin and core, is detrimental to the structures' strength and integrity and thus must be detected before reaching critical levels. However, highly directional low density cores, such as Nomex honeycomb, make the task of damage detection and health monitoring difficult. One possible method for detecting damage in composite sandwich structures, which seems to have received very little research attention, is analysis of global modal parameters. This study will investigate the viability of modal analysis techniques for detecting skin-core disbonds in carbon fiber-Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels through laboratory testing. A series of carbon fiber prepreg and Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels-representative of structural components used in lightweight composite airframes-were fabricated by means of autoclave co-cure. All panels were of equal dimensions and two were made with predetermined sizes of disbonded areas, created by substituting areas of Teflon release film in place of epoxy film adhesive during the cure. A laser vibrometer was used to capture frequency response functions (FRF) of all panels, and then real and imaginary FRFs at different locations on each plate and operating shapes for each plate were compared. Preliminary results suggest that vibration-based techniques hold promise for damage detection of composite sandwich structures.

  18. Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  19. Metabolic Panel

    MedlinePlus

    A metabolic panel is a group of tests that measures different chemicals in the blood. These tests are usually ... kidneys and liver. There are two types: basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The ...

  20. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. Lance

    1991-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of a titanium matrix composite hat-stiffened panel were experimentally examined for various combinations of thermal and mechanical loads. Panel failure was prevented by maintaining the applied loads below real-time critical buckling predictions. The test techniques used to apply the loads, minimize boundary were shown to compare well with a finite-element buckling analysis for previous panels. Comparisons between test predictions and analysis for this panel are ongoing.

  1. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A 60 kg batch of Resin M751 was produced in pilot plant scale. The resin was delivered to the prepreg company as an NMP solution. 100 kg of glass-fabric prepregs were fabricated. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication were provided. A new batch of Resin M756 (Code M756 - 2) was synthesized.

  2. Prediction of Moisture Distribution in Closed Ribbed Panel for Roof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukule, A.; Rocens, K.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays one of the possibilities to improve energy efficiency is the use of building elements with low air permeability, for example, sandwich panels with steel sheeting. However, these panels have one important disadvantage - a relatively small load-bearing capacity. This can be prevented by reinforcing the panel with antiseptized birch plywood ribs. For wood-based materials prediction of hygrothermal performance is important to avoid rot. Currently the methodology of ISO 13788:2012 is widely used assuming that moisture flux passes through the building envelope of any material. This assumption is not completely accurate with regard to a closed structure where no penetration of ambient humidity is possible. Therefore, in order to predict the distribution of moisture in such structure with the surfaces exposed to different temperatures and to assess the hazards of rot for plywood ribs, a methodology for closed building envelope is presented. To provide insight into expected results according to both methodologies, estimation for individual case with constant environmental conditions is given. According to the methodology for the closed building envelope no free water will occur. Therefore, it is believable that also no rot will be observed. This is contrary to the assessment according to the methodology of ISO 13788:2012, which predicts condensation.

  3. Wire and Packing Tape Sandwiches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can combine craft wire with clear packing tape to create a two-dimensional design that can be bent and twisted to create a three-dimensional form. Students sandwich wire designs between two layers of tape. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  4. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  5. Analytical piezoelasticity solution for vibration of piezoelectric laminated angle-ply circular cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapuria, S.; Kumari, P.; Nath, J. K.

    2009-07-01

    An exact two-dimensional (2D) piezoelasticity solution is presented for free vibration and steady-state forced response of simply supported piezoelectric angle-ply laminated circular cylindrical panels in cylindrical bending under harmonic electromechanical load, with and without damping. The piezoelectric layers are polarized along radial direction to induce extension actuation/sensing mechanism. The variables are expanded layerwise in Fourier series to satisfy the boundary conditions at the simply supported ends. The governing equations get reduced to ordinary differential equations in thickness direction with variable coefficients and these are solved by the modified Frobenius method. The unknown coefficients of the solution are obtained using the transfer matrix method. Results for the natural frequency and its variation with ply angle and for steady-state response due to harmonic electromechanical excitation are presented for single layer piezoelectric panel, and hybrid multilayered inhomogeneous test, composite and sandwich panels. The numerical results presented in tabular form would serve as useful benchmark for assessing one-dimensional (1D) panel theories for free vibration and harmonic response of hybrid cylindrical panels.

  6. Acoustic transmission loss and structureborne noise transmission tests on a LASCOR and a reference steel panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, C. J.

    1993-09-01

    LASCOR is a laser welded corrugated steel sandwich developed as a lightweight construct for ship superstructures. Tests were performed to measure acoustic transmission loss and structureborne noise transmission for both a LASCOR panel and a reference conventional rib-stiffened steel panel. This report outlines the test methods used and compares the results for the two panels.

  7. Preparation for foam composites. [using polybenzimidazole for fireproofing panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximovich, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    Methods were developed for the fabrication of fire resistant panels utilizing polybenzimidazole (PBI) and Kerimid 601 resins along with glass, quartz, and Kevlar reinforcements. Stitched truss structure, both unfilled and filled with PBI foam, were successfully fabricated and tested. Second generation structures were then selected, fabricated, and tested, with a PBI/glass skin/PBI foam sandwich structure emerging as the optimum panel concept. Mechanical properties, smoke generation, and fire resistance were determined for the candidate panels.

  8. Multiscale Fatigue Life Prediction for Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue life prediction capabilities have been incorporated into the HyperSizer Composite Analysis and Structural Sizing Software. The fatigue damage model is introduced at the fiber/matrix constituent scale through HyperSizer s coupling with NASA s MAC/GMC micromechanics software. This enables prediction of the micro scale damage progression throughout stiffened and sandwich panels as a function of cycles leading ultimately to simulated panel failure. The fatigue model implementation uses a cycle jumping technique such that, rather than applying a specified number of additional cycles, a specified local damage increment is specified and the number of additional cycles to reach this damage increment is calculated. In this way, the effect of stress redistribution due to damage-induced stiffness change is captured, but the fatigue simulations remain computationally efficient. The model is compared to experimental fatigue life data for two composite facesheet/foam core sandwich panels, demonstrating very good agreement.

  9. Measuring Core/Facesheet Bond Toughness in Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines two test methods to evaluate the peel toughness of the skin to core debond of sandwich panels. The methods tested were the climbing drum (CD) peel test and the double cantilever beam (DCB) test. While the CD peel test is only intended for qualitative measurements, it is shown in this study that qualitative measurements can be performed and compare well with DCB test data. It is also shown that artificially stiffening the facesheets of a DCB specimen can cause the test to behave more like a flatwise tensile test than a peel test.

  10. Experimental Study of the Compression Response of Fluted-Core Composite Panels with Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Guzman, J. Carlos; McCarville, Douglas; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Fluted-core sandwich composites consist of integral angled web members spaced between laminate face sheets, and may have the potential to provide benefits over traditional sandwich composites for certain aerospace applications. However, fabrication of large autoclave-cured fluted-core cylindrical shells with existing autoclaves will require that the shells be fabricated in segments, and joined longitudinally to form a complete barrel. Two different longitudinal fluted-core joint designs were considered experimentally in this study. In particular, jointed fluted-core-composite panels were tested in longitudinal compression because longitudinal compression is the primary loading condition in dry launch-vehicle barrel sections. One of the joint designs performed well in comparison with unjointed test articles, and the other joint design failed at loads approximately 14% lower than unjointed test articles. The compression-after-impact (CAI) performance of jointed fluted-core composites was also investigated by testing test articles that had been subjected to 6 ft-lb impacts. It was found that such impacts reduced the load-carrying capability by 9% to 40%. This reduction is dependent on the joint concept, component flute size, and facesheet thickness.

  11. Influence of reinforcement type on the mechanical behavior and fire response of hybrid composites and sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancaspro, James William

    Lightweight composites and structural sandwich panels are commonly used in marine and aerospace applications. Using carbon, glass, and a host of other high strength fiber types, a broad range of laminate composites and sandwich panels can be developed. Hybrid composites can be constructed by laminating multiple layers of varying fiber types while sandwich panels are manufactured by laminating rigid fiber facings onto a lightweight core. However, the lack of fire resistance of the polymers used for the fabrication remains a very important problem. The research presented in this dissertation deals with an inorganic matrix (Geopolymer) that can be used to manufacture laminate composites and sandwich panels that are resistant up to 1000°C. This dissertation deals with the influence of fiber type on the mechanical behavior and the fire response of hybrid composites and sandwich structures manufactured using this resin. The results are categorized into the following distinct studies. (i) High strength carbon fibers were combined with low cost E-glass fibers to obtain hybrid laminate composites that are both economical and strong. The E-glass fabrics were used as a core while the carbon fibers were placed on the tension face and on both tension and compression faces. (ii) Structural sandwich beams were developed by laminating various types of reinforcement onto the tension and compression faces of balsa wood cores. The flexural behavior of the beams was then analyzed and compared to beams reinforced with organic composite. The effect of core density was evaluated using oak beams reinforced with inorganic composite. (iii) To measure the fire response, balsa wood sandwich panels were manufactured using a thin layer of a fire-resistant paste to serve for fire protection. Seventeen sandwich panels were fabricated and tested to measure the heat release rates and smoke-generating characteristics. The results indicate that Geopolymer can be effectively used to fabricate both

  12. Identification of honeycomb sandwich properties by high-resolution modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebillat, M.; Boutillon, X.

    2010-06-01

    A method is proposed to identify the mechanical properties of the skin and core materials of honeycomb sandwich. All the elastic coefficients and loss-factors that matter in the dynamics of a panel in the thick-plate approximation are identified. To this end, experimental natural modes (i.e. eigenmodes of the damped system) are compared to the numerical modes of a large sandwich panel (lx,y/h ≃ 80). The chosen generic model for the visco-elastic behaviour of the materials is E (1 + jη). The numerical modes are computed by means of a Rayleigh-Ritz procedure and their dampings are predicted according to the visco-elastic model. The frequencies and dampings of the natural modes of the panel are estimated experimentally by means of a high-resolution modal analysis technique. An optimisation procedure yields the desired coefficients. A sensitivity analysis assess the reliability of the method.

  13. Insert Design and Manufacturing for Foam-Core Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lares, Alan

    Sandwich structures have been used in the aerospace industry for many years. The high strength to weight ratios that are possible with sandwich constructions makes them desirable for airframe applications. While sandwich structures are effective at handling distributed loads such as aerodynamic forces, they are prone to damage from concentrated loads at joints or due to impact. This is due to the relatively thin face-sheets and soft core materials typically found in sandwich structures. Carleton University's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Project Team has designed and manufactured a UAV (GeoSury II Prototype) which features an all composite sandwich structure fuselage structure. The purpose of the aircraft is to conduct geomagnetic surveys. The GeoSury II Prototype serves as the test bed for many areas of research in advancing UAV technologies. Those areas of research include: low cost composite materials manufacturing, geomagnetic data acquisition, obstacle detection, autonomous operations and magnetic signature control. In this thesis work a methodology for designing and manufacturing inserts for foam-core sandwich structures was developed. The results of this research work enables a designer wishing to design a foam-core sandwich airframe structure, a means of quickly manufacturing optimized inserts for the safe introduction of discrete loads into the airframe. The previous GeoSury II Prototype insert designs (v.1 & v.2) were performance tested to establish a benchmark with which to compare future insert designs. Several designs and materials were considered for the new v.3 inserts. A plug and sleeve design was selected, due to its ability to effectively transfer the required loads to the sandwich structure. The insert material was chosen to be epoxy, reinforced with chopped carbon fibre. This material was chosen for its combination of strength, low mass and also compatibility with the face-sheet material. The v.3 insert assembly is 60% lighter than the

  14. Scattering analysis of high performance large sandwich radomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavit, Reuven; Smolski, Adam P.; Michielssen, Eric; Mittra, Raj

    1992-02-01

    Large radomes are assembled from many panels connected together forming joints or seams. When the panels are type A sandwiches that are optimized for minimum transmission loss over moderately narrow bandwidths, the seams and joints introduce scattering effects that can degrade the overall electromagnetic performance. Tuning the dielectric seams with conductive wires and optimizing their geometry is, therefore, crucial to enhancing the electromagnetic performance of the radome. The authors address the problem of systematically tuning the dielectric seams and present both numerical and experimental results to illustrate the tuning procedure. Included are results showing the effect of the tuning of the radome on the radiation of an enclosed aperture of circular or elliptic shape.

  15. An Analysis of Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Polymer Matrix Composite Sandwich Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Roberts, Gary D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Zheng, Diahua; Averbeck, Timothy; Roth, Donald J.; Jeanneau, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Structural sandwich materials composed of triaxially braided polymer matrix composite material face sheets sandwiching a foam core are being utilized for applications including aerospace components and recreational equipment. Since full scale components are being made from these sandwich materials, it is necessary to develop proper inspection practices for their manufacture and in-field use. Specifically, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques need to be investigated for analysis of components made from these materials. Hockey blades made from sandwich materials and a flat sandwich sample were examined with multiple NDE techniques including thermographic, radiographic, and shearographic methods to investigate damage induced in the blades and flat panel components. Hockey blades used during actual play and a flat polymer matrix composite sandwich sample with damage inserted into the foam core were investigated with each technique. NDE images from the samples were presented and discussed. Structural elements within each blade were observed with radiographic imaging. Damaged regions and some structural elements of the hockey blades were identified with thermographic imaging. Structural elements, damaged regions, and other material variations were detected in the hockey blades with shearography. Each technique s advantages and disadvantages were considered in making recommendations for inspection of components made from these types of materials.

  16. Using Conducting Wire at A-Sandwich Junctions to Improve the Transmission Performance of Radomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inasawa, Yoshio; Nishimura, Toshio; Tsuruta, Jun; Miyashita, Hiroaki; Konishi, Yoshihiko

    We present design procedures for using conducting wires in A-sandwich junctions to achieve high transmission performance; benchtest results validate the procedures. The scattering characteristics of the junction are obtained by solving the electric field integral equation of volumetric equivalent currents. The transmission performance is evaluated by subtracting the scattered fields of the same-sized A-sandwich panel in order to offset the effect of edge diffraction. Optimum wire width is determined by examining transmission performance with different arrangements. The designed junction achieves high transmission performance. The measured scattering characteristics of a bench model demonstrate the validity of the presented method.

  17. Panel flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Criteria are presented for the prediction of panel flutter, determination of its occurrence, design for its prevention, and evaluation of its severity. Theoretical analyses recommended for the prediction of flutter stability boundaries, vibration amplitudes, and frequencies for several types of panels are described. Vibration tests and wind tunnel tests are recommended for certain panels and environmental flow conditions to provide information for design of verification analysis. Appropriate design margins on flutter stability boundaries are given and general criteria are presented for evaluating the severity of possible short-duration, limited-amplitude panel flutter on nonreusable vehicles.

  18. Buckling of a Longitudinally Jointed Curved Composite Panel Arc Segment for Next Generation of Composite Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles: Verification Testing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrokh, Babak; Segal, Kenneth N.; Akkerman, Michael; Glenn, Ronald L.; Rodini, Benjamin T.; Fan, Wei-Ming; Kellas, Sortiris; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an all-bonded out-of-autoclave (OoA) curved longitudinal composite joint concept, intended for use in the next generation of composite heavy lift launch vehicles, was evaluated and verified through finite element (FE) analysis, fabrication, testing, and post-test inspection. The joint was used to connect two curved, segmented, honeycomb sandwich panels representative of a Space Launch System (SLS) fairing design. The overall size of the resultant panel was 1.37 m by 0.74 m (54 in by 29 in), of which the joint comprised a 10.2 cm (4 in) wide longitudinal strip at the center. NASTRAN and ABAQUS were used to perform linear and non-linear analyses of the buckling and strength performance of the jointed panel. Geometric non-uniformities (i.e., surface contour imperfections) were measured and incorporated into the FE model and analysis. In addition, a sensitivity study of the specimens end condition showed that bonding face-sheet doublers to the panel's end, coupled with some stress relief features at corner-edges, can significantly reduce the stress concentrations near the load application points. Ultimately, the jointed panel was subjected to a compressive load. Load application was interrupted at the onset of buckling (at 356 kN 80 kips). A post-test non-destructive evaluation (NDE) showed that, as designed, buckling occurred without introducing any damage into the panel or the joint. The jointed panel was further capable of tolerating an impact damage to the same buckling load with no evidence of damage propagation. The OoA cured all-composite joint shows promise as a low mass factory joint for segmented barrels.

  19. Compression After Impact Testing of Sandwich Structures Using the Four Point Bend Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Gregory, Elizabeth; Jackson, Justin; Kenworthy, Devon

    2008-01-01

    For many composite laminated structures, the design is driven by data obtained from Compression after Impact (CAI) testing. There currently is no standard for CAI testing of sandwich structures although there is one for solid laminates of a certain thickness and lay-up configuration. Most sandwich CAI testing has followed the basic technique of this standard where the loaded ends are precision machined and placed between two platens and compressed until failure. If little or no damage is present during the compression tests, the loaded ends may need to be potted to prevent end brooming. By putting a sandwich beam in a four point bend configuration, the region between the inner supports is put under a compressive load and a sandwich laminate with damage can be tested in this manner without the need for precision machining. Also, specimens with no damage can be taken to failure so direct comparisons between damaged and undamaged strength can be made. Data is presented that demonstrates the four point bend CAI test and is compared with end loaded compression tests of the same sandwich structure.

  20. Facesheet Wrinkling in Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ley, Robert P.; Lin, Weichuan; Mbanefo, Uy

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a concise summary of the state-of-the-art for the analysis of the facesheet wrinkling mode of failure in sandwich structures. This document is not an exhaustive review of the published research related to facesheet wrinkling. Instead, a smaller number of key papers are reviewed in order to provide designers and analysts with a working understanding of the state-of-the-art. Designers and analysts should use this survey to guide their judgement when deciding which one of a wide variety of available facesheet wrinkling design formulas is applicable to a specific design problem.

  1. Efficient Design and Analysis of Lightweight Reinforced Core Sandwich and PRSEUS Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Lucking, Ryan C.; Collier, Craig S.; Ainsworth, James J.; Toubia, Elias A.

    2012-01-01

    Design, analysis, and sizing methods for two novel structural panel concepts have been developed and incorporated into the HyperSizer Structural Sizing Software. Reinforced Core Sandwich (RCS) panels consist of a foam core with reinforcing composite webs connecting composite facesheets. Boeing s Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) panels use a pultruded unidirectional composite rod to provide axial stiffness along with integrated transverse frames and stitching. Both of these structural concepts are ovencured and have shown great promise applications in lightweight structures, but have suffered from the lack of efficient sizing capabilities similar to those that exist for honeycomb sandwich, foam sandwich, hat stiffened, and other, more traditional concepts. Now, with accurate design methods for RCS and PRSEUS panels available in HyperSizer, these concepts can be traded and used in designs as is done with the more traditional structural concepts. The methods developed to enable sizing of RCS and PRSEUS are outlined, as are results showing the validity and utility of the methods. Applications include several large NASA heavy lift launch vehicle structures.

  2. Advanced radiator concepts utilizing honeycomb panel heat pipes (stainless steel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Tanzer, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing moderate temperature range heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for highly efficient radiator fins for the NASA space station was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts were evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. Concepts evaluated include: type of material, material and panel thicknesses, wick type and manufacturability, liquid and vapor communication among honeycomb cells, and liquid flow return from condenser to evaporator facesheet areas. In addition, the overall performance of the honeycomb panel heat pipe was evaluated analytically.

  3. A Global/Local Finite Element Approach for Predicting Interlaminar and Intralaminar Damage Evolution in Composite Stiffened Panels Under Compressive Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaoli, Elisa; Riccio, Aniello

    2011-04-01

    This paper addresses the prediction of intralaminar and interlaminar damage onset and evolution in composite structures through the use of a finite element based procedure. This procedure joins methodologies whose credibility has been already assessed in literature such as the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (for delamination) and the ply discount approach (for matrix/fiber failures). In order to establish the reliability of the procedure developed, comparisons with literature experimental results on a stiffened panel with an embedded delamination are illustrated. The methodology proposed, implemented in ANSYS as post-processing routines, is combined with a finite element model of the panel, built by adopting both shell and solid elements within the frame of an embedded global/local approach to connect differently modelled substructures.

  4. Integrally rigidized acoustic interior spacecraft panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A sandwich panel concept is described which utilizes a monolithic I-beam design as the core. The core and skins are integrally bonded with thermosetting resin into a homogeneous structure. In addition to possessing a high strength to weight ratio, the panel resists combustion, delamination, aging due to fatigue, localized stresses, and exhibits good acoustic properties. Since the panel concept has definite potential as a high flame retardant and low smoke emission panel with excellent structural integrity, aerospace materials were used to optimize the construction for highly demanding space shuttle applications. The specific materials of construction were chosen for low flammability and off-gassing properties as well as for strength, light weight, and sound dampening.

  5. Graphene-antenna sandwich photodetector.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Yumin; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-07-11

    Nanoscale antennas sandwiched between two graphene monolayers yield a photodetector that efficiently converts visible and near-infrared photons into electrons with an 800% enhancement of the photocurrent relative to the antennaless graphene device. The antenna contributes to the photocurrent in two ways: by the transfer of hot electrons generated in the antenna structure upon plasmon decay, as well as by direct plasmon-enhanced excitation of intrinsic graphene electrons due to the antenna near field. This results in a graphene-based photodetector achieving up to 20% internal quantum efficiency in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. This device can serve as a model for merging the light-harvesting characteristics of optical frequency antennas with the highly attractive transport properties of graphene in new optoelectronic devices. PMID:22703522

  6. Development of lightweight fire retardant, low-smoke, high-strength, thermally stable aircraft floor paneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, D. B.; Burnside, J. V.; Hajari, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    Fire resistance mechanical property tests were conducted on sandwich configurations composed of resin-fiberglass laminates bonded with adhesives to Nomex honeycomb core. The test results were compared to proposed and current requirements for aircraft floor panel applications to demonstrate that the fire safety of the airplane could be improved without sacrificing mechanical performance of the aircraft floor panels.

  7. Calibration of an analytical thermal model for an epoxy-based composite sandwich design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Davis, Darrell; Stuckey, Charles I.

    2001-02-01

    An epoxy-based sandwich configuration was designed to meet the structural and thermal requirements of a nose cap for the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB's). This project was suspended in late 1999, but the information gathered during this work is unique in the sense that portions of graphite-epoxy layers were modeled at temperatures exceeding their glass transition temperatures. This work presents the results of the thermal model calibration efforts. A symmetric sandwich configuration was chosen that includes an inner and outer structural skin with a graphite-epoxy composite, Hexcel's AGP370-8H/3501-6 (AS4/3501-6), and a center epoxy-based syntactic core. 3M SC350G, that provides thermal protection. Each graphite-epoxy section consists of seven layers, each layer with a 0°, 90°, or +/-45° graphite fiber orientation. Three flat panels (0.305×0.483 m top view dimensions) using this sandwich construction were fabricated and exposed to an aerothermal environment in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Improved Hot Gas Facility (IHGF). Each of these panels had ten interstitial thermocouples in the panel. The exact locations of the thermocouples and thickness of the different layers were determined by X-ray evaluation. A 1-D model was generated that used the outer surface IR measured temperature as a boundary condition, and the predicted temperatures were compared with the measured temperatures, calibrating the code. .

  8. A Study on Flexural Properties of Sandwich Structures with Fiber/Metal Laminate Face Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariushi, S.; Sadighi, M.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a new family of sandwich structures with fiber metal laminate (FML) faces is investigated. FMLs have benefits over both metal and fiber reinforced composites. To investigate the bending properties of sandwich beams with FML faces and compare with similar sandwich beams with fibrous composite faces, 6 groups of specimen with different layer arrangements were made and tested. Results show that FML faces have good resistance against transverse local loads and minimize stress concentration and local deformations of skin and core under the loading tip. In addition, FML faces have a good integrity even after plateau region of foam cores and prevent from catastrophic failures, which cannot be seen in fibrous composite faces. Also, FML faces are lighter than metal faces and have better connection with foam cores. Sandwich beams with FML faces have a larger elastic region because of simultaneous deformation of top and bottom faces and larger failure strain thanks to good durability of FMLs. A geometrical nonlinear classical theory is used to predict force-deflection behavior. In this model an explicit formula between symmetrical sandwich beams deflections and applied force which can be useful for designers, is derived. Good agreement is obtained between the analytical predictions and experimental results. Also, analytical results are compared with small deformation solution in a parametric study, and the effects of geometric parameters on difference between linear and nonlinear results are discussed.

  9. Feedback sandwiches affect perceptions but not performance.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Jay; Abercrombie, Sara; McCarty, Teresita

    2013-08-01

    The feedback sandwich technique-make positive comments; provide critique; end with positive comments-is commonly recommended to feedback givers despite scant evidence of its efficacy. These two studies (N = 20; N = 350) of written peer feedback with third-year medical students on clinical patient note-writing assignments indicate that students think feedback sandwiches positively impact subsequent performance when there is no evidence that they do. The effort necessary to produce feedback sandwiches and students' unwarranted confidence in their performance impact have implications for teaching about how to give feedback.

  10. Analytical comparison of three stiffened panel concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Jill M.; Wu, K. Chauncey; Robinson, James C.

    1995-01-01

    Three stiffened panel concepts are evaluated to find optimized designs for integral stiffeners in the barrels of Reusable Launch Vehicle fuel tanks. The three panel concepts considered are a T-stiffened panel, a panel with one blade stiffener centered between each pair of T-stiffeners, and a panel with two blade stiffeners equally spaced between each pair of T-stiffeners. The panels are optimized using PASCO for a range of compressive loads, and the computed areal weight for each panel is used to compare the concepts and predict tank weights. The areal weight of the T-stiffened panel with one blade is up to seven-percent lower than the other panel concepts. Two tank construction methods are compared for a representative tank design with three barrels. In the first method, 45-degree circumferential sections of a barrel are each designed to carry the same maximum load in the barrel. In the second method, each barrel section is designed for the maximum load in that section. Representative tanks designed with the first method are over 250 lb heavier than tanks designed using the second method. Optimized panel designs and areal weights are also computed for variation of the nominal panel length and skin thickness.

  11. Iterative learning control applied to a non-linear vortex panel model for improved aerodynamic load performance of wind turbines with smart rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Mark W.; Tutty, Owen R.; Rogers, Eric; Sandberg, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of smart devices in wind turbine rotor blades could, in conjunction with collective and individual pitch control, improve the aerodynamic performance of the rotors. This is currently an active area of research with the primary objective of reducing the fatigue loads but mitigating the effects of extreme loads is also of interest. The aerodynamic loads on a wind turbine blade contain periodic and non-periodic components and one approach is to consider the application of iterative learning control algorithms. In this paper, the control design is based on a simple, in relative terms, computational fluid dynamics model that uses non-linear wake effects to represent flow past an airfoil. A representation for the actuator dynamics is included to undertake a detailed investigation into the level of control possible and on how performance can be effectively measured.

  12. Mode I Toughness Measurements of Core/Facesheet Bonds in Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2006-01-01

    Composite sandwich structures will be used in many future applications in aerospace, marine and offshore industries due to the fact that the strength and stiffness to mass ratios surpass any other structural type. Sandwich structure also offers advantages over traditional stiffened panels such as ease of manufacturing and repair. During the last three decades, sandwich structure has been used extensively for secondary structure in aircraft (fuselage floors, rudders and radome structure). Sandwich structure is also used as primary structure in rotorcraft, the most common example being the trailing edge of rotor blades. As with other types of composite construction, sandwich structure exhibits several types of failure mode such as facesheet wrinkling, core crushing and sandwich buckling. Facesheet/core debonding has also been observed in the marine and aerospace industry. During this failure mode, peel stresses applied to an existing facesheet/core debond or an interface low in toughness, results in the facesheet being peeled from the core material, possibly leading to a significant loss in structural integrity of the sandwich panel. In an incident during a test on a liquid hydrogen fuel tank of the X-33 prototype vehicle, the outer graphite/epoxy facesheet and honeycomb core became debonded from the inner facesheet along significant areas, leading to failure of the tank. As a consequence of the accident; significant efforts were made to characterize the toughness of the facesheet/core bond. Currently, the only standardized method available for assessing the quality of the facesheet/core interface is the climbing drum peel test (ASTM D1781). During this test a sandwich beam is removed from a panel and the lip of one of the facesheets is attached to a drum, as shown in Fig. 1. The drum is then rotated along the sandwich beam, causing the facesheet to peel from the core. This method has two major drawbacks. First, it is not possible to obtain quantitative fracture data

  13. Panel Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Lists the speakers and summarizes the issues addressed for 12 panel sessions on topics related to networking, including libraries and national networks, federal national resources and energy programs, multimedia issues, telecommuting, remote image serving, accessing the Internet, library automation, scientific information, applications of Z39.50,…

  14. Systems, Apparatuses, and Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, III, Stanley S. (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  15. Analyses for Debonding of Stitched Composite Sandwich Structures Using Improved Constitutive Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Sleight, D. W.; Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.

    2001-01-01

    A fracture mechanics analysis based on strain energy release rates is used to study the effect of stitching in bonded sandwich beam configurations. Finite elements are used to model the configurations. The stitches were modeled as discrete nonlinear spring elements with a compliance determined by experiment. The constitutive models were developed using the results of flatwise tension tests from sandwich material rather than monolithic material. The analyses show that increasing stitch stiffness, stitch density and debond length decrease strain energy release rates for a fixed applied load.

  16. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49/epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after three years' service, and found to be performing satisfactorily. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft, including sandwich and solid laminate wing-body panels, and 150 C service aft engine fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  17. Improving Strength of Postbuckled Panels Through Stitching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of blade-stiffened graphite-epoxy panels with impact damage is examined to determine the effect of adding through-the-thickness stitches in the stiffener flange-to-skin interface. The influence of stitches is evaluated by examining buckling and failure for panels with failure loads up to 3.5 times greater than buckling loads. Analytical and experimental results from four configurations of panel specimens are presented. For each configuration, two panels were manufactured with skin and flanges held together with through-the-thickness stitches introduced prior to resin infusion and curing and one panel was manufactured with no stitches holding the flange to the skin. No mechanical fasteners were used for the assembly of any of these panels. Panels with and without low-speed impact damage were loaded to failure in compression. Buckling and failure modes are discussed. Stitching had little effect on buckling loads but increased the failure loads of impact-damaged panels by up to 30%.

  18. High capacity demonstration of honeycomb panel heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of performance enhancing the sandwich panel heat pipe was investigated for moderate temperature range heat rejection radiators on future-high-power spacecraft. The hardware development program consisted of performance prediction modeling, fabrication, ground test, and data correlation. Using available sandwich panel materials, a series of subscale test panels were augumented with high-capacity sideflow and temperature control variable conductance features, and test evaluated for correlation with performance prediction codes. Using the correlated prediction model, a 50-kW full size radiator was defined using methanol working fluid and closely spaced sideflows. A new concept called the hybrid radiator individually optimizes heat pipe components. A 2.44-m long hybrid test vehicle demonstrated proof-of-principle performance.

  19. Structural performance of two aerobrake hexagonal heat shield panel concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Dyess, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Structural sizing and performance are presented for two structural concepts for an aerobrake hexagonal heat shield panel. One concept features a sandwich construction with an aluminum honeycomb core and thin quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy face sheets. The other concept features a skin-rib isogrid construction with thin quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy skins and graphite-epoxy ribs oriented at 0, +60, and -60 degs along the panel. Linear static, linear bifurcation buckling, and nonlinear static analyses were performed to compare the structural performance of the two panel concepts and assess their feasibility for a lunar transfer vehicle aerobrake application.

  20. Packaging, deployment, and panel design concepts for a truss-stiffened 7-panel precision deployable reflector with feed boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Collins, Timothy J.; Dyess, James W.; Kenner, Scott; Bush, Harold G.

    1993-01-01

    A concept is presented for achieving a remotely deployable truss-stiffened reflector consisting of seven integrated sandwich panels that form the reflective surface, and an integrated feed boom. The concept has potential for meeting aperture size and surface precision requirements for some high-frequency microwave remote sensing applications. The packaged reflector/feed boom configuration is a self-contained unit that can be conveniently attached to a spacecraft bus. The package has a cylindrical envelope compatible with typical launch vehicle shrouds. Dynamic behavior of a deployed configuration having a 216-inch focal length and consisting of 80-inch-diameter, two-inch-thick panels is examined through finite-element analysis. Results show that the feed boom and spacecraft bus can have a large impact on the fundamental frequency of the deployed configuration. Two candidate rib-stiffened sandwich panel configurations for this application are described, and analytical results for panel mass and stiffness are presented. Results show that the addition of only a few rib stiffeners, if sufficiently deep, can efficiently improve sandwich panel stiffness.

  1. 61. Upper panel in cornerpower panel lcpa lower panel in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Upper panel in corner-power panel lcpa lower panel in corner-oxygen regeneration unit, at right-air conditioner control panel, on floor-bio-pack 45 for emergency breathing, looking northwest - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  2. Design procedures for flutter-free surface panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurenson, R. M.; Mcpherson, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    An approach for the design of lightweight external surface panel configurations to preclude panel flutter was developed. Design procedures were developed for flat orthotropic panels under the interacting influence of parameters such as support flexibility, inplane loads, pressure differential, and flow angularity. The basic relationships required to define these design procedures were based on theoretical panel flutter analyses. Where possible, the design procedures were verified through comparison with available experimental panel flutter data.

  3. Elevated Temperature, Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Structure Manufactured Out-of-Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Sutter, James K.; Burke, Eric R.; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2012-01-01

    Several 1/16th-scale curved sandwich composite panel sections of a 10 m diameter barrel were fabricated to demonstrate the manufacturability of large-scale curved sections using minimum gauge, [+60/-60/0]s, toughened epoxy composite facesheets co-cured with low density (50 kilograms per cubic meters) aluminum honeycomb core. One of these panels was fabricated out of autoclave (OoA) by the vacuum bag oven (VBO) process using Cycom(Registered Trademark) T40-800b/5320-1 prepreg system while another panel with the same lay-up and dimensions was fabricated using the autoclave-cure, toughened epoxy prepreg system Cycom(Registered Trademark) IM7/977-3. The resulting 2.44 m x 2 m curved panels were investigated by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) to determine initial fabrication quality and then cut into smaller coupons for elevated temperature wet (ETW) mechanical property characterization. Mechanical property characterization of the sandwich coupons was conducted including edge-wise compression (EWC), and compression-after-impact (CAI) at conditions ranging from 25 C/dry to 150 C/wet. The details and results of this characterization effort are presented in this paper.

  4. Architectural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Alliance Wall Corporation's Whyteboard, a porcelain enamel on steel panels wall board, owes its color stability to a KIAC engineering background study to identify potential technologies and manufacturers of equipment which could be used to detect surface flaws. One result of the data base search was the purchase of a spectrocolorimeter which enables the company to control some 250 standard colors, and match special colors.

  5. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. L.

    A titanium-matrix-composite (TMC) hat-stiffened panel of 61 cm sq area and 3.175 cm thick was nondestructively tested to 649 C to examine its buckling characteristics. Compressive loads were applied to the panel in a 978.6 kN uniaxial load frame system. High-temperature testing was performed using quartz lamp heating. A single-strain-age force/stiffness buckling prediction technique was developed to predict panel buckling loads. For the monolithic panel, these test predictions correlated within 10 percent with a finite-element buckling analyses performed elsewhere. Comparisons between force/stiffness predictions and analyses for the TMC panel are in progress.

  6. Thermal-structural panel buckling tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Randolph C.; Richards, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    A titanium-matrix-composite (TMC) hat-stiffened panel of 61 cm sq area and 3.175 cm thick was nondestructively tested to 649 C to examine its buckling characteristics. Compressive loads were applied to the panel in a 978.6 kN uniaxial load frame system. High-temperature testing was performed using quartz lamp heating. A single-strain-age force/stiffness buckling prediction technique was developed to predict panel buckling loads. For the monolithic panel, these test predictions correlated within 10 percent with a finite-element buckling analyses performed elsewhere. Comparisons between force/stiffness predictions and analyses for the TMC panel are in progress.

  7. Analysis and Fabrication of Paraboloidal CFRP Sandwich Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tayo Steve

    The low areal weight requirements of telescopes in aerospace applications has driven the study on composite mirrors for several years. For example, the primary parabolic mirror in a balloon-borne, Cassegrain telescope required an optical quality better than 30 microns in figure RMS error. A parametric study on composite sandwich mirrors was conducted by using finite element analysis as well as optical analysis. The factors covered the cell sizes, core materials, core thicknesses, face layups, and support configurations. Based on theoretical calculations, many high quality spherical composite sandwich mirrors were generated by using a non-heat curing process. The CFRP faces and Nomex core were chosen as the baseline materials for mirror fabrication due to their high strength and low weight. The proposed replication method applied an interface layer between face and surface coat to eliminate print -through problems. Many important goals have been realized in those mirror samples with optical laser interferometer testing. These include the figure RMS error less than 2 microns and the surface RMS error less than 0.05 micron. The areal weights of the mirror samples are less than 7 kg/m ^2. The thermal stability of these mirrors was observed from the optical results with thermal cycling tests. The proposed 2-meter parabolic composite sandwich mirror, with an areal weight of less than 10 kg/m ^2, would consist of either (0/90/45/ -45) _{rm S} layup faces with an optimal 3^{' '} core or (QC) layup faces with a total core thickness of 5 inches. Both a ring support around the equator and the 18-point Hindle-type support would lead to the best optical quality under both self weight and thermal loading.

  8. Exploratory Investigation of Failure Mechanisms in Transition Regions between Solid Laminates and X-cor(registered tm) Truss Sandwich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Paris, Isabelle L.

    2004-01-01

    Small sub-component specimens consisting of solid laminates at the ends that transition to X-cor(R) truss sandwich in the center, were tested in a combination of three point bending, uni-axial tension, and combined tension and bending. The failure process in the transition region was documented for each loading using digital video and high-resolution cameras. For the 3-point bending tests, most of the deformation occurred in the solid laminate regions on either end of the specimen. Some pin debonding from the skin of the X-cor(R) truss sandwich was observed in the transition region and was accompanied by audible "pings" throughout the loading. Tension loaded specimens failed in the sandwich skin in the middle of the gage length, accompanied by separation of the sandwich core from the back skin and by delamination between the top skin and bottom skin at the transition region. The pinging associated with pin debonding occurred as the load was increased. However, the frequency of the pinging exceeded any visual observations of pin debonding in the video of the transition region. For specimens tested in combined tension and bending, the greatest amount of pinging occurred during initial application of the axial load. High-resolution images in the transition region indicated that the pinging corresponded to pins debonding and buckling due to the through-thickness Poisson contraction of the specimen. This buckling continued to a much smaller extent as the transverse load was applied.

  9. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  10. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-04-30

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  11. Impact resistance of composite laminated sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chun-Gon; Jun, Eui-Jin

    1992-01-01

    Investigated are the effects of face layup sequence and core density of a sandwich plate on the impact delamination area of the laminated facesheet. The sandwich plate is made of graphite/epoxy faces and Nomex honeycomb core. The size and shape of delamination due to impact at each interply location have been measured by the room temperature deply technique. The shape of the interply delamination under impact is, in general, found to be two-lobed. The shape exhibits very peculiar regularity under various experimental conditions. The quantitative measurement of delamination size has shown that the face layup with small relative orientation between adjacent plies and high density core are desirable in sandwich plates to reduce the impact delamination.

  12. Fatigue and fracture of foam cores used in sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Elio

    This study focused on the fracture and fatigue crack growth behavior in polyvinylchloride (PVC) and polyethersulfone (PES) foams. A new sandwich double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimen was implemented. Elastic foundation and finite element analysis and experimental testing confirmed that the DCB specimen is appropriate for static and cyclic crack propagation testing of soft polymer foams. A comprehensive experimental mechanical analysis was conducted on PVC foams of densities ranging from 45 to 100 kg/m3 and PES foams of densities ranging from 60 to 130 kg/m3. An in-situ scanning electron microscope study on miniature foam fracture specimens showed that crack propagation in the PVC foam was inter-cellular and in the PES foam, failure occurred predominately by extensional failure of vertical cell edges. Sandwich DCB specimens were loaded cyclically as well. For the PVC foams, the crack growth rates were substantially influence by the density. For the PES foams, there was no clear indication about the influence of foam density on the crack growth rate.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Inserts in Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyawanichakul, P.; Castanie, B.; Barrau, J.-J.

    2005-05-01

    In aeronautics, sandwich structures are widely used for secondary structures like flaps or landing gear doors. In the case of landing gear doors, the junction is made by a local reinforcement called an insert. This insert is made by a resin molded in the Nomex™ sandwich core. Such structures are still designed mainly using test results and the lack of an efficient numerical model remains a problem. The purpose of this study is on the one hand to perform experiments in order to be able to identify the failure modes and on the other hand to propose an efficient numerical model. Pull-out tests with cycling were conducted and 3D displacement measured by optical methods. The potential failure modes are numerous (delamination, local fiber breaking, skin/core debonding, core crushing, core shear buckling, potting failure, etc.). Experiments demonstrated that, for the lower loads, the non-linearity and the hysteresis are mainly due to core shear buckling. From this observation, the nonlinear behavior of the core is identified by a 3 point-bending test. The shear-modulus damage law is then implemented on a non-linear finite element model and an acceptable correlation of the tests is achieved. As a consequence, some improvements of the technology will be proposed, manufactured and tested.

  14. Donor-acceptor heteroleptic open sandwiches.

    PubMed

    Merino, Gabriel; Beltrán, Hiram I; Vela, Alberto

    2006-02-01

    A series of donor-acceptor heteroleptic open sandwiches with formula CpM-M'Pyl (M = B, Al, Ga; M' = Li, Na; Cp = cyclopentadienyl; Pyl = pentadienyl) has been designed in silico using density functional theory. The most stable complexes are those containing boron as a donor atom. A molecular orbital analysis shows that the s character of the lone pair located at the group 13 element is mainly responsible for the complex stabilization. It is also found that the surrounding medium has a similar effect on these sandwiches such as in the "classical" donor-acceptor complexes, showing a decrement in the group 13 element-alkaline metal bond lengths.

  15. Stresses in edge stiffened anisotropic sandwich plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Koganti M.; Rao, Y. U. M.

    Hybrid-stress finite elements are used to study the static behavior of an edge stiffened anisotropic sandwich plate subjected to cylindrical bending. The stress concentration factors at the interface of core and stiffener are evaluated. The analysis of the simply-supported sandwich indicates that the state of stress at the interface of core and stiffener is increased and that the edge stiffener induces clamping conditions. The faces and stiffener at the edge are, respectively, subjected to negative and positive transverse shear, causing considerable bending action in faces about their own centroidal axis.

  16. Transport and kinetics in sandwiched membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Y S; Vieth, W R; Matsuura, T

    1991-01-01

    A bioreactor in which living yeast cells are sandwiched between an ultrafiltration membrane and a reverse osmosis membrane was constructed, and experiments were performed for the conversion of substrate glucose to product ethanol. A set of equations that include both transport through a series of barrier layers and bioreaction rate were developed to predict the performance of the sandwich bioreactor. The above equations were solved by using numerical values for the transport parameter and the bioreaction rate constant, and the results are compared with the experimental data.

  17. POSTOP: Postbuckled open-stiffener optimum panels, user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggers, S. B.; Dickson, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    The computer program POSTOP developed to serve as an aid in the analysis and sizing of stiffened composite panels that may be loaded in the postbuckling regime, is intended for the preliminary design of metal or composite panels with open-section stiffeners, subjected to multiple combined biaxial compression (or tension), shear and normal pressure load cases. Longitudinal compression, however, is assumed to be the dominant loading. Temperature, initial bow eccentricity and load eccentricity effects are included. The panel geometry is assumed to be repetitive over several bays in the longitudinal (stiffener) direction as well as in the transverse direction. Analytical routines are included to compute panel stiffnesses, strains, local and panel buckling loads, and skin/stiffener interface stresses. The resulting program is applicable to stiffened panels as commonly used in fuselage, wing, or empennage structures. The capabilities and limitations of the code are described. Instructions required to use the program and several example problems are included.

  18. Evaluation of Analysis Techniques for Fluted-Core Sandwich Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    Buckling-critical launch-vehicle structures require structural concepts that have high bending stiffness and low mass. Fluted-core, also known as truss-core, sandwich construction is one such concept. In an effort to identify an analysis method appropriate for the preliminary design of fluted-core cylinders, the current paper presents and compares results from several analysis techniques applied to a specific composite fluted-core test article. The analysis techniques are evaluated in terms of their ease of use and for their appropriateness at certain stages throughout a design analysis cycle (DAC). Current analysis techniques that provide accurate determination of the global buckling load are not readily applicable early in the DAC, such as during preliminary design, because they are too costly to run. An analytical approach that neglects transverse-shear deformation is easily applied during preliminary design, but the lack of transverse-shear deformation results in global buckling load predictions that are significantly higher than those from more detailed analysis methods. The current state of the art is either too complex to be applied for preliminary design, or is incapable of the accuracy required to determine global buckling loads for fluted-core cylinders. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an analytical method for calculating global buckling loads of fluted-core cylinders that includes transverse-shear deformations, and that can be easily incorporated in preliminary design.

  19. Engineering Sandwich Courses in British Technological Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J. P.; Urry, S. A.

    1971-01-01

    The development of sandwich courses, a review of their progress and a consideration of the problems associated with their operation are described. These courses are integrated so that industrial training is required and is interspersed between academic segments. (Author/TS)

  20. Wave propagation in metamaterial lattice sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Wen, Jihong; Yin, Jianfei; Yu, Dianlong

    2016-04-01

    This paper designed a special acoustic metamaterial 3D Kagome lattice sandwich plate. Dispersion properties and vibration responses of both traditional plate and metamaterial plate are investigated based on FEA methods. The traditional plate does not have low-frequency complete bandgaps, but the metamaterial plate has low-frequency complete bandgap (at 620Hz) coming from the symmetrical local cantilever resonators. The bandgap frequency is approximate to the first-order natural frequency of the oscillator. Complex wave modes are analyzed. The dispersion curves of longitudinal waves exist in the flexural bandgap. The dispersion properties demonstrate the metamaterial design is advantageous to suppress the low-frequency flexural wave propagation in lattice sandwich plate. The flexural vibrations near the bandgap are also suppressed efficiently. The longitudinal excitation stimulates mainly longitudinal waves and lots of low-frequency flexural vibration modes are avoided. Furthermore, the free edge effects in metamaterial plate provide new method for damping optimizations. The influences of damping on vibrations of the metamaterial sandwich plate are studied. Damping has global influence on the wave propagation; stronger damping will induce more vibration attenuation. The results enlighten us damping and metamaterial design approaches can be unite in the sandwich plates to suppress the wave propagations.

  1. Feedback Sandwiches Affect Perceptions but Not Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Jay; Abercrombie, Sara; McCarty, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    The feedback sandwich technique-make positive comments; provide critique; end with positive comments-is commonly recommended to feedback givers despite scant evidence of its efficacy. These two studies (N = 20; N = 350) of written peer feedback with third-year medical students on clinical patient note-writing assignments indicate that students…

  2. Understanding Successful Sandwich Placements: A Bourdieusian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Martyn; Zukas, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Sandwich placements and other integrated work and study schemes are increasingly advocated as a key means by which universities can promote students' employability. However, there is little understanding of how successful placements work in terms of facilitating learning and development. Drawing on three longitudinal case studies of students who…

  3. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  4. HYBRID-SANDWICHED REINFORCEMENT WITH GEOSYNTHETICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, Kazuya; Yamazaki, Shinji; Sakakibara, Tsutomu

    Advantageous aspects of sandwich-type reinforced earth structures combined with geosynthetics and sand mat are highlighted in this paper. Those aspects were elucidated by two kinds of laboratory tests : (1) large consolidation tests for improvement of hydraulic conductivity and (2) model footing tests on improvement of bearing capacity and deformation characteristics for reinforced earth structures, including both vertical permeability and horizontal transmissibility characteristics of geosynthetics results from both laboratory tests indicated the following: i) Hydraulic conductivity of geosynthetics used for this type of earth reinforcement can be maintained for a long period. Such conductivity sometimes disappears, particularly because of clogging when geosynthetics are adopted in embankment construction using fine-grained soils. This fact indicates that the sand mats which are laid above and beneath geosynthetics play a salient role in preventing clogging of geosynthetics that occurs by intrusion of fines from cohesive soils. ii) Sandwich-type reinforcement combined with geosynthetics and sand mats increases stability and decreases deformation of earth structures. In particular, the sandwich structure is effective for providing toughness, which has remained an important issue for reducing infrastructural maintenance and costs. In the later part of the paper, conventionally available stability analysis was carried out to propose the design procedure for reinforced earth structures and at the same time numerical analysis was also conducted to ensure the applicability of the hybrid-sandwiched earth reinforcement newly proposed in the current paper. Finally, based on the horizontal placement by means of HBS described in the current paper, the vertical drain procedure using the sandwich structures for accelerating consolidation and increasing stability of soft soils is also suggested for the future research and investigation.

  5. Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, James

    1997-03-01

    Panelists: Arthur Bienenstock, Stanford University Cherry Ann Murray, Lucent Technologies Venkatesh Narayanamurti, University of California-Santa Barbara Paul Peercy, SEMI-SEMATECH Robert Richardson, Cornell University James Roberto, Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Board on Physics and Astronomy is undertaking a series of reassessments of all branches of physics as the foundation of a new physics survey. As part of this project, a Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics has been established under the leadership of Venkatesh Narayanamurti of the University of California-Santa Barbara. The committee has been working since June on a study that will include an illustrative recounting of major recent achievements; identification of new opportunities and challenges facing the field; and articulation-for leaders in government, industry, universities, and the public at large-of the important roles played by the field in modern society. An especially urgent issue is how to maintain the intellectual vitality of condensed matter and materials physics, and its contributions to the well-being of the United States, in an era of limited resources. The forum will feature a panel of materials researchers who are members of the Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics. They will give a brief report on the status of the study and engage in a dialogue with the audience about issues facing the condensed matter and materials physics community. Broad community input is vital to the success of the study. Please come and make your voice heard!

  6. Supersonic flutter suppression of electrorheological fluid-based adaptive panels resting on elastic foundations using sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M.; Nezami, M.; Aryaee Panah, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    Brief reviews on suppressing panel flutter vibrations by various active control strategies as well as utilization tunable electrorheological fluids (ERFs) for vibration control of structural systems are presented. Active suppression of the supersonic flutter motion of a simply supported sandwich panel with a tunable ERF interlayer, and coupled to an elastic foundation, is subsequently investigated. The structural formulation is based on the classical beam theory along with the Winkler-Pasternak foundation model, the ER fluid core is modeled as a first-order Kelvin-Voigt material, and the quasi-steady first-order supersonic piston theory is employed to describe the aerodynamic loading. Hamilton’s principle is used to derive a set of fully coupled dynamic equations of motion. The generalized Fourier expansions in conjunction with the Galerkin method are then employed to formulate the governing equations in the state space domain. The critical dynamic pressures at which unstable panel oscillations (coalescence of eigenvalues) occur are obtained via the p-method for selected applied electric field strengths (E = 0,2,4 kV mm-1). The classical Runge-Kutta time integration algorithm is subsequently used to calculate the open-loop aeroelastic response of the system in various basic loading configurations (i.e. uniformly distributed blast, gust, sonic boom, and step loads), with or without an interacting soft/stiff elastic foundation. Finally, a sliding mode control synthesis (SMC) involving the first six natural modes of the structural system is set up to actively suppress the closed-loop system response in supersonic flight conditions and under the imposed excitations. Simulation results demonstrate performance, effectiveness, and insensitivity with respect to the spillover of the proposed SMC-based control system. Limiting cases are considered and good agreements with the data available in the literature as well as with the computations made by using the Rayleigh

  7. Development of assembly techniques for fire resistant aircraft interior panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. C. S.

    1978-01-01

    Ten NASA Type A fire resistant aircraft interior panels were fabricated and tested to develop assembly techniques. These techiques were used in the construction of a full scale lavatory test structure for flame propagation testing. The Type A panel is of sandwich construction consisting of Nomex honeycomb filled with quinone dioxime foam, and bismaleimide/glass face sheets bonded to the core with polyimide film adhesive. The materials selected and the assembly techniques developed for the lavatory test structure were designed for obtaining maximum fire containment with minimum smoke and toxic emission.

  8. Experimental Evaluation of Tuned Chamber Core Panels for Payload Fairing Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.; Herlan, Jonathan W.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical models have been developed to predict the sound absorption and sound transmission loss of tuned chamber core panels. The panels are constructed of two facesheets sandwiching a corrugated core. When ports are introduced through one facesheet, the long chambers within the core can be used as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. To evaluate the accuracy of the analytical models, absorption and sound transmission loss tests were performed on flat panels. Measurements show that the acoustic resonators embedded in the panels improve both the absorption and transmission loss of the sandwich structure at frequencies near the natural frequency of the resonators. Analytical predictions for absorption closely match measured data. However, transmission loss predictions miss important features observed in the measurements. This suggests that higher-fidelity analytical or numerical models will be needed to supplement transmission loss predictions in the future.

  9. Experimental and numerical analysis of defects in composite panels used in business aircrafts interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Edu; Courteau-Godmaire, H.; Fotsing, R.; Billotte, C.; Levesque, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an optical characterization and numerical prediction of local deformations appearing on the visible side of composite sandwich panels used for interior furniture of business airplanes. During manufacturing of furniture panels, metallic inserts are bonded inside the sandwich panel using an epoxy adhesive. Surface defects appear on the visible side of the panels due to curing of the adhesive, but also because of temperature gradients and humidity during manufacturing and in service. This paper presents an optical characterization based on deflectometry principle, that allows qualitative and quantitative analyses of the surface deformations in 3-dimensions. In addition, this paper presents a parametric model based on finite elements to predict the formation of surface defects using ABAQUS. A comparison is presented between the experimental observations and numerical predictions with good agreement between them.

  10. Fiber Composite Sandwich Thermostructural Behavior: Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Aiello, R. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1986-01-01

    Several computational levels of progressive sophistication/simplification are described to computationally simulate composite sandwich hygral, thermal, and structural behavior. The computational levels of sophistication include: (1) three-dimensional detailed finite element modeling of the honeycomb, the adhesive and the composite faces; (2) three-dimensional finite element modeling of the honeycomb assumed to be an equivalent continuous, homogeneous medium, the adhesive and the composite faces; (3) laminate theory simulation where the honeycomb (metal or composite) is assumed to consist of plies with equivalent properties; and (4) derivations of approximate, simplified equations for thermal and mechanical properties by simulating the honeycomb as an equivalent homogeneous medium. The approximate equations are combined with composite hygrothermomechanical and laminate theories to provide a simple and effective computational procedure for simulating the thermomechanical/thermostructural behavior of fiber composite sandwich structures.

  11. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  12. Repeated buckling of composite shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Josef; Weller, Tanchum

    1990-01-01

    Failures in service of aerospace structures and research at the Technion Aircraft Structures Laboratory have revealed that repeatedly buckled stiffened shear panels might be susceptible to premature fatigue failures. Extensive experimental and analytical studies have been performed at Technion on repeated buckling, far in excess of initial buckling, for both metal and composite shear panels with focus on the influence of the surrounding structure. The core of the experimental investigation consisted of repeated buckling and postbuckling tests on Wagner beams in a three-point loading system under realistic test conditions. The effects of varying sizes of stiffeners, of the magnitude of initial buckling loads, of the panel aspect ratio and of the cyclic shearing force, V sub cyc, were studied. The cyclic to critical shear buckling ratios, (V sub cyc/V sub cr) were on the high side, as needed for efficient panel design, yet all within possible flight envelopes. The experiments were supplemented by analytical and numerical analyses. For the metal shear panels the test and numerical results were synthesized into prediction formulas, which relate the life of the metal shear panels to two cyclic load parameters. The composite shear panels studied were hybrid beams with graphite/epoxy webs bonded to aluminum alloy frames. The test results demonstrated that composite panels were less fatigue sensitive than comparable metal ones, and that repeated buckling, even when causing extensive damage, did not reduce the residual strength by more than 20 percent. All the composite panels sustained the specified fatigue life of 250,000 cycles. The effect of local unstiffened holes on the durability of repeatedly buckled shear panels was studied for one series of the metal panels. Tests on 2024 T3 aluminum panels with relatively small unstiffened holes in the center of the panels demonstrated premature fatigue failure, compared to panels without holes. Preliminary tests on two graphite

  13. Comparison of Brazed Residual Stress and Thermal Deformation between X-Type and Pyramidal Lattice Truss Sandwich Structure: Neutron Diffraction Measurement and Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenchun; Wei, Zhiquan; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Weiya; Woo, Wanchuck

    2016-06-01

    This paper uses finite element method and neutron diffraction measurement to study the residual stress in lattice truss sandwich structure. A comparison of residual stress and thermal deformation between X-type and pyramidal lattice truss sandwich structure has been carried out. The residual stresses are concentrated in the middle joint and then decreases gradually to both the ends. The residual stresses in the X-type lattice truss sandwich structure are smaller than those in pyramidal structure. The maximum longitudinal and transverse stresses of pyramidal structure are 220 and 202 MPa, respectively, but they decrease to 190 and 145 MPa for X-type lattice truss sandwich structure, respectively. The thermal deformation for lattice truss sandwich panel structure is of wave shape. The X-type has a better resistance to thermal deformation than pyramidal lattice truss sandwich structure. The maximum wave deformation of pyramidal structure (0.02 mm) is about twice as that of X-type (0.01 mm) at the same brazing condition.

  14. Stress analysis and buckling of J-stiffened graphite-epoxy panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    A graphite epoxy shear panel with bonded on J stiffeners was investigated. The panel, loaded to buckling in a picture frame shear test is described. Two finite element models, each of which included the doubler material bonded to the panel skin under the stiffeners and at the panel edges, were used to make a stress analysis of the panel. The shear load distributions in the panel from two commonly used boundary conditions, applied shear load and applied displacement, were compared with the results from one of the finite element models that included the picture frame test fixture.

  15. Mechanical analysis of confectioning flaw of refractory alloy honeycomb sandwich structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaodong; Kong, Xianghao; Shi, Liping; Li, Mingwei

    2009-03-01

    Thermal protection system is one of the key technology of reusable launch vehicle (RLV). After C/C and ceramic-matrix composite used in space orbiter, one new-typed thermal protection systems (TPS)-ARMOR TPS is coming forth. ARMOR TPS is means adaptable, robust, metallic, operable, reusable TPS. The ARMOR TPS has many advantages, for example: fixing easily, longer life, good properties, short time of maintenance and service. The ARMOR TPS is one of important candidate structure of RLV. ARMOR thermal protection system in foreign countries for reusable launch vehicle is used instead of the traditional ceramic-matrix composite thermal protection system and C/C thermal protection system. Also the constituent feature of ARMOR thermal protection system is much better than the traditional TPS. In comparison with traditional TPS, the ARMOR TPS will be the best selection for all kinds of RLV. So the ARMOR thermal protection system will be used in aviation and spaceflight field more and more widely because of its much better performance. ARMOR TPS panel is above the whole ARMOR TPS, and the metal honeycomb sandwich structure is the surface of the ARMOR TPS panel. So the metal honeycomb sandwich structure plays an important role in the ARMOR TPS, while it bears the flight dynamic pressure and stands against the flight dynamic calefaction. The metal honeycomb sandwich structure is made using the technique of the whole braze welding. In the course of the vacuum high temperature braze welding, its surface will appear concave. The reasons which lead to the shortage are summarized and discussed. The difference of thermal expansion coefficient and pressure between the core and the panels may be the chief reasons. This paper will analyze the mechanics behavior of metal honeycomb sandwich structure in the course of the vacuum high temperature braze welding, then make sure the reasons and get a way to solve it. Haynes214 is a good material of face sheet at present. γ - TiAl and

  16. Method of Making a Composite Panel Having Subsonic Transverse Wave Speed Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L. (Inventor); Klos, Jacob (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of making a composite panel having subsonic transverse wave speed characteristics which has first and second sheets sandwiching a core with at least one of the sheets being attached to the core at first regions thereof and unattached to the core at second regions thereof.

  17. The Bending Strength, Internal Bonding and Thickness Swelling of a Five Layer Sandwiched Bamboo Particleboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaludin, M. A.; Bahari, S. A.; Nordin, K.; Soh, T. F. T.

    2010-03-01

    The demand for wood based material is increasing but the supply is decreasing. Therefore the price of these raw materials has increased. Bamboo provides an economically feasible alternative raw material for the wood based industry. Its properties are comparable to wood. It is also compatible with the existing processing technology. Bamboo is in abundance, easy to propagate and of short maturation period. Bamboo provides a cheaper alternative resource for the wood based industry. The development of new structural components from bamboo will widen its area of application from handicrafts to furniture and building components. In this study, five layer sandwiched bamboo particleboard were manufactured. The sandwiched Bamboo PB consists of a bamboo PB core, oil palm middle veneers and thin meranti surface veneers. The physical and mechanical properties of the bamboo sandwiched particleboards were tested in accordance to the BS-EN 317:1993 [1] and BS-EN 310:1993 [2], respectively. All the samples passed the standards. The modulus of elasticity was about 352% higher than the value specified in the BS standard, BS-EN 312-4:1996 [3]. The Internal bonding was about 23% higher than the general requirements specified in the standard. On the other hand, the thickness swelling was about 6% lower than the standard. No glue line failure was observed in the strength tests. Critical failures in the IB tests were observed in the particleboards. Tension failures were observed in the surface veneers in the bending tests. The five layer sandwiched bamboo particleboard can be used for light weight construction such as furniture, and wall and door panels in buildings.

  18. Sound transmission through lined, composite panel structures: Transversely isotropic poro-elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Woo

    A joint experimental and analytical investigation of the sound transmission loss (STL) and two-dimensional free wave propagation in composite sandwich panels is presented here. An existing panel, a Nomex honeycomb sandwich panel, was studied in detail. For the purpose of understanding the typical behavior of sandwich panels, a composite structure comprising two aluminum sheets with a relatively soft, poro-elastic foam core was also constructed and studied. The cores of both panels were modeled using an anisotropic (transversely isotropic) poro-elastic material theory. Several estimation methods were used to obtain the material properties of the honeycomb core and the skin plates to be used in the numerical calculations. Appropriate values selected from among the estimates were used in the STL and free wave propagation models. The prediction model was then verified in two ways: first, the calculated wave speeds and STL of a single poro-elastic layer were numerically verified by comparison with the predictions of a previously developed isotropic model. Secondly, to physically validate the transversely isotropic model, the measured STL and the phase speeds of the sandwich panels were compared with their predicted values. To analyze the actual treatment of a fuselage structure, multi-layered configurations, including a honeycomb panel and several layers such as air gaps, acoustic blankets and membrane partitions, were formulated. Then, to find the optimal solution for improving the sound barrier performance of an actual fuselage system, air layer depth and glass fiber lining effects were investigated by using these multi-layer models. By using the free wave propagation model, the first anti-symmetric and symmetric modes of the sandwich panels were characterized to allow the identification of the coincidence frequencies of the sandwich panel. The behavior of the STL could then be clearly explained by comparison with the free wave propagation solutions. By performing a

  19. An enriched 1D finite element for the buckling analysis of sandwich beam-columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sad Saoud, Kahina; Le Grognec, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Sandwich constructions have been widely used during the last few decades in various practical applications, especially thanks to the attractive compromise between a lightweight and high mechanical properties. Nevertheless, despite the advances achieved to date, buckling still remains a major failure mode for sandwich materials which often fatally leads to collapse. Recently, one of the authors derived closed-form analytical solutions for the buckling analysis of sandwich beam-columns under compression or pure bending. These solutions are based on a specific hybrid formulation where the faces are represented by Euler-Bernoulli beams and the core layer is described as a 2D continuous medium. When considering more complex loadings or non-trivial boundary conditions, closed-form solutions are no more available and one must resort to numerical models. Instead of using a 2D computationally expensive model, the present paper aims at developing an original enriched beam finite element. It is based on the previous analytical formulation, insofar as the skin layers are modeled by Timoshenko beams whereas the displacement fields in the core layer are described by means of hyperbolic functions, in accordance with the modal displacement fields obtained analytically. By using this 1D finite element, linearized buckling analyses are performed for various loading cases, whose results are confronted to either analytical or numerical reference solutions, for validation purposes.

  20. Buckling Analysis of Angle-ply Composite and Sandwich Plates by Combination of Geometric Stiffness Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Wu; Wanji, Chen

    2007-05-01

    Buckling response of angle-ply laminated composite and sandwich plates are analyzed using the global-local higher order theory with combination of geometric stiffness matrix in this paper. This global-local theory completely fulfills the free surface conditions and the displacement and stress continuity conditions at interfaces. Moreover, the number of unknowns in this theory is independent of the number of layers in the laminate. Based on this global-local theory, a three-noded triangular element satisfying C1 continuity conditions has also been proposed. The bending part of this element is constructed from the concept of DKT element. In order to improve the accuracy of the analysis, a method of modified geometric stiffness matrix has been introduced. Numerical results show that the present theory not only computes accurately the buckling response of general laminated composite plates but also predicts the critical buckling loads of soft-core sandwiches. However, the global higher-order theories as well as first order theories might encounter some difficulties and overestimate the critical buckling loads for soft-core sandwich plates.

  1. On the Rigidity in Bending of a Sandwich with Thick CFRP Facings and Thin Soft Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprino, G.; Iaccarino, P.; Langella, A.; Lamboglia, A.

    2009-06-01

    Flexure tests in three-point bending were performed in the elastic domain on sandwich specimens whose facings were made of T800H/3900-2 laminates, and the core by a soft rubbery layer. The contribution of the shear and flexural deformations to the overall deflection was varied by varying the slenderness ratio. The rigidities yielded by the load-displacement curve were corrected for the indentation occurring at the points of load introduction, using an experimentally determined calibration curve. Due to the thinness of the sandwich, indentation negligibly affected the precision of the results, with the apparent rigidities differing from the actual ones by less than 2%. By an analytical formula previously developed for sandwich structures, a prediction of the rigidities in flexure was attempted, adopting elastic constants available in the literature. The correlation with the data points was poor, with the theoretical results largely overestimating the actual rigidities. However, the reliability of the closed-form formula was supported by finite element analysis, carried out modelling the facings by 2D plate elements, and the core by 3D brick elements. Through the formula, the core shear modulus was individuated as responsible of the discrepancies observed. Assuming a suitable value for this parameter, both the analytic solution and the finite element models were able to match with accuracy the rigidities measured.

  2. Finite element based stability-constrained weight minimization of sandwich composite ducts for airship applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khode, Urmi B.

    High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) airships are platform of interest due to their persistent observation and persistent communication capabilities. A novel HALE airship design configuration incorporates a composite sandwich propulsive hull duct between the front and the back of the hull for significant drag reduction via blown wake effects. The sandwich composite shell duct is subjected to hull pressure on its outer walls and flow suction on its inner walls which result in in-plane wall compressive stress, which may cause duct buckling. An approach based upon finite element stability analysis combined with a ply layup and foam thickness determination weight minimization search algorithm is utilized. Its goal is to achieve an optimized solution for the configuration of the sandwich composite as a solution to a constrained minimum weight design problem, for which the shell duct remains stable with a prescribed margin of safety under prescribed loading. The stability analysis methodology is first verified by comparing published analytical results for a number of simple cylindrical shell configurations with FEM counterpart solutions obtained using the commercially available code ABAQUS. Results show that the approach is effective in identifying minimum weight composite duct configurations for a number of representative combinations of duct geometry, composite material and foam properties, and propulsive duct applied pressure loading.

  3. Panel resonant behavior of wind turbine blades.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2010-03-01

    The principal design drivers in the certification of wind turbine blades are ultimate strength, fatigue resistance, adequate tip-tower clearance, and buckling resistance. Buckling resistance is typically strongly correlated to both ultimate strength and fatigue resistance. A composite shell with spar caps forms the airfoil shape of a blade and reinforcing shear webs are placed inside the blade to stiffen the blade in the flap-wise direction. The spar caps are dimensioned and the shear webs are placed so as to add stiffness to unsupported panel regions and reduce their length. The panels are not the major flap-wise load carrying element of a blade; however, they must be designed carefully to avoid buckling while minimizing blade weight. Typically, buckling resistance is evaluated by consideration of the load-deflection behavior of a blade using finite element analysis (FEA) or full-scale static testing of blades under a simulated extreme loading condition. The focus of this paper is on the use of experimental modal analysis to measure localized resonances of the blade panels. It can be shown that the resonant behavior of these panels can also provide a means to evaluate buckling resistance by means of analytical or experimental modal analysis. Further, panel resonances have use in structural health monitoring by observing changes in modal parameters associated with panel resonances, and use in improving panel laminate model parameters by correlation with test data. In recent modal testing of wind turbine blades, a set of panel modes were measured. This paper will report on the findings of these tests and accompanying numerical and analytical modeling efforts aimed at investigating the potential uses of panel resonances for blade evaluation, health monitoring, and design.

  4. Performance of truss panels with kagome cores and design of a high authority shape morphing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ju

    This dissertation includes two parts: First, the performance of a light weight truss panels with Kagome cores; Second, design of a high authority morphing structure for hinging and twisting. The performance characteristics of a truss core sandwich panel design based on the 3D Kagome are measured and compared with earlier numerical simulations and the consistency is demonstrated. Panels are fabricated by investment casting and tested in compression, shear and 3-point bending. The isotropic nature of this core design is confirmed. The superior performance relative to truss designs based on the tetrahedron is demonstrated and attributed to the greater resistance to plastic buckling at the equivalent core density. The failed samples are examined in the scanning electron microscope and imperfections are identified to have caused the premature failures. A concept for a high authority shape morphing plate is described. The design incorporates an active Kagome back-plane capable of changing the shape of a solid face by transmitting loads through a tetrahedral core. The two shape deformations to be achieved and demonstrated consist of hinging and twisting. The design is performed by a combination of analytic estimation and numerical simulation, guided by previous assessments of the Kagome configuration. The objective is to ascertain designs that provide the maximum edge displacement subjected to specified passive load. An optimization is used to ascertain the largest displacement achievable within the force capacity of the actuators. These displacements have been demonstrated and shown to correspond with values predicted by numerical simulation. Non-linear effects, such as face wrinkling, are probed by using a finite element method and the fidelity of the results assessed through comparison with measurements. The numerical results are used to validate a dimensional analysis of trends in the actuation resistance of the structure with geometry, as well as the passive load

  5. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi; Sugiman, Saputra, Yudhi

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Impact Responses on Through-thickness Stitched Foam Core Sandwich Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Fan; Wu, Xiao-Qing; Li, Jia-Lu

    2013-12-01

    This paper was based on the explicit finite element codes to predict the impact behavior of through-thickness stitched foam core sandwich composites. It is proposed that the extent of the impact damage can be characterized by the token parameters of cracking width, penetration depth and damage angle; and observations made during the simulative analysis with such damage parameters. The results show that the same tendencies and characteristics are shown on the numerical and test results of impact force-displacement plots, and a good agreement is also obtained in damage parameters. In comparing the unstitched types, the through-thickness stitched sandwiches are optimal for both the peak loads shown on the numerical plots at 25.0 J; and demonstrate the fewer extent of impact damage with a 63.5 and 6.0 % decreasing to the cracking width and penetration depth respectively, and where a 52.0 % increasing to the damage angle.

  7. Large Deformation Behavior of Long Shallow Cylindrical Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, Douglas M.; Hyer, Michael W.; Johnson, Eric R.

    1991-01-01

    An exact solution is presented for the large deformation response of a simply supported orthotropic cylindrical panel subjected to a uniform line load along a cylinder generator. The cross section of the cylinder is circular and deformations up to the fully snapped through position are investigated. The orthotropic axes are parallel to the generator and circumferential directions. The governing equations are derived using laminated plate theory, nonlinear strain-displacement relations, and applying variational principles. The response is investigated for the case of a panel loaded exactly at midspan and for a panel with the load offset from midspan. The mathematical formulation is one dimensional in the circumferential coordinate. Solutions are obtained in closed-form. An experimental apparatus was designed to load the panels. Experimental results of displacement controlled tests performed on graphite-epoxy curved panels are compared with analytical predictions.

  8. Elastic constants for superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Formulae and the associated graphs are presented for contrasting the effective elastic constants for a superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) corrugated sandwich core and a honeycomb sandwich core. The results used in the comparison of the structural properties of the two types of sandwich cores are under conditions of equal sandwich density. It was found that the stiffness in the thickness direction of the optimum SPF/DB corrugated core (i.e., triangular truss core) was lower than that of the honeycomb core, and that the former had higher transverse shear stiffness than the latter.

  9. Evaluation of barely visible indentation damage (BVID) in CF/EP sandwich composites using guided wave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, Samir; Ye, Lin; Dong, Xingjian; Alamdari, Mehrisadat Makki

    2016-08-01

    Barely visible indentation damage after quasi-static indentation in sandwich CF/EP composites was assessed using ultrasonic guided wave signals. Finite element analyses were conducted to investigate the interaction between guided waves and damage, further to assist in the selection process of the Lamb wave sensitive modes for debonding identification. Composite sandwich beams and panels structures were investigated. Using the beam structure, a damage index was defined based on the change in the peak magnitude of the captured wave signals before and after the indentation, and the damage index was correlated with the residual deformation (defined as the depth of the dent), that was further correlated with the amount of crushing within the core. Both A0 and S0 Lamb wave modes showed high sensitivity to the presence of barely visible indentation damage with residual deformation of 0.2 mm. Furthermore, barely visible indentation damage was assessed in composite sandwich panels after indenting to 3 and 5 mm, and the damage index was defined, based on (a) the peak magnitude of the wave signals before and after indentation or (b) the mismatch between the original and reconstructed wave signals based on a time-reversal algorithm, and was subsequently applied to locate the position of indentation.

  10. A double-sandwich ELISA for identification of monoclonal antibodies suitable for sandwich immunoassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sandwich immunoassay (sIA) is an invaluable technique for concentrating, detecting, and quantifying target antigens. The two critical components required are a capture antibody and a detection antibody, each binding a different epitope on the target antigen. The specific antibodies incorporated...

  11. A study of sandwich T-joints and composite lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turaga, Umamaheswar V. R. S.

    In this study, new efficient designs for adhesive sandwich T-joint and single-lap joint were proposed and investigated. In the proposed new sandwich T-joint, called U-channel joint, the load transfer path at the web-flange interface was modified to include a U-shaped aluminum channel which provides strong path for load transfer. Experimental results show that the new design has 62% more strength than the conventional circular fillet joint. The new U-channel joint was tested in tension, compression and bending to investigate its characteristics. It is found to have good performance in bending also, even though in compression it performs same as the circular fillet joint. An extensive parametric study was carried out to investigate the effect of parameters like flange skin stiffener, foam density, foam thickness in the web, and aluminum attachments. A fracture mechanics criterion based on the strain energy release rate was used to explain the failure modes, apart from the stress analysis explanation. The failure loads of the joints in compression were predicted using a maximum principal stress failure criterion based on the sandwich beam theory. A new single lap joint with attachments was proposed in the second phase of the research. The design was verified using both aluminum and composite materials. The new design was found to have 59% more strength than the single-lap joint. A parametric study was performed to find out the influence of the angle of attachment, thickness of attachment and the length of attachment. By careful consideration of design parameters, the joint can be optimized. Finally, the failure loads of the single lap joints with and without attachments were predicted using different failure criteria.

  12. Buckling Design and Analysis of a Payload Fairing One-Sixth Cylindrical Arc-Segment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosareo, Daniel N.; Oliver, Stanley T.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    Design and analysis results are reported for a panel that is a 16th arc-segment of a full 33-ft diameter cylindrical barrel section of a payload fairing structure. Six such panels could be used to construct the fairing barrel, and, as such, compression buckling testing of a 16th arc-segment panel would serve as a validation test of the buckling analyses used to design the fairing panels. In this report, linear and nonlinear buckling analyses have been performed using finite element software for 16th arc-segment panels composed of aluminum honeycomb core with graphiteepoxy composite facesheets and an alternative fiber reinforced foam (FRF) composite sandwich design. The cross sections of both concepts were sized to represent realistic Space Launch Systems (SLS) Payload Fairing panels. Based on shell-based linear buckling analyses, smaller, more manageable buckling test panel dimensions were determined such that the panel would still be expected to buckle with a circumferential (as opposed to column-like) mode with significant separation between the first and second buckling modes. More detailed nonlinear buckling analyses were then conducted for honeycomb panels of various sizes using both Abaqus and ANSYS finite element codes, and for the smaller size panel, a solid-based finite element analysis was conducted. Finally, for the smaller size FRF panel, nonlinear buckling analysis was performed wherein geometric imperfections measured from an actual manufactured FRF were included. It was found that the measured imperfection did not significantly affect the panel's predicted buckling response

  13. Pressure Testing of a Minimum Gauge PRSEUS Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew J.; Rouse, Marshall; Linton, Kim A.; Li, Victor P.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced aircraft configurations that have been developed to increase fuel efficiency require advanced, novel structural concepts capable of handling the unique load conditions that arise. One such concept is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) developed by the Boeing Company. The PRSEUS concept is being investigated by NASA s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program for use in a hybrid-wing body (HWB) aircraft. This paper summarizes the analysis and test of a PRSEUS panel subjected to internal pressure, the first such pressure test for this structural concept. The pressure panel used minimum gauge skin, with stringer and frame configurations consistent with previous PRSEUS tests. Analysis indicated that for the minimum gauge skin panel, the stringer locations exhibit fairly linear response, but the skin bays between the stringers exhibit nonlinear response. Excellent agreement was seen between nonlinear analysis and test results in the critical portion at the center of the panel. The pristine panel was capable of withstanding the required 18.4 psi pressure load condition without exhibiting any damage. The impacted panel was capable of withstanding a pressure load in excess of 28 psi before initial failure occurred at the center stringer, and the panel was capable of sustaining increased pressure load after the initial failure. This successful PRSEUS panel pressure panel test was a critical step in the building block approach for enabling the use of this advanced structural concept on future aircraft, such as the HWB.

  14. Hypersonic panel flutter in a rarefied atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resende, Hugo B.

    1993-01-01

    Panel flutter is a form of dynamic aeroelastic instability resulting from the interaction between motion of an aircraft structural panel and the aerodynamic loads exerted on that panel by air flowing past one of the faces. It differs from lifting surface flutter in the sense that it is not usually catastrophic, the panel's motion being limited by nonlinear membrane stresses produced by the transverse displacement. Above some critical airflow condition, the linear instability grows to a limit cycle . The present investigation studies panel flutter in an aerodynamic regime known as 'free molecule flow', wherein intermolecular collisions can be neglected and loads are caused by interactions between individual molecules and the bounding surface. After collision with the panel, molecules may be reflected specularly or reemitted in diffuse fashion. Two parameters characterize this process: the 'momentum accommodation coefficient', which is the fraction of the specularly reflected molecules; and the ratio between the panel temperature and that of the free airstream. This model is relevant to the case of hypersonic flight vehicles traveling at very high altitudes and especially for panels oriented parallel to the airstream or in the vehicle's lee. Under these conditions the aerodynamic shear stress turns out to be considerably larger than the surface pressures, and shear effects must be included in the model. This is accomplished by means of distributed longitudinal and bending loads. The former can cause the panel to buckle. In the example of a simply-supported panel, it turns out that the second mode of free vibration tends to dominate the flutter solution, which is carried out by a Galerkin analysis. Several parametric studies are presented. They include the effects of (1) temperature ratio; (2) momentum accommodation coefficient; (3) spring parameters, which are associated with how the panel is connected to adjacent structures; (4) a parameter which relates compressive

  15. A study on metallic thermal protection system panel for Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caogen, Yao; Hongjun, Lü; Zhonghua, Jia; Xinchao, Jia; Yan, Lu; Haigang, Li

    2008-07-01

    A Ni-based superalloy honeycomb thermal protection system (TPS) panel has been fabricated. And a curved Ni-based superalloy honeycomb sandwich has also been fabricated. The preliminary thermal insulation results of a fabricated Ni-based superalloy honeycomb TPS panel (the areal density of this panel is 6.7 kg /m2 and total height is 32 mm) indicate that the maximum temperature of the lower surfaces of the panel is lower than 150∘ C when the temperature of outer surface is held at 650∘ C for 30 min. The flatwise tensile strength and compressive properties of a fabricated Ni-based superalloy honeycomb sandwich coupon was studied at room temperature. A multilayered coating has been developed on the surface of the superalloy honeycomb TPS panel for environmental protection and thermal control. The oxidation weight-change results show that the weight change of the Ni-based superalloy honeycomb sandwich with the oxidation resistant coating is extremely small at 1100∘ C in air for 10 h. The emittance layer of the multilayered coating imparts an emittance in excess of 0.85 during exposure at 850∘ C, which was at least 14% greater than that of the substrate with oxidation resistant alone.

  16. Shear buckling analysis of a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1994-01-01

    A buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to shear loading. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. The global shear buckling load was found to be several times higher than the local shear buckling load. The classical shear buckling theory for a flat plate was found to be useful in predicting the local shear buckling load of the hat-stiffened panel, and the predicted local shear buckling loads thus obtained compare favorably with the results of finite element analysis.

  17. Advanced concentrator panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D. M.; Bedard, R. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The prototype fabrication of a lightweight, high-quality cellular glass substrate reflective panel for use in an advanced point-focusing solar concentrator was completed. The reflective panel is a gore shaped segment of an 11-m paraboloidal dish. The overall concentrator design and the design of the reflective panels are described. prototype-specific panel design modifications are discussed and the fabrication approach and procedure outlined.

  18. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  19. Integrated Structural/Acoustic Modeling of Heterogeneous Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett, A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven, M.; Pennline, James, A.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the dynamic response of heterogeneous media is presented. A given medium is discretized into a number of subvolumes, each of which may contain an elastic anisotropic material, void, or fluid, and time-dependent boundary conditions are applied to simulate impact or incident pressure waves. The full time-dependent displacement and stress response throughout the medium is then determined via an explicit solution procedure. The model is applied to simulate the coupled structural/acoustic response of foam core sandwich panels as well as aluminum panels with foam inserts. Emphasis is placed on the acoustic absorption performance of the panels versus weight and the effects of the arrangement of the materials and incident wave frequency.

  20. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  1. Compressive Strength of Stainless-Steel Sandwiches at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Pride, Richard A.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from crippling tests of stainless-steel sandwich specimens in the temperature range from 80 F to 1,200 F. The specimens included resistance-welded 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with single-corrugated cores, type 301 stainless-steel sandwiches with double-corrugated cores, and brazed 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with honeycomb cores. The experimental strengths are compared with predicted buckling and crippling strengths. The crippling strengths were predicted from the calculated maximum strength of the individual plate elements of the sandwiches and from a correlation procedure which gives the elevated-temperature crippling strength when the experimental room-temperature crippling strengths are known. Photographs of some of the tested specimens are included to show the modes of failure.

  2. Compressive buckling analysis of hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to uniaxial compression. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. It was found that the global buckling load was several times higher than the buckling load. The predicted local buckling loads compared favorably with both experimental data and finite-element analysis.

  3. Refined Zigzag Theory for Laminated Composite and Sandwich Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; DiSciuva, Marco; Gherlone, Marco

    2009-01-01

    A refined zigzag theory is presented for laminated-composite and sandwich plates that includes the kinematics of first-order shear deformation theory as its baseline. The theory is variationally consistent and is derived from the virtual work principle. Novel piecewise-linear zigzag functions that provide a more realistic representation of the deformation states of transverse-shear-flexible plates than other similar theories are used. The formulation does not enforce full continuity of the transverse shear stresses across the plate s thickness, yet is robust. Transverse-shear correction factors are not required to yield accurate results. The theory is devoid of the shortcomings inherent in the previous zigzag theories including shear-force inconsistency and difficulties in simulating clamped boundary conditions, which have greatly limited the accuracy of these theories. This new theory requires only C(sup 0)-continuous kinematic approximations and is perfectly suited for developing computationally efficient finite elements. The theory should be useful for obtaining relatively efficient, accurate estimates of structural response needed to design high-performance load-bearing aerospace structures.

  4. A general panel sizing computer code and its application to composite structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.; Stroud, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code for obtaining the dimensions of optimum (least mass) stiffened composite structural panels is described. The procedure, which is based on nonlinear mathematical programming and a rigorous buckling analysis, is applicable to general cross sections under general loading conditions causing buckling. A simplified method of accounting for bow-type imperfections is also included. Design studies in the form of structural efficiency charts for axial compression loading are made with the code for blade and hat stiffened panels. The effects on panel mass of imperfections, material strength limitations, and panel stiffness requirements are also examined. Comparisons with previously published experimental data show that accounting for imperfections improves correlation between theory and experiment.

  5. Safety Panel Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore what resources are potentially available to safety panels and to provide some guidance on how to utilize those resources. While the examples used in this paper will concentrate on the Flight Equipment and Reliability Review Panel (FESRRP) and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) hardware that have come through that panel, as well as resources at Johnson Space Center, the paper will address how this applies to safety panels in general, and where possible cite examples for other safety panels.

  6. Which Is The Best Sandwich Compound? Hexaphenylbenzene Substituted By Sandwich Compounds Bearing Sc, Cr, and Fe.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Estrella; Martínez, Ana; Rios, Citlalli; Salcedo, Roberto

    2015-11-25

    The electronic properties of nine different hexaarylbenzene molecules substituted by sandwich compounds have been studied by applying density functional theory. Different structures and the particular electron donor power of these systems have been considered in order to analyze their oxidant capacity, using bis(ciclopentadienyl) scandium, ferrocene, and bis(benzene)chromium as sandwich compounds. Both monometallic and bimetallic combinations are investigated. According to the ionization energies and electron affinities, compounds with Cr are nucleophiles and represent the best electron donors, whereas compounds with Sc are electrophiles and represent the best electron acceptors. The worse electron donor or acceptor is hexakis(4-ferrocenyl phenyl) benzene. This is very significant, as it implies that the very well-known electronic properties of hexakis(4-ferrocenyl phenyl) benzene can be improved by substituting with other metals, such as Sc and Cr. This suggests several possible applications for these compounds. PMID:26528582

  7. Nanoparticle organization in sandwiched polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Curk, Tine; Martinez-Veracoechea, Francisco J; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2014-05-14

    The organization of nanoparticles inside grafted polymer layers is governed by the interplay of polymer-induced entropic interactions and the action of externally applied fields. Earlier work had shown that strong external forces can drive the formation of colloidal structures in polymer brushes. Here we show that external fields are not essential to obtain such colloidal patterns: we report Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations that demonstrate that ordered structures can be achieved by compressing a "sandwich" of two grafted polymer layers, or by squeezing a coated nanotube, with nanoparticles in between. We show that the pattern formation can be efficiently controlled by the applied pressure, while the characteristic length-scale, that is, the typical width of the patterns, is sensitive to the length of the polymers. Based on the results of the simulations, we derive an approximate equation of state for nanosandwiches. PMID:24707901

  8. ICFA neutrino panel report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    2015-07-01

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: "To promote international cooperation in the development of the accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments." In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel's findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel's initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  9. Interactive optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  10. "Inverse Sandwich" Complexes of Perhalogenated Cyclohexasilane

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xuliang; Shulz, Douglas; Braun, Christopher; Ugrinov, Angel; and Boudjouk, Philip

    2010-04-20

    Perhalogenated cyclohexasilanes, Si6X12 (X = Cl, Br), were prepared by reaction of Si6H12 with molecular chlorine or bromine in cold (-89 °C) dichloromethane. Single-crystal structural determination by X-ray analysis shows that the six silicon atoms comprising Si6Br12 adopt a chair conformation in the solid state. The addition of p-tolunitrile to Si6X12 (X = Cl, Br) leads to the rapid formation of colorless precipitates. Si6Br12 3 2(p-CH3C6H4CN) adopts an 'inverse sandwich' structure where the N atoms of the p-tolunitrile molecules are μ6 bonded and are located above and below the planar hexagonal Si6 ring. In conclusion, Si6X12 (X = Cl, Br) was synthesized by molecular halogenation of Si6H12 in high yield and good purity. Perhalogenated cyclohexasilanes react with p-tolunitrile to give 'inverse sandwich' adducts 3 and 4 with a planar Si6 ring upon coordination. Our future reports will detail dianionic adducts based on tetra-n-butylammonium halides as well as a monoanionic adamantyl azide adduct of Si6Cl12. It is straightforward to conceptualize the utility of Si6X12 ∙ Ln chemistry in molecular assembly of silicon-based clusters/tubes/wires. Thereby, we proffer that this constitutes a new landscape in Si chemistry.

  11. Development of lightweight, fire-retardant, low-smoke, high-strength, thermally stable aircraft floor paneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Ougland, R. M.; Karch, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Extensive fire resistance and mechanical property tests were conducted on sandwich configurations composed of resin-fiberglass laminates bonded with adhesive to Nomex honeycomb and foam core. The test results were used to select a combination of materials that would improve the fire safety of the airplane without sacrificing mechanical performance of the aircraft floor panels. A test panel is being service evaluated in a commercial aircraft.

  12. Damage tolerance of woven graphite-epoxy buffer strip panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy panels with S glass buffer strips were tested in tension and shear to measure their residual strengths with crack-like damage. The buffer strips were regularly spaced narrow strips of continuous S glass. Panels were made with a uniweave graphite cloth where the S glass buffer material was woven directly into the cloth. Panels were made with different width and thickness buffer strips. The panels were loaded to failure while remote strain, strain at the end of the slit, and crack opening displacement were monitoring. The notched region and nearby buffer strips were radiographed periodically to reveal crack growth and damage. Except for panels with short slits, the buffer strips arrested the propagating crack. The strength (or failing strain) of the panels was significantly higher than the strength of all-graphite panels with the same length slit. Panels with wide, thick buffer strips were stronger than panels with thin, narrow buffer strips. A shear-lag model predicted the failing strength of tension panels with wide buffer strips accurately, but over-estimated the strength of the shear panels and the tension panels with narrow buffer strips.

  13. Design, Optimization, and Evaluation of A1-2139 Compression Panel with Integral T-Stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulani, Sameer B.; Havens, David; Norris, Ashley; Bird, R. Keith; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Olliffe, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A T-stiffened panel was designed and optimized for minimum mass subjected to constraints on buckling load, yielding, and crippling or local stiffener failure using a new analysis and design tool named EBF3PanelOpt. The panel was designed for a compression loading configuration, a realistic load case for a typical aircraft skin-stiffened panel. The panel was integrally machined from 2139 aluminum alloy plate and was tested in compression. The panel was loaded beyond buckling and strains and out-of-plane displacements were extracted from 36 strain gages and one linear variable displacement transducer. A digital photogrammetric system was used to obtain full field displacements and strains on the smooth (unstiffened) side of the panel. The experimental data were compared with the strains and out-of-plane deflections from a high-fidelity nonlinear finite element analysis.

  14. Fabrication and evaluation of cold/formed/weldbrazed beta-titanium skin-stiffened compression panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Bales, T. T.; Davis, R. C.; Wiant, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    The room temperature and elevated temperature buckling behavior of cold formed beta titanium hat shaped stiffeners joined by weld brazing to alpha-beta titanium skins was determined. A preliminary set of single stiffener compression panels were used to develop a data base for material and panel properties. These panels were tested at room temperature and 316 C (600 F). A final set of multistiffener compression panels were fabricated for room temperature tests by the process developed in making the single stiffener panels. The overall geometrical dimensions for the multistiffener panels were determined by the structural sizing computer code PASCO. The data presented from the panel tests include load shortening curves, local buckling strengths, and failure loads. Experimental buckling loads are compared with the buckling loads predicted by the PASCO code. Material property data obtained from tests of ASTM standard dogbone specimens are also presented.

  15. Mechanical Properties of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Foam Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B. a.; Hebsur, M.; Cosgriff, L. M.; Fedor, J.

    2007-01-01

    Rectangular 17-4PH stainless steel sandwiched foam panels were fabricated using a commercial manufacturing technique by brazing two sheets to a foam core. Microstructural observations and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of the panels revealed large variations in the quality of the brazed areas from one panel to the next as well as within the same panel. Shear tests conducted on specimens machined from the panels exhibited failures either in the brazed region or in the foam core for the poorly brazed and well-brazed samples, respectively. Compression tests were conducted on the foam cores to evaluate their elastic and plastic deformation behavior. These data were compared with published data on polymeric and metallic foams, and with theoretical deformation models proposed for open cell foams.

  16. Titanium honeycomb panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, W. L.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    The paper describes the procedures of thermal mechanical tests carried out at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on two tianium honeycomb wing panels bonded using liquid interface diffusion (LID) technique, and presents the results of these tests. The 58.4 cm square panels consisted of two 0.152-cm-thick Ti 6-2-4-2 face sheets LID-bonded to a 1.9-cm-thick honeycomb core, with bearing plates fastened to the perimeter of the upper and the lower panel surfaces. The panels were instrumented with sensors for measuring surface temperature, strain, and deflections to 315 C and 482 C. Thermal stress levels representative of those encountered during aerodynamic heating were produced by heating the upper panel surface and restraining all four edges. After more than 100 thermal cycles from room temperature to 315 C and 50 cycles from room temperature to 482 C, no significant structural degradation was detected in the panels.

  17. Creep relaxation and fully reversible creep of foam core sandwich composites in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Paz, Ismael; Shafiq, Basir

    2015-12-01

    Foam core sandwich composites were subjected to (i) creep to failure, (ii) cyclic creep-relaxation and (iii) fully reversible cyclic creep loading in seawater in order to mimic an actual ship hull's service lifetime scenario. The results indicate a strong dependence of lifetime on the mode of loading. A significant reduction in the overall life was observed under cyclic creep as compared with the conventional creep to failure. Creep relaxation (R=1) tests were performed at loading-relaxation periods of 24/24, 24/12, 24/6, 12/12 and 6/6 h, while the fully reversible (R=-1) creep tests were conducted at loading-reversed loading times of 36/36, 24/24, 12/12, 6/6, and 3/3 h. The results suggest that creep-relaxation lifetime characteristics depend predominantly on the relaxation time as opposed to loading times, i.e. longer relaxation periods lead to shorter life. Whereas, fully reversible creep appears to be dependent upon the number of reversals whereby, life is observed to reduce as the number of reversals increase. These significant observations are explained in terms of various possible paths to interface cell wall collapse. Modes of failure were predominantly indentation and core compression in the vicinity of the loading site.

  18. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

  19. Solar reflection panels

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Grossman, James W.; Reshetnik, Michael

    2006-07-18

    A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front surface of the composite panel. The composite panel comprises a front sheet affixed to a surface of a core material, preferably a core material comprising a honeycomb structure, and a back sheet affixed to an opposite surface of the core material. The invention may further comprise a sealing strip, preferably comprising EPDM, positioned between the glass mirror and the front surface of the composite panel. The invention also is of methods of making such solar collectors.

  20. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  1. Investigation of Orbital Debris Impacts on Shuttle Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.; Kerr, Justin H.; Lyons, Frankel; Herrin, Jason H.; Ryan, Shannon J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents the data collected from two hypervelocity micro-meteoroid orbital debris (MMOD) impact events where the shuttle payload bay door radiator sandwich panel was completely perforated. Scanning Electron Microscope/Energy-Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analysis of impact residue provided evidence to identify the source of each impact. Impact site features that indicate projectile directionality are discussed, along with hypervelocity impact testing on representative samples conducted to simulate the impact event. The paper provides results of a study of impact risks for the size of particles that caused the MMOD damage and the regions of the orbiter vehicle that would be vulnerable to an equivalent projectile

  2. Forced vibration of a shear thickening fluid sandwich beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Minghai; Hu, Gang; Jin, Lu; Lin, Kun; Zou, Dujian

    2016-05-01

    The forced vibration of a sandwich beam integrating a shear thickening fluid (STF) core and with conductive skins subjected to a periodic excitation was investigated theoretically in this study. The rheological properties of the STF material including viscosity, plasticity, and elasticity may be changed under the periodic vibration, and hence they were considered. The governing equation of motion was derived based on the complex stiffness method and some key parameters were derived based on the Timoshenko beam theory. Effects of the excitation frequency, the excitation amplitude, the excitation location, and the skin/core thickness ratio on the nature frequency of the sandwich beam were investigated. It was found that the STF core has a significant effect on the dynamic property of the sandwich beam. Based on the findings, integrating the STF core in a sandwich beam can reduce the vibration of the beam.

  3. The sandwich model: the 'music and dance' of therapeutic action.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alexandra M

    2014-04-01

    My premise is that a 'layered' approach is necessary to understand the process of exchanges that result in therapeutic change. I imagine these processes occurring in three layers - although the number of domains in which change is taking place is actually infinite - such as in a sandwich. The top layer, or top slice of bread of the sandwich, represents a broad view of the change process; it is non-linear and includes the feature of uncertainty, a general principle of dynamic systems theory. The middle layer, or the meat of the sandwich, is explained by theories that are immediately and clinically useful to a therapist, such as psychoanalytic theories. These are primarily linear theories and use language and symbols to 'tell a story of what happened'. The bottom layer, or bottom slice of bread of the sandwich, is the micro-process; this layer includes the moment-to-moment patterns of coordinated rhythms that both communicate meaning and provide the essential scaffold for all higher-level change processes. The micro-process also requires a non-linear theory to make sense of its variability and emergent properties. Taking a bite out of the sandwich will include a 'polysemic bundle of communicative behaviors' (Harrison and Tronick, 2011). I will illustrate the 'sandwich model' with the clinical case of the analytic treatment of a 5 year-old boy.

  4. Harvesting energy from the sun---photovoltaic panel apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, David; Schier, Walter

    2011-04-01

    Two 11 cm x 18 cm photovoltaic panels are mounted on a modified ballistic pendulum apparatus that was retired from service in our labs. Its heavy base with pivoted arm provides a stable mount with angle adjustment. Residential PV panel installations group the panels both in series and in parallel, extract maximum power from these groupings, and deal with varying intensity due to changing light conditions. Measurements in the undergraduate lab with a bare light bulb simultaneously provide characteristic graphs of current vs voltage, power vs voltage, load resistance vs voltage for PV panels singly, in series, or in parallel. Also intensity dependence on angle and on distance to the light source are studied in the lab. A custom junction box with a variable load resistor connects the PV panels to PASCO's interface box with voltage and current leads. PASCO's Data Studio is used to record and analyze the graphs.

  5. Fabrication of mucoadhesive chitosan coated polyvinylpyrrolidone/cyclodextrin/clotrimazole sandwich patches for oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Tonglairoum, Prasopchai; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Panomsuk, Suwanee; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to fabricate clotrimazole (CZ)-composite sandwich nanofibers using electrospinning. The CZ-loaded polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) fiber was coated with chitosan-cysteine (CS-SH)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to increase the mucoadhesive properties and to achieve a sustained release of the drug from the nanofibers. The nanofibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The nanofibers mechanical and mucoadhesive properties, drug release, antifungal activity and cytotoxicity were also assessed. The fibers were in the nanoscale with good mucoadhesive properties. The XRPD revealed a molecular dispersion of amorphous CZ in the nanofibers. The initial fast release of CZ from the nanofibers was achieved. Moreover, the sandwich nanofibers coated for longer times resulted in slower release rates compared with the shorter coating times. The CZ-loaded nanofibers killed the Candida significantly faster than the commercial CZ lozenges at 5, 15 and 30 min and were safe for a 2-h incubation. Therefore, these nanofibers may be promising candidates for the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:26256338

  6. Damage Behaviors of Foam Sandwiched Composite Materials Under Quasi-Static Three-point Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fa; Mohmmed, Ramadan; Sun, Baozhong; Gu, Bohong

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the quasi-static three-point bending damage behaviors of foam sandwiched composites in finite element analyses (FEA) and experimental. Finite element calculations were performed to characterize the static response of foam sandwich composites with different ply angle face sheets. Quasi-static three-point bending tests were conducted with a MTS materials testing system to obtain the load-displacement curves and energy absorption under quasi-static bending. A crushable foam model was used in order to explore the mechanical behaviors of core materials, while the Hashin criterion was employed to predict the failure of the face sheets. The load-displacement curves show a satisfactory agreement between the experimental and numerical results. The finite element calculations can also be used to obtain the failure mode included the core damage, face sheet damage and face-core interface damage. It can be observed that the damage at the core material can be classified as either core cracking or core crushing. The damage of the face sheet was through matrix cracking and delamination, with fiber breakage. The significant indentation occurs as a result of the fiber breakage. The face-core interface crack was typically induced by the cracks initiated from the tensile side and propagated to the compressive side.

  7. Fabrication of mucoadhesive chitosan coated polyvinylpyrrolidone/cyclodextrin/clotrimazole sandwich patches for oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Tonglairoum, Prasopchai; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Panomsuk, Suwanee; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to fabricate clotrimazole (CZ)-composite sandwich nanofibers using electrospinning. The CZ-loaded polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) fiber was coated with chitosan-cysteine (CS-SH)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to increase the mucoadhesive properties and to achieve a sustained release of the drug from the nanofibers. The nanofibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The nanofibers mechanical and mucoadhesive properties, drug release, antifungal activity and cytotoxicity were also assessed. The fibers were in the nanoscale with good mucoadhesive properties. The XRPD revealed a molecular dispersion of amorphous CZ in the nanofibers. The initial fast release of CZ from the nanofibers was achieved. Moreover, the sandwich nanofibers coated for longer times resulted in slower release rates compared with the shorter coating times. The CZ-loaded nanofibers killed the Candida significantly faster than the commercial CZ lozenges at 5, 15 and 30 min and were safe for a 2-h incubation. Therefore, these nanofibers may be promising candidates for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  8. Outbrief - Long Life Rocket Engine Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jason Eugene

    2004-01-01

    This white paper is an overview of the JANNAF Long Life Rocket Engine (LLRE) Panel results from the last several years of activity. The LLRE Panel has met over the last several years in order to develop an approach for the development of long life rocket engines. Membership for this panel was drawn from a diverse set of the groups currently working on rocket engines (Le. government labs, both large and small companies and university members). The LLRE Panel was formed in order to determine the best way to enable the design of rocket engine systems that have life capability greater than 500 cycles while meeting or exceeding current performance levels (Specific Impulse and Thrust/Weight) with a 1/1,OOO,OOO likelihood of vehicle loss due to rocket system failure. After several meetings and much independent work the panel reached a consensus opinion that the primary issues preventing LLRE are a lack of: physics based life prediction, combined loads prediction, understanding of material microphysics, cost effective system level testing. and the inclusion of fabrication process effects into physics based models. With the expected level of funding devoted to LLRE development, the panel recommended that fundamental research efforts focused on these five areas be emphasized.

  9. Advanced beaded and tubular structural panels. Volume 1: Design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to exploit the efficiency of curved elements in the design of lightweight structural panels under combined loads of axial compression, inplane shear, and bending. Data cover analytical procedures for optimum panel design, static strength analyses, results of panel design studies, and correlation of theory with test results.

  10. A Refined Zigzag Beam Theory for Composite and Sandwich Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Sciuva, Marco Di; Gherlone, Marco

    2009-01-01

    A new refined theory for laminated composite and sandwich beams that contains the kinematics of the Timoshenko Beam Theory as a proper baseline subset is presented. This variationally consistent theory is derived from the virtual work principle and employs a novel piecewise linear zigzag function that provides a more realistic representation of the deformation states of transverse-shear flexible beams than other similar theories. This new zigzag function is unique in that it vanishes at the top and bottom bounding surfaces of a beam. The formulation does not enforce continuity of the transverse shear stress across the beam s cross-section, yet is robust. Two major shortcomings that are inherent in the previous zigzag theories, shear-force inconsistency and difficulties in simulating clamped boundary conditions, and that have greatly limited the utility of these previous theories are discussed in detail. An approach that has successfully resolved these shortcomings is presented herein. Exact solutions for simply supported and cantilevered beams subjected to static loads are derived and the improved modelling capability of the new zigzag beam theory is demonstrated. In particular, extensive results for thick beams with highly heterogeneous material lay-ups are discussed and compared with corresponding results obtained from elasticity solutions, two other zigzag theories, and high-fidelity finite element analyses. Comparisons with the baseline Timoshenko Beam Theory are also presented. The comparisons clearly show the improved accuracy of the new, refined zigzag theory presented herein over similar existing theories. This new theory can be readily extended to plate and shell structures, and should be useful for obtaining relatively low-cost, accurate estimates of structural response needed to design an important class of high-performance aerospace structures.

  11. Microgravity Science Research Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Bradley M.; Trinh, Eugene H.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Larson, David; Koss, Matthew; Ostrach, Simon

    2000-01-01

    This document is a transcription of the Microgravity Science Research Panel's discussion about their research and about some of the contributions that they feel have been important to the field during their time with the program. The panel includes Dr. Eugene Trinh, Dr. Lawrence DeLucas, Dr. Charles Bugg, Dr. David Larson, and Dr. Simon Ostrach.

  12. Technology Panel Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented from five technology panels which convened to identify relevant technologies within their discipline for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) and to assess the current and projected state of these technologies. The five panels considered the following topics: optics, materials and structure, sensing and control, science instruments, and systems and missions.

  13. Panel 5: Microbiology and Immunology Panel

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Barenkamp, Stephen; Kyd, Jennelle; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Patel, Janak A.; Heikkinen, Terho; Yamanaka, Noboru; Ogra, Pearay; Swords, W. Edward; Sih, Tania; Pettigrew, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective is to perform a comprehensive review of the literature from January 2007 through June 2011 on the virology, bacteriology, and immunology related to otitis media. Data Sources PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine. Review Methods Three subpanels with co-chairs comprising experts in the virology, bacteriology, and immunology of otitis media were formed. Each of the panels reviewed the literature in their respective fields and wrote draft reviews. The reviews were shared with all panel members, and a second draft was created. The entire panel met at the 10th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media in June 2011 and discussed the review and refined the content further. A final draft was created, circulated, and approved by the panel. Conclusion Excellent progress has been made in the past 4 years in advancing an understanding of the microbiology and immunology of otitis media. Advances include laboratory-based basic studies, cell-based assays, work in animal models, and clinical studies. Implications for Practice The advances of the past 4 years formed the basis of a series of short-term and long-term research goals in an effort to guide the field. Accomplishing these goals will provide opportunities for the development of novel interventions, including new ways to better treat and prevent otitis media. PMID:23536533

  14. ICFA neutrino panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2015-07-15

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: <<>>In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel’s findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel’s initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  15. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

  16. Aerosol Deposition and Solar Panel Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Rollings, A.; Taylor, S. J.; Parks, J.; Barnard, J.; Holmes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Passive and active solar collector farms are often located in relatively dry desert regions where cloudiness impacts are minimized. These farms may be susceptible to reduced performance due to routine or episodic aerosol deposition on collector surfaces. Intense episodes of wind blown dust deposition may negatively impact farm performance, and trigger need to clean collector surfaces. Aerosol deposition rate depends on size, morphology, and local meteorological conditions. We have developed a system for solar panel performance testing under real world conditions. Two identical 0.74 square meter solar panels are deployed, with one kept clean while the other receives various doses of aerosol deposition or other treatments. A variable load is used with automation to record solar panel maximum output power every 10 minutes. A collocated sonic anemometer measures wind at 10 Hz, allowing for both steady and turbulent characterization to establish a link between wind patterns and particle distribution on the cells. Multispectral photoacoustic instruments measure aerosol light scattering and absorption. An MFRSR quantifies incoming solar radiation. Solar panel albedo is measured along with the transmission spectra of particles collected on the panel surface. Key questions are: At what concentration does aerosol deposition become a problem for solar panel performance? What are the meteorological conditions that most strongly favor aerosol deposition, and are these predictable from current models? Is it feasible to use the outflow from an unmanned aerial vehicle hovering over solar panels to adequately clean their surface? Does aerosol deposition from episodes of nearby forest fires impact performance? The outlook of this research is to build a model that describes environmental effects on solar panel performance. Measurements from summer and fall 2015 will be presented along with insights gleaned from them.

  17. Finite element buckling and postbuckling solutions for multilayered composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1995-01-01

    A study is made of the buckling and postbuckling responses of flat, unstiffened composite panels subjected to various combinations of mechanical and thermal loads. The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation von Karman-type plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the strain components, stress resultants and the generalized displacements of the plate. The stability boundary, postbuckling response and the sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the buckling and postbuckling responses to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented for both solid panels and panels with central circular cutouts. The results show the effects of the variations in the fiber orientation angels, aspect ratio of the panel, and the hole diameter (for panels with cutouts) on the stability boundary, postbuckling response and sensitivity coefficients.

  18. Ebolavirus Nucleoprotein C-Termini Potently Attract Single Domain Antibodies Enabling Monoclonal Affinity Reagent Sandwich Assay (MARSA) Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Antigen detection assays can play an important part in environmental surveillance and diagnostics for emerging threats. We are interested in accelerating assay formulation; targeting the agents themselves to bypass requirements for a priori genome information or surrogates. Previously, using in vitro affinity reagent selection on Marburg virus we rapidly established monoclonal affinity reagent sandwich assay (MARSA) where one recombinant antibody clone was both captor and tracer for polyvalent nucleoprotein (NP). Hypothesizing that the closely related Ebolavirus genus may share the same Achilles' heel, we redirected the scheme to see whether similar assays could be delivered and began to explore their mechanism. Methods and Findings In parallel we selected panels of llama single domain antibodies (sdAb) from a semi-synthetic library against Zaire, Sudan, Ivory Coast, and Reston Ebola viruses. Each could perform as both captor and tracer in the same antigen sandwich capture assay thereby forming MARSAs. All sdAb were specific for NP and those tested required the C-terminal domain for recognition. Several clones were cross-reactive, indicating epitope conservation across the Ebolavirus genus. Analysis of two immune shark sdAb revealed they also targeted the C-terminal domain, and could be similarly employed, yet were less sensitive than a comparable llama sdAb despite stemming from immune selections. Conclusions The C-terminal domain of Ebolavirus NP is a strong attractant for antibodies and enables sensitive sandwich immunoassays to be rapidly generated using a single antibody clone. The polyvalent nature of nucleocapsid borne NP and display of the C-terminal region likely serves as a bountiful affinity sink during selections, and a highly avid target for subsequent immunoassay capture. Combined with the high degree of amino acid conservation through 37 years and across wide geographies, this domain makes an ideal handle for monoclonal affinity reagent

  19. Make Your Own Solar Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students make a simulated solar panel to learn about the principles behind energy production using solar panels. Provides information about how solar panels function to produce energy. (MCO)

  20. Selective Reinforcement to Enhance the Structural Performance of Metallic Compression Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of the influence of selective reinforcement on metallic panels with cutouts was conducted. Selective reinforcement was shown to be a weight effective concept for increasing structural performance of panels with cutouts designed to carry loads into the post-buckled regime. For instance, a selectively reinforced aluminum panel under shear load exhibited a 68 percent increase in specific-buckling load as compared to a geometrically comparable unreinforced aluminum panel. In comparison, a quasi-isotropic carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer composite panel only produced a 45 percent higher specific-buckling load than the same unreinforced aluminum panel. Selective reinforcement offers the potential to tailor structural response through local strengthening and stiffening the structure for a broad range of structural application.

  1. Flutter Research on Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordes, Eldon E.; Tuovila, Weimer J.; Guy, Lawrence D.

    1960-01-01

    Representative experimental results are presented to show the current status of the panel flutter problem. Results are presented for unstiffened rectangular panels and for rectangular panels stiffened by corrugated backing. Flutter boundaries are established for all types of panels when considered on the basis of equivalent isotropic plates. The effects of Mach number, differential pressure, and aerodynamic heating on panel flutter are discussed. A flutter analysis of orthotropic panels is presented in the appendix.

  2. Investigation of the Behavior of Thin-Walled Panels with Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podorozhny, A. A.

    1946-01-01

    The present paper deals with the computation and methods of reinforcement of stiffened panels with cutouts under bending loads such as are applied to the sides of a fuselage. A comparison is maade between the computed and test results. Results are presented of tests on panels with cutouts under tensile and compressive loads.

  3. A Damage Tolerance Comparison of Composite Hat-Stiffened and Honeycomb Sandwich Structure for Launch Vehicle Interstage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a direct comparison of the compression-after-impact (CAI) strength of impact-damaged, hat-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich structure for launch vehicle use was made. The specimens used consisted of small substructure designed to carry a line load of approx..3,000 lb/in. Damage was inflicted upon the specimens via drop weight impact. Infrared thermography was used to examine the extent of planar damage in the specimens. The specimens were prepared for compression testing to obtain residual compression strength versus damage severity curves. Results show that when weight of the structure is factored in, both types of structure had about the same CAI strength for a given damage level. The main difference was that the hat-stiffened specimens exhibited a multiphase failure whereas the honeycomb sandwich structure failed catastrophically.

  4. POPOVER Review Panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Davito, A.; Baker, C.J.; King, C.J.; Costerus, B.; Nelson, T.; Prokosch, D.; Pastrnak, J.; Grace, P.

    1996-04-10

    The POPOVER series of high explosive (HE) certification tests was conducted at the Big Explosives Experimental Facility (BEEF) in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The two primary objectives of POPOVER were to certify that: (1) BEEF meets DOE requirements for explosives facilities and is safe for personnel-occupied operations during testing of large charges of conventional HE. (2) Facility structures and equipment will function as intended when subjected to the effects of these charges. After careful analysis of test results, the POPOVER Review Panel concludes that the POPOVER series met both objectives. Further details on the Review Panel`s conclusions are included in Section 7--Findings and Recommendations.

  5. Effect of Porosity Content of Arc-Sprayed Alloy 625 Skins on the Flexural Behavior of Nickel Foam Core Sandwich Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati, S.; Pershin, L.; Coyle, T. W.; Mostaghimi, J.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic foam core sandwich structures have been of particular interest for engineering applications in recent decades because of their unique mechanical and physical properties. Thermal spraying techniques have been recently introduced as a novel low-cost method for production of these structures with complex shapes. One of the potential applications of the metallic foam core sandwich structures prepared by thermal spray techniques is as heat shield devices. Open porosity in the microstructure of the coating may allow the cooling efficiency of the heat shield to be improved through the film cooling phenomenon. A modified twin wire-arc spraying process was employed to deposit high temperature resistant alloy 625 coatings with a high percentage of the open porosity. The effect of skin porosity on the mechanical properties (flexural rigidity) of the sandwich structures was studied using a four-point bending test. It was concluded from the four-point bending test results that increase in the porosity content of the coatings leads to decrease in the flexural rigidity of the sandwich panels. The ductility of the porous and conventional arc-sprayed alloy 625 coatings was improved after heat treatment at 1100 °C for 3 h.

  6. Sound transmission through triple-panel structures lined with poroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, previous theories on the prediction of sound transmission loss for a double-panel structure lined with poroelastic materials are extended to address the problem of a triple-panel structure. Six typical configurations are considered for a triple-panel structure based on the method of coupling the porous layers to the facing panels which determines critically the sound insulation performance of the system. The transfer matrix method is employed to solve the system by applying appropriate types of boundary conditions for these configurations. The transmission loss of the triple-panel structures in a diffuse sound field is calculated as a function of frequency and compared with that of corresponding double-panel structures. Generally, the triple-panel structure with poroelastic linings has superior acoustic performance to the double-panel counterpart, remarkably in the mid-high frequency range and possibly at low frequencies, by selecting appropriate configurations in which those with two air gaps in the structure exhibit the best overall performance over the entire frequency range. The poroelastic lining significantly lowers the cut-on frequency above which the triple-panel structure exhibits noticeably higher transmission loss. Compared with a double-panel structure, the wider range of system parameters for a triple-panel structure due to the additional partition provides more design space for tuning the sound insulation performance. Despite the increased structural complexity, the triple-panel structure lined with poroelastic materials has the obvious advantages in sound transmission loss while without the penalties in weight and volume, and is hence a promising replacement for the widely used double-panel sandwich structure.

  7. Evaluation of Sandwich Structure Bonding In Out-of-Autoclave Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Baughman, James M.; Zimmerman, Thomas J.; Sutter, James K.; Gardner, John M.

    2010-01-01

    The out-of-autoclave-vacuum-bag-only (OOA-VBO) process is low in capital expenditures compared to the traditional autoclave, however, the material challenges for OOA-VBO workable material systems are high. Presently there are few such aerospace grade prepreg materials available commercially. In this study, we evaluated processing and properties of honeycomb sandwich structure (HC/SS) panels fabricated by co-curing composite face sheet with adhesives by the OOA-VBO process in an oven. The prepreg materials were IM7/MTM 45-1 and T40-800B/5320. Adhesives studied were AF-555M, XMTA-241/PM15, FM-309-1M and FM-300K. Aluminum H/C cores with and without perforations were included. It was found that adhesives in IM7/MTM 45-1/AF-555M, T40-800B/5320/FM 309-1M and T40-800B/5320/FM-300K panels all foamed but yielded high flatwise tensile (FWT) strength values above 8,275 kPA (1,200 psi). IM7/MTM 45-1/XMTA-241/PM15 did not foam, yet yielded a low FWT strength. SEM photomicrographs revealed that the origin of this low strength was poor adhesion in the interfaces between the adhesive and face sheet composite due to poor wetting associated with the high initial viscosity of the XMTA-241/PM15 adhesive.

  8. A new rate-dependent unidirectional composite model - Application to panels subjected to underwater blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoding; de Vaucorbeil, Alban; Tran, Phuong; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we developed a finite element fluid-structure interaction model to understand the deformation and failure mechanisms of both monolithic and sandwich composite panels. A new failure criterion that includes strain-rate effects was formulated and implemented to simulate different damage modes in unidirectional glass fiber/matrix composites. The laminate model uses Hashin's fiber failure criterion and a modified Tsai-Wu matrix failure criterion. The composite moduli are degraded using five damage variables, which are updated in the post-failure regime by means of a linear softening law governed by an energy release criterion. A key feature in the formulation is the distinction between fiber rupture and pull-out by introducing a modified fracture toughness, which varies from a fiber tensile toughness to a matrix tensile toughness as a function of the ratio of longitudinal normal stress to effective shear stress. The delamination between laminas is modeled by a strain-rate sensitive cohesive law. In the case of sandwich panels, core compaction is modeled by a crushable foam plasticity model with volumetric hardening and strain-rate sensitivity. These constitutive descriptions were used to predict deformation histories, fiber/matrix damage patterns, and inter-lamina delamination, for both monolithic and sandwich composite panels subjected to underwater blast. The numerical predictions were compared with experimental observations. We demonstrate that the new rate dependent composite damage model captures the spatial distribution and magnitude of damage significantly more accurately than previously developed models.

  9. Sound Transmission through Two Concentric Cylindrical Sandwich Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper solves the problem of sound transmission through a system of two infinite concentric cylindrical sandwich shells. The shells are surrounded by external and internal fluid media and there is fluid (air) in the annular space between them. An oblique plane sound wave is incident upon the surface of the outer shell. A uniform flow is moving with a constant velocity in the external fluid medium. Classical thin shell theory is applied to the inner shell and first-order shear deformation theory is applied to the outer shell. A closed form for transmission loss is derived based on modal analysis. Investigations have been made for the impedance of both shells and the transmission loss through the shells from the exterior into the interior. Results are compared for double sandwich shells and single sandwich shells. This study shows that: (1) the impedance of the inner shell is much smaller than that of the outer shell so that the transmission loss is almost the same in both the annular space and the interior cavity of the shells; (2) the two concentric sandwich shells can produce an appreciable increase of transmission loss over single sandwich shells especially in the high frequency range; and (3) design guidelines may be derived with respect to the noise reduction requirement and the pressure in the annular space at a mid-frequency range.

  10. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    A comprehensive metabolic panel is a group of blood tests. They provide an overall picture of your body's chemical balance and metabolism. Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes ...

  11. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  12. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  13. Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page helpful? Also known as: CMP; Chem 12; Chemistry Panel; Chemistry Screen; SMA 12; SMA 20; SMAC (somewhat outdated ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  14. BMP (Basic Metabolic Panel)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Was this page helpful? Also known as: BMP; Chemistry Panel; Chemistry Screen; Chem 7; SMA 7; SMAC7 (somewhat outdated ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  15. A Double-Sandwich ELISA for Identification of Monoclonal Antibodies Suitable for Sandwich Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Stanker, Larry H; Hnasko, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The sandwich immunoassay (sELISA) is an invaluable technique for concentrating, detecting, and quantifying target antigens. The two critical components required are a capture antibody and a detection antibody, each binding a different epitope on the target antigen. The specific antibodies incorporated into the test define most of the performance parameters of any subsequent immunoassay regardless of the assay format: traditional ELISA, lateral-flow immunoassay, various bead-based assays, antibody-based biosensors, or the reporting label. Here we describe an approach for identifying monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) suitable for use as capture antibodies and detector antibodies in a sELISA targeting bacterial protein toxins. The approach was designed for early identification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), in the initial hybridoma screen.

  16. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49/epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels were inspected and found to be performing satisfactorily after two years flight service on an Eastern and an Air Canada L-1011. Six panels are on each aircraft including sandwich and solid laminate wing-body panels, and 300 F service aft engine fairings. Some of the panels were removed from the aircraft to permit inspection of inner surfaces and fastener hole conditions. Minor defects such as surface cracks due to impact damage, small delaminated areas, elongation and fraying of fastener holes, were noted. None of these defects were considered serious enough to warrant corrective action in the opinion of airline personnel. The defects are typical for the most part of defects noted on similar fiberglass parts.

  17. Fire containment tests of aircraft interior panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Leon, H. A.; Williamson, R. B.; Hasegawa, H.; Fisher, F.; Draemel, R.; Marcussen, W. H.; Hilado, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an experimental program carried out to evaluate a possible method for testing the fire-containment qualities of aircraft interior panels. The experimental apparatus consisted of a burner that simulates various fire loads under different ventilation conditions in an enclosure of approximately the same size as an aircraft lavatory module. Two fire-containment tests are discussed in which two adjoining walls of the enclosure were made from state-of-the-art composite panels; rats were exposed to the combustion products in order to evaluate the toxic threat posed by those products. The results show that the burner can be employed to represent various fire-load conditions and that the methodology developed for fire containment can be useful in evaluating the fire resistance of composite panels before conducting large-scale tests. It is concluded that elements of the fire-containment criteria include the temperature rise on the backface of the panels as a function of time, the flame burn-through by either decomposition or severe distortion of the material, and the toxicity of the combustion gases evolved.

  18. Pop-Art Panels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    James Rosenquist's giant Pop-art panels included realistic renderings of well-known contemporary foods and objects, juxtaposed with famous people in the news--largely from the 1960s, '70s and '80s--and really serve as visual time capsules. In this article, eighth-graders focus on the style of James Rosenquist to create their own Pop-art panel that…

  19. Photovoltaic panel support assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.M.; Underwood, J.C.; Shingleton, J.

    1993-07-20

    A solar energy electrical power source is described comprising in combination at least two flat photovoltaic panels disposed side-by-side in co-planar relation with one another, a pivot shaft extending transversely across the panels, at least two supports spaced apart lengthwise of the pivot shaft, means for connecting the pivot shaft to the at least two supports, attachment means for connecting the at least two panels to the pivot shaft so that the panels can pivot about the longitudinal axis of the shaft, coupling means mechanically coupling all of the panels together so as to form a unified flat array, and selectively operable drive means for mechanically pivoting the unified flat array about the axis; wherein each of the flat photovoltaic panels comprises at least two modules each comprising a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells, the at least two modules being aligned along a line extending at a right angle to the pivot shaft, and the coupling means comprises (a) an elongate member extending parallel to and spaced from the pivot shaft and (b) means for attaching the elongate member to the panels; and further wherein each flat photovoltaic panel comprises a unitary frame consisting of a pair of end frame members extending parallel to the pivot shaft, a pair of side frame members extending between and connected to the end frame members, and a pair of spaced apart cross frame members, with one of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and a first one of each of the end and cross frame members, and the other of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and the second one of each of the end and cross frame members, whereby the gap created by the spaced apart cross frame members allow air to pass between them in order to reduce the sail effect when the solar array is subjected to buffeting winds.

  20. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  1. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  2. Hexagon solar power panel

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Irwin

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy panel comprises a support upon which silicon cells are arrayed. The cells are wafer thin and of two geometrical types, both of the same area and electrical rating, namely hexagon cells and hourglass cells. The hourglass cells are composites of half hexagons. A near perfect nesting relationship of the cells achieves a high density packing whereby optimum energy production per panel area is achieved.

  3. Test results from large wing and fuselage panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Ram C.; Voldman, Mike

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the first results in an assessment of the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance of stiffened wing and fuselage subcomponents. Under this NASA funded program, 10 large wing and fuselage panels, variously fabricated by automated tow placement and dry-stitched preform/resin transfer molding, are to be tested. The first test of an automated tow placement six-longeron fuselage panel under shear load was completed successfully. Using NASTRAN finite-element analysis the stiffness of the panel in the linear range prior to buckling was predicted within 3.5 percent. A nonlinear analysis predicted the buckling load within 10 percent and final failure load within 6 percent. The first test of a resin transfer molding six-stringer wing panel under compression was also completed. The panel failed unexpectedly in buckling because of inadequate supporting structure. The average strain was 0.43 percent with a line load of 20.3 kips per inch of width. This strain still exceeds the design allowable strains. Also, the stringers did not debond before failure, which is in contrast to the general behavior of unstitched panels.

  4. Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Stiffened Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Collier, Craig S.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    A new progressive failure analysis capability for stiffened composite panels has been developed based on the combination of the HyperSizer stiffened panel design/analysis/optimization software with the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC). MAC/GMC discretizes a composite material s microstructure into a number of subvolumes and solves for the stress and strain state in each while providing the homogenized composite properties as well. As a result, local failure criteria may be employed to predict local subvolume failure and the effects of these local failures on the overall composite response. When combined with HyperSizer, MAC/GMC is employed to represent the ply level composite material response within the laminates that constitute a stiffened panel. The effects of local subvolume failures can then be tracked as loading on the stiffened panel progresses. Sample progressive failure results are presented at both the composite laminate and the composite stiffened panel levels. Deformation and failure model predictions are compared with experimental data from the World Wide Failure Exercise for AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates.

  5. Sandwich complex-containing macromolecules: property tunability through versatile synthesis.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola

    2014-03-01

    Sandwich complexes feature unique properties as the physical and electronic properties of a hydrocarbon ligand or its derivative are integrated into the physical, electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of a metal. Incorporation of these complexes into macromolecules results in intriguing physical, electrical, and optical properties that were hitherto unknown in organic-based macromolecules. These properties are tunable through well-designed synthetic strategies. This review surveys many of the synthetic approaches that have resulted in tuning the properties of sandwich complex-containing macromolecules. While the past two decades have seen an ever-growing number of research publications in this field, gaps remain to be filled. Thus, we expect this review to stimulate research interest towards bridging these gaps, which include the insolubility of some of these macromolecules as well as expanding the scope of the sandwich complexes.

  6. Vibration analysis and optimization of sandwich composite with curvilinear fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, S.; Narita, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper develops a shell element based on the refined zigzag theory (RZT) and applies it to the vibration analysis and optimization problem of the composite sandwich plate composed of CFRP skins and soft-cores. The RZT accepts large differences in layer stiffness, and requires less calculation effort than the layer-wise or three-dimensional theories. Numerical results revealed that the present method predicts vibration characteristics of composite sandwich plates with soft-core accurately. Then, shapes of reinforcing fibers in CFRP composite skins are optimized to maximize fundamental frequencies. As an optimizer, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach is employed since curvilinear fiber shapes are defined by continuous design variables. Obtained results showed that the composite sandwich with optimum curvilinear fiber shapes indicates higher fundamental frequencies compared with straight fibers.

  7. ['Sandwich PhD': considerations for a successful experience abroad].

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Marina de Goes; Bueno, Mariana; Gastaldo, Denise; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos

    2013-03-01

    International PhD internship, named "Sandwich PhD" in Brazil is an opportunity to improve research abilities, to become known in academic area and to establish and/or increase work opportunities in an international context. In this article, we describe key factors regarding the planning and development of the "Sandwich PhD" as experienced by professors and students involved in the collaboration between the School of Nursing, University of São Paulo and Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Canada. We also present the participation of PhD students' network as an alternative to the "Sandwich PhD". An international experience, when well-planned and developed correctly, promotes students' personal and professional development and favors the internationalization of Brazilian graduate programs and research groups.

  8. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During 1997, the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) continued its safety reviews of NASA's human space flight and aeronautics programs. Efforts were focused on those areas that the Panel believed held the greatest potential to impact safety. Continuing safe Space Shuttle operations and progress in the manufacture and testing of primary components for the International Space Station (ISS) were noteworthy. The Panel has continued to monitor the safety implications of the transition of Space Shuttle operations to the United Space Alliance (USA). One area being watched closely relates to the staffing levels and skill mix in both NASA and USA. Therefore, a section of this report is devoted to personnel and other related issues that are a result of this change in NASA's way of doing business for the Space Shuttle. Attention will continue to be paid to this important topic in subsequent reports. Even though the Panel's activities for 1997 were extensive, fewer specific recommendations were formulated than has been the case in recent years. This is indicative of the current generally good state of safety of NASA programs. The Panel does, however, have several longer term concerns that have yet to develop to the level of a specific recommendation. These are covered in the introductory material for each topic area in Section 11. In another departure from past submissions, this report does not contain individual findings and recommendations for the aeronautics programs. While the Panel devoted its usual efforts to examining NASA's aeronautic centers and programs, no specific recommendations were identified for inclusion in this report. In lieu of recommendations, a summary of the Panel's observations of NASA's safety efforts in aeronautics and future Panel areas of emphasis is provided. With profound sadness the Panel notes the passing of our Chairman, Paul M. Johnstone, on December 17, 1997, and our Staff Assistant, Ms. Patricia M. Harman, on October 5, 1997. Other

  9. Debonding Stress Concentrations in a Pressurized Lobed Sandwich-Walled Generic Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2004-01-01

    A finite-element stress analysis has been conducted on a lobed composite sandwich tank subjected to internal pressure and cryogenic cooling. The lobed geometry consists of two obtuse circular walls joined together with a common flat wall. Under internal pressure and cryogenic cooling, this type of lobed tank wall will experience open-mode (a process in which the honeycomb is stretched in the depth direction) and shear stress concentrations at the junctures where curved wall changes into flat wall (known as a curve-flat juncture). Open-mode and shear stress concentrations occur in the honeycomb core at the curve-flat junctures and could cause debonding failure. The levels of contributions from internal pressure and temperature loading to the open-mode and shear debonding failure are compared. The lobed fuel tank with honeycomb sandwich walls has been found to be a structurally unsound geometry because of very low debonding failure strengths. The debonding failure problem could be eliminated if the honeycomb core at the curve-flat juncture is replaced with a solid core.

  10. Evaluation of a Highly Anticlastic Panel with Tow Overlaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Gurdal, Zafer

    2007-01-01

    A rectangular, variable-stiffness panel with tow overlaps was manufactured using an advanced tow placement machine. The cured panel had large anticlastic imperfections, with measured amplitudes of over two times the average panel thickness. These imperfections were not due to the overall steered-fiber layup or the tow overlaps, but instead resulted from local asymmetries in the laminate that were caused by a manufacturing oversight. In the nominal panel layup, fiber angles vary linearly from 60 degrees on the panel axial centerline to 30 degrees on the parallel edges. A geometrically nonlinear analysis was performed with a -280 degree Fahrenheit thermal load to simulate the postcure cooldown to room temperature. The predicted geometric imperfections correlated well with the measured panel shape. Unique structural test fixtures were then developed which greatly reduced these imperfections, but they also caused prestresses in the panel. Surface imperfections measured after the panel was installed in the test fixtures were used with nonlinear finite element analyses to predict these fixturing-induced prestresses. These prestresses were also included in structural analyses of panel end compression to failure, and the analytical results compared well with test data when both geometric and material nonlinearities were included.

  11. Buckling Design and Imperfection Sensitivity of Sandwich Composite Launch-Vehicle Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Sleight, David W.; Myers, David E.; Waters, W. Allen, Jr.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Lovejoy, Andrew W.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Composite materials are increasingly being considered and used for launch-vehicle structures. For shell structures, such as interstages, skirts, and shrouds, honeycomb-core sandwich composites are often selected for their structural efficiency. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the structural response, including buckling, of sandwich composite shell structures. Additionally, small geometric imperfections can significantly influence the buckling response, including considerably reducing the buckling load, of shell structures. Thus, both the response of the theoretically perfect structure and the buckling imperfection sensitivity must be considered during the design of such structures. To address the latter, empirically derived design factors, called buckling knockdown factors (KDFs), were developed by NASA in the 1960s to account for this buckling imperfection sensitivity during design. However, most of the test-article designs used in the development of these recommendations are not relevant to modern launch-vehicle constructions and material systems, and in particular, no composite test articles were considered. Herein, a two-part study on composite sandwich shells to (1) examine the relationship between the buckling knockdown factor and the areal mass of optimized designs, and (2) to interrogate the imperfection sensitivity of those optimized designs is presented. Four structures from recent NASA launch-vehicle development activities are considered. First, designs optimized for both strength and stability were generated for each of these structures using design optimization software and a range of buckling knockdown factors; it was found that the designed areal masses varied by between 6.1% and 19.6% over knockdown factors ranging from 0.6 to 0.9. Next, the buckling imperfection sensitivity of the optimized designs is explored using nonlinear finite-element analysis and the as-measured shape of a large-scale composite cylindrical

  12. Prediction of stiffener-skin separation in composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Han-Pin; Mahler, Mary A.; Deo, Ravi B.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology was developed to predict the failure of stiffened composite panels by stiffener-skin separation. The methodology is applicable to curved or flat panels under combined uniaxial compression and in-plane shear loads. The analytical crux of the methodology are two different analysis packages: PACL1, which predicts the stress and displacement fields in a stiffened postbuckled panel; and WEBSTER, which predicts the local interfacial (shear and normal) stresses at the skin and stiffener flange junction. PACL1 is a Rayleigh-Ritz analysis of curved composite panels loaded into a post-buckling range. WEBSTER is a two-dimensional elasticity analysis for the skin-stiffener interface. Results of the predictive methodology are given.

  13. Vibration Response Predictions for Heavy Panel Mounted Components from Panel Acreage Environment Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Phillip; Frady, Greg; Duvall, Lowery; Fulcher, Clay; LaVerde, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The development of new launch vehicles in the Aerospace industry often relies on response measurements taken from previously developed vehicles during various stages of liftoff and ascent, and from wind tunnel models. These measurements include sound pressure levels, dynamic pressures in turbulent boundary layers and accelerations. Rigorous statistical scaling methods are applied to the data to derive new environments and estimate the performance of new skin panel structures. Scaling methods have proven to be reliable, particularly for designs similar to the vehicles used as the basis for scaling, and especially in regions of smooth acreage without exterior protuberances or heavy components mounted to the panel. To account for response attenuation of a panel-mounted component due to its apparent mass at higher frequencies, the vibroacoustics engineer often reduces the acreage vibration according to a weight ratio first suggested by Barrett. The accuracy of the reduction is reduced with increased weight of the panel-mounted component, and does not account for low-frequency amplification of the component/panel response as a system. A method is proposed that combines acreage vibration from scaling methods with finite element analysis to account for the frequency-dependent dynamics of heavy panel-mounted components. Since the acreage and mass-loaded skins respond to the same dynamic input pressure, such pressure may be eliminated in favor of a frequency-dependent scaling function applied to the acreage vibration to predict the mass-loaded panel response. The scaling function replaces the Barrett weight ratio, and contains all of the dynamic character of the loaded and unloaded skin panels. The solution simplifies for spatially uncorrelated and fully correlated input pressures. Since the prediction uses finite element models of the loaded and unloaded skins, a rich suite of response data are available to the design engineer, including interface forces, stress and strain

  14. Optimization of aircraft interior panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Roper, Willard D.

    1986-01-01

    Eight different graphite composite panels were fabricated using four different resin matrices. The resin matrices included Hercules 71775, a blend of vinylpolystyrpyridine and bismaleimide, H795, a bismaleimide, Cycom 6162, a phenolic, and PSP 6022M, a polystyrylpyridine. Graphite panels were fabricated using fabric or unidirectional tape. This report describes the processes for preparing these panels and some of their mechanical, thermal and flammability properties. Panel properties are compared with state-of-the-art epoxy fiberglass composite panels.

  15. Panel methods: An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Larry L.

    1990-01-01

    Panel methods are numerical schemes for solving (the Prandtl-Glauert equation) for linear, inviscid, irrotational flow about aircraft flying at subsonic or supersonic speeds. The tools at the panel-method user's disposal are (1) surface panels of source-doublet-vorticity distributions that can represent nearly arbitrary geometry, and (2) extremely versatile boundary condition capabilities that can frequently be used for creative modeling. Panel-method capabilities and limitations, basic concepts common to all panel-method codes, different choices that were made in the implementation of these concepts into working computer programs, and various modeling techniques involving boundary conditions, jump properties, and trailing wakes are discussed. An approach for extending the method to nonlinear transonic flow is also presented. Three appendices supplement the main test. In appendix 1, additional detail is provided on how the basic concepts are implemented into a specific computer program (PANAIR). In appendix 2, it is shown how to evaluate analytically the fundamental surface integral that arises in the expressions for influence-coefficients, and evaluate its jump property. In appendix 3, a simple example is used to illustrate the so-called finite part of the improper integrals.

  16. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) monitored NASA's activities and provided feedback to the NASA Administrator, other NASA officials and Congress throughout the year. Particular attention was paid to the Space Shuttle, its launch processing and planned and potential safety improvements. The Panel monitored Space Shuttle processing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and will continue to follow it as personnel reductions are implemented. There is particular concern that upgrades in hardware, software, and operations with the potential for significant risk reduction not be overlooked due to the extraordinary budget pressures facing the agency. The authorization of all of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Block II components portends future Space Shuttle operations at lower risk levels and with greater margins for handling unplanned ascent events. Throughout the year, the Panel attempted to monitor the safety activities related to the Russian involvement in both space and aeronautics programs. This proved difficult as the working relationships between NASA and the Russians were still being defined as the year unfolded. NASA's concern for the unique safety problems inherent in a multi-national endeavor appears appropriate. Actions are underway or contemplated which should be capable of identifying and rectifying problem areas. The balance of this report presents 'Findings and Recommendations' (Section 2), 'Information in Support of Findings and Recommendations' (Section 3) and Appendices describing Panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1994 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period (Section 4).

  17. Design, Optimization and Evaluation of Integrally Stiffened Al 7050 Panel with Curved Stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wesley C. H.; Bird, R. Keith; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Havens, David; Norris, Ashley; Olliffe, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A curvilinear stiffened panel was designed, manufactured, and tested in the Combined Load Test Fixture at NASA Langley Research Center. The panel was optimized for minimum mass subjected to constraints on buckling load, yielding, and crippling or local stiffener failure using a new analysis tool named EBF3PanelOpt. The panel was designed for a combined compression-shear loading configuration that is a realistic load case for a typical aircraft wing panel. The panel was loaded beyond buckling and strains and out-of-plane displacements were measured. The experimental data were compared with the strains and out-of-plane deflections from a high fidelity nonlinear finite element analysis and linear elastic finite element analysis of the panel/test-fixture assembly. The numerical results indicated that the panel buckled at the linearly elastic buckling eigenvalue predicted for the panel/test-fixture assembly. The experimental strains prior to buckling compared well with both the linear and nonlinear finite element model.

  18. Nonlinear Analysis and Post-Test Correlation for a Curved PRSEUS Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Kevin; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn; Neal, Albert L.; Linton, Kim, A.; Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, developed by The Boeing Company, has been extensively studied as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA s) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program. The PRSEUS concept provides a light-weight alternative to aluminum or traditional composite design concepts and is applicable to traditional-shaped fuselage barrels and wings, as well as advanced configurations such as a hybrid wing body or truss braced wings. Therefore, NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and The Boeing Company partnered in an effort to assess the performance and damage arrestments capabilities of a PRSEUS concept panel using a full-scale curved panel in the FAA Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility. Testing was conducted in the FASTER facility by subjecting the panel to axial tension loads applied to the ends of the panel, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure loadings. Additionally, reactive hoop loads were applied to the skin and frames of the panel along its edges. The panel successfully supported the required design loads in the pristine condition and with a severed stiffener. The panel also demonstrated that the PRSEUS concept could arrest the progression of damage including crack arrestment and crack turning. This paper presents the nonlinear post-test analysis and correlation with test results for the curved PRSEUS panel. It is shown that nonlinear analysis can accurately calculate the behavior of a PRSEUS panel under tension, pressure and combined loading conditions.

  19. Thermomechanical postbuckling of multilayered composite panels with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The results of a study of the detailed thermomechanical postbuckling response characteristics of flat unstiffened composite panels with central circular cutouts are presented. The panels are subjected to combined temperature changes and applied edge loading (or edge displacements). The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. The postbuckling displacements, transverse shear stresses, transverse shear strain energy density, and their sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the post-buckling response to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented showing the effects of the variations in the hole diameter, laminate stacking sequence, fiber orientation, and aspect ratio of the panel on the thermomechanical postbuckling response and its sensitivity to changes in panel parameters.

  20. Refined Zigzag Theory for Homogeneous, Laminated Composite, and Sandwich Plates: A Homogeneous Limit Methodology for Zigzag Function Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; DiSciuva, Marco; Gherlone, marco

    2010-01-01

    The Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) for homogeneous, laminated composite, and sandwich plates is presented from a multi-scale formalism starting with the inplane displacement field expressed as a superposition of coarse and fine contributions. The coarse kinematic field is that of first-order shear-deformation theory, whereas the fine kinematic field has a piecewise-linear zigzag distribution through the thickness. The condition of limiting homogeneity of transverse-shear properties is proposed and yields four distinct sets of zigzag functions. By examining elastostatic solutions for highly heterogeneous sandwich plates, the best-performing zigzag functions are identified. The RZT predictive capabilities to model homogeneous and highly heterogeneous sandwich plates are critically assessed, demonstrating its superior efficiency, accuracy ; and a wide range of applicability. The present theory, which is derived from the virtual work principle, is well-suited for developing computationally efficient CO-continuous finite elements, and is thus appropriate for the analysis and design of high-performance load-bearing aerospace structures.

  1. Origami of thick panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Origami patterns, including the rigid origami patterns in which flat inflexible sheets are joined by creases, are primarily created for zero-thickness sheets. In order to apply them to fold structures such as roofs, solar panels, and space mirrors, for which thickness cannot be disregarded, various methods have been suggested. However, they generally involve adding materials to or offsetting panels away from the idealized sheet without altering the kinematic model used to simulate folding. We develop a comprehensive kinematic synthesis for rigid origami of thick panels that differs from the existing kinematic model but is capable of reproducing motions identical to that of zero-thickness origami. The approach, proven to be effective for typical origami, can be readily applied to fold real engineering structures.

  2. Oven wall panel construction

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  3. Advanced solar panel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes solar cell panel designs that utilize new hgih efficiency solar cells along with lightweight rigid panel technology. The resulting designs push the W/kg and W/sq m parameters to new high levels. These new designs are well suited to meet the demand for higher performance small satellites. This paper reports on progress made on two SBIR Phase 1 contracts. One panel design involved the use of large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells of 19% efficiency combined with a lightweight rigid graphite fiber epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power level of 60 W/kg with a potential of reaching 80 W/kg. The second panel design involved the use of newly developed high efficiency (22%) dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with an advanced lightweight rigid substrate using aluminum honeycomb core with high strength graphite fiber mesh facesheets. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power of 105 W/kg and 230 W/sq m. This paper will address the construction details of the panels and an a analysis of the component weights. A strawman array design suitable for a typical small-sat mission is described for each of the two panel design technologies being studied. Benefits in respect to weight reduction, area reduction, and system cost reduction are analyzed and compared to conventional arrays.

  4. Detection of entrapped moisture in honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallmark, W. B.

    1967-01-01

    Thermal neutron moisture detection system detects entrapped moisture in intercellular areas of bonded honeycomb sandwich structures. A radium/beryllium fast neutron source bombards a specimen. The emitted thermal neutrons from the target nucleus are detected and counted by a boron trifluoride thermal neutron detector.

  5. Dielectrophoretic behaviours of microdroplet sandwiched between LN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lipin; Li, Shaobei; Fan, Bolin; Yan, Wenbo; Wang, Donghui; Shi, Lihong; Chen, Hongjian; Ban, Dechao; Sun, Shihao

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a sandwich configuration for microfluidic manipulation in LiNbO3 platform based on photovoltaic effect, and the behaviours of dielectric microdroplet under this sandwich configuration are investigated. It is found that the microdroplet can generate in the form of liquid bridge inside the LiNbO3-based sandwich structure under the governing dielectrophoretic force, and the dynamic process of microdroplet generation highly depends on the substrate combinations. Dynamic features found for different combinations are explained by the different electrostatic field distribution basing on the finite-element simulation results. Moreover, the electrostatic field required by the microdroplet generation is estimated through meniscus evolution and it is found in good agreement with the simulated electrostatic field inside the sandwich gap. Several kinds of microdroplet manipulations are attempted in this work. We suggest that the local dielectrophoretic force acting on the microdroplet depends on the distribution of the accumulated irradiation dosage. Without using any additional pumping or jetting actuator, the microdroplet can be step-moved, deformed or patterned by the inconsecutive dot-irradiation scheme, as well as elastically stretched out and back or smoothly guided in a designed pass by the consecutive line-irradiation scheme.

  6. Star cell type core configuration for structural sandwich materials

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    A new pattern for cellular core material used in sandwich type structural materials. The new pattern involves star shaped cells intermixed with hexagonal shaped cells. The new patterned cellular core material includes star shaped cells interconnected at points thereof and having hexagonal shape cells positioned adjacent the star points. The new pattern allows more flexibility and can conform more easily to curved shapes.

  7. Development of biobased sandwich structures for mass transit application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munusamy, Sethu Raaj

    Efforts to increase the biobased content in sandwich composites are being investigated to reduce the dependence on synthetically produced or mined, energy-intensive materials for numerous composite applications. Vegetable oil-based polyurethane foams are gaining recognition as good substitutes for synthetic counter parts while utilizing bast fiber to replace fiberglass is also gaining credence. In this study, soy oil-based polyurethane foam was evaluated as a core in a sandwich construction with facesheets of hybridized kenaf and E-glass fibers in a vinyl ester resin matrix to replace traditionally used plywood sheeting on steel frame for mass transit bus flooring systems. As a first step towards implementation, the static performance of the biobased foam was compared to 100% synthetic foam. Secondly, biobased sandwich structures were processed and their static performance was compared to plywood. The biobased sandwich composites designed and processed were shown to hold promise towards replacing plywood for bus flooring applications by displaying an increase of 130% for flexural strength and 135% for flexural modulus plus better indentation values.

  8. Dielectrophoretic behaviours of microdroplet sandwiched between LN substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lipin; Li, Shaobei; Fan, Bolin; Yan, Wenbo; Wang, Donghui; Shi, Lihong; Chen, Hongjian; Ban, Dechao; Sun, Shihao

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a sandwich configuration for microfluidic manipulation in LiNbO3 platform based on photovoltaic effect, and the behaviours of dielectric microdroplet under this sandwich configuration are investigated. It is found that the microdroplet can generate in the form of liquid bridge inside the LiNbO3-based sandwich structure under the governing dielectrophoretic force, and the dynamic process of microdroplet generation highly depends on the substrate combinations. Dynamic features found for different combinations are explained by the different electrostatic field distribution basing on the finite-element simulation results. Moreover, the electrostatic field required by the microdroplet generation is estimated through meniscus evolution and it is found in good agreement with the simulated electrostatic field inside the sandwich gap. Several kinds of microdroplet manipulations are attempted in this work. We suggest that the local dielectrophoretic force acting on the microdroplet depends on the distribution of the accumulated irradiation dosage. Without using any additional pumping or jetting actuator, the microdroplet can be step-moved, deformed or patterned by the inconsecutive dot-irradiation scheme, as well as elastically stretched out and back or smoothly guided in a designed pass by the consecutive line-irradiation scheme. PMID:27383027

  9. Dielectrophoretic behaviours of microdroplet sandwiched between LN substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lipin; Li, Shaobei; Fan, Bolin; Yan, Wenbo; Wang, Donghui; Shi, Lihong; Chen, Hongjian; Ban, Dechao; Sun, Shihao

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a sandwich configuration for microfluidic manipulation in LiNbO3 platform based on photovoltaic effect, and the behaviours of dielectric microdroplet under this sandwich configuration are investigated. It is found that the microdroplet can generate in the form of liquid bridge inside the LiNbO3-based sandwich structure under the governing dielectrophoretic force, and the dynamic process of microdroplet generation highly depends on the substrate combinations. Dynamic features found for different combinations are explained by the different electrostatic field distribution basing on the finite-element simulation results. Moreover, the electrostatic field required by the microdroplet generation is estimated through meniscus evolution and it is found in good agreement with the simulated electrostatic field inside the sandwich gap. Several kinds of microdroplet manipulations are attempted in this work. We suggest that the local dielectrophoretic force acting on the microdroplet depends on the distribution of the accumulated irradiation dosage. Without using any additional pumping or jetting actuator, the microdroplet can be step-moved, deformed or patterned by the inconsecutive dot-irradiation scheme, as well as elastically stretched out and back or smoothly guided in a designed pass by the consecutive line-irradiation scheme. PMID:27383027

  10. Advanced beaded and tubular structural panels. Volume 2: Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrove, M. D.; Northrop, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to exploit the efficiency of curved elements in the design of lightweight structural panels under combined loads of axial compression, inplane shear, and bending. A summary of the total program (analysis, fabrication and test) is presented in document NASA CR-2514. Detailed descriptions of the analysis effort and of the panel tests are contained in supplementary documents NASA CR-132460 and NASA-CR-132515 respectively. Data are also given on the development of economical fabrication techniques to minimize the effects of fabrication limitations on optimum panel designs.

  11. Fracture Analysis of the FAA/NASA Wide Stiffened Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.; Young, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the fracture analyses conducted on the FAA/NASA stiffened and unstiffened panels using the STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) code with the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. The STAGS code with the "plane-strain" core option was used in all analyses. Previous analyses of wide, flat panels have shown that the high-constraint conditions around a crack front, like plane strain, has to be modeled in order for the critical CTOA fracture criterion to predict wide panel failures from small laboratory tests. In the present study, the critical CTOA value was determined from a wide (unstiffened) panel with anti-buckling guides. The plane-strain core size was estimated from previous fracture analyses and was equal to about the sheet thickness. Rivet flexibility and stiffener failure was based on methods and criteria, like that currently used in industry. STAGS and the CTOA criterion were used to predict load-against-crack extension for the wide panels with a single crack and multiple-site damage cracking at many adjacent rivet holes. Analyses were able to predict stable crack growth and residual strength with a few percent (5%) of stiffened panel tests results but over predicted the buckling failure load on a unstiffened panel with a single crack by 10%.

  12. Experimental study on behavior of GFRP stiffened panels under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankeri, Pradeep; Ganesh Mahidhar, P. K.; Prakash, S. Suriya; Ramji, M.

    2015-03-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) materials are extensively used in the aerospace and marine industries because of their high strength and stiffness to weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance. Stiffened panels are commonly used in aircraft wing and fuselage parts. The present study focuses on the behavior of composite stiffened panels under compressive loading. With the introduction of stiffeners to unstiffened composite plates, the structural stiffness of the panel increases resulting in higher strength and stiffness. Studies in the past have shown that the critical structural failure mode under compressive loading of a stiffened composite panel is by local buckling. The present study attempts to evaluate the mechanical behavior of composite stiffened panels under compression using blade stiffener configuration and in particular on the behavior of the skin- stiffener interface through experimental testing. A novel test fixture is developed for experimental testing of GFRP stiffened panels. A non-contact whole field strain analysis technique called digital image correlation (DIC) is used for capturing the strain and damage mechanisms. Blade stiffeners increased the strength, stiffness and reduced the out-of plane displacement at failure. The failure of both the unstiffened and stiffened panels was through local buckling rather than through material failure. DIC was able to capture the strain localization and buckling failure modes.

  13. Fracture Analysis of the FAA/NASA Wide Stiffened Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.; Young, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the fracture analyses conducted on the FAA/NASA stiffened and unstiffened panels using the STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) code with the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. The STAGS code with the "plane-strain" core option was used in all analyses. Previous analyses of wide, flat panels have shown that the high-constraint conditions around a crack front, like plane strain, has to be modeled in order for the critical CTOA fracture criterion to predict wide panel failures from small laboratory tests. In the present study, the critical CTOA value was determined from a wide (unstiffened) panel with anti-buckling guides. The plane-strain core size was estimated from previous fracture analyses and was equal to about the sheet thickness. Rivet flexibility and stiffener failure was based on methods and criteria, like that currently used in industry. STAGS and the CTOA criterion were used to predict load-against-crack extension for the wide panels with a single crack and multiple-site damage cracking at many adjacent rivet holes. Analyses were able to predict stable crack growth and residual strength within a few percent (5%) of stiffened panel tests results but over predicted the buckling failure load on an unstiffened panel with a single crack by 10%.

  14. Panel 3 - characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.; Erdemir, A.; Janghsing Hsieh; Lee, R.H.; Xian Zheng Pan; Deming Shu; Feldman, A.; Glass, J.T.; Kleimer, R.; Lawton, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The task of this panel was to identify and prioritize needs in the area of characterization of diamond and diamond-like-carbon (DLC) films for use in the transportation industry. Until recent advances in production of inexpensive films of diamonds and DLC, it was not feasible that these materials could be mass produced. The Characterization Panel is restricting itself to identifying needs in areas that would be most useful to manufacturers and users in producing and utilizing diamond and DLC coatings in industry. These characterization needs include in-situ monitoring during growth, relation of structure to performance, and standards and definitions.

  15. Wisconsin Twin Panel.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Carol A; Lemery, Kathryn S; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2002-10-01

    The Wisconsin Twin Panel was initiated in 1994 to serve a study of the development of childhood mood and behavioral disorders. Families who give birth to twins within the state of Wisconsin are recruited within 6 months of the birth. The panel currently supports three ongoing, longitudinal research projects. Research foci include studying epigenetic contributions to emotional, physical, cognitive, and motoric development of infant and toddler twins; physiological concomitants of childhood temperament; and early risk and resiliency factors related to child psychopathology. All three studies include videotaped observational assessments and biological measures. PMID:12537886

  16. Novel self-assembled sandwich nanomedicine for NIR-responsive release of NO

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; He, Qianjun; Liu, Yi; Ma, Ying; Fu, Xiao; Liu, Yijing; Huang, Peng; He, Nongyue; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    A novel sandwich nanomedicine (GO-BNN6) for near-infrared (NIR) light responsive release of nitric oxide (NO) has been constructed by self-assembling of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and a NO donor BNN6 through the π-π stacking interaction. GO-BNN6 nanomedicine has an extraordinarily high drug loading capacity (1.2 mg BNN6 per mg GO), good thermal stability, and high NIR responsiveness. The NO release from GO-BNN6 can be easily triggered and effectively controlled by adjusting the switching, irradiation time and power density of NIR laser. The intracellular NIR-responsive release of NO from GO-BNN6 nanomedicine causes a remarkable anti-cancer effect. PMID:26568270

  17. A novel self-assembled sandwich nanomedicine for NIR-responsive release of NO.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; He, Nongyue; He, Qianjun; Liu, Yi; Ma, Ying; Fu, Xiao; Liu, Yijing; Huang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-21

    A novel sandwich nanomedicine (GO-BNN6) for near-infrared (NIR) light responsive release of nitric oxide (NO) has been constructed by self-assembly of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and a NO donor BNN6 through the π-π stacking interaction. The GO-BNN6 nanomedicine has an extraordinarily high drug loading capacity (1.2 mg BNN6 per mg GO), good thermal stability, and high NIR responsiveness. The NO release from GO-BNN6 can be easily triggered and effectively controlled by adjusting the switching, irradiation time and power density of NIR laser. The intracellular NIR-responsive release of NO from the GO-BNN6 nanomedicine causes a remarkable anti-cancer effect.

  18. An efficient finite element with layerwise mechanics for smart piezoelectric composite and sandwich shallow shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, M. Yaqoob; Kapuria, S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present a new efficient four-node finite element for shallow multilayered piezoelectric shells, considering layerwise mechanics and electromechanical coupling. The laminate mechanics is based on the zigzag theory that has only seven kinematic degrees of freedom per node. The normal deformation of the piezoelectric layers under the electric field is accounted for without introducing any additional deflection variables. A consistent quadratic variation of the electric potential across the piezoelectric layers with the provision of satisfying the equipotential condition of electroded surfaces is adopted. The performance of the new element is demonstrated for the static response under mechanical and electric potential loads, and for free vibration response of smart shells under different boundary conditions. The predictions are found to be very close to the three dimensional piezoelasticity solutions for hybrid shells made of not only single-material composite substrates, but also sandwich substrates with a soft core for which the equivalent single layer (ESL) theories perform very badly.

  19. Comparative Study of Permeatal Sandwich Tympanoplasty and Postaural Underlay Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nagpure, Prakash Shankarrao; Yadav, Manish; Chavan, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tympanoplasty is the most common operation performed by an Otolaryngologist right from the period of residency. During the last hundred years various modifications in this surgical technique have come up because of continued efforts made by otologists all over the world to achieve the best surgical outcome. Aim To compare the graft take up and complications associated with the Permeatal Sandwich Tympanoplasty performed with the use of Otoendoscope and traditional Postaural Underlay technique of Tympanoplasty from 1st September 2014 to 30th August 2015. Materials and Methods Patients attending the ENT OPD, suffering from Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM) were selected on the basis of type of perforation and their workup was done to assess the candidature for tympanoplasty. Results A total of 100 patients were included in the study and the overall graft take was 92.3% in cases of Permeatal Sandwich technique as compared to 64.58% in the case of postaural underlay technique, with a majority of the failures in the large central perforation group rendering a p = 0.021 for patients operated for Large perforations, p = 0.036 for moderate perforations and p = 0.476 for small perforations. The overall p = 0.000649 which is highly significant. On comparing the complications there were only 2 cases in Permeatal Sandwich Technique compared to 25 cases in Postaural Underlay technique rendering a highly significant p-value 0f 0.000000348. There was a difference in hearing improvement with majority of the cases improving to the range of 16-25 dB in Permeatal Sandwich technique compared to 26-45 dB in Postaural Underlay technique. Conclusion Permeatal Sandwich technique produce much better results when compared with Postaural approach in terms of graft take up, complications and hearing improvement. PMID:27190842

  20. A novel self-assembled sandwich nanomedicine for NIR-responsive release of NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; He, Nongyue; He, Qianjun; Liu, Yi; Ma, Ying; Fu, Xiao; Liu, Yijing; Huang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-11-01

    A novel sandwich nanomedicine (GO-BNN6) for near-infrared (NIR) light responsive release of nitric oxide (NO) has been constructed by self-assembly of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and a NO donor BNN6 through the π-π stacking interaction. The GO-BNN6 nanomedicine has an extraordinarily high drug loading capacity (1.2 mg BNN6 per mg GO), good thermal stability, and high NIR responsiveness. The NO release from GO-BNN6 can be easily triggered and effectively controlled by adjusting the switching, irradiation time and power density of NIR laser. The intracellular NIR-responsive release of NO from the GO-BNN6 nanomedicine causes a remarkable anti-cancer effect.A novel sandwich nanomedicine (GO-BNN6) for near-infrared (NIR) light responsive release of nitric oxide (NO) has been constructed by self-assembly of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and a NO donor BNN6 through the π-π stacking interaction. The GO-BNN6 nanomedicine has an extraordinarily high drug loading capacity (1.2 mg BNN6 per mg GO), good thermal stability, and high NIR responsiveness. The NO release from GO-BNN6 can be easily triggered and effectively controlled by adjusting the switching, irradiation time and power density of NIR laser. The intracellular NIR-responsive release of NO from the GO-BNN6 nanomedicine causes a remarkable anti-cancer effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: NMR and MS data of BNN6, stability of GO-BNN6, NIR-responsibility comparison of BNN6 and GO-BNN6, and NMR spectrum of RBSP. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06630a

  1. Strain-gage bridge calibration and flight loads measurements on a low-aspect-ratio thin wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peele, E. L.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1975-01-01

    Strain-gage bridges were used to make in-flight measurements of bending moment, shear, and torque loads on a low-aspect-ratio, thin, swept wing having a full depth honeycomb sandwich type structure. Standard regression analysis techniques were employed in the calibration of the strain bridges. Comparison of the measured loads with theoretical loads are included.

  2. 42. Interior detail, parlor, paneled chimney breast. This paneling likely ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Interior detail, parlor, paneled chimney breast. This paneling likely dates from the house's phase I construction spanning from 1728 into the 1730's. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. 78. DETAIL OF COMMUNICATIONS PANEL ON LAUNCH ANALYST PANEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. DETAIL OF COMMUNICATIONS PANEL ON LAUNCH ANALYST PANEL SHOWING 20 CHANNEL-SELECTION SWITCHES, ROTARY DIAL, HEADSET, AND FOOT PEDAL - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Stepped inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel includes stacked optical waveguides having stepped inlet facets collectively defining an inlet face for receiving image light, and having beveled outlet faces collectively defining a display screen for displaying the image light channeled through the waveguides by internal reflection.

  5. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a five-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASA's safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are 'one deep.' The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting 'brain drain' could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. The major NASA programs are also limited in their ability to plan property for the future. This is of particular concern for the Space Shuttle and ISS because these programs are scheduled to operate well into the next century. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has

  6. Solar maximum mission panel jettison analysis remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    A study is presented of the development of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) configurations for jettison of the solar panels on the Solar Maximum Mission/Multimission Satellite. A valid RMS maneuver between jettison configurations was developed. Arm and longeron loads and effector excursions due to the solar panel jettison were determined to see if they were within acceptable limits. These loads and end effector excursions were analyzed under two RMS modes, servos active in position hold submode, and in the brakes on mode.

  7. Mechanical Characterization of In and Out-of-Autoclave Cured Composite Panels for Large Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Lerch, Bradley A.; Wilmoth, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Two manufacturing demonstration panels (1/16th-arc-segments of 10 m diameter cylinder) were fabricated under the composites part of the Lightweight Space Structures and Materials program. Both panels were of sandwich construction with aluminum core and 8-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy facesheets. One of the panels was constructed with in-autoclave curable unidirectional prepreg (IM7/977-3) and the second with out-of-autoclave unidirectional prepreg (T40-800B/5320-1). Following NDE inspection, each panel was divided into a number of small specimens for material property characterization and a large (0.914 m wide by 1.524 m long) panel for a buckling study. Results from the small specimen tests were used to (a) assess the fabrication quality of each 1/16th arc segment panel and (b) to develop and/or verify basic material property inputs to Finite Element analysis models. The mechanical performance of the two material systems is assessed at the coupon level by comparing average measured properties such as flatwise tension, edgewise compression, and facesheet tension. The buckling response of the 0.914 m wide by 1.524 m long panel provided a comparison between the in- and out-of autoclave systems at a larger scale.

  8. Laminar flow control perforated wing panel development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischler, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Many structural concepts for a wing leading edge laminar flow control hybrid panel were analytically investigated. After many small, medium, and large tests, the selected design was verified. New analytic methods were developed to combine porous titanium sheet bonded to a substructure of fiberglass and carbon/epoxy cloth. At -65 and +160 F test conditions, the critical bond of the porous titanium to the composite failed at lower than anticipated test loads. New cure cycles, design improvements, and test improvements significantly improved the strength and reduced the deflections from thermal and lateral loadings. The wave tolerance limits for turbulence were not exceeded. Consideration of the beam column midbay deflections from the combinations of the axial and lateral loadings and thermal bowing at -65 F, room temperature, and +160 F were included. Many lap shear tests were performed at several cure cycles. Results indicate that sufficient verification was obtained to fabricate a demonstration vehicle.

  9. Report of Industry Panel Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Simon; Gier, Jochen; Heitland, Greg; Povinelli, Louis; Sharma, Om; VandeWall, Allen

    2006-01-01

    A final report is presented from the industry panel group. The contents include: 1) General comments; 2) Positive progress since Minnowbrook IV; 3) Industry panel outcome; 4) Prioritized turbine projects; 5) Prioritized compressor projects; and 6) Miscellaneous.

  10. LCD Panels: The Electronic Wonder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Glenn

    1994-01-01

    Describes Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panels and their use in the classroom. Topics discussed include active versus passive matrix panels; the number of pixels; projectors, including transmissive or reflective overhead projectors; costs; and vendors that supply LCDs. (LRW)

  11. Evaluation of the Transient Liquid Phase (TLP) Bonding Process for Ti3Al-Based Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Hoffman, Eric K.

    1998-01-01

    The suitability of using transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding to fabricate honeycomb core sandwich panels with Ti-14Al-21Nb (wt%) titanium aluminide (T3Al) face sheets for high-temperature hypersonic vehicle applications was evaluated. Three titanium alloy honeycomb cores and one Ti3Al alloy honeycomb core were investigated. Edgewise compression (EWC) and flatwise tension (FWT) tests on honeycomb core sandwich specimens and tensile tests of the face sheet material were conducted at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1500 F. EWC tests indicated that the honeycomb cores and diffusion bonded joints were able to stabilize the face sheets up to and beyond the face sheet compressive yield strength for all temperatures investigated. The specimens with the T3Al honeycomb core produced the highest FWT strengths at temperatures above 1000 F. Tensile tests indicated that TLP processing conditions resulted in decreases in ductility of the Ti-14Al-21Nb face sheets. Microstructural examination showed that the side of the face sheets to which the filler metals had been applied was transformed from equiaxed alpha2 grains to coarse plates of alpha2 with intergranular Beta. Fractographic examination of the tensile specimens showed that this transformed region was dominated by brittle fracture.

  12. A Multi-scale Refined Zigzag Theory for Multilayered Composite and Sandwich Plates with Improved Transverse Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iurlaro, Luigi; Gherlone, Marco; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) enables accurate predictions of the in-plane displacements, strains, and stresses. The transverse shear stresses obtained from constitutive equations are layer-wise constant. Although these transverse shear stresses are generally accurate in the average, layer-wise sense, they are nevertheless discontinuous at layer interfaces, and thus they violate the requisite interlaminar continuity of transverse stresses. Recently, Tessler applied Reissner's mixed variational theorem and RZT kinematic assumptions to derive an accurate and efficient shear-deformation theory for homogeneous, laminated composite, and sandwich beams, called RZT(m), where "m" stands for "mixed". Herein, the RZT(m) for beams is extended to plate analysis, where two alternative assumptions for the transverse shear stresses field are examined: the first follows Tessler's formulation, whereas the second is based on Murakami's polynomial approach. Results for elasto-static simply supported and cantilever plates demonstrate that Tessler's formulation results in a powerful and efficient structural theory that is well-suited for the analysis of multilayered composite and sandwich panels.

  13. Behavior of Concrete Panels Reinforced with Synthetic Fibers, Mild Steel, and GFRP Composites Subjected to Blasts

    SciTech Connect

    C. P. Pantelides; T. T. Garfield; W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson; J. E. Blakeley

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating finite element models to predict the performance of reinforced concrete panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The specimens were 1.2 m square panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consisted of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bars; FRC panels without additional reinforcement; FRC panels with steel bars; NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars; and NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces. Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. FRC panels with steel bars had the best performance for new construction. NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces had the best performance for strengthening or rehabilitation of existing structures. The performance of NWC panels with GFRP bars was strongly influenced by the bar spacing. The behavior of the panels is classified in terms of damage using immediate occupancy, life safety, and near collapse performance levels. Preliminary dynamic simulations are compared to the experimental results.

  14. Development and application of a double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to porcine circovirus 2.

    PubMed

    Ge, Meng; Luo, Wei; Jiang, Daliang; Li, Runcheng; Zhao, Wenwei; Chen, Guoliang; Yang, Xingdong; Yu, Xinglong

    2012-09-01

    A double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is described for detection of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) antibodies using the well-characterized recombinant PCV2 capsid protein. In a comparative test of 394 pig sera against an indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test and a commercial ELISA kit (also based on the recombinant PCV2 capsid protein), the results showed that the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the assay were, respectively, 90.61, 94.02, and 91.62% compared with IIF and 94.38, 95.28, and 94.67% compared with the commercial ELISA kit. Assay of 12 PCV-free pigs over a 5-week period produced only PCV2-negative titers by all 3 methods. These results and the seroprofiles of 4 pig farms obtained by both the commercial ELISA kit and the double-antigen sandwich ELISA indicate that the sandwich ELISA is a reliable method for detection of antibodies to PCV2. Additionally, the method described here permits the use of undiluted test serum samples simultaneously loaded with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated antigen into the test well, and the complete test procedure can be performed in less than 90 min. This double-antigen sandwich ELISA should be a useful tool to aid swine industry professionals in deciding the intervention strategies for the control of PCV2-associated diseases.

  15. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodies commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after 9 years of service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left hand and right hand set of a wing body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate under wing fillet panel; and a 422 K (300 F) service aft engine fairing. The fairings have accumulated a total of 70,000 hours, with one ship set having over 24,000 hours service. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, a few minor disbonds and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  16. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after five years' service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left-hand and right-hand set of a wing-body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate under-wing fillet panel; and a 150 C (300 F) service aft engine fairing. The fairings have accumulated a total of 40,534 hours, with one ship set having 16,091 hours service as of Feb. 11, 1979. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings.

  17. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  18. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  19. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  20. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.